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1

Extended Development Work to Validate a HLW Calcine Waste Form via INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter  

SciTech Connect

To accomplish calcine treatment objectives, the Idaho Clean-up Project contractor, CWI, has chosen to immobilize the calcine in a glass-ceramic via the use of a Hot-Isostatic-Press (HIP); a treatment selection formally documented in a 2010 Record of Decision (ROD). Even though the HIP process may prove suitable for the calcine as specified in the ROD and validated in a number of past value engineering sessions, DOE is evaluating back-up treatment methods for the calcine as a result of the technical, schedule, and cost risk associated with the HIPing process. Consequently DOE HQ has requested DOE ID to make INL's bench-scale cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM) available for investigating its viability as a process alternate to calcine treatment. The waste form is the key component of immobilization of radioactive waste. Providing a solid, stable, and durable material that can be easily be stored is the rationale for immobilization of radioactive waste material in glass, ceramic, or glass-ceramics. Ceramic waste forms offer an alternative to traditional borosilicate glass waste forms. Ceramics can usually accommodate higher waste loadings than borosilicate glass, leading to smaller intermediate and long-term storage facilities. Many ceramic phases are known to possess superior chemical durability as compared to borosilicate glass. However, ceramics are generally multiphase systems containing many minor phase that make characterization and prediction of performance within a repository challenging. Additionally, the technologies employed in ceramic manufacture are typically more complex and expensive. Thus, many have proposed using glass-ceramics as compromise between in the more inexpensive, easier to characterize glass waste forms and the more durable ceramic waste forms. Glass-ceramics have several advantages over traditional borosilicate glasses as a waste form. Borosilicate glasses can inadvertently devitrify, leading to a less durable product that could crack during cooling and crystals may be prone to dissolution. By designing a glass-ceramics, the risks of deleterious effects from devitrification are removed. Furthermore, glass-ceramics have higher mechanical strength and impact strengths and possess greater chemical durability as noted above. Glass-ceramics should provide a waste form with the advantages of glass - ease of manufacture - with improved mechanical properties, thermal stability, and chemical durability. This report will cover aspects relevant for the validation of the CCIM use in the production of glass-ceramic waste forms.

James A. King; Vince Maio

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite - Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined HLW  

SciTech Connect

During the seventh year of the current grant (DE-FG02-05ER63966) we completed an exhaustive study of cold calcination and began work on the development of tank fill materials to fill empty tanks and control residuals. Cold calcination of low and high NOx low activity waste (LAW) SRS Tank 44 and Hanford AN-107 simulants, respectively with metallic Al + Si powders was evaluated. It was found that a combination of Al and Si powders could be used as reducing agents to reduce the nitrate and nitrite content of both low and high NOx LAW to low enough levels to allow the LAW to be solidified directly by mixing it with metakaolin and allowing it to cure at 90 C. During room temperature reactions, NOx was reduced and nitrogen was emitted as N2 or NH3. This was an important finding because now one can pretreat LAW at ambient temperatures which provides a low-temperature alternative to thermal calcination. The significant advantage of using Al and Si metals for denitration/denitrition of the LAW is the fact that the supernate could potentially be treated in situ in the waste tanks themselves. Tank fill materials based upon a hydroceramic binder have been formulated from mixtures of metakaolinite, Class F fly ash and Class C flue gas desulphurization (FGD) ash mixed with various concentrations of NaOH solution. These harden over a period of hours or days depending on composition. A systematic study of properties of the tank fill materials (leachability) and ability to adsorb and hold residuals is under way.

Grutzeck, Michael

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

4

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Full Document and Summary Versions...

5

PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

CERTA, P.J.

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

6

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Summary of Waste Calcination at INTEC  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized-bed calcination at the Idaho Nuclear Technologies and Engineering Center (INTEC, formally called the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) has been used to solidify acidic metal nitrate fuel reprocessing and incidental wastes wastes since 1961. A summary of waste calcination in full-scale and pilot plant calciners has been compiled for future reference. It contains feed compositions and operating conditions for all the processing campaigns for the original Waste Calcining Facility (WCF), the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) started up in 1982, and numerous small scale pilot plant tests for various feed types. This summary provides a historical record of calcination at INTEC, and will be useful for evaluating calcinability of future wastes.

O'Brien, Barry Henry; Newby, Bill Joe

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Summary - WTP HLW Waste Vitrification Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

W W HLW W DOE is Immob site's t facilitie Facility to iden the HL to be i norma The as along w Level ( * H * H * H Sy * Pu D The Ele Site: H roject: W Report Date: M ited States Waste T Why DOE Waste Vitrificatio s constructing bilization Plant tank wastes. T es including a H y (HLW). The ntify the critical LW and determ ncorporated in ally requires a T What th ssessment team with each elem (TRL) for the H LW Melter Fee LW Melter Pro LW Melter Offg ystem/Process ulse Jet Mixer isposal System To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Hanford/ORP Waste Treatme March 2007 Departmen Treatmen W E-EM Did This n Facility a Waste Treat (WTP) at Hanf The WTP is com High-Level Wa purpose of this technology ele mine if these are to the final WT Technology Re he TRA Team m identified the

9

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Richland, Washington, 99352 07-DESIGN-046 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 07-DESIGN-046 iii Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) and the DOE Office of Environmental and Radioactive Waste Management (EM), Office of Project Recovery have completed a

10

Waste Calcining Facility remote inspection report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) remote inspections was to evaluate areas in the facility which are difficult to access due to high radiation fields. The areas inspected were the ventilation exhaust duct, waste hold cell, adsorber manifold cell, off-gas cell, calciner cell and calciner vessel. The WCF solidified acidic, high-level mixed waste generated during nuclear fuel reprocessing. Solidification was accomplished through high temperature oxidation and evaporation. Since its shutdown in 1981, the WCFs vessels, piping systems, pumps, off-gas blowers and process cells have remained contaminated. Access to the below-grade areas is limited due to contamination and high radiation fields. Each inspection technique was tested with a mock-up in a radiologically clean area before the equipment was taken to the WCF for the actual inspection. During the inspections, essential information was obtained regarding the cleanliness, structural integrity, in-leakage of ground water, indications of process leaks, indications of corrosion, radiation levels and the general condition of the cells and equipment. In general, the cells contain a great deal of dust and debris, as well as hand tools, piping and miscellaneous equipment. Although the building appears to be structurally sound, the paint is peeling to some degree in all of the cells. Cracking and spalling of the concrete walls is evident in every cell, although the east wall of the off-gas cell is the worst. The results of the completed inspections and lessons learned will be used to plan future activities for stabilization and deactivation of the facility. Remote clean-up of loose piping, hand tools, and miscellaneous debris can start immediately while information from the inspections is factored into the conceptual design for deactivating the facility.

Patterson, M.W.; Ison, W.M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF)...

12

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS MATRICES FOR HLW RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

SciTech Connect

Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and I{sup 129}. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

Jantzen, C.

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

Amended Record of Decision for the Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Record of Decision for the Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement Amended Record of Decision for the Idaho High-Level Waste...

14

Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

A potential option in the program for long-term management of high-level wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, calls for retrieving calcine waste and converting it to a more stable and less dispersible form. An inventory of calcine produced during the period December 1963 to May 1999 has been prepared based on calciner run, solids storage facilities operating, and miscellaneous operational information, which gives the range of chemical compositions of calcine waste stored at INTEC. Information researched includes calciner startup data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, solids storage bin capacities, calcine storage bin distributor systems, and solids storage bin design and temperature monitoring records. Unique information on calcine solids storage facilities design of potential interest to remote retrieval operators is given.

M. D. Staiger

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF). SNF is nuclear fuel that has been used as fuel in a reactor...

16

Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a quantitative inventory and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. From December 1963 through May 2000, liquid radioactive wastes generated by spent nuclear fuel reprocessing were converted into a solid, granular form called calcine. This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins.

M. D. Staiger

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

HLW-OVP-94-00n High Level Waste Management Division HLW System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B.2 Environmental Documentation C. Waste Removal Schedule C. 1 Type I, II and IV Tanks C. 2 Type III Tanks D. Process Logic Diagram E. Process Logic Interactive Matrix F....

18

A Method to Evaluate Additional Waste Forms to Optimize Performance of the HLW Repository  

SciTech Connect

The DOE high-level waste (HLW) disposal system is based on decisions made in the 1970s. The de facto Yucca Mountain WAC for HLW, contained in the Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document (WASRD), and the DOE-EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification for Vitrified High Level Waste Forms (WAPS) tentatively describes waste forms to be interred in the repository, and limits them to borosilicate glass (BSG). It is known that many developed waste forms are as durable as or better than environmental assessment or EA-glass. Among them are the salt-ceramic and metallic waste forms developed at ANL-W. Also, iron phosphate glasses developed at University of Missouri show promise in stabilizing the most refractory materials in Hanford HLW. However, for any of this science to contribute, the current Total System Performance Assessment model must be able to evaluate the additional waste form to determine potential impacts on repository performance. The results can then support the technical bases required in the repository license application. A methodology is proposed to use existing analysis models to evaluate potential additional waste forms for disposal without gathering costly material specific degradation data. The concept is to analyze the potential impacts of waste form chemical makeup on repository performance assuming instantaneous waste matrix dissolution. This assumption obviates the need for material specific degradation models and is based on the relatively modest fractional contribution DOE HLW makes to the repository radionuclide and hazardous metals inventory. The existing analysis models, with appropriate data modifications, are used to evaluate geochemical interactions and material transport through the repository. This methodology would support early screening of proposed waste forms through simplified evaluation of disposal performance, and would provide preliminary guidance for repository license amendment in the future.

D. Gombert; L. Lauerhass

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Determination of the Rate of Formation of Hydroceramic Waste Forms made with INEEL Calcined Wastes  

SciTech Connect

The formulation, synthesis, characterization and hydration kinetics of hydroceramic waste forms designed as potential hosts for existing INEEL calcine high-level wastes have been established as functions of temperature and processing time. Initial experimentations were conducted with several aluminosilicate pozzolanic materials, ranging from fly ash obtained from various power generating coal and other combustion industries to reactive alumina, natural clays and ground bottled glass powders. The final selection criteria were based on the ease of processing, excellent physical properties and chemical durability (low-leaching) determined from the PCT test produced in hydroceramic. The formulation contains vermiculite, Sr(NO32), CsC1, NaOH, thermally altered (calcined natural clay) and INEEL simulated calcine high-level nuclear wastes and 30 weight percent of fluorinel blend calcine and zirconia calcine. Syntheses were carried out at 75-200 degree C at autogeneous water pressure (100% relative humidity) at various time intervals. The resulting monolithic compact products were hard and resisted breaking when dropped from a 5 ft height. Hydroceramic host mixed with fluorinel blend calcine and processed at 75 degree C crumbled into rice hull-side grains or developed scaly flakes. However, the samples equally possessed the same chemical durability as their unbroken counterparts. Phase identification by XRD revealed that hydroceramic host crystallized type zeolite at 75-150 degree C and NaP1 at 175-200 degree C in addition to the presence of quartz phase originating from the clay reactant. Hydroceramic host mixed with either fluorinel blend calcine or zirconia calcine crystallized type A zeolite at 75-95 degree C, formed a mixture of type A zeolite and hydroxysodalite at 125-150 degree C and hydroxysodalite at 175-200 degree C. Quartz, calcium fluoride and zirconia phases from the clay reactant and the two calcine wastes were also detected. The PCT test solution conductivity, pH and analytical concentration measured as a function of time decrease exponentially. In some cases nitrate, sulfate, chloride and fluoride ion concentrations increased with time and processing temperature with respect to the reference sample. The increasing concentration of these ions was due to the lack of formation of crystalline phases that can incorporate them in their structures, especially cancrinite. Another plausible explanations for their increase was due to the continuous withdrawal of cations with time, for example sodium to form zeolites, thereby increase their concentrations.

Barry Scheetz; Johnson Olanrewaju

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW) structural integrity program  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site has fifty-one underground tanks for radioactive waste storage and processing with doubly-contained piping systems for waste transfer. The SRS High Level Waste structural Integrity Program provides a process for evaluation and documenting material aging issues for structures, systems and components (SSC) in these facilities to maintain their confinement function. SRS has been monitoring waste, waste storage tanks, testing transfer lines and controlling waste chemistry for many years. A successful structural integrity (SI) program requires the following: detailed understanding of applicable degradation mechanisms; controlled chemistries and additions, as necessary; regular chemistry sampling and monitoring; structural capacity considerations; and a combination of on-line and periodic inspection and testing programs to provide early detection of generic degradation and verify effectiveness of the management of degradation under aging conditions identified by the SI Program. The application of these elements in the HLW SI Program achieves confinement in the facilities throughout desired service life.

Marra, J.E.; Abodishish, H.A.; Barnes, D.M.; Sindelar, R.L.; Flanders, H.E.; Houston, T.W.; Wiersma, B.J.; McNatt, F.G. Sr.; Cowfer, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING GLASS FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

This Test Plan describes work to support the development and testing of high waste loading glass formulations that achieve high glass melting rates for Hanford high aluminum high level waste (HLW). In particular, the present testing is designed to evaluate the effect of using low activity waste (LAW) waste streams as a source of sodium in place ofchemical additives, sugar or cellulose as a reductant, boehmite as an aluminum source, and further enhancements to waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work will include preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM 100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, glass processing temperature, incorporation of the LAW waste stream as a sodium source, type of organic reductant, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality. Also included is a confirmatory test on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) with a composition selected from those tested on the DM100. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same waste composition. This Test Plan is prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is about 12,500. This estimate is based upon the inventory ofthe tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat transfer and glass melting rate. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of {approx}1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HLW waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150 C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage. The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP contract requirements. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization oftank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulfur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste-loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected that these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by about 25% or more.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

Preliminary flowsheet for plasma arc calcination of selected Hanford tank waste  

SciTech Connect

This preliminary flowsheet document was developed for the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM). This flowsheet documents the calcination technology that can be used to accomplish the destruction of organics, ferrocyanide, and nitrate/nitrite salts in addition to solubilizing aluminum compounds in selected waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The flow sheet conditions are 76 L/min diluted waste feed rate at 800{degrees}C, atmospheric pressure, and 100 millisecond residence time in the calciner. Preliminary flow diagrams, material balances, and energy requirements are presented.

Hendrickson, D.W.

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

23

Design and performance of atomizing nozzles for spray calcination of high-level wastes  

SciTech Connect

A key aspect of high-level liquid-waste spray calcination is waste-feed atomization by using air atomizing nozzles. Atomization substantially increases the heat transfer area of the waste solution, which enhances rapid drying. Experience from the spray-calciner operations has demonstrated that nozzle flow conditions that produce 70-..mu.. median-volume-diameter or smaller spray droplets are required for small-scale spray calciners (drying capacity less than 80 L/h). For large-scale calciners (drying capacity greater than 300 L/h), nozzle flow conditions that produce 100-..mu.. median-volume-diameter or smaller spray droplets are required. Mass flow ratios of 0.2 to 0.4, depending on nozzle size, are required for proper operation of internal-mix atomizing nozzles. Both internal-mix and external-mix nozzles have been tested at PNL. Due to the lower airflow requirements and fewer large droplets produced, the internal-mix nozzle has been chosen for primary development in the spray calciner program at PNL. Several nozzle air-cap materials for internal-mix nozzles have been tested for wear resistance. Results show that nozzle air caps of stainless steel and Cer-vit (a machineable glass ceramic) are suceptible to rapid wear by abrasive slurries, whereas air caps of alumina and reaction-bonded silicon nitride show only slow wear. Longer-term testing is necessary to determine more accurately the actual frequency of nozzle replacement. Atomizing nozzle air caps of alumina are subject to fracture from thermal shock, whereas air caps of silicon nitride and Cer-vit are not. Fractured nozzles are held in place by the air-cap retaining ring and continue to atomize satisfactorily. Therefore, fractures caused by thermal shocking do not necessarily result in nozzle failure.

Miller, F.A.; Stout, L.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Crystallization In High Level Waste (HLW) Glass Melters: Operational Experience From The Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

processing strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal tolerant high level waste (HLW) glasses targeting higher waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. This report provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with scaled melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by K-3 refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. This report includes a review of the crystallization observed with the scaled melters and the full scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2). Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for WTP. Operation of the first and second (current) DWPF melters has demonstrated that the strategy of using a liquidus temperature predictive model combined with a 100 C offset from the normal melter operating temperature of 1150 C (i.e., the predicted liquidus temperature (TL) of the glass must be 1050 C or less) has been successful in preventing any detrimental accumulation of spinel in the DWPF melt pool, and spinel has not been observed in any of the pour stream glass samples. Spinel was observed at the bottom of DWPF Melter 1 as a result of K-3 refractory corrosion. Issues have occurred with accumulation of spinel in the pour spout during periods of operation at higher waste loadings. Given that both DWPF melters were or have been in operation for greater than 8 years, the service life of the melters has far exceeded design expectations. It is possible that the DWPF liquidus temperature approach is conservative, in that it may be possible to successfully operate the melter with a small degree of allowable crystallization in the glass. This could be a viable approach to increasing waste loading in the glass assuming that the crystals are suspended in the melt and swept out through the riser and pour spout. Additional study is needed, and development work for WTP might be leveraged to support a different operating limit for the DWPF. Several recommendations are made regarding considerations that need to be included as part of the WTP crystal tolerant strategy based on the DWPF development work and operational data reviewed here. These include: Identify and consider the impacts of potential heat sinks in the WTP melter and glass pouring system; Consider the contributions of refractory corrosion products, which may serve to nucleate additional crystals leading to further accumulation; Consider volatilization of components from the melt (e.g., boron, alkali, halides, etc.) and determine their impacts on glass crystallization behavior; Evaluate the impacts of glass REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) conditions and the distribution of temperature within the WTP melt pool and melter pour chamber on crystal accumulation rate; Consider the impact of precipitated crystals on glass viscosity; Consider the impact of an accumulated crystalline layer on thermal convection currents and bubbler effectiveness within the melt pool; Evaluate the impact of spinel accumulation on Joule heating of the WTP melt pool; and Include noble metals in glass melt experiments because of their potential to act as nucleation site

Fox, K. M.

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

25

DOE/EA-1149; Environmental Assessment: Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility, Idaho Nation Engineering Laboratory (and FONSI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 July 1996 Environmental Assessment Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE CLOSURE OF THE WASTE CALCINING FACILITY AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The DOE-Idaho Operations Office has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of radioactive and hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce the risks to human

26

AVS: Experimental Tests of a New Process to Inductively Vitrify HLW Inside the Final Disposal Containers at Very High Waste Loadings  

SciTech Connect

The design and performance capabilities of the Advanced Vitrification System (AVS) are described, together with the results of experimental tests. The AVS is an in-can melting system in which high-level waste (HLW) is vitrified directly inside the final disposal container. The AVS container, or module, consists of an outer stainless steel canister and an alumina-lined, inner graphite crucible, which is thermally insulated from the outer stainless canister. The graphite crucible is inductively heated to very high temperatures (up to 1500 C) by an external low frequency (30 Hertz) alternating current (AC) transformer coil. The actively cooled outer stainless canister remains at near ambient temperature. The HLW/frit mixture is fed into the hot graphite crucible, where it is vitrified. After cooldown, the HLW/frit feed and off-gas pipes are disconnected from the top of the module, which is then sealed and readied for shipment or storage. All radioactively contaminated melter components inside the module are disposed of along with the vitrified waste. The graphite crucible also provides a geologically stable barrier for the vitrified product. The AVS potentially can double HLW loading over that obtained from Joule melters; lower vitrification costs by about half; reduce the number of disposal canisters required by about half; handle diverse waste feeds with high concentrations of problem elements such as chromium and zirconium; and reduce the time needed to vitrify a given inventory of HLW.

Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Jordan, J.; Ventre, L.; Barletta, R.; Manowitz, B.; Steinberg, M.; Grossman, W.; Maise, G.; Salzano, F.; Hess, C.; Ramsey, W. G.; Plodinec, M. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

27

Effect of composition and temperature on the properties of High-Level Waste (HLW) glasses melting above 1200{degrees}C (Draft)  

SciTech Connect

Increasing the melting temperature of HLW glass allows an increase of waste loading (thus reducing product volume) and the production of more durable glasses at a faster melting rate. However, HLW glasses that melt at high temperatures differ in composition from glasses formulated for low temperature ({approximately}1150{degree}C). Consequently, the composition of high-temperature glasses falls in a region previously not well tested or understood. This report represents a preliminary study of property/composition relationships of high-temperature Hanford HLW glasses using a one-component-at-a-time change approach. A test matrix has been designed to explore a composition region expected for high-temperature high-waste loading HLW glasses to be produced at Hanford. This matrix was designed by varying several key components (SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, UO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and others) starting from a glass based on a Hanford HLW all-blend waste. Glasses were fabricated and tested for viscosity, glass transition temperature, electrical conductivity, crystallinity, liquidus temperature, and PCT release. The effect of individual components on glass properties was assessed using first- and second- order empirical models. The first-order component effects were compared with those from low-temperature HLW glasses.

Vienna, J.D.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J. [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

EIS-0287: Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology EIS-0287: Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition In October 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) issued the Final Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0287 (Final EIS)). The Final EIS contains an evaluation of reasonable alternatives for the management of mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW),1 mixed HLW calcine, and associated low-level waste (LLW), as well as disposition alternatives for HLW facilities when their missions are completed. DOE/EIS-0287, Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology, Office of Environmental Management, Idaho, 70 FR 44598 (August

29

HLW-OVP-97-0068 High Level Waste Management Division High-Level...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

not exceed the applicable concentration limits for Class C low-level waste as set out in 10 CFR Part 61; and (c) will be managed, pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act, so that safety...

30

INCONEL 690 CORROSION IN WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PLANT) HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS MELTS RICH IN ALUMINUM & BISMUTH & CHROMIUM OR ALUMINUM/SODIUM  

SciTech Connect

Metal corrosion tests were conducted with four high waste loading non-Fe-limited HLW glass compositions. The results at 1150 C (the WTP nominal melter operating temperature) show corrosion performance for all four glasses that is comparable to that of other typical borosilicate waste glasses, including HLW glass compositions that have been developed for iron-limited WTP streams. Of the four glasses tested, the Bi-limited composition shows the greatest extent of corrosion, which may be related to its higher phosphorus content. Tests at higher suggest that a moderate elevation of the melter operating temperature (up to 1200 C) should not result in any significant increase in Inconel corrosion. However, corrosion rates did increase significantly at yet higher temperatures (1230 C). Very little difference was observed with and without the presence of an electric current density of 6 A/inch{sup 2}, which is the typical upper design limit for Inconel electrodes. The data show a roughly linear relationship between the thickness of the oxide scale on the coupon and the Cr-depletion depth, which is consistent with the chromium depletion providing the material source for scale growth. Analysis of the time dependence of the Cr depletion profiles measured at 1200 C suggests that diffusion of Cr in the Ni-based Inconel alloy controls the depletion depth of Cr inside the alloy. The diffusion coefficient derived from the experimental data agrees within one order of magnitude with the published diffusion coefficient data for Cr in Ni matrices; the difference is likely due to the contribution from faster grain boundary diffusion in the tested Inconel alloy. A simple diffusion model based on these data predicts that Inconel 690 alloy will suffer Cr depletion damage to a depth of about 1 cm over a five year service life at 1200 C in these glasses.

KRUGER AA; FENG Z; GAN H; PEGG IL

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

31

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory High-Level Waste Roadmap. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) High-Level Waste (HLW) Roadmap takes a strategic look at the entire HLW life-cycle starting with generation, through interim storage, treatment and processing, transportation, and on to final disposal. The roadmap is an issue-based planning approach that compares ``where we are now`` to ``where we want and need to be.`` The INEL has been effectively managing HLW for the last 30 years. Calcining operations are continuing to turn liquid HLW into a more manageable form. Although this document recognizes problems concerning HLW at the INEL, there is no imminent risk to the public or environment. By analyzing the INEL current business operations, pertinent laws and regulations, and committed milestones, the INEL HLW Roadmap has identified eight key issues existing at the INEL that must be resolved in order to reach long-term objectives. These issues are as follows: A. The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs a consistent policy for HLW generation, handling, treatment, storage, and disposal. B. The capability for final disposal of HLW does not exist. C. Adequate processes have not been developed or implemented for immobilization and disposal of INEL HLW. D. HLW storage at the INEL is not adequate in terms of capacity and regulatory requirements. E. Waste streams are generated with limited consideration for waste minimization. F. HLW is not adequately characterized for disposal nor, in some cases, for storage. G. Research and development of all process options for INEL HLW treatment and disposal are not being adequately pursued due to resource limitations. H. HLW transportation methods are not selected or implemented. A root-cause analysis uncovered the underlying causes of each of these issues.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement (December 1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HLW & FD EIS HLW & FD EIS 3-13 DOE/EIS-0287D Calcine storag e i n b i n s ets Calcine storag e i n b i n s et s Cesium ion exchange & grouting Cesium ion exchange & grouting NWCF* NWCF* Calcine Mixed transuranic waste/SBW Mixed transuranic waste/NGLW Low-level waste disposa l*** disposa l*** Tank heels Transuranic waste (from tank heels) * * * * Mixed transuranic waste/ NGLW Mixed transuranic waste/ NGLW M i x e d t r a nsuran ic w a s t e / M i x e d t r a nsuran ic w a s t e / S B W s t o rage in Ta n k F a r m S B W s t o rage in Ta n k F a r m Low-leve l waste Low-leve l waste FIGURE 3-2. Continued Current Operations Alternative. LEGEND * Including high-temperature and maximum achievable control technology upgrades. Mixed transuranic waste/ newly generated liquid waste New Waste Calcining Facility ** Calcine would be transferred from bin set #1 to bin set #6 or #7.

33

An Overview of Project Planning for Hot-Isostatic Pressure Treatment of High-Level Waste Calcine for the Idaho Cleanup Project - 12289  

SciTech Connect

The Calcine Disposition Project is responsible for retrieval, treatment by hot-isostatic pressure, packaging, and disposal of highly radioactive calcine stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site in southeast Idaho. In the 2009 Amended Record of Decision: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement the Department of Energy documented the selection of hot-isostatic pressure as the technology to treat the calcine. The Record of Decision specifies that the treatment results in a volume-reduced, monolithic waste form suitable for transport outside of Idaho by a target date of December 31, 2035. That target date is specified in the 1995 Idaho Settlement Agreement to treat and prepare the calcine for transport out of Idaho in exchange for allowing storage of Navy spent nuclear fuel at the INL Site. The project is completing the design of the calcine-treatment process and facility to comply with Record of Decision, Settlement Agreement, Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, and Department of Energy requirements. A systems engineering approach is being used to define the project mission and requirements, manage risks, and establish the safety basis for decision making in compliance with DOE O 413.3B, 'Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets'. The approach draws heavily on 'design-for-quality' tools to systematically add quality, predict design reliability, and manage variation in the earliest possible stages of design when it is most efficient. Use of these tools provides a standardized basis for interfacing systems to interact across system boundaries and promotes system integration on a facility-wide basis. A mass and energy model was developed to assist in the design of process equipment, determine material-flow parameters, and estimate process emissions. Data generated from failure modes and effects analysis and reliability, availability, maintainability, and inspectability analysis were incorporated into a time and motion model to validate and verify the capability to complete treatment of the calcine within the required schedule. The Calcine Disposition Project systems engineering approach, including use of industry-proven design-for-quality tools and quantitative assessment techniques, has strengthened the project's design capability to meet its intended mission in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner. Use of these tools has been particularly helpful to the project in early design planning to manage variation; improve requirements and high-consequence risk management; and more effectively apply alternative, interface, failure mode, RAMI, and time and motion analyses at the earliest possible stages of design when their application is most efficient and cost effective. The project is using these tools to design and develop HIP treatment of highly radioactive calcine to produce a volume-reduced, monolithic waste form with immobilization of hazardous and radioactive constituents. (authors)

Nenni, Joseph A.; Thompson, Theron J. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83403 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0287 (September 2002) EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0287 (September 2002) This EIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternatives for managing high-level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW) and newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in liquid and solid forms. This EIS also analyzes alternatives for the final disposition of HLW management facilities at the INEEL after their missions are completed. Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-0287 (September 2002)

35

EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition 7: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition SUMMARY This EIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternatives for managing high-level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW) and newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in liquid and solid forms. This EIS also analyzes alternatives for the final disposition of HLW management facilities at the INEEL after their missions are completed. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 12, 2010 EIS-0287: Amended Record of Decision Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition January 4, 2010

36

Overview of Integrated Waste Treatment Unit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Overview Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Overview Overview for the DOE High Level Waste Corporate Board March 5, 2009 safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management 2 2 Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Mission * Mission - Project mission is to provide treatment of approximately 900,000 gallons of tank farm waste - referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) - stored at the Idaho Tank Farm Facility to a stable waste form suitable for disposition at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). - Per the Idaho Cleanup Project contract, the resident Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) facility, shall have the capability for future packaging and shipping of the existing high level waste (HLW) calcine to the geologic

37

Technology development program for Idaho Chemical Processing Plant spent fuel and waste management  

SciTech Connect

Acidic high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage at the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, and describes the Spent Fuel and HLW Technology program in more detail.

Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.; Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Review of Alternative Technologies for Pretreatment of Accumulated HLW  

SciTech Connect

Accumulated liquid high-level wastes (HLW) from nuclear centers in Russia and the United States (U. S.) contain great amounts of nonradioactive salts; it is prudent to vitrify not the entire volume of these wastes, but only the concentrates of radionuclides recovered from them. For this purpose, different pretreatment technologies based on liquid-liquid extraction are under development.

Romanovsky, V.; Rimski-Korsakov, A.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

39

Cementitious waste option scoping study report  

SciTech Connect

A Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target date of 2035. This study investigates the nonseparations Cementitious Waste Option (CWO) as a means to achieve this goal. Under this option all liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and existing HLW calcine would be recalcined with sucrose, grouted, canisterized, and interim stored as a mixed-HLW for eventual preparation and shipment off-Site for disposal. The CWO waste would be transported to a Greater Confinement Disposal Facility (GCDF) located in the southwestern desert of the US on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All transport preparation, shipment, and disposal facility activities are beyond the scope of this study. CWO waste processing, packaging, and interim storage would occur over a 5-year period between 2013 and 2017. Waste transport and disposal would occur during the same time period.

Lee, A.E.; Taylor, D.D.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

HLW system plan - revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The projected ability of the Tank Farm to support DWPF startup and continued operation has diminished somewhat since revision 1 of this Plan. The 13 month delay in DWPF startup, which actually helps the Tank Farm condition in the near term, was more than offset by the 9 month delay in ITP startup, the delay in the Evaporator startups and the reduction to Waste Removal funding. This Plan does, however, describe a viable operating strategy for the success of the HLW System and Mission, albeit with less contingency and operating flexibility than in the past. HLWM has focused resources from within the division on five near term programs: The three evaporator restarts, DWPF melter heatup and completion of the ITP outage. The 1H Evaporator was restarted 12/28/93 after a 9 month shutdown for an extensive Conduct of Operations upgrade. The 2F and 2H Evaporators are scheduled to restart 3/94 and 4/94, respectively. The RHLWE startup remains 11/17/97.

Not Available

1994-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant High Level Waste Facility Radioactive Liquid Waste Disposal System Hazards Analysis Activities (EA-WTP-HLW-2014-08-18(a))...

42

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4). Although disposal of HLW remains...for long-term disposal is through deep...successful waste-disposal program has eluded...geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Authorized...Administration withdrew funding for Yucca Mountain...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

44

HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses  

SciTech Connect

In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Maty et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

45

The production of advanced glass ceramic HLW forms using cold crucible induction melter  

SciTech Connect

Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIM) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in a near future. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHM) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIM offers unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. It is concluded that glass ceramic waste forms that are tailored to immobilize fission products of HLW can be can be made from the HLW processed with the CCIM. The advantageous higher temperatures reached with the CCIM and unachievable with JHM allows the lanthanides, alkali, alkaline earths, and molybdenum to dissolve into a molten glass. Upon controlled cooling they go into targeted crystalline phases to form a glass ceramic waste form with higher waste loadings than achievable with borosilicate glass waste forms. Natural cooling proves to be too fast for the formation of all targeted crystalline phases.

Rutledge, V.J.; Maio, V. [Idaho National Laboratory: P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-2110 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test  

SciTech Connect

About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be successfully calcined at 600 C with an AAR of 1.75. Unburned hydrocarbons are reduced to less than 10 ppm (7% O2, dry basis), with >90% reduction of NOx emissions. Mercury removal by the carbon bed reached 99.99%, surpassing the control efficiency needed to meet MACT emissions standards. No deleterious impacts on the carbon bed were observed during the tests. The test results imply that upgrading the NWCF calciner with a more efficient cyclone separator and the proposed MACT equipment can process the remaining tanks wastes in 3 years or less, and comply with the MACT standards.

Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O'Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2-05 PEGG-2 - Melter Tests with High Al HLW - Nov 2010 emb.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Melter Melter Testing with High Aluminum HLW Streams Ian L. Pegg, Hao Gan, Wing K. Kot, Keith S. Matlack, and Innocent Joseph * Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC * EnergySolutions, Inc. DOE EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010 Print Close Melter Testing with High Aluminum HLW Streams 2 LAW Vitrification (90+% of waste mass) HLW Vitrification (90+% of waste activity) Pretreatment (solid/liquid separation, Cs-IX, Al, Cr, leaching) SLUDGE SUPERNATE Maximize Mass Maximize Activity Hanford WTP - Key Process Flows LAW glass disposed on site HLW glass disposed of in National Geologic Repository - TBD * Supernate: Solution of Na, Al, P, K, S, Cl, Cs, Tc, nitrates, hydroxides... * Sludge: Solids high in Fe, Al, Zr, Cr, Bi, Sr, TRU, oxides, hydroxides....

48

Summary - Preliminary TRA of the Calcine Disposition Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Calcine Calcine The Id materi Dec. 2 Press additiv form w those project anticip 2012 a CD-1 a selecte Level ( assess Eleme assign prepar The as below achiev * R * Ba * C The Ele Site: I roject: C Report Date: ited States Prelim Why DOE e HIP Treatment daho high-level al designated t 2009) to underg (HIP) process. ves, converts th with durability a of borosilicate t is currently in pates Critical D authorizing the approval, it is t ed technology (TRL) of 4 or h sment was to id ents (CTEs) of t n the TRLs that ration for CD-1 What th ssessment team along with the ved prior to CD etrieval//Pneum atching and Mi eramic Additive To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin daho Nationa Calcine Dispo February 201 Departmen minary T E-EM Did This t Process Flow D waste calcine through an am

49

EMPIRICAL MODEL FOR FORMULATION OF CRYSTAL-TOLERANT HLW GLASSES  

SciTech Connect

Historically, high-level waste (HLW) glasses have been formulated with a low liquideus temperature (T{sub L}), or temperature at which the equilibrium fraction of spinel crystals in the melt is below 1 vol % (T{sub 0.01}), nominally below 1050 C. These constraints cannot prevent the accumulation of large spinel crystals in considerably cooler regions ({approx} 850 C) of the glass discharge riser during melter idling and significantly limit the waste loading, which is reflected in a high volume of waste glass, and would result in high capital, production, and disposal costs. A developed empirical model predicts crystal accumulation in the riser of the melter as a function of concentration of spinel-forming components in glass, and thereby provides guidance in formulating crystal-tolerant glasses that would allow high waste loadings by keeping the spinel crystals small and therefore suspended in the glass.

KRUGER AA; MATYAS J; HUCKLEBERRY AR; VIENNA JD; RODRIGUEZ CA

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

Tank Waste Committee - Transcribed Flipcharts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRU waste retrieval Provided the State of New Mexico concurs Determine not HLW (process knowledge) As long as meets all applicable requirements "evaluation" not...

51

HLW System Integrated Project Team  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

l l W S Hi h l W S High Level Waste System High Level Waste System Integrated Project Team Integrated Project Team Integrated Project Team Integrated Project Team Steve Schneider Steve Schneider Office of Engineering and Technology High Level Waste Corporate Board March 5, 2009 This document is intended for planning and analysis purposes, assuming a continuing constrained budget environment. Every effort will be made to comply with all applicable environmental and legal obligations, while also assuring that essential functions necessary to protect human health, the environment and national security are maintained. 1 Introduction Introduction Introduction Introduction Challenges and Priorities High Level Waste Strategic Initiative Results High Level Waste System Integrated

52

TRUEX partitioning studies applied to ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located in southeast Idaho at the USDOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, formerly reprocessed highly enriched spent nuclear fuel to recover fissionable uranium. The HLW raffinates from the combined PUREX/REDOX type uranium recovery process were converted to solid oxides (calcine) in a high temperature fluidized bed. Liquid effluents from the calcination process were combined with liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW) generated primarily in conjunction with decontamination activities. Due to the high sodium content in the SBW, this secondary waste stream is not directly amenable to solidification via calcination. Currently, approximately 1.5 millon gallons of liquid SBW are stored at the ICPP in large tanks. Several treatment options for the SBW are currently being considered, including the TRansUranic EXtraction (TRUEX) process developed by Horwitz and co-workers at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in preparation for the final disposition of SBW. Herein described are experimental results of radionuclide tracer studies with simulated SBW using the TRUEX process solvent.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Law, J.D.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

HLW Melter Control Strategy Without Visual Feedback VSL-12R2500-1 Rev 0  

SciTech Connect

Plans for the treatment of high level waste (HL W) at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) are based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the pretreatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form [I]. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat and mass transfer and increase glass melting rates. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of ~ 1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HL W waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150?C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage.

Kruger, A A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Callow, Richard A. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Abramowitz, Howard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Brandys, Marek [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

54

HLW-OVP-96 C  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

aligns the System Plan with the FY96 Ten Year Plan, under which the site's 24 old-style tanks will be emptied by 2006 and all existing high level waste will be vitrified by 2018....

55

High Level Waste ManagemenfDivision ..  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B.2 Environmental Documentation C. Regulatory Waste Removal Schedule (Type I, II and IV Tanks) D. Process Logic Diagram E. Process Logic Interactive Matrix F. HLW Integrated...

56

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...06520, USA. Nuclear power is re-emerging...proclaiming a nuclear renaissance...example, plant safety...liabilities, terrorism at plants and in transport...high-level nuclear wastes (HLW...factor in risk perceptions...supporting nuclear power in the abstract...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

57

Risk-informing decisions about high-level nuclear waste repositories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance assessments (PAs) are important sources of information for societal decisions in high-level radioactive waste (HLW) management, particularly in evaluating safety cases for proposed HLW repository development. ...

Ghosh, Suchandra Tina, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

High Level Waste Management Division . H L W System Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Regulatory Documentation C. Regulatory Waste Removal Schedule (Type I, II and IV Tanks) D. Process Logic Diagram E. Process Logic Interactive Matrix F. HLW Integrated...

59

Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Oversight's November 2013 review included observation of a pneumatic pressure test, structural steel bolting in the High-Level Waste Facility (HLW), and review of the...

60

The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter  

SciTech Connect

Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information 1.0 Summary This information demonstrates the wastes in the twelve Hanford Site tanks meet the definition of transuranic (TRU. The wastes in these twelve (12) tanks are not high-level waste (HLW), and contain more than 100 nanocuries

62

Final Report - Testing of Optimized Bubbler Configuration for HLW Melter VSL-13R2950-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/12/2013  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this work was to determine the glass production rate increase and ancillary effects of adding more bubbler outlets to the current WTP HLW melter baseline. This was accomplished through testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) at VSL. The DM1200 unit was selected for these tests since it was used previously with several HLW waste streams including the four tank wastes proposed for initial processing at Hanford. This melter system was also used for the development and optimization of the present baseline WTP HLW bubbler configuration for the WTP HLW melter, as well as for MACT testing for both HLW and LAW. Specific objectives of these tests were to: Conduct DM1200 melter testing with the baseline WTP bubbling configuration and as augmented with additional bubblers. Conduct DM1200 melter testing to differentiate the effects of total bubbler air flow and bubbler distribution on glass production rate and cold cap formation. Collect melter operating data including processing rate, temperatures at a variety of locations within the melter plenum space, melt pool temperature, glass melt density, and melter pressure with the baseline WTP bubbling configuration and as augmented with additional bubblers. Collect melter exhaust samples to compare particulate carryover for different bubbler configurations. Analyze all collected data to determine the effects of adding more bubblers to the WTP HLW melter to inform decisions regarding future lid re-designs. The work used a high aluminum HLW stream composition defined by ORP, for which an appropriate simulant and high waste loading glass formulation were developed and have been previously processed on the DM1200.

Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Callow, R. A.; Joseph, I.; Matlack, K. S.; Kot, W. K.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and treat the waste remaining in 177 underground storage tanks; store the high-level radioactive waste (HLW); dispose of the low-activity waste (LAW) at the Hanford Site...

64

Calcining process emission screening test for polychlorinated dibenzodioxins  

SciTech Connect

Since 1963, the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has been using fluidized-bed technology to convert high-level radioactive liquid waste into a granular solid for interim storage before eventual long-term storage. The calcining process uses kerosene, oxygen, air and a cooling jacket to maintain the temperature of the fluidized bed at approximately 400 C. The solids are moved to storage bins and the combustion gases and fine particles are swept from the bed to an atmospheric protection system. This atmospheric protection system includes a cyclone to collect larger particles; a nitric acid scrubber to cool gases and collect small particles; a condenser to reduce water content; silica gel beds to adsorb volatile ruthenium, water, and hydrocarbons; and a series of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters to collect minute particles. The calcination process solidifies waste solutions containing molar levels of acid, nitrate, fluoride, zirconium, aluminum, iron, boron, and cadmium; minor levels (<0.1%) of various fission products and organics; and trace levels (<50 ppm) of chloride and sulfate. Because the process burns kerosene in the presence of other organics and chloride salts; the calciner was considered a potential production source of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD). Therefore, it was necessary to determine if PCDD were being released from the calcination process. Because a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and PCDD standards were not available, a screening procedure using two gas chromatographs with electron capture detectors and no PCDD calibration standards was developed.

Hartenstein, S.D.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

High Level Waste System Plan Revision 9  

SciTech Connect

Revision 9 of the High Level Waste System Plan documents the current operating strategy of the HLW System at SRS to receive, store, treat, and dispose of high-level waste.

Davis, N.R.; Wells, M.N.; Choi, A.S.; Paul, P.; Wise, F.E.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

SEISMIC DESIGN EVALUATION GUIDELINES FOR BURIED PIPING FOR THE DOE HLW FACILITIES'  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

6 1 6 1 7 1 1 SEISMIC DESIGN EVALUATION GUIDELINES FOR BURIED PIPING FOR THE DOE HLW FACILITIES' Chi-Wen Lin Consultant, Martinez, CA George Antaki Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC Kamal Bandyopadhyay Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY ABSTRACT This paper presents the seismic design and evaluation guidelines for underground piping for the Department of Energy (DOE) High-Level-Waste (HLW) Facilities. The underground piping includes both single and double containment steel pipes and concrete pipes with steel lining, with particular emphasis on the double containment piping. The design and evaluation guidelines presented in this paper follow the generally accepted beam-on-elastic- foundation analysis principle and the inertial response calculation method, respectively, for piping directly

67

DEVELOPING AN OPTIMIZED PROCESS STRATEGY FOR ACID CLEANING OF THE SAVANNAH RIVERSITE HLW TANKS  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS), there remains approximately 35 million gallons of High Level Waste (HLW) that was mostly created from Purex and SRS H-Area Modified (HM) nuclear fuel cycles. The waste is contained in approximately forty-nine tanks fabricated from commercially available carbon steel. In order to minimize general corrosion, the waste is maintained as very-alkaline solution. The very-alkaline chemistry has caused hydrated metal oxides to precipitate and form a sludge heel. Over the years, the sludge waste has aged, with some forming a hardened crust. To aid in the removal of the sludge heels from select tanks for closure the use of oxalic acid to dissolve the sludge is being investigated. Developing an optimized process strategy based on laboratory analyses would be prohibitively costly. This research, therefore, demonstrates that a chemical equilibrium based software program can be used to develop an optimized process strategy for oxalic acid cleaning of the HLW tanks based on estimating resultant chemistries, minimizing resultant oxalates sent to the evaporator, and minimizing resultant solids sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF).

Ketusky, E

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

68

FINAL REPORT TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-02R0100-2 REV 1 2/17/03  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from a series of nine tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1 [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plans. The nine tests reported here were preceded by an initial series of short-duration tests conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Reports. The DM1200 system was deployed for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. These tests include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The primary objective of the present series of tests was to determine the effects of a variety of parameters on the glass production rate in comparison to the RPP-WTP HL W design basis of 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d. Previous testing on the DMIOOO system [1] concluded that achievement of that rate with simulants of projected WTP melter feeds (AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102) was unlikely without the use of bubblers. As part of those tests, the same feed that was used during the cold-commissioning of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) HLW vitrification system was run on the DM1000 system. The DM1000 tests reproduced the rates that were obtained at the larger WVDP facility, lending confidence to the tests results [1]. Since the inclusion or exclusion of a bubbler has significant design implications, the Project commissioned further tests to address this issue. In an effort to identify factors that might increase the glass production rate for projected WTP melter feeds, a subsequent series of tests was performed on the DM100 system. Several tests variables led to glass production rate increases to values significantly above the 400 kg/m2/d requirement. However, while small-scale melter tests are useful for screening relative effects, they tend to overestimate absolute glass production rates, particularly for un-bubbled tests. Consequently, when scale-up effects were taken into account, it was not clear that any of the variables investigated would conclusively meet the 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d requirement without bubbling. The present series of tests was therefore performed on the DM1200 one-third scale HLW pilot melter system to provide the required basis for a final decision on whether bubblers would be included in the HLW melter. The present tests employed the same AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing for consistency and comparability with the results from the earlier tests.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BARDAKCI T; GONG W; D'ANGELO NA; SCHATZ TR; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 1 (CDP) Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project...

70

Immobilization and Waste Form Product Acceptance for Low Level and TRU Waste Forms  

SciTech Connect

The Tanks Focus Area is supporting technology development in immobilization of both High Level (HLW) and Low Level (LLW) radioactive wastes. The HLW process development at Hanford and Idaho is patterned closely after that of the Savannah River (Defense Waste Processing Facility) and West Valley Sites (West Valley Demonstration Project). However, the development and options open to addressing Low Level Waste are diverse and often site specific. To start, it is important to understand the breadth of Low Level Wastes categories.

Holtzscheiter, E.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Harbour, J.R.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Waste Acceptance Product EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms Presentation to the HLW Corporate Board July 24, 2008 By Tony Kluk/Ken Picha 2 Background * Originally Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications were Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) documents and project specific: - Defense Waste Processing Facility (PE-03, July 1989) - West Valley Demonstration Project (PE-04, January 1990) * Included many of same specifications as current version of WAPS * First version of RW Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document in January 1993 (included requirements for both SNF and HLW) * EM decided to extract requirements for HLW and put into the WAPS document 3 Background (Cont'd) * Lists technical specifications for acceptance of borosilicate HLW

72

Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant December 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Operational Awareness Record for the Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant High Level Waste Facility Radioactive Liquid Waste Disposal System Hazards Analysis Activities (EA-WTP-HLW-2014-08-18(a))

73

Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Aluminum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000  

SciTech Connect

The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur. Waste processing rate increases for high-iron streams as a combined effect of higher waste loadings and higher melt rates resulting from new formulations have been achieved. (author)

Kruger, Albert A. [WTP Engineering Division, United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 450, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [WTP Engineering Division, United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 450, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Alumimum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000  

SciTech Connect

The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP?s overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur. Waste processing rate increases for high-iron streams as a combined effect of higher waste loadings and higher melt rates resulting from new formulations have been achieved.

Kruger, Albert A.

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

75

AKUFVE studies on extraction behavior of neptunium from simulated HLW solutions by 30% TBP  

SciTech Connect

The extraction behavior of neptunium from 3 M nitric acid as well as simulated pressurized heavy water reactor high level radioactive waste (PHWR-HLW) solution by 30% TBP/dodecane was studied using AKUFVE. Np(IV)/Np(V) was oxidized to Np(VI) using oxidizing agents, such as K{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, VO{sub 2}{sup +} and NaNO{sub 2}. Stripping of neptunium from the loaded TBP phase was studied using reducing agents like hydrogen peroxide, ascorbic acid, hydroxylamine hydrochloride and hydrazine sulfate. Results of these extraction and stripping studies have been discussed in this paper.

Chitnis, R.R.; Wattal, P.K.; Murali, M.S.; Nair, G.C.; Mathur, J.N. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 27, 2011 July 27, 2011 End of Year 2010 SNF & HLW Inventories Map of the United States of America that shows the location of approximately 64,000 MTHM of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) & 275 High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Canisters. July 27, 2011 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended.

77

CLOSURE OF HLW TANKS PHASE 2 FULL SCALE COOLING COILS GROUT FILL DEMONSTATIONS  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) support for the Tank Closure and Technology Development (TCTD) group's strategy for closing high level radioactive waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Specifically, this task addresses the ability to successfully fill intact cooling coils, presently within the HLW tanks, with grout that satisfies the fresh and cured grout requirements [1] under simulated field conditions. The overall task was divided into two phases. The first phase was the development of a grout formulation that satisfies the processing requirements for filling the HLW tank cooling coils [5]. The second phase of the task, which is documented in this report, was the filling of full scale cooling coils under simulated field conditions using the grout formulation developed in the first phase. SRS Type I tank cooling coil assembly design drawings and pressure drop calculations were provided by the Liquid Waste (LW) customer to be used as the basis for configuring the test assemblies. The current concept for closing tanks equipped with internal cooling coils is to pump grout into the coils to inhibit pathways for infiltrating water. Access to the cooling coil assemblies is through the existing supply/return manifold headers located on top of the Type I tanks. The objectives for the second phase of the testing, as stated in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance plan (TTQAP) [2], were to: (1) Perform a demonstration test to assess cooling coil grout performance in simulated field conditions, and (2) Measure relevant properties of samples prepared under simulated field conditions. SRNL led the actual work of designing, fabricating and filling two full-scale cooling coil assemblies which were performed at Clemson Engineering Technologies Laboratory (CETL) using the South Carolina University Research and Education Foundation (SCUREF) program. A statement of work (SOW) was issued to CETL [6] to perform this work.

Hansen, E; Alex Cozzi, A

2008-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

78

Microwave calcination for plutonium immobilization and residue stabilization  

SciTech Connect

In the late 1980`s development was begun on a process using microwave energy to vitrify low level mixed waste sludge and transuranic mixed waste sludge generated in Building 374 at Rocky Flats. This process was shown to produce a dense, highly durable waste form. With the cessation of weapons production at Rocky Flats, the emphasis has changed from treatment of low level and TRU wastes to stabilizaiton of plutonium oxide and residues. This equipment is versatile and can be used as a heat source to calcine, react or vitrify many types of residues and oxides. It has natural economies in that it heats only the material to be treated, significantly reducing cycle times over conventional furnaces. It is inexpensive to operate in that most of the working components remain outside of any necessary contamination enclosure and therefore can easily be maintained. Limited testing has been successfully performed on cerium oxide (as a surrogate for plutonium oxide), surrogate electrorefining salts, surrogate residue sludge and residue ash. Future plans also include tests on ion exchange resins. In an attempt to further the usefullness of this technology, a mobile, self-contained microwave melting system is currently under development and expected to be operational at Rocky Flats Enviromental Technology Site by the 4th quarter of FY96.

Harris, M.J.; Rising, T.L.; Roushey, W.J.; Sprenger, G.S. [Kaiser-Hill Co., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Final Report - Effects of High Spinel and Chromium Oxide Crystal Contents on Simulated HLW Vitrification in DM100 Melter Tests, VSL-09R1520-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/22/09  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of the work was to evaluate the effects of spinel and chromium oxide particles on WTP HLW melter operations and potential impacts on melter life. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale tests, settling and rheological tests, and tests on the DM100 melter system. Crucible testing was designed to develop and identify HLW glass compositions with high waste loadings that exhibit formation of crystalline spinel and/or chromium oxide phases up to relatively high crystal contents (i.e., > 1 vol%). Characterization of crystal settling and the effects on melt rheology was performed on the HLW glass formulations. Appropriate candidate HLW glass formulations were selected, based on characterization results, to support subsequent melter tests. In the present work, crucible melts were formulated that exhibit up to about 4.4 vol% crystallization.

Kruger, Albert A.; Matlack, K. S.; Kot, W.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Lutze, W.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

80

FINAL REPORT START-UP AND COMMISSIONING TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-01R0100-2 REV 0 1/20/03  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from commissioning tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM 1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part BI [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plan. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Report. The DM1200 system will be used for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. This will include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The results presented in this report are from the initial series of short-duration tests that were conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system prior to conducting the main body of development tests that have been planned for this system. These tests were directed primarily at system 'debugging,' operator training, and procedure refinement. The AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing was selected for these tests.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BRANDYS M; WILSON CN; SCHATZ TR; GONG W; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

FINAL REPORT INTEGRATED DM1200 MELTER TESTING USING AZ 102 AND C 106/AY-102 HLW SIMULANTS: HLW SIMULANT VERIFICATION VSL-05R5800-1 REV 0 6/27/05  

SciTech Connect

The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter tests were to determine the effects of feed rheology, feed solid content, and bubbler configuration on glass production rate and off-gas system performance while processing the HLW AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102 feed compositions; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components, as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and perform pre- and post test inspections of system components. The specific objectives (including test success criteria) of this testing, along with how each objective was met, are outlined in a table. The data provided in this Final Report address the impacts of HLW melter feed rheology on melter throughput and validation of the simulated HLW melter feeds. The primary purpose of this testing is to further validate/verify the HLW melter simulants that have been used for previous melter testing and to support their continued use in developing melter and off-gas related processing information for the Project. The primary simulant property in question is rheology. Simulants and melter feeds used in all previous melter tests were produced by direct addition of chemicals; these feed tend to be less viscous than rheological the upper-bound feeds made from actual wastes. Data provided here compare melter processing for the melter feed used in all previous DM100 and DM1200 tests (nominal melter feed) with feed adjusted by the feed vendor (NOAH Technologies) to be more viscous, thereby simulating more closely the upperbounding feed produced from actual waste. This report provides results of tests that are described in the Test Plan for this work. The Test Plan is responsive to one of several test objectives covered in the WTP Test Specification for this work; consequently, only part of the scope described in the Test Specification was addressed in this particular Test Plan. For the purpose of comparison, the tests reported here were performed with AZ-102 and C-106/AY-102 HLW simulants and glass compositions that are essentially the same as those used for recent DM1200 tests. One exception was the use of an alternate, higher-waste-loading C-106/AY-102 glass composition that was used in previous DM100 tests to further evaluate the performance of the optimized bubbler configuration.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

82

Calcination and pyroprocessing of mineral fines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT During the past 40 years we have witnessed an interesting development in technologies for calcination and pyroprocessing of fine-grained material. This has led to the gas suspension principles now being widely used in the cement industry and in chemical processing systems for solids. The present paper deals with the dilute-phase systems and summarises the developments over the past 10 years illustrating the importance of raw material properties and product specifications in the selection and design of GSC systems. Methods for the characterisation of raw materials, such as crushed rock, flotation concentrates and hydrates, are illustrated with examples from industrial plants operating on dolomite, limestone and alumina hydrate. KEY WORDS GSC Gas Suspension Calcination Lime, Dolime, Alumina, Minerals Processing

E.A. Neubert

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/06/08 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11/06/08 11/06/08 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/06/08 The following documents are associated with the Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting held on November 6th, 2008. Note: (Please contact Steven Ross at steven.ross@em.doe.gov for a HLW Glass Waste Loadings version with animations on slide 6). Slurry Retrieval, Pipeline Transport & Plugging and Mixing Workshop The Way Ahead - West Valley Demonstration Project High-Level Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals Hanford Tank Waste Residuals HLW Glass Waste Loadings High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee More Documents & Publications Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 System Planning for Low-Activity Waste at Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility

84

Supplemental Immobilization Cast Stone Technology Development and Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment facility will have the capacity to separate all of the tank wastes into the HLW and LAW fractions, and the HLW Vitrification Facility will have the capacity to vitrify all of the HLW. However, a second immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A number of alternatives, including Cast Stonea cementitious waste formare being considered to provide the additional LAW immobilization capacity.

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Pierce, Eric M.; Cozzi, Alex; Chung, Chul-Woo; Swanberg, David J.

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Optimizing High Level Waste Disposal  

SciTech Connect

If society is ever to reap the potential benefits of nuclear energy, technologists must close the fuel-cycle completely. A closed cycle equates to a continued supply of fuel and safe reactors, but also reliable and comprehensive closure of waste issues. High level waste (HLW) disposal in borosilicate glass (BSG) is based on 1970s era evaluations. This host matrix is very adaptable to sequestering a wide variety of radionuclides found in raffinates from spent fuel reprocessing. However, it is now known that the current system is far from optimal for disposal of the diverse HLW streams, and proven alternatives are available to reduce costs by billions of dollars. The basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider extensive waste form and process technology research and development efforts, which have been conducted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), international agencies and the private sector. Matching the waste form to the waste chemistry and using currently available technology could increase the waste content in waste forms to 50% or more and double processing rates. Optimization of the HLW disposal system would accelerate HLW disposition and increase repository capacity. This does not necessarily require developing new waste forms, the emphasis should be on qualifying existing matrices to demonstrate protection equal to or better than the baseline glass performance. Also, this proposed effort does not necessarily require developing new technology concepts. The emphasis is on demonstrating existing technology that is clearly better (reliability, productivity, cost) than current technology, and justifying its use in future facilities or retrofitted facilities. Higher waste processing and disposal efficiency can be realized by performing the engineering analyses and trade-studies necessary to select the most efficient methods for processing the full spectrum of wastes across the nuclear complex. This paper will describe technologies being evaluated at Idaho National Laboratory and the facilities weve designed to evaluate options and support optimization.

Dirk Gombert

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

High Level Waste Corporate Board Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on 24 July 2008 1 on 24 July 2008 1 Office of Environmental Management High-Level Waste Corporate Board Charter Purpose This Charter establishes the High- Level Waste (HLW) Corporate Board, (hereinafter referred to as the 'Board') within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The Board will serve as a consensus building body to integrate the Department of Energy (DOE) HLW management and disposition activities across the EM program and, with the coordination and cooperation of other program offices, across the DOE complex. The Board will identify the need for and develop policies, planning, standards and guidance and provide the integration necessary to implement an effective and efficient national HLW program. The Board will also evaluate the implications of HLW issues and their

87

Connecting section and associated systems concept for the spray calciner/in-can melter process  

SciTech Connect

For a number of years, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory have been developing processes and equipment for converting high-level liquid wastes to solid forms. One of these processes is the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter system. To immobilize high-level liquid wastes, this system must be operated remotely, and the calcine must be reliably conveyed from the calciner to the melting furnace. A concept for such a remote conveyance system was developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and equipment was tested under full-scale, nonradioactive conditions. This concept and the design of demonstration equipment are described, and the results of equipment operation during experimental runs of 7 d are presented. The design includes a connecting section and its associated systems - a canister sypport and alignment concept and a weight-monitoring system for the melting furnace. Overall, the runs demonstrated that the concept design is an acceptable method of connecting the two pieces of process equipment together. Although the connecting section has not been optimized in all areas of concern, it provides a first-generation design of a production-oriented system.

Petkus, L.L.; Gorton, P.S.; Blair, H.T.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

EIS-0356: Retrieval, Treatment and Disposal of Tank Wastes and Closure of Single-Shell Tanks at the Hanford Site, Richland, WA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed retrieval, treatment, and disposal of the waste being managed in the high-level waste (HLW) tank farms at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and closure of the 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and associated facilities in the HLW tank farms.

89

Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2 (CDP) Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 2 (CDP) Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download...

90

Cogeneration Waste Heat Recovery at a Coke Calcining Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hard surface overlays on their impellers and scrolls to prevent erosion. The use of linings was selected after a comprehensive study was performed investi gating the expected wear on unlined equipment, additional cost of linings, frequency of main... is provided fr the pump discharge head r for of the bypass steam e tering carbon steel steam sal s line line of the refine is feet long. The st am is metered by a primary venturi flow nozzle, essure transmitters, and temperature elements ne r...

Coles, R. L.

91

Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

Burgard, K.C.

1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

92

Production of a High-Level Waste Glass from Hanford Waste Samples  

SciTech Connect

The HLW glass was produced from a HLW sludge slurry (Envelope D Waste), eluate waste streams containing high levels of Cs-137 and Tc-99, solids containing both Sr-90 and transuranics (TRU), and glass-forming chemicals. The eluates and Sr-90/TRU solids were obtained from ion-exchange and precipitation pretreatments, respectively, of other Hanford supernate samples (Envelopes A, B and C Waste). The glass was vitrified by mixing the different waste streams with glass-forming chemicals in platinum/gold crucibles and heating the mixture to 1150 degree C. Resulting glass analyses indicated that the HLW glass waste form composition was close to the target composition. The targeted waste loading of Envelope D sludge solids in the HLW glass was 30.7 wt percent, exclusive of Na and Si oxides. Condensate samples from the off-gas condenser and off-gas dry-ice trap indicated that very little of the radionuclides were volatilized during vitrification. Microstructure analysis of the HLW glass using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX) showed what appeared to be iron spinel in the HLW glass. Further X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the presence of nickel spinel trevorite (NiFe2O4). These crystals did not degrade the leaching characteristics of the glass. The HLW glass waste form passed leach tests that included a standard 90 degree C Product Consistency Test (PCT) and a modified version of the United States Environmental Protection Agency Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

Crawford, C.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Farrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.; Bibler, N.E.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Pyroprocessing of fine industrial minerals in a suspension flash calciner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Suspension flash calcining is well suited for heat treatment of -20 mesh and finer materials at temperatures up to 1400C. The system has been applied to a number of materials including limestone, dolomite, phosphate and gypsum, which are discussed in this paper. The system operates in a countercurrent mode, incorporating one to three suspension cyclone preheat stages ahead of a suspension flash calciner; followed by one to three suspension cyclone cooling stages. Operating temperatures range from 11001200C for limestone and dolomite, to 800900C for phosphate and 150300C for gypsum. Fuel is normally fired directly into the suspension flash calciner vessel, or as in the case of gypsum in a separately fired air heater. Flash calcination offers a unique approach to the processing of fine materials. The short residence time of the flash calciner system works to prevent overburning, however the excellent heat transfer that is achieved allows the calcination load to be accomplished. KEYWORDS - Suspension, Calcining, Calcination, Limestone, Dolomite, Gypsum, Phosphate

W.E. Lindquist; S.M. Cohen; B.T. Field

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

TESTS WITH HIGH-BISMUTH HLW GLASSES FINAL REPORT VSL-10R1780-1 REV 0 12/13/10  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report describes the testing of glass formulations developed for Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) containing high concentrations of bismuth. In previous work on high-bismuth HLW streams specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP), fully compliant, high waste loading compositions were developed and subjected to melter testing on the DM100 vitrification system. However, during heat treatment according to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW canister centerline cooling (CCC) curves, crucible melts of the high-bismuth glasses were observed to foam. Clearly, such an occurrence during cooling of actual HLW canisters would be highly undesirable. Accordingly, the present work involves larger-scale testing to determine whether this effect occurs under more prototypical conditions, as well as crucible-scale tests to determine the causes and potentially remediate the observed foaming behavior. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts designed to determine the underlying causes of the foaming behavior as well as to assess potential mitigation strategies. Testing was also conducted on the DM1200 HLW Pilot melter with a composition previously tested on the DM100 and shown to foam during crucible-scale CCC heat treatment. The DM1200 tests evaluated foaming of glasses over a range of bismuth concentrations poured into temperature-controlled, 55-gallon drums which have a diameter that is close to that of the full-scale WTP HLW canisters. In addition, the DM1200 tests provided the first large-scale melter test data on high-bismuth WTP HLW compositions, including information on processing rates, cold cap behavior and off-gas characteristics, and data from this waste composition on the prototypical DM1200 off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for ORP on the same waste composition. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. The present glass formulation and melter testing work was aimed at one of the four waste streams previously specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). Such testing supports the ORP basis for projection of the amount of Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) to be produced at Hanford and evaluation of the likely potential for future enhancements of the WTP over and above the present well-developed baseline. It should be noted that the compositions of the four ORP-specified waste streams differ significantly from those of the feed tanks (AZ-101, AZ-102, C-16/AY-102, and C-104/AY-101) that have been the focus of the extensive technology development and design work performed for the WTP baseline. In this regard, the work on the ORP-specified compositions is complementary to and necessarily of a more exploratory nature than the work in support of the current WTP baseline.

MATLACK KS; KRUGER AA; JOSEPH I; GAN H; KOT WK; CHAUDHURI M; MOHR RK; MCKEOWN DA; BARDAKEI T; GONG W; BUECCHELE AC; PEGG IL

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

95

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual intec calcines Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electrodes calcined at 750... electrodes calcined at 750 C on phenol degradation. 3.3. Removal efficiency of TOC with Eu doped SnO2Sb... electrodes calcined at different...

96

Simulation of Combustion and Thermal-flow Inside a Petroleum Coke Rotary Calcining Kiln.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Calcined coke is the best material for making carbon anodes for smelting of alumina to aluminum. Calcining is an energy intensive industry and a significant (more)

Zhang, Zexuan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A Summary of INEEL Calcine Properties Used to Evaluate Direct Calcine Disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect

To support evaluations of the direct disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory calcines to the repository at Yucca Mountain, an evaluation of the performance of the calcine in the repository environment must be performed. This type of evaluation demonstrates, through computer modeling and analysis, the impact the calcine would have on the ability of the repository to perform its function of containment of materials during the repository lifetime. This report discusses parameters that were used in the scoping evaluation conducted in FY 2003. It provides nominal values for the parameters, with explanation of the source of the values, and how the values were modified for use in repository analysis activities.

C. A. Dahl

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Enclosure 3 DOE Response to EPA Question Regarding "High-Level Liquid Radioactive Waste"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to date, which is from the definitions in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act: The term "high-level radioactive of waste streams as from the applicable definition of HLW in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. 5/11/20051 #12 defining High Level Waste: For the purpose of this statement of policy, "high-level liquid radioactive

99

Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External Flowsheet Review Team (Technical) Report Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External Flowsheet Review Team (Technical) Report Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External Flowsheet Review Team (Technical) Report Summary - Flowsheet for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant More Documents & Publications Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility

100

Options for Determining Equivalent MHTM (Metric Tons of Heavy Metal) for DOE High Level Waste  

SciTech Connect

Section 114(d) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA), limits the overall capacity of the first repository to 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM). Current DOE policy is to allocate DOE spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) at 10 percent of the total, or 7,000 MTHM. For planning purposes, 4,667 MTHM will be allocated for HLW. While the NWPA provides a technical basis for determining the MTHM equivalence of HLW, it does not address the significant technical differences between DOE HLW and commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Although more than 170,000 MTHM of DOE fuel has been reprocessed to produce the inventory of HLW, the amount of radioactive waste generated per metric ton of DOE fuel is only a few percent of that in a metric ton of commercial fuel. This study compares the results of four methods for determining the MTHM equivalence of DOE HLW. These methods include (1) using the actual weight of heavy metal in reprocessed DOE fuel, (2) assuming the historical equivalence of 0.5 MTHM/canister of vitrified DOE HLW, (3) comparing the total radioactivity in DOE HLW to the radioactivity of commercial SNF, and (4) comparing the total radiotoxicity of DOE HLW, as defined for those radionuclides identified in 10 CFR 20, with SNF at 1,000 and 10,000 years. This study concludes that either of the last two options would meet Congresss stated purposes of the NWPA, which are to (1) provide "reasonable assurance that the public and the environment will be adequately protected from the hazards posed by high-level radioactive waste and such spent nuclear fuel as may be disposed of in a repository", and (2) to "define Federal policy for the disposal of such waste and spent fuel".

Knecht, Dieter August; Valentine, James Henry; Luptak, Alan Jay; Staiger, Merle Daniel; Loo, Henry Hung Yiu; Wichmann, Thomas Leonard

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel report assesses the technical options for the safe and permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) managed by the Department of Energy. Specifically, it considers whether DOE-managed HLW and SNF should be disposed of with commercial SNF and HLW in one geologic repository or whether there are advantages to developing separate geologic disposal pathways for some DOE-managed HLW and SNF. The report recommends that the Department begin implementation of a phased, adaptive, and consent-based strategy with development of a separate mined repository for some DOE-managed HLW and cooler DOE-managed SNF.

102

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

103

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB),  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB), Balance of Facilities (BOF) and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification Facilities (LAW) Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB), Balance of Facilities (BOF) and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification Facilities (LAW) Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB), Balance of Facilities (BOF) and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification Facilities (LAW) Summary - WTP Analytical Lab, BOF and LAW Waste Vitrification Facilities More Documents & Publications Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility Compilation of TRA Summaries

104

High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Level Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee John E. Marra, Ph.D. Associate Laboratory Director November 6, 2008 Richland, WA DOE-EM HLW Corporate Board Meeting Background - Performance Assessment Process Performance assessments are the fundamental risk assessment tool used by the DOE to evaluate and communicate the effectiveness and long-term impact of waste management and cleanup decisions. This includes demonstrations of compliance, NEPA analyses, and decisions about technologies and 2 analyses, and decisions about technologies and waste forms. Background - Process Perception EM-2 'Precepts' for Improved High-Level Waste Management (HLW Corporate Board Meeting - April 2008) Improved Performance Assessments (PA) The PA process is not consistently applied amongst the 3 The PA process is not consistently applied amongst the major HLW sites PA

105

POLCAL-A gas suspension calciner for pyroprocessing of minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The POLCAL(R) suspension calciner consists of several vertically arranged cyclones, connected by gas and material ducts. Fine-grained solids can be thermally treated in this system with a comparatively low energy input. A small proportion of the necessary amount of fuel is burned in a combustion chamber, while the greater part of the fuel is directly injected into the calciner. The fuel can be liquid or gaseous and, under certain conditions, even solid. Two industrial plants for the calcination of magnesite and a pasty filter cake from a precipitation process have been in operation for several years. One plant will shortly be commissioned and two further systems are being designed. Due to the effective heat exchange, the POLCAL system distinguishes itself by a low energy consumption. The simple design and the absence of rotating parts minimise the susceptibility to malfunctions and considerably reduce maintenance and repair costs. Due to the small amounts of material in the system, the change-over times to other product qualities and the start-up time after a shutdown of the system are short. The POLCAL system competes with multiple hearth furnaces, rotary kilns and fluidised bed kilns and lends itself to use in many branches of industry where minerals or intermediate products from other stages of the process must be calcined. KEYWORDS Calcination of minerals and precipitation products; low energy consumption; homogeneous product quality; operating industrial plants; pilot-scale tests with various materials.

P.W. Bhm

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Permitting plan for the high-level waste interim storage  

SciTech Connect

This document addresses the environmental permitting requirements for the transportation and interim storage of solidified high-level waste (HLW) produced during Phase 1 of the Hanford Site privatization effort. Solidified HLW consists of canisters containing vitrified HLW (glass) and containers that hold cesium separated during low-level waste pretreatment. The glass canisters and cesium containers will be transported to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-provided transportation cask via diesel-powered tractor trailer. Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Milestone M-90 establishes a new major milestone, and associated interim milestones and target dates, governing acquisition and/or modification of facilities necessary for: (1) interim storage of Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) immobilized HLW (IHLW) and other canistered high-level waste forms; and (2) interim storage and disposal of TWRS immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW). An environmental requirements checklist and narrative was developed to identify the permitting path forward for the HLW interim storage (HLWIS) project (See Appendix B). This permitting plan will follow the permitting logic developed in that checklist.

Deffenbaugh, M.L.

1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

107

Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Task: Identify Shortline Railroads Serving Nuclear Power Plants Establish Contact Information with Railroads Officials Field Review of each Railroad's Physical and Operational Infrastructure Facilitate Upgrades to Meet Safe Acceptable Standards Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel More Documents & Publications TEC Meeting Summaries - February 2008 Presentations TEC Meeting Summaries - July 2007 Presentations TEC Meeting Summaries - September 2006

108

An Investigation into the Oxidation State of Molybdenum in Simplified High Level Nuclear Waste Glass Compositions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Investigation into the Oxidation State of Molybdenum in Simplified High Level Nuclear Waste of Mo in glasses containing simplified simulated high level nuclear waste (HLW) streams has been originating from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Experiments using simulated nuclear waste streams

Sheffield, University of

109

H:\cindy_pratt\hlw rod.tif  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RECORD OF DECISION RECORD OF DECISION For The Idaho High- Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement December 2005 United States Department of Energy 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Environmental Management Record of Decision for the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement SUMMARY: DOE is making decisions pursuant to the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) (DOEÆIS-287), issued in October 2002. The Final EIS presents the analysis of a proposed action containing two sets of alternatives: (1) waste processing alternatives for treating, storing and disposing of liquid mixed (radioactive and hazardous) transuranic (TRU) waste/sodium-bearing

110

High-Level Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 Karthik Subramanian Bruce Wiersma November 2008 High Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting karthik.subramanian@srnl.doe.gov bruce.wiersma@srnl.doe.gov 2 Acknowledgements * Bruce Wiersma (SRNL) * Kayle Boomer (Hanford) * Michael T. Terry (Facilitator) * SRS - Liquid Waste Organization * Hanford Tank Farms * DOE-EM 3 Background * High level radioactive waste (HLW) tanks provide critical interim confinement for waste prior to processing and permanent disposal * Maintaining structural integrity (SI) of the tanks is a critical component of operations 4 Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 * Discuss the HLW tank integrity technology needs based upon the evolving waste processing and tank closure requirements along with its continued storage mission

111

Characteristics of potential repository wastes. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This document, and its associated appendices and microcomputer (PC) data bases, constitutes the reference OCRWM data base of physical and radiological characteristics data of radioactive wastes. This Characteristics Data Base (CDB) system includes data on spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste (HLW), which clearly require geologic disposal, and other wastes which may require long-term isolation, such as sealed radioisotope sources. The data base system was developed for OCRWM by the CDB Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various principal or official sources of these data provided primary information to the CDB Project which then used the ORIGEN2 computer code to calculate radiological properties. The data have been qualified by an OCRWM-sponsored peer review as suitable for quality-affecting work meeting the requirements of OCRWM`s Quality Assurance Program. The wastes characterized in this report include: light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and immobilized HLW.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

HANFORD MEDIUM & LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 LAB REPORT  

SciTech Connect

A fractional crystallization (FC) process is being developed to supplement tank waste pretreatment capabilities provided by the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). FC can process many tank wastes, separating wastes into a low-activity fraction (LAW) and high-activity fraction (HLW). The low-activity fraction can be immobilized in a glass waste form by processing in the bulk vitrification (BV) system.

HAMILTON, D.W.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

Distributions of 14 elements on 60 selected absorbers from two simulant solutions (acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate) for Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY  

SciTech Connect

Sixty commercially available or experimental absorber materials were evaluated for partitioning high-level radioactive waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. The distributions of 14 elements onto each absorber were measured from simulated solutions that represent acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate solutions from Hanford high-level waste (HLW) Tank 102-SY. The selected elements, which represent fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y); actinides (U, Pu, and Am); and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr), were traced by radionuclides and assayed by gamma spectrometry. Distribution coefficients for each of the 1680 element/absorber/solution combinations were measured for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to provide sorption kinetics information for the specified elements from these complex media. More than 5000 measured distribution coefficients are tabulated.

Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Identification of potential transuranic waste tanks at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to identify potential transuranic (TRU) material among the Hanford Site tank wastes for possible disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as an alternative to disposal in the high-level waste (HLW) repository. Identification of such material is the initial task in a trade study suggested in WHC-EP-0786, Tank Waste Remediation System Decisions and Risk Assessment (Johnson 1994). The scope of this document is limited to the identification of those tanks that might be segregated from the HLW for disposal as TRU, and the bases for that selection. It is assumed that the tank waste will be washed to remove soluble inert material for disposal as low-level waste (LLW), and the washed residual solids will be vitrified for disposal. The actual recommendation of a disposal strategy for these materials will require a detailed cost/benefit analysis and is beyond the scope of this document.

Colburn, R.P.

1995-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

115

High level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Division of Waste Products through a lead office at Savannah River is developing a program to immobilize all US high-level nuclear waste for terminal disposal. DOE high-level wastes include those at the Hanford Plant, the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, and the Savannah River Plant. Commercial high-level wastes, for which DOE is also developing immobilization technology, include those at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant and any future commercial fuels reprocessing plants. The first immobilization plant is to be the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River, scheduled for 1983 project submission to Congress and 1989 operation. Waste forms are still being selected for this plant. Borosilicate glass is currently the reference form, but alternate candidates include concretes, calcines, other glasses, ceramics, and matrix forms.

Crandall, J L

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

High-Level Waste Tank Cleaning and Field Characterization at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is nearing completion of radioactive high-level waste (HLW) retrieval from its storage tanks and subsequent vitrification of the HLW into borosilicate glass. Currently, 99.5% of the sludge radioactivity has been recovered from the storage tanks and vitrified. Waste recovery of cesium-137 (Cs-137) adsorbed on a zeolite media during waste pretreatment has resulted in 97% of this radioactivity being vitrified. Approximately 84% of the original 1.1 x 1018 becquerels (30 million curies) of radioactivity was efficiently vitrified from July 1996 to June 1998 during Phase I processing. The recovery of the last 16% of the waste has been challenging due to a number of factors, primarily the complex internal structural support system within the main 2.8 million liter (750,000 gallon) HLW tank designated 8D-2. Recovery of this last waste has become exponentially more challenging as less and less HLW is available to mobilize and transfer to the Vitrification Facility. This paper describes the progressively more complex techniques being utilized to remove the final small percentage of radioactivity from the HLW tanks, and the multiple characterization technologies deployed to determine the quantity of Cs-137, strontium-90 (Sr-90), and alpha-transuranic (alpha-TRU) radioactivity remaining in the tanks.

Drake, J. L.; McMahon, C. L.; Meess, D. C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

117

Technical Design and Optimization of a HLW-Repository in the Gorleben Salt Dome including Detailed Design of the Sealing System - 13305  

SciTech Connect

The preliminary safety analysis for a HLW repository at Gorleben, the potential repository site in Germany, takes into account an updated set of data on the amounts and types of expected heat generating waste, the documented results of the exploration of the Gorleben salt dome, and the 'Safety Requirements Governing the Final Disposal of Heat-Generating Radioactive Waste' as at 30 September 2010. A repository design was developed for two emplacement concepts (drift disposal and borehole disposal) mainly influenced by the thermal impact of the heat-generating waste on the host rock and taking into account mining constrains. According to the objective to create the conditions for a safe containment of the waste containers in the host rock, a closure concept consisting of backfilling and sealing measures was developed. The repository was designed in such a way that retrievability requirements can be met for all waste containers within the operating phase of the repository. In addition, it could be shown that sufficient measures for ensuring subcriticality are provided both during the operational and the post-closure phases of the repository. (authors)

Bollingerfehr, W.; Filbert, W.; Herold, P.; Lerch, C.; Mueller-Hoeppe, N. [DBE TECHNOLOGY GmbH, Eschenstrasse 55, D-31224 Peine (Germany)] [DBE TECHNOLOGY GmbH, Eschenstrasse 55, D-31224 Peine (Germany); Charlier, F. [International nuclear safety engineering GmbH, Jesuitenstrasse 4, D-52062 Aachen (Germany)] [International nuclear safety engineering GmbH, Jesuitenstrasse 4, D-52062 Aachen (Germany); Kilger, R. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Boltzmannstr. 14, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Boltzmannstr. 14, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

DATA SUMMARY REPORT SMALL SCALE MELTER TESTING OF HLW ALGORITHM GLASSES MATRIX1 TESTS VSL-07S1220-1 REV 0 7/25/07  

SciTech Connect

Eight tests using different HLW feeds were conducted on the DM100-BL to determine the effect of variations in glass properties and feed composition on processing rates and melter conditions (off-gas characteristics, glass processing, foaming, cold cap, etc.) at constant bubbling rate. In over seven hundred hours of testing, the property extremes of glass viscosity, electrical conductivity, and T{sub 1%}, as well as minimum and maximum concentrations of several major and minor glass components were evaluated using glass compositions that have been tested previously at the crucible scale. Other parameters evaluated with respect to glass processing properties were +/-15% batching errors in the addition of glass forming chemicals (GFCs) to the feed, and variation in the sources of boron and sodium used in the GFCs. Tests evaluating batching errors and GFC source employed variations on the HLW98-86 formulation (a glass composition formulated for HLW C-106/AY-102 waste and processed in several previous melter tests) in order to best isolate the effect of each test variable. These tests are outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to the Test Specification for this work. The present report provides summary level data for all of the tests in the first test matrix (Matrix 1) in the Test Plan. Summary results from the remaining tests, investigating minimum and maximum concentrations of major and minor glass components employing variations on the HLW98-86 formulation and glasses generated by the HLW glass formulation algorithm, will be reported separately after those tests are completed. The test data summarized herein include glass production rates, the type and amount of feed used, a variety of measured melter parameters including temperatures and electrode power, feed sample analysis, measured glass properties, and gaseous emissions rates. More detailed information and analysis from the melter tests with complete emission chemistry, glass durability, and melter operating details will be provided in the final report. A summary of the tests that were conducted is provided in Table 1. Each of the seven tests was of nominally one hundred hours in duration. Test B was conducted in two equal segments: the first with nominal additives, and the second with the replacement of borax with a mixture of boric acid and soda ash to determine the effect of alternative OPC sources on production rates and processing characteristics. Interestingly, sugar additions were required near mid points of Tests W and Z to reduce excessive foaming that severely limited feed processing rates. The sugar additions were very effective in recovering manageable processing conditions, albeit over the relatively short remainder of the test duration. Tests W and Z employed the highest melt viscosities but not by a particularly wide margin. Other tests, which did not exhibit such foaming Issues, employed higher concentrations of manganese or iron or both. These results highlight the need for the development of protocols for the a priori determination of which HLW feeds will require sugar additions and the appropriate amounts of sugar to be added in order to control foaming (and maintain throughput) without over-reduction of the melt (which could lead to molten metal formation). In total, over 8,800 kg of feed was processed to produce over 3200 kg of glass. Steady-state processing rates were achieved, and no secondary sulfate phases were observed during any of the tests. Analysis was performed on samples of the glass product taken throughout the tests to verify composition and properties. Sampling and analysis was also performed on melter exhaust to determine the effect of the feed and glass changes on melter emissions.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

119

Microsoft PowerPoint - 9-07 Case Atlanta HLW techexchange.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calcine Disposition Project Calcine Disposition Project Joel Case Calcine Disposition Project Federal Project Director November 17, 2010 Print Close 2 2 Calcine is Solidified First & Other Cycle Raffinates * Resulted in a 7 to 1 volume reduction * Capable of being safely stored for several hundred years in 43 large shielded bins contained in six bin sets Print Close 3 3 Calcine Generation History Campaign Parameters Begin End Volume gal Volume ft 3 Volume m 3 Curies Dec- 63 Mar - 81 4,081,000 77,300 2,189 Aug - 82 May - 00 3,644,000 78,000 2,209 Total 7,725,000 155,300 4,398 3.64E+07 Print Close 4 4 Calcine Solids Storage Facility (CSSF) Status CSSF Bins Capacity (m 3 ) In Use 1 12 227 2 7 851 3 7 1,130 4 3 486 5 7 1,010 6 7 1,506 Sub 43 5,210 Not in Use 7 7 1,784 Total 50 6,994 1 2 3 4 5 6 Print Close 5 Hot Isostatic Press Treatment Technology * The Department Selected Hot Isostatic

120

Molybdenum in Nuclear Waste Glasses -Incorporation and Redox state R.J. Short, R.J. Hand, N.C. Hyatt,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molybdenum in Nuclear Waste Glasses - Incorporation and Redox state R.J. Short, R.J. Hand, N form in simulated high level nuclear waste (HLW) glass melts have been studied. It was found less attention has been paid to the effects of redox on nuclear waste glasses. One particular element

Sheffield, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Application of PCT to the EBR II ceramic waste form.  

SciTech Connect

We are evaluating the use of the Product Consistency Test (PCT) developed to monitor the consistency of borosilicate glass waste forms for application to the multiphase ceramic waste form (CWF) that will be used to immobilize waste salts generated during the electrometallurgical conditioning of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR II). The CWF is a multiphase waste form comprised of about 70% sodalite, 25% borosilicate glass binder, and small amounts of halite and oxide inclusions. It must be qualified for disposal as a non-standard high-level waste (HLW) form. One of the requirements in the DOE Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document (WASRD) for HLW waste forms is that the consistency of the waste forms be monitored.[1] Use of the PCT is being considered for the CWF because of the similarities of the dissolution behaviors of both the sodalite and glass binder phases in the CWF to borosilicate HLW glasses. This paper provides (1) a summary of the approach taken in selecting a consistency test for CWF production and (2) results of tests conducted to measure the precision and sensitivity of the PCT conducted with simulated CWF.

Ebert, W. L.; Lewis, M. A.; Johnson, S. G.

2002-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced mineral calciner Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for hexagonal material... in the Sol-Gel Chemistry of Metal Oxides, Ultrastructure Processing of Advanced Materials; Uhlmann, D. R... at full calcination in air at...

123

Ractivit de l'anode et dsulfuration : effet du niveau de calcination du coke.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Les proprits du coke et la performance des anodes sont affectes par le niveau de calcination du coke. Une densit de coke (VBD) leve implique (more)

Bergeron-Lagac, Charles-Luc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

River Protection Project (RPP) Immobilized High Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document replaces HNF-1751, Revision 1. It incorporates updates to reflect changes in programmatic direction associated with the vitrification plant contract and associated DOE-ORP guidance. In addition it includes planning associated with failed/used melter and sample handling and disposition work scope. The document also includes format modifications and section numbering update consistent with CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. procedures.

BRIGGS, M.G.

2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

125

FINAL REPORT DETERMINATION OF THE PROCESSING RATE OF RPP WTP HLW SIMULANTS USING A DURAMELTER J 1000 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-00R2590-2 REV 0 8/21/00  

SciTech Connect

This report provides data, analysis, and conclusions from a series of tests that were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America (VSL) to determine the melter processing rates that are achievable with RPP-WTP HLW simulants. The principal findings were presented earlier in a summary report (VSL-00R2S90-l) but the present report provides additional details. One of the most critical pieces of information in determining the required size of the RPP-WTP HLW melter is the specific glass production rate in terms of the mass of glass that can be produced per unit area of melt surface per unit time. The specific glass production rate together with the waste loading (essentially, the ratio of waste-in to glass-out, which is determined from glass formulation activities) determines the melt area that is needed to achieve a given waste processing rate with due allowance for system availability. As a consequence of the limited amount of relevant information, there exists, for good reasons, a significant disparity between design-base specific glass production rates for the RPP-WTP LAW and HLW conceptual designs (1.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d and 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d, respectively); furthermore, small-scale melter tests with HLW simulants that were conducted during Part A indicated typical processing rates with bubbling of around 2.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d. This range translates into more than a factor of five variation in the resultant surface area of the HLW melter, which is clearly not without significant consequence. It is clear that an undersized melter is undesirable in that it will not be able to support the required waste processing rates. It is less obvious that there are potential disadvantages associated with an oversized melter, over and above the increased capital costs. A melt surface that is consistently underutilized will have poor cold cap coverage, which will result in increased volatilization from the melt (which is generally undesirable) and increased plenum temperatures due to increased thermal radiation from the melt surface (which mayor may not be desirable but the flexibility to choose may be lost). Increased volatilization is an issue both in terms of the increased challenge to the off-gas system as well as for the ability to effectively close the recycle loops for volatile species that must be immobilized in the glass product, most notably technetium and cesium. For these reasons, improved information is needed on the specific glass production rates of RPP-WTP HLW streams in DuraMelterJ systems over a range of operating conditions. Unlike the RPP-WTP LAW program, for which a pilot melter system to provide large-scale throughout information is already in operation, there is no comparable HLW activity; the results of the present study are therefore especially important. This information will reduce project risk by reducing the uncertainty associated with the amount of conservatism that mayor may not be associated with the baseline RPP-WTP HLW melter sizing decision. After the submission of the first Test Plan for this work, the RPP-WTP requested revisions to include tests to determine the processing rates that are achievable without bubbling, which was driven by the potential advantages of omitting bubblers from the HLW melter design in terms of reduced maintenance. A further objective of this effort became the determination of whether the basis of design processing rate could be achieved without bubbling. Ideally, processing rate tests would be conducted on a full-scale RPP-WTP melter system with actual HLW materials, but that is clearly unrealistic during Part B1. As a practical compromise the processing rate determinations were made with HL W simulants on a DuraMelter J system at as close to full scale as possible and the DM 1000 system at VSL was selected for that purpose. That system has a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}, which corresponds to about one-third scale based on the specific glass processing rate of 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d assumed in the RPP-WTP HLW conceptual design, but would correspon

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEREZ-CARDENAS F; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

126

Method of preparing nuclear wastes for tansportation and interim storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is formed into a substantially water-insoluble solid for temporary storage and transportation by mixing the calcined waste with at least 10 weight percent powdered anhydrous sodium silicate to form a mixture and subjecting the mixture to a high humidity environment for a period of time sufficient to form cementitious bonds by chemical reaction. The method is suitable for preparing an interim waste form from dried high level radioactive wastes.

Bandyopadhyay, Gautam (Naperville, IL); Galvin, Thomas M. (Darien, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Effect of calcination temperature on the photocatalytic reduction and oxidation processes of hydrothermally synthesized titania nanotubes.  

SciTech Connect

Titania nanotubes having diameters 8 to 12 nm and lengths of 50-300 nm were prepared using a hydrothermal method. Further, the titania nanotubes were calcined over the temperature range 200-800 C in order to enhance their photocatalytic properties by altering their morphology. The calcined titania nanotubes were characterized by using X-ray diffraction and surface area analysis and their morphological features were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Nanotubes calcined at 400 C showed the maximum extent of photocatalyitc reduction of carbon dioxide to methane, whereas samples calcined at 600 C produced maximum photocatalytic oxidation of acetaldehyde. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to interrogate the effects of nanotube structure on the charge separation and trapping as a function of calcination temperature. EPR results indicated that undercoordinated titania sites are associated with maximum CO{sub 2} reduction occurring in nanotubes calcined at 400 C. Despite the collapse of the nantube structure to form nanorods and the concomitant loss of surface area, the enhanced charge separation associated with increased crystallinity promoted high rates of oxidation of acetaldehyde in titania materials calcined at 600 C. These results illustrate that calcination temperature allows us to tune the morphological and surface features of the titania nanostructures for particular photocatalytic reactions.

Viayan, B.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Rajh, T.; Gray, K.; Northwestern Univ.

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

128

Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume  

SciTech Connect

This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

129

LITERATURE REVIEW OF PUO2 CALCINATION TIME AND TEMPERATURE DATA FOR SPECIFIC SURFACE AREA  

SciTech Connect

The literature has been reviewed in December 2011 for calcination data of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from plutonium oxalate Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} precipitation with respect to the PuO{sub 2} specific surface area (SSA). A summary of the literature is presented for what are believed to be the dominant factors influencing SSA, the calcination temperature and time. The PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} calcination data from this review has been regressed to better understand the influence of calcination temperature and time on SSA. Based on this literature review data set, calcination temperature has a bigger impact on SSA versus time. However, there is still some variance in this data set that may be reflecting differences in the plutonium oxalate preparation or different calcination techniques. It is evident from this review that additional calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} needs to be collected and evaluated to better define the relationship. The existing data set has a lot of calcination times that are about 2 hours and therefore may be underestimating the impact of heating time on SSA. SRNL recommends that more calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} be collected and this literature review data set be augmented to better refine the relationship between PuO{sub 2} SSA and its calcination parameters.

Daniel, G.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

130

Hight-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition Final High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement You are here: DOE-ID Home > Environmental Management > Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) Table of Contents Documents are in the Adobe® PDF format and require the Adobe® Reader to access them. If you do not currently have the Acrobat Reader, you can download the Free Adobe Reader at http://get.adobe.com/reader/ Icon link to Free Adobe Acrobat Reader software * Large chapters broken down into sections Summary* Cover [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 1.48 MB] Section, 1.0 [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 612 KB] Section, 2.0 [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 251 KB] Sections, 3.0 - 3.2.1a [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 1.4 MB] Section, 3.2.1b [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 2.0 MB] Sections, 3.2.2 - 4.0 [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 1.4 MB]

131

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF WASTE GLASS MELTER FEEDS  

SciTech Connect

Melter feeds for high-level nuclear waste (HLW) typically contain a large number of constituents that evolve gas on heating, Multiple gas-evolving reactions are both successive and simultaneous, and include the release of chemically bonded water, reactions of nitrates with organics, and reactions of molten salts with solid silica. Consequently, when a sample of a HLW feed is subjected to thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), the rate of change of the sample mass reveals multiple overlapping peaks. In this study, a melter feed, formulated for a simulated high-alumina HLW to be vitrified in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, currently under construction at the Hanford Site in Washington State, USA, was subjected to TGA. In addition, a modified melter feed was prepared as an all-nitrate version of the baseline feed to test the effect of sucrose addition on the gas-evolving reactions. Activation energies for major reactions were determined using the Kissinger method. The ultimate aim of TGA studies is to obtain a kinetic model of the gas-evolving reactions for use in mathematical modeling of the cold cap as an element of the overall model of the waste-glass melter. In this study, we focused on computing the kinetic parameters of individual reactions without identifying their actual chemistry, The rough provisional model presented is based on the first-order kinetics.

KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; POKORNY R; PIERCE DA

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

132

Development of an Advanced Combined Heat and Power (CHP) System Utilizing Off-Gas from Coke Calcination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Coke calcination is a process that involves the heating of green petroleum coke in order to remove volatile material and purify the coke for further processing. Calcined coke is vital to the...

133

Iron Phosphate Glasses for Vitrifying DOE High Priority Nuclear Wastes  

SciTech Connect

Iron phosphate glasses have been studied as an alternative glass for vitrifying Department of Energy (DOE) high priority wastes. The high priority wastes were the Low Activity Waste (LAW) and the High Level Waste (HLW) with high chrome content stored at Hanford, WA, and the Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. These wastes were recommended by Tanks Focus Area since they were expected to require special attention when vitrified in borosilicate glasses. All three of these wastes have been successfully vitrified in iron phosphate glasses at waste loadings ranging from a low of 32 wt% for the high sulfate LAW to 40 wt% for the SBW to a high of 75 wt% for the high chrome HLW. In addition to these desirable high waste loadings, the iron phosphate glasses were easily melted, typically between 950 and 1200 C, in less than 4 hours in commercial refractory oxide containers. It is noteworthy that the chemical durability of both glassy and deliberately crystallized iron phosphate wasteforms not only met, but significantly exceeded, all current DOE chemical durability requirements as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and Vapor Hydration Test (VHT). The high waste loading, low melting temperature, rapid furnace throughput (short melting time) and their outstanding chemical durability could significantly accelerate the clean up effort and reduce the time and cost of vitrifying these high priority wastes.

Kim, C.W.; Day, D.E.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Summary of Properties Used to Evaluate INEEL Calcine Disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect

To support evaluations of the direct disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory calcines to the repository at Yucca Mountain, an evaluation of the performance of the calcine in the repository environment must be performed. This type of evaluation demonstrates, through computer modeling and analysis, the impact the calcine would have on the ability of the repository to perform its function of containment of materials during the repository lifetime. This report discusses parameters that were used in the scoping evaluation conducted in FY 2003. It provides nominal values for the parameters, with explanation of the source of the values, and how the values were modified for use in repository analysis activities.

Dahl, C.A.

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

Characteristics of potential repository wastes. Volume 3, Appendix 3A, ORIGEN2 decay tables for immobilized high-level waste; Appendix 3B, Interim high-level waste forms  

SciTech Connect

This appendix presents the results of decay calculations using the ORIGEN2 code to determine the radiological properties of canisters of immobilized high-level waste as a function of decay time for decay times up to one million years. These calculations were made for the four HLW sites (West Valley Demonstration Project, Savannah River Site, Hanford Site, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) using the composition data discussed in the HLW section of this report. Calculated ({alpha},n) neutron production rates are also shown.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Hanford Tank Waste - Near Source Treatment of Low Activity Waste  

SciTech Connect

Treatment and disposition of Hanford Site waste as currently planned consists of I 00+ waste retrievals, waste delivery through up to 8+ miles of dedicated, in-ground piping, centralized mixing and blending operations- all leading to pre-treatment combination and separation processes followed by vitrification at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The sequential nature of Tank Farm and WTP operations requires nominally 15-20 years of continuous operations before all waste can be retrieved from many Single Shell Tanks (SSTs). Also, the infrastructure necessary to mobilize and deliver the waste requires significant investment beyond that required for the WTP. Treating waste as closely as possible to individual tanks or groups- as allowed by the waste characteristics- is being investigated to determine the potential to 1) defer, reduce, and/or eliminate infrastructure requirements, and 2) significantly mitigate project risk by reducing the potential and impact of single point failures. The inventory of Hanford waste slated for processing and disposition as LAW is currently managed as high-level waste (HLW), i.e., the separation of fission products and other radionuclides has not commenced. A significant inventory ofthis waste (over 20M gallons) is in the form of precipitated saltcake maintained in single shell tanks, many of which are identified as potential leaking tanks. Retrieval and transport (as a liquid) must be staged within the waste feed delivery capability established by site infrastructure and WTP. Near Source treatment, if employed, would provide for the separation and stabilization processing necessary for waste located in remote farms (wherein most ofthe leaking tanks reside) significantly earlier than currently projected. Near Source treatment is intended to address the currently accepted site risk and also provides means to mitigate future issues likely to be faced over the coming decades. This paper describes the potential near source treatment and waste disposition options as well as the impact these options could have on reducing infrastructure requirements, project cost and mission schedule.

Ramsey, William Gene

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

The results of HLW processing using zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Zirconium salt of dibutyl-phosphoric acid (ZS HDBP) dissolved in a diluent, is a promising solvent for liquid HLW processing. The investigations carried out earlier showed that ZS HDBP can recover a series of radionuclides (TPE, RE, U, Pu, Np, Sr) and some other elements (Mo, Ca, Fe) from aqueous solutions. The possibility of TPE and RE effective recovery and separation into appropriate fractions with high purification from each other was demonstrated as well. The results of extraction tests in the mixer-settlers in the course of liquid HLW treatment in hot cells, using ZS HDBP (0.4 M HDBP and 0.044 M Zr) dissolved in 30% TBP are presented. 30 liters of the feed solution containing TPE, RE, Sr and Cs with the total specific activity of 520 MBq/L and acidity of 2 M HNO{sub 3} were processed using the two-cycle flowsheet. TPE and RE recovery with subsequent stripping was realized in the first cycle, while Sr was recovered and concentrated in the second cycle. Raffinate of the latter contained almost all Cs. The degree of TPE and RE recovery was 104, and that of Sr was {approx}10. Decontamination factor of TPE and RE from Cs and Sr was 104, and that of Sr from TPE and Cs was 103. So, ZS HDBP can be used for separation of long-lived radionuclides from HLW with respect to radio-toxic category of the process products. (authors)

Fedorov, Yury; Zilberman, Boris; Shmidt, Olga; Saprikin, Vladimir; Ryasantsev, Valery [V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute, 194021, 28, 2nd Murinsky pr., Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

GLASS FORMULATION FOR THE HANFORD TANK WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT (WTP)  

SciTech Connect

A computational method for formulating Hanford HLW glasses was developed that is based on empirical glass composition-property models, accounts for all associated uncertainties, and can be solved in Excel{sup R} in minutes. Calculations for all waste form processing and compliance requirements included. Limited experimental validation performed.

KRUGER AA; VIENNA JD; KIM DS; JAIN V

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

139

An evaluation of neutralization for processing sodium-bearing liquid waste  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses an alternative concept for potentially managing the sodium-bearing liquid waste generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from the current method of calcining a blend of sodium waste and high-level liquid waste. The concept is based on removing the radioactive components from sodium-bearing waste by neutralization and grouting the resulting low-level waste for on-site near-surface disposal. Solidifying the sodium waste as a remote-handled transuranic waste is not considered to be practical because of excessive costs and inability to dispose of the waste in a timely fashion. Although neutralization can remove most radioactive components to provide feed for a solidified low-level waste, and can reduce liquid inventories four to nine years more rapidly than the current practice of blending sodium-bearing liquid waste with first-cycle raffinite, the alternative will require major new facilities and will generate large volumes of low-level waste. Additional facility and operating costs are estimated to be at least $500 million above the current practice of blending and calcining. On-site, low-level waste disposal may be technically difficult and conflict which national and state policies. Therefore, it is recommended that the current practice of calcining a blend of sodium-bearing liquid waste and high-level liquid waste be continued to minimize overall cost and process complexities. 17 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

Chipman, N.A.; Engelgau, G.O.; Berreth, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Secondary Waste Forms and Technetium Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secondary Waste Forms and Secondary Waste Forms and Technetium Management Joseph H. Westsik, Jr. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory EM HLW Corporate Board Meeting November 18, 2010 What are Secondary Wastes? Process condensates and scrubber and/or off-gas treatment liquids from the pretreatment and ILAW melter facilities at the Hanford WTP. Sent from WTP to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for treatment and disposal Treated liquid effluents under the ETF State Wastewater Discharge Permit Solidified liquid effluents under the Dangerous Waste Permit for disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to ETF to provide capacity for WTP secondary liquid wastes 2 Evaporator Condensate Solution Evaporator Pretreatment Melter SBS/ WESP Secondary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

17 - Immobilisation of Radioactive Waste in Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radionuclide immobilisation mechanisms are examined for vitreous wasteforms. Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are described in detail, including the ability of cations to enter into the glass network structure. The role of various cations is considered, including boron, intermediates, and modifiers and elements difficult to immobilise. Selection rules for designing nuclear wasteform silicate glasses are outlined. Glass composite materials to immobilise glass-immiscible waste components are discussed. Both one- and two-stage vitrification technologies are described. An overview is given of the development of vitrification technology, including current operational data on radioactive waste vitrification facilities. Calcination processes are considered in detail, including typical properties of waste calcination products. Recent developments in vitrification are given, including descriptions of cold crucible induction-heated melters and in situ vitrification. Limitations caused by radionuclide volatility are examined. Acceptance criteria are given for vitreous wasteforms.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Transportation Stakeholders National Transportation Stakeholders National Transportation Stakeholders National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Forum 2011 Annual Meeting 2011 Annual Meeting 2011 Annual Meeting 2011 Annual Meeting May 11, 2011 May 11, 2011 Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & & & & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Task: Task: Task: Task: Identify Shortline Railroads Serving Nuclear Power Plants Identify Shortline Railroads Serving Nuclear Power Plants

143

Waste Treatment Plant - 12508  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium-ion exchange columns, evaporator boilers and recirculation pumps, and various mechanical process pumps for transferring process fluids. During the first phase of pretreatment, the waste will be concentrated using an evaporation process. Solids will be filtered out, and the remaining soluble, highly radioactive isotopes will be removed using an ion-exchange process. The high-level solids will be sent to the High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility, and the low activity liquids will be sent to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility for further processing. The high-level waste will be transferred via underground pipes to the HLW Facility from the Pretreatment Facility. The waste first arrives at the wet cell, which rests inside a black-cell area. The pretreated waste is transferred through shielded pipes into a series of melter preparation and feed vessels before reaching the melters. Liquids from various facility processes also return to the wet cell for interim storage before recycling back to the Pretreatment Facility. (authors)

Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

High Level Waste management in Asia: R&D perspectives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present work is an attempt to provide an overview, about the status of R&D and current trends in HLW management in Asian countries. The INIS database was selected for this purpose. Appropriate query formulations on the database, resulted in the retrieval of 4322 unique bibliographic records. Using the content analysis method, all the records were analyzed. Part One of the analysis details Scientometric R&D indicators, Part Two is a subject-based analysis, grouped under: A. Spent Fuel Recovery & Partitioning B. Waste Immobilization C. Waste Disposal and D. Waste Packaging Materials. The results of this analysis are summarized in the study.

Sangeeta Deokattey; K. Bhanumurthy; P.K. Wattal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission W. R. Wilmarth March 5 2009 March 5, 2009 HLW Corporate Board Phoenix AZ HLW Corporate Board, Phoenix, AZ Co-authors M. E. Johnson, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company G. Lumetta, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory N Machara DOE Office of Engineering and Technology N. Machara, DOE Office of Engineering and Technology M. R. Poirier, Savannah River National Laboratory P C S DOE S h Ri P. C. Suggs, DOE Savannah River M. C. Thompson, Savannah River National Laboratory, Retired Retired 2 Background Separations is a fundamental business within DOE. The role of separations today is to expedite waste retrieval The role of separations today is to expedite waste retrieval, processing and closure. Recognized as part of E&T Roadmap

146

Nuclear Safety R&D in the Waste Processing Technology Development & Deployment Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R&D in the Waste Processing R&D in the Waste Processing Technology Development & Deployment Program Presentation to the DOE High Level Waste Corporate Board July 29, 2009 Al Baione Office of Waste Processing DOE-EM Office of Engineering & Technology 2 Outline Nuclear Safety Research & Development Overview Summary of EM- NSR&D Presentations from February 2009 Evaluating Performance of Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters under Fire/Smoke Challenge Conditions Structural Integrity Initiative for HLW Tanks Pipeline Plugging and Prevention Advanced Mixing Models Basic Science Opportunities in HLW Storage and Processing Safety Cementitious Barriers Partnership 3 Nuclear Safety Research & Development Overview DNFSB 2004-1 identified need for renewed DOE attention to nuclear safety R&D

147

Nuclear Waste Assessment System for Technical Evaluation (NUWASTE)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NWTRB NWTRB www.nwtrb.gov U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board: Roles and Priorities Presented by: Nigel Mote, Executive Director, U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board May 14, 2013 Hyatt Regency Buffalo, Buffalo, NY. Presented to: National Transportation Stakeholders' Forum NWTRB www.nwtrb.gov U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board The Board's Statutory Mandate * The 1987 amendments to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) established the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. * The Board evaluates the technical and scientific validity of DOE activities related to implementing the NWPA, including: - transportation, packaging, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW)

148

Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) provides that certain waste from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is not considered high-level waste (HLW) if the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), determines that the waste meets the statutory criteria set forth in Section 3116(a). Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination More Documents & Publications EIS-0287: Amended Record of Decision Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-296-B Rainbow Energy Marketing Corp: Federal Register Notice, Volume 77, No. 66 - April 4, 2012 SRS FTF Section 3116 Basis for Determination

149

Reevaluation of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria for Potential Cost Savings at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13598  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form. (authors)

Ray, J.W. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation (United States); Marra, S.L.; Herman, C.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Reevaluation Of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria For Potential Cost Savings At The Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form.

Ray, J. W.; Marra, S. L.; Herman, C. C.

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

151

Accelerator-driven transmutation of plutonium and nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate disposition of spent reactor fuel and processed high-level nuclear waste (HLW) has been a subject of much concern and little progress since the dawn of the nuclear era. In the United States today, the spent fuel from more than 110 commercial light water reactors continues to be stored onsite while highly toxic liquid HLW continues to be stored in tanks at several U.S. Department of Energy sites. The management policy that has been followed in the United States for the past 12 yr is defined by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982 and its subsequent amendment of 1987. The NWPA requires the disposal of spent fuel assemblies in geologic waste repositories, the first of which will presumably be located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The pace of the process for implementing the Yucca Mountain repository discussed in a recent General Accounting Office (GAO) assessment, remains frustratingly slow. By GAO estimation, an operational permanent waste repository at Yucca Mountain could be delayed beyond the 2020 time frame. The approach to formulating an acceptable HLW disposal strategy has always involved serious consideration of nonproliferation issues. Most recently, the nuclear weapon build-down following the Cold War has stimulated the need for the United States and Russia to dispose of surplus plutonium. Consideration of this has motivated (a) a recognition that all plutonium is a proliferation hazard and (b) a renewed debate on the best approach to dispose of plutonium in general. From an international perspective, there is little agreement on the best strategy for the ultimate disposition of HLW and plutonium. This paper discusses the concept of transmutation of plutonium.

Berwald, D.H. [Grumman Aerospace Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Evaluation of Options for Permanent Geologic Disposal of Spent NuclearFuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

[In Support of a Comprehensive National Nuclear Fuel Cycle Strategy, Volumes I and II (Appendices)] This study provides a technical basis for informing policy decisions regarding strategies for the management and permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in the United States requiring geologic isolation.

153

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah Savannah River Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 1 November 6, 2008 Presentation By Sherri R. Ross Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office The Issue * How clean is clean? * Ultimate Challenge - Justify highly radioactive radionuclides have been removed to the maximum extent practical? 2 removed to the maximum extent practical? - Building compelling regulatory documentation that will withstand intense scrutiny §3116 Requirements 1. Does not require disposal in deep geological repository 2. Highly radioactive radionuclides removed to the maximum extent practical 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 3 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C 4. Waste disposed pursuant to a State-approved closure plan or permit Note: If it is anticipated that Class C disposal limits will be exceeded, additional

154

High Level Waste System Impacts from Small Column Ion Exchange Implementation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this task is to identify potential waste streams that could be treated with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) and perform an initial assessment of the impact of doing so on the High-Level Waste (HLW) system. Design of the SCIX system has been performed as a backup technology for decontamination of High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SCIX consists of three modules which can be placed in risers inside underground HLW storage tanks. The pump and filter module and the ion exchange module are used to filter and decontaminate the aqueous tank wastes for disposition in Saltstone. The ion exchange module contains Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST in its engineered granular form is referred to as IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911), and is selective for removal of cesium ions. After the IE-911 is loaded with Cs-137, it is removed and the column is refilled with a fresh batch. The grinder module is used to size-reduce the cesium-loaded IE-911 to make it compatible with the sludge vitrification system in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). If installed at the SRS, this SCIX would need to operate within the current constraints of the larger HLW storage, retrieval, treatment, and disposal system. Although the equipment has been physically designed to comply with system requirements, there is also a need to identify which waste streams could be treated, how it could be implemented in the tank farms, and when this system could be incorporated into the HLW flowsheet and planning. This document summarizes a preliminary examination of the tentative HLW retrieval plans, facility schedules, decontamination factor targets, and vitrified waste form compatibility, with recommendations for a more detailed study later. The examination was based upon four batches of salt solution from the currently planned disposition pathway to treatment in the SCIX. Because of differences in capabilities between the SRS baseline and SCIX, these four batches were combined into three batches for a total of about 3.2 million gallons of liquid waste. The chemical and radiological composition of these batches was estimated from the SpaceMan Plus{trademark} model using the same data set and assumptions as the baseline plans.

McCabe, D. J.; Hamm, L. L.; Aleman, S. E.; Peeler, D. K.; Herman, C. C.; Edwards, T. B.

2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

155

DECONTAMINATION OF PLUTONIUM FOR FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE DURING OXALATE PRECIPITATION, FILTRATION AND CALCINATION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

Due to analytical limitations for the determination of fluoride (F) and chloride (Cl) in a previous anion exchange study, an additional study of the decontamination of Pu from F and Cl by oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination was performed. Anion product solution from the previous impurity study was precipitated as an oxalate, filtered, and calcined to produce an oxide for analysis by pyrohydrolysis for total Cl and F. Analysis of samples from this experiment achieved the purity specification for Cl and F for the proposed AFS-2 process. Decontamination factors (DF's) for the overall process (including anion exchange) achieved a DF of {approx}5000 for F and a DF of {approx}100 for Cl. Similar experiments where both HF and HCl were spiked into the anion product solution to a {approx}5000 {micro}g /g Pu concentration showed a DF of 5 for F and a DF of 35 for Cl across the combined precipitation-filtration-calcination process steps.

Kyser, E.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

156

Vitrification of High-Level Alumina Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Borophosphate glass compositions have been developed for the vitrification of a high alumina calcined defense waste. The effect of substituting SiO2 and P2O5 for B2O3 on the viscosity and leach resistance was mea...

J. R. Brotzman

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants By Fluidized Beds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This is particularly true in the cement industry. Cement manufacture consists of mining and grinding rocks, melting them to form clinkers, then grinding those clinkers to a powder. Through recovery of waste heat and inclusion of technology such as flash calciners...

Fraley, L. D.; Ksiao, H. K.; Thunem, C. B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 1 (CDP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT OF THE CALCINE DISPOSITION PROJECT VOLUME ONE Anthony F. Kluk Hoyt C. Johnson Clyde Phillip McGinnis Michael Rinker Steven L. Ross Herbert G. Sutter John Vienna February 2011 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC February 2011 ii This page intentionally left blank. Review of Calcine Disposition Project Self-Assessment of Technology Maturation iii SIGNATURES ____________________________________ ____________________________________ Anthony F. Kluk, Team Lead Date ____________________________________ ____________________________________ Hoyt C. Johnson Date ____________________________________ ____________________________________ Clyde Phillip McGinnis Date ____________________________________ ____________________________________

159

FINAL REPORT INTEGRATED DM1200 MELTER TESTING OF BUBBLER CONFIGURATIONS USING HLW AZ-101 SIMULANTS VSL-04R4800-4 REV 0 10/5/04  

SciTech Connect

This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of AZ-101 HLW simulants. The tests reported herein are a subset of six tests from a larger series of tests described in the Test Plan for the work; results from the other tests have been reported separately. The solids contents of the melter feeds were based on the WTP baseline value for the solids content of the feeds from pretreatment which changed during these tests from 20% to 15% undissolved solids resulting in tests conducted at two feed solids contents. Based on the results of earlier tests with single outlet 'J' bubblers, initial tests were performed with a total bubbling rate of 651 pm. The first set of tests (Tests 1A-1E) addressed the effects of skewing this total air flow rate back and forth between the two installed bubblers in comparison to a fixed equal division of flow between them. The second set of tests (2A-2D) addressed the effects of bubbler depth. Subsequently, as the location, type and number of bubbling outlets were varied, the optimum bubbling rate for each was determined. A third (3A-3C) and fourth (8A-8C) set of tests evaluated the effects of alternative bubbler designs with two gas outlets per bubbler instead of one by placing four bubblers in positions simulating multiple-outlet bubblers. Data from the simulated multiple outlet bubblers were used to design bubblers with two outlets for an additional set of tests (9A-9C). Test 9 was also used to determine the effect of small sugar additions to the feed on ruthenium volatility. Another set of tests (10A-10D) evaluated the effects on production rate of spiking the feed with chloride and sulfate. Variables held constant to the extent possible included melt temperature, plenum temperature, cold cap coverage, the waste simulant composition, and the target glass composition. The feed rate was increased to the point that a constant, essentially complete, cold cap was achieved, which was used as an indicator of a maximized feed rate for each test. The first day of each test was used to build the cold cap and decrease the plenum temperature. The remainder of each test was split into two- to six-day segments, each with a different bubbling rate, bubbler orientation, or feed concentration of chloride and sulfur.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; LUTZE W; CALLOW RA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

160

Performance Assessment Modeling for Savannah River Glass HLW Disposal in a Potential Repository at Yucca Mountain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance assessment (PA) simulates the long-term performance of a conceptual geological repository for nuclear waste or the performance of a subsystem such as the engineered barrier system (drifts, waste pa...

W. J. OConnell; W. L. Bourcier; J. Gansemer

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Summary - Flowsheet for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment Plant Waste Treatment Plant ETR Report Date: March 2006 ETR-1 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Flowsheet for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 53 million gallons of radioactive waste, separate it into high- and low-activity fractions, and produce canisters of high-level (HLW) glass (left) and containers of low-activity waste (LAW) glass (right). At the time of this review, the Plant was at approximately 70% design and 30% construction completion. The external review objective was to determine how well the WTP would meet its throughput capacities based on the current design,

162

Clean option: An alternative strategy for Hanford Tank Waste Remediation  

SciTech Connect

Plans for remediation of the Hanford underground storage tanks are currently undergoing reevaluation. As part of this process, many options are being considered for the Tank Waste Remediation System (MRS). The clean option'' described here proposes an aggressive waste processing strategy to achieve the three ma or objectives: Greatly reduce the volume of high-level waste (HLW) to lessen demands on geologic repository space; decrease by several orders of magnitude the amount of radioactivity and toxicity now in the waste tanks that will be left permanently onsite as low-level solid waste (LLW); and accomplish the first two objectives without significantly increasing the total amount of waste for disposal. The study discussed here focuses on process chemistry, as it provides the foundation for achieving the clean option objectives. Because demonstrated separation steps have been identified and connected in a way that meets these objectives, the study concludes that the process chemistry rests on a firm technical basis.

Straalsund, J.L.; Swanson, J.L.; Baker, E.G.; Jones, E.O.; Kuhn, W.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Holmes, J.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hot isostatic press waste option study report  

SciTech Connect

A Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant be treated so that it is ready to move out of Idaho for disposal by the target date of 2035. This study investigates the immobilization of all Idaho Chemical Processing Plant calcine, including calcined sodium bearing waste, via the process known as hot isostatic press, which produces compact solid waste forms by means of high temperature and pressure (1,050 C and 20,000 psi), as the treatment method for complying with the settlement agreement. The final waste product would be contained in stainless-steel canisters, the same type used at the Savannah River Site for vitrified waste, and stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory until a national geological repository becomes available for its disposal. The waste processing period is from 2013 through 2032, and disposal at the High Level Waste repository will probably begin sometime after 2065.

Russell, N.E.; Taylor, D.D.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

INTEGRATED DM 1200 MELTER TESTING OF HLW C-106/AY-102 COMPOSITION USING BUBBLERS VSL-03R3800-1 REV 0 9/15/03  

SciTech Connect

This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post test inspections of system components.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

165

7 - Assessing and modelling the performance of nuclear waste and associated packages for long-term management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Examples of analytical approaches and methodologies for modelling the behaviour of waste forms and waste package metals in long-term management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) are presented. Two cases, long-term geological disposal and interim extended dry storage, are considered. The integrity of the waste package (or canister) that serves as a barrier is dependent upon the performance of construction metals. Corrosion degradation modes of the construction metals are evaluated. The waste behaviour during SNF degradation is also evaluated. In each mode of corrosion or degradation, the associated risk insights are discussed in the system performance of disposal or storage.

T.M. Ahn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

High Level Waste Management Division High-Level Waste System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

describes the HLW Program that will vitrify all HLW contained in the old and new-style tanks by FY2028. The canister production rate is projected to average 200 canisters per...

167

Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data: Biannual report, August 1987--January 1988  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) evaluations on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW). The waste package is a proposed engineered barrier that is part of a permanent repository for HLW. Metal alloys are the principal barriers within the engineered system. Since enactment of the Budget Reconciliation Act for Fiscal Year 1988, the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site (in which tuff is the geologic medium) is the only site that will be characterized for use as high-level nuclear waste repository. During the reporting period of August 1987 to January 1988, five reviews were completed for tuff, and these were grouped into the categories: ferrous alloys, copper, groundwater chemistry, and glass. Two issues are identified for the Yucca Mountain site: the approach used to calculate corrosion rates for ferrous alloys, and crevice corrosion was observed in a copper-nickel alloy. Plutonium can form pseudo-colloids that may facilitate transport. NBS work related to the vitrification of HLW borosilicate glass at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and activities of the DOE Materials Characterization Center (MCC) for the 6-month reporting period are also included. 27 refs., 3 figs.

Interrante, C.; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.; Ondik, H.; Plante, E.; Ricker, R.; Ruspi, J.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

169

HIGH-LEVEL WASTE FEED CERTIFICATION IN HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANKS  

SciTech Connect

The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. DOE's River Protection Project (RPP) mission modeling and WTP facility modeling assume that individual 3785 cubic meter (l million gallon) HLW feed tanks are homogenously mixed, representatively sampled, and consistently delivered to the WTP. It has been demonstrated that homogenous mixing ofHLW sludge in Hanford DSTs is not likely achievable with the baseline design thereby causing representative sampling and consistent feed delivery to be more difficult. Inconsistent feed to the WTP could cause additional batch-to-batch operational adjustments that reduce operating efficiency and have the potential to increase the overall mission length. The Hanford mixing and sampling demonstration program will identify DST mixing performance capability, will evaluate representative sampling techniques, and will estimate feed batch consistency. An evaluation of demonstration program results will identify potential mission improvement considerations that will help ensure successful mission completion. This paper will discuss the history, progress, and future activities that will define and mitigate the mission risk.

THIEN MG; WELLS BE; ADAMSON DJ

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

170

Technologies for destruction of long-lived radionuclides in high-level nuclear waste - overview and requirements  

SciTech Connect

A major issue surrounding current nuclear power generation is the management and disposal of long-lived, high-level waste (HLW). The planned and scientifically acceptable destination for this waste is in deep underground, geologically stable, repositories. However, public concerns surrounding such disposal of long-lived nuclear wastes and other issues such as proliferation and safety negatively affect the potential role that nuclear power can play in meeting current and future national energy needs. This paper and this topical session on nuclear waste minimization, management, and remediation focus on two nuclear systems and their associated technologies that have the potential to address concerns surrounding long-lived radionuclides in HLW. Both systems offer technology applicable to HLW from current light water reactors (LWRs). In addition, these systems represent advanced nuclear power concepts that have important features associated with integrated management of wastes long-term fuel supplies, and enhanced safety. The first system is the integral fast reactor (IFR) concept. This system incorporates a metal-fueled fast reactor coupled with chemical separations based on pyroprocessing to produce power while burning long-lived actinide waste. The IFR applications include the burning of actinides from current LWR spent fuel and energy production in a breeder environment. The second concept, accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW), is based on an accelerator-induced intense source of thermal neutrons and is aimed at the destruction of long-lived actinides and fission products. This concept can be applied to long-lived radionuclides in spent-fuel HLW as well as a future fission power source built around use of natural thorium or uranium as fuels coupled with concurrent waste destruction.

Arthur, E.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

RECENT PROCESS AND EQUIPMENT IMPROVEMENTS TO INCREASE HIGH LEVEL WASTE THROUGHPUT AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began stabilizing high level waste (HLW) in a glass matrix in 1996. Over the past few years, there have been several process and equipment improvements at the DWPF to increase the rate at which the high level waste can be stabilized. These improvements have either directly increased waste processing rates or have desensitized the process to upsets, thereby minimizing downtime and increasing production. Improvements due to optimization of waste throughput with increased HLW loading of the glass resulted in a 6% waste throughput increase based upon operational efficiencies. Improvements in canister production include the pour spout heated bellows liner (5%), glass surge (siphon) protection software (2%), melter feed pump software logic change to prevent spurious interlocks of the feed pump with subsequent dilution of feed stock (2%) and optimization of the steam atomized scrubber (SAS) operation to minimize downtime (3%) for a total increase in canister production of 12%. A number of process recovery efforts have allowed continued operation. These include the off gas system pluggage and restoration, slurry mix evaporator (SME) tank repair and replacement, remote cleaning of melter top head center nozzle, remote melter internal inspection, SAS pump J-Tube recovery, inadvertent pour scenario resolutions, dome heater transformer bus bar cooling water leak repair and new Infra-red camera for determination of glass height in the canister are discussed.

Odriscoll, R; Allan Barnes, A; Jim Coleman, J; Timothy Glover, T; Robert Hopkins, R; Dan Iverson, D; Jeff Leita, J

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Final Report - Sulfate Solubility in RPP-WTP HLW Glasses, VSL-06R6780-1, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of work and testing specified by Test Specifications 24590-HLW-TSP-RT-01-006 Rev 1, Test Plans VSL-02T7800-1 Rev 1 and Test Exceptions 24590-HLW-TEF-RT-05-00007. The work and any associated testing followed established quality assurance requirements and were conducted as authorized. The descriptions provided in this report are an accurate account of both the conduct of the work and the data collected. Results required by the Test Plans are reported. Also reported are any unusual or anomalous occurrences that are different from the starting hypotheses. The test results and this report have been reviewed and verified.

Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Feng, A.; Gan, H.; Kot, W. K.

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

173

PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this calculation is to provide a dose consequence analysis of high-level waste (HLW) consisting of plutonium immobilized in vitrified HLW to be handled at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain for a beyond design basis event (BDBE) under expected conditions using best estimate values for each calculation parameter. In addition to the dose calculation, a plutonium respirable particle size for dose calculation use is derived. The current concept for this waste form is plutonium disks enclosed in cans immobilized in canisters of vitrified HLW (i.e., glass). The plutonium inventory at risk used for this calculation is selected from Plutonium Immobilization Project Input for Yucca Mountain Total Systems Performance Assessment (Shaw 1999). The BDBE examined in this calculation is a nonmechanistic initiating event and the sequence of events that follow to cause a radiological release. This analysis will provide the radiological releases and dose consequences for a postulated BDBE. Results may be considered in other analyses to determine or modify the safety classification and quality assurance level of repository structures, systems, and components. This calculation uses best available technical information because the BDBE frequency is very low (i.e., less than 1.0E-6 events/year) and is not required for License Application for the Monitored Geologic Repository. The results of this calculation will not be used as part of a licensing or design basis.

J.A. Ziegler

2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

Management of nuclear materials and non-HLW | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the consolidation and disposition of nuclear materials, including plutonium, uranium, and nuclear waste in accordance with applicable statutes, DOE Orders and international...

175

Performance Assessment Uncertainty Analysis for Japan's HLW Program Feasibility Study (H12)  

SciTech Connect

Most HLW programs in the world recognize that any estimate of long-term radiological performance must be couched in terms of the uncertainties derived from natural variation, changes through time and lack of knowledge about the essential processes. The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute followed a relatively standard procedure to address two major categories of uncertainty. First, a FEatures, Events and Processes (FEPs) listing, screening and grouping activity was pursued in order to define the range of uncertainty in system processes as well as possible variations in engineering design. A reference and many alternative cases representing various groups of FEPs were defined and individual numerical simulations performed for each to quantify the range of conceptual uncertainty. Second, parameter distributions were developed for the reference case to represent the uncertainty in the strength of these processes, the sequencing of activities and geometric variations. Both point estimates using high and low values for individual parameters as well as a probabilistic analysis were performed to estimate parameter uncertainty. A brief description of the conceptual model uncertainty analysis is presented. This paper focuses on presenting the details of the probabilistic parameter uncertainty assessment.

BABA,T.; ISHIGURO,K.; ISHIHARA,Y.; SAWADA,A.; UMEKI,H.; WAKASUGI,K.; WEBB,ERIK K.

1999-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

Risk assessment for the off-site transportation of high-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of high-level waste (HLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers risks to collective populations and individuals under both routine and accident transportation conditions for truck and rail shipment modes. The report discusses the scope of the HLW transportation assessment, describes the analytical methods used for the assessment, defines the alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, and details important assessment assumptions. Results are reported for five alternatives. In addition, to aid in the understanding and interpretation of the results, specific areas of uncertainty are described, with an emphasis on how the uncertainties may affect comparisons of the alternatives.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Circulating-Fluidized-Bed-Based Calcium-Looping Gasifier: Experimental Studies on the CalcinationCarbonation Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the first one, kinetic rates are developed for calcination in the presence of three media: nitrogen (N2), CO2, and steam (H2O). ... For this study, the particle size was taken to be 45 ?m.(1)(2)To study the effects of the particle size on calcination and carbonation reactions, limestone particles of sizes 325, 275, 230, and 135 ?m were subjected to calcination with N2 as the medium at 950 C. ... The gasifier was heated by a hot solid coming from the regenerator and by the fluidizing medium. ...

Bishnu Acharya; Animesh Dutta; Prabir Basu

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Crystal chemical adaptations of the apatite structure for the incorporation of simulated high level nuclear waste (HLW).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Singapore has achieved outstanding econmic success since gaining independence, through the creation of industrial pillars in finance, shipping, semiconductors, petrochemicals, and more recently, biotechnology. These (more)

Lim, Sing Chin.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Experimental data and analysis to support the design of an ion-exchange process for the treatment of Hanford tank waste supernatant liquids  

SciTech Connect

Hanford`s 177 underground storage tanks contain a mixture of sludge, salt cake, and alkaline supernatant liquids. Disposal options for these wastes are high-level waste (HLW) glass for disposal in a repository or low-level waste (LLW) glass for onsite disposal. Systems-engineering studies show that economic and environmental considerations preclude disposal of these wastes without further treatment. Difficulties inherent in transportation and disposal of relatively large volumes of HLW make it impossible to vitrify all of the tank waste as HLW. Potential environmental impacts make direct disposal of all of the tank waste as LLW glass unacceptable. Although the pretreatment and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include retrieval of the aqueous liquids, dissolution of the salt cakes, and washing of the sludges to remove soluble components. Most of the cesium is expected to be in the aqueous liquids, which are the focus of this report on cesium removal by ion exchange. The main objectives of the ion-exchange process are removing cesium from the bulk of the tank waste (i.e., decontamination) and concentrating the separated cesium for vitrification. Because exact requirements for removal of {sup 137}Cs have not yet been defined, a range of removal requirements will be considered. This study addresses requirements to achieve {sup 137}Cs levels in LLW glass between (1) the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Class C (10 CFR 61) limit of 4600 Ci/m{sup 3} and (2) 1/10th of the NRC Class A limit of 1 Ci/m{sup 3} i.e., 0.1/m{sup 3}. The required degrees of separation of cesium from other waste components is a complex function involving interactions between the design of the vitrification process, waste form considerations, and other HLW stream components that are to be vitrified.

Kurath, D.E.; Bray, L.A.; Brooks, K.P.; Brown, G.N.; Bryan, S.A.; Carlson, C.D.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.; Kim, A.Y.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 2 (CDP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRELIMINARY TECHNOLOGY PRELIMINARY TECHNOLOGY OF THE CALCINE Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy ECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT ALCINE DISPOSITION PROJECT VOLUME TWO Anthony F. Kluk Hoyt C. Johnson Clyde Phillip McGinnis Michael Rinker Steven L. Ross Herbert G. Sutter John Vienna February 2011 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC SSESSMENT ROJECT 412.09 (06/03/2009 - Rev. 11) CALCINE DISPOSITION PROJECT TECHNOLOGY MATURATION PLAN Identifier: Revision*: Page: PLN-1482 2 C-1 of C-317 Appendix C Appendix C Checklists for Critical Technology Elements and Technology Readiness Levels This appendix provides the CTE and TRL checklists for the CTEs. For the TRL questions that receive a "Y" (yes) response, the supporting documentation is provided with a complete reference at the

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181

Hanford Supplemental Treatment: Literature and Modeling Review of SRS HLW Salt Dissolution and Fractional Crystallization  

SciTech Connect

In order to accelerate waste treatment and disposal of Hanford tank waste by 2028, the Department of Energy (DOE) and CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CHG), Inc. are evaluating alternative technologies which will be used in conjunction with the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) to safely pretreat and immobilize the tank waste. Several technologies (Bulk Vitrification and Steam Reforming) are currently being evaluated for immobilizing the pretreated waste. Since the WTP does not have sufficient capacity to pretreat all the waste going to supplemental treatment by the 2028 milestone, two technologies (Selective Dissolution and Fractional Crystallization) are being considered for pretreatment of salt waste. The scope of this task was to: (1) evaluate the recent Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 41 dissolution campaign and other literature to provide a more complete understanding of selective dissolution, (2) provide an update on the progress of salt dissolution and modeling activities at SRS, (3) investigate SRS experience and outside literature sources on industrial equipment and experimental results of previous fractional crystallization processes, and (4) evaluate recent Hanford AP104 boildown experiments and modeling results and recommend enhancements to the Environmental Simulation Program (ESP) to improve its predictive capabilities. This report provides a summary of this work and suggested recommendations.

Choi, A. S.; Flach, G. P.; Martino, C. J.; Zamecnik, J. R.; Harris, M. K.; Wilmarth, W. R.; Calloway, T. B.

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

182

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 03/05/09 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 03/05/09 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 03/05/09 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 03/05/09 The following documents are associated with the Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting held on March 5th, 2009. Overview of Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Desired PU Loading During Vitrification HLW System Integrated Project Team Waste Determination and Section 3116 of the 2005 National Defense Authorization Act - HQ Perspective Status of Art & Practice of Performance Assessment within the DOE Complex Experience from the Short Course on Introduction to Nuclear Chemistry and Fuel Cycle Separations and Future Educational Opportunities Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission Performance Assessment Community of Practice Action Item Review and Status

183

The U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Status Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NWTRB NWTRB www.nwtrb.gov U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board The U S Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board The U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Status Update Presented to: National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Presented By: National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Mark Abkowitz May 11, 2011 The Board's Statutory Mandate * The 1987 amendments to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) established the U S Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board established the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. * The Board evaluates the technical and scientific validity of DOE activities related to: - transportation, packaging and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) - site characterization, design, development, and operations of facilities for

184

Calcined Dolomite, Magnesite, and Calcite for Cleaning Hot Gas from a Fluidized Bed Biomass Gasifier with Steam:? Life and Usefulness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calcined Dolomite, Magnesite, and Calcite for Cleaning Hot Gas from a Fluidized Bed Biomass Gasifier with Steam:? Life and Usefulness ... About the temperature effect, at low (800 C) and medium (840 C) temperatures, the calcite is soon deactivated. ...

Jess Delgado; Mara P. Aznar; Jos Corella

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

185

Idaho National Laboratory Description, Chellenges, Technology, Issues, and Needs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i f th Hi i f th Hi h L l W t (HLW) P Overview of the High Level Waste (HLW) Program at the Id h N ti l L b t (INL) Sit Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Description Challenges Technology Issues and Needs Description, Challenges, Technology, Issues, and Needs 1 April 1, 2008 INL Site HLW is in Dry Storage in the Form of Calcine 8 9M ll f li id HLW t d t 4400 bi t f * 8-9M gallons of liquid HLW were converted to 4400 cubic meters of granular solid (calcine) through a fluidized bed calcination process - 7 to 1 volume reduction achieved * Average particle size is 0.4 cm * Bulk density is about 1 5 to 1 8 g/cc * Bulk density is about 1.5 to 1.8 g/cc - Contains roughly 44 metric tons heavy metal * Calcine is stored in 43 bins in 6 concrete-shielded binsets with one spare p - 7 th set of bins - intended for calcined SBW

186

GLASS FABRICATION AND ANALYSIS LITERATURE REVIEW AND METHOD SELECTION FOR WTP WASTE FEED QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Scope of the Report The objective of this literature review is to identify and review documents to address scaling, design, operations, and experimental setup, including configuration, data collection, and remote handling that would be used during waste feed qualification in support of the glass fabrication unit operation. Items addressed include: ? LAW and HLW glass formulation algorithms; ? Mixing and sampling; ? Rheological measurements; ? Heat of hydration; ? Glass fabrication techniques; ? Glass inspection; ? Composition analysis; ? Use of cooling curves; ? Hydrogen generation rate measurement.

Peeler, D.

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

187

US Department of Energy Storage of Spent Fuel and High Level Waste  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT This paper provides an overview of the Department of Energy's (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) storage management. Like commercial reactor fuel, DOE's SNF and HLW were destined for the Yucca Mountain repository. In March 2010, the DOE filed a motion with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to withdraw the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain. A new repository is now decades away. The default for the commercial and DOE research reactor fuel and HLW is on-site storage for the foreseeable future. Though the motion to withdraw the license application and delay opening of a repository signals extended storage, DOE's immediate plans for management of its SNF and HLW remain the same as before Yucca Mountain was designated as the repository, though it has expanded its research and development efforts to ensure safe extended storage. This paper outlines some of the proposed research that DOE is conducting and will use to enhance its storage systems and facilities.

Sandra M Birk

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

FINAL REPORT DM1200 TESTS WITH AZ 101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-03R3800-4 REV 0 2/17/04  

SciTech Connect

This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM 1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW AZ-101 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW AZ-101 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate and feed solids content on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post-test inspections of system components. The test objectives (including test success criteria), along with how they were met, are outlined in a table.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; GONG W; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

189

Enhanced Sulfate Management in HLW Glass Formulations VSL12R2540-1 REV 0  

SciTech Connect

The Low Activity Waste (LAW) tanks that are scheduled to provide the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) with waste feeds contain significant amounts of sulfate. The sulfate content in the LAW feeds is sufficiently high that a separate molten sulfate salt phase may form on top of the glass melt during the vitrification process unless suitable glass formulations are employed and sulfate levels are controlled. Since the formation of the salt phase is undesirable from many perspectives, mitigation approaches had to be developed. Considerable progress has been made and reported by the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) in enhancing sulfate incorporation into LAW glass melts and developing strategies to manage and mitigate the risks associated with high-sulfate feeds.

Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

190

Radiological assessment of the consequences of the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in subseabed sediments  

SciTech Connect

The radiological assessment of the seabed option consists in estimating the detriment to man and to the environment that could result from the disposal of high-level waste (HLW) within the seabed sediments in deep oceans. The assessment is made for the high-level waste (vitrified glass) produced by the reprocessing of 10/sup 5/ tons of heavy metal from spent fuel, which represents the amount of waste generated by 3333 reactor-yr of 900-MW(electric) reactors, i.e., 3000 GW(electric) x yr. The disposal option considered is to use 14,667 steel penetrators, each of them containing five canisters of HLW glass (0.15 m/sup 3/ each). These penetrators would reach a depth of 50 m in the sediments and would be placed at an average distance of 180 m from each other, requiring a disposal area on the order of 22 x 22 km. Two such potential disposal areas in the Atlantic Ocean were studied, Great Meteor East (GME) and South Nares Abyssal Plains (SNAP). A special ship design is proposed to minimize transportation accidents. Approximately 100 shipments would be necessary to dispose of the proposed amount of waste. The results of this radiological assessment seem to show that the disposal of HLW in subseabed sediments is radiologically a very acceptable option.

de Marsily, G.; Behrendt, V.; Ensminger, D.A.; Flebus, C.; Hutchinson, B.L.; Kane, P.; Karpf, A.; Klett, R.D.; Mobbs, S.; Poulin, M.; Stanners, D.A.; Wuschke, D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

MATRIX 1 RESULTS OF THE FY07 ENHANCED DOE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE MELTER THROUGHPUT STUDIES AT SRNL  

SciTech Connect

High-level waste (HLW) throughput (i.e., the amount of waste processed per unit time) is a function of two critical parameters: waste loading (WL) and melt rate. For the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), increasing HLW throughput would significantly reduce the overall mission life cycle costs for the Department of Energy (DOE). It has been proposed that a team of glass formulation and processing experts at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) at Catholic University of America develop a systematic approach to increase HLW throughput (by increasing WL with minimal or positive impacts on melt rate). Programmatically, this task is aimed at proof-of-principle testing and the development of tools to improve waste loading and melt rate, which will lead to higher waste throughput. The following four specific tasks have been proposed to meet this programmatic objective: (1) Integration and Oversight, (2) Crystal Accumulation Modeling (led by PNNL)/Higher Waste Loading Glasses (led by SRNL), (3) Melt Rate Evaluation and Modeling, and (4) Melter Scale Demonstrations. The details of these tasks can be found in the associated task plan WSRC-STI-2007-00483. The current study is focused on Task 2 (crystal accumulation modeling and higher waste loading glasses) and involves glass formulation and physical property testing by both PNNL and SRNL (as defined in the PNNL and SRNL test plans). The intent of this report is to document the chemical composition and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results and statistical analysis of PNNL's Test Matrix 1 glasses. Note that this document is only a compilation of the data collected by SRNL for PNNL's glasses in support of this task and no conclusions will be drawn.

Raszewski, F; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

192

Clean option: An alternative strategy for Hanford Tank Waste Remediation. Volume 1, Overview  

SciTech Connect

Plans for remediation of the Hanford underground storage tanks are currently undergoing reevaluation. As part of this process, many options are being considered for the Tank Waste Remediation System (MRS). The ``clean option`` described here proposes an aggressive waste processing strategy to achieve the three ma or objectives: Greatly reduce the volume of high-level waste (HLW) to lessen demands on geologic repository space; decrease by several orders of magnitude the amount of radioactivity and toxicity now in the waste tanks that will be left permanently onsite as low-level solid waste (LLW); and accomplish the first two objectives without significantly increasing the total amount of waste for disposal. The study discussed here focuses on process chemistry, as it provides the foundation for achieving the clean option objectives. Because demonstrated separation steps have been identified and connected in a way that meets these objectives, the study concludes that the process chemistry rests on a firm technical basis.

Straalsund, J.L.; Swanson, J.L.; Baker, E.G.; Jones, E.O.; Kuhn, W.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Holmes, J.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2009  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2009 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2009 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per LWO-LWE-2008-00423, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2009, were completed. All Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2009 met the requirements of C-ESG-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 1, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.4. UT inspections were performed on Tank 29 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2009-00559, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2009, Waste Tank 29. Post chemical cleaning UT measurements were made in Tank 6 and the results are documented in SRNL-STI-2009-00560, Tank Inspection NDE Results Tank 6, Including Summary of Waste Removal Support Activities in Tanks 5 and 6. A total of 6669 photographs were made and 1276 visual and video inspections were performed during 2009. Twenty-Two new leaksites were identified in 2009. The locations of these leaksites are documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.4. Fifteen leaksites at Tank 5 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. Five leaksites at Tank 6 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. Two new leaksites were identified at Tank 19 during waste removal activities. Previously documented leaksites were reactivated at Tanks 5 and 12 during waste removal activities. Also, a very small amount of additional leakage from a previously identified leaksite at Tank 14 was observed.

West, B.; Waltz, R.

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

Granite Recrystallization The Key to an Alternative Strategy for HLW Disposal? Fergus G.F. Gibb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JD, U.K. ABSTRACT An alternative strategy is proposed for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF HLWs, such as spent reactor fuel, to `cool' for a period (usually a few decades) prior to disposal potentially damaging temperature rises. Secondly, the waste contains sufficient quantities of very long lived

Sheffield, University of

195

DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIGUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT  

SciTech Connect

Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive is used to improve stripping performance and to mitigate the effects of any surfactants present in the feed stream. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Pak, D.; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.; Caldwell, T.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

196

FINAL REPORT MELTER TESTS WITH AZ-101 HLW SIMULANT USING A DURAMELTER 100 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-01R10N0-1 REV 1 2/25/02  

SciTech Connect

This report provides data, analyses, and conclusions from a series of tests that were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic of America (VSL) to determine the processing rates that are achievable with AZ-101 HLW simulants and corresponding melter feeds on a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) vitrification system. One of the most critical pieces of information in determining the required size of the RPP-WTP HLW melter is the specific glass production rate in terms of the mass of glass that can be produced per unit area of melt surface per unit time. The specific glass production rate together with the waste loading (essentially, the ratio of waste-in to glass-out, which is determined from glass formulation activities) determines the melt area that is needed to achieve a given waste processing rate with due allowance for system availability. Tests conducted during Part B1 (VSL-00R2590-2) on the DM1000 vitrification system installed at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America showed that, without the use of bubblers, glass production rates with AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102 simulants were significantly lower than the Project design basis rate of 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d. Conversely, three-fold increases over the design basis rate were demonstrated with the use of bubblers. Furthermore, an un-bubbled control test using a replica of the melter feed used in cold commissioning tests at West Valley reproduced the rates that were observed with that feed on the WVDP production melter. More recent tests conducted on the DM1200 system, which more closely represents the present RPP-WTP design, are in general agreement with these earlier results. Screening tests conducted on the DM10 system have provided good indications of the larger-scale processing rates with bubblers (for both HL W and LAW feeds) but significantly overestimated the DM1000 un-bubbled rate observed for C-106/AY-102 melter feeds. This behavior is believed to be a consequence of the role of heat transfer in rate attainment and the much greater role of wall effects in heat transfer when the melt pool is not agitated. The DM100 melter used for the present tests has a surface area of 0.108 m{sup 2}, which is approximately 5 times larger than that of the DM10 (0.021 m{sup 2}) and approximately 11 times smaller than that of the DM1000 (1.2 m{sup 2}) (the DM1000 has since been replaced by a pilot-scale prototypical HLW melter, designated the DM1200, which has the same surface area as the DM1000). Testing on smaller melters is the most economical method for obtaining data over a wide range of operating conditions (particularly at extremes) and for guiding the more expensive tests that are performed at pilot-scale. Thus, one objective of these tests was to determine whether the DM100 melters are sufficiently large to reproduce the un-bubbled melt rates observed at the DM1000 scale, or to determine the extent of any off-set. DM100-scale tests can then be used to screen feed chemistry variations that may serve to increase the un-bubbled production rates prior to confirmation at pilot scale. Finally, extensive characterization data obtained on simulated HLW melter feeds formed from various glass forming additives indicated that there may be advantages in terms of feed rheology and stability to the replacement of some of the hydroxides by carbonates. A further objective of the present tests was therefore to identify any deleterious processing effects of such a change before adopting the carbonate feed as the baseline. Data from the WVDP melter using acidified (nitrated) feeds, and without bubbling, showed productions rates that are higher than those observed with the alkaline RPP feeds at the VSL. Therefore, the effect of feed acidification on production rate also was investigated. This work was performed under Test Specification, 'TSP-W375-00-00019, Rev 0, 'HLW-DM10 and DM100 Melter Tests' dated November 13, 2000 and the corresponding Test Plan. It should be noted, however, that the RPP-WTP Project directed a series of changes to the Test Plan as the result

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

197

PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF VITREOUS STATE LABORATORY AY102/C106 AND AZ102 HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER FEED SIMULANTS (U)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this task is to characterize and report specified physical properties and pH of simulant high level waste (HLW) melter feeds (MF) processed through the scaled melters at Vitreous State Laboratories (VSL). The HLW MF simulants characterized are VSL AZ102 straight hydroxide melter feed, VSL AZ102 straight hydroxide rheology adjusted melter feed, VSL AY102/C106 straight hydroxide melter feed, VSL AY102/C106 straight hydroxide rheology adjusted melter feed, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) AY102/C106 precipitated hydroxide processed sludge blended with glass former chemicals at VSL to make melter feed. The physical properties and pH were characterized using the methods stated in the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) characterization procedure (Ref. 7).

Hansen, E

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

International trade and waste and fuel managment issue, 2006  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the January-February issue is on international trade and waste and fuel managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: HLW management in France, by Michel Debes, EDF, France; Breakthroughs from future reactors, by Jacques Bouchard, CEA, France; 'MOX for peace' a reality, by Jean-Pierre Bariteau, AREVA Group, France; Swedish spent fuel and radwaste, by Per H. Grahn and Marie Skogsberg, SKB, Sweden; ENC2005 concluding remarks, by Larry Foulke, 'Nuclear Technology Matters'; Fuel crud formation and behavior, by Charles Turk, Entergy; and, Plant profile: major vote of confidence for NP, by Martti Katka, TVO, Finland.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2010  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2010 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2010 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per SRR-LWE-2009-00138, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2010, were completed. Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2010 met the requirements of C-ESG-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 3, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.6. UT inspections were performed on Tanks 30, 31 and 32 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2010-00533, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2010, Waste Tanks 30, 31 and 32. A total of 5824 photographs were made and 1087 visual and video inspections were performed during 2010. Ten new leaksites at Tank 5 were identified in 2010. The locations of these leaksites are documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.5. Ten leaksites at Tank 5 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. None of these new leaksites resulted in a release to the environment. The leaksites were documented during wall cleaning activities and the waste nodules associated with the leaksites were washed away. Previously documented leaksites were reactivated at Tank 12 during waste removal activities.

West, B.; Waltz, R.

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

200

High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High-Level Waste Corporate Board High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda Loews Hotel 1065 West Peachtree St, Atlanta, Georgia November 18, 2010 Time Topic Speaker 7:30 AM Closed Session - ratify Charter Board members 8:30 AM Welcome, Introduction, 2011 focus for HLW Corp Board Shirley Olinger 8:50 AM Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet  Show flowsheet w/ split locations  Describe recycle of LAW concept  Discuss baseline assumptions  Describe subsequent talks using flowsheet figure Gary Smith 9:15 AM Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP)  Tc/I split factors (w/ and w/o recycle)  Water management (w/ and w/o recycle) Albert Kruger 9:45 AM WTP Melter/Offgas Systems Decontamination Factors  Re as a stimulant for Tc  Issues that limit Tc incorporation in LAW glass

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Tank Waste Committee Page 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be the facility construction. If this project moves forward there will be an interface control document for the HLW facility that is separate from pretreatment. This proposal...

202

Final Report - High Level Waste Vitrification System Improvements, VSL-07R1010-1, Rev 0, dated 04/16/07  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work conducted to support the development and testing of new glass formulations that extend beyond those that have been previously investigated for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The principal objective was to investigate maximization of the incorporation of several waste components that are expected to limit waste loading and, consequently, high level waste (HLW) processing rates and canister count. The work was performed with four waste compositions specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP); these wastes contain high concentrations of bismuth, chromium, aluminum, and aluminum plus sodium. The tests were designed to identify glass formulations that maximize waste loading while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, increased glass processing temperature, increased crystallinity, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality.

Kruger, Albert A.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Gong, W.; Champman, C. C.; Joseph, I.; Matlack, K. S.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

203

Formulation and Characterization of Waste Glasses with Varying Processing Temperature  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the preliminary results of glass formulation and characterization accomplished within the finished scope of the EM-31 technology development tasks for WP-4 and WP-5, including WP-4.1.2: Glass Formulation for Next Generation Melter, WP-5.1.2.3: Systematic Glass Studies, and WP-5.1.2.4: Glass Formulation for Specific Wastes. This report also presents the suggested studies for eventual restart of these tasks. The initial glass formulation efforts for the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM), operating at {approx}1200 C, with selected HLW (AZ-101) and LAW (AN-105) successfully developed glasses with significant increase of waste loading compared to that is likely to be achieved based on expected reference WTP formulations. Three glasses formulated for AZ-101HLW and one glass for AN-105 LAW were selected for the initial CCIM demonstration melter tests. Melter tests were not performed within the finished scope of the WP-4.1.2 task. Glass formulations for CCIM were expanded to cover additional HLWs that have high potential to successfully demonstrate the unique advantages of the CCIM technologies based on projected composition of Hanford wastes. However, only the preliminary scoping tests were completed with selected wastes within the finished scope. Advanced glass formulations for the reference WTP melter, operating at {approx}1200 C, were initiated with selected specific wastes to determine the estimated maximum waste loading. The incomplete results from these initial formulation efforts are summarized. For systematic glass studies, a test matrix of 32 high-aluminum glasses was completed based on a new method developed in this study.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, M. J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lepry, William C.; Lang, Jesse B.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Vienna, John D.; Johnson, Fabienne; Marra, James C.; Peeler, David K.

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

204

C-106 High-Level Waste Solids: Washing/Leaching and Solubility Versus Temperature Studies  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the Hanford tank C-106 high-level waste (HLW) solids. The objective of this work was to determine the composition of the C-106 solids remaining after washing with 0.01M NaOH or leaching with 3M NaOH. Another objective of this test was to determine the solubility of various C-106 components as a function of temperature. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-8,Rev. 0, Determination of the Solubility of HLW Sludge Solids. The test went according to plan, with only minor deviations from the test plan. The deviations from the test plan are discussed in the experimental section.

GJ Lumetta; DJ Bates; PK Berry; JP Bramson; LP Darnell; OT Farmer III; LR Greenwood; FV Hoopes; RC Lettau; GF Piepel; CZ Soderquist; MJ Steele; RT Steele; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

205

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 03/05/09 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3/05/09 3/05/09 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 03/05/09 The following documents are associated with the Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting held on March 5th, 2009. Overview of Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Desired PU Loading During Vitrification HLW System Integrated Project Team Waste Determination and Section 3116 of the 2005 National Defense Authorization Act - HQ Perspective Status of Art & Practice of Performance Assessment within the DOE Complex Experience from the Short Course on Introduction to Nuclear Chemistry and Fuel Cycle Separations and Future Educational Opportunities Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission Performance Assessment Community of Practice Action Item Review and Status More Documents & Publications

206

Summary - System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford EM Project: WTP ETR Report Date: November 2008 ETR-18 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review Construction of the facilities of the Hanford site's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) are scheduled for completion in 2017, with radioactive waste processing scheduled to begin in 2019. An estimated 23 to 35 years will then be required to complete high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. However, vitrification of low-activity waste (LAW) may extend the WTP mission duration by decades more if supplemental LAW processing beyond the capacity of the present facility is not incorporated. The purpose of this independent review was to

207

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt This report summarizes efforts to simulate coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes occurring within a generic hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt; chemical processes of the system allow precipitation and dissolution of salt with elevated temperatures that drive water and water vapor flow around hot waste packages. Characterizing salt backfill processes is an important objective of the exercise. An evidence-based algorithm for mineral dehydration is also applied in the modeling. The Finite Element Heat and Mass transfer code (FEHM) is used to simulate coupled thermal,

208

Glass Development for Treatment of LANL Evaporator Bottoms Waste  

SciTech Connect

Vitrification is an attractive treatment option for meeting the stabilization and final disposal requirements of many plutonium (Pu) bearing materials and wastes at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) TA-55 facility, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Hanford, and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared that vitrification is the "best demonstrated available technology" for high- level radioactive wastes (HLW) (Federal Register 1990) and has produced a handbook of vitriilcation technologies for treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste (US EPA, 1992). This technology has been demonstrated to convert Pu-containing materials (Kormanos, 1997) into durable (Lutze, 1988) and accountable (Forsberg, 1995) waste. forms with reduced need for safeguarding (McCulhun, 1996). The composition of the Evaporator Bottoms Waste (EVB) at LANL, like that of many other I%-bearing materials, varies widely and is generally unpredictable. The goal of this study is to optimize the composition of glass for EVB waste at LANL, and present the basic techniques and tools for developing optimized glass compositions for other Pu-bearing materials in the complex. This report outlines an approach for glass formulation with fixed property restrictions, using glass property-composition databases. This approach is applicable to waste glass formulation for many variable waste streams and vitrification technologies.. Also reported are the preliminary property data for simulated evaporator bottom glasses, including glass viscosity and glass leach resistance using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

DE Smith; GF Piepel; GW Veazey; JD Vienna; ML Elliott; RK Nakaoka; RP Thimpke

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

209

Environmental control technology for coal cleaning wastes  

SciTech Connect

Chemical and mineralogical examination of coal wastes and their drainages has led us to consider three approaches to solution of the coal waste drainage problem. The first is alteration of the waste to render it non-polluting. Calcining of the waste has been shown to be an effective way of accomplishing this, but the cost of this technique is too high for it to be of any use. The second approach is codisposal of the coal waste with neutralizing and/or absorbing agents. The best way to implementing this approach is sequential slurry coating of the coal waste with lime and limestone, which is both effective and inexpensive. This is probably the best of the one-time treatments which we have evaluated when both effectiveness and cost are considered. Unfortunately this approach suffers from a lack of permanence and must be augmented with some other method of permanent diposal. The third approach to controlling coal waste effluent is to collect and treat the drainages. Perhaps the most effective way of doing this is by alkaline neutralization of the drainages. This is currently the most widely used technique for this purpose, because of its simplicity and availability. We have shown that it is effective provided that the iron is oxidized to the plus three oxidation state, and that the cost of this treatment is low. However, the need for continued treatment into the indefinite future must be considered a severe limitation.

Wagner, P.; Heaton, R.C.; Wangen, L.E.; Nyitray, A.M.; Jones, M.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

RECENT PROGRESS IN DOE WASTE TANK CLOSURE  

SciTech Connect

The USDOE complex currently has over 330 underground storage tanks that have been used to process and store radioactive waste generated from the production of weapons materials. These tanks contain over 380 million liters of high-level and low-level radioactive waste. The waste consists of radioactively contaminated sludge, supernate, salt cake or calcine. Most of the waste exists at four USDOE locations, the Hanford Site, the Savannah River Site, the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the West Valley Demonstration Project. A summary of the DOE tank closure activities was first issued in 2001. Since then, regulatory changes have taken place that affect some of the sites and considerable progress has been made in closing tanks. This paper presents an overview of the current regulatory changes and drivers and a summary of the progress in tank closures at the various sites over the intervening six years. A number of areas are addressed including closure strategies, characterization of bulk waste and residual heel material, waste removal technologies for bulk waste, heel residuals and annuli, tank fill materials, closure system modeling and performance assessment programs, lessons learned, and external reviews.

Langton, C

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Separation, Concentration, and Immobilization of Technetium and Iodine from Alkaline Supernate Waste  

SciTech Connect

Development of remediation technologies for the characterization, retrieval, treatment, concentration, and final disposal of radioactive and chemical tank waste stored within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex represents an enormous scientific and technological challenge. A combined total of over 90 million gallons of high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) are stored in 335 underground storage tanks at four different DOE sites. Roughly 98% of this waste is highly alkaline in nature and contains high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite salts along with lesser concentrations of other salts. The primary waste forms are sludge, saltcake, and liquid supernatant with the bulk of the radioactivity contained in the sludge, making it the largest source of HLW. The saltcake (liquid waste with most of the water removed) and liquid supernatant consist mainly of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide salts. The main radioactive constituent in the alkaline supernatant is cesium-137, but strontium-90, technetium-99, and transuranic nuclides are also present in varying concentrations. Reduction of the radioactivity below Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits would allow the bulk of the waste to be disposed of as LLW. Because of the long half-life of technetium-99 (2.1 x 10 5 y) and the mobility of the pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) in the environment, it is expected that technetium will have to be removed from the Hanford wastes prior to disposal as LLW. Also, for some of the wastes, some level of technetium removal will be required to meet LLW criteria for radioactive content. Therefore, DOE has identified a need to develop technologies for the separation and concentration of technetium-99 from LLW streams. Eichrom has responded to this DOE-identified need by demonstrating a complete flowsheet for the separation, concentration, and immobilization of technetium (and iodine) from alkaline supernatant waste.

James Harvey; Michael Gula

1998-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

Effects of calcination on adsorption and CO hydrogenation activity/selectivity of potassium-promoted Fe/SiO/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect

Effects of calcination pretreatment on the kinetics and energetics of H/sub 2/ adsorption were determined by TPD. Pretreatment effects on the CO hydrogenation activity and selectivity properties were determined with a differential reactor. Calcination increases adsorption strength and dramatically changes CO hydrogenation selectivity.

Bartholomew, C.H.; Rankin, J.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Proceedings of the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

The fifth of a series of waste minimization (WMIN)/reduction workshops (Waste Reduction Workshop V) was held at the Little Tree Inn in Idaho Falls, Idaho, on July 24--26, 1990. The workshops are held under the auspices of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for sharing site activities in WMIN/reduction planning. Topics covered were management commitment, organizational structure, goal setting, reporting requirements, data bases and tracking systems, pollution prevention, awareness and incentives, information exchange, process waste assessment (PWA) implementation, and recycling internal and external. The workshops assist DOE waste-generating sites in implementing WMIN/reduction programs, plans, and activities, thus providing for optimal waste reduction within the DOE complex. All wastes are considered within this discipline: liquid, solid, and airborne, within the categories of high-level waste (HLW), transuranic waste (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, and mixed waste.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Evaluation of defense-waste glass produced by full-scale vitrification equipment  

SciTech Connect

Three full-scale vitrification processes at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory produced over 67,000 kg of simulated nuclear-waste glass from March 1979 to August 1980. Samples were analyzed to monitor process operation and evaluate the resulting glass product. These processes are: Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter (SC/ICM); Spray Calciner/Calcine-Fed Ceramic Melter (SC/CFCM); and Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter (LFCM). Waste components in the process feed varied less than +- 10%. The SC/ICM and SC/CFCM which use separate waste and frit feed systems showed larger glass compositional variation than the LFCM, which processed only premixed feed during this period. The SC/ICM and SC/CFCM product contained significant amounts of acmite crystals, while the LFCM product was largely amorphous. In addition, the lower portion of all SC/ICM-filled canisters contained a zone rich in waste components. A product chemical durability as determined by pH4 and soxhlet leach tests varied considerably. Aside from increased durability under pH4 conditions with decreasing waste content, glass composition, microstructure and melting process did not correlate with glass durability. For all samples analyzed, the weight loss under pH4 conditions ranged from 17.7 to 85.2 wt %. Soxhlet conditions produced weight losses from 1.78 to 3.56 wt %.

Lukacs, J.M.; Petkus, L.L.; Mellinger, G.B.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Assessment of degradation concerns for spent fuel, high-level wastes, and transuranic wastes in monitored retrievalbe storage  

SciTech Connect

It has been concluded that there are no significant degradation mechanisms that could prevent the design, construction, and safe operation of monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facilities. However, there are some long-term degradation mechanisms that could affect the ability to maintain or readily retrieve spent fuel (SF), high-level wastes (HLW), and transuranic wastes (TRUW) several decades after emplacement. Although catastrophic failures are not anticipated, long-term degradation mechanisms have been identified that could, under certain conditions, cause failure of the SF cladding and/or failure of TRUW storage containers. Stress rupture limits for Zircaloy-clad SF in MRS range from 300 to 440/sup 0/C, based on limited data. Additional tests on irradiated Zircaloy (3- to 5-year duration) are needed to narrow this uncertainty. Cladding defect sizes could increase in air as a result of fuel density decreases due to oxidation. Oxidation tests (3- to 5-year duration) on SF are also needed to verify oxidation rates in air and to determine temperatures below which monitoring of an inert cover gas would not be required. Few, if any, changes in the physical state of HLW glass or canisters or their performance would occur under projected MRS conditions. The major uncertainty for HLW is in the heat transfer through cracked glass and glass devitrification above 500/sup 0/C. Additional study of TRUW is required. Some fraction of present TRUW containers would probably fail within the first 100 years of MRS, and some TRUW would be highly degraded upon retrieval, even in unfailed containers. One possible solution is the design of a 100-year container. 93 references, 28 figures, 17 tables.

Guenther, R.J.; Gilbert, E.R.; Slate, S.C.; Partain, W.L.; Divine, J.R.; Kreid, D.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Synthesis of Gallium Oxide Hydroxide Crystals in Aqueous Solutions with or without Urea and Their Calcination Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solution of gallium(III) nitrate and stirring at 90°C for 10 h, followed by calcination of the recovered of solid electro- lytes of superior (as compared with Y-stabilized zirconia) ionic conductivity, i.e., La0-chemical synthesis of powders of doped LaGaO3 fuel cell ceramics.24,25 The first experimental study

Tas, A. Cuneyt

218

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Technologies for destruction of long-lived radionuclides in high-level nuclear waste: Overview and requirements  

SciTech Connect

This paper, and this topical session on Nuclear Waste Minimization, Management and Remediation, focuses on two nuclear systems, and their associated technologies, that have the potential to address concerns surrounding long-lived radionuclides in high-level waste. Both systems offer technology applicable to HLW from present light-water reactors (LWR). Additionally these systems represent advanced nuclear power concepts that have important features associated with integrated management of wastes, long-term fuel supplies, and enhanced safety. The first system is the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept. This system incorporates a metal-fueled fast reactor coupled with chemical separations based on pyroprocessing to produce power while simultaneously burning long-lived actinide waste. IFR applications include burning of actinides from current LWR spent fuel and energy production in a breeder environment. The second concept, Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW), is based upon an accelerator-induced intense source of thermal neutrons and is aimed at destruction of long-lived actinides and fission products. This concept can be applied to long-lived radionuclides in spent fuel HLW as well as a future fission power source built around use of natural thorium or uranium as fuels coupled with concurrent waste destruction.

Arthur, E.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

DEFENSE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS DEGRADATION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the analyses that were done to develop models for radionuclide release from high-level waste (HLW) glass dissolution that can be integrated into performance assessment (PA) calculations conducted to support site recommendation and license application for the Yucca Mountain site. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000a). It specifically addresses the item, ''Defense High Level Waste Glass Degradation'', of the product technical work plan. The AP-3.15Q Attachment 1 screening criteria determines the importance for its intended use of the HLW glass model derived herein to be in the category ''Other Factors for the Postclosure Safety Case-Waste Form Performance'', and thus indicates that this factor does not contribute significantly to the postclosure safety strategy. Because the release of radionuclides from the glass will depend on the prior dissolution of the glass, the dissolution rate of the glass imposes an upper bound on the radionuclide release rate. The approach taken to provide a bound for the radionuclide release is to develop models that can be used to calculate the dissolution rate of waste glass when contacted by water in the disposal site. The release rate of a particular radionuclide can then be calculated by multiplying the glass dissolution rate by the mass fraction of that radionuclide in the glass and by the surface area of glass contacted by water. The scope includes consideration of the three modes by which water may contact waste glass in the disposal system: contact by humid air, dripping water, and immersion. The models for glass dissolution under these contact modes are all based on the rate expression for aqueous dissolution of borosilicate glasses. The mechanism and rate expression for aqueous dissolution are adequately understood; the analyses in this AMR were conducted to provide models and parameter values that can be used to calculate the dissolution rates for the different modes of water contact. The analyses were conducted to identify key aspects of the mechanistic model for glass dissolution to be included in the abstracted models used for PA calculations, evaluate how the models can be used to calculate bounding values of the glass dissolution rates under anticipated water contact modes in the disposal. system, and determine model parameter values for the range of potential waste glass compositions and anticipated environmental conditions. The analysis of a bounding rate also considered the effects of the buildup of glass corrosion products in the solution contacting the glass and potential effects of alteration phase formation. Note that application of the models and model parameter values is constrained to the anticipated range of HLW glass compositions and environmental conditions. The effects of processes inherent to exposure to humid air and dripping water were not modeled explicitly. Instead, the impacts of these processes on the degradation rate were taken into account by using empirically measured parameter values. These include the rates at which water sorbs onto the glass, drips onto the glass, and drips off of the glass. The dissolution rates of glasses that were exposed to humid air and dripping water measured in laboratory tests are used to estimate model parameter values for contact by humid air and dripping water in the disposal system.

W. Ebert

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

STATUS OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF IN-TANK/AT-TANK SEPARATIONS TECHNOLOGIES FOR FOR HIGH-LEVEL WASTE PROCESSING FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

SciTech Connect

Within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Technology Innovation and Development, the Office of Waste Processing manages a research and development program related to the treatment and disposition of radioactive waste. At the Savannah River (South Carolina) and Hanford (Washington) Sites, approximately 90 million gallons of waste are distributed among 226 storage tanks (grouped or collocated in 'tank farms'). This waste may be considered to contain mixed and stratified high activity and low activity constituent waste liquids, salts and sludges that are collectively managed as high level waste (HLW). A large majority of these wastes and associated facilities are unique to the DOE, meaning many of the programs to treat these materials are 'first-of-a-kind' and unprecedented in scope and complexity. As a result, the technologies required to disposition these wastes must be developed from basic principles, or require significant re-engineering to adapt to DOE's specific applications. Of particular interest recently, the development of In-tank or At-Tank separation processes have the potential to treat waste with high returns on financial investment. The primary objective associated with In-Tank or At-Tank separation processes is to accelerate waste processing. Insertion of the technologies will (1) maximize available tank space to efficiently support permanent waste disposition including vitrification; (2) treat problematic waste prior to transfer to the primary processing facilities at either site (i.e., Hanford's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) or Savannah River's Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF)); and (3) create a parallel treatment process to shorten the overall treatment duration. This paper will review the status of several of the R&D projects being developed by the U.S. DOE including insertion of the ion exchange (IX) technologies, such as Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at Savannah River. This has the potential to align the salt and sludge processing life cycle, thereby reducing the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) mission by 7 years. Additionally at the Hanford site, problematic waste streams, such as high boehmite and phosphate wastes, could be treated prior to receipt by WTP and thus dramatically improve the capacity of the facility to process HLW. Treatment of boehmite by continuous sludge leaching (CSL) before receipt by WTP will dramatically reduce the process cycle time for the WTP pretreatment facility, while treatment of phosphate will significantly reduce the number of HLW borosilicate glass canisters produced at the WTP. These and other promising technologies will be discussed.

Aaron, G.; Wilmarth, B.

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

222

DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIFUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT  

SciTech Connect

Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. Conclusions from this work include the following. The CSSX process is capable of reducing {sup 137}Cs in high level radioactive waste by a factor of more than 40,000 using five extraction, two scrub, and five strip stages. Tests demonstrated extraction and strip section stage efficiencies of greater than 93% for the Tank 49H waste test and greater than 88% for the simulant waste test. During a test with HLW, researchers processed 39 liters of Tank 49H solution and the waste raffinate had an average decontamination factor (DF) of 6.78E+04, with a maximum of 1.08E+05. A simulant waste solution ({approx}34.5 liters) with an initial Cs concentration of 83.1 mg/L was processed and had an average DF greater than 5.9E+03, with a maximum DF of greater than 6.6E+03. The difference may be attributable to differences in contactor stage efficiencies. Test results showed the solvent can be stripped of cesium and recycled for {approx}25 solvent turnovers without the occurrence of any measurable solvent degradation or negative effects from minor components. Based on the performance of the 12-stage 2-cm apparatus with the Tank 49H HLW, the projected DF for MCU with seven extraction, two scrub, and seven strip stages operating at a nominal efficiency of 90% is {approx}388,000. At 95% stage efficiency, the DF in MCU would be {approx}3.2 million. Carryover of organic solvent in aqueous streams (and aqueous in organic streams) was less than 0.1% when processing Tank 49H HLW. The entrained solvent concentration measured in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) was as much as {approx}140 mg/L, although that value may be overstated by as much as 50% due to modifier solubility in the DSS. The entrained solvent concentration was measured in the strip effluent (SE) and the results are pending. A steady-state concentration factor (CF) of 15.9 was achieved with Tank 49H HLW. Cesium distribution ratios [D(Cs)] were measured with non-radioactive Tank 49H waste simulant and actual Tank 49H waste. Below is a comparison of D(Cs) values of ESS and 2-cm tests. Batch Extraction-Strip-Scrub (ESS) tests yielded D(Cs) values for extraction of {approx}81-88 for tests with Tank 49H waste and waste simulant. The results from the 2-cm contactor tests were in agreement with values of 58-92 for the Tank 49H HLW test and 54-83 for the simulant waste test. These values are consistent with the reference D(Cs) for extraction of {approx}60. In tests with Tank 49H waste and waste simulant, batch ESS tests measured D(Cs) values for the two scrub stages as {approx}3.5-5.0 for the first scrub stage and {approx}1.0-3.0 for the second scrub stage. In the Tank 49H test, the D(Cs) values for the 2-cm test were far from the ESS values. A D(Cs) value of 161 was measured for the first scrub stage and 10.8 for the second scrub stage. The data suggest that the scrub stage is not operating as effectively as intended. For the simulant test, a D(Cs) value of 1.9 was measured for the first scrub stage; the sample from the second scrub stage was compromised. Measurements of the pH of all stage samples for the Tank 49H test showed that the pH for extraction and scrub stages was 14 and the pH for the strip stages was {approx}7. It is expected that the pH of the second scrub stage would be {approx}12-13. Batch ESS tests measured D(Cs) values for the strip stages to be {approx}0.002-0.010. A high value in Strip No.3 of a test with simulant solution has been attributed to issues associated with the limits of detection for the

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Caldwell, T.; Pak, D; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

223

Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data; Volume 8: Biannual report, August 1989--January 1990  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes evaluations by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of some of the Department of Energy (DOE) activities on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for the six-month period, August 1989--January 1990. This includes reviews of related materials research and plans, information on the Yucca Mountain, Nevada disposal site activities, and other information regarding supporting research and special assistance. Short discussions are given relating to the publications reviewed and complete reviews and evaluations are included. Reports of other work are included in the Appendices.

Interrante, C.G. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of High-Level Waste Management; Fraker, A.C.; Escalante, E. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (MSEL), Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Metallurgy Div.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Evaluation and compilation of DOE [Department of Energy] waste package test data; Biannual report, February 1988--July 1988  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes evaluations by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of Department of Energy (DOE) activities on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for the six month period February 1988 through July 1988. Activities for the DOE Materials Characterization Center are reviewed for the period January 1988 through June 1988. A summary is given of the Yucca Mountain, Nevada disposal site activities. Short discussions relating to the reviewed publications are given and complete reviews and evaluations are included. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Interrante, C.; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.; Plante, E.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Summary - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) for Low-Actvity Waste at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DBVS DBVS ETR Report Date: September 2006 ETR-3 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) for Low Activity Waste (LAW) at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with the safe retrieval, treatment and disposal of 53 million gallons of Hanford radioactive waste. The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being designed to treat and vitrify the High Level Waste (HLW) fraction in 20-25 years. The WTP is undersized for vitrifying the LAW fraction over the same time frame. The DOE is evaluating Bulk Vitrification as an alternative to increasing the size of the WTP LAW treatment process. Bulk vitrification is an in-container melting

226

Waste Determination and Section 3116 of the 2005 National Defense Authorization Act - HQ Perspective  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Level Waste Corporate Board Level Waste Corporate Board Section 3116 A H d t P ti A Headquarters Perspective Martin J. Letourneau Chair, Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group , p y p March 5, 2008 safety performance cleanup closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Section 3116 vs. DOE Order 435.1 * From a technical perspective, the criteria are essentially identical y * Both paths provide a methodology to treat and manage waste incidental to reprocessing as non-HLW * Section 3116 can only be applied in the states of South Carolina and Idaho * For consistency all future WIR Evaluations will be * For consistency, all future WIR Evaluations will be modeled after the Section 3116 process * One key difference is the regulatory responsibility of One key difference is the regulatory responsibility of

227

ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: A NEW PROCESS FOR CHEMICALLY CLEANING SAVANNAH RIVER WASTE TANKS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has 49 high level waste (HLW) tanks that must be emptied, cleaned, and closed as required by the Federal Facilities Agreement. The current method of chemical cleaning uses several hundred thousand gallons per tank of 8 weight percent (wt%) oxalic acid to partially dissolve and suspend residual waste and corrosion products such that the waste can be pumped out of the tank. This adds a significant quantity of sodium oxalate to the tanks and, if multiple tanks are cleaned, renders the waste incompatible with the downstream processing. Tank space is also insufficient to store this stream given the large number of tanks to be cleaned. Therefore, a search for a new cleaning process was initiated utilizing the TRIZ literature search approach, and Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination--Ultraviolet (CORD-UV), a mature technology currently used for decontamination and cleaning of commercial nuclear reactor primary cooling water loops, was identified. CORD-UV utilizes oxalic acid for sludge dissolution, but then decomposes the oxalic acid to carbon dioxide and water by UV treatment outside the system being treated. This allows reprecipitation and subsequent deposition of the sludge into a selected container without adding significant volume to that container, and without adding any new chemicals that would impact downstream treatment processes. Bench top and demonstration loop measurements on SRS tank sludge stimulant demonstrated the feasibility of applying CORD-UV for enhanced chemical cleaning of SRS HLW tanks.

Ketusky, E; Neil Davis, N; Renee Spires, R

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

228

MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Current Understanding and Remaining Challenges in Modeling Long-Term Degradation of Borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Chemical durability is not a single material property that can be uniquely measured. Instead it is the response to a host of coupled material and environmental processes whose rates are estimated by a combination of theory, experiment, and modeling. High-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is perhaps the most studied of any material yet there remain significant technical gaps regarding their chemical durability. The phenomena affecting the long-term performance of HLW glasses in their disposal environment include surface reactions, transport properties to and from the reacting glass surface, and ion exchange between the solid glass and the surrounding solution and alteration products. The rates of these processes are strongly influenced and are coupled through the solution chemistry, which is in turn influenced by the reacting glass and also by reaction with the near-field materials and precipitation of alteration products. Therefore, those processes must be understood sufficiently well to estimate or bound the performance of HLW glass in its disposal environment over geologic time-scales. This article summarizes the current state of understanding of surface reactions, transport properties, and ion exchange along with the near-field materials and alteration products influences on solution chemistry and glass reaction rates. Also summarized are the remaining technical gaps along with recommended approaches to fill those technical gaps.

Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gin, Stephane [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Inagaki, Yaohiro [Dept. of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoda (Japan)

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

230

Summary of national and international fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide activities related to nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs are summarized. Several trends have developed in waste management strategy: All countries having to dispose of reprocessing wastes plan on conversion of the high-level waste (HLW) stream to a borosilicate glass and eventual emplacement of the glass logs, suitably packaged, in a deep geologic repository. Countries that must deal with plutonium-contaminated waste emphasize pluonium recovery, volume reduction and fixation in cement or bitumen in their treatment plans and expect to use deep geologic repositories for final disposal. Commercially available, classical engineering processing are being used worldwide to treat and immobilize low- and intermediate-level wastes (LLW, ILW); disposal to surface structures, shallow-land burial and deep-underground repositories, such as played-out mines, is being done widely with no obvious technical problems. Many countries have established extensive programs to prepare for construction and operation of geologic repositories. Geologic media being studied fall into three main classes: argillites (clay or shale); crystalline rock (granite, basalt, gneiss or gabbro); and evaporates (salt formations). Most nations plan to allow 30 years or longer between discharge of fuel from the reactor and emplacement of HLW or spent fuel is a repository to permit thermal and radioactive decay. Most repository designs are based on the mined-gallery concept, placing waste or spent fuel packages into shallow holes in the floor of the gallery. Many countries have established extensive and costly programs of site evaluation, repository development and safety assessment. Two other waste management problems are the subject of major R and D programs in several countries: stabilization of uranium mill tailing piles; and immobilization or disposal of contaminated nuclear facilities, namely reactors, fuel cycle plants and R and D laboratories.

Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

232

Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development of a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both combined waste stream options in terms of waste loading and/or decay time required before treatment. For Option 1, glass ceramics show an increase in waste loading of 15 mass % and reduction in decay time of 24 years. Decay times of {approx}50 years or longer are close to the expected age of the fuel that will be reprocessed when the modified open or closed fuel cycle is expected to be put into action. Option 2 shows a 2x to 2.5x increase in waste loading with decay times of only 45 years. Note that for Option 2 glass, the required decay time before treatment is only 35 years because of the waste loading limits related to the solubility of MoO{sub 3} in glass. If glass was evaluated for similar waste loadings as those achieved in Option 2 glass ceramics, the decay time would be significantly longer than 45 years. These glass ceramics are not optimized, but already they show the potential to dramatically reduce the amount of waste generated while still utilizing the proven processing technology used for glass production.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Sickafus, Kurt E.

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

233

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

234

SRNL PHASE 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE WTP WASTE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project is currently transitioning its emphasis from an engineering design and construction phase toward facility completion, start-up and commissioning. With this transition, the WTP Project has initiated more detailed assessments of the requirements that must be met during the actual processing of the Hanford Site tank waste. One particular area of interest is the waste qualification program. In general, the waste qualification program involves testing and analysis to demonstrate compliance with waste acceptance criteria, determine waste processability, and demonstrate laboratory-scale unit operations to support WTP operations. The testing and analysis are driven by data quality objectives (DQO) requirements necessary for meeting waste acceptance criteria for transfer of high-level wastes from the tank farms to the WTP, and for ensuring waste processability including proper glass formulations during processing within the WTP complex. Given the successful implementation of similar waste qualification efforts at the Savannah River Site (SRS) which were based on critical technical support and guidance from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), WTP requested subject matter experts (SMEs) from SRNL to support a technology exchange with respect to waste qualification programs in which a critical review of the WTP program could be initiated and lessons learned could be shared. The technology exchange was held on July 18-20, 2011 in Richland, Washington, and was the initial step in a multi-phased approach to support development and implementation of a successful waste qualification program at the WTP. The 3-day workshop was hosted by WTP with representatives from the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and SRNL in attendance as well as representatives from the US DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) and the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) Site Representative office. The purpose of the workshop was to share lessons learned and provide a technology exchange to support development of a technically defensible waste qualification program. The objective of this report is to provide a review, from SRNL's perspective, of the WTP waste qualification program as presented during the workshop. In addition to SRNL's perspective on the general approach to the waste qualification program, more detailed insight into the specific unit operations presented by WTP during the workshop is provided. This report also provides a general overview of the SRS qualification program which serves as a basis for a comparison between the two programs. Recommendations regarding specific steps are made based on the review and SRNL's lessons learned from qualification of SRS low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) to support maturation of the waste qualification program leading to WTP implementation.

Peeler, D.; Hansen, E.; Herman, C.; Marra, S.; Wilmarth, B.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

235

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

236

A One System Integrated Approach to Simulant Selection for Hanford High Level Waste Mixing and Sampling Tests  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capabilities using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This represents one of the largest remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. Previous testing has focused on very specific TOC or WTP test objectives and consequently the simulants were narrowly focused on those test needs. A key attribute in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2010-2 is to ensure testing is performed with a simulant that represents the broad spectrum of Hanford waste. The One System Integrated Project Team is a new joint TOC and WTP organization intended to ensure technical integration of specific TOC and WTP systems and testing. A new approach to simulant definition has been mutually developed that will meet both TOC and WTP test objectives for the delivery and receipt of HLW. The process used to identify critical simulant characteristics, incorporate lessons learned from previous testing, and identify specific simulant targets that ensure TOC and WTP testing addresses the broad spectrum of Hanford waste characteristics that are important to mixing, sampling, and transfer performance are described.

Thien, Mike G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Barnes, Steve M. [URS, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

237

A One System Integrated Approach to Simulant Selection for Hanford High Level Waste Mixing and Sampling Tests - 13342  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capabilities using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This represents one of the largest remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. Previous testing has focused on very specific TOC or WTP test objectives and consequently the simulants were narrowly focused on those test needs. A key attribute in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2010-2 is to ensure testing is performed with a simulant that represents the broad spectrum of Hanford waste. The One System Integrated Project Team is a new joint TOC and WTP organization intended to ensure technical integration of specific TOC and WTP systems and testing. A new approach to simulant definition has been mutually developed that will meet both TOC and WTP test objectives for the delivery and receipt of HLW. The process used to identify critical simulant characteristics, incorporate lessons learned from previous testing, and identify specific simulant targets that ensure TOC and WTP testing addresses the broad spectrum of Hanford waste characteristics that are important to mixing, sampling, and transfer performance are described. (authors)

Thien, Mike G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O Box 850, Richland WA, 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O Box 850, Richland WA, 99352 (United States); Barnes, Steve M. [Waste Treatment Plant, 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland WA 99354 (United States)] [Waste Treatment Plant, 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland WA 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

An investigation on the influence of milling time and calcination temperature on the characterization of nano cerium oxide powder synthesized by mechanochemical route  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: ? Synthesis of nanosized CeO{sub 2} was carried out using mechanochemical reactions plus sequential calcinations procedure. ? The effect of milling time and calcinations procedure on crystallite size and surface area of the as-synthesized powders was investigated. ? The extended milling times were exposed to result in the smaller crystallite size, and hence higher surface area for the as-synthesized powder. ? Higher calcinations temperatures, on the other hand, led to the as-synthesized powder with a larger crystallite size and therefore, lower surface area. ? Activation energy for nanocrystallite growth was calculated during the calcinations procedure and the aforementioned crystallite growth was found to be conducted in the light of interfacial reactions. -- Abstract: The synthesis of nano-sized CeO{sub 2} powder was investigated via mechanochemical reactions between hydrate cerium chloride and sodium hydroxide as the starting materials. The process was followed by a subsequent calcination procedure. Characterization of as-synthesized powder was performed using X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, BrunnerEmmettTeller (BET) nitrogen gas absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and particle size analyzer (PSA). The precursors were milled for different milling times and then were subjected to different heat treatment procedure at variable temperatures from 100 to 700 C. According to the results, milling time and calcination temperatures induce paramountal effects on crystallite size and surface area of as-synthesized powders. In addition, the average activation energy for the growth of nanocrystals during calcination was determined to be about 12.53 kJ/mol, suggesting the influence of interfacial reactions on the crystallite growth during the calcination procedure.

Aminzare, M., E-mail: masoudaminzare@yahoo.com [Materials Engineering Department, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amoozegar, Z. [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadrnezhaad, S.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Steam Reforming Application for Treatment of DOE Sodium Bearing Tank Wastes at INL for ICP  

SciTech Connect

The patented THOR steam reforming waste treatment technology has been selected as the technology of choice for treatment of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). SBW is an acidic tank waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at INL. It consists primarily of waste from decontamination activities and laboratory wastes. SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid, alkali and aluminum nitrates, with minor amounts of many inorganic compounds including radionuclides, mainly cesium and strontium. The THOR steam reforming process will convert the SBW tank waste feed into a dry, solid, granular product. The THOR technology was selected to treat SBW, in part, because it can provide flexible disposal options to accommodate the final disposition path selected for SBW. THOR can produce a final end-product that will meet anticipated requirements for disposal as Remote-Handled TRU (RH-TRU) waste; and, with modifications, THOR can also produce a final endproduct that could be qualified for disposal as High Level Waste (HLW). SBW treatment will be take place within the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), a new facility that will be located at the INTEC. This paper provides an overview of the THOR process chemistry and process equipment being designed for the IWTU.

J. Bradley Mason; Kevin Ryan; Scott Roesener; Michael Cowen; Duane Schmoker; Pat Bacala; Bill Landman

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Method for solidification of radioactive and other hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solidification of liquid radioactive waste, and other hazardous wastes, is accomplished by the method of the invention by incorporating the waste into a porous glass crystalline molded block. The porous block is first loaded with the liquid waste and then dehydrated and exposed to thermal treatment at 50-1,000.degree. C. The porous glass crystalline molded block consists of glass crystalline hollow microspheres separated from fly ash (cenospheres), resulting from incineration of fossil plant coals. In a preferred embodiment, the porous glass crystalline blocks are formed from perforated cenospheres of grain size -400+50, wherein the selected cenospheres are consolidated into the porous molded block with a binder, such as liquid silicate glass. The porous blocks are then subjected to repeated cycles of saturating with liquid waste, and drying, and after the last cycle the blocks are subjected to calcination to transform the dried salts to more stable oxides. Radioactive liquid waste can be further stabilized in the porous blocks by coating the internal surface of the block with metal oxides prior to adding the liquid waste, and by coating the outside of the block with a low-melting glass or a ceramic after the waste is loaded into the block.

Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana A. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Voskresenskaya, Elena N. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Kostin, Eduard M. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Pavlov, Vyacheslav F. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Revenko, Yurii A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Sharonova, Olga M. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Macheret, Yevgeny (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

TECHNICAL PEER REVIEW REPORT - YUCCA MOUNTAIN: WASTE PACKAGE CLOSURE CONTROL SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Waste Package Closure System (WPCS) project is to assist in the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and associated high-level wastes (HLW) at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. Materials will be transferred from the casks into a waste package (WP), sealed, and placed into the underground facility. The SNF/HLW transfer and closure operations will be performed in an aboveground facility. The objective of the Control System is to bring together major components of the entire WPCS ensuring that unit operations correctly receive, and respond to, commands and requests for data. Integrated control systems will be provided to ensure that all operations can be performed remotely. Maintenance on equipment may be done using hands-on or remote methods, depending on complexity, exposure, and ease of access. Operating parameters and nondestructive examination results will be collected and stored as permanent electronic records. Minor weld repairs must be performed within the closure cell if the welds do not meet the inspection acceptance requirements. Any WP with extensive weld defects that require lids to be removed will be moved to the remediation facility for repair.

NA

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

242

World first in high level waste vitrification - A review of French vitrification industrial achievements  

SciTech Connect

AREVA has more than 30 years experience in operating industrial HLW (High Level radioactive Waste) vitrification facilities (AVM - Marcoule Vitrification Facility, R7 and T7 facilities). This vitrification technology was based on borosilicate glasses and induction-heating. AVM was the world's first industrial HLW vitrification facility to operate in-line with a reprocessing plant. The glass formulation was adapted to commercial Light Water Reactor fission products solutions, including alkaline liquid waste concentrates as well as platinoid-rich clarification fines. The R7 and T7 facilities were designed on the basis of the industrial experience acquired in the AVM facility. The AVM vitrification process was implemented at a larger scale in order to operate the R7 and T7 facilities in-line with the UP2 and UP3 reprocessing plants. After more than 30 years of operation, outstanding record of operation has been established by the R7 and T7 facilities. The industrial startup of the CCIM (Cold Crucible Induction Melter) technology with enhanced glass formulation was possible thanks to the close cooperation between CEA and AREVA. CCIM is a water-cooled induction melter in which the glass frit and the waste are melted by direct high frequency induction. This technology allows the handling of highly corrosive solutions and high operating temperatures which permits new glass compositions and a higher glass production capacity. The CCIM technology has been implemented successfully at La Hague plant.

Brueziere, J.; Chauvin, E. [AREVA, 1 place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Defense (France); Piroux, J.C. [Joint Vitrification Laboratory - LCV, Marcoule, BP171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

SMALL-SCALE TESTING OF PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION  

SciTech Connect

The H-Canyon facility will be used to dissolve Pu metal for subsequent purification and conversion to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) using Phase II of HB-Line. To support the new mission, SRNL conducted a series of experiments to produce calcined plutonium (Pu) oxide and measure the physical properties and water adsorption of that material. This data will help define the process operating conditions and material handling steps for HB-Line. An anion exchange column experiment produced 1.4 L of a purified 52.6 g/L Pu solution. Over the next nine weeks, seven Pu(IV) oxalate precipitations were performed using the same stock Pu solution, with precipitator feed acidities ranging from 0.77 M to 3.0 M nitric acid and digestion times ranging from 5 to 30 minutes. Analysis of precipitator filtrate solutions showed Pu losses below 1% for all precipitations. The four larger precipitation batches matched the target oxalic acid addition time of 44 minutes within 4 minutes. The three smaller precipitation batches focused on evaluation of digestion time and the oxalic acid addition step ranged from 25-34 minutes because of pump limitations in the low flow range. Following the precipitations, 22 calcinations were performed in the range of 610-690 C, with the largest number of samples calcined at either 650 or 635 C. Characterization of the resulting PuO{sub 2} batches showed specific surface areas in the range of 5-14 m{sup 2}/g, with 16 of the 22 samples in the range of 5-10 m2/g. For samples analyzed with typical handling (exposed to ambient air for 15-45 minutes with relative humidities of 20-55%), the moisture content as measured by Mass Spectrometry ranged from 0.15 to 0.45 wt % and the total mass loss at 1000 C, as measured by TGA, ranged from 0.21 to 0.58 wt %. For the samples calcined between 635 and 650 C, the moisture content without extended exposure ranged from 0.20 to 0.38 wt %, and the TGA mass loss ranged from 0.26 to 0.46 wt %. Of these latter samples, the samples calcined at 650 C generally had lower specific surface areas and lower moisture contents than the samples calcined at 635 C, which matches expectations from the literature. Taken together, the TGA-MS results for samples handled at nominally 20-50% RH, without extended exposure, indicate that the Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation process followed by calcination at 635-650 C appears capable of producing PuO{sub 2} with moisture content < 0.5 wt% as required by the 3013 Standard. Exposures of PuO{sub 2} samples to ambient air for 3 or more hours generally showed modest mass gains that were primarily gains in moisture content. These results point to the need for a better understanding of the moisture absorption of PuO{sub 2} and serve as a warning that extended exposure times, particularly above the 50% RH level observed in this study will make the production of PuO{sub 2} with less than 0.5 wt % moisture more challenging. Samples analyzed in this study generally contained approximately 2 monolayer equivalents of moisture. In this study, the bulk of the moisture released from samples below 300 C, as did a significant portion of the CO{sub 2}. Samples in this study consistently released a minor amount of NO in the 40-300 C range, but no samples released CO or SO{sub 2}. TGA-MS results also showed that MS moisture content accounted for 80 {+-} 8% of the total mass loss at 1000 C measured by the TGA. The PuO{sub 2} samples produced had particles sizes that typically ranged from 0.2-88 {micro}m, with the mean particle size ranging from 6.4-9.3 {micro}m. The carbon content of ten different calcination batches ranged from 190-480 {micro}g C/g Pu, with an average value of 290 {micro}g C/g Pu. A statistical review of the calcination conditions and resulting SSA values showed that in both cases tested, calcination temperature had a significant effect on SSA, as expected from literature data. The statistical review also showed that batch size had a significant effect on SSA, but the narrow range of batch sizes tested is a compelling reason to set aside that result until tests

Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.; Scogin, J.; Daniel, G.; King, W.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

244

Feasibility Study for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated under a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is the complete calcination (i.e., treatment) of all SBW by December 31, 2012. One of the proposed options for treatment of SBW is vitrification. This study will examine the viability of SBW vitrification. This study describes the process and facilities to treat the SBW, from beginning waste input from INTEC Tank Farm to the final waste forms. Schedules and cost estimates for construction and operation of a Vitrification Facility are included. The study includes a facility layout with drawings, process description and flow diagrams, and preliminary equipment requirements and layouts.

J. J. Quigley; B. D. Raivo; S. O. Bates; S. M. Berry; D. N. Nishioka; P. J. Bunnell

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Waste Heat Management Options: Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Management Options Heat Management Options Industrial Process Heating Systems By Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi E-mail: athekdi@e3minc.com E3M, Inc. August 20, 2009 2 Source of Waste Heat in Industries * Steam Generation * Fluid Heating * Calcining * Drying * Heat Treating * Metal Heating * Metal and Non-metal Melting * Smelting, agglomeration etc. * Curing and Forming * Other Heating Waste heat is everywhere! Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc 3 Waste Heat Sources from Process Heating Equipment * Hot gases - combustion products - Temperature from 300 deg. F. to 3000 deg.F. * Radiation-Convection heat loss - From temperature source of 500 deg. F. to 2500 deg. F. * Sensible-latent heat in heated product - From temperature 400 deg. F. to 2200 deg. F. * Cooling water or other liquids - Temperature from 100 deg. F. to 180 deg. F.

246

HIGH TEMPERATURE TREATMENT OF INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES - SIA RADON EXPERIENCE  

SciTech Connect

This review describes high temperature methods of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) treatment currently used at SIA Radon. Solid and liquid organic and mixed organic and inorganic wastes are subjected to plasma heating in a shaft furnace with formation of stable leach resistant slag suitable for disposal in near-surface repositories. Liquid inorganic radioactive waste is vitrified in a cold crucible based plant with borosilicate glass productivity up to 75 kg/h. Radioactive silts from settlers are heat-treated at 500-700 0C in electric furnace forming cake following by cake crushing, charging into 200 L barrels and soaking with cement grout. Various thermochemical technologies for decontamination of metallic, asphalt, and concrete surfaces, treatment of organic wastes (spent ion-exchange resins, polymers, medical and biological wastes), batch vitrification of incinerator ashes, calcines, spent inorganic sorbents, contaminated soil, treatment of carbon containing 14C nuclide, reactor graphite, lubricants have been developed and implemented.

Sobolev, I.A.; Dmitriev, S.A.; Lifanov, F.A.; Kobelev, A.P.; Popkov, V.N.; Polkanov, M.A.; Savkin, A.E.; Varlakov, A.P.; Karlin, S.V.; Stefanovsky, S.V.; Karlina, O.K.; Semenov, K.N.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

247

Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste  

SciTech Connect

As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

State-of-the-art review of materials properties of nuclear waste forms.  

SciTech Connect

The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) was established at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to assemble a standardized nuclear waste materials data base for use in research, systems and facility design, safety analyses, and waste management decisions. This centralized data base will be provided through the means of a Nuclear Waste Materials Handbook. The first issue of the Handbook will be published in the fall of 1981 in looseleaf format so that it can be updated as additional information becomes available. To ensure utmost reliability, all materials data appearing in the Handbook will be obtained by standard procedures defined in the Handbook and approved by an independent Materials Review Board (MRB) comprised of materials experts from Department of Energy laboratories and from universities and industry. In the interim before publication of the Handbook there is need for a report summarizing the existing materials data on nuclear waste forms. This review summarizes materials property data for the nuclear waste forms that are being developed for immobilization of high-level radioactive waste. It is intended to be a good representation of the knowledge concerning the properties of HLW forms as of March 1981. The table of contents lists the following topics: introduction which covers waste-form categories, and important waste-form materials properties; physical properties; mechanical properties; chemical durability; vaporization; radiation effects; and thermal phase stability.

Mendel, J. E.; Nelson, R. D.; Turcotte, R. P.; Gray, W. J.; Merz, M. D.; Roberts, F. P.; Weber, W. J.; Westsik, Jr., J. H.; Clark, D. E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

CSER 94-004: Criticality safety of double-shell waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

This criticality safety evaluation covers double-shell waste storage tanks (DSTs), double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs), vault tanks, and the 242-A Evaporator located in the High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Farms on the Hanford Site. Limits and controls are specified and the basis for ensuring criticality safety is discussed. A minimum limit of 1,000 is placed upon the solids/plutonium mass ratio in incoming waste. The average solids/Pu mass ratio over all waste in tank farms is estimated to be about 74,500, about 150 times larger than required to assure subcriticality in homogeneous waste. PFP waste in Tank-102-SY has an estimated solids/Pu mass ratio of 10,000. Subcriticality is assured whenever the plutonium concentration is less than 2.6 g. The median reported plutonium concentration for 200 samples of waste solids is about 0.01 g (0.038 g/gal). A surveillance program is proposed to increase the knowledge of the waste and provide added assurance of the high degree of subcriticality.

Rogers, C.A.

1994-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

250

Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization Using Vitreous Ceramics Interim Progress Report October 1994-September 1995  

SciTech Connect

Vitreous ceramic waste forms are being developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to complement glass waste forms in implementing the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) Program to support the US Department of Energy`s environmental restoration efforts. These vitreous ceramics are composed of various metal-oxide crystalline phases embedded in a silicate-glass phase. This work extends the success of vitreous ceramic waste forms to treat wastes with both high metal and high alkali contents. Two successful approaches are discussed: developing high-durability alkali-binding crystals in a durable glassy matrix, and developing water-soluble crystals in a durable and continuous glassy matrix. Nepheline-vitreous ceramics were demonstrated for the immobilization of high-alkali wastes with alkali contents up to 21 wt%. The chemical durability of the nepheline-vitreous ceramics is better than the corresponding glasses, especially in over longer times. Vitreous ceramics with Cs{sub 2}O loading up to 35.4 wt% have been developed. Vitreous ceramic waste forms were developed from 90 and 100% Oak Ridge National Laboratory K-25 pond sludge. Heat treatment resulted in targeted crystal formation of spinels, potassium feldspar, and Ca-P phases. The K-25 pond sludge vitreous ceramics were up to 42 times more durable than high-level environmental assessments (EA) glass. The toxicity characteristics leach procedure (TCLP) concentration of LVC-6 is at least 2,000 times lower than US Environmental Protection Agency limits. Idaho Chemical Process Plant (ICPP) calcined wastes were immobilized into vitreous ceramics with calcine loading up to 88%. These ICPP-vitreous ceramics were more durable than the EA glass by factors of 5 to 30. Vitreous ceramic waste forms are being developed to complement, not to replace, glass waste forms.

Feng, X; Hahn, W K; Gong, M [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Gong, W; Wang, L; Ewing, R C [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences] [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Vectra GSI, Inc. low-level waste melter testing Phase 1 test report  

SciTech Connect

A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Vectra GSI, Inc. was one of seven vendors selected for Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW that were completed during fiscal year 1995. The attached report prepared by Vectra GSI, Inc. describes results of melter testing using slurry feed and dried feeds. Results of feed drying and prereaction tests using a fluid bed calciner and rotary dryer also are described.

Stegen, G.E.; Wilson, C.N.

1996-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

252

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 1: Sections 1-9  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. The methodology is in compliance with the most recent guidance from DOE. It considers the spectrum of accident sequences that could occur in activities covered by the WM PEIS and uses a graded approach emphasizing the risk-dominant scenarios to facilitate discrimination among the various WM PEIS alternatives. Although it allows reasonable estimates of the risk impacts associated with each alternative, the main goal of the accident analysis methodology is to allow reliable estimates of the relative risks among the alternatives. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

EIS-0287-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-SA-01: Supplement Analysis -SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0287-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition DOE/EIS-0287-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (June 2005). In October 2002, DOE issued the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement that provided an analysis of the potential environmental consequences of alternatives/options for the management and disposition of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW), High-Level Waste (HLW) calcine, and HLW facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. DOE/EIS-0287-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (June 2005)

254

Reference concepts for the final disposal of LWR spent fuel and other high activity wastes in Spain  

SciTech Connect

Studies over the last three years have been recently concluded with the selection of a reference repository concept for the final disposal of spent fuel and other high activity wastes in deep geological formations. Two non-site specific preliminary designs, at a conceptual level, have been developed; one considers granite as the host rock and the other rock salt formations. The Spanish General Radioactive Waste Program also considers clay as a potential host rock for HLW deep disposal; conceptualization for a deep repository in clay is in the initial phase of development. The salt repository concept contemplates the disposal of the HLW in self-shielding casks emplaced in the drifts of an underground facility, excavated at a depth of 850 m in a bedded salt formation. The Custos Type I(7) cask admits up to seven intact PWR fuel assemblies or 21 of BWR type. The final repository facilities are planned to accept a total of 20,000 fuel assemblies (PWR and BWR) and 50 vitrified waste canisters over a period of 25 years. The total space needed for the surface facilities amounts to 322,000 m{sup 2}, including the rock salt dump. The space required for the underground facilities amounts to 1.2 km{sup 2}, approximately. The granite repository concept contemplates the disposal of the HLW in carbon steel canisters, embedded in a 0.75 m thick buffer of swelling smectite clay, in the drifts of an underground facility, excavated at a depth of 55 m in granite. Each canister can host 3 PWR or 9 BWR fuel assemblies. For this concept the total number of canisters needed amounts to 4,860. The space required for the surface and underground facilities is similar to that of the salt concept. The technical principles and criteria used for the design are discussed, and a description of the repository concept is presented.

Huertas, F.; Ulibarri, A. [ENRESA, Madrid (Spain)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Preliminary Assessment of the Hanford Tank Waste Feed Acceptance and Product Qualification Programs  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) is engaging the national laboratories to provide the scientific and technological rigor to support EM program and project planning, technology development and deployment, project execution, and assessment of program outcomes. As an early demonstration of this new responsibility, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have been chartered to implement a science and technology program addressing Hanford Tank waste feed acceptance and product qualification. As a first step, the laboratories examined the technical risks and uncertainties associated with the planned waste feed acceptance and qualification testing for Hanford tank wastes. Science and technology gaps were identified for work associated with 1) feed criteria development with emphasis on identifying the feed properties and the process requirements, 2) the Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process qualification program, and 3) the WTP HLW glass product qualification program. Opportunities for streamlining the accetpance and qualification programs were also considered in the gap assessment. Technical approaches to address the science and technology gaps and/or implement the opportunities were identified. These approaches will be further refined and developed as strong integrated teams of researchers from national laboratories, contractors, industry, and academia are brought together to provide the best science and technology solutions. Pursuing the identified approaches will have immediate and long-term benefits to DOE in reducing risks and uncertainties associated with tank waste removal and preparation, transfers from the tank farm to the WTP, processing within the WTP Pretreatment Facility, and in producing qualified HLW glass products. Additionally, implementation of the identified opportunities provides the potential for long-term cost savings given the anticipated facility life of WTP.

Herman, C. C.; Adamson, Duane J.; Herman, D. T.; Peeler, David K.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Reboul, S. H.; Stone, M. E.; Peterson, Reid A.; Chun, Jaehun; Fort, James A.; Vienna, John D.; Wells, Beric E.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Tank waste remediation system operation and utilization plan,vol. I {ampersand} II  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL) is in the first stages of contracting with private companies for the treatment and immobilization of tank wastes. The components of tank waste retrieval, treatment, and immobilization have been conceived in two phases (Figure 1.0-1). To meet RL's anticipated contractual requirements, the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC) companies will be required to provide waste feeds to the private companies consistent with waste envelopes that define the feeds in terms of quantity, and concentration of both chemicals and radionuclides. The planning that supports delivery of the feed must be well thought out in four basic areas: (1) Low-activity waste (LAW)/high-level waste (HLW) feed staging plans. How is waste moved within the existing tanks to deliver waste that corresponds to the defined feed envelopes to support the Private Contractor's processing schedule and processing rate? (2) Single-shell tank (SST) retrieval sequence. How are Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1994) milestones for SST retrieval integrated into the Phase I processing to set the stage for Phase II processing to complete the mission? (3) Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flowsheet. How do materials flow from existing tank inventories through: (1) blending and pretreatment functions in the double-shell tanks (DSTs), (2) contractor processing facilities, and (3) stored waste forms (Figure 1.0-2); (4) Storage and disposal of the immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) and immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) product. How is the ILAW and IHLW product received from the private companies, the ILAW disposed onsite, and the IHLW stored onsite until final disposal?

Kirkbride, R.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Cost estimate of high-level radioactive waste containers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the bottoms-up cost estimates for fabrication of high-level radioactive waste disposal containers based on the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design (SCP-CD). These estimates were acquired by Babcock and Wilcox (B&S) under sub-contract to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The estimates were obtained for two leading container candidate materials (Alloy 825 and CDA 715), and from other three vendors who were selected from a list of twenty solicited. Three types of container designs were analyzed that represent containers for spent fuel, and for vitrified high-level waste (HLW). The container internal structures were assumed to be AISI-304 stainless steel in all cases, with an annual production rate of 750 containers. Subjective techniques were used for estimating QA/QC costs based on vendor experience and the specifications derived for the LLNL-YMP Quality Assurance program. In addition, an independent QA/QC analysis is reported which was prepared by Kasier Engineering. Based on the cost estimates developed, LLNL recommends that values of $825K and $62K be used for the 1991 TSLCC for the spent fuel and HLW containers, respectively. These numbers represent the most conservative among the three vendors, and are for the high-nickel anstenitic steel (Alloy 825). 6 refs., 7 figs.

Russell, E.W.; Clarke, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Domian, H.A. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)] [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Madson, A.A. [Kaiser Engineers California Corp., Oakland, CA (United States)] [Kaiser Engineers California Corp., Oakland, CA (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

ESTIMATING HIGH LEVEL WASTE MIXING PERFORMANCE IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

SciTech Connect

The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of high level waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tank Operations Contractor (TOC), Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is currently demonstrating mixing, sampling, and batch transfer performance in two different sizes of small-scale DSTs. The results of these demonstrations will be used to estimate full-scale DST mixing performance and provide the key input to a programmatic decision on the need to build a dedicated feed certification facility. This paper discusses the results from initial mixing demonstration activities and presents data evaluation techniques that allow insight into the performance relationships of the two small tanks. The next steps, sampling and batch transfers, of the small scale demonstration activities are introduced. A discussion of the integration of results from the mixing, sampling, and batch transfer tests to allow estimating full-scale DST performance is presented.

THIEN MG; GREER DA; TOWNSON P

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

259

INSTALLATION OF BUBBLERS IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITED DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC assumed the liquid waste contract at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the summer of 2009. The main contractual agreement was to close 22 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks in eight years. To achieve this aggressive commitment, faster waste processing throughout the SRS liquid waste facilities will be required. Part of the approach to achieve faster waste processing is to increase the canister production rate of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) from approximately 200 canisters filled with radioactive waste glass per year to 400 canisters per year. To reach this rate for melter throughput, four bubblers were installed in the DWPF Melter in the late summer of 2010. This effort required collaboration between SRR, SRR critical subcontractor EnergySolutions, and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, including the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The tasks included design and fabrication of the bubblers and related equipment, testing of the bubblers for various technical issues, the actual installation of the bubblers and related equipment, and the initial successful operation of the bubblers in the DWPF Melter.

Smith, M.; Iverson, D.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

260

Summary Of Cold Crucible Vitrification Tests Results With Savannah River Site High Level Waste Surrogates  

SciTech Connect

The cold crucible inductive melting (CCIM) technology successfully applied for vitrification of low- and intermediate-level waste (LILW) at SIA Radon, Russia, was tested to be implemented for vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) stored at Savannah River Site, USA. Mixtures of Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) and 4 (SB4) waste surrogates and borosilicate frits as slurries were vitrified in bench- (236 mm inner diameter) and full-scale (418 mm inner diameter) cold crucibles. Various process conditions were tested and major process variables were determined. Melts were poured into 10L canisters and cooled to room temperature in air or in heat-insulated boxes by a regime similar to Canister Centerline Cooling (CCC) used at DWPF. The products with waste loading from ~40 to ~65 wt.% were investigated in details. The products contained 40 to 55 wt.% waste oxides were predominantly amorphous; at higher waste loadings (WL) spinel structure phases and nepheline were present. Normalized release values for Li, B, Na, and Si determined by PCT procedure remain lower than those from EA glass at waste loadings of up to 60 wt.%.

Stefanovsky, Sergey; Marra, James; Lebedev, Vladimir

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

THE RETRIEVAL KNOWLEDGE CENTER EVALUATION OF LOW TANK LEVEL MIXING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK RETRIEVAL 10516  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Complex has over two-hundred underground storage tanks containing over 80-million gallons of legacy waste from the production of nuclear weapons. The majority of the waste is located at four major sites across the nation and is planned for treatment over a period of almost forty years. The DOE Office of Technology Innovation & Development within the Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) sponsors technology research and development programs to support processing advancements and technology maturation designed to improve the costs and schedule for disposal of the waste and closure of the tanks. Within the waste processing focus area are numerous technical initiatives which included the development of a suite of waste removal technologies to address the need for proven equipment and techniques to remove high level radioactive wastes from the waste tanks that are now over fifty years old. In an effort to enhance the efficiency of waste retrieval operations, the DOE-EM Office of Technology Innovation & Development funded an effort to improve communications and information sharing between the DOE's major waste tank locations as it relates to retrieval. The task, dubbed the Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) was co-lead by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with core team members representing the Oak Ridge and Idaho sites, as well as, site contractors responsible for waste tank operations. One of the greatest challenges to the processing and closure of many of the tanks is complete removal of all tank contents. Sizeable challenges exist for retrieving waste from High Level Waste (HLW) tanks; with complications that are not normally found with tank retrieval in commercial applications. Technologies currently in use for waste retrieval are generally adequate for bulk removal; however, removal of tank heels, the materials settled in the bottom of the tank, using the same technology have proven to be difficult. Through the RKC, DOE-EM funded an evaluation of adaptable commercial technologies that could assist with the removal of the tank heels. This paper will discuss the efforts and results of developing the RKC to improve communications and discussion of tank waste retrieval through a series of meetings designed to identify technical gaps in retrieval technologies at the DOE Hanford and Savannah River Sites. This paper will also describe the results of an evaluation of commercially available technologies for low level mixing as they might apply to HLW tank heel retrievals.

Fellinger, A.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

262

Baseline Flowsheet Generation for the Treatment and Disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Sodium Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

The High-Level Waste (HLW) Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) must implement technologies and processes to treat and qualify radioactive wastes located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) for permanent disposal. This paper describes the approach and accomplishments to date for completing development of a baseline vitrification treatment flowsheet for sodium-bearing waste (SBW), including development of a relational database used to manage the associated process assumptions. A process baseline has been developed that includes process requirements, basis and assumptions, process flow diagrams, a process description, and a mass balance. In the absence of actual process or experimental results, mass and energy balance data for certain process steps are based on assumptions. Identification, documentation, validation, and overall management of the flowsheet assumptions are critical to ensuring an integrated, focused program. The INEEL HLW Program initially used a roadmapping methodology, developed through the INEEL Environmental Management Integration Program, to identify, document, and assess the uncertainty and risk associated with the SBW flowsheet process assumptions. However, the mass balance assumptions, process configuration and requirements should be accessible to all program participants. This need resulted in the creation of a relational database that provides formal documentation and tracking of the programmatic uncertainties related to the SBW flowsheet.

Barnes, Charles Marshall; Lauerhass, Lance; Olson, Arlin Leland; Taylor, Dean Dalton; Valentine, James Henry; Lockie, Keith Andrew

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Baseline Flowsheet Generation for the Treatment and Disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Sodium Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

The High-Level Waste (HLW) Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) must implement technologies and processes to treat and qualify radioactive wastes located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) for permanent disposal. This paper describes the approach and accomplishments to date for completing development of a baseline vitrification treatment flowsheet for sodium-bearing waste (SBW), including development of a relational database used to manage the associated process assumptions. A process baseline has been developed that includes process requirements, basis and assumptions, process flow diagrams, a process description, and a mass balance. In the absence of actual process or experimental results, mass and energy balance data for certain process steps are based on assumptions. Identification, documentation, validation, and overall management of the flowsheet assumptions are critical to ensuring an integrated, focused program. The INEEL HLW Program initially used a roadmapping methodology, developed through the INEEL Environmental Management Integration Program, to identify, document, and assess the uncertainty and risk associated with the SBW flowsheet process assumptions. However, the mass balance assumptions, process configuration and requirements should be accessible to all program participants. This need resulted in the creation of a relational database that provides formal documentation and tracking of the programmatic uncertainties related to the SBW flowsheet.

Barnes, C.M.; Lauerhass, L.; Olson, A.L.; Taylor, D.D.; Valentine, J.H.; Lockie, K.A. (DOE- ID)

2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

264

Sodium-bearing Waste Treatment Technology Evaluation Report  

SciTech Connect

Sodium-bearing waste (SBW) disposition is one of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operation Offices (NE-ID) and State of Idahos top priorities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL has been working over the past several years to identify a treatment technology that meets NE-ID and regulatory treatment requirements, including consideration of stakeholder input. Many studies, including the High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), have resulted in the identification of five treatment alternatives that form a short list of perhaps the most appropriate technologies for the DOE to select from. The alternatives are (a) calcination with maximum achievable control technology (MACT) upgrade, (b) steam reforming, (c) cesium ion exchange (CsIX) with immobilization, (d) direct evaporation, and (e) vitrification. Each alternative has undergone some degree of applied technical development and preliminary process design over the past four years. This report presents a summary of the applied technology and process design activities performed through February 2004. The SBW issue and the five alternatives are described in Sections 2 and 3, respectively. Details of preliminary process design activities for three of the alternatives (steam reforming, CsIX, and direct evaporation) are presented in three appendices. A recent feasibility study provides the details for calcination. There have been no recent activities performed with regard to vitrification; that section summarizes and references previous work.

Charles M. Barnes; Arlin L. Olson; Dean D. Taylor

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Testing to evaluate the suitability of waste forms developed for electrometallurgically treated spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel for disposal in the Yucca Mountain reporsitory.  

SciTech Connect

The results of laboratory testing and modeling activities conducted to support the development of waste forms to immobilize wastes generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel and their qualification for disposal in the federal high-level radioactive waste repository are summarized in this report. Tests and analyses were conducted to address issues related to the chemical, physical, and radiological properties of the waste forms relevant to qualification. These include the effects of composition and thermal treatments on the phase stability, radiation effects, and methods for monitoring product consistency. Other tests were conducted to characterize the degradation and radionuclide release behaviors of the ceramic waste form (CWF) used to immobilize waste salt and the metallic waste form (MWF) used to immobilize metallic wastes and to develop models for calculating the release of radionuclides over long times under repository-relevant conditions. Most radionuclides are contained in the binder glass phase of the CWF and in the intermetallic phase of the MWF. The release of radionuclides from the CWF is controlled by the dissolution rate of the binder glass, which can be tracked using the same degradation model that is used for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glass. Model parameters measured for the aqueous dissolution of the binder glass are used to model the release of radionuclides from a CWF under all water-contact conditions. The release of radionuclides from the MWF is element-specific, but the release of U occurs the fastest under most test conditions. The fastest released constituent was used to represent all radionuclides in model development. An empirical aqueous degradation model was developed to describe the dependence of the radionuclide release rate from a MWF on time, pH, temperature, and the Cl{sup -} concentration. The models for radionuclide release from the CWF and MWF are both bounded by the HLW glass degradation model developed for use in repository licensing, and HLW glass can be used as a surrogate for both CWF and MWF in performance assessment calculations. Test results indicate that the radionuclide release from CWF and MWF is adequately described by other relevant performance assessment models, such as the models for the solution chemistries in breached waste packages, dissolved concentration limits, and the formation of radionuclide-bearing colloids.

Ebert, W. E.

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Enhanced Chemical Cleaning: A New Process for Chemically Cleaning Savannah River Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) there are 49 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks that eventually must be emptied, cleaned, and closed. The current method of chemically cleaning SRS HLW tanks, commonly referred to as Bulk Oxalic Acid Cleaning (BOAC), requires about a half million liters (130,000 gallons) of 8 weight percent (wt%) oxalic acid to clean a single tank. During the cleaning, the oxalic acid acts as the solvent to digest sludge solids and insoluble salt solids, such that they can be suspended and pumped out of the tank. Because of the volume and concentration of acid used, a significant quantity of oxalate is added to the HLW process. This added oxalate significantly impacts downstream processing. In addition to the oxalate, the volume of liquid added competes for the limited available tank space. A search, therefore, was initiated for a new cleaning process. Using TRIZ (Teoriya Resheniya Izobretatelskikh Zadatch or roughly translated as the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving), Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination with Ultraviolet Light (CORD-UV{reg_sign}), a mature technology used in the commercial nuclear power industry was identified as an alternate technology. Similar to BOAC, CORD-UV{reg_sign} also uses oxalic acid as the solvent to dissolve the metal (hydr)oxide solids. CORD-UV{reg_sign} is different, however, since it uses photo-oxidation (via peroxide/UV or ozone/UV to form hydroxyl radicals) to decompose the spent oxalate into carbon dioxide and water. Since the oxalate is decomposed and off-gassed, CORD-UV{reg_sign} would not have the negative downstream oxalate process impacts of BOAC. With the oxalate destruction occurring physically outside the HLW tank, re-precipitation and transfer of the solids, as well as regeneration of the cleaning solution can be performed without adding additional solids, or a significant volume of liquid to the process. With a draft of the pre-conceptual Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) flowsheet, taking full advantage of the many CORD-UV{reg_sign} benefits, performance demonstration testing was initiated using available SRS sludge simulant. The demonstration testing confirmed that ECC is a viable technology, as it can dissolve greater than 90% of the sludge simulant and destroy greater than 90% of the oxalates. Additional simulant and real waste testing are planned.

Ketusky, Edward; Spires, Renee; Davis, Neil

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

267

EIS-0287: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0287: Final Environmental Impact Statement Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition This EIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternatives for managing high- level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW) and newly generated liq- uid waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in liquid and solid forms. This EIS also analyzes alternatives for the final disposition of HLW management facilities at the INEEL after their missions are completed. After considering comments on the Draft EIS (DOE/EIS- 0287D), as well as information on available treatment technologies, DOE and the State of Idaho have iden- tified separate preferred alternatives for

268

United States Program on Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

The President signed the Congressional Joint Resolution on July 23, 2002, that designated the Yucca Mountain site for a proposed geologic repository to dispose of the nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is currently focusing its efforts on submitting a license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in December 2004 for construction of the proposed repository. The legislative framework underpinning the U.S. repository program is the basis for its continuity and success. The repository development program has significantly benefited from international collaborations with other nations in the Americas.

Stewart, L.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

269

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton...

270

Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is radioactive material no longer considered valuable...238U, 235U, and 226Ra (where the latter decays to 222Rn gas by emitting an alpha particle) or formed through fission of fissile radioisotopes ...

Rob P. Rechard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

USE OF AN EQUILIBRIUM MODEL TO FORECAST DISSOLUTION EFFECTIVENESS, SAFETY IMPACTS, AND DOWNSTREAM PROCESSABILITY FROM OXALIC ACID AIDED SLUDGE REMOVAL IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS 1-15  

SciTech Connect

This thesis details a graduate research effort written to fulfill the Magister of Technologiae in Chemical Engineering requirements at the University of South Africa. The research evaluates the ability of equilibrium based software to forecast dissolution, evaluate safety impacts, and determine downstream processability changes associated with using oxalic acid solutions to dissolve sludge heels in Savannah River Site High Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 1-15. First, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Coupled with a model, a material balance determines the fate of hypothetical worst-case sludge in the treatment and neutralization tanks during each chemical adjustment. Although sludge is dissolved, after neutralization more is created within HLW. An energy balance determines overpressurization and overheating to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen may overwhelm the purge ventilation. Limiting the heel volume treated/acid added and processing the solids through vitrification is preferred and should not significantly increase the number of glass canisters.

KETUSKY, EDWARD

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Efficient preparation of nanocrystalline anatase TiO2 and V/TiO2 thin layers using microwave drying and/or microwave calcination technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be significantly improved and extended if microwave energy is employed during the drying and/or calcination step many important applications, including, among others, dye-sensitized solar cells [1] or photocatalytic of the hydrolysis rate [6]. Sol­gel method has several advantages such as low processing temperature, homogeneity

Cirkva, Vladimir

273

A Model of Transient Thermal Transport Phenomena Applied to the Carbonation and Calcination of a Sorbent Particle for Calcium Oxide Looping CO2 Capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

looping is selected as the model cycle because of its suitability for solar-driven carbon dioxide captureA Model of Transient Thermal Transport Phenomena Applied to the Carbonation and Calcination of a Sorbent Particle for Calcium Oxide Looping CO2 Capture Lindsey Yue and Wojciech Lipi´nski, The Australian

274

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

275

Simulation of Syngas Production from Municipal Solid Waste Gasification in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Using Aspen Plus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation of Syngas Production from Municipal Solid Waste Gasification in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Using Aspen Plus ... When the reaction kinetics is not known, a rigorous reactor and multiphase equilibrium based on the minimization of the total Gibbs free energy of the product mixture (an RGibbs block) is preferred to predict the equilibrium composition of the produced syngas. ... Catalytic steam gasification of municipal solid waste (MSW) to produce hydrogen-rich gas or syngas (H2 + CO) with calcined dolomite as a catalyst in a bench-scale downstream fixed bed reactor was investigated. ...

Miaomiao Niu; Yaji Huang; Baosheng Jin; Xinye Wang

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

276

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From Waste to Energy To Energy from Waste #12;9.00-9.30: Registration 9.30-9.40: Chairman Ella Stengler opens

Columbia University

277

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT FOR HANFORD'S LOW ACTIVITY WASTE AND SECONDARY WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of I-125/129 and Tc-99 to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Ninety six grams of radioactive product were made for testing. The second campaign commenced using SRS LAW chemically trimmed to look like Hanford's LAW. Six hundred grams of radioactive product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Cozzi, A.; Bannochie, C.; Burket, P.; Daniel, G.

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

278

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

279

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING WITH ACUTAL HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTES VERIFYING FBSR AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the cleanup mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is one of the supplementary treatments being considered. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and other secondary wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates/nitrites, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, and/or radio-nuclides like I-129 and Tc-99. Radioactive testing of Savannah River LAW (Tank 50) shimmed to resemble Hanford LAW and actual Hanford LAW (SX-105 and AN-103) have produced a ceramic (mineral) waste form which is the same as the non-radioactive waste simulants tested at the engineering scale. The radioactive testing demonstrated that the FBSR process can retain the volatile radioactive components that cannot be contained at vitrification temperatures. The radioactive and nonradioactive mineral waste forms that were produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process are shown to be as durable as LAW glass.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Bannochie, C.; Daniel, G.; Nash, C.; Cozzi, A.; Herman, C.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

280

Deployment of Performance Management Methodology as part of Liquid Waste Program at Savannah River Site - 12178  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR) assumed the management lead of the Liquid Waste (LW) Program at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The four SRR partners and AREVA, as an integrated subcontractor are performing the ongoing effort to safely and reliably: - Close High Level Waste (HLW) storage tanks; - Maximize waste throughput at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF); - Process salt waste into stable final waste form; - Manage the HLW liquid waste material stored at SRS. As part of these initiatives, SRR and AREVA deployed a performance management methodology based on Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) at the DWPF in order to support the required production increase. This project took advantage of lessons learned by AREVA through the deployment of Total Productive Maintenance and Visual Management methodologies at the La Hague reprocessing facility in France. The project also took advantage of measurement data collected from different steps of the DWPF process by the SRR team (Melter Engineering, Chemical Process Engineering, Laboratory Operations, Plant Operations). Today the SRR team has a standard method for measuring processing time throughout the facility, a reliable source of objective data for use in decision-making at all levels, and a better balance between engineering department goals and operational goals. Preliminary results show that the deployment of this performance management methodology to the LW program at SRS has already significantly contributed to the DWPF throughput increases and is being deployed in the Saltstone facility. As part of the liquid waste program on Savannah River Site, SRR committed to enhance production throughput of DWPF. Beyond technical modifications implemented at different location of the facility, SRR deployed performance management methodology based on OEE metrics. The implementation benefited from the experience gained by AREVA in its own facilities in France. OEE proved to be a valuable tool in order to support the enhancement program in DWPF by providing unified metrics to measure plant performances, identify bottleneck location, and rank the most time consuming causes from objective data shared between the different groups belonging to the organization. Beyond OEE, the Visual Management tool adapted from the one used at La Hague were also provided in order to further enhance communication within the operating teams. As a result of all the initiatives implemented on DWPF, achieved production has been increased to record rates from FY10 to FY11. It is expected that thanks to the performance management tools now available within DWPF, these results will be sustained and even improved in the future to meet system plan targets. (authors)

Prod'homme, A.; Drouvot, O.; Gregory, J. [AREVA, Paris (France); Barnes, B.; Hodges, B.; Hart, M. [SRR, Aiken, SC (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE BATCH 4 VARIABILITY STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing for vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) in early FY2007. To support this process, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 503 for vitrifying this sludge batch, based on the composition projection provided by the Liquid Waste Organization on June 22, 2006. Frit 418 was also recommended for possible use during the transition from SB3 to SB4. A critical step in the SB4 qualification process is to demonstrate the applicability of the durability models, which are used as part of the DWPF's process control strategy, to the glass system of interest via a variability study. A variability study is an experimentally-driven assessment of the predictability and acceptability of the quality of the vitrified waste product that is anticipated from the processing of a sludge batch. At the DWPF, the durability of the vitrified waste product is not directly measured. Instead, the durability is predicted using a set of models that relate the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response of a glass to the chemical composition of that glass. In addition, a glass sample is taken during the processing of that sludge batch, the sample is transmitted to SRNL, and the durability is measured to confirm acceptance. The objective of a variability study is to demonstrate that these models are applicable to the glass composition region anticipated during the processing of the sludge batch - in this case the Frit 503 - SB4 compositional region. The success of this demonstration allows the DWPF to confidently rely on the predictions of the durability/composition models as they are used in the control of the DWPF process.

Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

282

Evaluation of DMDOHEMA based supported liquid membrane system for high level waste remediation under simulated conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract N,N?-dimethyl-N,N?-dioctyl-2,(2?-hexyloxyethyl) malonamide (DMDOHEMA) has been proposed as solvent for the partitioning of radiotoxic minor actinides from high-level waste (HLW) solutions. The facilitated transport of 241Am(III), 239Pu(IV), 233U(VI), 237Np(V) across supported liquid membrane (SLM) impregnated with DMDOHEMA solution in n-dodecane was investigated under varying conditions of feed acidity, receiver phase composition, carrier concentration, and membrane thickness. Micro porous PTFE membrane was used as the polymeric support. There was a decrease in the transport of metal ions under the pressurized heavy water reactor simulated HLW (PHWR-SHLW) conditions. The physical stability of the SLM impregnated with the carrier was investigated for ~60 days by performing Am(III) permeation studies. Marginal variation in the transport behavior suggested reasonably good stability of the impregnated carrier in the membrane pores. A simple mathematical model has been developed to simulate experimental data and to explain quantitatively the role of different parameters.

Ajay B. Patil; Pankaj Kandwal; V.S. Shinde; P.N. Pathak; P.K. Mohapatra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Investigation of the possibility of using hydrogranulation in reprocessing radioactive wastes of radiochemical production facilities  

SciTech Connect

Radio-chemical production facilities are constantly accumulating liquid radioactive wastes (still residues as the result of evaporation of extraction and adsorption solutions etc.) which are a complex multicomponent mixtures. The wastes are frequently stored for extended periods of time while awaiting disposition and in some cases, and this is much worse, they are released into the environment. In this report, I would like to draw your attention to some results we have obtained from investigations aimed at simplifying handing of such wastes by the precipitation of hard to dissolve metal hydroxides, the flocculation of the above into granules with the help of surface-active agents (in this case a polyacrylamide - PAA), quickly precipitated and easily filtered. The precipitate may be quickly dried and calcinated, if necessary, and transformed into a dense oxide sinter. In other words it may be transformed into a material convenient for storage or burial.

Revyakin, V.; Borisov, L.M. [All Russian Scientific and Research Institute of Non-Organic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Performance assessment of the direct disposal in unsaturated tuff or spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste owned by USDOE: Volume 2, Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect

This assessment studied the performance of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a hypothetical repository in unsaturated tuff. The results of this 10-month study are intended to help guide the Office of Environment Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE) on how to prepare its wastes for eventual permanent disposal. The waste forms comprised spent fuel and high-level waste currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Hanford reservations. About 700 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of the waste under study is stored at INEL, including graphite spent nuclear fuel, highly enriched uranium spent fuel, low enriched uranium spent fuel, and calcined high-level waste. About 2100 MTHM of weapons production fuel, currently stored on the Hanford reservation, was also included. The behavior of the waste was analyzed by waste form and also as a group of waste forms in the hypothetical tuff repository. When the waste forms were studied together, the repository was assumed also to contain about 9200 MTHM high-level waste in borosilicate glass from three DOE sites. The addition of the borosilicate glass, which has already been proposed as a final waste form, brought the total to about 12,000 MTHM.

Rechard, R.P. [ed.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

286

Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Nuclear Materials Contained in High-Activity Waste Arising from the Operations at the 'SHELTER' Facility  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the nuclear accident at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986, the explosion dispeesed nuclear materials contained in the nuclear fuel of the reactor core over the destroyed facilities at Unit No. 4 and over the territory immediately adjacent to the destroyed unit. The debris was buried under the Cascade Wall. Nuclear materials at the SHELTER can be characterized as spent nuclear fuel, fresh fuel assemblies (including fuel assemblies with damaged geometry and integrity, and individual fuel elements), core fragments of the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4, finely-dispersed fuel (powder/dust), uranium and plutonium compounds in water solutions, and lava-like nuclear fuel-containing masses. The new safe confinement (NSC) is a facility designed to enclose the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4 destroyed by the accident. Construction of the NSC involves excavating operations, which are continuously monitored including for the level of radiation. The findings of such monitoring at the SHELTER site will allow us to characterize the recovered radioactive waste. When a process material categorized as high activity waste (HAW) is detected the following HLW management operations should be involved: HLW collection; HLW fragmentation (if appropriate); loading HAW into the primary package KT-0.2; loading the primary package filled with HAW into the transportation cask KTZV-0.2; and storing the cask in temporary storage facilities for high-level solid waste. The CDAS system is a system of 3He tubes for neutron coincidence counting, and is designed to measure the percentage ratio of specific nuclear materials in a 200-liter drum containing nuclear material intermixed with a matrix. The CDAS consists of panels with helium counter tubes and a polyethylene moderator. The panels are configured to allow one to position a waste-containing drum and a drum manipulator. The system operates on the add a source basis using a small Cf-252 source to identify irregularities in the matrix during an assay. The platform with the source is placed under the measurement chamber. The platform with the source material is moved under the measurement chamber. The design allows one to move the platform with the source in and out, thus moving the drum. The CDAS system and radioactive waste containers have been built. For each drum filled with waste two individual measurements (passive/active) will be made. This paper briefly describes the work carried out to assess qualitatively and quantitatively the nuclear materials contained in high-level waste at the SHELTER facility. These efforts substantially increased nuclear safety and security at the facility.

Cherkas, Dmytro

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Preparation of a coprecipitated Cu/ZnO catalyst for the methanol synthesis from CO2 effects of the calcination and reduction conditions on the catalytic performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cu/ZnO catalysts having a Cu:Zn molar ratio of 50:50 were prepared from hydroxycarbonate precursors, such as aurichalcite and zincian-malachite. CuO crystallite size of the calcined catalysts obtained from aurichalcite greatly depended on the heating rate for the calcination. Very small crystallites of CuO were formed at low heating rates. On the other hand, no effect of the heating rate on the CuO crystallites was observed for the catalysts obtained from zincian-malachite. The calcined catalyst containing the very small crystallites of CuO was reduced under various conditions. The catalysts prepared were then subjected to the methanol synthesis from CO2. Activity and selectivity of the catalysts depended on the procedure for the reduction and the reductant. The most active and selective catalyst was obtained by the reduction with methanol at 443K for 17h. It was suggested that the high activity and selectivity resulted from the high dispersion of Cu and the preferential emergence of flat surface Cu sites.

Shin-ichiro Fujita; Shuhei Moribe; Yoshinori Kanamori; Miki Kakudate; Nobutsune Takezawa

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Reduction of NO{sub x} emissions from cement kiln/calciner through the use of the NO{sub x}OUT process  

SciTech Connect

The post combustion reduction of NO{sub x} using urea has proven to be an effective method in controlling NO{sub x} from various combustion sources. This process, a selective non-catalytic reduction process known as NO{sub x}OUT, has been successfully demonstrated in a cement kiln/calciner operated by Ash Grove Cement. Testing was done under ten different kiln/calciner operating conditions. Using three to four injectors, NO{sub x} was efficiently reduced from 350--600 pounds per hour (3.5--6.0 lb/ton of clinker) to less than 100 pounds per hour (1.0 lb/ton of clinker). This calculates to a NO{sub x} reduction of > 80% for most cases. Chemical utilization was greater than 50%. A high degree of mixing and a long residence time at an appropriate temperature present in the preheater tower contributed to these excellent results. An average ammonia slip was four ppm above a baseline level at normalized stoichiometric ratio of 1. Based on this demonstration, cement kiln/calciners have been identified as an ideal application for the NO{sub x}OUT Process. NO{sub x} was efficiently and effectively reduced with minimal byproduct emissions and virtually no effect on plant operations.

Sun, W.H. [Nalco Fuel Tech., Naperville, IL (United States); Bisnett, M.J.; Kirk, D.W. [Nalco Fuel Tech, Santa Fe Springs, CA (United States); Steuch, H.E. [Ash Grove Cement Co., Portland, OR (United States); Hille, J. [Ash Grove Cement Co., Seattle, WA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Processing Waste Processing Workers process and repackage waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Centers Cask Processing Enclosure. Workers process and repackage waste at...

290

Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ  

SciTech Connect

A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

MAR ASSESSMENTS OF THE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SYSTEM PLAN REVISION 16  

SciTech Connect

High-level waste (HLW) throughput (i.e., the amount of waste processed per unit of time) is primarily a function of two critical parameters: waste loading (WL) and melt rate. For the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), increasing HLW throughput would significantly reduce the overall mission life cycle costs for the Department of Energy (DOE). Significant increases in waste throughput have been achieved at DWPF since initial radioactive operations began in 1996. Key technical and operational initiatives that supported increased waste throughput included improvements in facility attainment, the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) flowsheet, process control models and frit formulations. As a result of these key initiatives, DWPF increased WLs from a nominal 28% for Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) to {approx}34 to 38% for SB3 through SB6 while maintaining or slightly improving canister fill times. Although considerable improvements in waste throughput have been obtained, future contractual waste loading targets are nominally 40%, while canister production rates are also expected to increase (to a rate of 325 to 400 canisters per year). Although implementation of bubblers have made a positive impact on increasing melt rate for recent sludge batches targeting WLs in the mid30s, higher WLs will ultimately make the feeds to DWPF more challenging to process. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) recently requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to perform a paper study assessment using future sludge projections to evaluate whether the current Process Composition Control System (PCCS) algorithms would provide projected operating windows to allow future contractual WL targets to be met. More specifically, the objective of this study was to evaluate future sludge batch projections (based on Revision 16 of the HLW Systems Plan) with respect to projected operating windows using current PCCS models and associated constraints. Based on the assessments, the waste loading interval over which a glass system (i.e., a projected sludge composition with a candidate frit) is predicted to be acceptable can be defined (i.e., the projected operating window) which will provide insight into the ability to meet future contractual WL obligations. In this study, future contractual WL obligations are assumed to be 40%, which is the goal after all flowsheet enhancements have been implemented to support DWPF operations. For a system to be considered acceptable, candidate frits must be identified that provide access to at least 40% WL while accounting for potential variation in the sludge resulting from differences in batch-to-batch transfers into the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and/or analytical uncertainties. In more general terms, this study will assess whether or not the current glass formulation strategy (based on the use of the Nominal and Variation Stage assessments) and current PCCS models will allow access to compositional regions required to targeted higher WLs for future operations. Some of the key questions to be considered in this study include: (1) If higher WLs are attainable with current process control models, are the models valid in these compositional regions? If the higher WL glass regions are outside current model development or validation ranges, is there existing data that could be used to demonstrate model applicability (or lack thereof)? If not, experimental data may be required to revise current models or serve as validation data with the existing models. (2) Are there compositional trends in frit space that are required by the PCCS models to obtain access to these higher WLs? If so, are there potential issues with the compositions of the associated frits (e.g., limitations on the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and/or Li{sub 2}O concentrations) as they are compared to model development/validation ranges or to the term 'borosilicate' glass? If limitations on the frit compositional range are realized, what is the impact of these restrictions on other glass properties such as the ability to suppress nepheline formation or influence m

Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.

2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

292

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation - A world wide review  

SciTech Connect

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high-level waste (HLW), which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. The most widely accepted method of doing this is to seal the radioactive materials in metal canisters that are enclosed by a protective sheath and placed underground in a repository that has been carefully constructed in an appropriate rock formation. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised, and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. Table 1 presents a summary of the various formations under investigation according to the reports submitted for this world wide review. It can be seen that in those countries that are searching for repository sites, granitic and metamorphic rocks are the prevalent rock type under investigation. Six countries have developed underground research facilities that are currently in use. All of these investigations are in saturated systems below the water table, except the United States project, which is in the unsaturated zone of a fractured tuff.

Witherspoon, P.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

294

Integrated data base for 1993: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 9  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and DOE spent fuel; also, commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1992. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest U.S. Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste (HLW), transuranic (TRU), waste, low-level waste (LLW), commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) LLW. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the calendar-year (CY) 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal.

Klein, J.A.; Storch, S.N.; Ashline, R.C. [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

DOE signs Record of Decision selecting Hot Isostatic Pressing Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: Brad Bugger (208) 526-0833 Danielle Miller (208) 526-5709 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 28, 2009 DOE signs Record of Decision selecting Hot Isostatic Pressing Technology for Treatment of High Level Waste The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has signed the Record of Decision (ROD) for the treatment of high level waste calcine at the Department�s Idaho Site, meeting a legal commitment to the State of Idaho for a decision no later than the end of 2009. DOE today announced its decision to treat high-level waste (HLW) calcine using an industrially mature manufacturing process known as hot isostatic pressing (HIP). DOE selected this technology to treat roughly 5,750 cubic yards of highly radioactive waste generated from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel to recover uranium. Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel was terminated by a DOE policy decision in 1992.

296

Accelerated weathering of high-level and plutonium-bearing lanthanide borosilicate waste glasses under hydraulically unsaturated conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed that a can-in-canister waste package design be used for disposal of excess weapons-grade Pu at the proposed mined geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This configuration consists of a high-level waste (HLW) canister fitted with a rack that holds mini-canisters containing a Pu-bearing lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) waste glass and/or titanate-based ceramic (?15% of the total canister volume). The remaining volume of the HLW canister is then filled with HLW glass (?85% of the total canister volume). A 6-a pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) test was conducted to investigate waste formwaste form interactions that may occur when water penetrates the canisters and contacts the waste forms. The PUF column volumetric water content was observed to increase steadily during the test because of water accumulation associated with alteration phases formed on the surfaces of the glasses. Periodic excursions in effluent pH, electrical conductivity, and solution chemistry were monitored and correlated with the formation of a clay phase(s) during the test. Geochemical modeling, with the EQ3NR code, of select effluent solution samples suggests the dominant secondary reaction product for the surrogate HLW glass, SRL-202, is a smectite di-octahedral clay phase(s), possibly nontronite [Na0.33 Fe2(AlSi)4O10(OH)2n(H2O)] or beidellite [Na0.33Al2.33Si3.67O10(OH)2]. This clay phase was identified in scanning electron microscope (SEM) images as discrete spherical particles growing out of a hydrated gel layer on reacted SRL-202 glass. Alpha energy analysis (AEA) of aliquots of select effluent samples that were filtered through a 1.8nm filter suggest that approximately 80% of the total measurable Pu was in the form of a filterable particulate, in comparison to unfiltered aliquots of the same sample. These results suggest the filterable particles are >1.8nm but smaller than the 0.2?m average diameter openings of the Ti porous plate situated at the base of the column. In this advection-dominated system, Pu appeared to be migrating principally as or in association with colloids after being released from the LaBS glass. Analyses of reacted LaBS glass particles with SEM with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy suggest that Pu may have segregated into a discrete disk-like phase, possibly PuO2. Alteration products that contain the neutron absorber Gd have not been positively identified. Separation of the Pu and the neutron absorber Gd during glass dissolution and transport could be a criticality issue for the proposed repository. However, the translation and interpretation of these long-term PUF test results to actual disposed waste packages requires further analysis.

Eric M. Pierce; B.P. McGrail; P.F. Martin; J. Marra; B.W. Arey; K.N. Geiszler

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Development Of A Macro-Batch Qualification Strategy For The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has evaluated the existing waste feed qualification strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) based on experience from the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) waste qualification program. The current waste qualification programs for each of the sites are discussed in the report to provide a baseline for comparison. Recommendations on strategies are then provided that could be implemented at Hanford based on the successful Macrobatch qualification strategy utilized at SRS to reduce the risk of processing upsets or the production of a staged waste campaign that does not meet the processing requirements of the WTP. Considerations included the baseline WTP process, as well as options involving Direct High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) processing, and the potential use of a Tank Waste Characterization and Staging Facility (TWCSF). The main objectives of the Hanford waste feed qualification program are to demonstrate compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), determine waste processability, and demonstrate unit operations at a laboratory scale. Risks to acceptability and successful implementation of this program, as compared to the DWPF Macro-Batch qualification strategy, include: Limitations of mixing/blending capability of the Hanford Tank Farm; The complexity of unit operations (i.e., multiple chemical and mechanical separations processes) involved in the WTP pretreatment qualification process; The need to account for effects of blending of LAW and HLW streams, as well as a recycle stream, within the PT unit operations; and The reliance on only a single set of unit operations demonstrations with the radioactive qualification sample. This later limitation is further complicated because of the 180-day completion requirement for all of the necessary waste feed qualification steps. The primary recommendations/changes include the following: Collection and characterization of samples for relevant process analytes from the tanks to be blended during the staging process; Initiation of qualification activities earlier in the staging process to optimize the campaign composition through evaluation from both a processing and glass composition perspective; Definition of the parameters that are important for processing in the WTP facilities (unit operations) across the anticipated range of wastes and as they relate to qualification-scale equipment; Performance of limited testing with simulants ahead of the waste feed qualification sample demonstration as needed to determine the available processing window for that campaign; and Demonstration of sufficient mixing in the staging tank to show that the waste qualification sample chemical and physical properties are representative of the transfers to be made to WTP. Potential flowcharts for derivatives of the Hanford waste feed qualification process are also provided in this report. While these recommendations are an extension of the existing WTP waste qualification program, they are more in line with the processes currently performed for SRS. The implementation of these processes at SRS has been shown to offer flexibility for processing, having identified potential processing issues ahead of the qualification or facility processing, and having provided opportunity to optimize waste loading and throughput in the DWPF.

Herman, Connie C.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

300

Rock mass modification around a nuclear waste repository in welded tuff  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of numerical analyses to estimate the extent of rock mass modification resulting from the presence of a High Level Waste (HLW) repository. Changes in rock mass considered are stresses and joint deformations resulting from disposal room excavation and thermal efffects induced by the heat generated by nuclear waste. rock properties and site conditions are taken from the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report for the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Analyses were conducted using boundary element and distinct element methods. Room-scale models and repository-scale models were investigated for up to 500 years after waste emplacement. Results of room-scale analyses based on the thermoelastic boundary element model indicate that a zone of modified rock develops around the disposal rooms for both vertical and horizontal waste emplacement. This zone is estimated to extend a distance of roughly two room diameters from the room surface. Results from the repository-scale model, which are based on the thermoelastic boundary element model and the distinct element model, indicate a zone with modified rock mass properties starting approximately 100 m above and below the repository, with a thickness of approximately 200 m above and 150 m below the repository. Slip-prone subhorizontal features are shown to have a substantial effect on rock mass response. The estimates of rock mass modification reflect uncertainties and simplifying assumptions in the models. 32 refs., 57 figs., 1 tab.

Mack, M.G.; Brandshaug, T.; Brady, B.H.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Simulation of Self-Irradiation of High-Sodium Content Nuclear Waste Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Alkali-borosilicate glasses are widely used in nuclear industry as a matrix for immobilisation of hazardous radioactive wastes. Durability or corrosion resistance of these glasses is one of key parameters in waste storage and disposal safety. It is influenced by many factors such as composition of glass and surrounding media, temperature, time and so on. As these glasses contain radioactive elements most of their properties including corrosion resistance are also impacted by self-irradiation. The effect of external gamma-irradiation on the short-term (up to 27 days) dissolution of waste borosilicate glasses at moderate temperatures (30 deg. to 60 deg. C) was studied. The glasses studied were Magnox Waste glass used for immobilisation of HLW in UK, and K-26 glass used in Russia for ILW immobilisation. Glass samples were irradiated under {gamma}-source (Co-60) up to doses 1 and 11 MGy. Normalised rates of elemental release and activation energy of release were measured for Na, Li, Ca, Mg, B, Si and Mo before and after irradiation. Irradiation up to 1 MGy results in increase of leaching rate of almost all elements from both MW and K-26 with the exception of Na release from MW glass. Further irradiation up to a dose of 11 MGy leads to the decrease of elemental release rates to nearly initial value. Another effect of irradiation is increase of activation energies of elemental release. (authors)

Pankov, Alexey S.; Ojovan, Michael I. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Batyukhnova, Olga G. [International Education Training Centre, SUE SIA 'Radon', The 7-th Rostovsky Lane 2/14, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation); Lee, William E. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, Exhibition Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Radioactive Waste Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

303

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

304

Waste?to?Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste?to?Energy Presentation by Jonathan Male, Director of the Bioenery Technolgies Office, Department of Energy

305

Memo, "Incorporation of HLW Glass Shell V2.0 into the Flowsheets," to ED Lee, CCN: 184905, October 20, 2009  

SciTech Connect

Efforts are being made to increase the efficiency and decrease the cost of vitrifying radioactive waste stored in tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The compositions of acceptable and processable high-level waste (HL W) glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to reduce cost. A database of glass properties of waste glass and associated simulated waste glasses was collected and documented in PNNL 18501, Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume and glass property models were curve-fitted to the glass compositions. A routine was developed that estimates HL W glass volumes using the following glass property models: II Nepheline, II One-Percent Crystal Temperature (T1%), II Viscosity (11) II Product Consistency Tests (PCT) for boron, sodium, and lithium, and II Liquidus Temperature (TL). The routine, commonly called the HL W Glass Shell, is presented in this document. In addition to the use of the glass property models, glass composition constraints and rules, as recommend in PNNL 18501 and in other documents (as referenced in this report) were incorporated. This new version of the HL W Glass Shell should generally estimate higher waste loading in the HL W glass than previous versions.

Gimpel, Rodney F.; Kruger, Albert A.

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

306

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Amounts of Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term nuclear waste...embraces all residues from the use of radioactive materials, including uses in medicine and industry. The most highly radioactive of these are the spent fuel or reprocessed wastes from co...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Potential Application Of Radionuclide Scaling Factors To High Level Waste Characterization  

SciTech Connect

Production sources, radiological properties, relative solubilities in waste, and laboratory analysis techniques for the forty-five radionuclides identified in Hanford?s Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Feed Acceptance Data Quality Objectives (DQO) document are addressed in this report. Based on Savannah River Site (SRS) experience and waste characteristics, thirteen of the radionuclides are judged to be candidates for potential scaling in High Level Waste (HLW) based on the concentrations of other radionuclides as determined through laboratory measurements. The thirteen radionuclides conducive to potential scaling are: Ni-59, Zr-93, Nb-93m, Cd-113m, Sn-121m, Sn-126, Cs-135, Sm-151, Ra-226, Ra-228, Ac-227, Pa-231, and Th-229. The ability to scale radionuclides is useful from two primary perspectives: 1) it provides a means of checking the radionuclide concentrations that have been determined by laboratory analysis; and 2) it provides a means of estimating radionuclide concentrations in the absence of a laboratory analysis technique or when a complex laboratory analysis technique fails. Along with the rationale for identifying and applying the potential scaling factors, this report also provides examples of using the scaling factors to estimate concentrations of radionuclides in current SRS waste and into the future. Also included in the report are examples of independent laboratory analysis techniques that can be used to check results of key radionuclide analyses. Effective utilization of radionuclide scaling factors requires understanding of the applicable production sources and the chemistry of the waste. As such, the potential scaling approaches identified in this report should be assessed from the perspective of the Hanford waste before reaching a decision regarding WTP applicability.

Reboul, S. H.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nuclear Waste Management in the United StatesStarting Over  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Morris, IL, reprocessing plant; an additional DOE site with HLW is the decommissioned commercial reprocessing plant, West Valley, NY. There is no SNF or HLW in Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, or the Virgin Islands. 16 The U.S. Department of...

Rodney C. Ewing; Frank N. von Hippel

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

Saldin, Dilano

310

DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC MODEL OF BOEHMITE DISSOLUTION IN CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE HANFORD WASTE PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

Boehmite (e.g., aluminum oxyhydroxide) is a major non-radioactive component in Hanford and Savannah River nuclear tank waste sludge. Boehmite dissolution from sludge using caustic at elevated temperatures is being planned at Hanford to minimize the mass of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW) during operation of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). To more thoroughly understand the chemistry of this dissolution process, we have developed an empirical kinetic model for aluminate production due to boehmite dissolution. Application of this model to Hanford tank wastes would allow predictability and optimization of the caustic leaching of aluminum solids, potentially yielding significant improvements to overall processing time, disposal cost, and schedule. This report presents an empirical kinetic model that can be used to estimate the aluminate production from the leaching of boehmite in Hanford waste as a function of the following parameters: (1) hydroxide concentration; (2) temperature; (3) specific surface area of boehmite; (4) initial soluble aluminate plus gibbsite present in waste; (5) concentration of boehmite in the waste; and (6) (pre-fit) Arrhenius kinetic parameters. The model was fit to laboratory, non-radioactive (e.g. 'simulant boehmite') leaching results, providing best-fit values of the Arrhenius A-factor, A, and apparent activation energy, E{sub A}, of A = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} hour{sup -1} and E{sub A} = 90 kJ/mole. These parameters were then used to predict boehmite leaching behavior observed in previously reported actual waste leaching studies. Acceptable aluminate versus leaching time profiles were predicted for waste leaching data from both Hanford and Savannah River site studies.

DISSELKAMP RS

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Recycling of sodium waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling of sodium waste ... Methods for handling and recycling a dangerous and costly chemical. ...

Bettina Hubler-Blank; Michael Witt; Herbert W. Roesky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

314

Method and article for primary containment of cesium wastes. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a cesium-retentive waste form, characterized by a high degree of compositional stability and mechanical integrity, is provided by subjecting a cesium-loaded zeolite to heat under conditions suitable for stabilizing the zeolite and immobilizing the cesium, and coating said zeolite for sufficient duration within a suitable environment with at least one dense layer of pyrolytic carbon to seal therein said cesium to produce a final, cesium-bearing waste form. Typically, the zolite is stabilized and the cesium immobilized in less than four hours by confinement within an air environment maintained at about 600/sup 0/C. Coatings are thereafter applied by confining the calcined zeolite within a coating environment comprising inert fluidizing and carbon donor gases maintained at 1000/sup 0/C for a suitable duration.

Angelini, P.; Lackey, W.J.; Stinton, D.P.; Blanco, R.E.; Bond, W.D.; Arnold, W.D. Jr.

1981-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

317

Reduction of NO{sub x} emissions from a dry process preheater kiln with calciner through the use of the urea-based SNCR process  

SciTech Connect

The post combustion reduction of NO{sub x} using urea has proven to be an effective method in controlling NO{sub x} from various combustion sources. Such a reduction process has been successfully demonstrated in a week-long test at Ash Grove`s dry process cement kiln system located in Seattle. This system is equipped with planetary coolers, a 5-stage preheater and an air-through-the-kiln calciner. Testing was done under ten different kiln/calciner operating conditions. Using three to four injectors, NO{sub x} was efficiently reduced from 350--600 lb per hour lb/ton of clinker to less than 100 lb per hour. This calculates to a NO{sub x} reduction of greater than 80% for most cases. Chemical utilization was greater than 50%. A high degree of mixing and a long residence time at an appropriate temperature present in the preheater tower contributed to these excellent results. An average ammonia slip was four ppm above a baseline level at a normalized stoichiometric ratio of 1. This demonstration confirms expectations that dry process cement kilns with 4+ preheater stages are an ideal application for the selective noncatalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with urea. NO{sub x} was efficiently and effectively reduced with minimal byproduct emissions and virtually no effect on plant operations.

Steuch, H.E. [Ash Grove Cement Co., Portland, OR (United States)] [Ash Grove Cement Co., Portland, OR (United States); Hille, J.T. [Ash Grove Cement Co., Seattle, WA (United States)] [Ash Grove Cement Co., Seattle, WA (United States); Sun, W.H. [Nalco Fuel Tech, Naperville, IL (United States)] [Nalco Fuel Tech, Naperville, IL (United States); Bisnett, M.J.; Kirk, D.W. [Nalco Fuel Tech, Santa Fe Springs, CA (United States)] [Nalco Fuel Tech, Santa Fe Springs, CA (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

ROAD MAP FOR DEVELOPMENT OF CRYSTAL-TOLERANT HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASSES  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is building a Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is being temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. This road map guides the research and development for formulation and processing of crystaltolerant glasses, identifying near- and long-term activities that need to be completed over the period from 2014 to 2019. The primary objective is to maximize waste loading for Hanford waste glasses without jeopardizing melter operation by crystal accumulation in the melter or melter discharge riser. The potential applicability to the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will also be addressed in this road map. The planned research described in this road map is motivated by the potential for substantial economic benefits (significant reductions in glass volumes) that will be realized if the current constraints (T1% for WTP and TL for DWPF) are approached in an appropriate and technically defensible manner for defense waste and current melter designs. The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal-tolerant high-level waste (HLW) glasses targeting high waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. The modeling effort will be an iterative process, where model form and a broader range of conditions, e.g., glass composition and temperature, will evolve as additional data on crystal accumulation are gathered. Model validation steps will be included to guide the development process and ensure the value of the effort (i.e., increased waste loading and waste throughput). A summary of the stages of the road map for developing the crystal-tolerant glass approach, their estimated durations, and deliverables is provided.

Fox, K.; Peeler, D.; Herman, C.

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix A Appendix A Site Evaluation Process A-iii DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page Appendix A Site Evaluation Process A-1 A.1 Introduction A-1 A.2 Methodology A-1 A.3 High-Level Waste Treatment and Interim Storage Site Selection A-3 A.3.1 Identification of "Must" Criteria A-3 A.3.2 Identification of "Want" Criteria A-3 A.3.3 Identification of Candidate Sites A-3 A.3.4 Evaluation Process A-4 A.3.5 Results of Evaluation Process A-6 A.4 Low-Activity Waste Disposal Site Selection A-6 A.4.1 Identification of "Must" Criteria A-7 A.4.2 Identification of "Want" Criteria A-8 A.4.3 Identification of Candidate Sites A-8 A.4.4 Evaluation Process A-8 A.4.5 Results of Evaluation Process A-9 A.4.6 Final Selection of a Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility

320

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

322

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(ex: organic Rankine cycle) High installed KW capital Low temperature waste heat (<100C) is not practicable Further efficiency loss in electrolytic conversion to...

323

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

324

LOW ACTIVITY WASTE FEED SOLIDS CARACTERIZATION AND FILTERABILITY TESTS  

SciTech Connect

The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that is currently under construction. The baseline plan for the WTP Pretreatment facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) feed and Low Activity Waste (LAW) feed. Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and sealed in canisters. The LAW glass will be disposed onsite in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium in the WTP Pretreatment facility, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Options are being explored to immobilize the LAW portion of the tank waste, i.e., the LAW feed from the WTP Pretreatment facility. Removal of {sup 99}Tc from the LAW Feed, followed by off-site disposal of the {sup 99}Tc, would eliminate a key risk contributor for the IDF Performance Assessment (PA) for supplemental waste forms, and has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow sheets for LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. One of these flowsheets will specifically examine removing {sup 99}Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. The conceptual flow sheet of the {sup 99}Tc removal process includes a filter to remove insoluble solids prior to processing the stream in an ion exchange column, but the characteristics and behavior of the liquid and solid phases has not previously been investigated. This report contains results of testing of a simulant that represents the projected composition of the feed to the Supplemental LAW process. This feed composition is not identical to the aqueous tank waste fed to the Waste Treatment Plant because it has been processed through WTP Pretreatment facility and therefore contains internal changes and recycle streams that will be generated within the WTP process. Although a Supplemental LAW feed simulant has previously been prepared, this feed composition differs from that simulant because those tests examined only the fully soluble aqueous solution at room temperature, not the composition formed after evaporation, including the insoluble solids that precipitate after it cools. The conceptual flow sheet for Supplemental LAW immobilization has an option for removal of {sup 99}Tc from the feed stream, if needed. Elutable ion exchange has been selected for that process. If implemented, the stream would need filtration to remove the insoluble solids prior to processing in an ion exchange column. The characteristics, chemical speciation, physical properties, and filterability of the solids are important to judge the feasibility of the concept, and to estimate the size and cost of a facility. The insoluble solids formed during these tests were primarily natrophosphate, natroxalate, and a sodium aluminosilicate compound. At the elevated temperature and 8 M [Na+], appreciable insoluble solids (1.39 wt%) were present. Cooling to room temperature and dilution of the slurry from 8 M to 5 M [Na+] resulted in a slurry containing 0.8 wt% insoluble solids. The solids (natrophosphate, natroxalate, sodium aluminum silicate, and a hydrated sodium phosphate) were relatively stable and settled quickly. Filtration rates were in the range of those observed with iron-based simulated Hanford tank sludge simulants, e.g., 6 M [Na+] Hanford tank 241-AN-102, even though their chemical speciation is considerably different. Chemical cleaning of the crossflow filter was readily accomplished with acid. As this simulant formulation was based on an average composition of a wide range of feeds using an integrated computer model, this exact composition may never be observed. But the test conditions were selected to enable comparison to the model to enable improving its chemical prediction capability.

McCabe, D.; Crawford, C.; Duignan, M.; Williams, M.; Burket, P.

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

325

Radiological assessment of the consequences of the disposal of high level radioactive waste in sub-seabed sediments  

SciTech Connect

The radiological assessment of the Seabed option consists of estimating the detriment to man and to the environment that could result from the disposal of high-level nuclear waste within the seabed sediments in the deep oceans. The assessment is made for the high-level waste (vitrified glass) produced by the reprocessing of 10/sup 5/ tons of heavy metal from spent fuel, which represents the amount of waste generated by 3333 reactor-years of 900 MW(e) reactors, i.e., 3000 GW(E).a. The disposal option considered is to use 14,667 steel penetrators, each of them containing five canisters of HLW glass (0,15 m/sup 3/ each). These penetrators would reach a depth of 50 m in the sediments and would be placed at an average distance of 180 m from each other, requiring a disposal area on the order of 22 x 22 km. Two such potential disposal areas in the Atlantic ocean were studied, Great Meteor East (GME) and South Nares Abyssal Plains (SNAP). A special ship design is proposed to minimize transportation accidents. Approximately 100 shipments would be necessary to dispose of the proposed amount of waste. 1 ref.

de Marsily, G.; Behrendt, V.; Ensminger, D.A.; Flebus, C.; Hutchinson, B.L.; Kane, P.; Karpf, A.; Klett, R.D.; Mobbs, S.; Poulin, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

SUMMARY OF FY11 SULFATE RETENTION STUDIES FOR DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of studies related to the incorporation of sulfate in high level waste (HLW) borosilicate glass produced at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). A group of simulated HLW glasses produced for earlier sulfate retention studies was selected for full chemical composition measurements to determine whether there is any clear link between composition and sulfate retention over the compositional region evaluated. In addition, the viscosity of several glasses was measured to support future efforts in modeling sulfate solubility as a function of predicted viscosity. The intent of these studies was to develop a better understanding of sulfate retention in borosilicate HLW glass to allow for higher loadings of sulfate containing waste. Based on the results of these and other studies, the ability to improve sulfate solubility in DWPF borosilicate glasses lies in reducing the connectivity of the glass network structure. This can be achieved, as an example, by increasing the concentration of alkali species in the glass. However, this must be balanced with other effects of reduced network connectivity, such as reduced viscosity, potentially lower chemical durability, and in the case of higher sodium and aluminum concentrations, the propensity for nepheline crystallization. Future DWPF processing is likely to target higher waste loadings and higher sludge sodium concentrations, meaning that alkali concentrations in the glass will already be relatively high. It is therefore unlikely that there will be the ability to target significantly higher total alkali concentrations in the glass solely to support increased sulfate solubility without the increased alkali concentration causing failure of other Product Composition Control System (PCCS) constraints, such as low viscosity and durability. No individual components were found to provide a significant improvement in sulfate retention (i.e., an increase of the magnitude necessary to have a dramatic impact on blending, washing, or waste loading strategies for DWPF) for the glasses studied here. In general, the concentrations of those species that significantly improve sulfate solubility in a borosilicate glass must be added in relatively large concentrations (e.g., 13 to 38 wt % or more of the frit) in order to have a substantial impact. For DWPF, these concentrations would constitute too large of a portion of the frit to be practical. Therefore, it is unlikely that specific additives may be introduced into the DWPF glass via the frit to significantly improve sulfate solubility. The results presented here continue to show that sulfate solubility or retention is a function of individual glass compositions, rather than a property of a broad glass composition region. It would therefore be inappropriate to set a single sulfate concentration limit for a range of DWPF glass compositions. Sulfate concentration limits should continue to be identified and implemented for each sludge batch. The current PCCS limit is 0.4 wt % SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass, although frit development efforts have led to an increased limit of 0.6 wt % for recent sludge batches. Slightly higher limits (perhaps 0.7-0.8 wt %) may be possible for future sludge batches. An opportunity for allowing a higher sulfate concentration limit at DWPF may lay lie in improving the laboratory experiments used to set this limit. That is, there are several differences between the crucible-scale testing currently used to define a limit for DWPF operation and the actual conditions within the DWPF melter. In particular, no allowance is currently made for sulfur partitioning (volatility versus retention) during melter processing as the sulfate limit is set for a specific sludge batch. A better understanding of the partitioning of sulfur in a bubbled melter operating with a cold cap as well as the impacts of sulfur on the off-gas system may allow a higher sulfate concentration limit to be established for the melter feed. This approach would have to be taken carefully to ensure that a

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

327

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid frequently and change them if contaminated. 5. Use radioactive waste container to collect the waste. 6. Check

Jia, Songtao

328

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from tank waste. * Decreases the volume of water to create room in double-shell tanks, allowing them to accept waste from noncompliant single- shell tanks. * Treats up to 1...

329

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

trucks for scale. The DSTs have limited capacity and are aging. Maintaining these tanks is important to ensure that waste is ready to supply the Waste Treatment Plant. The...

330

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

331

Nuclear waste solids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Glass and polycrystalline materials for high-level radioactive waste immobilization are discussed. Borosilicate glass has been selected as the waste form for defence high-level radwaste in the US. Since releas...

L. L. Hench; D. E. Clark; A. B. Harker

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Alkaline-Side Extraction of Cesium from Savannah River Tank Waste Using a Calixarene-Crown Ether Extractant  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented supporting the viability of the alkaline-side CSEX process as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removal of cesium from aqueous high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Under funding from the USDOE Efficient Separations and Crosscutting program, a flowsheet was suggested in early June of 1998, and in the following four months, this flowsheet underwent extensive testing, both in batch tests at ORNL and ANL and in two centrifugal-contactor tests at ANL. To carry out these tests, the initial ESP funding was augmented by direct funds from Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation. The flowsheet employed a solvent containing a calixarene-crown hybrid compound called BoBCalixC6 that was invented at ORNL and can now be obtained commercially for government use from IBC Advanced Technologies. This special extractant is so powerful and selective that it can be used at only 0.01 M, compensating for its expense, but a modifier is required for use in an aliphatic diluent, primarily to increase the cesium distribution ratio D{sub Cs} in extraction. The modifier selected is a relatively economical fluorinated alcohol called Cs3, invented at ORNL and so far available. only from ORNL. For the flowsheet, the modifier is used at 0.2 M in the branched aliphatic kerosene Isopar{reg_sign} L. Testing at ORNL and ANL involved simulants of the SRS HLW. After extraction of the Cs from the waste simulant, the solvent is scrubbed with 0.05 M HNO{sub 3} and stripped with a solution comprised of 0.0005 M HNO{sub 3} and 0.0001 M CsNO{sub 3}. The selection of these conditions is justified in this report, both on the basis of experimental data and underlying theory.

Bonnesen, P.V.; Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Moyer, B.A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

334

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 9430 of 9,640 results. 21 - 9430 of 9,640 results. Download EIS-0287: Final Environmental Impact Statement Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0287-final-environmental-impact-statement Download EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0287 (September 2002) This EIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternatives for managing high-level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW) and newly generated liquid... http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0287-idaho-high-level-waste-and-facilities-disposition-final-environmental-impa-1 Download EIS-0250-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level

335

Summary.qxd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS cussed below. Options excluded from DOE's Preferred Alternative are, storage of calcine in the bin sets for an indefinite period under the Continued Current Operations Alternative, the shipment of calcine to the Hanford Site for treatment under the Minimum INEEL Processing Alternative, and disposal of mixed low-level waste on the INEEL under any alter- native. The selection of any one of, or combi- nation of, technologies or options used to implement the proposed action would be based on performance criteria that include risk, cost, time, and compliance factors. The selection may also be based on the results of laboratory and demonstration scale evaluations and com- parisons using actual wastes in proof of process tests.

336

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

337

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

338

Engineering study of the potential uses of salts from selective crystallization of Hanford tank wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Salt Process (CSP) is the fractional crystallization of nitrate salts from tank waste stored on the Hanford Site. This study reviews disposition options for a CSP product made from Hanford Site tank waste. These options range from public release to onsite low-level waste disposal to no action. Process, production, safety, environment, cost, schedule, and the amount of CSP material which may be used are factors considered in each option. The preferred alternative is offsite release of clean salt. Savings all be generated by excluding the material from low-level waste stabilization. Income would be received from sales of salt products. Savings and income from this alternative amount to $1,027 million, excluding the cost of CSP operations. Unless public sale of CSP products is approved, the material should be calcined. The carbonate form of the CSP could then be used as ballast in tank closure and stabilization efforts. Not including the cost of CSP operations, savings of $632 million would be realized. These savings would result from excluding the material from low-level waste stabilization and reducing purchases of chemicals for caustic recycle and stabilization and closure. Dose considerations for either alternative are favorable. No other cost-effective alternatives that were considered had the capacity to handle significant quantities of the CSP products. If CSP occurs, full-scale tank-waste stabilization could be done without building additional treatment facilities after Phase 1 (DOE 1996). Savings in capital and operating cost from this reduction in waste stabilization would be in addition to the other gains described.

Hendrickson, D.W.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda More Documents &...

340

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security More Documents &...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Containment of uranium in the proposed Egyptian geologic repository for radioactive waste using hydroxyapatite.  

SciTech Connect

Currently, the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority is designing a shallow-land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste. To insure containment and prevent migration of radionuclides from the site, the use of a reactive backfill material is being considered. One material under consideration is hydroxyapatite, Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}, which has a high affinity for the sorption of many radionuclides. Hydroxyapatite has many properties that make it an ideal material for use as a backfill including low water solubility (K{sub sp}>10{sup -40}), high stability under reducing and oxidizing conditions over a wide temperature range, availability, and low cost. However, there is often considerable variation in the properties of apatites depending on source and method of preparation. In this work, we characterized and compared a synthetic hydroxyapatite with hydroxyapatites prepared from cattle bone calcined at 500 C, 700 C, 900 C and 1100 C. The analysis indicated the synthetic hydroxyapatite was similar in morphology to 500 C prepared cattle hydroxyapatite. With increasing calcination temperature the crystallinity and crystal size of the hydroxyapatites increased and the BET surface area and carbonate concentration decreased. Batch sorption experiments were performed to determine the effectiveness of each material to sorb uranium. Sorption of U was strong regardless of apatite type indicating all apatite materials evaluated. Sixty day desorption experiments indicated desorption of uranium for each hydroxyapatite was negligible.

Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Headley, Thomas Jeffrey; Sanchez, Charles Anthony (University of Arizona, Yuma, AZ); Zhao, Hongting; Salas, Fred Manuel; Hasan, Mahmoud A. (Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt); Holt, Kathleen Caroline

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

DRAFT EM SSAB Chair's Meeting Waste Disposition Strategies...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

of lessons learned and equipment for use of TRUPACT-III at other sites * Closed Tanks 5 and 6, which are the 5 th and 6 th tanks to be closed * Continuing production of HLW...

343

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility where the melter is pouring molten glass inside a canister. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a

344

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

345

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

346

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

347

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste...

348

Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

349

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability  

SciTech Connect

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

6 - Nuclear Waste Regulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most influential national and international bodies providing recommendations on radiation protection are described, including the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Protection philosophies and the ICRP general principles of radiation protection are discussed. Radioactive material regulations and sources of radiation are explained. Criteria of exemption from regulatory control are discussed with examples of exemption levels for naturally occurring and radioactive waste radionuclides. Clearance of both moderate and bulk amounts of materials from regulatory control is also explained, including examples of EU and the UK regulations. Dose limits recommended by the ICRP are given, as well as the main principles of control of radiation hazards. Nuclear waste classification schemes are outlined, including the IAEA classification scheme. A brief explanation of nuclear waste classes including exempt waste, very short-lived waste, very low-level waste, low-level waste, intermediate-level waste and high-level waste is given. Examples of waste classification schemes are given, including that of the UK.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

352

Quasicrystalline Approach to Prediting the Spinel-Nepheline Liquidus: Application to Nuclear Waste Glass Processing  

SciTech Connect

The crystal-melt equilibria in complex fifteen component melts are modeled based on quasicrystalline concepts. A pseudobinary phase diagram between acmite (which melts incongruently to a transition metal ferrite spinel) and nepheline is defined. The pseudobinary lies within the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} quaternary system that defines the crystallization of basalt glass melts. The pseudobinary provides the partitioning of species between the melt and the primary liquidus phases. The medium range order of the melt and the melt-crystal exchange equilibria are defined based on a constrained mathematical treatment that considers the crystallochemical coordination of the elemental species in acmite and nepheline. The liquidus phases that form are shown to be governed by the melt polymerization and the octahedral site preference energies. This quasicrystalline liquidus model has been used to prevent unwanted crystallization in the world's largest high level waste (HLW) melter for the past three years while allowing >10 wt% higher waste loadings to be processed.

Jantzen, Carol

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

353

IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION  

SciTech Connect

During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

354

Stabilization of compactible waste  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT)  

SciTech Connect

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT) provides mobile semi-trailer mounted nondestructive examination (NDE) and assay (NDA) for nuclear waste drum characterization. WIT uses various computed tomography (CT) methods for both NDE and NDA of nuclear waste drums. Low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive waste can be inspected and characterized without opening the drums. With externally transmitted x-ray NDE techniques, WIT has the ability to identify high density waste materials like heavy metals, define drum contents in two- and three-dimensional space, quantify free liquid volumes through density and x-ray attenuation coefficient discrimination, and measure drum wall thickness. With waste emitting gamma-ray NDA techniques, WIT can locate gamma emitting radioactive sources in two- and three-dimensional space, identify gamma emitting isotopic species, identify the external activity levels of emitting gamma-ray sources, correct for waste matrix attenuation, provide internal activity approximations, and provide the data needed for waste classification as LLW or TRU. The mobile feature of WIT allows inspection technologies to be brought to the nuclear waste drum storage site without the need to relocate drums for safe, rapid, and cost-effective characterization of regulated nuclear waste. The combination of these WIT characterization modalities provides the inspector with an unprecedented ability to non-invasively characterize the regulated contents of waste drums as large as 110 gallons, weighing up to 1,600 pounds. Any objects that fit within these size and weight restrictions can also be inspected on WIT, such as smaller waste bags and drums that are five and thirty-five gallons.

Bernardi, R.T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Deep Geologic Nuclear Waste Disposal - No New Taxes - 12469  

SciTech Connect

To some, the perceived inability of the United States to dispose of high-level nuclear waste justifies a moratorium on expansion of nuclear power in this country. Instead, it is more an example of how science yields to social pressure, even on a subject as technical as nuclear waste. Most of the problems, however, stem from confusion on the part of the public and their elected officials, not from a lack of scientific knowledge. We know where to put nuclear waste, how to put it there, how much it will cost, and how well it will work. And it's all about the geology. The President's Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future has drafted a number of recommendations addressing nuclear energy and waste issues (BRC 2011) and three recommendations, in particular, have set the stage for a new strategy to dispose of high-level nuclear waste and to manage spent nuclear fuel in the United States: 1) interim storage for spent nuclear fuel, 2) resumption of the site selection process for a second repository, and 3) a quasi-government entity to execute the program and take control of the Nuclear Waste Fund in order to do so. The first two recommendations allow removal and storage of spent fuel from reactor sites to be used in the future, and allows permanent disposal of actual waste, while the third controls cost and administration. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NPWA 1982) provides the second repository different waste criteria, retrievability, and schedule, so massive salt returns as the candidate formation of choice. The cost (in 2007 dollars) of disposing of 83,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) high-level waste (HLW) is about $ 83 billion (b) in volcanic tuff, $ 29 b in massive salt, and $ 77 b in crystalline rock. Only in salt is the annual revenue stream from the Nuclear Waste Fund more than sufficient to accomplish this program without additional taxes or rate hikes. The cost is determined primarily by the suitability of the geologic formation, i.e., how well it performs on its own for millions of years with little engineering assistance from humans. It is critical that the states most affected by this issue (WA, SC, ID, TN, NM and perhaps others) develop an independent multi-state agreement in order for a successful program to move forward. Federal approval would follow. Unknown to most, the United States has a successful operating deep permanent geologic nuclear repository for high and low activity waste, called the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Its success results from several factors, including an optimal geologic and physio-graphic setting, a strong scientific basis, early regional community support, frequent interactions among stakeholders at all stages of the process, long-term commitment from the upper management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over several administrations, strong New Mexico State involvement and oversight, and constant environmental monitoring from before nuclear waste was first emplaced in the WIPP underground (in 1999) to the present. WIPP is located in the massive bedded salts of the Salado Formation, whose geological, physical, chemical, redox, thermal, and creep-closure properties make it an ideal formation for long-term disposal, long-term in this case being greater than 200 million years. These properties also mean minimal engineering requirements as the rock does most of the work of isolating the waste. WIPP has been operating for twelve years, and as of this writing, has disposed of over 80,000 m{sup 3} of nuclear weapons waste, called transuranic or TRU waste (>100 nCurie/g but <23 Curie/1000 cm{sup 3}) including some high activity waste from reprocessing of spent fuel from old weapons reactors. All nuclear waste of any type from any source can be disposed in this formation better, safer and cheaper than in any other geologic formation. At the same time, it is critical that we complete the Yucca Mountain license application review so as not to undermine the credibility of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the scientific commun

Conca, James [RJLee Group, Inc., Pasco WA 509.205.7541 (United States); Wright, Judith [UFA Ventures, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 5720 of 28,560 results. 11 - 5720 of 28,560 results. Download EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0287 (September 2002) This EIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternatives for managing high-level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW) and newly generated liquid... http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0287-idaho-high-level-waste-and-facilities-disposition-final-environmental-impa-1 Download Audit Report: OAS-L-03-16 Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Incident Response Program http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-oas-l-03-16 Download DOE-TSPP-8, Approving and Issuing DOE Technical Standards- July 1, 2009 This document is the TSPP for Approving and Issuing DOE Technical

358

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 8440 of 26,764 results. 31 - 8440 of 26,764 results. Download EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0287 (September 2002) This EIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternatives for managing high-level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW) and newly generated liquid... http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0287-idaho-high-level-waste-and-facilities-disposition-final-environmental-impa-1 Download EA-1819: Final Environmental Assessment Kilowatts for Kenston Wind Energy Project, Chagrin Falls, Geauga County http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1819-final-environmental-assessment Download LNG Annual Report- 2005 LNG Annual Report - 2005 http://energy.gov/fe/downloads/lng-annual-report-2005

359

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18 18 19 T he WIPP's first waste receipt, 11 years later than originally planned, was a monumental step forward in the safe management of nuclear waste. Far from ending, however, the WIPP story has really just begun. For the next 35 years, the DOE will face many challenges as it manages a complex shipment schedule from transuranic waste sites across the United States and continues to ensure that the repository complies with all regulatory requirements. The DOE will work to maintain the highest level of safety in waste handling and trans- portation. Coordination with sites Disposal operations require coordination with sites that will ship transuranic waste to the WIPP and include periodic certification of waste characterization and handling practices at those facilities. During the WIPP's

360

SRS - Programs - Waste Solidification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Solidification Waste Solidification The two primary facilities operated within the Waste Solidification program are Saltstone and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. The largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the world, DWPF converts the high-level liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for immobilizing high-level radioactive liquids into a more stable, manageable form until a federal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Synthesizing Optimal Waste Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vitrification of tank wastes to form glass is a technique that will be used for the disposal of high-level waste at Hanford. ... Durability restrictions ensure that the resultant glass meets the quantitative criteria for disposal/long-term storage in a repository. ... If glasses are formulated to minimize the volume of glass that would be produced, then the cost of processing the waste and storing the resultant glass would be greatly reduced. ...

Venkatesh Narayan; Urmila M. Diwekar; Mark Hoza

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

363

Waste Confidence Discussion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 2012 ♦ Knoxville, Tennessee Long-Term Update Draft Report, "Background and Preliminary Assumptions for an Environmental Impact Statement- Long-Term Waste Confidence Update" Elements of the Long-Term Update - Draft environmental impact statement - Draft Waste Confidence Decision - Proposed Waste Confidence Rule based on the EIS and Decision, if applicable 2 Overview of Draft Report Background and assumptions report is first step in process. Basic topics in the report are:

364

Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Section 24: Waste Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy (DOE). 1995b. Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (Revision 2, December). DOECAO-95-1121. ERMS 531643. Carlsbad Area Office, Carlsbad, NM. PDF Author U.S....

366

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

training, security) * Closure plan Tank-Related Permit Units New * 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) * 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) Existing * 242-A Evaporator * Waste Treatment...

367

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

368

Electronic Waste Transformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electronic Waste Transformation ... Instead, entrepreneurial individuals and small businesses recover valuable metals such as copper from obsolete equipment through activities such as burning. ...

CHERYL HOGUE

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Waste minimization assessment procedure  

SciTech Connect

Perry Nuclear Power Plant began developing a waste minimization plan early in 1991. In March of 1991 the plan was documented following a similar format to that described in the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. Initial implementation involved obtaining management's commitment to support a waste minimization effort. The primary assessment goal was to identify all hazardous waste streams and to evaluate those streams for minimization opportunities. As implementation of the plan proceeded, non-hazardous waste streams routinely generated in large volumes were also evaluated for minimization opportunities. The next step included collection of process and facility data which would be useful in helping the facility accomplish its assessment goals. This paper describes the resources that were used and which were most valuable in identifying both the hazardous and non-hazardous waste streams that existed on site. For each material identified as a waste stream, additional information regarding the materials use, manufacturer, EPA hazardous waste number and DOT hazard class was also gathered. Once waste streams were evaluated for potential source reduction, recycling, re-use, re-sale, or burning for heat recovery, with disposal as the last viable alternative.

Kellythorne, L.L. (Centerior Energy, Cleveland, OH (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

371

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 19, 2014 - No second release at WIPP September 12, 2014 - Waste hoist transformer replacement September 09, 2014 - Additional areas cleared in WIPP underground...

373

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

FINAL REPORT DURAMELTER 100 HLW SIMULANT VALIDATION TESTS WITH C-106/AY-102 FEEDS VSL-05R5710-1 REV 0 6/2/05  

SciTech Connect

The principal objectives of the DM100 tests were to determine the processing characteristics of several C-106/AY102 feeds derived from simulants prepared by different methods, which result in different physical characteristics of the feed. The VSL simulant used in a previous test was prepared by the direct hydroxide method, which was the method used for feed preparation in the bulk of previous VSL melter testing. The NOAH Technologies Corporation modified-rheology simulant was prepared to the same composition as the VSL simulant using a method that resulted in rheological properties closer to those of certain actual waste samples. The SIPP simulant was produced by processing a co-precipitated waste simulant through a non-radioactive pilot scale semi-integrated pretreatment facility. The general intent of these tests was to provide a basis for determining whether the variations in rheology or other feed physical characteristics arising from the different methods of simulant preparation have significant effects on the processing characteristics of the feed in the melter. Completion of the test objectives is detailed in a table.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site: Results of Technology Down-Selection and Research and Development to Support New Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW) program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of HLW for disposal. The Salt Processing Project (SPP) is the salt waste (water-soluble) treatment portion of this effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction, and operation of technologies to prepare the salt-waste feed material for immobilization at the site's Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility [DWPF]). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to DWPF include cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and actinides. In April 2000, the DOE Deputy Secretary for Project Completion (EM-40) established the SRS Salt Processing Project Technical Working Group (TWG) to manage technology development of treatment alternatives for SRS high-level salt wastes. The separation alternatives investigated included three candidate Cs-removal processes selected, as well as actinide and Sr removal that are also required as a part of each process. The candidate Cs-removal processes are: crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange (CST); caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX); and small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). The Tanks Focus Area was asked to assist DOE by managing the SPP research and development (R&D), revising roadmaps, and developing down-selection criteria. The down-selection decision process focused its analysis on three levels: (a) identification of goals that the selected technology should achieve, (b) selection criteria that are a measure of performance of the goal, and (c) criteria scoring and weighting for each technology alternative. After identifying the goals and criteria, the TWG analyzed R&D results and engineering data and scored the technology alternatives versus the criteria. Based their analysis and scoring, the TWG recommended CSSX as the preferred alternative. This recommendation was formalized in July 2001 when DOE published the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and was finalized in the DOE Record of Decision issued in October 2001.

Lang, K.; Gerdes, K.; Picha, K.; Spader, W.; McCullough, J.; Reynolds, J.; Morin, J. P.; Harmon, H. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

376

Waste Loading Enhancements for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE GLASSES Albert A. Kruger, Glass Scientist DOE-WTP Project Office Engineering Division US Department of Energy Richland,...

377

Tank Waste Committee Page 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of a PA is to examine the final waste disposition at Hanford, such as waste in the tanks at C-Farm. Vince said the quest is to model waste movement over 10,000 years,...

378

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Radioactive Waste Source Reduction 1,500 Radioactive Waste $6,000 $2,500 $6,000 Waste Yard Sorting Table surveying to sort clean waste from radioactive waste Radioactive Emissions Emission lives. Radioactive Waste generated through wet chemistry Waste Minimization 30 Mixed waste / Liquid

379

Effects of potassium and calcination pretreatment on the adsorption and chemical/physical properties of Fe/SiO/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect

Studies of the effects of potassium on CO, CO/sub 2/, and hydrogen adsorptions on iron indicate that potassium promotion increases heats of adsorption of CO and H/sub 2/, enhances the rate of CO dissociation, increases CO saturation coverage, and decreases the CO sticking coefficient. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of potassium promoter and calcination of the stoichiometries and kinetics of CO, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/ adsorptions on Fe/SiO/sub 2/ and to relate these effects to changes in the physical and chemical properties of the catalyst. The results reveal important differences in behavior for CO and H/sub 2/ adsorptions on precalcined Fe/SiO/sub 2/ and Fe/K/SiO/sub 2/ compared to the adsorptions on single crystal or polycrystalline iron, which may relate to changes in the surface and bulk properties of iron such as potassium coverage and extent of reduction. 33 references.

Rankin, J.L.; Bartholomew, C.H.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Chapter 19 - Nuclear Waste Fund  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 CHAPTER 19 NUCLEAR WASTE FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. This chapter establishes the financial, accounting, and budget policies and procedures for civilian and defense nuclear waste activities, as authorized in Public Law 97-425, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, referred to hereafter as the Act. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are funded by the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) or the Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal appropriation. c. Background. The Act established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and assigned it responsibility for the management

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Solid Waste Rules (New Hampshire)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The solid waste statute applies to construction and demolition debris, appliances, recyclables, and the facilities that collect, process, and dispose of solid waste. DES oversees the management of...

382

Solid Waste Management (North Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Solid Waste Program regulates safe management of solid waste through guidance, technical assistance, regulations, permitting, environmental monitoring, compliance evaluation and enforcement....

383

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Management Waste Management Oak Ridge has an onsite CERCLA disposal facility, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility, that reduces cleanup and transportation costs....

384

Municipal Waste Combustion (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule establishes requirements for emissions from, and design and operation of, municipal waste combustion units. "Municipal waste"means all materials and substances discarded from residential...

385

Waste Disposal | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Disposal Waste Disposal Trucks transport debris from Oak Ridges cleanup sites to the onsite CERCLA disposal area, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility....

386

22 - Radioactive waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the disposal of radioactive wastes that arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, beneficial uses of isotopes, and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. The spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. It is anticipated that a multi-barrier system involving packaging and geologic media will provide protection of the public over the centuries. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In some countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is done by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

REGIONAL BINNING FOR CONTINUED STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND HIGH-LEVEL WASTES  

SciTech Connect

In the Continued Storage Analysis Report (CSAR) (Reference 1), DOE decided to analyze the environmental consequences of continuing to store the commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at 72 commercial nuclear power sites and DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste at five Department of Energy sites by region rather than by individual site. This analysis assumes that three commercial facilities pairs--Salem and Hope Creek, Fitzpatrick and Nine-Mile Point, and Dresden and Moms--share common storage due to their proximity to each other. The five regions selected for this analysis are shown on Figure 1. Regions 1, 2, and 3 are the same as those used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in their regulatory oversight of commercial power reactors. NRC Region 4 was subdivided into two regions to more appropriately define the two different climates that exist in NRC Region 4. A single hypothetical site in each region was assumed to store all the SNF and HLW in that region. Such a site does not exist and has no geographic location but is a mathematical construct for analytical purposes. To ensure that the calculated results for the regional analyses reflect appropriate inventory, facility and material degradation, and radionuclide transport, the waste inventories, engineered barriers, and environmental conditions for the hypothetical sites were developed from data for each of the existing sites within the given region. Weighting criteria to account for the amount and types of SNF and HLW at each site were used in the development of the environmental data for the regional site, such that the results of the analyses for the hypothetical site were representative of the sum of the results of each actual site if they had been modeled independently. This report defines the actual site data used in development of this hypothetical site, shows how the individual site data was weighted to develop the regional site, and provides the weighted data used in the CSAR analysis. It is divided into Part 1 that defines time-dependent releases from each regional site, Part 2 that defines transport conditions through the groundwater, and Part 3 that defines transport through surface water and populations using the surface waters for drinking.

W. Lee Poe, Jr

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T h e W a s t e I s o l a t i o n P i l o t P l a n t DOE 1980. Final Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1981. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): Record of Decision. Federal Register, Vol. 46, No. 18, p. 9162, (46 Federal Register 9162), January 28, 1981. U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026-FS, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Record of Decision: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Federal Register, Vol. 55, No. 121, 25689-25692, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1994. Comparative Study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transportation Alternatives.

392

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patricia Suggs Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2 Overview * Current SRS Liquid Waste System status * Opportunity to accelerate salt processing - transformational technologies - Rotary Microfiltration (RMF) and Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) - Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (ARP/MCU) extension with next generation extractant - Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) performance enhancement - Saltstone enhancements * Life-cycle impacts and benefits 3 SRS Liquid Waste Total Volume >37 Million Gallons (Mgal) Total Curies 183 MCi (51% ) 175 MCi (49% ) >358 Million Curies (MCi) Sludge 34.3 Mgal (92% ) 3.0 Mgal (8%)

393

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum, may react with liquid in a landfill and cause uncontrolled temperature increases, significant changes

394

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Solid Waste Management 0: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction, and the regulations provide details about permitting, construction, registration, and operation requirements. The regulations contain specific guidance for land

395

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

SciTech Connect

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Waste inspection tomography (WIT)  

SciTech Connect

The WIT program will provide an inspection system that offers the nuclear waste evaluator a unique combination of tools for regulatory-driven characterization of low-level waste (LLW), transuranic waste (TRU), and mixed waste drums. WIT provides nondestructive, noninvasive, and environmentally safe inspections using X-ray and gamma ray technologies, with reasonable cost and throughput. Two emission imaging techniques will be employed for characterizing materials in waste containers. The first of these is gamma emission tomography, commonly called single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Rather than using an external radiation source, SPECT uses the emission of radioactive materials within the object of interest for imaging. In this case, emission from actual nuclear waste within a container will provide a three-dimensional image of the radioactive substances in the container. The second emission technique will use high-purity germanium detectors for gamma ray spectroscopy. This technique, called nondestructive assay (NDA), can identify the emitting isotopic species and strength. Work in emission tomography and assay of nuclear waste has been undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a technique called Passive Tomography. Results from a process development unit are presented.

Bernardi, R.T.; Han, K.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Characterization Of Supernate Samples From High Level Waste Tanks 13H, 30H, 37H, 39H, 45F, 46F and 49H  

SciTech Connect

This document presents work conducted in support of technical needs expressed, in part, by the Engineering, Procurement, and Construction Contractor for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The Department of Energy (DOE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyze and characterize supernate waste from seven selected High Level Waste (HLW) tanks to allow: classification of feed to be sent to the SWPF; verification that SWPF processes will be able to meet Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC); and updating of the Waste Characterization System (WCS) database. This document provides characterization data of samples obtained from Tanks 13H, 30H, 37H, 39H, 45F, 46F, and 49H and discusses results. Characterization of the waste tank samples involved several treatments and analysis at various stages of sample processing. These analytical stages included as-received liquid, post-dilution to 6.44 M sodium (target), post-acid digestion, post-filtration (at 3 filtration pore sizes), and after cesium removal using ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP). All tanks will require cesium removal as well as treatment with Monosodium Titanate (MST) for {sup 90}Sr (Strontium) decontamination. A small filtration effect for 90Sr was observed for six of the seven tank wastes. No filtration effects were observed for Pu (Plutonium), Np (Neptunium), U (Uranium), or Tc (Technetium); {sup 137}Cs (Cesium) concentration is ~E+09 pCi/mL for all the tank wastes. Tank 37H is significantly higher in {sup 90}Sr than the other six tanks. {sup 237}Np in the F-area tanks (45F and 46F) are at least 1 order of magnitude less than the H-Area tank wastes. The data indicate a constant ratio of {sup 99}Tc to Cs in the seven tank wastes. This indicates the Tc remains largely soluble in Savannah River Site (SRS) waste and partitions similarly with Cs. {sup 241}Am (Americium) concentration was low in the seven tank wastes. The majority of data were detection limit values, the largest being < 1.0E+04 pCi/mL. Measured values for Pu and U were generally well below solubility model predictions.

Stallings, M. E.; Barnes, M. J.; Peters, T. B.; Diprete, D. P.; Hobbs, D. T.; Fink, S. D.

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Inorganic ion exchange evaluation and design: Silicotitanate ion exchange waste conversion  

SciTech Connect

Ion exchange materials are being evaluated for removing Cs, SR from tank waste. Thermal conversion of a variety of compositions within the Cs{sub 2}O-TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} phase diagram yielded both glass and crystalline materials, some of which show low leach rates and negligible Cs losses during heat treatment. A new material, CsTiSi{sub 2}0{sub 6}, with a structure isomorphous to pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}0{sub 6}) has been identified. This material represents a new class of crystalline zeolite materials which contain large amounts of titanium. Direct conversion of Cs loaded silicotitanate ion exchangers to CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} is an excellent alternative to dissolving the Cs-loaded or Cs-eluted exchangers in borosilicate glass because: CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} is formed using a simple, one step heat treatment. The unique crystalline pollucite-like structure of CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} traps Cs, and exhibits extremely low Cs leach rates. CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} is converted to solid waste at a low processing temperature of 700 to 800 C (nominal melter operating temperatures are 1150 C). CsTiSi{sub 2}0{sub 6} concentrates the waste, thus generating lower volumes of expensive HLW. Cs losses due to volatilization during processing of CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} are extremely low.

Balmer, M.L.; Bunker, B.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A Brief Review of Filtration Studies for Waste Treatment at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This document completes the requirements of Milestone 1-2, PNNL Draft Literature Review, discussed in the scope of work outlined in the EM-31 Support Project task plan WP-2.3.6-2010-1. The focus of task WP 2.3.6 is to improve the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) understanding of filtration operations for high-level waste (HLW) to enhance filtration and cleaning efficiencies, thereby increasing process throughput and reducing the sodium demand (through acid neutralization). Developing the processes for fulfilling the cleaning/backpulsing requirements will result in more efficient operations for both the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Savannah River Site (SRS), thereby increasing throughput by limiting cleaning cycles. The purpose of this document is to summarize Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys (PNNLs) literature review of historical filtration testing at the laboratory and of testing found in peer-reviewed journals. Eventually, the contents of this document will be merged with a literature review by SRS to produce a summary report for DOE of the results of previous filtration testing at the laboratories and the types of testing that still need to be completed to address the questions about improved filtration performance at WTP and SRS. To this end, this report presents 1) a review of the current state of crossflow filtration knowledge available in the peer-reviewed literature, 2) a detailed review of PNNL-related filtration studies specific to the Hanford site, and 3) an overview of current waste filtration models developed by PNNL and suggested avenues for future model development.

Daniel, Richard C.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

403

Generating power with waste wood  

SciTech Connect

Among the biomass renewables, waste wood has great potential with environmental and economic benefits highlighting its resume. The topics of this article include alternate waste wood fuel streams; combustion benefits; waste wood comparisons; waste wood ash; pilot scale tests; full-scale test data; permitting difficulties; and future needs.

Atkins, R.S.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Methane generation from waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

405

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z