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1

Extended Development Work to Validate a HLW Calcine Waste Form via INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To accomplish calcine treatment objectives, the Idaho Clean-up Project contractor, CWI, has chosen to immobilize the calcine in a glass-ceramic via the use of a Hot-Isostatic-Press (HIP); a treatment selection formally documented in a 2010 Record of Decision (ROD). Even though the HIP process may prove suitable for the calcine as specified in the ROD and validated in a number of past value engineering sessions, DOE is evaluating back-up treatment methods for the calcine as a result of the technical, schedule, and cost risk associated with the HIPing process. Consequently DOE HQ has requested DOE ID to make INL's bench-scale cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM) available for investigating its viability as a process alternate to calcine treatment. The waste form is the key component of immobilization of radioactive waste. Providing a solid, stable, and durable material that can be easily be stored is the rationale for immobilization of radioactive waste material in glass, ceramic, or glass-ceramics. Ceramic waste forms offer an alternative to traditional borosilicate glass waste forms. Ceramics can usually accommodate higher waste loadings than borosilicate glass, leading to smaller intermediate and long-term storage facilities. Many ceramic phases are known to possess superior chemical durability as compared to borosilicate glass. However, ceramics are generally multiphase systems containing many minor phase that make characterization and prediction of performance within a repository challenging. Additionally, the technologies employed in ceramic manufacture are typically more complex and expensive. Thus, many have proposed using glass-ceramics as compromise between in the more inexpensive, easier to characterize glass waste forms and the more durable ceramic waste forms. Glass-ceramics have several advantages over traditional borosilicate glasses as a waste form. Borosilicate glasses can inadvertently devitrify, leading to a less durable product that could crack during cooling and crystals may be prone to dissolution. By designing a glass-ceramics, the risks of deleterious effects from devitrification are removed. Furthermore, glass-ceramics have higher mechanical strength and impact strengths and possess greater chemical durability as noted above. Glass-ceramics should provide a waste form with the advantages of glass - ease of manufacture - with improved mechanical properties, thermal stability, and chemical durability. This report will cover aspects relevant for the validation of the CCIM use in the production of glass-ceramic waste forms.

James A. King; Vince Maio

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite - Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined HLW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the seventh year of the current grant (DE-FG02-05ER63966) we completed an exhaustive study of cold calcination and began work on the development of tank fill materials to fill empty tanks and control residuals. Cold calcination of low and high NOx low activity waste (LAW) SRS Tank 44 and Hanford AN-107 simulants, respectively with metallic Al + Si powders was evaluated. It was found that a combination of Al and Si powders could be used as reducing agents to reduce the nitrate and nitrite content of both low and high NOx LAW to low enough levels to allow the LAW to be solidified directly by mixing it with metakaolin and allowing it to cure at 90 C. During room temperature reactions, NOx was reduced and nitrogen was emitted as N2 or NH3. This was an important finding because now one can pretreat LAW at ambient temperatures which provides a low-temperature alternative to thermal calcination. The significant advantage of using Al and Si metals for denitration/denitrition of the LAW is the fact that the supernate could potentially be treated in situ in the waste tanks themselves. Tank fill materials based upon a hydroceramic binder have been formulated from mixtures of metakaolinite, Class F fly ash and Class C flue gas desulphurization (FGD) ash mixed with various concentrations of NaOH solution. These harden over a period of hours or days depending on composition. A systematic study of properties of the tank fill materials (leachability) and ability to adsorb and hold residuals is under way.

Grutzeck, Michael

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

4

Method for calcining radioactive wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form by calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix.

Bjorklund, William J. (Richland, WA); McElroy, Jack L. (Richland, WA); Mendel, John E. (Kennewick, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

CERTA, P.J.

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

6

Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite-Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined Sodium Bearing Waste (HLW and/or LLW)  

SciTech Connect

Zeolites are extremely versatile. They can adsorb liquids and gases and serve as cation exchange media. They occur in nature as well cemented deposits. The ancient Romans used blocks of zeolitized tuff as a building material. Using zeolites for the management of radioactive waste is not a new idea, but a process by which the zeolites can be made to act as a cementing agent is. Zeolitic materials are relatively easy to synthesize from a wide range of both natural and man-made substances. The process under study is derived from a well known method in which metakaolin (an impure thermally dehydroxylated kaolinite heated to {approx}700 C containing traces of quartz and mica) is mixed with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and reacted in slurry form (for a day or two) at mildly elevated temperatures. The zeolites form as finely divided powders containing micrometer ({micro}m) sized crystals. However, if the process is changed slightly and only just enough concentrated sodium hydroxide solution is added to the metakaolinite to make a thick crumbly paste and then the paste is compacted and cured under mild hydrothermal conditions (60-200 C), the mixture will form a hard ceramic-like material containing distinct crystalline tectosilicate minerals (zeolites and feldspathoids) imbedded in an X-ray amorphous hydrated sodium aluminosilicate matrix. Due to its lack of porosity and vitreous appearance we have chosen to call this composite a ''hydroceramic''.

Grutzeck, Michael W.

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

7

Process Design Concepts for Stabilization of High Level Waste Calcine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current baseline assumption is that packaging as is and direct disposal of high level waste (HLW) calcine in a Monitored Geologic Repository will be allowed. The fall back position is to develop a stabilized waste form for the HLW calcine, that will meet repository waste acceptance criteria currently in place, in case regulatory initiatives are unsuccessful. A decision between direct disposal or a stabilization alternative is anticipated by June 2006. The purposes of this Engineering Design File (EDF) are to provide a pre-conceptual design on three low temperature processes under development for stabilization of high level waste calcine (i.e., the grout, hydroceramic grout, and iron phosphate ceramic processes) and to support a down selection among the three candidates. The key assumptions for the pre-conceptual design assessment are that a) a waste treatment plant would operate over eight years for 200 days a year, b) a design processing rate of 3.67 m3/day or 4670 kg/day of HLW calcine would be needed, and c) the performance of waste form would remove the HLW calcine from the hazardous waste category, and d) the waste form loadings would range from about 21-25 wt% calcine. The conclusions of this EDF study are that: (a) To date, the grout formulation appears to be the best candidate stabilizer among the three being tested for HLW calcine and appears to be the easiest to mix, pour, and cure. (b) Only minor differences would exist between the process steps of the grout and hydroceramic grout stabilization processes. If temperature control of the mixer at about 80aC is required, it would add a major level of complexity to the iron phosphate stabilization process. (c) It is too early in the development program to determine which stabilizer will produce the minimum amount of stabilized waste form for the entire HLW inventory, but the volume is assumed to be within the range of 12,250 to 14,470 m3. (d) The stacked vessel height of the hot process vessels in the hydroceramic grout process (i.e., 21 m) appears to be about the same as that estimated by the Direct Cementitious Waste Process in 1998, for which a conceptual design was developed. Some of the conceptual design efforts in the 1998 study may be applicable to the stabilizer processes addressed in this EDF. (e) The gamma radiation fields near the process vessels handling HLW calcine would vary from a range of about 300-350 R/hr at a distance of 2.5 cm from the side of the vessels to a range of about 50-170 R/hr at a distance of 100 cm from the side of the vessels. The calculations were made for combined calcine, which was defined as the total HLW calcine inventory uniformly mixed. (f) The gamma radiation fields near the stabilized waste in canisters would range from about 25-170 R/hr at 2.5 cm from the side of the canister and 5-35 R/hr at 100 cm from the side of the canister, depending on the which bin set was the source of calcine.

T. R. Thomas; A. K. Herbst

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Summary of Waste Calcination at INTEC  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized-bed calcination at the Idaho Nuclear Technologies and Engineering Center (INTEC, formally called the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) has been used to solidify acidic metal nitrate fuel reprocessing and incidental wastes wastes since 1961. A summary of waste calcination in full-scale and pilot plant calciners has been compiled for future reference. It contains feed compositions and operating conditions for all the processing campaigns for the original Waste Calcining Facility (WCF), the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) started up in 1982, and numerous small scale pilot plant tests for various feed types. This summary provides a historical record of calcination at INTEC, and will be useful for evaluating calcinability of future wastes.

O' Brien, Barry Henry; Newby, Bill Joe

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

New Waste Calciner High Temperature Operation  

SciTech Connect

A new Calciner flowsheet has been developed to process the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) in the INTEC Tank Farm. The new flowsheet increases the normal Calciner operating temperature from 500 C to 600 C. At the elevated temperature, sodium in the waste forms stable aluminates, instead of nitrates that melt at calcining temperatures. From March through May 2000, the new high-temperature flowsheet was tested in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Calciner. Specific test criteria for various Calciner systems (feed, fuel, quench, off-gas, etc.) were established to evaluate the long-term operability of the high-temperature flowsheet. This report compares in detail the Calciner process data with the test criteria. The Calciner systems met or exceeded all test criteria. The new flowsheet is a visible, long-term method of calcining SBW. Implementation of the flowsheet will significantly increase the calcining rate of SBW and reduce the amount of calcine produced by reducing the amount of chemical additives to the Calciner. This will help meet the future waste processing milestones and regulatory needs such as emptying the Tank Farm.

Swenson, M.C.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Calcination process for radioactive wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method for minimizing the volatilization of chlorides during solidification in a fluidized-bed calciner of liquids containing sodium, nitrate and chloride ions. Zirconium and fluoride are introduced into the liquid, and one-half mole of calcium nitrate is added per mole of fluoride present in the liquid mixture. The mixture is calcined in the fluidized-bed calciner at about 500.degree.C., producing a high bulk density calcine product containing the chloride, thus tying up the chloride in the solid product and minimizing chloride volatilization.

Kilian, Douglas C. (Kennewick, WA)

1976-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

12

Summary - WTP HLW Waste Vitrification Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

W W HLW W DOE is Immob site's t facilitie Facility to iden the HL to be i norma The as along w Level ( * H * H * H Sy * Pu D The Ele Site: H roject: W Report Date: M ited States Waste T Why DOE Waste Vitrificatio s constructing bilization Plant tank wastes. T es including a H y (HLW). The ntify the critical LW and determ ncorporated in ally requires a T What th ssessment team with each elem (TRL) for the H LW Melter Fee LW Melter Pro LW Melter Offg ystem/Process ulse Jet Mixer isposal System To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Hanford/ORP Waste Treatme March 2007 Departmen Treatmen W E-EM Did This n Facility a Waste Treat (WTP) at Hanf The WTP is com High-Level Wa purpose of this technology ele mine if these are to the final WT Technology Re he TRA Team m identified the

13

Pyrochemical treatment of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant high-level waste calcine  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), has reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuels for the US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1951 to recover uranium, krypton-85, and isolated fission products for interim treatment and immobilization. The acidic radioactive high-level liquid waste (HLLW) is routinely stored in stainless steel tanks and then, since 1963, calcined to form a dry granular solid. The resulting high-level waste (HLW) calcine is stored in seismically hardened stainless steel bins that are housed in underground concrete vaults. A research and development program has been established to determine the feasibility of treating ICPP HLW calcine using pyrochemical technology.This technology is described.

Todd, T.A.; DelDebbio, J.A.; Nelson, L.O.; Sharpsten, M.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Richland, Washington, 99352 07-DESIGN-046 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 07-DESIGN-046 iii Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) and the DOE Office of Environmental and Radioactive Waste Management (EM), Office of Project Recovery have completed a

15

Chemistry of application of calcination/dissolution to the Hanford tank waste inventory  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 330,000 metric tons of sodium-rich radioactive waste originating from separation of plutonium from irradiated uranium fuel are stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Fractionation of the waste into low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) streams is envisioned via partial water dissolution and limited radionuclide extraction operations. Under optimum conditions, LLW would contain most of the chemical bulk while HLW would contain virtually all of the transuranic and fission product activity. Calcination at around 850 C, followed by water dissolution, has been proposed as an alternative initial treatment of Hanford Site waste to improve waste dissolution and the envisioned LLW/HLW split. Results of literature and laboratory studies are reported on the application of calcination/dissolution (C/D) to the fractionation of the Hanford Site tank waste inventory. Both simulated and genuine Hanford Site waste materials were used in the lab tests. To evaluation confirmed that C/D processing reduced the amount of several components from the waste. The C/D dissolutions of aluminum and chromium allow redistribution of these waste components from the HLW to the LLW fraction. Comparisons of simple water-washing with C/D processing of genuine Hanford Site waste are also reported based on material (radionuclide and chemical) distributions to solution and solid residue phases. The lab results show that C/D processing yielded superior dissolution of aluminum and chromium sludges compared to simple water dissolution. 57 refs., 26 figs., 18 tabs.

Delegard, C.H.; Elcan, T.D.; Hey, B.E.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Waste Calcining Facility remote inspection report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) remote inspections was to evaluate areas in the facility which are difficult to access due to high radiation fields. The areas inspected were the ventilation exhaust duct, waste hold cell, adsorber manifold cell, off-gas cell, calciner cell and calciner vessel. The WCF solidified acidic, high-level mixed waste generated during nuclear fuel reprocessing. Solidification was accomplished through high temperature oxidation and evaporation. Since its shutdown in 1981, the WCFs vessels, piping systems, pumps, off-gas blowers and process cells have remained contaminated. Access to the below-grade areas is limited due to contamination and high radiation fields. Each inspection technique was tested with a mock-up in a radiologically clean area before the equipment was taken to the WCF for the actual inspection. During the inspections, essential information was obtained regarding the cleanliness, structural integrity, in-leakage of ground water, indications of process leaks, indications of corrosion, radiation levels and the general condition of the cells and equipment. In general, the cells contain a great deal of dust and debris, as well as hand tools, piping and miscellaneous equipment. Although the building appears to be structurally sound, the paint is peeling to some degree in all of the cells. Cracking and spalling of the concrete walls is evident in every cell, although the east wall of the off-gas cell is the worst. The results of the completed inspections and lessons learned will be used to plan future activities for stabilization and deactivation of the facility. Remote clean-up of loose piping, hand tools, and miscellaneous debris can start immediately while information from the inspections is factored into the conceptual design for deactivating the facility.

Patterson, M.W.; Ison, W.M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS MATRICES FOR HLW RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and I{sup 129}. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

Jantzen, C.

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

18

INEEL Summary on Calcination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Irradiated nuclear fuel reprocessing to recover 235U and 80Kr began at the INEEL in 1953. The resulting acidic high-level liquid radioactive waste (HLW) was stored in stainless steel tanks in underground concrete vaults. A fluidized-bed calcination process was developed during the 1950s to form a granular calcine solid from the acidic HLW with a seven-fold volume reduction. An engineering-scale demonstration, the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) was constructed and operated in 1963. After the successful demonstration of the process, the WCF was continued as a production facility through 1981, Calcining 15,000 m3 of HLW to 2,160 m3 of calcine.1 The New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) was designed and constructed based on the operating experience of the WCF, and began operation in 1982. With a rated capacity of 3,000 gallons/day, the NWCF continued waste processing operations through May of 2000, resulting in an additional 2,226 m3 of calcine (total current inventory of 4,386 m3).2 During waste processing at the NWCF, sodium-bearing waste (SBW) from decontamination activities was blended with HLW to minimize alkali (sodium and potassium) concentrations in the calciner feed solution. This was necessary due to the propensity of sodium and potassium nitrates to melt in the calciner, causing the bed to agglomerate and interfere with fluidization. However, near the end of HLW processing, work was initiated to modify the calcination process to treat SBW directly, blending it with chemical additives such as aluminum nitrate rather than lower alkali content HLW liquids. The result of this development effort was to increase the operating temperature of the calciner from 500C to 600C. The 600C SBW flowsheet was successfully demonstrated at the NWCF during two separate trials during 1999 and 2000.3, 4 The conclusion from these demonstrations was that operating the existing NWCF at 600C is a viable method for solidifying SBW, and this concept is currently being evaluated as one option for preparing the SBW for disposal. To restart the NWCF for SBW processing, applicable environmental waste processing and/or air permits will be required. It is anticipated that the NWCF will be regulated as an incinerator; thus, compliance with maximum achievable control technology (MACT) emission limits will be required. To meet these stringent standards, an upgrade to the off-gas treatment train will be required. Specifically, emission of CO, total hydrocarbons (THC), and mercury must be mitigated. In addition, NOx abatement is necessary to eliminate interferences with the instrumentation required for air monitoring to demonstrate compliance.

Gombert, Dirk

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HLW is the highly radioactive material resulting from the reprocessing of SNF. Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the federal government is responsible for the disposal...

20

Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratorys Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter  

SciTech Connect

This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine's make-up is HLW containing relatively high concentrations of zirconium and aluminum, representative of the cladding material of the reprocessed fuel that generated the calcine. A separate study to define the CCIM testing needs of these other calcine classifications in currently being prepared under a separate work package (WP-0) and will be provided as a milestone report at the end of this fiscal year.

Vince Maio

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Method for calcining nuclear waste solutions containing zirconium and halides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reduction in the quantity of gelatinous solids which are formed in aqueous zirconium-fluoride nuclear reprocessing waste solutions by calcium nitrate added to suppress halide volatility during calcination of the solution while further suppressing chloride volatility is achieved by increasing the aluminum to fluoride mole ratio in the waste solution prior to adding the calcium nitrate.

Newby, Billie J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an inventory of calcined waste produced at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center during the period from December 1963 to May 2000. The report was prepared based on calciner runs, operation of the calcined solids storage facilities, and miscellaneous operational information that establishes the range of chemical compositions of calcined waste stored at Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The report will be used to support obtaining permits for the calcined solids storage facilities, possible treatment of the calcined waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and to ship the waste to an off-site facility including a geologic repository. The information in this report was compiled from calciner operating data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, calcine temperature monitoring records, and facility design of the calcined solids storage facilities. A compact disk copy of this report is provided to facilitate future data manipulations and analysis.

Staiger, Merle Daniel; M. C. Swenson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive report provides definitive volume, mass, and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Calcine composition data are required for regulatory compliance (such as permitting and waste disposal), future treatment of the caline, and shipping the calcine to an off-Site-facility (such as a geologic repository). This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins. The Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs) were designed by different architectural engineering firms and built at different times. Each CSSF has a unique design, reflecting varying design criteria and lessons learned from historical CSSF operation. The varying CSSF design will affect future calcine retrieval processes and equipment. Revision 4 of this report presents refinements and enhancements of calculations concerning the composition, volume, mass, chemical content, and radioactivity of calcined waste produced and stored within the CSSFs. The historical calcine samples are insufficient in number and scope of analysis to fully characterize the entire inventory of calcine in the CSSFs. Sample data exist for all the liquid wastes that were calcined. This report provides calcine composition data based on liquid waste sample analyses, volume of liquid waste calcined, calciner operating data, and CSSF operating data using several large Microsoft Excel (Microsoft 2003) databases and spreadsheets that are collectively called the Historical Processing Model. The calcine composition determined by this method compares favorably with historical calcine sample data.

Staiger, M. Daniel, Swenson, Michael C.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A potential option in the program for long-term management of high-level wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, calls for retrieving calcine waste and converting it to a more stable and less dispersible form. An inventory of calcine produced during the period December 1963 to May 1999 has been prepared based on calciner run, solids storage facilities operating, and miscellaneous operational information, which gives the range of chemical compositions of calcine waste stored at INTEC. Information researched includes calciner startup data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, solids storage bin capacities, calcine storage bin distributor systems, and solids storage bin design and temperature monitoring records. Unique information on calcine solids storage facilities design of potential interest to remote retrieval operators is given.

M. D. Staiger

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

compounds VSL Vitreous State Laboratory of the Catholic University of America WESP Wet Electrostatic Precipitator WGI Washington Group International WTP Waste Treatment and...

26

ICPP radioactive liquid and calcine waste technologies evaluation. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has received spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim storage since 1951 and reprocessing since 1953. Until recently, the major activity of the ICPP has been the reprocessing of SNF to recover fissile uranium; however, changing world events have raised questions concerning the need to recover and recycle this material. In April 1992, DOE chose to discontinue reprocessing SNF for uranium recovery and shifted its focus toward the management and disposition of radioactive wastes accumulated through reprocessing activities. Currently, 1.8 million gallons of radioactive liquid wastes (1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid wastes and 0.3 million gallons of high-level liquid waste) and 3,800 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of calcine waste are in inventory at the ICPP. Legal drivers and agreements exist obligating the INEL to develop, demonstrate, and implement technologies for safe and environmentally sound treatment and interim storage of radioactive liquid and calcine waste. Candidate treatment processes and waste forms are being evaluated using the Technology Evaluation and Analysis Methodology (TEAM) Model. This process allows decision makers to (1) identify optimum radioactive waste treatment and disposal form alternatives; (2) assess tradeoffs between various optimization criteria; (3) identify uncertainties in performance parameters; and (4) focus development efforts on options that best satisfy stakeholder concerns. The Systems Analysis technology evaluation presented in this document supports the DOE in selecting the most effective radioactive liquid and calcine waste management plan to implement in compliance with established regulations, court orders, and agreements.

Murphy, J.A.; Pincock, L.F.; Christiansen, I.N.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF). SNF is nuclear fuel that has been used as fuel in a reactor...

28

Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a quantitative inventory and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. From December 1963 through May 2000, liquid radioactive wastes generated by spent nuclear fuel reprocessing were converted into a solid, granular form called calcine. This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins.

M. D. Staiger M. C. Swenson

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE ) GLASSES FOR HANFORDS WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of glass formulation development and melter testing to identify high waste loading glasses to treat high-Al high level waste (HLW) at Hanford. Previous glass formulations developed for this HLW had high waste loadings but their processing rates were lower that desired. The present work was aimed at improving the glass processing rate while maintaining high waste loadings. Glass formulations were designed, prepared at crucible-scale and characterized to determine their properties relevant to processing and product quality. Glass formulations that met these requirements were screened for melt rates using small-scale tests. The small-scale melt rate screening included vertical gradient furnace (VGF) and direct feed consumption (DFC) melter tests. Based on the results of these tests, modified glass formulations were developed and selected for larger scale melter tests to determine their processing rate. Melter tests were conducted on the DuraMelter 100 (DMIOO) with a melt surface area of 0.11 m{sup 2} and the DuraMelter 1200 (DMI200) HLW Pilot Melter with a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}. The newly developed glass formulations had waste loadings as high as 50 wt%, with corresponding Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration in the glass of 26.63 wt%. The new glass formulations showed glass production rates as high as 1900 kg/(m{sup 2}.day) under nominal melter operating conditions. The demonstrated glass production rates are much higher than the current requirement of 800 kg/(m{sup 2}.day) and anticipated future enhanced Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) requirement of 1000 kg/(m{sup 2}.day).

KRUGER AA; BOWAN BW; JOSEPH I; GAN H; KOT WK; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

30

OPTIMUM FILL VOLUMES IN POT CALCINATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The 15,000 MW nuclear economy assumed for the long range study of pot calcination costs reported earlier was used as a basis for calculating optimum fill volumes. An algebraic expression was developed for cost as a functmon of the normalized radius of the central void space in a partially filled vessel. Minima of this expression were found for acmdmc and neutralized wastes in 6, 12, and 24in.-diameter vessels. Optimum fill volumes decreased as vessel diameter increased, varying for acidic wastes from 99.8% for 6-in.-diameter vessels to 92.5% for 24-in.diameter vessels. Decreases in costs by using optimum fill volumes instead of the 90% fill volume assumed for all cases in the long range study were small, the largest being an 8% decrease for neutralized wastes in 6- in.-diameter vessels. (auth)

Perona, J.J.

1961-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

31

Addendum to the Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an addendum to the report Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, INEEL/EXT-98-00455 Rev. 1, June 2003. The original report provided a summary description of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs). It also contained dozens of pages of detailed data tables documenting the volume and composition (chemical content and radionuclide activity) of the calcine stored in the CSSFs and the liquid waste from which the calcine was derived. This addendum report compiles the calcine composition data from the original report. It presents the compiled data in a graphical format with units (weight percent, curies per cubic meter, and nanocuries per gram) that are commonly used in regulatory and waste acceptance criteria documents. The compiled data are easier to use and understand when comparing the composition of the calcine with potential regulatory or waste acceptance criteria. This addendum report also provides detailed explanations for the large variability in the calcine composition among the CSSFs. The calcine composition varies as a result of reprocessing different types of fuel that had different cladding materials. Different chemicals were used to dissolve the various types of fuel, extract the uranium, and calcine the resulting waste. This resulted in calcine with variable compositions. This addendum report also identifies a few trace chemicals and radionuclides for which the accuracy of the amounts estimated to be in the calcine could be improved by making adjustments to the assumptions and methods used in making the estimates.

M. D. Staiger; Michael Swenson; T. R. Thomas

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Cogeneration Waste Heat Recovery at a Coke Calcining Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PSE Inc. recently completed the design, construction and start-up of a cogeneration plant in which waste heat in the high temperature flue gases of three existing coke calcining kilns is recovered to produce process steam and electrical energy. The heat previously exhausted to the atmosphere is now converted to steam by waste heat recovery boilers. Eighty percent of the steam produced is metered for sale to a major oil refinery, while the remainder passes through a steam turbine generator and is used for deaeration and feedwater heating. The electricity produced is used for the plant auxiliaries and sold to the local utility. Many design concepts were incorporated into the plant which provided for high plant availability, reliability and energy efficiency. This paper will show how these concepts were implemented and incorporated into the detailed design of the plant while making cogeneration a cost effective way to save conventional fuels. Operating data since plant start-up will also be presented.

Coles, R. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Determination of the Rate of Formation of Hydroceramic Waste Forms made with INEEL Calcined Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formulation, synthesis, characterization and hydration kinetics of hydroceramic waste forms designed as potential hosts for existing INEEL calcine high-level wastes have been established as functions of temperature and processing time. Initial experimentations were conducted with several aluminosilicate pozzolanic materials, ranging from fly ash obtained from various power generating coal and other combustion industries to reactive alumina, natural clays and ground bottled glass powders. The final selection criteria were based on the ease of processing, excellent physical properties and chemical durability (low-leaching) determined from the PCT test produced in hydroceramic. The formulation contains vermiculite, Sr(NO32), CsC1, NaOH, thermally altered (calcined natural clay) and INEEL simulated calcine high-level nuclear wastes and 30 weight percent of fluorinel blend calcine and zirconia calcine. Syntheses were carried out at 75-200 degree C at autogeneous water pressure (100% relative humidity) at various time intervals. The resulting monolithic compact products were hard and resisted breaking when dropped from a 5 ft height. Hydroceramic host mixed with fluorinel blend calcine and processed at 75 degree C crumbled into rice hull-side grains or developed scaly flakes. However, the samples equally possessed the same chemical durability as their unbroken counterparts. Phase identification by XRD revealed that hydroceramic host crystallized type zeolite at 75-150 degree C and NaP1 at 175-200 degree C in addition to the presence of quartz phase originating from the clay reactant. Hydroceramic host mixed with either fluorinel blend calcine or zirconia calcine crystallized type A zeolite at 75-95 degree C, formed a mixture of type A zeolite and hydroxysodalite at 125-150 degree C and hydroxysodalite at 175-200 degree C. Quartz, calcium fluoride and zirconia phases from the clay reactant and the two calcine wastes were also detected. The PCT test solution conductivity, pH and analytical concentration measured as a function of time decrease exponentially. In some cases nitrate, sulfate, chloride and fluoride ion concentrations increased with time and processing temperature with respect to the reference sample. The increasing concentration of these ions was due to the lack of formation of crystalline phases that can incorporate them in their structures, especially cancrinite. Another plausible explanations for their increase was due to the continuous withdrawal of cations with time, for example sodium to form zeolites, thereby increase their concentrations.

Barry Scheetz; Johnson Olanrewaju

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Formulation Efforts for Direct Vitrification of INEEL Blend Calcine Waste Simulate: Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of glass formulation efforts for Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) high level waste (HWL) calcine. Two waste compositions were used during testing. Testing started by using the Run 78 calcine composition and switched to simulated Blend calcine composition when it became available. The goal of the glass formulation efforts was to develop a frit composition that will accept higher waste loading that satisfies the glass processing and product acceptance constraints. 1. Melting temperature of 1125 ? 25?C 2. Viscosity between 2 and 10 Pa?s at the melting temperature 3. Liquidus temperature at least 100?C below the melting temperature 4. Normalized release of B, Li and Na each below 1 g/m2 (per ASTM C 1285-97) Glass formulation efforts tested several frit compositions with variable waste loadings of Run 78 calcine waste simulant. Frit 107 was selected as the primary candidate for processing since it met all process and performance criteria up to 45 mass% waste loading. When the simulated Blend calcine waste composition became available Frits 107 and 108 compositions were retested and again Frit 107 remained the primary candidate. However, both frits suffered a decrease in waste loading when switching from the Run 78 calcine to simulated Blend calcine waste composition. This was due to increase concentrations of both F and Al2O3 along with a decrease in CaO and Na2O in the simulate Blend calcine waste all of which have strong impacts on the glass properties that limit waste loading of this type of waste.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Vienna, John D.; Peeler, David K.; Reamer, I. A.

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

Property Models for High Waste Loaded Hanford HLW Glasses  

High Waste Loading Was Shown for Selected Wastes Examples of the high loaded glasses Al 2O 3 loadings in the 24-26 wt% range compared to <15% for a

36

Polysiloxane Encapsulation of High Level Calcine Waste for Transportation or Disposal  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an experimental study investigating the potential uses for silicon-polymer encapsulation of High Level Calcine Waste currently stored within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The study investigated two different applications of silicon polymer encapsulation. One application uses silicon polymer to produce a waste form suitable for disposal at a High Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility directly, and the other application encapsulates the calcine material for transportation to an offsite melter for further processing. A simulated waste material from INTEC, called pilot scale calcine, which contained hazardous materials but no radioactive isotopes was used for the study, which was performed at the University of Akron under special arrangement with Orbit Technologies, the originators of the silicon polymer process called Polymer Encapsulation Technology (PET). This document first discusses the PET process, followed by a presentation of past studies involving PET applications to waste problems. Next, the results of an experimental study are presented on encapsulation of the INTEC calcine waste as it applies to transportation or disposal of calcine waste. Results relating to long-term disposal include: 1) a characterization of the pilot calcine waste; 2) Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing of an optimum mixture of pilot calcine, polysiloxane and special additives; and, 3) Material Characterization Center testing MCC-1P evaluation of the optimum waste form. Results relating to transportation of the calcine material for a mixture of maximum waste loading include: compressive strength testing, 10-m drop test, melt testing, and a Department of Transportation (DOT) oxidizer test.

Loomis, Guy George

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Silicon-Polymer Encapsulation of High-Level Calcine Waste for Transportation or Disposal  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an experimental study investigating the potential uses for silicon-polymer encapsulation of High Level Calcine Waste currently stored within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The study investigated two different applications of silicon polymer encapsulation. One application uses silicon polymer to produce a waste form suitable for disposal at a High Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility directly, and the other application encapsulates the calcine material for transportation to an offsite melter for further processing. A simulated waste material from INTEC, called pilot scale calcine, which contained hazardous materials but no radioactive isotopes was used for the study, which was performed at the University of Akron under special arrangement with Orbit Technologies, the originators of the silicon polymer process called Polymer Encapsulation Technology (PET). This document first discusses the PET process, followed by a presentation of past studies involving PET applications to waste problems. Next, the results of an experimental study are presented on encapsulation of the INTEC calcine waste as it applies to transportation or disposal of calcine waste. Results relating to long-term disposal include: (1) a characterization of the pilot calcine waste; (2) Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing of an optimum mixture of pilot calcine, polysiloxane and special additives; and, (3) Material Characterization Center testing MCC-1P evaluation of the optimum waste form. Results relating to transportation of the calcine material for a mixture of maximum waste loading include: compressive strength testing, 10-m drop test, melt testing, and a Department of Transportation (DOT) oxidizer test.

G. G. Loomis; C. M. Miller; J. A. Giansiracusa; R. Kimmel; S. V. Prewett

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

HWMA closure plan for the Waste Calcining Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) calcined and evaporated aqueous wastes generated from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The calciner operated from 1963 to 1981, primarily processing high level waste from the first cycle of spent fuel extraction. Following the calciner shutdown the evaporator system concentrated high activity aqueous waste from 1983 until 1987. In 1988, US Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) requested interim status for the evaporator system, in anticipation of future use of the evaporator system. The evaporator system has not been operated since it received interim status. At the present time, DOE-ID is completing construction on a new evaporator at the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) and the evaporator at the WCF is not needed. The decision to not use the WCF evaporator requires Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) and DOE-ID to close these units. After a detailed evaluation of closure options, LITCO and DOE-ID have determined the safest option is to fill the voids (grout the vessels, cells and waste pile) and close the WCF to meet the requirements applicable to landfills. The WCF will be covered with a concrete cap that will meet the closure standards. In addition, it was decided to apply these closure standards to the calcining system since it is contained within the WCF building. The paper describes the site, waste inventory, closure activities, and post-closure care plans.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

New Waste Calcining Facility Non-radioactive Process Decontamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a test of the New Calcining Facility (NWCF) process decontamination system. The decontamination system test occurred in December 1981, during non-radioactive testing of the NWCF. The purpose of the decontamination system test was to identify equipment whose design prevented effective calcine removal and decontamination. Effective equipment decontamination was essential to reduce radiation fields for in-cell work after radioactive processing began. The decontamination system test began with a pre-decontamination inspection of the equipment. The pre-decontamination inspection documented the initial condition and cleanliness of the equipment. It provided a basis for judging the effectiveness of the decontamination. The decontamination consisted of a series of equipment flushes using nitric acid and water. A post-decontamination equipment inspection determined the effectiveness of the decontamination. The pre-decontamination and post-decontamination equipment inspections were documented with hotographs. The decontamination system was effective in removing calcine from most of the NWCF equipment as evidenced by little visible calcine residue in the equipment after decontamination. The decontamination test identified four areas where the decontamination system required improvement. These included the Calciner off-gas line, Cyclone off-gas line, fluidizing air line, and the Calciner baffle plates. Physical modifications to enhance decontamination were made to those areas, resulting in an effective NWCF decontamination system.

Swenson, Michael Clair

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

New Waste Calcining Facility Non-Radioactive Process Decontamination  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a test of the New Calcining Facility (NWCF) process decontamination system. The decontamination system test occurred in December 1981, during non-radioactive testing of the NWCF. The purpose of the decontamination system test was to identify equipment whose design prevented effective calcine removal and decontamination. Effective equipment decontamination was essential to reduce radiation fields for in-cell work after radioactive processing began. The decontamination system test began with a pre-decontamination inspection of the equipment. The pre- decontamination inspection documented the initial condition and cleanliness of the equipment. It provided a basis for judging the effectiveness of the decontamination. The decontamination consisted of a series of equipment flushes using nitric acid and water. A post-decontamination equipment inspection determined the effectiveness of the decontamination. The pre-decontamination and post-decontamination equipment inspections were documented with photographs. The decontamination system was effective in removing calcine from most of the NWCF equipment as evidenced by little visible calcine residue in the equipment after decontamination. The decontamination test identified four areas where the decontamination system required improvement. These included the Calciner off-gas line, Cyclone off-gas line, fluidizing air line, and the Calciner baffle plates. Physical modifications to enhance decontamination were made to those areas, resulting in an effective NWCF decontamination system.

Swenson, Michael C.

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ICPP radioactive liquid and calcine waste technologies evaluation final report and recommendation  

SciTech Connect

Using a formalized Systems Engineering approach, the Latched Idaho Technologies Company developed and evaluated numerous alternatives for treating, immobilizing, and disposing of radioactive liquid and calcine wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Based on technical analysis data as of March, 1995, it is recommended that the Department of Energy consider a phased processing approach -- utilizing Radionuclide Partitioning for radioactive liquid and calcine waste treatment, FUETAP Grout for low-activity waste immobilization, and Glass (Vitrification) for high-activity waste immobilization -- as the preferred treatment and immobilization alternative.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat transfer and glass melting rate. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of {approx}1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HLW waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150 C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage. The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulfur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in wasteloading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected that these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by about 25% or more.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT W; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I; BARDAKCI T; GAN H; GONG W; CHAUDHURI M

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

43

DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING GLASS FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

This Test Plan describes work to support the development and testing of high waste loading glass formulations that achieve high glass melting rates for Hanford high aluminum high level waste (HLW). In particular, the present testing is designed to evaluate the effect of using low activity waste (LAW) waste streams as a source of sodium in place ofchemical additives, sugar or cellulose as a reductant, boehmite as an aluminum source, and further enhancements to waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work will include preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM 100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, glass processing temperature, incorporation of the LAW waste stream as a sodium source, type of organic reductant, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality. Also included is a confirmatory test on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) with a composition selected from those tested on the DM100. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same waste composition. This Test Plan is prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is about 12,500. This estimate is based upon the inventory ofthe tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat transfer and glass melting rate. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of {approx}1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HLW waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150 C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage. The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP contract requirements. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization oftank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulfur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste-loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected that these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by about 25% or more.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter high-level waste solidification technical manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical manual summarizes process and equipment technology developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory over the last 20 years for vitrification of high-level liquid waste by the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process. Pacific Northwest Laboratory experience includes process development and demonstration in laboratory-, pilot-, and full-scale equipment using nonradioactive synthetic wastes. Also, laboratory- and pilot-scale process demonstrations have been conducted using actual high-level radioactive wastes. In the course of process development, more than 26 tonnes of borosilicate glass have been produced in 75 canisters. Four of these canisters contained radioactive waste glass. The associated process and glass chemistry is discussed. Technology areas described include calciner feed treatment and techniques, calcination, vitrification, off-gas treatment, glass containment (the canister), and waste glass chemistry. Areas of optimization and site-specific development that would be needed to adapt this base technology for specific plant application are indicated. A conceptual Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter system design and analyses are provided in the manual to assist prospective users in evaluating the process for plant application, to provide equipment design information, and to supply information for safety analyses and environmental reports. The base (generic) technology for the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process has been developed to a point at which it is ready for plant application.

Larson, D.E. (ed.)

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Pyrochemical processing of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) High Level Waste (HLW) calcine  

SciTech Connect

Inertial force damping control by micromanipulator modulation is proposed to suppress the vibrations of a micro/macro-manipulator system. The proposed controller, developed using classical control theory, is added to the existing control system. The proposed controller uses real-time measurements of macro-manipulator flexibility to adjust the motion of the micro manipulator to counteract structural vibrations. Experimental studies using an existing micro/macro flexible link manipulator testbed demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach to suppression of vibrations in the macro/micro-manipulator system using micromanipulator-based inertial active damping control.

Bronson, M.C.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Riley, D.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Nelson, L.; Del Debbio, J. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Collaboration, Automation, and Information Management at Hanford High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Tank Farms - 14210  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), operator of High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Tank Farms at the Hanford Site, is taking an over 20-year leap in technology, replacing systems that were monitored with clipboards and obsolete computer systems, as well as solving major operations and maintenance hurdles in the area of process automation and information management. While WRPS is fully compliant with procedures and regulations, the current systems are not integrated and do not share data efficiently, hampering how information is obtained and managed.

Aurah, Mirwaise Y.; Roberts, Mark A.

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

47

Calcination of Fluorinel-sodium waste blends using sugar as a feed additive (formerly WINCO-11879)  

SciTech Connect

Methods were studied for using sugar as a feed additive for converting the sodium-bearing wastes stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant into granular, free flowing solids by fluidized-bed calcination at 500{degrees}C. All methods studied blended sodium-bearing wastes with Fluorinel wastes but differed in the types of sugar (sucrose or dextrose) that were added to the blend. The most promising sugar additive was determined to be sucrose, since it is converted more completely to inorganic carbon than is dextrose. The effect of the feed aluminum-to-alkali metal mole ratio on calcination of these blends with sugar was also investigated. Increasing the aluminum-to-alkali metal ratio from 0.6 to 1.0 decreased the calcine product-to-fines ratio from 3.0 to 1.0 and the attrition index from 80 to 15%. Further increasing the ratio to 1.25 had no effect.

Newby, B.J.; Thomson, T.D.; O`Brien, B.H.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Design and performance of a full-scale spray calciner for nonradioactive high-level-waste-vitrification studies  

SciTech Connect

In the spray calcination process, liquid waste is spray-dried in a heated-wall spray dryer (termed a spray calciner), and then it may be combined in solid form with a glass-forming frit. This mixture is then melted in a continuous ceramic melter or in an in-can melter. Several sizes of spray calciners have been tested at PNL- laboratory scale, pilot scale and full scale. Summarized here is the experience gained during the operation of PNL's full-scale spray calciner, which has solidified approx. 38,000 L of simulated acid wastes and approx. 352,000 L of simulated neutralized wastes in 1830 h of processing time. Operating principles, operating experience, design aspects, and system descriptions of a full-scale spray calciner are discussed. Individual test run summaries are given in Appendix A. Appendices B and C are studies made by Bechtel Inc., under contract by PNL. These studies concern, respectively, feed systems for the spray calciner process and a spray calciner vibration analysis. Appendix D is a detailed structural analysis made at PNL of the spray calciner. These appendices are included in the report to provide a complete description of the spray calciner and to include all major studies made concerning PNL's full-scale spray calciner.

Miller, F.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Development Of High Waste-Loading HLW Glasses For High Bismuth Phosphate Wastes, VSL-12R2550-1, Rev 0  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from tests with new glass formulations that have been developed for several high Bi-P HLW compositions that are expected to be processed at the WTP that have not been tested previously. WTP HLW feed compositions were reviewed to select waste batches that are high in Bi-P and that are reasonably distinct from the Bi-limited waste that has been tested previously. Three such high Bi-P HLW compositions were selected for this work. The focus of the present work was to determine whether the same type of issues as seen in previous work with high-Bi HLW will be seen in HLW with different concentrations of Bi, P and Cr and also whether similar glass formulation development approaches would be successful in mitigating these issues. New glass compositions were developed for each of the three representative Bi-P HLW wastes and characterized with respect to key processing and product quality properties and, in particular, those relating to crystallization and foaming tendency.

Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

50

Mercury retorting of calcine waste, contaminated soils and railroad ballast at the Idaho National Egineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been involved in nuclear reactor research and development for over 40 years. One of the earliest major projects involved the development of a nuclear powered aircraft engine, a long-term venture which used mercury as a shielding medium. Over the course of several years, a significant amount of mercury was spilled along the railroad tracks where the test engines were transported and stored. In addition, experiments with volume reduction of waste through a calcine process employing mercury as a catalyst resulted in mercury contaminated calcine waste. Both the calcine and Test Area North wastes have been identified in Department of Energy Action Memorandums to be retorted, thereby separating the mercury from the various contaminated media. Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company awarded the Mercury Retort contract to ETAS Corporation and assigned Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. to manage the treatment field activities. The mercury retort process entails a mobile unit which consists of four trailer-mounted subsystems requiring electricity, propane, and a water supply. This mobile system demonstrates an effective strategy for retorting waste and generating minimal secondary waste.

Cotten, G.B.; Rothermel, J.S. [Parsons Engineering Science, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Sherwood, J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Heath, S.A.; Lo, T.Y.R. [ETAS Corporation (United States)

1996-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

51

ANL progress in minimizing effects of LEU conversion on calcination of fission-product {sup 99}Mo acid waste solution.  

SciTech Connect

A partnership between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), MDS Nordion (MDSN), Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL) and SGN (France) has addressed the conversion of the MAPLE Reactor 99Mo production process from high-enriched uranium (HEU) targets to low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets. One effect of the conversion would be to increase the amount of solid uranium waste five-fold; we have worked to minimize the effect of the additional waste on the overall production process and, in particular, solid waste storage. Two processes were investigated for the treatment of the uranium-rich acidic waste solution: direct calcination, and oxalate precipitation as a prelude to calcination. Direct calcination generates a dense UO3 solid that should allow a significantly greater amount of uranium in one waste container than is planned for the HEU process, but doing so results in undesirable sputtering. These results suggest that direct calcination could be adapted for use with LEU targets without a large effect on the uranium waste treatment procedures. The oxalate-calcination generates a lower-density granular U3O8 product; sputtering is not significant during calcination of the uranyl oxalate precipitate. A physical means to densify the product would need to be developed to increase the amount of uranium in each waste container. Future work will focus on the specific chemical reactions that occur during the direct and oxalate calcination processes.

Bakel, A.; Vandegrift, G.; Quigley, K.; Aase, S.; Neylon, M.; Carney, K.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville vicinity, Butte County, Idaho -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data. Historical American engineering record  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the history of the Old Waste Calcining Facility. It begins with introductory material on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the Materials Testing Reactor fuel cycle, and the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The report then describes management of the wastes from the processing plant in the following chapters: Converting liquid to solid wastes; Fluidized bed waste calcining process and the Waste Calcining Facility; Waste calcining campaigns; WCF gets a new source of heat; New Waste Calcining Facility; Last campaign; Deactivation and the RCRA cap; Significance/context of the old WCF. Appendices contain a photo key map for HAER photos, a vicinity map and neighborhood of the WCF, detailed description of the calcining process, and chronology of WCF campaigns.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Removal of strontium-90 from calcined wastes with the SREX process  

SciTech Connect

Experiments have been performed to formulate chemical procedures for the processing of radioactive dissolved calcine wastes for the removal of {sup 90}Sr with the SREX (Strontium Extraction) solvent. Batch contact solvent extraction experiments have been performed to yield a processing scheme which is highly efficient for the extraction of Sr, while remaining free from insoluble precipitate formation and third phase formation. The effect of various scrubbing and stripping techniques and elevated temperature have been evaluated. The results of the batch contact experimentation has formed the basis for a proposed processing flowsheet which is scheduled soon for demonstration in centrifugal contactors.

Wood, D.J.; Mann, N.R.; Tillotson, R.; Tullock, P.A.; Todd, T.A.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Disposal of defense spent fuel and HLW from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

Acid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage ate the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, with an emphasis on the description of HLW and spent fuels requiring repository disposal.

Ermold, L.F.; Loo, H.H.; Klingler, R.D.; Herzog, J.D.; Knecht, D.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

DOE/EA-1149; Environmental Assessment: Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility, Idaho Nation Engineering Laboratory (and FONSI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 July 1996 Environmental Assessment Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE CLOSURE OF THE WASTE CALCINING FACILITY AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The DOE-Idaho Operations Office has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of radioactive and hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce the risks to human

56

Environmental assessment: Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to close the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF). The WCF is a surplus DOE facility located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Six facility components in the WCF have been identified as Resource Conservation and Recovery Ace (RCRA)-units in the INEL RCRA Part A application. The WCF is an interim status facility. Consequently, the proposed WCF closure must comply with Idaho Rules and Standards for Hazardous Waste contained in the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA) Section 16.01.05. These state regulations, in addition to prescribing other requirements, incorporate by reference the federal regulations, found at 40 CFR Part 265, that prescribe the requirements for facilities granted interim status pursuant to the RCRA. The purpose of the proposed action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce potential risks to human health and the environment, and to comply with the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) requirements.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Effect of aluminum and silicon reactants and process parameters on glass-ceramic waste form characteristics for immobilization of high-level fluorinel-sodium calcined waste  

SciTech Connect

In this report, the effects of aluminum and silicon reactants, process soak time and the initial calcine particle size on glass-ceramic waste form characteristics for immobilization of the high-level fluorinel-sodium calcined waste stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) are investigated. The waste form characteristics include density, total and normalized elemental leach rates, and microstructure. Glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing (HIPing) a pre-compacted mixture of pilot plant fluorinel-sodium calcine, Al, and Si metal powders at 1050{degrees}C, 20,000 psi for 4 hours. One of the formulations with 2 wt % Al was HIPed for 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours at the same temperature and pressure. The calcine particle size range include as calcined particle size smaller than 600 {mu}m (finer than {minus}30 mesh, or 215 {mu}m Mass Median Diameter, MMD) and 180 {mu}m (finer than 80 mesh, or 49 {mu}m MMD).

Vinjamuri, K.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Draft environmental assessment -- Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-Idaho Operations Office has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of radioactive and hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce these risks to human health and the environment and to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements. The WCF closure project is described in the DOE Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement (Programmatic EIS). DOE determined in the Programmatic EIS Record of Decision (ROD) that certain actions would be implemented and other actions deferred. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and evaluated reasonable alternatives, including the no action alternative in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations. Based on the analysis in the EA, the action will not have a significant effect on the human environment.

Braun, J.B.; Irving, J.S.; Staley, C.S.; Stanley, N.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

EIS-0287: Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology EIS-0287: Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition In October 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) issued the Final Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0287 (Final EIS)). The Final EIS contains an evaluation of reasonable alternatives for the management of mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW),1 mixed HLW calcine, and associated low-level waste (LLW), as well as disposition alternatives for HLW facilities when their missions are completed. DOE/EIS-0287, Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology, Office of Environmental Management, Idaho, 70 FR 44598 (August

60

Melter Testing with High Aluminum HLW Streams  

Hanford Tank Waste is High in Aluminum Estimated Al inventory is 8750 MT Problem: Large fraction of Al is in the HLW solids Greatly increases the ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EVALUATION OF ULTIMATE DISPOSAL METHODS FOR LIQUID AND SOLID RADIOACTIVE WASTES. PART II. CONVERSION TO SOLID BY POT CALCINATION  

SciTech Connect

The costs of pot calcination of Purex and Thorex wastes were calculated. The wastes were assumed produced by a plant processing 1500 ton/year of U converter fuel at a burnup of 10,000 Mwd/ton and 270 ton/year of Th converter fuel at 20,000 Mwd/ton. Costs were calculated for processing Purex waste in acidic and reacidified forms and for processing Thorex wastes in acidic and reacidified forms and with constituents added for producing an acidic Thorex glass. Calcination vessel designs were right circular cylinders similar to those used in engineering development studies. Costs were calculated for processing in 6-, 12-, and 24-in.-dia vessels with a fixed length of 10 ft. Vessel costs used, based on estimates from private industry, were calculated for wastes decayed 120 days and 1, 3, 10, and 30 years after reactor discharge prior to calcination. Aging had negligible effect on costs, except as it permitted larger diameter vessels to be used, because vessel and operating costs were much larger than capital costs in all cases. The lowest cost was 0.87 x 10/sup -2/ mill/kwh/sub e/ for processing acidic Purex and Thorex wastes in 24-in.-dia vessels, and the highest was 5.0 x 10/sup -2/ mill/kwh/sub e/ for processing reacidified Purex and Thorex wastes in 6-in.-dia vessels. About 7 years of interim liquid storage would be required before acidic Purex wastes could be processed in 24-in.-dia vessels. (auth)

Perona, J.J.; Bradshaw, R.L.; Roberts, J.T.; Blomeke, J.O.

1961-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

62

Evolved Gas Analysis for High-alumina HLW (High Level Waste) Feed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the thermogravimetry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer, ... Tungstic Acid for Sorption of Uranium from Natural and Waste Waters and...

63

Vitrified waste option study report  

SciTech Connect

A {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates that all radioactive high-level waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target date of 2035. This report investigates vitrification treatment of all ICPP calcine, including the existing and future HLW calcine resulting from calcining liquid Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW). Currently, the SBW is stored in the tank farm at the ICPP. Vitrification of these wastes is an acceptable treatment method for complying with the Settlement Agreement. This method involves vitrifying the calcined waste and casting the vitrified mass into stainless steel canisters that will be ready to be moved out of the Idaho for disposal by 2035. These canisters will be stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) until they are sent to a HLW national repository. The operating period for vitrification treatment will be from 2013 through 2032; all HLW will be treated and in storage by the end of 2032.

Lopez, D.A.; Kimmitt, R.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Spring 2009 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post-Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under and approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment.

Boehmer, Ann M.

2009-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Advances in JHCM HLW Vitrification Technology through Scaled ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... at Savannah River, WTP HLW and LAW at Hanford, as well Rokkasho in Japan . ... Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

66

INCONEL 690 CORROSION IN WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PLANT) HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS MELTS RICH IN ALUMINUM & BISMUTH & CHROMIUM OR ALUMINUM/SODIUM  

SciTech Connect

Metal corrosion tests were conducted with four high waste loading non-Fe-limited HLW glass compositions. The results at 1150 C (the WTP nominal melter operating temperature) show corrosion performance for all four glasses that is comparable to that of other typical borosilicate waste glasses, including HLW glass compositions that have been developed for iron-limited WTP streams. Of the four glasses tested, the Bi-limited composition shows the greatest extent of corrosion, which may be related to its higher phosphorus content. Tests at higher suggest that a moderate elevation of the melter operating temperature (up to 1200 C) should not result in any significant increase in Inconel corrosion. However, corrosion rates did increase significantly at yet higher temperatures (1230 C). Very little difference was observed with and without the presence of an electric current density of 6 A/inch{sup 2}, which is the typical upper design limit for Inconel electrodes. The data show a roughly linear relationship between the thickness of the oxide scale on the coupon and the Cr-depletion depth, which is consistent with the chromium depletion providing the material source for scale growth. Analysis of the time dependence of the Cr depletion profiles measured at 1200 C suggests that diffusion of Cr in the Ni-based Inconel alloy controls the depletion depth of Cr inside the alloy. The diffusion coefficient derived from the experimental data agrees within one order of magnitude with the published diffusion coefficient data for Cr in Ni matrices; the difference is likely due to the contribution from faster grain boundary diffusion in the tested Inconel alloy. A simple diffusion model based on these data predicts that Inconel 690 alloy will suffer Cr depletion damage to a depth of about 1 cm over a five year service life at 1200 C in these glasses.

KRUGER AA; FENG Z; GAN H; PEGG IL

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hanford high level waste (HLW) tank mixer pump safe operating envelope reliability assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy and its contractor, Westinghouse Corp., are responsible for the management and safe storage of waste accumulated from processing defense reactor irradiated fuels for plutonium recovery at the Hanford Site. These wastes, which consist of liquids and precipitated solids, are stored in underground storage tanks pending final disposition. Currently, 23 waste tanks have been placed on a safety watch list because of their potential for generating, storing, and periodically releasing various quantities of hydrogen and other gases. Tank 101-SY in the Hanford SY Tank Farm has been found to release hydrogen concentrations greater than the lower flammable limit (LFL) during periodic gas release events. In the unlikely event that an ignition source is present during a hydrogen release, a hydrogen burn could occur with a potential to release nuclear waste materials. To mitigate the periodic gas releases occurring from Tank 101-SY, a large mixer pump currently is being installed in the tank to promote a sustained release of hydrogen gas to the tank dome space. An extensive safety analysis (SA) effort was undertaken and documented to ensure the safe operation of the mixer pump after it is installed in Tank 101-SY.1 The SA identified a need for detailed operating, alarm, and abort limits to ensure that analyzed safety limits were not exceeded during pump operations.

Fischer, S.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Clark, J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1998, the WCF was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the WCF to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post-closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report.

Idaho Cleanup Project

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Cost Comparison for the Transfer of Select Calcined Waste Canisters to the Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV  

SciTech Connect

This report performs a life-cycle cost comparison of three proposed canister designs for the shipment and disposition of Idaho National Laboratory high-level calcined waste currently in storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center to the proposed national monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Concept A (2 10-ft) and Concept B (2 15-ft) canisters are comparable in design, but they differ in size and waste loading options and vary proportionally in weight. The Concept C (5.5 17.5-ft) canister (also called the super canister), while similar in design to the other canisters, is considerably larger and heavier than Concept A and B canisters and has a greater wall thickness. This report includes estimating the unique life-cycle costs for the three canister designs. Unique life-cycle costs include elements such as canister purchase and filling at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, cask preparation and roundtrip consignment costs, final disposition in the monitored geologic repository (including canister off-loading and placement in the final waste disposal package for disposition), and cask purchase. Packaging of the calcine "as-is" would save $2.9 to $3.9 billion over direct vitrification disposal in the proposed national monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Using the larger Concept C canisters would use 0.75 mi less of tunnel space, cost $1.3 billion less than 10-ft canisters of Concept A, and would be complete in 6.2 years.

Michael B. Heiser; Clark B. Millet

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

The New Generation of Vertical Shaft Calciner Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... shaft calciner, the waste heat from which can be recuperated to generate electricity of 28 million kWh. The major invention is calciner structure optimization by...

71

Mercury removal at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's New Waste Calcining Facility  

SciTech Connect

Technologies were investigated to determine viable processes for removing mercury from the calciner (NWCF) offgas system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Technologies for gas phase and aqueous phase treatment were evaluated. The technologies determined are intended to meet EPA Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements under the Clean Air Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Currently, mercury accumulation in the calciner off-gas scrubbing system is transferred to the tank farm. These transfers lead to accumulation in the liquid heels of the tanks. The principal objective for aqueous phase mercury removal is heel mercury reduction. The system presents a challenge to traditional methods because of the presence of nitrogen oxides in the gas phase and high nitric acid in the aqueous scrubbing solution. Many old and new technologies were evaluated including sorbents and absorption in the gas phase and ion exchange, membranes/sorption, galvanic methods, and UV reduction in the aqueous phase. Process modifications and feed pre-treatment were also evaluated. Various properties of mercury and its compounds were summarized and speciation was predicted based on thermodynamics. Three systems (process modification, NOxidizer combustor, and electrochemical aqueous phase treatment) and additional technology testing were recommended.

S. C. Ashworth

2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

72

Mercury Removal at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's New Waste Calcining Facility  

SciTech Connect

Technologies were investigated to determine viable processes for removing mercury from the calciner (NWCF) offgas system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Technologies for gas phase and aqueous phase treatment were evaluated. The technologies determined are intended to meet EPA Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements under the Clean Air Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Currently, mercury accumulation in the calciner off-gas scrubbing system is transferred to the tank farm. These transfers lead to accumulation in the liquid heels of the tanks. The principal objective for aqueous phase mercury removal is heel mercury reduction. The system presents a challenge to traditional methods because of the presence of nitrogen oxides in the gas phase and high nitric acid in the aqueous scrubbing solution. Many old and new technologies were evaluated including sorbents and absorption in the gas phase and ion exchange, membranes/sorption, galvanic methods, and UV reduction in the aqueous phase. Process modifications and feed pre-treatment were also evaluated. Various properties of mercury and its compounds were summarized and speciation was predicted based on thermodynamics. Three systems (process modification, NOxidizer combustor, and electrochemical aqueous phase treatment) and additional technology testing were recommended.

Ashworth, Samuel Clay; Wood, R. A.; Taylor, D. D.; Sieme, D. D.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

End of Year 2010 SNF & HLW Inventories  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Map of the United States of America that shows the location of approximately 64,000 MTHM of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF)& 275 High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Canisters.

74

Thermal Diffusivity and Thermal Conductivity of HLW and LAW ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, such data were collected for four waste glasses representative of those currently projected for treatment of Hanford HLW and LAW streams.

75

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory High-Level Waste Roadmap. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) High-Level Waste (HLW) Roadmap takes a strategic look at the entire HLW life-cycle starting with generation, through interim storage, treatment and processing, transportation, and on to final disposal. The roadmap is an issue-based planning approach that compares ``where we are now`` to ``where we want and need to be.`` The INEL has been effectively managing HLW for the last 30 years. Calcining operations are continuing to turn liquid HLW into a more manageable form. Although this document recognizes problems concerning HLW at the INEL, there is no imminent risk to the public or environment. By analyzing the INEL current business operations, pertinent laws and regulations, and committed milestones, the INEL HLW Roadmap has identified eight key issues existing at the INEL that must be resolved in order to reach long-term objectives. These issues are as follows: A. The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs a consistent policy for HLW generation, handling, treatment, storage, and disposal. B. The capability for final disposal of HLW does not exist. C. Adequate processes have not been developed or implemented for immobilization and disposal of INEL HLW. D. HLW storage at the INEL is not adequate in terms of capacity and regulatory requirements. E. Waste streams are generated with limited consideration for waste minimization. F. HLW is not adequately characterized for disposal nor, in some cases, for storage. G. Research and development of all process options for INEL HLW treatment and disposal are not being adequately pursued due to resource limitations. H. HLW transportation methods are not selected or implemented. A root-cause analysis uncovered the underlying causes of each of these issues.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Sodium waste technology: A summary report. [Melt-drain-evaporation-calcination (MEDEC)  

SciTech Connect

The Sodium Waste Technology (SWT) Program was established to resolve long-standing issues regarding disposal of sodium-bearing waste and equipment. Comprehensive SWT research programs investigated a variety of approaches for either removing sodium from sodium-bearing items, or disposal of items containing sodium residuals. The most successful of these programs was the design, test, and the production operation of the Sodium Process Demonstration Facility at ANL-W. The technology used was a series of melt-drain-evaporate operations to remove nonradioactive sodium from sodium-bearing items and then converting the sodium to storable compounds.

Abrams, C.S.; Witbeck, L.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement (December 1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HLW & FD EIS HLW & FD EIS 3-13 DOE/EIS-0287D Calcine storag e i n b i n s ets Calcine storag e i n b i n s et s Cesium ion exchange & grouting Cesium ion exchange & grouting NWCF* NWCF* Calcine Mixed transuranic waste/SBW Mixed transuranic waste/NGLW Low-level waste disposa l*** disposa l*** Tank heels Transuranic waste (from tank heels) * * * * Mixed transuranic waste/ NGLW Mixed transuranic waste/ NGLW M i x e d t r a nsuran ic w a s t e / M i x e d t r a nsuran ic w a s t e / S B W s t o rage in Ta n k F a r m S B W s t o rage in Ta n k F a r m Low-leve l waste Low-leve l waste FIGURE 3-2. Continued Current Operations Alternative. LEGEND * Including high-temperature and maximum achievable control technology upgrades. Mixed transuranic waste/ newly generated liquid waste New Waste Calcining Facility ** Calcine would be transferred from bin set #1 to bin set #6 or #7.

78

Direct cementitious waste option study report  

SciTech Connect

A settlement agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target data of 2035. This study investigates the direct grouting of all ICPP calcine (including the HLW dry calcine and those resulting from calcining sodium-bearing liquid waste currently residing in the ICPP storage tanks) as the treatment method to comply with the settlement agreement. This method involves grouting the calcined waste and casting the resulting hydroceramic grout into stainless steel canisters. These canisters will be stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) until they are sent to a national geologic repository. The operating period for grouting treatment will be from 2013 through 2032, and all the HLW will be treated and in interim storage by the end of 2032.

Dafoe, R.E.; Losinski, S.J.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fall Semiannual Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1998, the WCF was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the WCF to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment.

D. F. Gianotto N. C. Hutten

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

80

Alternative calcination development status report  

SciTech Connect

The Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel and (INEEL) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, dated June 1, 1995, specifies that high-level waste stored in the underground tanks at the ICPP continue to be calcined while other options to treat the waste are studied. Therefore, the High-Level Waste Program has funded a program to develop new flowsheets to increase the liquid waste processing rate. Simultaneously, a radionuclide separation process, as well as other options, are also being developed, which will be compared to the calcination treatment option. Two alternatives emerged as viable candidates; (1) elevated temperature calcination (also referred to as high temperature calcination), and (2) sugar-additive calcination. Both alternatives were determined to be viable through testing performed in a lab-scale calcination mockup. Subsequently, 10-cm Calciner Pilot Plant scoping tests were successfully completed for both flowsheets. The results were compared to the standard 500 C, high-ANN flow sheet (baseline flowsheet). The product and effluent streams were characterized to help elucidate the process chemistry and to investigate potential environmental permitting issues. Several supplementary tests were conducted to gain a better understanding of fine-particles generation, calcine hydration, scrub foaming, feed makeup procedures, sugar/organic elimination, and safety-related issues. Many of the experiments are only considered to be scoping tests, and follow-up experiments will be required to establish a more definitive understanding of the flowsheets. However, the combined results support the general conclusion that flowsheet improvements for the NWCF are technically viable.

Boardman, R.D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The extraction of rare earth elements from ICPP sodium-bearing waste and dissolved zirconium calcine by CMP and TRUEX solvents  

SciTech Connect

The extraction of stable isotopes of Eu and Ce was investigated from simulated sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and dissolved zirconium calcine by TRUEX and CMP solvents at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Single batch contacts were carried out in order to evaluate the rare earth behavior in the extraction, scrub, strip and wash sections for the proposed flowsheets. It has been shown that these lanthanides are efficiently extracted from the sodium-bearing wastes into either solvent, are not scrubbed and are stripped from both of the extractants with dilute HEDPA. The extraction distribution coefficients for Ce and Eu are higher in the TRUEX solvent (D{sub Ce} = 11.7, D{sub Eu} = 14.9) compared with CMP (D{sub Ce} = 9.3, D{sub Eu} = 7.23) for SBW. The extraction distribution coefficients for Ce and Eu are considerably less in the TRUEX solvent (D{sub Ce}=1.13, D{sub Eu}=1.8) than in the CMP solvent (D{sub Ce}=7.4, D{sub Eu=}6.1) for dissolved zirconium calcine feeds. The lower distribution coefficients for the extraction of lanthanides in the TRUEX/dissolved zirconium calcine system can be explained by zirconium loading of the solvent. The data obtained also confirmed that Ce and Eu can be used as non-radioactive surrogates for Am in separation experiments with acidic solutions.

Todd, T.A.; Glagolenko, I.Y.; Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Calcined solids storage facility closure study  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} (or {open_quotes}Batt Agreement{close_quotes}) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed.

Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Immobilized High Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Alternative Generation and analysis and Decision Report 2nd Generation Implementing Architecture  

SciTech Connect

Two alternative approaches were previously identified to provide second-generation interim storage of Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW). One approach was retrofit modification of the Fuel and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) to accommodate IHLW. The results of the evaluation of the FMEF as the second-generation IHLW interim storage facility and subsequent decision process are provided in this document.

CALMUS, R.B.

2000-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

Precipitation, Calcination and Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 2, 2011 ... Over the years Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Calciners by Outotec (formerly Lurgi) have reduced energy consumption for calcination...

85

Petroleum Engineering Techniques for HLW Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes why petroleum engineering techniques are of importance and can be used for underground disposal of HLW (high-level radioactive waste). It is focused on rock salt as a geological host medium in combination with disposal of the HLW canisters in boreholes drilled from the surface. Both permanent disposal and disposal with the option to retrieve the waste are considered. The paper starts with a description of the disposal procedure. Next disposal in deep boreholes is treated. Then the possible use of deviated boreholes and of multiple boreholes is discussed. Also waste isolation aspects and the implications of the HLW heat generation are treated. It appears that the use of deep boreholes can be beneficial, and also that--to a certain extent--borehole deviation offers possibilities. The benefits of using multiple boreholes are questionable for permanent disposal, while this technique cannot be applied for retrievable disposal. For the use of casing material, the additional temperature rise due to the HLW heat generation must be taken into account.

van den Broek, W. M. G. T.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

86

EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0287 (September 2002) EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0287 (September 2002) This EIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternatives for managing high-level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW) and newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in liquid and solid forms. This EIS also analyzes alternatives for the final disposition of HLW management facilities at the INEEL after their missions are completed. Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-0287 (September 2002)

87

EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition 7: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition SUMMARY This EIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternatives for managing high-level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW) and newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in liquid and solid forms. This EIS also analyzes alternatives for the final disposition of HLW management facilities at the INEEL after their missions are completed. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 12, 2010 EIS-0287: Amended Record of Decision Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition January 4, 2010

88

HIGH ALUMINUM HLW GLASSES FOR HANFORDS WTP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The world's largest radioactive waste vitrification facility is now under construction at the United State Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is designed to treat nearly 53 million gallons of mixed hazardous and radioactive waste now residing in 177 underground storage tanks. This multi-decade processing campaign will be one of the most complex ever undertaken because of the wide chemical and physical variability of the waste compositions generated during the cold war era that are stored at Hanford. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated a program to improve the long-term operating efficiency of the WTP vitrification plants with the objective of reducing the overall cost of tank waste treatment and disposal and shortening the duration of plant operations. Due to the size, complexity and duration of the WTP mission, the lifecycle operating and waste disposal costs are substantial. As a result, gains in High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) waste loadings, as well as increases in glass production rate, which can reduce mission duration and glass volumes for disposal, can yield substantial overall cost savings. EnergySolutions and its long-term research partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of the Catholic University of America, have been involved in a multi-year ORP program directed at optimizing various aspects of the HLW and LAW vitrification flow sheets. A number of Hanford HLW streams contain high concentrations of aluminum, which is challenging with respect to both waste loading and processing rate. Therefore, a key focus area of the ORP vitrification process optimization program at EnergySolutions and VSL has been development of HLW glass compositions that can accommodate high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations while maintaining high processing rates in the Joule Heated Ceramic Melters (JHCMs) used for waste vitrification at the WTP. This paper, reviews the achievements of this program with emphasis on the recent enhancements in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loadings in HLW glass and its processing characteristics. Glass formulation development included crucible-scale preparation and characterization of glass samples to assess compliance with all melt processing and product quality requirements, followed by small-scale screening tests to estimate processing rates. These results were used to down-select formulations for subsequent engineering-scale melter testing. Finally, further testing was performed on the DM1200 vitrification system installed at VSL, which is a one-third scale (1.20 m{sup 2}) pilot melter for the WTP HLW melters and which is fitted with a fully prototypical off-gas treatment system. These tests employed glass formulations with high waste loadings and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents of {approx}25 wt%, which represents a near-doubling of the present WTP baseline maximum Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loading. In addition, these formulations were processed successfully at glass production rates that exceeded the present requirements for WTP HLW vitrification by up to 88%. The higher aluminum loading in the HLW glass has an added benefit in that the aluminum leaching requirements in pretreatment are reduced, thus allowing less sodium addition in pretreatment, which in turn reduces the amount of LAW glass to be produced at the WTP. The impact of the results from this ORP program in reducing the overall cost and schedule for the Hanford waste treatment mission will be discussed.

KRUGER AA; JOSEPH I; BOWMAN BW; GAN H; KOT W; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

89

Technology development program for Idaho Chemical Processing Plant spent fuel and waste management  

SciTech Connect

Acidic high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage at the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, and describes the Spent Fuel and HLW Technology program in more detail.

Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.; Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Overview of Integrated Waste Treatment Unit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Overview Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Overview Overview for the DOE High Level Waste Corporate Board March 5, 2009 safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management 2 2 Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Mission * Mission - Project mission is to provide treatment of approximately 900,000 gallons of tank farm waste - referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) - stored at the Idaho Tank Farm Facility to a stable waste form suitable for disposition at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). - Per the Idaho Cleanup Project contract, the resident Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) facility, shall have the capability for future packaging and shipping of the existing high level waste (HLW) calcine to the geologic

91

Waste form product characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has operated nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to support national interests for several decades. Since 1953, it has supported the development of technologies for the storage and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels (SNF) and the resultant wastes. However, the 1992 decision to discontinue reprocessing of SNF has left nearly 768 MT of SNF in storage at the INEL with unspecified plans for future dispositioning. Past reprocessing of these fuels for uranium and other resource recovery has resulted in the production of 3800 M{sup 3} calcine and a total inventory of 7600 M{sup 3} of radioactive liquids (1900 M{sup 3} destined for immediate calcination and the remaining sodium-bearing waste requiring further treatment before calcination). These issues, along with increased environmental compliance within DOE and its contractors, mandate operation of current and future facilities in an environmentally responsible manner. This will require satisfactory resolution of spent fuel and waste disposal issues resulting from the past activities. A national policy which identifies requirements for the disposal of SNF and high level wastes (HLW) has been established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) Sec.8,(b) para(3)) [1982]. The materials have to be conditioned or treated, then packaged for disposal while meeting US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The spent fuel and HLW located at the INEL will have to be put into a form and package that meets these regulatory criteria. The emphasis of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) future operations has shifted toward investigating, testing, and selecting technologies to prepare current and future spent fuels and waste for final disposal. This preparation for disposal may include mechanical, physical and/or chemical processes, and may differ for each of the various fuels and wastes.

Taylor, L.L.; Shikashio, R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Experimental Test Plan for Grouting H-3 Calcine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 4400 cubic meters of solid high-level waste called calcine are stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Under the Idaho Cleanup Project, dual disposal paths are being investigated. The first path includes calcine retrieval, package "as-is", and ship to the Monitored Geological Repository (MGR). The second path involves treatment of the calcine with such methods as vitrification or grouting. This test plan outlines the hot bench scale tests to grout actual calcine and verify that the waste form properties meet the waste acceptance criteria. This is a necessary sequential step in the process of qualifying a new waste form for repository acceptance. The archive H-3 calcine samples at the Contaminated Equipment Maintenance Building attached to New Waste Calcining Facility will be used in these tests at the Remote Analytical Laboratory. The tests are scheduled for the second quarter of fiscal year 2007.

Alan K. Herbst

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Countercurrent flowsheet testing of the TRUEX process with ICPP calcine  

SciTech Connect

Calcine was generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant over several decades as a method of solidifying numerous raffinates and wastes from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing for convenient interim storage. Unfortunately, the bulk of the calcine is inert, with radionuclides comprising less than 1 weight percent of the total calcine mass. The bulk of the calcine currently stored at the ICPP was produced from wastes generated during reprocessing of zirconium clad fuels. Consequently, this material contains varying, but large quantities of zirconium oxide. Currently, separations options are being considered for acidic solutions of dissolved ICPP calcines to minimize high level waste volumes and economic penalties perceived for final disposal of these wastes. The actinide separation process being emphasized for the dissolved calcine solutions is the TRUEX process. Substantial problems have been encountered during TRUEX flowsheet development efforts for dissolved zirconium calcine simulant due to the high concentrations and subsequent extraction of zirconium from the feed. Alteration of the calcine dissolution parameters has resulted in the development of a successful TRUEX/Zr calcine baseline flowsheet. This flowsheet has been tested using 22 stages of a 2.0 centimeter diameter centrifugal contactor pilot plant using simulated dissolved Zr calcine solution. With this flowsheet, a removal efficiency of > 96% was obtained for {sup 241}Am (analytical detection limits were reached). Less than 0.25% of the {sup 95}Zr exited with the high-level waste strip product.

Law, J.D.; Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Todd, T.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Structural Integrity Program for INTEC Calcined Solids Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual'. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

Jeffrey Bryant

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

Structural Integrity Program for INTEC Calcined Solids Storage Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

Bryant, Jeffrey Whealdon; Nenni, Joseph A; Timothy S. Yoder

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Cementitious waste option scoping study report  

SciTech Connect

A Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target date of 2035. This study investigates the nonseparations Cementitious Waste Option (CWO) as a means to achieve this goal. Under this option all liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and existing HLW calcine would be recalcined with sucrose, grouted, canisterized, and interim stored as a mixed-HLW for eventual preparation and shipment off-Site for disposal. The CWO waste would be transported to a Greater Confinement Disposal Facility (GCDF) located in the southwestern desert of the US on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All transport preparation, shipment, and disposal facility activities are beyond the scope of this study. CWO waste processing, packaging, and interim storage would occur over a 5-year period between 2013 and 2017. Waste transport and disposal would occur during the same time period.

Lee, A.E.; Taylor, D.D.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Bin Set 1 Calcine Retrieval Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

At the Department of Energy's Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as an interim waste management measure, both mixed high-level liquid waste and sodium bearing waste have been solidified by a calculation process and are stored in the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities. This calcined product will eventually be treated to allow final disposal in a national geologic repository. The Calcine Solids Storage Facilities comprise seven ''bit sets.'' Bin Set 1, the first to be constructed, was completed in 1959, and has been in service since 1963. It is the only bin set that does not meet current safe-shutdown earthquake seismic criteria. In addition, it is the only bin set that lacks built-in features to aid in calcine retrieval. One option to alleviate the seismic compliance issue is to transport the calcine from Bin Set 1 to another bin set which has the required capacity and which is seismically qualified. This report studies the feasibility of retrieving the calcine from Bi n Set 1 and transporting it into Bin Set 6 which is located approximately 650 feet away. Because Bin Set 1 was not designed for calcine retrieval, and because of the high radiation levels and potential contamination spread from the calcined material, this is a challenging engineering task. This report presents preconceptual design studies for remotely-operated, low-density, pneumatic vacuum retrieval and transport systems and equipment that are based on past work performed by the Raytheon Engineers and Constructors architectural engineering firm. The designs presented are considered feasible; however, future development work will be needed in several areas during the subsequent conceptual design phase.

R. D. Adams; S. M. Berry; K. J. Galloway; T. A. Langenwalter; D. A. Lopez; C. M. Noakes; H. K. Peterson; M. I. Pope; R. J. Turk

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Development of a SREX flowsheet for the separation of strontium from dissolved INEEL zirconium calcine  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experimentation has indicated that the SREX process is effective for partitioning {sup 90}Sr from acidic radioactive waste solutions located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. These laboratory results were used to develop a flowsheet for countercurrent testing of the SREX process with dissolved pilot plant calcine. Testing was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors which are installed in the Remote Analytical Laboratory hot cell. Dissolved Run No.64 pilot plant calcine spiked with {sup 85}Sr was used as feed solution for the testing. The flowsheet tested consisted of an extraction section (0.15 M 4{prime},4{prime}(5{prime})-di-(tert-butylcyclohexo)-18-crown-6 and 1.5 M TBP in Isopar-L.), a 1.0 M NaNO{sub 3} scrub section to remove extracted K from the SREX solvent, a 0.01 M HNO{sub 3} strip section for the removal of Sr from the SREX solvent, a 0.25 M Na2CO{sub 3} wash section to remove degradation products from the solvent, and a 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} rinse section. The behavior of {sup 85}Sr, Na, K, Al, B, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zr was evaluated. The described flowsheet successfully extracted {sup 85}Sr from the dissolved pilot plant calcine with a removal efficiency of 99.6%. Distribution coefficients for {sup 85}Sr ranged from 3.6 to 4.5 in the extraction section. With these distribution coefficients a removal efficiency of approximately >99.99% was expected. It was determined that the lower than expected removal efficiency can be attributed to a stage efficiency of only 60% in the extraction section. Extracted K was effectively scrubbed from the SREX solvent with the 1.0 M NaNO{sub 3} resulting in only 6.4% of the K in the HLW strip product. Sodium was not extracted from the dissolved calcine by the SREX solvent; however, the use of a 1.0 M NaNO{sub 3} scrub solution resulted in a Na concentration of 70 mg/L (12.3% of the feed concentration) in the HLW strip product. Al, B, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zr were determined to be essentially inextractable.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Todd, T.A.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Development of a SREX Flowsheet for the Separation of Strontium from Dissolved INEEL Zirconium Calcine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experimentation has indicated that the SREX process is effective for partitioning 90 Sr from acidic radioactive waste solutions located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. These laboratory results were used to develop a flowsheet for countercurrent testing of the SREX process with dissolved pilot plant calcine. Testing was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors which are installed in the Remote Analytical Laboratory hot cell. Dissolved Run #64 pilot plant calcine spiked with 85 Sr was used as feed solution for the testing. The flowsheet tested consisted of an extraction section (0.15 M 4',4'(5')-di-(tert-butylcyclohexo)-18-crown-6 and 1.5 M TBP in Isopar-L.), a 1.0 M NaNO3 scrub section to remove extracted K from the SREX solvent, a 0.01 M HNO3 strip section for the removal of Sr from the SREX solvent, a 0.25 M Na2CO3 wash section to remove degradation products from the solvent, and a 0.1 M HNO3 rinse section. The behavior of 85 Sr, Na, K, Al, B, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zr was evaluated. The described flowsheet successfully extracted 85 Sr from the dissolved pilot plant calcine with a removal efficiency of 99.6%. Distribution coefficients for 85 Sr ranged from 3.6 to 4.5 in the extraction section. With these distribution coefficients a removal efficiency of approximately >99.99% was expected. It was determined that the lower than expected removal efficiency can be attributed to a stage efficiency of only 60% in the extraction section. Extracted K was effectively scrubbed from the SREX solvent with the 1.0 M NaNO3 resulting in only 6.4% of the K in the HLW strip product. Sodium was not extracted from the dissolved calcine by the SREX solvent; however, the use of a 1.0 M NaNO3 scrub solution resulted in a Na concentration of 70 mg/L (12.3% of the feed concentration) in the HLW strip product. Al, B, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zr were determined to be essentially inextractable.

Law, Jack Douglas; Wood, David James; Todd, Terry Allen

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fall 2010 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility and the CPP 601/627/640 Facility at the INL Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report, as agreed between the Idaho Cleanup Project and Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. The Permit Condition III.H. portion of this report includes a description and the results of field methods associated with groundwater monitoring of the Waste Calcining Facility. Analytical results from groundwater sampling, results of inspections and maintenance of monitoring wells in the Waste Calcining Facility groundwater monitoring network, and results of inspections of the concrete cap are summarized. The Permit Condition I.U. portion of this report includes noncompliances not otherwise required to be reported under Permit Condition I.R. (advance notice of planned changes to facility activity which may result in a noncompliance) or Permit Condition I.T. (reporting of noncompliances which may endanger human health or the environment). This report also provides groundwater sampling results for wells that were installed and monitored as part of the Phase 1 post-closure period of the landfill closure components in accordance with HWMA/RCRA Landfill Closure Plan for the CPP-601 Deep Tanks System Phase 1. These monitoring wells are intended to monitor for the occurrence of contaminants of concern in the perched water beneath and adjacent to the CPP-601/627/640 Landfill. The wells were constructed to satisfy requirements of the HWMA/RCRA Post-Closure Plan for the CPP 601/627/640 Landfill.

Boehmer, Ann

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Evaluation of Calcine Disposition Path Forward  

SciTech Connect

This document describes an evaluation of the baseline and two alternative disposition paths for the final disposition of the calcine wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The pathways are evaluated against a prescribed set of criteria and a recommendation is made for the path forward.

Birrer, S.A.; Heiser, M.B.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

102

Evaluation of Calcine Disposition - Path Forward  

SciTech Connect

This document describes an evaluation of the baseline and two alternative disposition paths for the final disposition of the calcine wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The pathways are evaluated against a prescribed set of criteria and a recommendation is made for the path forward.

Steve Birrer

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Calcine Conversion Facility alternative concepts engineering studies  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the engineering study reported is to develop conceptual designs for two alternative facilities for the conversion of high level waste calcine to high level glass. The objectives and design bases of the two concepts (CCF/RSSF and CCF/FRP) are described. No recommendation of one concept in preference to the other is given. (LK)

1975-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Vienna, John D.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L.

2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

105

Structural Integrity Program for INTEC Calcined Solids Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual'. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

Jeffrey Bryant

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

107

Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program. Annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on the progress of activities during fiscal year 1993 in the Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). As a new program, efforts are just getting underway toward addressing major issues related to the fuel and waste stored at the ICPP. The SF&WMTDP has the following principal objectives: Investigate direct dispositioning of spent fuel, striving for one acceptable waste form; determine the best treatment process(es) for liquid and calcine wastes to minimize the volume of high level radioactive waste (HLW) and low level waste (LLW); demonstrate the integrated operability and maintainability of selected treatment and immobilization processes; and assure that implementation of the selected waste treatment process is environmentally acceptable, ensures public and worker safety, and is economically feasible.

Bryant, J.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Fluidized bed calciner apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for remotely calcining a slurry or solution feed stream of toxic or hazardous material, such as ammonium diurante slurry or uranyl nitrate solution, is disclosed. The calcining apparatus includes a vertical substantially cylindrical inner shell disposed in a vertical substantially cylindrical outer shell, in which inner shell is disposed a fluidized bed comprising the feed stream material to be calcined and spherical beads to aid in heat transfer. Extending through the outer and inner shells is a feed nozzle for delivering feed material or a cleaning chemical to the beads. Disposed in and extending across the lower portion of the inner shell and upstream of the fluidized bed is a support member for supporting the fluidized bed, the support member having uniform slots for directing uniform gas flow to the fluidized bed from a fluidizing gas orifice disposed upstream of the support member. Disposed in the lower portion of the inner shell are a plurality of internal electric resistance heaters for heating the fluidized bed. Disposed circumferentially about the outside length of the inner shell are a plurality of external heaters for heating the inner shell thereby heating the fluidized bed. Further, connected to the internal and external heaters is a means for maintaining the fluidized bed temperature to within plus or minus approximately 25.degree. C. of a predetermined bed temperature. Disposed about the external heaters is the outer shell for providing radiative heat reflection back to the inner shell.

Owen, Thomas J. (West Richland, WA); Klem, Jr., Michael J. (Richland, WA); Cash, Robert J. (Richland, WA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Technology development program for Idaho Chemical Processing Plant spent fuel and waste management  

SciTech Connect

Irradiated nuclear fuel has been reprocessed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) since 1953 to recover uranium-235 and krypton-85 for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The resulting acidic high-level liquid radioactive waste (HLLW) has been solidified to a high-level waste (HLW) calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless-steel bins enclosed in concrete vaults. Residual HLW and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless-steel underground tanks contained in concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also stored at INEL. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium. As a result of the decision to curtail reprocessing the ICPP Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development plan has been implemented to identify acceptable options for disposing of the (1) sodium-bearing liquid radioactive waste, (2) radioactive calcine, and (3) irradiated spent fuel stored at the INEL. The plan was developed jointly by DOE and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc., (WINCO) and with the concurrence of the State of Idaho.

Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.; Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Maty et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

111

Melter Throughput Enhancements for High-Iron HLW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work performed to develop and test new glass and feed formulations in order to increase glass melting rates in high waste loading glass formulations for HLW with high concentrations of iron. Testing was designed to identify glass and melter feed formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts to assess melt rate using a vertical gradient furnace system and to develop new formulations with enhanced melt rate. Testing evaluated the effects of waste loading on glass properties and the maximum waste loading that can be achieved. The results from crucible-scale testing supported subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass and feed formulations on waste processing rate and product quality. The DM100 was selected as the platform for these tests due to its extensive previous use in processing rate determination for various HLW streams and glass compositions.

Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Gan, Hoa [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Chaudhuri, Malabika [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

Redox Control For Hanford HLW Feeds VSL-12R2530-1, REV 0  

SciTech Connect

The principal objectives of this work were to investigate the effects of processing simulated Hanford HLW at the estimated maximum concentrations of nitrates and oxalates and to identify strategies to mitigate any processing issues resulting from high concentrations of nitrates and oxalates. This report provides results for a series of tests that were performed on the DM10 melter system with simulated C-106/AY-102 HLW. The tests employed simulated HLW feeds containing variable amounts of nitrates and waste organic compounds corresponding to maximum concentrations proj ected for Hanford HLW streams in order to determine their effects on glass production rate, processing characteristics, glass redox conditions, melt pool foaming, and the tendency to form secondary phases. Such melter tests provide information on key process factors such as feed processing behavior, dynamic effects during processing, processing rates, off-gas amounts and compositions, foaming control, etc., that cannot be reliably obtained from crucible melts.

Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

113

High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test  

SciTech Connect

About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be successfully calcined at 600 C with an AAR of 1.75. Unburned hydrocarbons are reduced to less than 10 ppm (7% O2, dry basis), with >90% reduction of NOx emissions. Mercury removal by the carbon bed reached 99.99%, surpassing the control efficiency needed to meet MACT emissions standards. No deleterious impacts on the carbon bed were observed during the tests. The test results imply that upgrading the NWCF calciner with a more efficient cyclone separator and the proposed MACT equipment can process the remaining tanks wastes in 3 years or less, and comply with the MACT standards.

Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O& #39; Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2-05 PEGG-2 - Melter Tests with High Al HLW - Nov 2010 emb.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Melter Melter Testing with High Aluminum HLW Streams Ian L. Pegg, Hao Gan, Wing K. Kot, Keith S. Matlack, and Innocent Joseph * Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC * EnergySolutions, Inc. DOE EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010 Print Close Melter Testing with High Aluminum HLW Streams 2 LAW Vitrification (90+% of waste mass) HLW Vitrification (90+% of waste activity) Pretreatment (solid/liquid separation, Cs-IX, Al, Cr, leaching) SLUDGE SUPERNATE Maximize Mass Maximize Activity Hanford WTP - Key Process Flows LAW glass disposed on site HLW glass disposed of in National Geologic Repository - TBD * Supernate: Solution of Na, Al, P, K, S, Cl, Cs, Tc, nitrates, hydroxides... * Sludge: Solids high in Fe, Al, Zr, Cr, Bi, Sr, TRU, oxides, hydroxides....

115

Idaho Chemical Processing Plant spent fuel and waste management technology development program plan: 1994 Update  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has received spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim storage since 1951 and reprocessing since 1953. Until April 1992, the major activity of the ICPP was the reprocessing of SNF to recover fissile uranium and the management of the resulting high-level wastes (HLW). In 1992, DOE chose to discontinue reprocessing SNF for uranium recovery and shifted its focus toward the continued safe management and disposition of SNF and radioactive wastes accumulated through reprocessing activities. Currently, 1.8 million gallons of radioactive liquid wastes (1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid wastes and 0.3 million gallons of high-level liquid waste), 3,800 cubic meters of calcine waste, and 289 metric tons heavy metal of SNF are in inventory at the ICPP. Disposal of SNF and high-level waste (HLW) is planned for a repository. Preparation of SNF, HLW, and other radioactive wastes for disposal may include mechanical, physical, and/or chemical processes. This plan outlines the program strategy of the ICPP spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) to develop and demonstrate the technology required to ensure that SNF and radioactive waste will be properly stored and prepared for final disposal in accordance with regulatory drivers. This Plan presents a brief summary of each of the major elements of the SF&WMTDP; identifies key program assumptions and their bases; and outlines the key activities and decisions that must be completed to identify, develop, demonstrate, and implement a process(es) that will properly prepare the SNF and radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP for safe and efficient interim storage and final disposal.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Summary - Preliminary TRA of the Calcine Disposition Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Calcine Calcine The Id materi Dec. 2 Press additiv form w those project anticip 2012 a CD-1 a selecte Level ( assess Eleme assign prepar The as below achiev * R * Ba * C The Ele Site: I roject: C Report Date: ited States Prelim Why DOE e HIP Treatment daho high-level al designated t 2009) to underg (HIP) process. ves, converts th with durability a of borosilicate t is currently in pates Critical D authorizing the approval, it is t ed technology (TRL) of 4 or h sment was to id ents (CTEs) of t n the TRLs that ration for CD-1 What th ssessment team along with the ved prior to CD etrieval//Pneum atching and Mi eramic Additive To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin daho Nationa Calcine Dispo February 201 Departmen minary T E-EM Did This t Process Flow D waste calcine through an am

117

EMPIRICAL MODEL FOR FORMULATION OF CRYSTAL-TOLERANT HLW GLASSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, high-level waste (HLW) glasses have been formulated with a low liquideus temperature (T{sub L}), or temperature at which the equilibrium fraction of spinel crystals in the melt is below 1 vol % (T{sub 0.01}), nominally below 1050 C. These constraints cannot prevent the accumulation of large spinel crystals in considerably cooler regions ({approx} 850 C) of the glass discharge riser during melter idling and significantly limit the waste loading, which is reflected in a high volume of waste glass, and would result in high capital, production, and disposal costs. A developed empirical model predicts crystal accumulation in the riser of the melter as a function of concentration of spinel-forming components in glass, and thereby provides guidance in formulating crystal-tolerant glasses that would allow high waste loadings by keeping the spinel crystals small and therefore suspended in the glass.

KRUGER AA; MATYAS J; HUCKLEBERRY AR; VIENNA JD; RODRIGUEZ CA

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

118

Challenges of Nuclear Waste Vitrification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US DOE has developed glass property-composition models to control glass compositions for HLW vitrification at Hanford Waste Treatment & Immobilization...

119

Tailored ceramic consolidation forms for ICPP waste compositions. Draft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A polyphase tailored ceramic simulated waste consolidation form for ICPP type high Zr content high-level waste (HLW) calcines. The ceramic is specifically designed to provide chemically stable host phases for each species present in the HLW and to maximize waste volume reduction through high loadings and form density. The ceramic is designed for a 73 wt% waste loading with a density of 3.35 {plus_minus} 0.5(9/cm{sup 3}). The major phase in the ceramic is a highsilica glass, which contains the neutron poison boron as well as the majority of the non-refractory species in the waste. The primary crystalline phases are calcium fluoride, calcium-yttrium stabilized cubic zirconia, an apatite type silicate containing the plutonium simulant Ce, and a Cd metal phase. Minor phase include zircon, zirconolite, and a sphene type phase. Leach testing and microscopic analysis shows the ceramic form to chemically durable, with only the glass phase showing any detectable dissolution in deionized water at 90{degree}C.

Harker, A.B.; Flintoff, J.F. [Rockwell International Corp., Thousand Oaks, CA (United States). Science Center

1989-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Tailored ceramic consolidation forms for ICPP waste compositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A polyphase tailored ceramic simulated waste consolidation form for ICPP type high Zr content high-level waste (HLW) calcines. The ceramic is specifically designed to provide chemically stable host phases for each species present in the HLW and to maximize waste volume reduction through high loadings and form density. The ceramic is designed for a 73 wt% waste loading with a density of 3.35 {plus minus} 0.5(9/cm{sup 3}). The major phase in the ceramic is a highsilica glass, which contains the neutron poison boron as well as the majority of the non-refractory species in the waste. The primary crystalline phases are calcium fluoride, calcium-yttrium stabilized cubic zirconia, an apatite type silicate containing the plutonium simulant Ce, and a Cd metal phase. Minor phase include zircon, zirconolite, and a sphene type phase. Leach testing and microscopic analysis shows the ceramic form to chemically durable, with only the glass phase showing any detectable dissolution in deionized water at 90{degree}C.

Harker, A.B.; Flintoff, J.F. (Rockwell International Corp., Thousand Oaks, CA (United States). Science Center)

1989-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Foreign travel report: Visits to UK, Belgium, Germany, and France to benchmark European spent fuel and waste management technology  

SciTech Connect

The ICPP WINCO Spent Fuel and Waste Management Development Program recently was funded by DOE-EM to develop new technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels, sodium-bearing liquid waste, and calcine to a form suitable for disposal. European organizations are heavily involved, in some cases on an industrial scale in areas of waste management, including spent fuel disposal and HLW vitrification. The purpose of this trip was to acquire first-hand European efforts in handling of spent reactor fuel and nuclear waste management, including their processing and technical capabilities as well as their future planning. Even though some differences exist in European and U.S. DOE waste compositions and regulations, many aspects of the European technologies may be applicable to the U.S. efforts, and several areas offer potential for technical collaboration.

Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

HLW System Integrated Project Team  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

l l W S Hi h l W S High Level Waste System High Level Waste System Integrated Project Team Integrated Project Team Integrated Project Team Integrated Project Team Steve Schneider Steve Schneider Office of Engineering and Technology High Level Waste Corporate Board March 5, 2009 This document is intended for planning and analysis purposes, assuming a continuing constrained budget environment. Every effort will be made to comply with all applicable environmental and legal obligations, while also assuring that essential functions necessary to protect human health, the environment and national security are maintained. 1 Introduction Introduction Introduction Introduction Challenges and Priorities High Level Waste Strategic Initiative Results High Level Waste System Integrated

123

Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.

2003-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

124

Dissolution of two NWCF calcines: Extent of dissolution and characterization of undissolved solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to determine the dissolution characteristics of two NWCF calcine types. A two-way blended calcine made from 4 parts nonradioactive aluminum nitrate and one part WM-102 was studied to determine the extent of dissolution for aluminum-type calcines. A two-way blend of 3.5 parts fluorinel waste from WM-187 and 1 part sodium waste from WM-185 was used to determine the extent of dissolution for zirconium-type calcines. This study was necessary to develop suitable aqueous separation flowsheets for the partitioning of actinides and fission products from ICPP calcines and to determine the disposition of the resulting undissolved solids (UDS). The dissolution flowsheet developed by Herbst was used to dissolve these two NWCF calcine types. Results show that greater than 95 wt% of aluminum and zirconium calcine types were dissolved after a single batch contact with 5 M HNO{sub 3}. A characterization of the UDS indicates that the weight percent of TRU elements in the UDS resulting from both calcine type dissolutions increases by approximately an order of magnitude from their concentrations prior to dissolution. Substantial activities of cesium and strontium are also present in the UDS resulting from the dissolution of both calcine types. Multiple TRU, Cs, and Sr analyses of both UDS types show that these solids are relatively homogeneous. From this study, it is estimated that between 63.5 and 635 cubic meters of UDS will be generated from the dissolution of 3800 M{sub 3} of calcine. The significant actinide and fission product activities in these UDS will preclude their disposal as low-level waste. If the actinide and fission activity resulting from the UDS is the only considered source in the dissolved calcine solutions, an estimated 99.9 to 99.99 percent of the solids must be removed from this solution for it to meet non-TRU Class A low-level waste.

Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Tranter, T.J. [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Statistical evaluation of process parameters affecting properties of ICPP ceramic waste forms  

SciTech Connect

A primary option to immobilize calcined ICPP High Level Waste (HLW) is to form a glass-ceramic by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) of a calcine-additive mixture. Laboratory-scale testing indicates that the resulting glass-ceramic product containing as much as 70 wt% calcined waste is durable and well densified. Compounds present in the waste, such as zirconia and calcium fluoride are used to form crystalline phases which host most of the radionuclides. Materials such as titania are added to immobilize species including cadmium and chromium, and silica is added to form an amorphous phase which hosts alkali metals and boron in the waste as well as radionuclides not immobilized in the crystalline phases. However, the formation of these desirable properties in the product also depends on HIPing conditions which are determined by the control of process parameters. Thus the twelve-run Plackett-Burman screening design was applied in this laboratory-scale study to determine process parameters having statistically significant effects on product properties.

Staples, B.A.

1989-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

126

Immobilization of Nuclear Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2010 ... Glassy and Glass Composite Nuclear Wasteforms: Michael Ojovan1; Bill Lee2; ... wastes which should be solidified for safe storage and disposal. ... has been vitrifying the Department of Energy's High Level Waste (HLW) at...

127

TRUEX partitioning studies applied to ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located in southeast Idaho at the USDOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, formerly reprocessed highly enriched spent nuclear fuel to recover fissionable uranium. The HLW raffinates from the combined PUREX/REDOX type uranium recovery process were converted to solid oxides (calcine) in a high temperature fluidized bed. Liquid effluents from the calcination process were combined with liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW) generated primarily in conjunction with decontamination activities. Due to the high sodium content in the SBW, this secondary waste stream is not directly amenable to solidification via calcination. Currently, approximately 1.5 millon gallons of liquid SBW are stored at the ICPP in large tanks. Several treatment options for the SBW are currently being considered, including the TRansUranic EXtraction (TRUEX) process developed by Horwitz and co-workers at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in preparation for the final disposition of SBW. Herein described are experimental results of radionuclide tracer studies with simulated SBW using the TRUEX process solvent.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Law, J.D.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

HLW Melter Control Strategy Without Visual Feedback VSL-12R2500-1 Rev 0  

SciTech Connect

Plans for the treatment of high level waste (HL W) at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) are based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the pretreatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form [I]. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat and mass transfer and increase glass melting rates. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of ~ 1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HL W waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150?C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage.

Kruger, A A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Callow, Richard A. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Abramowitz, Howard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Brandys, Marek [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

129

HLW MELTER CONTROL STRATEGY WITHOUT VISUAL FEEDBACK VSL-12R2500-1 REV 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plans for the treatment of high level waste (HL W) at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) are based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the pretreatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form [I]. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat and mass transfer and increase glass melting rates. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of ~ 1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HL W waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage.

KRUGER AA; JOSPEH I; MATLACK KS; CALLOW RA; ABRAMOWITZ H; PEGG IL; BRANDYS M; KOT WK

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

130

Final Report - Crystal Settling, Redox, and High Temperature Properties of ORP HLW and LAW Glasses, VSL-09R1510-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/18/09  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radioactive tank waste treatment programs at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) have featured joule heated ceramic melter technology for the vitrification of high level waste (HLW). The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) employs this same basic technology not only for the vitrification of HLW streams but also for the vitrification of Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams. Because of the much greater throughput rates required of the WTP as compared to the vitrification facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) or the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the WTP employs advanced joule heated melters with forced mixing of the glass pool (bubblers) to improve heat and mass transport and increase melting rates. However, for both HLW and LAW treatment, the ability to increase waste loadings offers the potential to significantly reduce the amount of glass that must be produced and disposed and, therefore, the overall project costs. This report presents the results from a study to investigate several glass property issues related to WTP HLW and LAW vitrification: crystal formation and settling in selected HLW glasses; redox behavior of vanadium and chromium in selected LAW glasses; and key high temperature thermal properties of representative HLW and LAW glasses. The work was conducted according to Test Plans that were prepared for the HLW and LAW scope, respectively. One part of this work thus addresses some of the possible detrimental effects due to considerably higher crystal content in waste glass melts and, in particular, the impact of high crystal contents on the flow property of the glass melt and the settling rate of representative crystalline phases in an environment similar to that of an idling glass melter. Characterization of vanadium redox shifts in representative WTP LAW glasses is the second focal point of this work. The third part of this work focused on key high temperature thermal properties of representative WTP HLW and LAW glasses over a wide range of temperatures, from the melter operating temperature to the glass transition.

Kruger, Albert A.; Wang, C.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Kot, W.; Feng, Z.; Viragh, C.; McKeown, D. A.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Cecil, R.; Zhao, W.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

131

Shielding analysis of the TRUPACT-series casks for transportation of Hanford HLW  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the authors propose the possibility of utilizing the TRUPACT-series casks for the transportation of high-level waste (HLW) from the Hanford reservation. The configurations of the TRUPACT series are a rectangular parallelepiped and a right circular cylinder, which are the TRUPACT-1 and -11, respectively. The TRUPACT series was designed as a type B contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste transportation system for use in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-related operations and was subjected to type B container accident tests, which it successfully passed. Thus from a safety standpoint, the TRUPACT series is provided with double containment, impact limitation, and fire-retardant capabilities. However, the shielding analysis has shown the major modifications are required to allow for the transport of even a reasonable fraction of Hanford HLW.

Banjac, V.; Sanchez, P.E.; Hills, C.R.; Heger, A.S. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Advanced Green Petroleum Coke Calcination In Electrothermal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Fluidization Technologies for the Mineral, Materials, and Energy Industries. Presentation Title, Advanced Green Petroleum Coke Calcination In...

133

Risk-informing decisions about high-level nuclear waste repositories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance assessments (PAs) are important sources of information for societal decisions in high-level radioactive waste (HLW) management, particularly in evaluating safety cases for proposed HLW repository development. ...

Ghosh, Suchandra Tina, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

NEXT GENERATION MELTER(S) FOR VITRIFICATION OF HANFORD WASTE STATUS AND DIRECTION  

SciTech Connect

Vitrification technology has been selected to treat high-level waste (HLW) at the Hanford Site, the West Valley Demonstration Project and the Savannah River Site (SRS), and low activity waste (LAW) at Hanford. In addition, it may potentially be applied to other defense waste streams such as sodium bearing tank waste or calcine. Joule-heated melters (already in service at SRS) will initially be used at the Hanford Site's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to vitrify tank waste fractions. The glass waste content and melt/production rates at WTP are limited by the current melter technology. Significant reductions in glass volumes and mission life are only possible with advancements in melter technology coupled with new glass formulations. The Next Generation Melter (NGM) program has been established by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's), Environmental Management Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) to develop melters with greater production capacity (absolute glass throughput rate) and the ability to process melts with higher waste fractions. Advanced systems based on Joule-Heated Ceramic Melter (JHCM) and Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technologies will be evaluated for HLW and LAW processing. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), DOE's tank waste contractor, is developing and evaluating these systems in cooperation with EM-31, national and university laboratories, and corporate partners. A primary NGM program goal is to develop the systems (and associated flowsheets) to Technology Readiness Level 6 by 2016. Design and testing are being performed to optimize waste glass process envelopes with melter and balance of plant requirements. A structured decision analysis program will be utilized to assess the performance of the competing melter technologies. Criteria selected for the decision analysis program will include physical process operations, melter performance, system compatibility and other parameters.

RAMSEY WG; GRAY MF; CALMUS RB; EDGE JA; GARRETT BG

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

135

Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the accesses using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The defense high level waste (HLW) disposal container provides long-term confinement of the commercial HLW and defense HLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms [IPWF]) placed within disposable canisters, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a defense HLW disposal container along with commercial HLW waste forms, which is known as co-disposal. The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container/waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual canister temperatures after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Defense HLW disposal containers for HLW disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters. Defense HLW disposal containers for co-disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters arranged in a ring and one DOE SNF canister inserted in the center and/or one or more DOE SNF canisters displacing a HLW canister in the ring. Defense HLW disposal containers also will hold two Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) and two HLW canisters in one disposal container. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinders, outer and inner cylinder lids, and may include a canister guide. An exterior label will provide a means by which to identify the disposal container and its contents.

N. E. Pettit

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

136

Final Report - Melt Rate Enhancement for High Aluminum HLW Glass Formulation, VSL-08R1360-1, Rev. 0, dated 12/19/08  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of the work reported here was to develop and identify HLW glass compositions that maximize waste processing rates for the aluminum limted waste composition specified by ORP while maintaining high waste loadings and acceptable glass properties. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale tests, confirmation tests on the DM100 melter system, and demonstration at pilot scale (DM1200). The DM100-BL unit was selected for these tests since it was used previously with the HLW waste streams evaluated in this study, was used for tests on HLW glass compositions to support subsequent tests on the HLW Pilot Melter, conduct tests to determine the effect of various glass properties (viscosity and conductivity) and oxide concentrations on glass production rates with HLW feed streams, and to assess the volatility of cesium and technetium during the vitrification of an HLW AZ-102 composition. The same melter was selected for the present tests in order to maintain comparisons between the previously collected data. These tests provide information on melter processing characteristics and off-gas data, including formation of secondary phases and partitioning. Once DM100 tests were completed, one of the compositions was selected for further testing on the DM1200; the DM1200 system has been used for processing a variety of simulated Hanford waste streams. Tests on the larger melter provide processing data at one third of the scale of the actual WTP HLW melter and, therefore, provide a more accurate and reliable assessment of production rates and potential processing issues. The work focused on maximizing waste processing rates for high aluminum HLW compositions. In view of the diversity of forms of aluminum in the Hanford tanks, tests were also conducted on the DM100 to determine the effect of changes in the form of aluminum on feed properties and production rate. In addition, the work evaluated the effect on production rate of modest increases in melter operating temperature. Glass composition development was based on one of the HLW waste compositions specified by ORP that has a high concentration of aluminum. Small-scale tests were used to provide an initial screening of various glass formulations with respect to melt rates; more definitive screening was provided by the subsequent DM100 tests. Glass properties evaluated included: viscosity, electrical conductivity, crystallinity, gross glass phase separation and the 7- day Product Consistency Test (ASTM-1285). Glass property limits were based upon the reference properties for the WTP HLW melter. However, the WTP crystallinity limit (< 1 vol% at 950oC) was relaxed slightly as a waste loading constraint for the crucible melts.

Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Gong, W.; Gan, H.; Matlack, K. S.; Bardakci, T.; Kot, W.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

137

HLW Feed Delivery AZ101 Batch Transfer to the Private Contractor Transfer and Mixing Process Improvements [Initial Release at Rev 2  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this business case is to provide Operations and Maintenance with a detailed transfer process review for the first High Level Waste (HLW) feed delivery to the Privatization Contractor (PC), AZ-101 batch transfer to PC. The Team was chartered to identify improvements that could be implemented in the field. A significant penalty can be invoked for not providing the quality, quantity, or timely delivery of HLW feed to the PC.

DUNCAN, G.P.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

138

WTP: Challenges and Major Breakthroughs in High Level Waste ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The US DOE has developed glass property-composition models to control glass compositions for HLW vitrification at Hanford Waste Treatment...

139

Nuclear waste solidification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

Bjorklund, William J. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter  

SciTech Connect

Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Final Report - Testing of Optimized Bubbler Configuration for HLW Melter VSL-13R2950-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/12/2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this work was to determine the glass production rate increase and ancillary effects of adding more bubbler outlets to the current WTP HLW melter baseline. This was accomplished through testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) at VSL. The DM1200 unit was selected for these tests since it was used previously with several HLW waste streams including the four tank wastes proposed for initial processing at Hanford. This melter system was also used for the development and optimization of the present baseline WTP HLW bubbler configuration for the WTP HLW melter, as well as for MACT testing for both HLW and LAW. Specific objectives of these tests were to: Conduct DM1200 melter testing with the baseline WTP bubbling configuration and as augmented with additional bubblers. Conduct DM1200 melter testing to differentiate the effects of total bubbler air flow and bubbler distribution on glass production rate and cold cap formation. Collect melter operating data including processing rate, temperatures at a variety of locations within the melter plenum space, melt pool temperature, glass melt density, and melter pressure with the baseline WTP bubbling configuration and as augmented with additional bubblers. Collect melter exhaust samples to compare particulate carryover for different bubbler configurations. Analyze all collected data to determine the effects of adding more bubblers to the WTP HLW melter to inform decisions regarding future lid re-designs. The work used a high aluminum HLW stream composition defined by ORP, for which an appropriate simulant and high waste loading glass formulation were developed and have been previously processed on the DM1200.

Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Callow, R. A.; Joseph, I.; Matlack, K. S.; Kot, W. K.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

142

Hanford Tank Waste What is in it? Where is it going?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment Plant currently under construction for treatment of High Level Waste at the Hanford Site will process High Level Waste (HLW) to reduce the quantity of HLW material that must be immobilized. Recently, an extensive testing program was undertaken to characterize the composition of some of the major sources of HLW in the Hanford tank farm system. This effort has led to an increased understanding of the chemical form and the underlying dissolution chemistry for much of the waste.

Peterson, Reid A.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Snow, Lanee A.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Outlooks of HLW Partitioning Technologies Usage for Recovering of Platinum Metals from Spent Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing practice of management of high level waste (HLW) generated by NPPs, call for a task of selective separation of the most dangerous long-lived radionuclides with the purpose of their subsequent immobilization and disposal. HLW partitioning allows to reduce substantially the cost of vitrified product storage owing to isolation of the most dangerous radionuclides, such as transplutonium elements (TPE) into separate fractions of small volumes, intended for ultimate storage. By now numerous investigations on partitioning of HLW of various composition have been carried out in many countries and a lot of processes permitting to recover cesium, strontium, TPE and rare earth elements (REE) have been already tested. Apart from enumerated radionuclides, a fair quantity of palladium and rhodium presents in spent fuel, but the problem of these elements recovery has not yet been decided at the operating radiochemical plants. A negative effect of platinum group metals (PGM) occurrence is determined by the formation of separate metal phase, which not only worsens the conditions of glass-melting but also shortens considerably the service life of the equipment. At the same time, the exhaustion of PGMs natural resources may finally lead to such a growth of their costs that the spent nuclear fuel would became a substituting source of these elements industrial production. Allowing above mentioned, it is of interest to develop the technique for ''reactor'' palladium and rhodium recovery process which would be compatible with HLW partitioning and could be realized using the same facilities. In the report the data on platinum metals distribution in spent fuel reprocessing products and the several flowsheets for palladium separation from HLW are presented.

Pokhitonov, Y. A.; Estimantovskiy, V.; Romanovski, v.; Zatsev, B.; Todd, T.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

144

Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.

2003-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

145

Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has received spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim storage and reprocessing since 1953. Reprocessing of SNF has resulted in an existing inventory of 1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid waste and 3800 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of calcine, in addition to the 768 metric tons (MT) of SNF and various other fuel materials in inventory. To date, the major activity of the ICPP has been the reprocessing of SNF to recover fissile uranium; however, recent changes in world events have diminished the demand to recover and recycle this material. As a result, DOE has discontinued reprocessing SNF for uranium recovery, making the need to properly manage and dispose of these and future materials a high priority. In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, as amended, disposal of SNF and high-level waste (HLW) is planned for a geological repository. Preparation of SNF, HLW, and other radioactive wastes for disposal may include mechanical, physical, and/or chemical processes. This plan outlines the program strategy of the ICPP Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) to develop and demonstrate the technology required to ensure that SNF and radioactive waste will properly stored and prepared for final disposal. Program elements in support of acceptable interim storage and waste minimization include: developing and implementing improved radioactive waste treatment technologies; identifying and implementing enhanced decontamination and decommissioning techniques; developing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) recycle capabilities; and developing and implementing improved technologies for the interim storage of SNF.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

SEISMIC DESIGN EVALUATION GUIDELINES FOR BURIED PIPING FOR THE DOE HLW FACILITIES'  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

6 1 6 1 7 1 1 SEISMIC DESIGN EVALUATION GUIDELINES FOR BURIED PIPING FOR THE DOE HLW FACILITIES' Chi-Wen Lin Consultant, Martinez, CA George Antaki Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC Kamal Bandyopadhyay Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY ABSTRACT This paper presents the seismic design and evaluation guidelines for underground piping for the Department of Energy (DOE) High-Level-Waste (HLW) Facilities. The underground piping includes both single and double containment steel pipes and concrete pipes with steel lining, with particular emphasis on the double containment piping. The design and evaluation guidelines presented in this paper follow the generally accepted beam-on-elastic- foundation analysis principle and the inertial response calculation method, respectively, for piping directly

147

Enhanced sludge processing of HLW: Hydrothermal oxidation of chromium, technetium, and complexants by nitrate. 1997 mid-year progress report  

SciTech Connect

'Treatment of High Level Waste (HLW) is the second most costly problem identified by OEM. In order to minimize costs of disposal, the volume of HLW requiring vitrification and long term storage must be reduced. Methods for efficient separation of chromium from waste sludges, such as the Hanford Tank Wastes (HTW), are key to achieving this goal since the allowed level of chromium in high level glass controls waste loading. At concentrations above 0.5 to 1.0 wt.% chromium prevents proper vitrification of the waste. Chromium in sludges most likely exists as extremely insoluble oxides and minerals, with chromium in the plus III oxidation state [1]. In order to solubilize and separate it from other sludge components, Cr(III) must be oxidized to the more soluble Cr(VI) state. Efficient separation of chromium from HLW could produce an estimated savings of $3.4B[2]. Additionally, the efficient separation of technetium [3], TRU, and other metals may require the reformulation of solids to free trapped species as well as the destruction of organic complexants. New chemical processes are needed to separate chromium and other metals from tank wastes. Ideally they should not utilize additional reagents which would increase waste volume or require subsequent removal. The goal of this project is to apply hydrothermal processing for enhanced chromium separation from HLW sludges. Initially, the authors seek to develop a fundamental understanding of chromium speciation, oxidation/reduction and dissolution kinetics, reaction mechanisms, and transport properties under hydrothermal conditions in both simple and complex salt solutions. The authors also wish to evaluate the potential of hydrothermal processing for enhanced separations of technetium and TRU by examining technetium and TRU speciation at hydrothermal conditions optimal for chromium dissolution.'

Buelow, S.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

FINAL REPORT TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-02R0100-2 REV 1 2/17/03  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from a series of nine tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1 [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plans. The nine tests reported here were preceded by an initial series of short-duration tests conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Reports. The DM1200 system was deployed for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. These tests include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The primary objective of the present series of tests was to determine the effects of a variety of parameters on the glass production rate in comparison to the RPP-WTP HL W design basis of 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d. Previous testing on the DMIOOO system [1] concluded that achievement of that rate with simulants of projected WTP melter feeds (AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102) was unlikely without the use of bubblers. As part of those tests, the same feed that was used during the cold-commissioning of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) HLW vitrification system was run on the DM1000 system. The DM1000 tests reproduced the rates that were obtained at the larger WVDP facility, lending confidence to the tests results [1]. Since the inclusion or exclusion of a bubbler has significant design implications, the Project commissioned further tests to address this issue. In an effort to identify factors that might increase the glass production rate for projected WTP melter feeds, a subsequent series of tests was performed on the DM100 system. Several tests variables led to glass production rate increases to values significantly above the 400 kg/m2/d requirement. However, while small-scale melter tests are useful for screening relative effects, they tend to overestimate absolute glass production rates, particularly for un-bubbled tests. Consequently, when scale-up effects were taken into account, it was not clear that any of the variables investigated would conclusively meet the 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d requirement without bubbling. The present series of tests was therefore performed on the DM1200 one-third scale HLW pilot melter system to provide the required basis for a final decision on whether bubblers would be included in the HLW melter. The present tests employed the same AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing for consistency and comparability with the results from the earlier tests.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BARDAKCI T; GONG W; D'ANGELO NA; SCHATZ TR; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

149

Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 1 (CDP) Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project...

150

RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT MISSION ANALYSIS WASTE BLENDING STUDY  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary evaluation for blending Hanford site waste with the objective of minimizing the amount of high-level waste (HLW) glass volumes without major changes to the overall waste retrieval and processing sequences currently planned. The evaluation utilizes simplified spreadsheet models developed to allow screening type comparisons of blending options without the need to use the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model. The blending scenarios evaluated are expected to increase tank farm operation costs due to increased waste transfers. Benefit would be derived from shorter operating time period for tank waste processing facilities, reduced onsite storage of immobilized HLW, and reduced offsite transportation and disposal costs for the immobilized HLW.

SHUFORD DH; STEGEN G

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

151

EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Waste Acceptance Product EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms Presentation to the HLW Corporate Board July 24, 2008 By Tony Kluk/Ken Picha 2 Background * Originally Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications were Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) documents and project specific: - Defense Waste Processing Facility (PE-03, July 1989) - West Valley Demonstration Project (PE-04, January 1990) * Included many of same specifications as current version of WAPS * First version of RW Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document in January 1993 (included requirements for both SNF and HLW) * EM decided to extract requirements for HLW and put into the WAPS document 3 Background (Cont'd) * Lists technical specifications for acceptance of borosilicate HLW

152

Final Report - Management of High Sulfur HLW, VSL-13R2920-1, Rev. 0, dated 10/31/2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present report describes results from a series of small-scale crucible tests to determine the extent of corrosion associated with sulfur containing HLW glasses and to develop a glass composition for a sulfur-rich HLW waste stream, which was then subjected to small-scale melter testing to determine the maximum acceptable sulfate loadings. In the present work, a new glass formulation was developed and tested for a projected Hanford HLW composition with sulfate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading. Testing was then performed on the DM10 melter system at successively higher waste loadings to determine the maximum waste loading without the formation of a separate sulfate salt phase. Small scale corrosion testing was also conducted using the glass developed in the present work, the glass developed in the initial phase of this work [26], and a high iron composition, all at maximum sulfur concentrations determined from melter testing, in order to assess the extent of Inconel 690 and MA758 corrosion at elevated sulfate contents.

Kruger, Albert A.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Feng, Z.; Gan, H,; Joseph, I.; Matlack, K. S.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

153

Dose Calculations for the Co-Disposal WP-of HLW-Glass and the Triga SNF  

SciTech Connect

This calculation is prepared by the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Operations (WPO). The purpose of this calculation is to determine the surface dose rates of a codisposal waste package (WP) containing a centrally located Department of Energy (DOE) standardized 18-in. spent nuclear fuel (SNF) canister, loaded with the TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) SNF. This canister is surrounded by five 3-m long canisters, loaded with Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW) glass. The results are to support the WP design and radiological analyses.

G. Radulescu

1999-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

154

Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Alumimum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000  

SciTech Connect

The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP?s overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur. Waste processing rate increases for high-iron streams as a combined effect of higher waste loadings and higher melt rates resulting from new formulations have been achieved.

Kruger, Albert A.

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

155

Experimental results: Pilot plant calcine dissolution and liquid feed stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dissolution of simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant pilot plant calcines, containing none of the radioactive actinides, lanthanides or fission products, was examined to evaluate the solubility of calcine matrix materials in acidic media. This study was a necessary precursor to dissolution and optimization experiments with actual radionuclide-containing calcines. The importance of temperature, nitric acid concentration, ratio of acid volume to calcine mass, and time on the amount, as a weight percentage of calcine dissolved, was evaluated. These parameters were studied for several representative pilot plant calcine types: (1) Run No. 74 Zirconia calcine; (2) Run No. 17 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 64 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 1027 Alumina calcine; and (4) Run No. 20 Alumina/Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Statistically designed experiments with the different pilot plant calcines indicated the effect of the studied process variables on the amount of calcine dissolved decreases in the order: Acid/Calcine Ratio > Temperature > HNO{sub 3} Concentration > Dissolution Time. The following conditions are suitable to achieve greater than 90 wt. % dissolution of most Zr, Al, or Na blend calcines: (1) Maximum nitric acid concentration of 5M; (2) Minimum acid/calcine ratio of 10 mL acid/1 gram calcine; (3) Minimum dissolution temperature of 90{degrees}C; and (4) Minimum dissolution time of 30 minutes. The formation of calcium sulphate (CaSO{sub 4}) precipitates was observed in certain dissolved calcine solutions during the dissolution experiments. Consequently, a study was initiated to evaluate if and under what conditions the resulting dissolved calcine solutions would be unstable with regards to precipitate formation. The results indicate that precipitate formation in the calcine solutions prepared under the above proposed dissolution conditions are not anticipated.

Herbst, R.S.; Fryer, D.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Johnson, C.K.; Todd, T.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 27, 2011 July 27, 2011 End of Year 2010 SNF & HLW Inventories Map of the United States of America that shows the location of approximately 64,000 MTHM of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) & 275 High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Canisters. July 27, 2011 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended.

157

Final Report - Effects of High Spinel and Chromium Oxide Crystal Contents on Simulated HLW Vitrification in DM100 Melter Tests, VSL-09R1520-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/22/09  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of the work was to evaluate the effects of spinel and chromium oxide particles on WTP HLW melter operations and potential impacts on melter life. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale tests, settling and rheological tests, and tests on the DM100 melter system. Crucible testing was designed to develop and identify HLW glass compositions with high waste loadings that exhibit formation of crystalline spinel and/or chromium oxide phases up to relatively high crystal contents (i.e., > 1 vol%). Characterization of crystal settling and the effects on melt rheology was performed on the HLW glass formulations. Appropriate candidate HLW glass formulations were selected, based on characterization results, to support subsequent melter tests. In the present work, crucible melts were formulated that exhibit up to about 4.4 vol% crystallization.

Kruger, Albert A.; Matlack, K. S.; Kot, W.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Lutze, W.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

158

Preliminary waste form characteristics report Version 1.0. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report focuses on radioactive waste form characteristics that will be used to design a waste package and an engineered barrier system (EBS) for a suitable repository as part of the Yucca Mountain Project. The term waste form refers to irradiated reactor fuel, other high-level waste (HLW) in various physical forms, and other radioactive materials (other than HLW) which are received for emplacement in a geologic repository. Any encapsulating of stabilizing matrix is also referred to as a waste form.

Stout, R.B.; Leider, H.R. [eds.

1991-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

159

FINAL REPORT START-UP AND COMMISSIONING TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-01R0100-2 REV 0 1/20/03  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from commissioning tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM 1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part BI [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plan. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Report. The DM1200 system will be used for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. This will include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The results presented in this report are from the initial series of short-duration tests that were conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system prior to conducting the main body of development tests that have been planned for this system. These tests were directed primarily at system 'debugging,' operator training, and procedure refinement. The AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing was selected for these tests.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BRANDYS M; WILSON CN; SCHATZ TR; GONG W; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

160

FINAL REPORT INTEGRATED DM1200 MELTER TESTING USING AZ 102 AND C 106/AY-102 HLW SIMULANTS: HLW SIMULANT VERIFICATION VSL-05R5800-1 REV 0 6/27/05  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter tests were to determine the effects of feed rheology, feed solid content, and bubbler configuration on glass production rate and off-gas system performance while processing the HLW AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102 feed compositions; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components, as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and perform pre- and post test inspections of system components. The specific objectives (including test success criteria) of this testing, along with how each objective was met, are outlined in a table. The data provided in this Final Report address the impacts of HLW melter feed rheology on melter throughput and validation of the simulated HLW melter feeds. The primary purpose of this testing is to further validate/verify the HLW melter simulants that have been used for previous melter testing and to support their continued use in developing melter and off-gas related processing information for the Project. The primary simulant property in question is rheology. Simulants and melter feeds used in all previous melter tests were produced by direct addition of chemicals; these feed tend to be less viscous than rheological the upper-bound feeds made from actual wastes. Data provided here compare melter processing for the melter feed used in all previous DM100 and DM1200 tests (nominal melter feed) with feed adjusted by the feed vendor (NOAH Technologies) to be more viscous, thereby simulating more closely the upperbounding feed produced from actual waste. This report provides results of tests that are described in the Test Plan for this work. The Test Plan is responsive to one of several test objectives covered in the WTP Test Specification for this work; consequently, only part of the scope described in the Test Specification was addressed in this particular Test Plan. For the purpose of comparison, the tests reported here were performed with AZ-102 and C-106/AY-102 HLW simulants and glass compositions that are essentially the same as those used for recent DM1200 tests. One exception was the use of an alternate, higher-waste-loading C-106/AY-102 glass composition that was used in previous DM100 tests to further evaluate the performance of the optimized bubbler configuration.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Supplement Analysis for the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2002, DOE issued the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) (DOE 2002) that provided an analysis of the potential environmental consequences of alternatives/options for the management and disposition of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW), High-Level Waste (HL W) calcine, and HLW facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), now known as the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and referred to hereafter as the Idaho Site. Subsequent to the issuance of the Final EIS, DOE included the requirement for treatment of SBW in the Request for Proposals for Environmental Management activities on the Idaho Site. The new Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) Contractor identified Steam Reforming as their proposed method to treat SBW; a method analyzed in the Final EIS as an option to treat SBW. The proposed Steam Reforming process for SBW is the same as in the Final EIS for retrieval, treatment process, waste form and transportation for disposal. In addition, DOE has updated the characterization data for both the HLW Calcine (BBWI 2005a) and SBW (BBWI 2004 and BBWI 2005b) and identified two areas where new calculation methods are being used to determine health and safety impacts. Because of those changes, DOE has prepared this supplement analysis to determine whether there are ''substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns'' or ''significant new circumstances or information'' within the meaning of the Council of Environmental Quality and DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9 (c) and 10 CFR 1021.314) that would require preparation of a Supplemental EIS. Specifically, this analysis is intended to determine if: (1) the Steam Reforming Option identified in the Final EIS adequately bounds impacts from the Steam Reforming Process proposed by the new ICP Contractor using the new characterization data, (2) the new characterization data is significantly different than the data presented in the Final EIS, (3) the new calculation methods present a significant change to the impacts described in the Final EIS, and (4) would the updated characterization data cause significant changes in the environmental impacts for the action alternatives/options presented in the Final EIS. There are no other aspects of the Final EIS that require additional review because DOE has not identified any additional new significant circumstances or information that would warrant such a review.

N /A

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/06/08 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11/06/08 11/06/08 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/06/08 The following documents are associated with the Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting held on November 6th, 2008. Note: (Please contact Steven Ross at steven.ross@em.doe.gov for a HLW Glass Waste Loadings version with animations on slide 6). Slurry Retrieval, Pipeline Transport & Plugging and Mixing Workshop The Way Ahead - West Valley Demonstration Project High-Level Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals Hanford Tank Waste Residuals HLW Glass Waste Loadings High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee More Documents & Publications Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 System Planning for Low-Activity Waste at Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility

163

Waste disposal options report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Volume 2 contains the following topical sections: estimates of feed and waste volumes, compositions, and properties; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Zr calcine; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Al calcine; determination of k{sub eff} for high level waste canisters in various configurations; review of ceramic silicone foam for radioactive waste disposal; epoxides for low-level radioactive waste disposal; evaluation of several neutralization cases in processing calcine and sodium-bearing waste; background information for EFEs, dose rates, watts/canister, and PE-curies; waste disposal options assumptions; update of radiation field definition and thermal generation rates for calcine process packages of various geometries-HKP-26-97; and standard criteria of candidate repositories and environmental regulations for the treatment and disposal of ICPP radioactive mixed wastes.

Russell, N.E.; McDonald, T.G.; Banaee, J.; Barnes, C.M.; Fish, L.W.; Losinski, S.J.; Peterson, H.K.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Wenzel, D.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy DOE-WTP ORP WTP Project Office HLW High-Level Waste Facility HVAC Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning LAB Analytical Laboratory LAW Low-Activity...

165

High Level Waste Corporate Board Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on 24 July 2008 1 on 24 July 2008 1 Office of Environmental Management High-Level Waste Corporate Board Charter Purpose This Charter establishes the High- Level Waste (HLW) Corporate Board, (hereinafter referred to as the 'Board') within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The Board will serve as a consensus building body to integrate the Department of Energy (DOE) HLW management and disposition activities across the EM program and, with the coordination and cooperation of other program offices, across the DOE complex. The Board will identify the need for and develop policies, planning, standards and guidance and provide the integration necessary to implement an effective and efficient national HLW program. The Board will also evaluate the implications of HLW issues and their

166

Use of under Calcined Coke to Produce Baked Anodes for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies on Impact of Calcined Petroleum from Different Sources on Anode Quality Study on Graphitization of Cathode Carbon Blocks for Aluminum Electrolysis.

167

Vibrated Bulk Density (VBD) of Calcined Petroleum Coke and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Vibrated bulk density (VBD) is a quantitative measurement used in the aluminum industry to evaluate the density of calcined petroleum coke.

168

Vibrated Bulk Density (VBD) of Calcined Petroleum Coke and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Vibrated Bulk Density (VBD) of Calcined Petroleum Coke and Implications of Changes in the ASTM Method D4292. Author(s), Bill Spencer,...

169

Determination of Coke Calcination Level and Anode Baking Level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Determination of Coke Calcination Level and Anode Baking Level Application and Reproducibility of Lc Based Methods. Author(s), Stein...

170

Prediction of Calcined Coke Bulk Density - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to changing green coke quality, a reliable forecast of the calcined coke VBD from small green coke samples is required. The VBD can be predicted from...

171

High-level waste melter alternatives assessment report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Program`s (hereafter referred to as HLW Program) Melter Candidate Assessment Activity performed in fiscal year (FY) 1994. The mission of the TWRS Program is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford Site waste (current and future tank waste and encapsulated strontium and cesium isotopic sources) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The goal of the HLW Program is to immobilize the HLW fraction of pretreated tank waste into a vitrified product suitable for interim onsite storage and eventual offsite disposal at a geologic repository. Preparation of the encapsulated strontium and cesium isotopic sources for final disposal is also included in the HLW Program. As a result of trade studies performed in 1992 and 1993, processes planned for pretreatment of tank wastes were modified substantially because of increasing estimates of the quantity of high-level and transuranic tank waste remaining after pretreatment. This resulted in substantial increases in needed vitrification plant capacity compared to the capacity of original Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). The required capacity has not been finalized, but is expected to be four to eight times that of the HWVP design. The increased capacity requirements for the HLW vitrification plant`s melter prompted the assessment of candidate high-capacity HLW melter technologies to determine the most viable candidates and the required development and testing (D and T) focus required to select the Hanford Site HLW vitrification plant melter system. An assessment process was developed in early 1994. This document describes the assessment team, roles of team members, the phased assessment process and results, resulting recommendations, and the implementation strategy.

Calmus, R.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

Burgard, K.C.

1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

173

Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

Burgard, K.C.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

174

Mission Need Statement: Calcine Disposition Project Major Systems Acquisition Project  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies the need to establish the Calcine Disposition Project to determine and implement the final disposition of calcine including characterization, retrieval, treatment (if necessary), packaging, loading, onsite interim storage pending shipment to a repository or interim storage facility, and disposition of related facilities.

J. T. Beck

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

175

TESTS WITH HIGH-BISMUTH HLW GLASSES FINAL REPORT VSL-10R1780-1 REV 0 12/13/10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Final Report describes the testing of glass formulations developed for Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) containing high concentrations of bismuth. In previous work on high-bismuth HLW streams specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP), fully compliant, high waste loading compositions were developed and subjected to melter testing on the DM100 vitrification system. However, during heat treatment according to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW canister centerline cooling (CCC) curves, crucible melts of the high-bismuth glasses were observed to foam. Clearly, such an occurrence during cooling of actual HLW canisters would be highly undesirable. Accordingly, the present work involves larger-scale testing to determine whether this effect occurs under more prototypical conditions, as well as crucible-scale tests to determine the causes and potentially remediate the observed foaming behavior. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts designed to determine the underlying causes of the foaming behavior as well as to assess potential mitigation strategies. Testing was also conducted on the DM1200 HLW Pilot melter with a composition previously tested on the DM100 and shown to foam during crucible-scale CCC heat treatment. The DM1200 tests evaluated foaming of glasses over a range of bismuth concentrations poured into temperature-controlled, 55-gallon drums which have a diameter that is close to that of the full-scale WTP HLW canisters. In addition, the DM1200 tests provided the first large-scale melter test data on high-bismuth WTP HLW compositions, including information on processing rates, cold cap behavior and off-gas characteristics, and data from this waste composition on the prototypical DM1200 off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for ORP on the same waste composition. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. The present glass formulation and melter testing work was aimed at one of the four waste streams previously specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). Such testing supports the ORP basis for projection of the amount of Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) to be produced at Hanford and evaluation of the likely potential for future enhancements of the WTP over and above the present well-developed baseline. It should be noted that the compositions of the four ORP-specified waste streams differ significantly from those of the feed tanks (AZ-101, AZ-102, C-16/AY-102, and C-104/AY-101) that have been the focus of the extensive technology development and design work performed for the WTP baseline. In this regard, the work on the ORP-specified compositions is complementary to and necessarily of a more exploratory nature than the work in support of the current WTP baseline.

MATLACK KS; KRUGER AA; JOSEPH I; GAN H; KOT WK; CHAUDHURI M; MOHR RK; MCKEOWN DA; BARDAKEI T; GONG W; BUECCHELE AC; PEGG IL

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

176

Waste management system alternatives for treatment of wastes from spent fuel reprocessing  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to help identify a preferred TRU waste treatment alternative for reprocessing wastes with respect to waste form performance in a geologic repository, near-term waste management system risks, and minimum waste management system costs. The results were intended for use in developing TRU waste acceptance requirements that may be needed to meet regulatory requirements for disposal of TRU wastes in a geologic repository. The waste management system components included in this analysis are waste treatment and packaging, transportation, and disposal. The major features of the TRU waste treatment alternatives examined here include: (1) packaging (as-produced) without treatment (PWOT); (2) compaction of hulls and other compactable wastes; (3) incineration of combustibles with cementation of the ash plus compaction of hulls and filters; (4) melting of hulls and failed equipment plus incineration of combustibles with vitrification of the ash along with the HLW; (5a) decontamination of hulls and failed equipment to produce LLW plus incineration and incorporation of ash and other inert wastes into HLW glass; and (5b) variation of this fifth treatment alternative in which the incineration ash is incorporated into a separate TRU waste glass. The six alternative processing system concepts provide progressively increasing levels of TRU waste consolidation and TRU waste form integrity. Vitrification of HLW and intermediate-level liquid wastes (ILLW) was assumed in all cases.

McKee, R.W.; Swanson, J.L.; Daling, P.M.; Clark, L.L.; Craig, R.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.; McCarthy, D.; Franklin, A.L.; Hazelton, R.F.; Lundgren, R.A.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the accesses using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The defense high level waste (HLW) disposal container provides long-term confinement of the commercial HLW and defense HLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms (IPWF)) placed within disposable canisters, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a defense HLW disposal container along with commercial HLW waste forms, which is known as 'co-disposal'. The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container/waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual canister temperatures after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Defense HLW disposal containers for HLW disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters. Defense HLW disposal containers for co-disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters arranged in a ring and one DOE SNF canister in the ring. Defense HLW disposal containers also will hold two Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) and two HLW canisters in one disposal container. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinders, outer and inner cylinder lids, and may include a canister guide. An exterior label will provide a means by which to identify the disposal container and its contents. Different materials will be selected for the disposal container inner and outer cylinders. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and natural barrier, will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different properties prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The inner cylinder and inner cylinder lids will be constructed of stainless steel and the outer cylinder and outer cylinder lids will be a barrier made of high-nickel alloy. The defense HLW disposal container interfaces with the emplacement drift environment and the internal waste by transferring heat from the canisters to the external environment and by protecting the canisters and their contents from damage/degradation by the external environment. The disposal container also interfaces with the canisters by limiting access of moderator and oxidizing agents to the waste. A loaded and sealed disposal container (waste package) interfaces with the Emplacement Drift System's emplacement drift waste package supports upon which the waste packages are placed. The disposal container interfaces with the Canister Transfer System, Waste Emplacement /Retrieval System, Disposal Container Handling System, and Waste Package Remediation System during loading, handling, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval for the disposal container/waste package.

NONE

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

178

Simulation of Combustion and Thermal-flow Inside a Petroleum Coke Rotary Calcining Kiln.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Calcined coke is the best material for making carbon anodes for smelting of alumina to aluminum. Calcining is an energy intensive industry and a significant (more)

Zhang, Zexuan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

IMPACT OF PARTICLE AGGLOMERATION ON ACCUMULATION RATES IN THE GLASS DISCHARGE RISER OF HLW MELTER  

SciTech Connect

The major factor limiting waste loading in continuous high-level radioactive waste (HLW) melters is an accumulation of particles in the glass discharge riser during a frequent and periodic idling of more than 20 days. An excessive accumulation can produce robust layers a few centimeters thick, which may clog the riser, preventing molten glass from being poured into canisters. Since the accumulation rate is driven by the size of particles we investigated with x-ray microtomography, scanning electron microscopy, and image analysis the impact of spinel forming components, noble metals, and alumina on the size, concentration, and spatial distribution of particles, and on the accumulation rate. Increased concentrations of Fe and Ni in the baseline glass resulted in the formation of large agglomerates that grew over the time to an average size of ~185155 {micro}m, and produced >3 mm thick layer after 120 h at 850C. The noble metals decreased the particle size, and therefore significantly slowed down the accumulation rate. Addition of alumina resulted in the formation of a network of spinel dendrites which prevented accumulation of particles into compact layers.

Kruger AA; Rodriguez CA: Matyas J; Owen AT; Jansik DP; Lang JB

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

Accident analysis for high-level waste management alternatives in the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

A comparative generic accident analysis was performed for the programmatic alternatives for high-level waste (HLW) management in the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS). The key facilities and operations of the five major HLW management phases were considered: current storage, retrieval, pretreatment, treatment, and interim canister storage. A spectrum of accidents covering the risk-dominant accidents was analyzed. Preliminary results are presented for HLW management at the Hanford site. A comparison of these results with those previously advanced shows fair agreement.

Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A Summary of INEEL Calcine Properties Used to Evaluate Direct Calcine Disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To support evaluations of the direct disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory calcines to the repository at Yucca Mountain, an evaluation of the performance of the calcine in the repository environment must be performed. This type of evaluation demonstrates, through computer modeling and analysis, the impact the calcine would have on the ability of the repository to perform its function of containment of materials during the repository lifetime. This report discusses parameters that were used in the scoping evaluation conducted in FY 2003. It provides nominal values for the parameters, with explanation of the source of the values, and how the values were modified for use in repository analysis activities.

C. A. Dahl

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Summary - Preliminary TRA of the Calcine Disposition Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Calcine The Id materi Dec. 2 Press additiv form w those project anticip 2012 a CD-1 a selecte Level ( assess Eleme assign prepar The as below achiev * R * Ba * C The Ele Site: I...

183

CSER 99-001: PFP LAB Dentirating calciner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A criticality safety evaluation report was prepared for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) laboratory denigrating calciner, located in Glovebox 188-1, that converts Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} solutions to the high fired stable oxide PuO{sub 2}. Fissile mass limits and volume limits are set for the glovebox for testing operations and training operators using only nitric acid feed to a plutonium oxide bed in the calciner.

MILLER, E.M.; DOBBIN, K.D.

1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

184

Technical Exchange on Improved Design and Performance of High Level Waste Melters - Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SIA Radon is responsible for management of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) produced in Central Russia. In cooperation with Minatom organizations Radon carries out R and D programs on treatment of simulated high level waste (HLW) as well. Radon scientists deal with a study of materials for LILW, HLW, and Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) wastes immobilization, and development and testing of processes and technologies for waste treatment and disposal. Radon is mostly experienced in LILW vitrification. This experience can be carried over to HLW vitrification especially in field of melting systems. The melter chosen as a basic unit for the vitrification plant is a cold crucible. Later on Radon experience in LILW vitrification as well as our results on simulated HLW vitrification are briefly described.

SK Sundaram; ML Elliott; D Bickford

1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

185

Preliminary waste acceptance criteria for the ICPP spent fuel and waste management technology development program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to identify requirements to be met by the Producer/Shipper of Spent Nuclear Fuel/High-LeveL Waste SNF/HLW in order for DOE to be able to accept the packaged materials. This includes defining both standard and nonstandard waste forms.

Taylor, L.L.; Shikashio, R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External Flowsheet Review Team (Technical) Report Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External Flowsheet Review Team (Technical) Report Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External Flowsheet Review Team (Technical) Report Summary - Flowsheet for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant More Documents & Publications Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility

187

Seismic design evaluation guidelines for buried piping for the DOE HLW Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the seismic design and evaluation guidelines for underground piping for the Department of Energy (DOE) High-Level-Waste (HLW) Facilities. The underground piping includes both single and double containment steel pipes and concrete pipes with steel lining, with particular emphasis on the double containment piping. The design and evaluation guidelines presented in this paper follow the generally accepted beam-on-elastic-foundation analysis principle and the inertial response calculation method, respectively, for piping directly in contact with the soil or contained in a jacket. A standard analysis procedure is described along with the discussion of factors deemed to be significant for the design of the underground piping. The following key considerations are addressed: the design feature and safety requirements for the inner (core) pipe and the outer pipe; the effect of soil strain and wave passage; assimilation of the necessary seismic and soil data; inertial response calculation for the inner pipe; determination of support anchor movement loads; combination of design loads; and code comparison. Specifications and justifications of the key parameters used, stress components to be calculated and the allowable stress and strain limits for code evaluation are presented.

Lin, Chi-Wen [Consultant, Martinez, CA (United States); Antaki, G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Bandyopadhyay, K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bush, S.H. [Review & Synthesis Association, Richland, WA (United States); Costantino, C. [City Univ. of New York, New York, NY (United States); Kennedy, R. [RPK Structural Mechanics, Yorba Linda, CA (United States). Consultant

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Iron Phosphate Glass as Potential Waste Matrix for High-Level Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, Iron Phosphate Glass (IPG) is investigated as the alternative final waste form for High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) in U.S. This study is aimed to investigate feasibility of IPG to HLW arising from commercial reprocessing in Japan. In order to evaluate favorable preparation conditions, maximum waste loading and property of IPG, the melting tests were carried. From the results of melting tests, the favorable preparation conditions was with matrix of Fe/P 0.43 (mole ratio in products) and melting at 1200{sup o} for 4h. The products of 10-20mass% waste loading of simulated HLW were glassy and had no crystal peaks, however the product of 30mass% waste loading showed some crystal peaks by XRD analysis. IPG and Borosilicate glass (BG) had about the same thermal properties. As a result, IPG had enough potential for high waste loading and the extremely good chemical durability for consideration as a waste form for Japanese HLW.

Fukui, T.; Ishinomori, T.; Endo, Y.; Sazarashi, M.; Ono, S.; Suzuki, K.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

189

Development and application of a conceptual approach for defining high-level waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a conceptual approach to defining high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and a preliminary quantitative definition obtained from an example implementation of the conceptual approach. On the basis of the description of HLW in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, we have developed a conceptual model in which HLW has two attributes: HLW is (1) highly radioactive and (2) requires permanent isolation via deep geologic disposal. This conceptual model results in a two-dimensional waste categorization system in which one axis, related to ''requires permanent isolation,'' is associated with long-term risks from waste disposal and the other axis, related to ''highly radioactive,'' is associated with short-term risks from waste management and operations; this system also leads to the specification of categories of wastes that are not HLW. Implementation of the conceptual model for defining HLW was based primarily on health and safety considerations. Wastes requiring permanent isolation via deep geologic disposal were defined by estimating the maximum concentrations of radionuclides that would be acceptable for disposal using the next-best technology, i.e., greater confinement disposal (GCD) via intermediate-depth burial or engineered surface structures. Wastes that are highly radioactive were defined by adopting heat generation rate as the appropriate measure and examining levels of decay heat that necessitate special methods to control risks from operations in a variety of nuclear fuel-cycle situations. We determined that wastes having a power density >200 W/m/sup 3/ should be considered highly radioactive. Thus, in the example implementation, the combination of maximum concentrations of long-lived radionuclides that are acceptable for GCD and a power density of 200 W/m/sup 3/ provides boundaries for defining wastes that are HLW.

Croff, A.G.; Forsberg, C.W.; Kocher, D.C.; Cohen, J.J.; Smith, C.F.; Miller, D.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Alternatives Generation and Analysis for Phase 1 High Level Waste Feed Tanks Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent revision of the US. Department of Energy privatization contract for the immobilization of high-level waste (HLW) at Hanford necessitates the investigation of alternative waste feed sources to meet contractual feed requirements. This analysis identifies wastes to be considered as HLW feeds and develops and conducts alternative analyses to comply with established criteria. A total of 12,426 cases involving 72 waste streams are evaluated and ranked in three cost-based alternative models. Additional programmatic criteria are assessed against leading alternative options to yield an optimum blended waste feed stream.

CRAWFORD, T.W.

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

191

High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Level Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee John E. Marra, Ph.D. Associate Laboratory Director November 6, 2008 Richland, WA DOE-EM HLW Corporate Board Meeting Background - Performance Assessment Process Performance assessments are the fundamental risk assessment tool used by the DOE to evaluate and communicate the effectiveness and long-term impact of waste management and cleanup decisions. This includes demonstrations of compliance, NEPA analyses, and decisions about technologies and 2 analyses, and decisions about technologies and waste forms. Background - Process Perception EM-2 'Precepts' for Improved High-Level Waste Management (HLW Corporate Board Meeting - April 2008) Improved Performance Assessments (PA) The PA process is not consistently applied amongst the 3 The PA process is not consistently applied amongst the major HLW sites PA

192

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

193

Permitting plan for the high-level waste interim storage  

SciTech Connect

This document addresses the environmental permitting requirements for the transportation and interim storage of solidified high-level waste (HLW) produced during Phase 1 of the Hanford Site privatization effort. Solidified HLW consists of canisters containing vitrified HLW (glass) and containers that hold cesium separated during low-level waste pretreatment. The glass canisters and cesium containers will be transported to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-provided transportation cask via diesel-powered tractor trailer. Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Milestone M-90 establishes a new major milestone, and associated interim milestones and target dates, governing acquisition and/or modification of facilities necessary for: (1) interim storage of Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) immobilized HLW (IHLW) and other canistered high-level waste forms; and (2) interim storage and disposal of TWRS immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW). An environmental requirements checklist and narrative was developed to identify the permitting path forward for the HLW interim storage (HLWIS) project (See Appendix B). This permitting plan will follow the permitting logic developed in that checklist.

Deffenbaugh, M.L.

1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

194

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB),  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB), Balance of Facilities (BOF) and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification Facilities (LAW) Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB), Balance of Facilities (BOF) and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification Facilities (LAW) Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB), Balance of Facilities (BOF) and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification Facilities (LAW) Summary - WTP Analytical Lab, BOF and LAW Waste Vitrification Facilities More Documents & Publications Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility Compilation of TRA Summaries

195

Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Task: Identify Shortline Railroads Serving Nuclear Power Plants Establish Contact Information with Railroads Officials Field Review of each Railroad's Physical and Operational Infrastructure Facilitate Upgrades to Meet Safe Acceptable Standards Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel More Documents & Publications TEC Meeting Summaries - February 2008 Presentations TEC Meeting Summaries - July 2007 Presentations TEC Meeting Summaries - September 2006

196

High-Level Waste Melter Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is faced with a massive cleanup task in resolving the legacy of environmental problems from years of manufacturing nuclear weapons. One of the major activities within this task is the treatment and disposal of the extremely large amount of high-level radioactive (HLW) waste stored at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The current planning for the method of choice for accomplishing this task is to vitrify (glassify) this waste for disposal in a geologic repository. This paper describes the results of the DOE-chartered independent review of alternatives for solidification of Hanford HLW that could achieve major cost reductions with reasonable long-term risks, including recommendations on a path forward for advanced melter and waste form material research and development. The potential for improved cost performance was considered to depend largely on increased waste loading (fewer high-level waste canisters for disposal), higher throughput, or decreased vitrification facility size.

Ahearne, J.; Gentilucci, J.; Pye, L. D.; Weber, T.; Woolley, F.; Machara, N. P.; Gerdes, K.; Cooley, C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

197

Systems study of the feasibility of high-level nuclear waste fractionation for thermal stress control in a geologic repository: appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the benefits and costs of fractionating the cesium and strontium (Cs/Sr) components in commercial high-level waste (HLW) to a separate waste stream for the purpose of reducing geologic-repository thermal stresses in the region of the HLW. The major conclusion is that the Cs/Sr fractionation concept offers the prospect of a substantial total system cost advantage for HLW disposal if reduced HLW package temperatures in a basalt repository are desired. However there is no cost advantage if currently designated maximum design temperatures are acceptable. Aging the HLW for 50 to 100 years can accomplish similar results at equivalent or lower costs. Volume II contains appendices for: (1) thermal analysis supplement; (2) fractionation process experimental results supplement; (3) cost analysis supplement; and (4) radiological risk analysis supplement.

McKee, R.W.; Elder, H.K.; McCallum, R.F.; Silviera, D.J.; Swanson, J.L.; Wiles, L.E.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Status of Sandia HLW canister/overpack program studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of the Sandia program has been to identify an extended life alloy suitable as an overpack surrounding an HLW canister. The function of the overpack, which may be only millimeters thick, is corrosion resistance, not support strength. Laboratory and hot-cell tests are being used to measure the corrosion rates and assess the metallurgical behavior of selected engineered barrier materials. Field and in situ tests and demonstrations are in the planning stage. Recent experimental results are reviewed, and the status of the various phases of this program are described. Several candidate alloys have been examined for corrosion behavior under environmental conditions typical of a salt repository. The prime candidate for long-lived overpacks, TiCode-12, has not been disqualified by any of the tests and overtests conducted in our investigations. However further testing of potential failure mechanisms are being evaluated before final material selection is made. Nickel-based and lower-cost alloys will also be examined. This program will culminate with large-scale overpack fabrication demonstrations and field testing in salt.

Molecke, M.A.; Abrego, L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Molybdenum Oxide Behavior in French HLW Nuclear Glass: Current ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rare Earth and Plutonium Doping of Apatite Secure and Certify Studies to Work on Production of Spiked Plutonium Vitrification of DOE Problematic Wastes...

200

A QUARTER CENTURY OF NUCLEAR WASTE MANAGEMENT IN JAPAN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is entitled ''A QUARTER CENTURY OF NUCLEAR WASTE MANAGEMENT IN JAPAN''. Since the first statement on the strategy for radioactive waste management in Japan was made by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in 1976, a quarter century has passed, in which much experience has been accumulated both in technical and social domains. This paper looks back in this 25-year history of radioactive waste management in Japan by highlighting activities related to high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal.

Masuda, S.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

H:\cindy_pratt\hlw rod.tif  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RECORD OF DECISION RECORD OF DECISION For The Idaho High- Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement December 2005 United States Department of Energy 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Environmental Management Record of Decision for the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement SUMMARY: DOE is making decisions pursuant to the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) (DOEÆIS-287), issued in October 2002. The Final EIS presents the analysis of a proposed action containing two sets of alternatives: (1) waste processing alternatives for treating, storing and disposing of liquid mixed (radioactive and hazardous) transuranic (TRU) waste/sodium-bearing

202

Dissolution of ORNL HLW sludge and partitioning of the actinides using the TRUEX process  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were conducted to evaluate the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for partitioning actinides from actual dissolved high-level radioactive waste (HLW) sludge. Samples of sludge from melton Valley Storage Tank W-25 were rinsed with mild caustic (0.2 M NaOH) to reduce the concentrations of nitrates and fission products associated with the interstitial liquid. In one campaign the rinsed sludge was leached in nitric acid, and about 50% of the dry mass of the sludge was dissolved. The resulting solution contained total metal concentrations of {approximately} 1.8 M with a nitric acid concentration of 2.9 M. In the other campaign the sludge was neutralized with nitric acid to destroy the carbonates, then leached with 2.6 M NaOH for {approximately} 6 h before rinsing with the mild caustic. The sludge was then leached in nitric acid, and about 80% of the sludge dissolved. The resulting solution contained total metal concentrations of {approximately} 0.6 M with a nitric acid concentration of 1.7 M. Chemical analyses of both phases were used to evaluate the process. Evaluation was based on two metrics: the fraction of TRU elements removed from the dissolved sludge and comparison of the results with predictions made with the Generic TRUEX Model (GTM). The fractions of Eu, Pu, Cm, Th and U species removed from aqueous solution in only one extraction stage were > 95% and were close to the values predicted by the GTM. Mercury was also found to be strongly extracted, with a one-stage removal of > 92%. In one test, vanadium appeared to be moderately extracted.

Spencer, B.B.; Egan, B.Z.; Beahm, E.C.; Chase, C.W.; Dillow, T.A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

High-Level Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 Karthik Subramanian Bruce Wiersma November 2008 High Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting karthik.subramanian@srnl.doe.gov bruce.wiersma@srnl.doe.gov 2 Acknowledgements * Bruce Wiersma (SRNL) * Kayle Boomer (Hanford) * Michael T. Terry (Facilitator) * SRS - Liquid Waste Organization * Hanford Tank Farms * DOE-EM 3 Background * High level radioactive waste (HLW) tanks provide critical interim confinement for waste prior to processing and permanent disposal * Maintaining structural integrity (SI) of the tanks is a critical component of operations 4 Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 * Discuss the HLW tank integrity technology needs based upon the evolving waste processing and tank closure requirements along with its continued storage mission

204

High level waste facilities -- Continuing operation or orderly shutdown  

SciTech Connect

Two options for Environmental Impact Statement No action alternatives describe operation of the radioactive liquid waste facilities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The first alternative describes continued operation of all facilities as planned and budgeted through 2020. Institutional control for 100 years would follow shutdown of operational facilities. Alternatively, the facilities would be shut down in an orderly fashion without completing planned activities. The facilities and associated operations are described. Remaining sodium bearing liquid waste will be converted to solid calcine in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) or will be left in the waste tanks. The calcine solids will be stored in the existing Calcine Solids Storage Facilities (CSSF). Regulatory and cost impacts are discussed.

Decker, L.A.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

DOE Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange - Agenda  

Discussion of Future R&D Needs: All-3:45. ID Calcine Treatment Options Study: Hagers: DOE-ID: 4:15: Waste Immobilization Community of Practice : Peeler: WSRC: RETURN ...

206

Measuring and Predicting Fission Product Noble Metals in SRS HLW Sludges  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The noble metals Ru, Rh, Pd, and Ag were produced in the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors as products of the fission of U-235. Consequently they are in the High Level Waste (HLW) sludges that are currently being immobilized into a borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The noble metals are a concern in the DWPF because they catalyze the decomposition of formic acid used in the process to produce the flammable gas hydrogen. As the concentration of these noble metals in the sludge increases, more hydrogen will be produced when this sludge is processed. In the SRS Tank Farm it takes approximately two years to prepare a sludge batch for processing in the DWPF. This length of time is necessary to mix the appropriate sludges, blend them to form a sludge batch and then wash it to enable processing in the DWPF. This means that the exact composition of a sludge batch is not known for {approx}two years. During this time, studies with simulated nonradioactive sludges must be performed to determine the desired DWPF processing parameters for the new sludge batch. Consequently, prediction of the noble metal concentrations is desirable to prepare appropriate simulated sludges for studies of the DWPF process for that sludge batch. These studies give a measure of the amount of hydrogen that will be produced when that sludge batch is processed. This report describes in detail the measurement of these noble metal concentrations in sludges and a way to predict their concentrations from an estimate of the lanthanum concentration in the sludge. Results for two sludges are presented in this report. These are Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) currently being processed by the DWPF and a sample of unwashed sludge from Tank 11 that will be part of Sludge Batch 4. The concentrations of the noble metals in HLW sludges are measured by using mass spectroscopy to determine concentrations of the isotopes that comprise each noble metal. For example, the noble metal Ru is comprised of isotopes with masses 101, 102, and 104. The element Rh has a single isotope with mass 103. The element Pd is comprised of five isotopes. These are at masses 105-108 and mass 110. As does Rh, Ag has only one isotope. This is at mass 109. However, results in this report show that the Ag concentration in the two samples was due to natural Ag being in the samples. Natural Ag has masses at 107 and 109. The Ag-107 interferes with the measurement of Pd-107. This Ag was used in one of the processes at SRS. The results also show that natural Cd is in the two samples. Cadmium has isotopes at masses 106, 108 and 110, thus it interferes with the analysis of the Pd isotopes at these masses. Cadmium was also used in one of the processes at SRS. However, the concentrations of the Pd isotopes at masses 106, 107, 108 and 110 could be calculated using the fission yields for the Pd isotopes, and the measured concentration of Pd at mass 105 where there is no Ag or Cd interference. Based on the measurements of the concentrations of the isotopes of each noble metal, the total concentration of that noble metal can be determined by summing the concentrations of the individual isotopes. The results in this report show that the relative concentrations of the isotopes of Ru and Rh are in proportion to their yields from the fission of U-235 in the reactors. These results were expected since these elements are very insoluble in caustic and thus are primarily in the sludge tanks rather then the salt tanks of the SRS Tank Farm. The relative concentration of Pd is somewhat lower than that based on the relative fission yields of its five isotopes. This indicates that some of the Pd is in the salt tanks rather than the sludge tanks of the Tank Farm. The concentrations of the noble metals were predicted using the High Level Waste Characterization System (WCS) at SRS. This system keeps record of the inventory of the major compounds and select radionuclides that are in each of the SRS HLW tanks. Using this system, the Closure Business Unit (CBU) can predict the major composition of a sludge ba

Bibler, N

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

207

Exploratory study of complexant concentrate waste processing  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this exploratory study, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for Westinghouse Hanford Company, was to determine the effect of applying advanced chemical separations technologies to the processing and disposal of high-level wastes (HLW) stored in underground tanks. The major goals of this study were to determine (1) if the wastes can be partitioned into a small volume of HLW plus a large volume of low-level waste (LLW), and (2) if the activity in the LLW can be lowered enough to meet NRC Class LLW criteria. This report presents the results obtained in a brief scouting study of various processes for separating radionuclides from Hanford complexant concentrate (CC) waste.

Lumetta, G.J.; Bray, L.A.; Kurath, D.E.; Morrey, J.R.; Swanson, J.L.; Wester, D.W.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Characteristics of potential repository wastes. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document, and its associated appendices and microcomputer (PC) data bases, constitutes the reference OCRWM data base of physical and radiological characteristics data of radioactive wastes. This Characteristics Data Base (CDB) system includes data on spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste (HLW), which clearly require geologic disposal, and other wastes which may require long-term isolation, such as sealed radioisotope sources. The data base system was developed for OCRWM by the CDB Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various principal or official sources of these data provided primary information to the CDB Project which then used the ORIGEN2 computer code to calculate radiological properties. The data have been qualified by an OCRWM-sponsored peer review as suitable for quality-affecting work meeting the requirements of OCRWM`s Quality Assurance Program. The wastes characterized in this report include: light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and immobilized HLW.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Preliminary Waste Form Compliance Plan for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory High-Level Waste  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has specific technical and documentation requirements for high-level waste (HLW) that is to be placed in a federal repository. This document describes in general terms the strategy to be used at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that vitrified HLW, if produced at the INEEL, meets these requirements. Waste form, canister, quality assurance, and documentation specifications are discussed. Compliance strategy is given, followed by an overview of how this strategy would be implemented for each specification.

B. A. Staples; T. P. O' Holleran

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Decontamination of high-level waste canisters  

SciTech Connect

This report presents evaluations of several methods for the in-process decontamination of metallic canisters containing any one of a number of solidified high-level waste (HLW) forms. The use of steam-water, steam, abrasive blasting, electropolishing, liquid honing, vibratory finishing and soaking have been tested or evaluated as potential techniques to decontaminate the outer surfaces of HLW canisters. Either these techniques have been tested or available literature has been examined to assess their applicability to the decontamination of HLW canisters. Electropolishing has been found to be the most thorough method to remove radionuclides and other foreign material that may be deposited on or in the outer surface of a canister during any of the HLW processes. Steam or steam-water spraying techniques may be adequate for some applications but fail to remove all contaminated forms that could be present in some of the HLW processes. Liquid honing and abrasive blasting remove contamination and foreign material very quickly and effectively from small areas and components although these blasting techniques tend to disperse the material removed from the cleaned surfaces. Vibratory finishing is very capable of removing the bulk of contamination and foreign matter from a variety of materials. However, special vibratory finishing equipment would have to be designed and adapted for a remote process. Soaking techniques take long periods of time and may not remove all of the smearable contamination. If soaking involves pickling baths that use corrosive agents, these agents may cause erosion of grain boundaries that results in rough surfaces.

Nesbitt, J.F.; Slate, S.C.; Fetrow, L.K.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Biodiesel synthesis using calcined layered double hydroxide catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic properties of calcined Li-Al, Mg-Al and Mg-Fe layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were examined in two transesterification reactions, namely, the reaction of glyceryl tributyrate with methanol, and the reaction of soybean oil with methanol. While the Li-Al catalysts showed high activity in these reactions at the reflux temperature of methanol, the Mg-Fe and Mg-Al catalysts exhibited much lower methyl ester yields. CO2 TPD measurements revealed the presence of sites of weak, medium and strong basicity on both Mg-Al and Li-Al catalysts, the latter showing higher concentrations of medium and strong base sites; by implication, these are the main sites active in transesterification catalyzed by calcined Li-Al LDHs. Maximum activity was observed for the Li-Al catalysts when a calcination temperature of 450-500 aC was applied, corresponding to decomposition of the layered double hydroxide to the mixed oxide without formation of crystalline lithium aluminate phases.

Schumaker, J. Link [University of Kentucky; Crofcheck, Czarena [University of Kentucky; TAckett, S. Adam [University of Kentucky; Santillan-Jimenez, Eduardo [University of Kentucky; Morgan, Tonya [University of Kentucky; Ji, Yaying [University of Kentucky; Crocker, Mark [University of Kentucky; Toops, Todd J [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for vertical calciner operation at the plutonium finishing plant  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC) for construction, installation, and operation of a vertical calciner to stabilize plutonium at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)Complex, pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060. The PFP Complex activities are focused on the cleanout and stabilization of plutonium residue left from plutonium weapons material processing activities. The prime purpose of the vertical calciner is to convert plutonium acid solutions to a more stable plutonium oxide. A test calciner has been developed and put in place in the 234-5Z Building. Development testing of this vertical calciner is ongoing. A new vertical calciner will be assembled for actual stabilization operation in Room 230C of the 234-5Z Building. The test calciner may be upgraded or replaced as an alternative to building a new calciner in Room 230C.

Hays, C.B., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

213

Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data; Biannual report, August 1988--January 1989: Volume 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes evaluations by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of Department of Energy (DOE) activities on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for the six-month period August 1988 through January 1989. Included are reviews of related materials research and plans, activities for the DOE Materials Characterization Center, information on the Yucca Mountain Project, and other information regarding supporting research and special assistance. NIST comments are given on the Yucca Mountain Consultation Draft Site Characterization Plan (CDSCP) and on the Waste Compliance Plan for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) High-Level Waste (HLW) Form. 3 figs.

Interrante, C.G. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA). Div. of High-Level Waste Management; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.C. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (IMSE), Gaithersburg, MD (USA). Metallurgy Div.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

215

Operating experience during high-level waste vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary of operational experiences, component and system performance, and lessons learned associated with the operation of the Vitrification Facility (VF) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The VF was designed to convert stored high-level radioactive waste (HLW) into a stable waste form (borosilicate glass) suitable for disposal in a federal repository. Following successful completion on nonradioactive test, HLW processing began in July 1995. Completion of Phase 1 of HLW processing was reached on 10 June 1998 and represented the processing of 9.32 million curies of cesium-137 (Cs-137) and strontium-90 (Sr-90) to fill 211 canisters with over 436,000 kilograms of glass. With approximately 85% of the total estimated curie content removed from underground waste storage tanks during Phase 1, subsequent operations will focus on removal of tank heel wastes.

Valenti, P.J.; Elliott, D.I.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE PLANT AT THE WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) vitrification melter was shut down in September 2002 after being used to vitrify High Level Waste (HLW) and process system residuals for six years. Processing of the HLW occurred from June 1996 through November 2001, followed by a program to flush the remaining HLW through to the melter. Glass removal and shutdown followed. The facility and process equipment is currently in a standby mode awaiting deactivation. During HLW processing operations, nearly 24 million curies of radioactive material were vitrified into 275 canisters of HLW glass. At least 99.7% of the curies in the HLW tanks at the WVDP were vitrified using the melter. Each canister of HLW holds approximately 2000 kilograms of glass with an average contact dose rate of over 2600 rem per hour. After vitrification processing ended, two more cans were filled using the Evacuated Canister Process to empty the melter at shutdown. This history briefly summarizes the initial stages of process development and earlier WVDP experience in the design and operation of the vitrification systems, followed by a more detailed discussion of equipment availability and failure rates during six years of operation. Lessons learned operating a system that continued to function beyond design expectations also are highlighted.

Petkus, Lawrence L.; Paul, James; Valenti, Paul J.; Houston, Helene; May, Joseph

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

217

Selection of Pretreatment Processes for Removal of Radionuclides from Hanford Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's), Office of River Protection (ORP) located at Hanford Washington has established a contract (1) to design, construct, and commission a new Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that will treat and immobilize the Hanford tank wastes for ultimate disposal. The WTP is comprised of four major elements, pretreatment, LAW immobilization, HLW immobilization, and balance of plant facilities. This paper describes the technologies selected for pretreatment of the LAW and HLW tank wastes, how these technologies were selected, and identifies the major technology testing activities being conducted to finalize the design of the WTP.

Carreon, R.; Mauss, B. M.; Johnson, M. E.; Holton, L. K.; Wright, G. T.; Peterson, R. A.; Rueter, K. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

218

BENEFITS OF VIBRATION ANALYSIS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF EQUIPMENT IN HLW TANKS - 12341  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vibration analyses of equipment intended for use in the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive liquid waste storage tanks are performed during pre-deployment testing and has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the life-cycle costs of the equipment. Benefits of using vibration analysis to identify rotating machinery problems prior to deployment in radioactive service will be presented in this paper. Problems encountered at SRS and actions to correct or lessen the severity of the problem are discussed. In short, multi-million dollar cost saving have been realized at SRS as a direct result of vibration analysis on existing equipment. Vibration analysis of equipment prior to installation can potentially reduce inservice failures, and increases reliability. High-level radioactive waste is currently stored in underground carbon steel waste tanks at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and at the Hanford Site, WA. Various types of rotating machinery (pumps and separations equipment) are used to manage and retrieve the tank contents. Installation, maintenance, and repair of these pumps and other equipment are expensive. In fact, costs to remove and replace a single pump can be as high as a half million dollars due to requirements for radioactive containment. Problems that lead to in-service maintenance and/or equipment replacement can quickly exceed the initial investment, increase radiological exposure, generate additional waste, and risk contamination of personnel and the work environment. Several different types of equipment are considered in this paper, but pumps provide an initial example for the use of vibration analysis. Long-shaft (45 foot long) and short-shaft (5-10 feet long) equipment arrangements are used for 25-350 horsepower slurry mixing and transfer pumps in the SRS HLW tanks. Each pump has a unique design, operating characteristics and associated costs, sometimes exceeding a million dollars. Vibration data are routinely collected during pre-installation tests and screened for: Critical speeds or resonance, Imbalance of rotating parts, Shaft misalignment, Fluid whirl or lubrication break down, Bearing damages, and Other component abnormalities. Examples of previous changes in operating parameters and fabrication tolerances and extension of equipment life resulting from the SRS vibration analysis program include: (1) Limiting operational speeds for some pumps to extend service life without design or part changes; (2) Modifying manufacturing methods (tightening tolerances) for impellers on slurry mixing pumps based on vibration data that indicated hydraulic imbalance; (3) Identifying rolling element mounting defects and replacing those components in pump seals before installation; and (4) Identifying the need for bearing design modification for SRS long-shaft mixing pump designs to eliminate fluid whirl and critical speeds which significantly increased the equipment service life. In addition, vibration analyses and related analyses have been used during new equipment scale-up tests to identify the need for design improvements for full-scale operation / deployment of the equipment in the full size tanks. For example, vibration analyses were recently included in the rotary micro-filtration scale-up test program at SRNL.

Stefanko, D.; Herbert, J.

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

219

Experimental Results of NWCF Run H4 Calcine Dissolution Studies Performed in FY-98 and -99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolution experiments were performed on actual samples of NWCF Run H-4 radioactive calcine in fiscal years 1998 and 1999. Run H-4 is an aluminum/sodium blend calcine. Typical dissolution data indicates that between 90-95 wt% of H-4 calcine can be dissolved using 1gram of calcine per 10 mLs of 5-8M nitric acid at boiling temperature. Two liquid raffinate solutions composed of a WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend and a WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend were converted into calcine at the NWCF. Calcine made from each blend was collected and transferred to RAL for dissolution studies. The WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend calcine was dissolved with resultant solutions used as feed material for separation treatment experimentation. The WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend calcine dissolution testing was performed to determine compositional analyses of the dissolved solution and generate UDS for solid/liquid separation experiments. Analytical fusion techniques were then used to determine compositions of the solid calcine and UDS from dissolution. The results from each of these analyses were used to calculate elemental material balances around the dissolution process, validating the experimental data. This report contains all experimental data from dissolution experiments performed using both calcine blends.

Garn, Troy Gerry; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Sierra, Tracy Laureena

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

DATA SUMMARY REPORT SMALL SCALE MELTER TESTING OF HLW ALGORITHM GLASSES MATRIX1 TESTS VSL-07S1220-1 REV 0 7/25/07  

SciTech Connect

Eight tests using different HLW feeds were conducted on the DM100-BL to determine the effect of variations in glass properties and feed composition on processing rates and melter conditions (off-gas characteristics, glass processing, foaming, cold cap, etc.) at constant bubbling rate. In over seven hundred hours of testing, the property extremes of glass viscosity, electrical conductivity, and T{sub 1%}, as well as minimum and maximum concentrations of several major and minor glass components were evaluated using glass compositions that have been tested previously at the crucible scale. Other parameters evaluated with respect to glass processing properties were +/-15% batching errors in the addition of glass forming chemicals (GFCs) to the feed, and variation in the sources of boron and sodium used in the GFCs. Tests evaluating batching errors and GFC source employed variations on the HLW98-86 formulation (a glass composition formulated for HLW C-106/AY-102 waste and processed in several previous melter tests) in order to best isolate the effect of each test variable. These tests are outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to the Test Specification for this work. The present report provides summary level data for all of the tests in the first test matrix (Matrix 1) in the Test Plan. Summary results from the remaining tests, investigating minimum and maximum concentrations of major and minor glass components employing variations on the HLW98-86 formulation and glasses generated by the HLW glass formulation algorithm, will be reported separately after those tests are completed. The test data summarized herein include glass production rates, the type and amount of feed used, a variety of measured melter parameters including temperatures and electrode power, feed sample analysis, measured glass properties, and gaseous emissions rates. More detailed information and analysis from the melter tests with complete emission chemistry, glass durability, and melter operating details will be provided in the final report. A summary of the tests that were conducted is provided in Table 1. Each of the seven tests was of nominally one hundred hours in duration. Test B was conducted in two equal segments: the first with nominal additives, and the second with the replacement of borax with a mixture of boric acid and soda ash to determine the effect of alternative OPC sources on production rates and processing characteristics. Interestingly, sugar additions were required near mid points of Tests W and Z to reduce excessive foaming that severely limited feed processing rates. The sugar additions were very effective in recovering manageable processing conditions, albeit over the relatively short remainder of the test duration. Tests W and Z employed the highest melt viscosities but not by a particularly wide margin. Other tests, which did not exhibit such foaming Issues, employed higher concentrations of manganese or iron or both. These results highlight the need for the development of protocols for the a priori determination of which HLW feeds will require sugar additions and the appropriate amounts of sugar to be added in order to control foaming (and maintain throughput) without over-reduction of the melt (which could lead to molten metal formation). In total, over 8,800 kg of feed was processed to produce over 3200 kg of glass. Steady-state processing rates were achieved, and no secondary sulfate phases were observed during any of the tests. Analysis was performed on samples of the glass product taken throughout the tests to verify composition and properties. Sampling and analysis was also performed on melter exhaust to determine the effect of the feed and glass changes on melter emissions.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

EPRI Review of Geologic Disposal for Used Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste: Volume IV - Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effective termination of the Yucca Mountain program by the U.S. Administration in 2009 has further delayed the construction and operation of a permanent disposal facility for used fuel and high level radioactive waste (HLW) in the United States. In concert with this decision, the President directed the Energy Secretary to establish the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future to review and provide recommendations on options for managing used fuel and HLW. EPRI is uniquely positioned to prov...

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

222

HLW Salt Disposition Alternatives Identification Preconceptual Phase I Summary Report (Including Attachments)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to summarize the process used by the Team to systematically develop alternative methods or technologies for final disposition of HLW salt. Additionally, this report summarizes the process utilized to reduce the total list of identified alternatives to an ''initial list'' for further evaluation. This report constitutes completion of the team charter major milestone Phase I Deliverable.

Piccolo, S.F.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

223

PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating radioactive waste solutions prior to disposal is described. A water-soluble phosphate, borate, and/or silicate is added. The solution is sprayed with steam into a space heated from 325 to 400 deg C whereby a powder is formed. The powder is melted and calcined at from 800 to 1000 deg C. Water vapor and gaseous products are separated from the glass formed. (AEC)

Johnson, B.M. Jr.; Barton, G.B.

1961-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

224

Microsoft PowerPoint - 9-07 Case Atlanta HLW techexchange.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calcine Disposition Project Calcine Disposition Project Joel Case Calcine Disposition Project Federal Project Director November 17, 2010 Print Close 2 2 Calcine is Solidified First & Other Cycle Raffinates * Resulted in a 7 to 1 volume reduction * Capable of being safely stored for several hundred years in 43 large shielded bins contained in six bin sets Print Close 3 3 Calcine Generation History Campaign Parameters Begin End Volume gal Volume ft 3 Volume m 3 Curies Dec- 63 Mar - 81 4,081,000 77,300 2,189 Aug - 82 May - 00 3,644,000 78,000 2,209 Total 7,725,000 155,300 4,398 3.64E+07 Print Close 4 4 Calcine Solids Storage Facility (CSSF) Status CSSF Bins Capacity (m 3 ) In Use 1 12 227 2 7 851 3 7 1,130 4 3 486 5 7 1,010 6 7 1,506 Sub 43 5,210 Not in Use 7 7 1,784 Total 50 6,994 1 2 3 4 5 6 Print Close 5 Hot Isostatic Press Treatment Technology * The Department Selected Hot Isostatic

225

Control schemes for an industrial rotary calciner with a heat shield around the combustion zone  

SciTech Connect

Soda ash (sodium carbonate) is produced by calcining natural trona ore (sodium sesquicarbonate) in rotary calciners. Shell overheating, the consequent deformation of the calciner shell, and heat loss are frequently encountered problems during this operation. Installation of a concentric, metallic heat shield around the calciner`s combustion zone can help to reduce the shell temperature and recover some of the energy that would otherwise be lost. Another problem often encountered is the deterioration of product quality when the system inputs deviate from their design rates. A mathematical model of the calciner with a heat shield is used to design different control schemes in order to maintain the product quality. Performance of the designed control schemes is demonstrated via computer simulation.

Ciftci, S.; Kim, N.K. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

KINETICS OF PARTICLE GROWTH IN A FLUIDIZED CALCINER  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized calcination involves the injection of an atomized feed solution containing dissolved solids into a bed of fluidized partioles at elevated temperatures suitable for drying and calcining. The study was conducted in a threeinch diameter fluidized column using aluminum oxide as bed material and aqueous aluminum nitrate solution as feed. Products were removed at regular intervals to maintain a constant bed weight. Particle growth was traced by adding radioactive aluminum oxide seeds of a given size to the starting bed and following their progress as they grew into successively larger sieve fractions. The effects on the growth rate of operating variables and physical properties of the feed were studied, including fluidizing air velocity, atomizing air rate, column temperature, feed concentration, feed rate, and viscosity and surface tension of the feed. For each product using screen analysis and gammacounting data a volume-surface mean diameter of the seedcontaining particles was calculated. Upon statistical analysis a linear relationship between the mean diameter of seed-containing particles and time exhibited very strong correlation, substantiating the hypothesis that particle growth was proportional to its surface area. From this linear relationship the over-all growth constant, equal to the slope, was obtained. Attrition effect of the atomizing air was found statistically to be non-significant. Normal growth far outweighed attrition and for steady-state operation other methods to produce seeds, such as jet or target attrition must be employed to balance normal growth. (auth)

Lee, B.S.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Vertical Ball Mill for the Grinding of Calcined Petroleum Coke to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new vertical ball ring mill concept has been developed based on the results of research on the grinding of calcined petroleum coke. Industrial vertical mills are...

228

Slurry calcination process for conversion of aqueous uranium and plutonium to a mixed oxide powder  

SciTech Connect

Pilot plant studies indicate that a slurry calcination process for conversion of uranium and plutonium solutions to a mixed oxide powder can be operated at a plant scale.

Jones, M K; Jenkins, W J

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Ractivit de l'anode et dsulfuration : effet du niveau de calcination du coke.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Les proprits du coke et la performance des anodes sont affectes par le niveau de calcination du coke. Une densit de coke (VBD) leve implique (more)

Bergeron-Lagac, Charles-Luc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

FINAL REPORT INTEGRATED DM1200 MELTER TESTING OF REDOX EFFECTS USING HLW AZ-101 AND C-106/AY-102 SIMULANTS VSL-04R4800-1 REV 0 5/6/  

SciTech Connect

This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102 HLW simulants. The tests reported herein are a subset of three tests from a larger series of tests described in the Test Plan for the work; results from the remaining tests will be reported separately. Three nine day tests, one with AZ-101 and two with C-106/AY-102 feeds were conducted with variable amounts of added sugar to address the effects of redox. The test with AZ-101 included ruthenium spikes to also address the effects of redox on ruthenium volatility. One of tests addressed the effects of increased flow-sheet nitrate levels using C-106/AY-102 feeds. With high nitrate/nitrite feeds (such as WTP LAW feeds), reductants are required to prevent melt foaming and deleterious effects on glass production rates. Sugar is the baseline WTP reductant for this purpose. WTP HLW feeds typically have relatively low nitrate/nitrite content in comparison to the organic carbon content and, therefore, have typically not required sugar additions. However, HLW feed variability, particularly with respect to nitrate levels, may necessitate the use of sugar in some instances. The tests reported here investigate the effects of variable sugar additions to the melter feed as well as elevated nitrate levels in the waste. Variables held constant to the extent possible included melt temperature, bubbling rate, plenum temperature, cold cap coverage, the waste simulant composition, and the target glass composition. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW feeds with variable amounts of added sugar and increased nitrate levels; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and perform pre- and post test inspections of system components. The specific objectives (including test success criteria) of this testing, along with how each objective was met, are outlined in a table.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; LUTZE W; BIZOT PM; CALLOW RA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

231

River Protection Project (RPP) Immobilized High Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document replaces HNF-1751, Revision 1. It incorporates updates to reflect changes in programmatic direction associated with the vitrification plant contract and associated DOE-ORP guidance. In addition it includes planning associated with failed/used melter and sample handling and disposition work scope. The document also includes format modifications and section numbering update consistent with CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. procedures.

BRIGGS, M.G.

2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

232

FINAL REPORT DETERMINATION OF THE PROCESSING RATE OF RPP WTP HLW SIMULANTS USING A DURAMELTER J 1000 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-00R2590-2 REV 0 8/21/00  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data, analysis, and conclusions from a series of tests that were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America (VSL) to determine the melter processing rates that are achievable with RPP-WTP HLW simulants. The principal findings were presented earlier in a summary report (VSL-00R2S90-l) but the present report provides additional details. One of the most critical pieces of information in determining the required size of the RPP-WTP HLW melter is the specific glass production rate in terms of the mass of glass that can be produced per unit area of melt surface per unit time. The specific glass production rate together with the waste loading (essentially, the ratio of waste-in to glass-out, which is determined from glass formulation activities) determines the melt area that is needed to achieve a given waste processing rate with due allowance for system availability. As a consequence of the limited amount of relevant information, there exists, for good reasons, a significant disparity between design-base specific glass production rates for the RPP-WTP LAW and HLW conceptual designs (1.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d and 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d, respectively); furthermore, small-scale melter tests with HLW simulants that were conducted during Part A indicated typical processing rates with bubbling of around 2.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d. This range translates into more than a factor of five variation in the resultant surface area of the HLW melter, which is clearly not without significant consequence. It is clear that an undersized melter is undesirable in that it will not be able to support the required waste processing rates. It is less obvious that there are potential disadvantages associated with an oversized melter, over and above the increased capital costs. A melt surface that is consistently underutilized will have poor cold cap coverage, which will result in increased volatilization from the melt (which is generally undesirable) and increased plenum temperatures due to increased thermal radiation from the melt surface (which mayor may not be desirable but the flexibility to choose may be lost). Increased volatilization is an issue both in terms of the increased challenge to the off-gas system as well as for the ability to effectively close the recycle loops for volatile species that must be immobilized in the glass product, most notably technetium and cesium. For these reasons, improved information is needed on the specific glass production rates of RPP-WTP HLW streams in DuraMelterJ systems over a range of operating conditions. Unlike the RPP-WTP LAW program, for which a pilot melter system to provide large-scale throughout information is already in operation, there is no comparable HLW activity; the results of the present study are therefore especially important. This information will reduce project risk by reducing the uncertainty associated with the amount of conservatism that mayor may not be associated with the baseline RPP-WTP HLW melter sizing decision. After the submission of the first Test Plan for this work, the RPP-WTP requested revisions to include tests to determine the processing rates that are achievable without bubbling, which was driven by the potential advantages of omitting bubblers from the HLW melter design in terms of reduced maintenance. A further objective of this effort became the determination of whether the basis of design processing rate could be achieved without bubbling. Ideally, processing rate tests would be conducted on a full-scale RPP-WTP melter system with actual HLW materials, but that is clearly unrealistic during Part B1. As a practical compromise the processing rate determinations were made with HL W simulants on a DuraMelter J system at as close to full scale as possible and the DM 1000 system at VSL was selected for that purpose. That system has a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}, which corresponds to about one-third scale based on the specific glass processing rate of 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d assumed in the RPP-WTP HLW conceptual design, but would correspon

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEREZ-CARDENAS F; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

Composition of simulants used in the evaluation of electrochemical processes for the treatment of high-level wastes  

SciTech Connect

Four simulants are being used in the evaluation of electrochemical processes for the treatment of high-level wastes (HLW). These simulants represent waste presently stored at the Hanford, Idaho Falls, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River sites. Three of the simulants are highly alkaline salt solutions (Hanford, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River), and one is highly acidic (Idaho Falls).

Hobbs, D.T.

1994-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

234

Potential dispositioning flowsheets for ICPP SNF and wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INEL), has reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuels for the US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1953. This activity resulted mainly in the recovery of uranium and the management of the resulting wastes. The acidic radioactive high-level liquid waste was routinely stored in stainless steel tanks and then calcined to form a dry granular solid. The calcine is stored in stainless steel bins that are housed in underground concrete vaults. In April 1992, the DOE discontinued the practice of reprocessing irradiated nuclear fuels. This decision has left a legacy of 1.8 million gallons of radioactive liquid wastes (1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid wastes and 0.3 million gallons of high-level liquid waste), 3800 cubic meters of calcine waste, and 289 metric tons of heavy metal within unprocessed spent nuclear fuel (SNF) left in inventory at the ICPP. The nation`s radioactive waste policy has been established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), which requires the final disposal of SNF and radioactive waste in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) standards. In accordance with these regulations and other legal agreements between the State of Idaho and the DOE, the DOE must, among other requirements, (1) complete a final Environmental Impact Statement by April 30, 1995, (2) evaluate and test sodium-bearing waste pre-treatment technologies, (3) select the sodium-bearing and calcine waste pre-treatment technology, if necessary, by June 1, 1995, and (4) select a technology for converting calcined waste into an appropriate disposal form by June 1, 1995.

Olson, A.L. [ed.; Anderson, P.A.; Bendixsen, C.L. [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data: Biannual report, August 1986-January 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) evaluations of Department of Energy (DOE) activities on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW). The waste package is a proposed engineered barrier that is part of a permanent repository for HLW. Metal alloys are the principal barriers within the engineered system. Technical discussions are given for the corrosion of metals proposed for the canister, particularly carbon and stainless steels, and copper. In the section on tuff, the current level of understanding of several canister materials is questioned. Within the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) section, discussions are given on problems concerning groundwater, materials for use in the metallic overpack, and diffusion through the packing. For the proposed salt site, questions are raised on the work on both ASTM A216 Steel and Ti-Code 12. NBS work related to the vitrification of HLW borosilicate glass at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is covered. NBS reviews of selected DOE technical reports and a summary of current waste-package activities of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is presented. Using a database management system, a computerized database for storage and retrieval of reviews and evaluations of HLW data has been developed and is described. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Interrante, C.; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.; Harrison, S.; Shull, R.; Linzer, M.; Ricker, R.; Ruspi, J.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Method of preparing nuclear wastes for tansportation and interim storage  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear waste is formed into a substantially water-insoluble solid for temporary storage and transportation by mixing the calcined waste with at least 10 weight percent powdered anhydrous sodium silicate to form a mixture and subjecting the mixture to a high humidity environment for a period of time sufficient to form cementitious bonds by chemical reaction. The method is suitable for preparing an interim waste form from dried high level radioactive wastes.

Bandyopadhyay, Gautam (Naperville, IL); Galvin, Thomas M. (Darien, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

LITERATURE REVIEW OF PUO2 CALCINATION TIME AND TEMPERATURE DATA FOR SPECIFIC SURFACE AREA  

SciTech Connect

The literature has been reviewed in December 2011 for calcination data of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from plutonium oxalate Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} precipitation with respect to the PuO{sub 2} specific surface area (SSA). A summary of the literature is presented for what are believed to be the dominant factors influencing SSA, the calcination temperature and time. The PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} calcination data from this review has been regressed to better understand the influence of calcination temperature and time on SSA. Based on this literature review data set, calcination temperature has a bigger impact on SSA versus time. However, there is still some variance in this data set that may be reflecting differences in the plutonium oxalate preparation or different calcination techniques. It is evident from this review that additional calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} needs to be collected and evaluated to better define the relationship. The existing data set has a lot of calcination times that are about 2 hours and therefore may be underestimating the impact of heating time on SSA. SRNL recommends that more calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} be collected and this literature review data set be augmented to better refine the relationship between PuO{sub 2} SSA and its calcination parameters.

Daniel, G.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

238

Final Report - Glass Formulation Development and Testing for DWPF High AI2O3 HLW Sludges, VSL-10R1670-1, Rev. 0, dated 12/20/10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of the work described in this Final Report is to develop and identify glass frit compositions for a specified DWPF high-aluminum based sludge waste stream that maximizes waste loading while maintaining high production rate for the waste composition provided by ORP/SRS. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale, vertical gradient furnace, and confirmation tests on the DM100 melter system. The DM100-BL unit was selected for these tests. The DM100-BL was used for previous tests on HLW glass compositions that were used to support subsequent tests on the HLW Pilot Melter. It was also used to process compositions with waste loadings limited by aluminum, bismuth, and chromium, to investigate the volatility of cesium and technetium during the vitrification of an HLW AZ-102 composition, to process glass formulations at compositional and property extremes, and to investigate crystal settling on a composition that exhibited one percent crystals at 963{degrees}C (i.e., close to the WTP limit). The same melter was selected for the present tests in order to maintain comparisons between the previously collected data. The tests provide information on melter processing characteristics and off-gas data, including formation of secondary phases and partitioning. Specific objectives for the melter tests are as follows: Determine maximum glass production rates without bubbling for a simulated SRS Sludge Batch 19 (SB19). Demonstrate a feed rate equivalent to 1125 kg/m{sup 2}/day glass production using melt pool bubbling. Process a high waste loading glass composition with the simulated SRS SB19 waste and measure the quality of the glass product. Determine the effect of argon as a bubbling gas on waste processing and the glass product including feed processing rate, glass redox, melter emissions, etc.. Determine differences in feed processing and glass characteristics for SRS SB19 waste simulated by the co-precipitated and direct-hydroxide methods. The above tests were proposed based on previous tests for WTP in which there were few differences in the melter processing characteristics, such as processing rate and melter emissions, between precipitated and direct hydroxide simulants, even though there were differences in rheological properties. To the extent this similarity is found also for simulants for SRS HLW, the direct hydroxide methods may offer the potential for faster, simpler, and cheaper simulant production. There was no plan to match the yield stress and particle size of the direct hydroxide simulant to that of the precipitated simulant because that would have increased the preparation cost and complexity and defeated the purpose of the tests. These objectives were addressed by first developing a series of glass frits and then conducting a crucible scale study to determine the waste loading achievable for the waste composition and to select the preferred frit. Waste loadings were increased until the limits of a glass property were exceeded experimentally. Glass properties for evaluation included: viscosity, electrical conductivity, crystallinity (including liquidus temperature and nepheline formation after canister centerline cooling (CCC) heat-treatment), gross glass phase separation, and the 7- day Product Consistency Test (PCT, ASTM-1285) response. Glass property limits were based upon the constraints used for DWPF process control.

Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Kot, W. K.; Gan, H.; Matlack, K. S.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

239

Evaluation of solid-based separation materials for the pretreatment of radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

Separation science will play an important role in pretreating nuclear wastes stored at various US Department of Energy Sites. The application of separation processes offers potential economic and environmental benefits with regards to remediating these sites. For example, at the Hanford Site, the sizeable volume of radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks could be partitioned into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) and a relatively large volume of low-level waste (LLW). After waste separation, only the smaller volume of HLW would require costly vitrification and geologic disposal. Furthermore, the quality of the remaining LLW form (e.g., grout) would be improved due to the lower inventory of radionuclides present in the LLW stream. This report investigates extraction chromatography as a possible separation process for Hanford wastes.

Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Wester, D.W.; Morrey, J.R.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume  

SciTech Connect

This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Boehmite Actual Waste Dissolutions Studies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level waste (HLW) sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of HLW requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove a significant quantity of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum is found in the form of gibbsite, sodium aluminate and boehmite. Gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic. Boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. Samples were taken from four Hanford tanks and homogenized in order to give a sample that is representative of REDOX (Reduction Oxidation process for Pu recovery) sludge solids. Bench scale testing was performed on the homogenized waste to study the dissolution of boehmite. Dissolution was studied at three different hydroxide concentrations, with each concentration being run at three different temperatures. Samples were taken periodically over the 170 hour runs in order to determine leaching kinetics. Results of the dissolution studies and implications for the proposed processing of these wastes will be discussed.

Snow, Lanee A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Peterson, Reid A.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Hight-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition Final High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement You are here: DOE-ID Home > Environmental Management > Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) Table of Contents Documents are in the Adobe® PDF format and require the Adobe® Reader to access them. If you do not currently have the Acrobat Reader, you can download the Free Adobe Reader at http://get.adobe.com/reader/ Icon link to Free Adobe Acrobat Reader software * Large chapters broken down into sections Summary* Cover [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 1.48 MB] Section, 1.0 [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 612 KB] Section, 2.0 [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 251 KB] Sections, 3.0 - 3.2.1a [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 1.4 MB] Section, 3.2.1b [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 2.0 MB] Sections, 3.2.2 - 4.0 [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 1.4 MB]

243

Experimental results of calcine dissolution studies performed during FY-94,95  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calcine dissolution studies were performed in FY-94,95 in order to extend the knowledge of dissolution and to obtain information necessary for scale-up design and operation. Experiments reported in this document were performed with non-radioactive and actual calcines to generate qualitative data regarding: (a) calcine dissolution rates, (b) undissolved solids settling characteristics, (c) undissolved solids heel formation, and (d) chemical treatments for undissolved solids heel dissolution. The goal of this work was to achieve complete calcine dissolution, or to determine conditions that would result in the maximum calcine dissolution. Small scale laboratory experiments (test-tube dissolutions) and a bench scale dissolver set-up were used in the effort. Results from this work show the bulk of the undissolved solids to settle at a rate of >9 inches per second when the baseline dissolution parameters are used. Baseline dissolution parameters were 100 grams of calcine being dissolved in 1 L of 5 M HNO{sub 3} at > 90 C while the solution is being vigorously and constantly mixed. This work also verified that dissolution is most complete when performed with aggressive mixing. Sequential dissolutions performed with non-radioactive and actual calcine indicate that little undissolved solids heel build-up is expected, and this small heel can be further dissolved by increasing the dissolution time or by adding fresh nitric acid.

Brewer, K.N.; Olson, A.L.; Roesener, W.S.; Tonso, J.L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

High-level waste management technology program plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to document the integrated technology program plan for the Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Management System. The mission of the SRS HLW System is to receive and store SRS high-level wastes in a see and environmentally sound, and to convert these wastes into forms suitable for final disposal. These final disposal forms are borosilicate glass to be sent to the Federal Repository, Saltstone grout to be disposed of on site, and treated waste water to be released to the environment via a permitted outfall. Thus, the technology development activities described herein are those activities required to enable successful accomplishment of this mission. The technology program is based on specific needs of the SRS HLW System and organized following the systems engineering level 3 functions. Technology needs for each level 3 function are listed as reference, enhancements, and alternatives. Finally, FY-95 funding, deliverables, and schedules are s in Chapter IV with details on the specific tasks that are funded in FY-95 provided in Appendix A. The information in this report represents the vision of activities as defined at the beginning of the fiscal year. Depending on emergent issues, funding changes, and other factors, programs and milestones may be adjusted during the fiscal year. The FY-95 SRS HLW technology program strongly emphasizes startup support for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and In-Tank Precipitation. Closure of technical issues associated with these operations has been given highest priority. Consequently, efforts on longer term enhancements and alternatives are receiving minimal funding. However, High-Level Waste Management is committed to participation in the national Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

Harmon, H.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A Summary of Properties Used to Evaluate INEEL Calcine Disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect

To support evaluations of the direct disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory calcines to the repository at Yucca Mountain, an evaluation of the performance of the calcine in the repository environment must be performed. This type of evaluation demonstrates, through computer modeling and analysis, the impact the calcine would have on the ability of the repository to perform its function of containment of materials during the repository lifetime. This report discusses parameters that were used in the scoping evaluation conducted in FY 2003. It provides nominal values for the parameters, with explanation of the source of the values, and how the values were modified for use in repository analysis activities.

Dahl, C.A.

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

246

High Level Waste Feed Certification in Hanford Double Shell Tanks  

SciTech Connect

The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. DOEs River Protection Project (RPP) mission modeling and WTP facility modeling assume that individual 3785 cubic meter (1 million gallon) HLW feed tanks are homogenously mixed, representatively sampled, and consistently delivered to the WTP. It has been demonstrated that homogenous mixing of HLW sludge in Hanford DSTs is not likely achievable with the baseline design thereby causing representative sampling and consistent feed delivery to be more difficult. Inconsistent feed to the WTP could cause additional batch to batch operational adjustments that reduces operating efficiency and has the potential to increase the overall mission length. The Hanford mixing and sampling demonstration program will identify DST mixing performance capability, will evaluate representative sampling techniques, and will estimate feed batch consistency. An evaluation of demonstration program results will identify potential mission improvement considerations that will help ensure successful mission completion. This paper will discuss the history, progress, and future activities that will define and mitigate the mission risk.

Thien, Micheal G.; Wells, Beric E.; Adamson, Duane J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

ICPP Waste Management Technology Development Program  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the decision to curtail reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), a Spent fuel and Waste Management Technology Development plan has been implemented to identify acceptable options for disposing of the (1) sodium-bearing liquid radioactive waste, (2) radioactive calcine, and (3) irradiated spent fuel stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The plan was developed jointly by DOE and WINCO.

Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.; Knecht, D.A. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bonkoski, M.J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

TRU waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to delineate the criteria by which unclassified waste will be accepted for emplacement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico and describe the bases upon which these criteria were established. These criteria are not intended to be specifications but rather limits that will allow waste generating and shipping sites to develop their own procedures and specifications for preparation of TRU waste for shipment to the WIPP. These criteria will also allow waste generating sites to plan future facilities for waste preparation that will produce TRU waste forms compatible with WIPP waste emplacement and isolation requirements. These criteria only apply to contract-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste forms and are not intended to apply to beta-gamma wastes, spent fuel, high-level waste (HLW), low-level waste (LLW), low specific activity (LSA) waste, or forms of radioactive waste for experimental purposes. Specifications for receipt of experimental waste forms will be prepared by the responsible projects in conjunction with the staff of the WIPP project at a later date. In addition, these criteria only apply to waste emplaced in bedded rock salt. Technical bases for these criteria may differ significantly from those for other host rocks. 25 refs. 4 figs., 1 tab.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Mineral phase and physical properties of red mud calcined at different temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different characterizations were carried out on red mud uncalcined and samples calcined in the range of 100C-1400C. In the present paper, the phase composition and structural transition of red mud heated from room temperature are indicated ...

Chuan-sheng Wu, Dong-yan Liu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Method for storage of solid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Metal canisters for long-term storage of calcined highlevel radioactive wastes can be made self-sealing against a breach in the canister wall by the addition of powdered cement to the canister with the calcine before it is sealed for storage. Any breach in the canister wall will permit entry of water which will mix with the cement and harden to form a concrete patch, thus sealing the opening in the wall of the canister and preventing the release of radioactive material to the cooling water or atmosphere.

Mecham, William J. (La Grange, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

High-Level Waste Systems Plan. Revision 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This revision of the High-Level Waste (HLW) System Plan aligns SRS HLW program planning with the DOE Savannah River (DOE-SR) Ten Year Plan (QC-96-0005, Draft 8/6), which was issued in July 1996. The objective of the Ten Year Plan is to complete cleanup at most nuclear sites within the next ten years. The two key principles of the Ten Year Plan are to accelerate the reduction of the most urgent risks to human health and the environment and to reduce mortgage costs. Accordingly, this System Plan describes the HLW program that will remove HLW from all 24 old-style tanks, and close 20 of those tanks, by 2006 with vitrification of all HLW by 2018. To achieve these goals, the DWPF canister production rate is projected to climb to 300 canisters per year starting in FY06, and remain at that rate through the end of the program in FY18, (Compare that to past System Plans, in which DWPF production peaked at 200 canisters per year, and the program did not complete until 2026.) An additional $247M (FY98 dollars) must be made available as requested over the ten year planning period, including a one-time $10M to enhance Late Wash attainment. If appropriate resources are made available, facility attainment issues are resolved and regulatory support is sufficient, then completion of the HLW program in 2018 would achieve a $3.3 billion cost savings to DOE, versus the cost of completing the program in 2026. Facility status information is current as of October 31, 1996.

Brooke, J.N.; Gregory, M.V.; Paul, P.; Taylor, G.; Wise, F.E.; Davis, N.R.; Wells, M.N.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Hanford Tank Waste - Near Source Treatment of Low Activity Waste  

SciTech Connect

Treatment and disposition of Hanford Site waste as currently planned consists of I 00+ waste retrievals, waste delivery through up to 8+ miles of dedicated, in-ground piping, centralized mixing and blending operations- all leading to pre-treatment combination and separation processes followed by vitrification at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The sequential nature of Tank Farm and WTP operations requires nominally 15-20 years of continuous operations before all waste can be retrieved from many Single Shell Tanks (SSTs). Also, the infrastructure necessary to mobilize and deliver the waste requires significant investment beyond that required for the WTP. Treating waste as closely as possible to individual tanks or groups- as allowed by the waste characteristics- is being investigated to determine the potential to 1) defer, reduce, and/or eliminate infrastructure requirements, and 2) significantly mitigate project risk by reducing the potential and impact of single point failures. The inventory of Hanford waste slated for processing and disposition as LAW is currently managed as high-level waste (HLW), i.e., the separation of fission products and other radionuclides has not commenced. A significant inventory ofthis waste (over 20M gallons) is in the form of precipitated saltcake maintained in single shell tanks, many of which are identified as potential leaking tanks. Retrieval and transport (as a liquid) must be staged within the waste feed delivery capability established by site infrastructure and WTP. Near Source treatment, if employed, would provide for the separation and stabilization processing necessary for waste located in remote farms (wherein most ofthe leaking tanks reside) significantly earlier than currently projected. Near Source treatment is intended to address the currently accepted site risk and also provides means to mitigate future issues likely to be faced over the coming decades. This paper describes the potential near source treatment and waste disposition options as well as the impact these options could have on reducing infrastructure requirements, project cost and mission schedule.

Ramsey, William Gene

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

GLASS FORMULATION FOR THE HANFORD TANK WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT (WTP)  

SciTech Connect

A computational method for formulating Hanford HLW glasses was developed that is based on empirical glass composition-property models, accounts for all associated uncertainties, and can be solved in Excel{sup R} in minutes. Calculations for all waste form processing and compliance requirements included. Limited experimental validation performed.

KRUGER AA; VIENNA JD; KIM DS; JAIN V

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

254

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energys Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Transportation Stakeholders National Transportation Stakeholders National Transportation Stakeholders National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Forum 2011 Annual Meeting 2011 Annual Meeting 2011 Annual Meeting 2011 Annual Meeting May 11, 2011 May 11, 2011 Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & & & & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Task: Task: Task: Task: Identify Shortline Railroads Serving Nuclear Power Plants Identify Shortline Railroads Serving Nuclear Power Plants

256

Secondary Waste Forms and Technetium Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secondary Waste Forms and Secondary Waste Forms and Technetium Management Joseph H. Westsik, Jr. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory EM HLW Corporate Board Meeting November 18, 2010 What are Secondary Wastes? Process condensates and scrubber and/or off-gas treatment liquids from the pretreatment and ILAW melter facilities at the Hanford WTP. Sent from WTP to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for treatment and disposal Treated liquid effluents under the ETF State Wastewater Discharge Permit Solidified liquid effluents under the Dangerous Waste Permit for disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to ETF to provide capacity for WTP secondary liquid wastes 2 Evaporator Condensate Solution Evaporator Pretreatment Melter SBS/ WESP Secondary

257

An evaluation of neutralization for processing sodium-bearing liquid waste  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses an alternative concept for potentially managing the sodium-bearing liquid waste generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from the current method of calcining a blend of sodium waste and high-level liquid waste. The concept is based on removing the radioactive components from sodium-bearing waste by neutralization and grouting the resulting low-level waste for on-site near-surface disposal. Solidifying the sodium waste as a remote-handled transuranic waste is not considered to be practical because of excessive costs and inability to dispose of the waste in a timely fashion. Although neutralization can remove most radioactive components to provide feed for a solidified low-level waste, and can reduce liquid inventories four to nine years more rapidly than the current practice of blending sodium-bearing liquid waste with first-cycle raffinite, the alternative will require major new facilities and will generate large volumes of low-level waste. Additional facility and operating costs are estimated to be at least $500 million above the current practice of blending and calcining. On-site, low-level waste disposal may be technically difficult and conflict which national and state policies. Therefore, it is recommended that the current practice of calcining a blend of sodium-bearing liquid waste and high-level liquid waste be continued to minimize overall cost and process complexities. 17 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

Chipman, N.A.; Engelgau, G.O.; Berreth, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Sodium Bearing Waste Processing Alternatives Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A multidisciplinary team gathered to develop a BBWI recommendation to DOE-ID on the processing alternatives for the sodium bearing waste in the INTEC Tank Farm. Numerous alternatives were analyzed using a rigorous, systematic approach. The data gathered were evaluated through internal and external peer reviews for consistency and validity. Three alternatives were identified to be top performers: Risk-based Calcination, MACT to WIPP Calcination and Cesium Ion Exchange. A dual-path through early Conceptual design is recommended for MACT to WIPP Calcination and Cesium Ion Exchange since Risk-based Calcination does not require design. If calcination alternatives are not considered based on giving Type of Processing criteria significantly greater weight, the CsIX/TRUEX alternative follows CsIX in ranking. However, since CsIX/TRUEX shares common uncertainties with CsIX, reasonable backups, which follow in ranking, are the TRUEX and UNEX alternatives. Key uncertainties must be evaluated by the decision-makers to choose one final alternative. Those key uncertainties and a path forward for the technology roadmapping of these alternatives is provided.

Murphy, James Anthony; Palmer, Brent J; Perry, Keith Joseph

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

ICPP waste management technology development program  

SciTech Connect

A program has been implemented at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) to identify technologies for disposing of sodium-bearing liquid radioactive waste, radioactive calcine, and irradiated spent fuel stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The sodium bearing waste and calcine, have resulted from ICPP reprocessing operations conducted since 1953. The irradiated spent fuel consists of various fuel compositions and ranges from complete fuel elements to fuel pieces for which no reprocessing flowsheet had been identified. The program includes a very strong systems analysis program to assure complete consideration of all issues (technical, economic, safety, environmental, etc.) affecting final disposal of the waste and spent fuel. A major goal of the program is to assure the final implementation is environmentally acceptable, ensures public and worker safety, and is economically feasible.

Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.; Knecht, D.A. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bonkoski, M.J. [USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Physical and chemical characteristics of candidate wastes for tailored ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tailored Ceramics offer a potential alternative to glass as an immobilization form for nuclear waste disposal. The form is applicable to the wide variety of existing wastes and may be tailored to suit the diverse environments being considered as disposal sites. Consideration of any waste product form, however, require extensive knowledge of the waste to be incorporated. A varity of waste types are under consideration for incorporation into a Tailored Ceramic form. This report integrates and summarizes chemical and physical characteristics of the candidate wastes. Included here are data on Savannah River Purex Process waste; Hanford bismuth phosphate, uranium recovery, redox, Purex, evaporator and residual liquid wastes; Idaho Falls calcine; Nuclear Fuel Services Purex and Thorex wastes and miscellaneous waste including estimated waste stream compositions produced by possible future commercial fuel reprocessing.

Mitchell, M.E.

1980-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission W. R. Wilmarth March 5 2009 March 5, 2009 HLW Corporate Board Phoenix AZ HLW Corporate Board, Phoenix, AZ Co-authors M. E. Johnson, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company G. Lumetta, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory N Machara DOE Office of Engineering and Technology N. Machara, DOE Office of Engineering and Technology M. R. Poirier, Savannah River National Laboratory P C S DOE S h Ri P. C. Suggs, DOE Savannah River M. C. Thompson, Savannah River National Laboratory, Retired Retired 2 Background Separations is a fundamental business within DOE. The role of separations today is to expedite waste retrieval The role of separations today is to expedite waste retrieval, processing and closure. Recognized as part of E&T Roadmap

262

Nuclear Safety R&D in the Waste Processing Technology Development & Deployment Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R&D in the Waste Processing R&D in the Waste Processing Technology Development & Deployment Program Presentation to the DOE High Level Waste Corporate Board July 29, 2009 Al Baione Office of Waste Processing DOE-EM Office of Engineering & Technology 2 Outline Nuclear Safety Research & Development Overview Summary of EM- NSR&D Presentations from February 2009 Evaluating Performance of Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters under Fire/Smoke Challenge Conditions Structural Integrity Initiative for HLW Tanks Pipeline Plugging and Prevention Advanced Mixing Models Basic Science Opportunities in HLW Storage and Processing Safety Cementitious Barriers Partnership 3 Nuclear Safety Research & Development Overview DNFSB 2004-1 identified need for renewed DOE attention to nuclear safety R&D

263

Vitrification and Product Testing of C-104 and AZ-102 Pretreated Sludge Mixed with Flowsheet Quantities of Secondary Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) has acquired Hanford tank waste treatment services at a demonstration scale. The River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) team is responsible for producing an immobilized (vitrified) high-level waste (IHLW) waste form. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, hereafter referred to as PNNL, has been contracted to produce and test a vitrified IHLW waste form from two Envelope D high-level waste (HLW) samples previously supplied to the RPP-WTP project by DOE.

Smith, Gary L.; Bates, Derrick J.; Goles, Ronald W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Lettau, Ralph C.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Smith, Harry D.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, Jerome J.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Clean option: An alternative strategy for Hanford Tank Waste Remediation. Volume 2, Detailed description of first example flowsheet  

SciTech Connect

Disposal of high-level tank wastes at the Hanford Site is currently envisioned to divide the waste between two principal waste forms: glass for the high-level waste (HLW) and grout for the low-level waste (LLW). The draft flow diagram shown in Figure 1.1 was developed as part of the current planning process for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), which is evaluating options for tank cleanup. The TWRS has been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to safely manage the Hanford tank wastes. It includes tank safety and waste disposal issues, as well as the waste pretreatment and waste minimization issues that are involved in the ``clean option`` discussed in this report. This report describes the results of a study led by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to determine if a more aggressive separations scheme could be devised which could mitigate concerns over the quantity of the HLW and the toxicity of the LLW produced by the reference system. This aggressive scheme, which would meet NRC Class A restrictions (10 CFR 61), would fit within the overall concept depicted in Figure 1.1; it would perform additional and/or modified operations in the areas identified as interim storage, pretreatment, and LLW concentration. Additional benefits of this scheme might result from using HLW and LLW disposal forms other than glass and grout, but such departures from the reference case are not included at this time. The evaluation of this aggressive separations scheme addressed institutional issues such as: radioactivity remaining in the Hanford Site LLW grout, volume of HLW glass that must be shipped offsite, and disposition of appropriate waste constituents to nonwaste forms.

Swanson, J.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Investigation of Cold Cap Behavior in HLW Melter through an Array ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Issues in Nuclear Waste Management in the 21st Century ... the batch-to-glass conversion as it occurs in high-level-waste glass processing melters. ... The Properties of Spent Nuclear Fuel under Waste Disposal Conditions ... UK Radioactive Waste: Classification, Sources and Management Strategies.

266

Nuclear Waste Assessment System for Technical Evaluation (NUWASTE)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NWTRB NWTRB www.nwtrb.gov U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board: Roles and Priorities Presented by: Nigel Mote, Executive Director, U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board May 14, 2013 Hyatt Regency Buffalo, Buffalo, NY. Presented to: National Transportation Stakeholders' Forum NWTRB www.nwtrb.gov U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board The Board's Statutory Mandate * The 1987 amendments to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) established the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. * The Board evaluates the technical and scientific validity of DOE activities related to implementing the NWPA, including: - transportation, packaging, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW)

267

Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) provides that certain waste from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is not considered high-level waste (HLW) if the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), determines that the waste meets the statutory criteria set forth in Section 3116(a). Federal Register Notice for the Waste Determination More Documents & Publications EIS-0287: Amended Record of Decision Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-296-B Rainbow Energy Marketing Corp: Federal Register Notice, Volume 77, No. 66 - April 4, 2012 SRS FTF Section 3116 Basis for Determination

268

Glassy slags as novel waste forms for remediating mixed wastes with high metal contents  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing a glassy slag final waste form for the remediation of low-level radioactive and mixed wastes with high metal contents. This waste form is composed of various crystalline and metal oxide phases embedded in a silicate glass phase. This work indicates that glassy slag shows promise as final waste form because (1) it has similar or better chemical durability than high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses, (2) it can incorporate large amounts of metal wastes, (3) it can incorporate waste streams having low contents of flux components (boron and alkalis), (4) it has less stringent processing requirements (e.g., viscosity and electric conductivity) than glass waste forms, (5) its production can require little or no purchased additives, which can result in greater reduction in waste volume and overall treatment costs. By using glassy slag waste forms, minimum additive waste stabilization approach can be applied to a much wider range of waste streams than those amenable only to glass waste forms.

Feng, X.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Brown, N.R.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.; Ebert, W.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Review and Demonstration of Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power (KHNP) Vitrification Technology for Low Level Waste Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vitrification is the process of stabilizing nuclides in a glass matrix in order to enhance disposal options. A mature technology, vitrification has been applied to high level radioactive waste (HLW) for more than 40 years. As disposal costs and public concern for the environment increase, vitrification is considered to be a promising technology for low level waste (LLW) stabilization. This report covers the characteristics of LLW generated from nuclear power plants, current melter technologies ...

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

270

DECONTAMINATION OF PLUTONIUM FOR FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE DURING OXALATE PRECIPITATION, FILTRATION AND CALCINATION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

Due to analytical limitations for the determination of fluoride (F) and chloride (Cl) in a previous anion exchange study, an additional study of the decontamination of Pu from F and Cl by oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination was performed. Anion product solution from the previous impurity study was precipitated as an oxalate, filtered, and calcined to produce an oxide for analysis by pyrohydrolysis for total Cl and F. Analysis of samples from this experiment achieved the purity specification for Cl and F for the proposed AFS-2 process. Decontamination factors (DF's) for the overall process (including anion exchange) achieved a DF of {approx}5000 for F and a DF of {approx}100 for Cl. Similar experiments where both HF and HCl were spiked into the anion product solution to a {approx}5000 {micro}g /g Pu concentration showed a DF of 5 for F and a DF of 35 for Cl across the combined precipitation-filtration-calcination process steps.

Kyser, E.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

271

Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection Data PackageFluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site in southeast Washington State has 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes stored in 177 underground tanks (ORP 2010). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), through its contractors, is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to convert the radioactive and hazardous wastes into stable glass waste forms for disposal. Within the WTP, the pretreatment facility will receive the retrieved waste from the tank farms and separate it into two treated process streams. These waste streams will be vitrified, and the resulting waste canisters will be sent to offsite (high-level waste [HLW]) and onsite (immobilized low-activity waste [ILAW]) repositories. As part of the pretreatment and ILAW processing, liquid secondary wastes will be generated that will be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) on the Hanford Site for further treatment. These liquid secondary wastes will be converted to stable solid waste forms that will be disposed of in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has initiated secondary waste form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is developing data packages to support that down-selection. The objective of the data packages is to identify, evaluate, and summarize the existing information on the four waste forms being considered for stabilizing and solidifying the liquid secondary wastes. At the Hanford Site, the FBSR process is being evaluated as a supplemental technology for treating and immobilizing Hanford LAW radioactive tank waste and for treating secondary wastes from the WTP pretreatment and LAW vitrification processes.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Strachan, Denis M.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Pires, Richard P.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

272

ICPP Tank Farm planning through 2012  

SciTech Connect

Historically, liquid high-level waste (HLW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant has been stored in the Tank Farm after which it is calcined with the calcine being stored in stainless steel bins. Following the curtailment of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing in 1992, the HLW treatment methods were re-evaluated to establish a path forward for producing a final waste form from the liquid sodium bearing wastes (SBW) and the HLW calcine. Projections for significant improvements in waste generation, waste blending and evaporation, and calcination were incorporated into the Tank Farm modeling. This optimized modeling shows that all of the SBW can be calcined by the end of 2012 as required by the Idaho Settlement Agreement. This Tank Farm plan discusses the use of each of the eleven HLW tanks and shows that two tanks can be emptied, allowing them to be Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closed by 2006. In addition, it describes the construction of each tank and vault, gives the chemical concentrations of the contents of each tank, based on historical input and some sampling, and discusses the regulatory drivers important to Tank Farm operation. It also discusses new waste generation, the computer model used for the Tank Farm planning, the operating schedule for each tank, and the schedule for when each tank will be empty and closed.

Palmer, W.B.; Millet, C.B.; Staiger, M.D.; Ward, F.S.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 1 (CDP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT OF THE CALCINE DISPOSITION PROJECT VOLUME ONE Anthony F. Kluk Hoyt C. Johnson Clyde Phillip McGinnis Michael Rinker Steven L. Ross Herbert G. Sutter John Vienna February 2011 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC February 2011 ii This page intentionally left blank. Review of Calcine Disposition Project Self-Assessment of Technology Maturation iii SIGNATURES ____________________________________ ____________________________________ Anthony F. Kluk, Team Lead Date ____________________________________ ____________________________________ Hoyt C. Johnson Date ____________________________________ ____________________________________ Clyde Phillip McGinnis Date ____________________________________ ____________________________________

274

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah Savannah River Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 1 November 6, 2008 Presentation By Sherri R. Ross Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office The Issue * How clean is clean? * Ultimate Challenge - Justify highly radioactive radionuclides have been removed to the maximum extent practical? 2 removed to the maximum extent practical? - Building compelling regulatory documentation that will withstand intense scrutiny §3116 Requirements 1. Does not require disposal in deep geological repository 2. Highly radioactive radionuclides removed to the maximum extent practical 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 3 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C 4. Waste disposed pursuant to a State-approved closure plan or permit Note: If it is anticipated that Class C disposal limits will be exceeded, additional

275

FINAL REPORT INTEGRATED DM1200 MELTER TESTING OF BUBBLER CONFIGURATIONS USING HLW AZ-101 SIMULANTS VSL-04R4800-4 REV 0 10/5/04  

SciTech Connect

This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of AZ-101 HLW simulants. The tests reported herein are a subset of six tests from a larger series of tests described in the Test Plan for the work; results from the other tests have been reported separately. The solids contents of the melter feeds were based on the WTP baseline value for the solids content of the feeds from pretreatment which changed during these tests from 20% to 15% undissolved solids resulting in tests conducted at two feed solids contents. Based on the results of earlier tests with single outlet 'J' bubblers, initial tests were performed with a total bubbling rate of 651 pm. The first set of tests (Tests 1A-1E) addressed the effects of skewing this total air flow rate back and forth between the two installed bubblers in comparison to a fixed equal division of flow between them. The second set of tests (2A-2D) addressed the effects of bubbler depth. Subsequently, as the location, type and number of bubbling outlets were varied, the optimum bubbling rate for each was determined. A third (3A-3C) and fourth (8A-8C) set of tests evaluated the effects of alternative bubbler designs with two gas outlets per bubbler instead of one by placing four bubblers in positions simulating multiple-outlet bubblers. Data from the simulated multiple outlet bubblers were used to design bubblers with two outlets for an additional set of tests (9A-9C). Test 9 was also used to determine the effect of small sugar additions to the feed on ruthenium volatility. Another set of tests (10A-10D) evaluated the effects on production rate of spiking the feed with chloride and sulfate. Variables held constant to the extent possible included melt temperature, plenum temperature, cold cap coverage, the waste simulant composition, and the target glass composition. The feed rate was increased to the point that a constant, essentially complete, cold cap was achieved, which was used as an indicator of a maximized feed rate for each test. The first day of each test was used to build the cold cap and decrease the plenum temperature. The remainder of each test was split into two- to six-day segments, each with a different bubbling rate, bubbler orientation, or feed concentration of chloride and sulfur.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; LUTZE W; CALLOW RA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

276

INTEGRATED DM 1200 MELTER TESTING OF HLW C-106/AY-102 COMPOSITION USING BUBBLERS VSL-03R3800-1 REV 0 9/15/03  

SciTech Connect

This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post test inspections of system components.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

277

Summary - Flowsheet for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment Plant Waste Treatment Plant ETR Report Date: March 2006 ETR-1 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Flowsheet for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 53 million gallons of radioactive waste, separate it into high- and low-activity fractions, and produce canisters of high-level (HLW) glass (left) and containers of low-activity waste (LAW) glass (right). At the time of this review, the Plant was at approximately 70% design and 30% construction completion. The external review objective was to determine how well the WTP would meet its throughput capacities based on the current design,

278

EVALUATION OF THE INTEGRATED SOLUBILITY MODEL, A GRADED APPROACH FOR PREDICTING PHASE DISTRIBUTION IN HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the DOE River Protection Project (RPP) is to store, retrieve, treat and dispose of Hanford's tank waste. Waste is retrieved from the underground tanks and delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Waste is processed through a pretreatment facility where it is separated into low activity waste (LAW), which is primarily liquid, and high level waste (HLW), which is primarily solid. The LAW and HLW are sent to two different vitrification facilities and glass canisters are then disposed of onsite (for LAW) or shipped off-site (for HLW). The RPP mission is modeled by the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS), a dynamic flowsheet simulator and mass balance model that is used for mission analysis and strategic planning. The integrated solubility model (ISM) was developed to improve the chemistry basis in HTWOS and better predict the outcome of the RPP mission. The ISM uses a graded approach to focus on the components that have the greatest impact to the mission while building the infrastructure for continued future improvement and expansion. Components in the ISM are grouped depending upon their relative solubility and impact to the RPP mission. The solubility of each group of components is characterized by sub-models of varying levels of complexity, ranging from simplified correlations to a set of Pitzer equations used for the minimization of Gibbs Energy.

PIERSON KL; BELSHER JD; SENIOW KR

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

Hot isostatic press waste option study report  

SciTech Connect

A Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant be treated so that it is ready to move out of Idaho for disposal by the target date of 2035. This study investigates the immobilization of all Idaho Chemical Processing Plant calcine, including calcined sodium bearing waste, via the process known as hot isostatic press, which produces compact solid waste forms by means of high temperature and pressure (1,050 C and 20,000 psi), as the treatment method for complying with the settlement agreement. The final waste product would be contained in stainless-steel canisters, the same type used at the Savannah River Site for vitrified waste, and stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory until a national geological repository becomes available for its disposal. The waste processing period is from 2013 through 2032, and disposal at the High Level Waste repository will probably begin sometime after 2065.

Russell, N.E.; Taylor, D.D.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

HIGH-LEVEL WASTE FEED CERTIFICATION IN HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANKS  

SciTech Connect

The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. DOE's River Protection Project (RPP) mission modeling and WTP facility modeling assume that individual 3785 cubic meter (l million gallon) HLW feed tanks are homogenously mixed, representatively sampled, and consistently delivered to the WTP. It has been demonstrated that homogenous mixing ofHLW sludge in Hanford DSTs is not likely achievable with the baseline design thereby causing representative sampling and consistent feed delivery to be more difficult. Inconsistent feed to the WTP could cause additional batch-to-batch operational adjustments that reduce operating efficiency and have the potential to increase the overall mission length. The Hanford mixing and sampling demonstration program will identify DST mixing performance capability, will evaluate representative sampling techniques, and will estimate feed batch consistency. An evaluation of demonstration program results will identify potential mission improvement considerations that will help ensure successful mission completion. This paper will discuss the history, progress, and future activities that will define and mitigate the mission risk.

THIEN MG; WELLS BE; ADAMSON DJ

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Risk perception on management of nuclear high-level and transuranic waste storage  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s program for disposing of nuclear High-Level Waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste has been impeded by overwhelming political opposition fueled by public perceptions of actual risk. Analysis of these perceptions shows them to be deeply rooted in images of fear and dread that have been present since the discovery of radioactivity. The development and use of nuclear weapons linked these images to reality and the mishandling of radioactive waste from the nations military weapons facilities has contributed toward creating a state of distrust that cannot be erased quickly or easily. In addition, the analysis indicates that even the highly educated technical community is not well informed on the latest technology involved with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. It is not surprising then, that the general public feels uncomfortable with DOE`s management plans for with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. Postponing the permanent geologic repository and use of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) would provide the time necessary for difficult social and political issues to be resolved. It would also allow time for the public to become better educated if DOE chooses to become proactive.

Dees, L.A.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

FINAL REPORT REGULATORY OFF GAS EMISSIONS TESTING ON THE DM1200 MELTER SYSTEM USING HLW AND LAW SIMULANTS VSL-05R5830-1 REV 0 10/31/05  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operational requirements for the River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) and High Level Waste (HLW) melter systems, together with the feed constituents, impose a number of challenges to the off-gas treatment system. The system must be robust from the standpoints of operational reliability and minimization of maintenance. The system must effectively control and remove a wide range of solid particulate matter, acid mists and gases, and organic constituents (including those arising from products of incomplete combustion of sugar and organics in the feed) to concentration levels below those imposed by regulatory requirements. The baseline design for the RPP-WTP LAW primary off-gas system includes a submerged bed scrubber (SBS), a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP), and a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The secondary off-gas system includes a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed (AC-S), a thermal catalytic oxidizer (TCO), a single-stage selective catalytic reduction NOx treatment system (SCR), and a packed-bed caustic scrubber (PBS). The baseline design for the RPP-WTP HLW primary off-gas system includes an SBS, a WESP, a high efficiency mist eliminator (HEME), and a HEPA filter. The HLW secondary off-gas system includes a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed, a silver mordenite bed, a TCO, and a single-stage SCR. The one-third scale HLW DM1200 Pilot Melter installed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was equipped with a prototypical off-gas train to meet the needs for testing and confirmation of the performance of the baseline off-gas system design. Various modifications have been made to the DM1200 system as the details of the WTP design have evolved, including the installation of a silver mordenite column and an AC-S column for testing on a slipstream of the off-gas flow; the installation of a full-flow AC-S bed for the present tests was completed prior to initiation of testing. The DM1200 system was reconfigured to enable testing of the baseline HLW or LAW off-gas trains to perform off-gas emissions testing with both LAW and HLW simulants in the present work. During 2002 and 2003, many of these off-gas components were tested individually and in an integrated manner with the DM1200 Pilot Melter. Data from these tests are being used to support engineering design confirmation and to provide data to support air permitting activities. In fiscal year 2004, the WTP Project was directed by the Office of River Protection (ORP) to comply with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements for organics. This requires that the combined melter and off-gas system have destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of >99.99% for principal organic dangerous constituents (PODCs). In order to provide confidence that the melter and off-gas system are able to achieve the required DRE, testing has been directed with both LAW and HLW feeds. The tests included both 'normal' and 'challenge' WTP melter conditions in order to obtain data for the potential range of operating conditions for the WTP melters and off-gas components. The WTP Project, Washington State Department of Ecology, and ORP have agreed that naphthalene will be used for testing to represent semi-volatile organics and allyl alcohol will be used to represent volatile organics. Testing was also performed to determine emissions of halides, metals, products of incomplete combustion (PICs), dioxins, furans, coplanar PCBs, total hydrocarbons, and COX and NOX, as well as the particle size distribution (PSD) of particulate matter discharged at the end of the off-gas train. A description of the melter test requirements and analytical methods used is provided in the Test Plan for this work. Test Exceptions were subsequently issued which changed the TCO catalyst, added total organic emissions (TOE) to exhaust sampling schedule, and allowing modification of the test conditions in response to attainable plenum temperatures as well as temperature increases in the sulfur impr

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

283

Final Report - Sulfate Solubility in RPP-WTP HLW Glasses, VSL-06R6780-1, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of work and testing specified by Test Specifications 24590-HLW-TSP-RT-01-006 Rev 1, Test Plans VSL-02T7800-1 Rev 1 and Test Exceptions 24590-HLW-TEF-RT-05-00007. The work and any associated testing followed established quality assurance requirements and were conducted as authorized. The descriptions provided in this report are an accurate account of both the conduct of the work and the data collected. Results required by the Test Plans are reported. Also reported are any unusual or anomalous occurrences that are different from the starting hypotheses. The test results and this report have been reviewed and verified.

Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Feng, A.; Gan, H.; Kot, W. K.

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

284

Management of nuclear materials and non-HLW | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

including plutonium, uranium, and nuclear waste in accordance with applicable statutes, DOE Orders and international commitments. Advice encompasses issues related to mixed oxide...

285

WASTE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR AUGUST AND SEPTEMBER 1961  

SciTech Connect

Work is being carried out to develop and demonstrate on pilot plant scale integrated processes for treatment and disposal of radmoactive wastes. High-level waste calcination, low-level waste treatment, economic and hazards evaluation, engineering evaluation, disposal in deep wells, disposal in natural salt formations, Clinch River studies, fundamental studies of minerals, and White Oak Creek basin study are discussed. (M.C.G.)

Blanco, R.E.; Struxness, E.G.

1961-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

286

WASTE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR DECEMBER 1961 AND JANUARY 1962  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the development and demonstration on a pilot plant scale integrated processes for treatment and ultimate disposal of radioactive wastes is reported. Topics covered include: high-level waste calcination; lowlevel waste treatment; engineering, economics, and hazards evaluation; disposal ln deep wells; disposal in natural salt formations; Clinch River study; fundamental study of minerals; and White Oak Creek basin study. (M.C.G.)

Blanco, R.E.; Struxness, E.G.

1962-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Risk assessment for the off-site transportation of high-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of high-level waste (HLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers risks to collective populations and individuals under both routine and accident transportation conditions for truck and rail shipment modes. The report discusses the scope of the HLW transportation assessment, describes the analytical methods used for the assessment, defines the alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, and details important assessment assumptions. Results are reported for five alternatives. In addition, to aid in the understanding and interpretation of the results, specific areas of uncertainty are described, with an emphasis on how the uncertainties may affect comparisons of the alternatives.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Underground storage tank integrated demonstration: Evaluation of pretreatment options for Hanford tank wastes  

SciTech Connect

Separation science plays a central role inn the pretreatment and disposal of nuclear wastes. The potential benefits of applying chemical separations in the pretreatment of the radioactive wastes stored at the various US Department of Energy sites cover both economic and environmental incentives. This is especially true at the Hanford Site, where the huge volume (>60 Mgal) of radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks could be partitioned into a very small volume of high-level waste (HLW) and a relatively large volume of low-level waste (LLW). The cost associated with vitrifying and disposing of just the HLW fraction in a geologic repository would be much less than those associated with vitrifying and disposing of all the wastes directly. Futhermore, the quality of the LLW form (e.g., grout) would be improved due to the lower inventory of radionuclides present in the LLW stream. In this report, we present the results of an evaluation of the pretreatment options for sludge taken from two different single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site-Tanks 241-B-110 and 241-U-110 (referred to as B-110 and U-110, respectively). The pretreatment options examined for these wastes included (1) leaching of transuranic (TRU) elements from the sludge, and (2) dissolution of the sludge followed by extraction of TRUs and {sup 90}Sr. In addition, the TRU leaching approach was examined for a third tank waste type, neutralized cladding removal waste.

Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Colton, N.G.; Jones, E.O.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Waste Package Component Design Methodology Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the methodology being used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to design waste packages and ancillary components. This summary information is intended for readers with general interest, but also provides technical readers a general framework surrounding a variety of technical details provided in the main body of the report. The purpose of this report is to document and ensure appropriate design methods are used in the design of waste packages and ancillary components (the drip shields and emplacement pallets). The methodology includes identification of necessary design inputs, justification of design assumptions, and use of appropriate analysis methods, and computational tools. This design work is subject to ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description''. The document is primarily intended for internal use and technical guidance for a variety of design activities. It is recognized that a wide audience including project management, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others are interested to various levels of detail in the design methods and therefore covers a wide range of topics at varying levels of detail. Due to the preliminary nature of the design, readers can expect to encounter varied levels of detail in the body of the report. It is expected that technical information used as input to design documents will be verified and taken from the latest versions of reference sources given herein. This revision of the methodology report has evolved with changes in the waste package, drip shield, and emplacement pallet designs over many years and may be further revised as the design is finalized. Different components and analyses are at different stages of development. Some parts of the report are detailed, while other less detailed parts are likely to undergo further refinement. The design methodology is intended to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational requirements of the YMP. Four waste package configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology during the licensing process. These four configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor absorber plate waste package (21-PWRAP), the 44-boiling water reactor waste package (44-BWR), the 5 defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW) DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal short waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Short), and the naval canistered SNF long waste package (Naval SNF Long). Design work for the other six waste packages will be completed at a later date using the same design methodology. These include the 24-boiling water reactor waste package (24-BWR), the 21-pressurized water reactor control rod waste package (21-PWRCR), the 12-pressurized water reactor waste package (12-PWR), the 5 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal long waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Long), the 2 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal waste package (2-MC012-DHLW), and the naval canistered SNF short waste package (Naval SNF Short). This report is only part of the complete design description. Other reports related to the design include the design reports, the waste package system description documents, manufacturing specifications, and numerous documents for the many detailed calculations. The relationships between this report and other design documents are shown in Figure 1.

D.C. Mecham

2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

290

Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission initial updated baseline summary  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a summary of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Retrieval and Disposal Mission Initial Updated Baseline (scope, schedule, and cost), developed to demonstrate Readiness-to-Proceed (RTP) in support of the TWRS Phase 1B mission. This Updated Baseline is the proposed TWRS plan to execute and measure the mission work scope. This document and other supporting data demonstrate that the TWRS Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) team is prepared to fully support Phase 1B by executing the following scope, schedule, and cost baseline activities: Deliver the specified initial low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) feed batches in a consistent, safe, and reliable manner to support private contractors` operations starting in June 2002; Deliver specified subsequent LAW and HLW feed batches during Phase 1B in a consistent, safe, and reliable manner; Provide for the interim storage of immobilized HLW (IHLW) products and the disposal of immobilized LAW (ILAW) products generated by the private contractors; Provide for disposal of byproduct wastes generated by the private contractors; and Provide the infrastructure to support construction and operations of the private contractors` facilities.

Swita, W.R.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

291

Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 2 (CDP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRELIMINARY TECHNOLOGY PRELIMINARY TECHNOLOGY OF THE CALCINE Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy ECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT ALCINE DISPOSITION PROJECT VOLUME TWO Anthony F. Kluk Hoyt C. Johnson Clyde Phillip McGinnis Michael Rinker Steven L. Ross Herbert G. Sutter John Vienna February 2011 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC SSESSMENT ROJECT 412.09 (06/03/2009 - Rev. 11) CALCINE DISPOSITION PROJECT TECHNOLOGY MATURATION PLAN Identifier: Revision*: Page: PLN-1482 2 C-1 of C-317 Appendix C Appendix C Checklists for Critical Technology Elements and Technology Readiness Levels This appendix provides the CTE and TRL checklists for the CTEs. For the TRL questions that receive a "Y" (yes) response, the supporting documentation is provided with a complete reference at the

292

Evaluation and selection of aqueous-based technology for partitioning radionuclides from ICPP calcine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early in 1993 Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) chartered a Panel of Nuclear Separations Experts. The purpose of this Panel was to assist WINCO scientists and engineers in selecting, evaluating, and ranking candidate aqueous-based processes and technologies for potential use in partitioning selected radionuclides from nitric acid solutions of retrieved Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) calcine. Radionuclides of interest are all transuranium elements, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 137}Cs. The six man Panel met for 4 days (February 16--19, 1993) on the campus of the Idaho State University in Pocatello, Idaho. Principal topics addressed included: Available radionuclide removal technology; applicability of separations technology and processes to ICPP calcine; and potential integrated radionuclide partitioning schemes. This report, prepared from contributions from all Panel members, presents a comprehensive account of the proceedings and significant findings of the February, 1993 meeting in Pocatello.

Olson, A.L.; Schulz, W.W.; Burchfield, L.A.; Carlson, C.D.; Swanson, J.L.; Thompson, M.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Conceptual design for remote handling methods using the HIP process in the Calcine Immobilization Program  

SciTech Connect

This report recommends the remote conceptual design philosophy for calcine immobilization using the hot isostatic press (HIP) process. Areas of remote handling operations discussed in this report include: (1) introducing the process can into the front end of the HIP process, (2) filling and compacting the calcine/frit mixture into the process can, (3) evacuating and sealing the process can, (4) non-destructive testing of the seal on the process can, (5) decontamination of the process can, (6) HIP furnace loading and unloading the process can for the HIPing operation, (7) loading an overpack canister with processed HIP cans, (8) sealing the canister, with associated non-destructive examination (NDE) and decontamination, and (9) handling canisters for interim storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site.

Berry, S.M.; Cox, C.G.; Hoover, M.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Application of the Evacuated Canister System for Removing Residual Molten Glass From the West Valley Demonstration Project High-Level Waste Melter  

SciTech Connect

The principal mission of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is to meet a series of objectives defined in the West Valley Demonstration Project Act (Public Law 96-368). Chief among these is the objective to solidify liquid high-level waste (HLW) at the WVDP site into a form suitable for disposal in a federal geologic repository. In 1982, the Secretary of Energy formally selected vitrification as the technology to be used to solidify HLW at the WVDP. One of the first steps in meeting the HLW solidification objective involved designing, constructing and operating the Vitrification (Vit) Facility, the WVDP facility that houses the systems and subsystems used to process HLW into stainless steel canisters of borosilicate waste-glass that satisfy waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for disposal in a federal geologic repository. HLW processing and canister production began in 1996. The final step in meeting the HLW solidification objective involved ending Vit system operations and shut ting down the Vit Facility. This was accomplished by conducting a discrete series of activities to remove as much residual material as practical from the primary process vessels, components, and associated piping used in HLW canister production before declaring a formal end to Vit system operations. Flushing was the primary method used to remove residual radioactive material from the vitrification system. The inventory of radioactivity contained within the entire primary processing system diminished by conducting the flushing activities. At the completion of flushing activities, the composition of residual molten material remaining in the melter (the primary system component used in glass production) consisted of a small quantity of radioactive material and large quantities of glass former materials needed to produce borosilicate waste-glass. A special system developed during the pre-operational and testing phase of Vit Facility operation, the Evacuated Canister System (ECS), was deployed at the West Valley Demonstration Project to remove this radioactively dilute, residual molten material from the melter before Vit system operations were brought to a formal end. The ECS consists of a stainless steel canister of the same size and dimensions as a standard HLW canister that is equipped with a special L-shaped snorkel assembly made of 304L stainless steel. Both the canister and snorkel assembly fit into a stainless steel cage that allows the entire canister assembly to be positioned over the melter as molten glass is drawn out by a vacuum applied to the canister. This paper describes the process used to prepare and apply the ECS to complete molten glass removal before declaring a formal end to Vit system operations and placing the Vit Facility into a safe standby mode awaiting potential deactivation.

May, Joseph J.; Dombrowski, David J.; Valenti, Paul J.; Houston, Helene M.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

295

Tank Waste Remediation System tank waste pretreatment and vitrification process development testing requirements assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-faceted study was initiated in November 1993 to provide assurance that needed testing capabilities, facilities, and support infrastructure (sampling systems, casks, transportation systems, permits, etc.) would be available when needed for process and equipment development to support pretreatment and vitrification facility design and construction schedules. This first major report provides a snapshot of the known testing needs for pretreatment, low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification, and documents the results of a series of preliminary studies and workshops to define the issues needing resolution by cold or hot testing. Identified in this report are more than 140 Hanford Site tank waste pretreatment and LLW/HLW vitrification technology issues that can only be resolved by testing. The report also broadly characterizes the level of testing needed to resolve each issue. A second report will provide a strategy(ies) for ensuring timely test capability. Later reports will assess the capabilities of existing facilities to support needed testing and will recommend siting of the tests together with needed facility and infrastructure upgrades or additions.

Howden, G.F.

1994-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

296

Idaho National Laboratory Description, Chellenges, Technology, Issues, and Needs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i f th Hi i f th Hi h L l W t (HLW) P Overview of the High Level Waste (HLW) Program at the Id h N ti l L b t (INL) Sit Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Description Challenges Technology Issues and Needs Description, Challenges, Technology, Issues, and Needs 1 April 1, 2008 INL Site HLW is in Dry Storage in the Form of Calcine 8 9M ll f li id HLW t d t 4400 bi t f * 8-9M gallons of liquid HLW were converted to 4400 cubic meters of granular solid (calcine) through a fluidized bed calcination process - 7 to 1 volume reduction achieved * Average particle size is 0.4 cm * Bulk density is about 1 5 to 1 8 g/cc * Bulk density is about 1.5 to 1.8 g/cc - Contains roughly 44 metric tons heavy metal * Calcine is stored in 43 bins in 6 concrete-shielded binsets with one spare p - 7 th set of bins - intended for calcined SBW

297

ACCOUNTING FOR A VITRIFIED PLUTONIUM WASTE FORM IN THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY TOTAL SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT (TSPA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vitrification technology utilizing a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass appears to be a viable option for dispositioning excess weapons-useable plutonium that is not suitable for processing into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. A significant effort to develop a glass formulation and vitrification process to immobilize plutonium was completed in the mid-1990s to support the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP). Further refinement of the vitrification process was accomplished as part of the Am/Cm solution vitrification project. The LaBS glass formulation was found to be capable of immobilizing in excess of 10 wt% Pu and to be very tolerant of the impurities accompanying the plutonium material streams. Thus, this waste form would be suitable for dispositioning plutonium owned by the Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) that may not be well characterized and may contain high levels of impurities. The can-in-canister technology demonstrated in the PIP could be utilized to dispose of the vitrified plutonium in the federal radioactive waste repository. The can-in-canister technology involves placing small cans of the immobilized Pu form into a high level waste (HLW) glass canister fitted with a rack to hold the cans and then filling the canister with HLW glass. Testing was completed to demonstrate that this technology could be successfully employed with little or no impact to current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operation and that the resulting canisters were essentially equivalent to the present HLW glass canisters to be dispositioned in the federal repository. The performance of wastes in the repository and, moreover, the performance of the entire repository system is being evaluated by the Department of Energy-Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE-RW) using a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) methodology. Technical bases documents (e.g., Analysis/Modeling Reports (AMR)) that address specific issues regarding waste form performance are being used to develop process models as input to the TSPA analyses. In this report, models developed in five AMRs for waste forms currently slated for disposition in the repository are evaluated for their applicability to waste forms with plutonium immobilized in LaBS glass using the can-in-canister technology. Those AMRs address: high-level waste glass degradation; radionuclide inventory; in-package chemistry; dissolved concentration limits of radioactive elements; and colloid-associated radionuclide concentrations. Based on evaluation of how the models treated HLW glass and similarities in the corrosion behaviors of borosilicate HLW glasses and LaBS glass, the models in the AMRs were deemed to be directly applicable to the disposition of excess weapons-useable plutonium. The evaluations are summarized.

Marra, J

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

298

US Department of Energy Storage of Spent Fuel and High Level Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This paper provides an overview of the Department of Energy's (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) storage management. Like commercial reactor fuel, DOE's SNF and HLW were destined for the Yucca Mountain repository. In March 2010, the DOE filed a motion with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to withdraw the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain. A new repository is now decades away. The default for the commercial and DOE research reactor fuel and HLW is on-site storage for the foreseeable future. Though the motion to withdraw the license application and delay opening of a repository signals extended storage, DOE's immediate plans for management of its SNF and HLW remain the same as before Yucca Mountain was designated as the repository, though it has expanded its research and development efforts to ensure safe extended storage. This paper outlines some of the proposed research that DOE is conducting and will use to enhance its storage systems and facilities.

Sandra M Birk

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Status Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NWTRB NWTRB www.nwtrb.gov U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board The U S Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board The U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Status Update Presented to: National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Presented By: National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Mark Abkowitz May 11, 2011 The Board's Statutory Mandate * The 1987 amendments to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) established the U S Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board established the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. * The Board evaluates the technical and scientific validity of DOE activities related to: - transportation, packaging and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) - site characterization, design, development, and operations of facilities for

300

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 03/05/09 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 03/05/09 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 03/05/09 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 03/05/09 The following documents are associated with the Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting held on March 5th, 2009. Overview of Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Desired PU Loading During Vitrification HLW System Integrated Project Team Waste Determination and Section 3116 of the 2005 National Defense Authorization Act - HQ Perspective Status of Art & Practice of Performance Assessment within the DOE Complex Experience from the Short Course on Introduction to Nuclear Chemistry and Fuel Cycle Separations and Future Educational Opportunities Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission Performance Assessment Community of Practice Action Item Review and Status

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM - 2011  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2011 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2011 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per SRR-LWE-2011-00026, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2011, were completed. Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2011 met the requirements of C-ESR-G-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 3, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.6. UT inspections were performed on Tanks 25, 26 and 34 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00495, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2011, Waste Tanks 25, 26, 34 and 41. A total of 5813 photographs were made and 835 visual and video inspections were performed during 2011. A potential leaksite was discovered at Tank 4 during routine annual inspections performed in 2011. The new crack, which is above the allowable fill level, resulted in no release to the environment or tank annulus. The location of the crack is documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.6.

West, B.; Waltz, R.

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

302

Report - Melter Testing of New High Bismuth HLW Formulations VSL-13R2770-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the work described was to test two glasses formulated for a high bismuth waste stream on the DM100 melter system. Testing was designed to determine processing characteristics and production rates, assess the tendency for foaming, and confirm glass properties. The glass compositions tested were previously developed to maintain high waste loadings and processing rates while suppressing the foaming observed in previous tests

Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Kot, W. K.; Gan, H.; Matlack, K. S.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

303

GLASS FABRICATION AND ANALYSIS LITERATURE REVIEW AND METHOD SELECTION FOR WTP WASTE FEED QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Scope of the Report The objective of this literature review is to identify and review documents to address scaling, design, operations, and experimental setup, including configuration, data collection, and remote handling that would be used during waste feed qualification in support of the glass fabrication unit operation. Items addressed include: ? LAW and HLW glass formulation algorithms; ? Mixing and sampling; ? Rheological measurements; ? Heat of hydration; ? Glass fabrication techniques; ? Glass inspection; ? Composition analysis; ? Use of cooling curves; ? Hydrogen generation rate measurement.

Peeler, D.

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

304

Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste sludge: Status Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the status of process development for pretreating Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge, of which [approximately] 3.3 [times] 10[sup 6] L is stored in Tanks 103-AW and 105-AW at the Hanford Site. The initial baseline process chosen for pretreating NCRW sludge is to dissolve the sludge in nitric acid and extract the -transuranic (MU) elements from the dissolved sludge solution with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl methyl phosphine oxide (CNWO). This process converts the NCRW sludge into a relatively large volume of low-level waste (LLW) to be disposed of as grout, leaving only a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) requiring vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP).

Lumetta, G J; Swanson, J L

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

FINAL REPORT DM1200 TESTS WITH AZ 101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-03R3800-4 REV 0 2/17/04  

SciTech Connect

This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM 1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW AZ-101 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW AZ-101 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate and feed solids content on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post-test inspections of system components. The test objectives (including test success criteria), along with how they were met, are outlined in a table.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; GONG W; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

306

SOLIDIFICATION OF THE HANFORD LAW WASTE STREAM PRODUCED AS A RESULT OF NEAR-TANK CONTINUOUS SLUDGE LEACHING AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE RECOVERY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), is responsible for the remediation and stabilization of the Hanford Site tank farms, including 53 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wasted waste contained in 177 underground tanks. The plan calls for all waste retrieved from the tanks to be transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The WTP will consist of three primary facilities including pretreatment facilities for Low Activity Waste (LAW) to remove aluminum, chromium and other solids and radioisotopes that are undesirable in the High Level Waste (HLW) stream. Removal of aluminum from HLW sludge can be accomplished through continuous sludge leaching of the aluminum from the HLW sludge as sodium aluminate; however, this process will introduce a significant amount of sodium hydroxide into the waste stream and consequently will increase the volume of waste to be dispositioned. A sodium recovery process is needed to remove the sodium hydroxide and recycle it back to the aluminum dissolution process. The resulting LAW waste stream has a high concentration of aluminum and sodium and will require alternative immobilization methods. Five waste forms were evaluated for immobilization of LAW at Hanford after the sodium recovery process. The waste forms considered for these two waste streams include low temperature processes (Saltstone/Cast stone and geopolymers), intermediate temperature processes (steam reforming and phosphate glasses) and high temperature processes (vitrification). These immobilization methods and the waste forms produced were evaluated for (1) compliance with the Performance Assessment (PA) requirements for disposal at the IDF, (2) waste form volume (waste loading), and (3) compatibility with the tank farms and systems. The iron phosphate glasses tested using the product consistency test had normalized release rates lower than the waste form requirements although the CCC glasses had higher release rates than the quenched glasses. However, the waste form failed to meet the vapor hydration test criteria listed in the WTP contract. In addition, the waste loading in the phosphate glasses were not as high as other candidate waste forms. Vitrification of HLW waste as borosilicate glass is a proven process; however the HLW and LAW streams at Hanford can vary significantly from waste currently being immobilized. The ccc glasses show lower release rates for B and Na than the quenched glasses and all glasses meet the acceptance criterion of < 4 g/L. Glass samples spiked with Re{sub 2}O{sub 7} also passed the PCT test. However, further vapor hydration testing must be performed since all the samples cracked and the test could not be performed. The waste loading of the iron phosphate and borosilicate glasses are approximately 20 and 25% respectively. The steam reforming process produced the predicted waste form for both the high and low aluminate waste streams. The predicted waste loadings for the monolithic samples is approximately 39%, which is higher than the glass waste forms; however, at the time of this report, no monolithic samples were made and therefore compliance with the PA cannot be determined. The waste loading in the geopolymer is approximately 40% but can vary with the sodium hydroxide content in the waste stream. Initial geopolymer mixes revealed compressive strengths that are greater than 500 psi for the low aluminate mixes and less than 500 psi for the high aluminate mixes. Further work testing needs to be performed to formulate a geopolymer waste form made using a high aluminate salt solution. A cementitious waste form has the advantage that the process is performed at ambient conditions and is a proven process currently in use for LAW disposal. The Saltstone/Cast Stone formulated using low and high aluminate salt solutions retained at least 97% of the Re that was added to the mix as a dopant. While this data is promising, additional leaching testing must be performed to show compliance with the PA. Compressive strength tests must also be performed on the Cast Ston

Reigel, M.; Johnson, F.; Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

307

Separation of strontium-90 from Hanford high-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

Current guidelines for disposing of high-level radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site call for vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) in borosilicate glass and disposing the glass canisters in a deep geologic repository. Disposition of the low-level waste (LLW) is yet to be determined, but it will likely be immobilized in a glass matrix and disposed of on site. To lower the radiological risk associated with the LLW form, methods are being developed to separate {sup 90}Sr from the bulk waste material so this isotope can be routed to the HLW stream. A solvent extraction method is being investigated to separate {sup 90}Sr from acid-dissolved Hanford tank wastes. Results of experiments with actual tank waste indicate that this method can be used to achieve separation of {sup 90}Sr from the bulk waste components. Greater than 99% of the {sup 90}Sr was removed from an acidic dissolved sludge solution by extraction with di-tbutylcyclohexano-18-crown-6 in 1-octanol (the SREX process). The major sludge components were not extracted.

Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Jones, E.O.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

DESIGN ANALYSIS FOR THE DEFENSE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ''Design Analysis for the Defense High-Level Waste Disposal Container'' analysis is to technically define the defense high-level waste (DHLW) disposal container/waste package using the Waste Package Department's (WPD) design methods, as documented in ''Waste Package Design Methodology Report'' (CRWMS M&O [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor] 2000a). The DHLW disposal container is intended for disposal of commercial high-level waste (HLW) and DHLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms), placed within disposable canisters. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-managed spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a DHLW disposal container along with HLW forms. The objective of this analysis is to demonstrate that the DHLW disposal container/waste package satisfies the project requirements, as embodied in Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description Document (SDD) (CRWMS M&O 1999a), and additional criteria, as identified in Waste Package Design Sensitivity Report (CRWMS M&Q 2000b, Table 4). The analysis briefly describes the analytical methods appropriate for the design of the DHLW disposal contained waste package, and summarizes the results of the calculations that illustrate the analytical methods. However, the analysis is limited to the calculations selected for the DHLW disposal container in support of the Site Recommendation (SR) (CRWMS M&O 2000b, Section 7). The scope of this analysis is restricted to the design of the codisposal waste package of the Savannah River Site (SRS) DHLW glass canisters and the Training, Research, Isotopes General Atomics (TRIGA) SNF loaded in a short 18-in.-outer diameter (OD) DOE standardized SNF canister. This waste package is representative of the waste packages that consist of the DHLW disposal container, the DHLW/HLW glass canisters, and the DOE-managed SNF in disposable canisters. The intended use of this analysis is to support Site Recommendation reports and to assist in the development of WPD drawings. Activities described in this analysis were conducted in accordance with the Development Plan ''Design Analysis for the Defense High-Level Waste Disposal Container'' (CRWMS M&O 2000c) with no deviations from the plan.

G. Radulesscu; J.S. Tang

2000-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

309

Enhanced Sulfate Management in HLW Glass Formulations VSL12R2540-1 REV 0  

SciTech Connect

The Low Activity Waste (LAW) tanks that are scheduled to provide the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) with waste feeds contain significant amounts of sulfate. The sulfate content in the LAW feeds is sufficiently high that a separate molten sulfate salt phase may form on top of the glass melt during the vitrification process unless suitable glass formulations are employed and sulfate levels are controlled. Since the formation of the salt phase is undesirable from many perspectives, mitigation approaches had to be developed. Considerable progress has been made and reported by the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) in enhancing sulfate incorporation into LAW glass melts and developing strategies to manage and mitigate the risks associated with high-sulfate feeds.

Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

310

FINAL REPORT MELTER TESTS WITH AZ-101 HLW SIMULANT USING A DURAMELTER 100 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-01R10N0-1 REV 1 2/25/02  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data, analyses, and conclusions from a series of tests that were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic of America (VSL) to determine the processing rates that are achievable with AZ-101 HLW simulants and corresponding melter feeds on a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) vitrification system. One of the most critical pieces of information in determining the required size of the RPP-WTP HLW melter is the specific glass production rate in terms of the mass of glass that can be produced per unit area of melt surface per unit time. The specific glass production rate together with the waste loading (essentially, the ratio of waste-in to glass-out, which is determined from glass formulation activities) determines the melt area that is needed to achieve a given waste processing rate with due allowance for system availability. Tests conducted during Part B1 (VSL-00R2590-2) on the DM1000 vitrification system installed at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America showed that, without the use of bubblers, glass production rates with AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102 simulants were significantly lower than the Project design basis rate of 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d. Conversely, three-fold increases over the design basis rate were demonstrated with the use of bubblers. Furthermore, an un-bubbled control test using a replica of the melter feed used in cold commissioning tests at West Valley reproduced the rates that were observed with that feed on the WVDP production melter. More recent tests conducted on the DM1200 system, which more closely represents the present RPP-WTP design, are in general agreement with these earlier results. Screening tests conducted on the DM10 system have provided good indications of the larger-scale processing rates with bubblers (for both HL W and LAW feeds) but significantly overestimated the DM1000 un-bubbled rate observed for C-106/AY-102 melter feeds. This behavior is believed to be a consequence of the role of heat transfer in rate attainment and the much greater role of wall effects in heat transfer when the melt pool is not agitated. The DM100 melter used for the present tests has a surface area of 0.108 m{sup 2}, which is approximately 5 times larger than that of the DM10 (0.021 m{sup 2}) and approximately 11 times smaller than that of the DM1000 (1.2 m{sup 2}) (the DM1000 has since been replaced by a pilot-scale prototypical HLW melter, designated the DM1200, which has the same surface area as the DM1000). Testing on smaller melters is the most economical method for obtaining data over a wide range of operating conditions (particularly at extremes) and for guiding the more expensive tests that are performed at pilot-scale. Thus, one objective of these tests was to determine whether the DM100 melters are sufficiently large to reproduce the un-bubbled melt rates observed at the DM1000 scale, or to determine the extent of any off-set. DM100-scale tests can then be used to screen feed chemistry variations that may serve to increase the un-bubbled production rates prior to confirmation at pilot scale. Finally, extensive characterization data obtained on simulated HLW melter feeds formed from various glass forming additives indicated that there may be advantages in terms of feed rheology and stability to the replacement of some of the hydroxides by carbonates. A further objective of the present tests was therefore to identify any deleterious processing effects of such a change before adopting the carbonate feed as the baseline. Data from the WVDP melter using acidified (nitrated) feeds, and without bubbling, showed productions rates that are higher than those observed with the alkaline RPP feeds at the VSL. Therefore, the effect of feed acidification on production rate also was investigated. This work was performed under Test Specification, 'TSP-W375-00-00019, Rev 0, 'HLW-DM10 and DM100 Melter Tests' dated November 13, 2000 and the corresponding Test Plan. It should be noted, however, that the RPP-WTP Project directed a series of changes to the Test Plan as the result

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

311

DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIGUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive is used to improve stripping performance and to mitigate the effects of any surfactants present in the feed stream. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Pak, D.; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.; Caldwell, T.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

312

RPP-PLAN-47325 Revision 0 Radioactive Waste Determination Process Plan for Waste Management Area C Tank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This plan describes the radioactive waste determination process that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will use for Hanford Site Waste Management Area C (WMA C) tank waste residuals subject to DOE authority under DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. Preparation of this plan is a required component of actions the DOE-Office of River Protection (ORP) must take to fulfill proposed Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-045-80. Waste Management Area C is comprised of various single-shell tanks, encased and direct-buried pipes, diversion boxes, pump pits, and unplanned release sites (sites contaminated as a result of spills of tank waste to the environment). Since operations began in the late 1940s, the tanks in WMA C have continuously stored waste managed as high-level waste (HLW) that was derived from defense-related nuclear research, development, and weapons production activities. Planning for the final closure of WMA C is underway. This radioactive waste determination process plan assumes that tank closure will follow retrieval of as much tank waste as technically and economically practical. It is also assumed for the purposes of this plan that after completion

Waste Residuals; J. R. Robertson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Research and development activities waste fixation program. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1975  

SciTech Connect

Engineering-scale in-canister melting tests were made to evaluate the use of silicon to prevent formation of water-soluble molybdate phases in melts. The tests demonstrated that silicon metal powder added to the feed stock effectively prevents formation of such phases. A test also showed that coatings of ZrO$sub 2$ or chromium carbide on stainless steel canisters prevent oxidation during the in-can melting process. Thermal analysis of canister design concepts examined effects of type of storage, use of fins, emissivity, canister size and cracks in glass. Pressurization tests show that all types of calcine can produce very high pressures within the canister unless the calcine is post-treated at temperatures greater than 850$sup 0$C. Initial studies on the effects of alpha and recoil bombardment (from $sup 244$Cm doping) on devitrification of waste- containing glass were completed. The devitrification behavior of a waste-bearing zinc orthosilicate glass is being studied using optical microscopy, electron microprobe, and x-ray diffraction examination. Fine calcine particles were agglomerated into larger particles suitable for coating via chemical vapor deposition. Thermal stability tests of nickel and Cr$sub 7$C$sub 3$ coatings on waste calcine have been conducted, and deterioration has occurred at temperatures as low as 500$sup 0$C. Waste-containing pellets were successfully coated by plasma spraying Al$sub 2$O$sub 3$ powder. Calculations indicate that plasma spraying of large pellets is feasible on a production scale. Seven scoping runs made with a disc pelletizer indicate that it can provide a simple, inexpensive process for making high-quality pellets from calcine-frit powders. Risk assessment was used to systematically identify dominant sequences for the accidental release of radionuclides during the solidification, basin storage, and rail transport activities of high-level waste management. (JGB)

McElroy, J L

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

High-level waste borosilicate glass a compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current plans call for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to start up facilities for vitrification of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina, in 1995; West Valley Demonstration Project, West Valley, New York, in 1996; and at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, after the year 2000. The product from these facilities will be canistered HLW borosilicate glass, which will be stored, transported, and eventually disposed of in a geologic repository. The behavior of this glass waste product, under the range of likely service conditions, is the subject of considerable scientific and public interest. Over the past few decades, a large body of scientific information on borosilicate waste glass has been generated worldwide. The intent of this document is to consolidate information pertaining to our current understanding of waste glass corrosion behavior and radionuclide release. The objective, scope, and organization of the document are discussed in Section 1.1, and an overview of borosilicate glass corrosion is provided in Section 1.2. The history of glass as a waste form and the international experience with waste glass are summarized in Sections 1.3 and 1.4, respectively.

Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

CRYSTALLIZATION IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE GLASSES U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION WTP ENGINEERING DIVISION  

SciTech Connect

Various circumstances influence crystallization in glassmaking, for example: (1) crystals nucleate and grow before the glass-forming melt occurs; (2) crystals grow or dissolve in flowing melt and during changing temperature; (3) crystals move under the influence of gravity; (4) crystals agglomerate and interact with gas bubbles; (5) high-level wastes (HLW) are mixtures of a large number of components in unusual proportions; (6) melter processing of HLW and the slow cooling of HLW glass in canisters provides an opportunity for a variety of crystalline forms to precipitate; (7) settling of crystals in a HLW glass melter may produce undesirable sludge at the melter bottom; and (8) crystallization of the glass product may increase, but also ruin chemical durability. The conclusions are: (1) crystal growth and dissolution typically proceed in a convective medium at changing temperature; (2) to represent crystallization or dissolution the kinetics must be expressed in the form of rate equations, such as dC/dt = f(C,T) and the temperature dependence of kinetic coefficients and equilibrium concentrations must be accounted for; and (3) non-equilibrium phenomena commonly occur - metastable crystallization, periodic distribution of crystals; and dendritic crystal growth.

KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

316

Evaluation of the Candidate High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain Using Total System Performance Assessment: Phase 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A successful license application for the candidate spent-fuel and high level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain depends on a robust demonstration of long-term safety. This report presents EPRI's independent review to identify any conservatisms in the U.S. Depawrtment of Energy's (DOE's) Phase 5 Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The review specifically identifies key facility components, makes recommendations regarding technical development work priorities, and evaluates ove...

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

317

ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2010  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2010 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2010 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per SRR-LWE-2009-00138, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2010, were completed. Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2010 met the requirements of C-ESG-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 3, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.6. UT inspections were performed on Tanks 30, 31 and 32 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2010-00533, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2010, Waste Tanks 30, 31 and 32. A total of 5824 photographs were made and 1087 visual and video inspections were performed during 2010. Ten new leaksites at Tank 5 were identified in 2010. The locations of these leaksites are documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.5. Ten leaksites at Tank 5 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. None of these new leaksites resulted in a release to the environment. The leaksites were documented during wall cleaning activities and the waste nodules associated with the leaksites were washed away. Previously documented leaksites were reactivated at Tank 12 during waste removal activities.

West, B.; Waltz, R.

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

318

High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High-Level Waste Corporate Board High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda Loews Hotel 1065 West Peachtree St, Atlanta, Georgia November 18, 2010 Time Topic Speaker 7:30 AM Closed Session - ratify Charter Board members 8:30 AM Welcome, Introduction, 2011 focus for HLW Corp Board Shirley Olinger 8:50 AM Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet  Show flowsheet w/ split locations  Describe recycle of LAW concept  Discuss baseline assumptions  Describe subsequent talks using flowsheet figure Gary Smith 9:15 AM Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP)  Tc/I split factors (w/ and w/o recycle)  Water management (w/ and w/o recycle) Albert Kruger 9:45 AM WTP Melter/Offgas Systems Decontamination Factors  Re as a stimulant for Tc  Issues that limit Tc incorporation in LAW glass

319

INEEL HEPA Filter Leach System: A Mixed Waste Solution  

SciTech Connect

Calciner operations and the fuel dissolution process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory have generated many mixed waste high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The HEPA Filter Leach System located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center lowers radiation contamination levels and reduces cadmium, chromium, and mercury concentrations on spent HEPA filter media to below disposal limits set by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The treated HEPA filters are disposed as low-level radioactive waste. The technical basis for the existing system was established and optimized in initial studies using simulants in 1992. The treatment concept was validated for EPA approval in 1994 by leaching six New Waste Calcining Facility spent HEPA filters. Post-leach filter media sampling results for all six filters showed that both hazardous and radiological constituent levels were reduced so the filters could be disposed of as low-level radioactive waste. Since the validation tests the HEPA Filter Leach System has processed 78 filters in 1997 and 1998. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory HEPA Filter Leach System is the only mixed waste HEPA treatment system in the DOE complex. This process is of interest to many of the other DOE facilities and commercial companies that have generated mixed waste HEPA filters but currently do not have a treatment option available.

Argyle, Mark Don; Demmer, Ricky Lynn; Archibald, Kip Ernest; Brewer, Ken Neal; Pierson, Kenneth Alan; Shackelford, Kimberlee Rene; Kline, Kelli Suzanne

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

INEEL HEPA Filter Leach System: A Mixed Waste Solution  

SciTech Connect

Calciner operations and the fuel dissolution process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory have generated many mixed waste high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)filters. The HEPA Filter Leach System located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center lowers radiation contamination levels and reduces cadmium, chromium, and mercury concentrations on spent HEPA filter media to below disposal limits set by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The treated HEPA filters are disposed as low-level radioactive waste. The technical basis for the existing system was established and optimized in initial studies using simulants in 1992. The treatment concept was validated for EPA approval in 1994 by leaching six New Waste Calcining Facility spent HEPA filters. Post-leach filter media sampling results for all six filters showed that both hazardous and radiological constituent levels were reduced so the filters could be disposed of as low-level radioactive waste. Since the validation tests the HEPA Filter Leach System has processed 78 filters in 1997 and 1998. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory HEPA Filter Leach System is the only mixed waste HEPA treatment system in the DOE complex. This process is of interest to many of the other DOE facilities and commercial companies that have generated mixed waste HEPA filters but currently do not have a treatment option available.

K. Archibald; K. Brewer; K. Kline; K. Pierson; K. Shackelford; M. Argyle; R. Demmer

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Final Report - High Level Waste Vitrification System Improvements, VSL-07R1010-1, Rev 0, dated 04/16/07  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work conducted to support the development and testing of new glass formulations that extend beyond those that have been previously investigated for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The principal objective was to investigate maximization of the incorporation of several waste components that are expected to limit waste loading and, consequently, high level waste (HLW) processing rates and canister count. The work was performed with four waste compositions specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP); these wastes contain high concentrations of bismuth, chromium, aluminum, and aluminum plus sodium. The tests were designed to identify glass formulations that maximize waste loading while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, increased glass processing temperature, increased crystallinity, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality.

Kruger, Albert A.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Gong, W.; Champman, C. C.; Joseph, I.; Matlack, K. S.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

322

Formulation and Characterization of Waste Glasses with Varying Processing Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the preliminary results of glass formulation and characterization accomplished within the finished scope of the EM-31 technology development tasks for WP-4 and WP-5, including WP-4.1.2: Glass Formulation for Next Generation Melter, WP-5.1.2.3: Systematic Glass Studies, and WP-5.1.2.4: Glass Formulation for Specific Wastes. This report also presents the suggested studies for eventual restart of these tasks. The initial glass formulation efforts for the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM), operating at {approx}1200 C, with selected HLW (AZ-101) and LAW (AN-105) successfully developed glasses with significant increase of waste loading compared to that is likely to be achieved based on expected reference WTP formulations. Three glasses formulated for AZ-101HLW and one glass for AN-105 LAW were selected for the initial CCIM demonstration melter tests. Melter tests were not performed within the finished scope of the WP-4.1.2 task. Glass formulations for CCIM were expanded to cover additional HLWs that have high potential to successfully demonstrate the unique advantages of the CCIM technologies based on projected composition of Hanford wastes. However, only the preliminary scoping tests were completed with selected wastes within the finished scope. Advanced glass formulations for the reference WTP melter, operating at {approx}1200 C, were initiated with selected specific wastes to determine the estimated maximum waste loading. The incomplete results from these initial formulation efforts are summarized. For systematic glass studies, a test matrix of 32 high-aluminum glasses was completed based on a new method developed in this study.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, M. J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lepry, William C.; Lang, Jesse B.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Vienna, John D.; Johnson, Fabienne; Marra, James C.; Peeler, David K.

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

323

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 03/05/09 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3/05/09 3/05/09 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 03/05/09 The following documents are associated with the Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting held on March 5th, 2009. Overview of Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Desired PU Loading During Vitrification HLW System Integrated Project Team Waste Determination and Section 3116 of the 2005 National Defense Authorization Act - HQ Perspective Status of Art & Practice of Performance Assessment within the DOE Complex Experience from the Short Course on Introduction to Nuclear Chemistry and Fuel Cycle Separations and Future Educational Opportunities Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission Performance Assessment Community of Practice Action Item Review and Status More Documents & Publications

324

Summary - System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford EM Project: WTP ETR Report Date: November 2008 ETR-18 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review Construction of the facilities of the Hanford site's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) are scheduled for completion in 2017, with radioactive waste processing scheduled to begin in 2019. An estimated 23 to 35 years will then be required to complete high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. However, vitrification of low-activity waste (LAW) may extend the WTP mission duration by decades more if supplemental LAW processing beyond the capacity of the present facility is not incorporated. The purpose of this independent review was to

325

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt This report summarizes efforts to simulate coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes occurring within a generic hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt; chemical processes of the system allow precipitation and dissolution of salt with elevated temperatures that drive water and water vapor flow around hot waste packages. Characterizing salt backfill processes is an important objective of the exercise. An evidence-based algorithm for mineral dehydration is also applied in the modeling. The Finite Element Heat and Mass transfer code (FEHM) is used to simulate coupled thermal,

326

Hydrogen generation rates in Savannah River Site high-level nuclear waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-level nuclear waste (HLW) is stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as alkaline, high-nitrate slurries in underground carbon steel tanks. Hydrogen is continuously generated in the waste tanks as a result of the radiolysis of water. Hydrogen generation rates have recently been measured in several waste tanks containing different types of waste. The measured rates ranged from 1.1 to 6.7 cubic feet per million Btu of decay heat. The measured rates are consistent with laboratory data which show that the hydrogen generation rate depends on the nitrate concentration and the decay heat content of the waste. Sampling at different locations indicated that the hydrogen is uniformly distributed radially within the tank.

Hobbs, D.T.; Norris, P.W.; Pucko, S.A.; Bibler, N.E.; Walker, D.D.; d'Entremont, P.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The disposition of INEEL radioactive wastes is now under a Settlement Agreement between the DOE and the State of Idaho. The Settlement Agreement requires that existing liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW), and other liquid waste inventories be treated by December 31, 2012. This agreement also requires that all HLW, including calcined waste, be disposed or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. Sodium bearing waste (SBW) is produced from decontamination operations and HLW from reprocessing of SNF. SBW and HLW are radioactive and hazardous mixed waste; the radioactive constituents are regulated by DOE and the hazardous constituents are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Calcined waste, a dry granular material, is produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF). Two primary waste tank storage locations exist at the ICPP: Tank Farm Facility (TFF) and the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). The TFF has the following underground storage tanks: four 18,400-gallon tanks (WM 100-102, WL 101); four 30,000-gallon tanks (WM 103-106); and eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. This includes nine 300,000-gallon tanks (WM 182-190) and two 318,000 gallon tanks (WM 180-181). This study analyzes the closure and subsequent use of the eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. The 18,400 and 30,000-gallon tanks were not included in the work scope and will be closed as a separate activity. This study was conducted to support the HLW Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) waste separations options and addresses closure of the 300,000-gallon liquid waste storage tanks and subsequent tank void uses. A figure provides a diagram estimating how the TFF could be used as part of the separations options. Other possible TFF uses are also discussed in this study.

Spaulding, B.C.; Gavalya, R.A.; Dahlmeir, M.M. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

RADIOACTIVE WASTE CONDITIONING, IMMOBILISATION, AND ENCAPSULATION PROCESSES AND TECHNOLOGIES: OVERVIEW AND ADVANCES (CHAPTER 7)  

SciTech Connect

The main immobilization technologies that are available commercially and have been demonstrated to be viable are cementation, bituminization, and vitrification. Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either alkali borosilicate glass or alkali aluminophosphate glass. The exact compositions of nuclear waste glasses are tailored for easy preparation and melting, avoidance of glass-in-glass phase separation, avoidance of uncontrolled crystallization, and acceptable chemical durability, e.g., leach resistance. Glass has also been used to stabilize a variety of low level wastes (LLW) and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) low level wastes (MLLW) from other sources such as fuel rod cladding/decladding processes, chemical separations, radioactive sources, radioactive mill tailings, contaminated soils, medical research applications, and other commercial processes. The sources of radioactive waste generation are captured in other chapters in this book regarding the individual practices in various countries (legacy wastes, currently generated wastes, and future waste generation). Future waste generation is primarily driven by interest in sources of clean energy and this has led to an increased interest in advanced nuclear power production. The development of advanced wasteforms is a necessary component of the new nuclear power plant (NPP) flowsheets. Therefore, advanced nuclear wasteforms are being designed for robust disposal strategies. A brief summary is given of existing and advanced wasteforms: glass, glass-ceramics, glass composite materials (GCMs), and crystalline ceramic (mineral) wasteforms that chemically incorporate radionuclides and hazardous species atomically in their structure. Cementitious, geopolymer, bitumen, and other encapsulant wasteforms and composites that atomically bond and encapsulate wastes are also discussed. The various processing technologies are cross-referenced to the various types of wasteforms since often a particular type of wasteform can be made by a variety of different processing technologies.

Jantzen, C.

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

329

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

RECENT PROGRESS IN DOE WASTE TANK CLOSURE  

SciTech Connect

The USDOE complex currently has over 330 underground storage tanks that have been used to process and store radioactive waste generated from the production of weapons materials. These tanks contain over 380 million liters of high-level and low-level radioactive waste. The waste consists of radioactively contaminated sludge, supernate, salt cake or calcine. Most of the waste exists at four USDOE locations, the Hanford Site, the Savannah River Site, the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the West Valley Demonstration Project. A summary of the DOE tank closure activities was first issued in 2001. Since then, regulatory changes have taken place that affect some of the sites and considerable progress has been made in closing tanks. This paper presents an overview of the current regulatory changes and drivers and a summary of the progress in tank closures at the various sites over the intervening six years. A number of areas are addressed including closure strategies, characterization of bulk waste and residual heel material, waste removal technologies for bulk waste, heel residuals and annuli, tank fill materials, closure system modeling and performance assessment programs, lessons learned, and external reviews.

Langton, C

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Vitrification of high level nuclear waste inside ambient temperature disposal containers using inductive heating: The SMILE system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach, termed SMILE (Small Module Inductively Loaded Energy), for the vitrification of high level nuclear wastes (HLW) is described. Present vitrification systems liquefy the HLW solids and associated frit material in large high temperature melters. The molten mix is then poured into small ({approximately}1 m{sup 3}) disposal canisters, where it solidifies and cools. SMILE eliminates the separate, large high temperature melter. Instead, the BLW solids and frit melt inside the final disposal containers, using inductive heating. The contents then solidify and cool in place. The SMILE modules and the inductive heating process are designed so that the outer stainless can of the module remains at near ambient temperature during the process cycle. Module dimensions are similar to those of present disposal containers. The can is thermally insulated from the high temperature inner container by a thin layer of refractory alumina firebricks. The inner container is a graphite crucible lined with a dense alumina refractory that holds the HLW and fiit materials. After the SMILE module is loaded with a slurry of HLW and frit solids, an external multi-turn coil is energized with 30-cycle AC current. The enclosing external coil is the primary of a power transformer, with the graphite crucible acting as a single turn ``secondary.`` The induced current in the ``secondary`` heats the graphite, which in turn heats the HLW and frit materials. The first stage of the heating process is carried out at an intermediate temperature to drive off remnant liquid water and water of hydration, which takes about 1 day. The small fill/vent tube to the module is then sealed off and the interior temperature raised to the vitrification range, i.e., {approximately}1200C. Liquefaction is complete after approximately 1 day. The inductive heating then ceases and the module slowly loses heat to the environment, allowing the molten material to solidify and cool down to ambient temperature.

Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) INTEGRITY PROJECT HIGH LEVEL WASTE CHEMISTRY OPTIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office (DOE) of River Protection (ORP) has a continuing program for chemical optimization to better characterize corrosion behavior of High-Level Waste (HLW). The DOE controls the chemistry in its HLW to minimize the propensity of localized corrosion, such as pitting, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nitrate-containing solutions. By improving the control of localized corrosion and SCC, the ORP can increase the life of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) carbon steel structural components and reduce overall mission costs. The carbon steel tanks at the Hanford Site are critical to the mission of safely managing stored HLW until it can be treated for disposal. The DOE has historically used additions of sodium hydroxide to retard corrosion processes in HLW tanks. This also increases the amount of waste to be treated. The reactions with carbon dioxide from the air and solid chemical species in the tank continually deplete the hydroxide ion concentration, which then requires continued additions. The DOE can reduce overall costs for caustic addition and treatment of waste, and more effectively utilize waste storage capacity by minimizing these chemical additions. Hydroxide addition is a means to control localized and stress corrosion cracking in carbon steel by providing a passive environment. The exact mechanism that causes nitrate to drive the corrosion process is not yet clear. The SCC is less of a concern in the newer stress relieved double shell tanks due to reduced residual stress. The optimization of waste chemistry will further reduce the propensity for SCC. The corrosion testing performed to optimize waste chemistry included cyclic potentiodynamic volarization studies. slow strain rate tests. and stress intensity factor/crack growth rate determinations. Laboratory experimental evidence suggests that nitrite is a highly effective:inhibitor for pitting and SCC in alkaline nitrate environments. Revision of the corrosion control strategies to a nitrite-based control, where there is no constant depletion mechanism as with hydroxide, should greatly enhance tank lifetime, tank space availability, and reduce downstream reprocessing costs by reducing chemical addition to the tanks.

WASHENFELDER DJ

2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

335

Technologies for destruction of long-lived radionuclides in high-level nuclear waste: Overview and requirements  

SciTech Connect

This paper, and this topical session on Nuclear Waste Minimization, Management and Remediation, focuses on two nuclear systems, and their associated technologies, that have the potential to address concerns surrounding long-lived radionuclides in high-level waste. Both systems offer technology applicable to HLW from present light-water reactors (LWR). Additionally these systems represent advanced nuclear power concepts that have important features associated with integrated management of wastes, long-term fuel supplies, and enhanced safety. The first system is the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept. This system incorporates a metal-fueled fast reactor coupled with chemical separations based on pyroprocessing to produce power while simultaneously burning long-lived actinide waste. IFR applications include burning of actinides from current LWR spent fuel and energy production in a breeder environment. The second concept, Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW), is based upon an accelerator-induced intense source of thermal neutrons and is aimed at destruction of long-lived actinides and fission products. This concept can be applied to long-lived radionuclides in spent fuel HLW as well as a future fission power source built around use of natural thorium or uranium as fuels coupled with concurrent waste destruction.

Arthur, E.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

EPRI Review of Geologic Disposal for Used Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste: Volume I--The U.S. Site Selection Process Prior to the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. efforts to site and construct a deep geologic repository for used fuel and high level radioactive waste (HLW) proceeded in fits and starts over a three decade period from the late 1950s until 1982, when the U.S. Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). This legislation codified a national approach for developing a deep geologic repository. Amendment of the NWPA in 1987 resulted in a number of dramatic changes in direction for the U.S. program, most notably the selection of Yucca Mountai...

2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

337

Idaho Chemical Processing Plant low-level waste grout stabilization development program FY-96 status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general purpose of the Grout Stabilization Development Program is to solidify and stabilize the liquid low-level wastes (LLW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). It is anticipated that LLW will be produced from the following: (1) chemical separation of the tank farm high-activity sodium-bearing waste; (2) retrieval, dissolution, and chemical separation of the aluminum, zirconium, and sodium calcines; (3) facility decontamination processes; and (4) process equipment waste. The main tasks completed this fiscal year as part of the program were chromium stabilization study for sodium-bearing waste and stabilization and solidification of LLW from aluminum and zirconium calcines. The projected LLW will be highly acidic and contain high amounts of nitrates. Both of these are detrimental to Portland cement chemistry; thus, methods to precondition the LLW and to cure the grout were explored. A thermal calcination process, called denitration, was developed to solidify the waste and destroy the nitrates. A three-way blend of Portland cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash was successfully tested. Grout cubes were prepared at various waste loadings to maximize loading while meeting compressive strength and leach resistance requirements. For the sodium LLW, a 25% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 3.5 and a compressive strength of 2,500 pounds per square inch while meeting leach, mix, and flow requirements. It was found that the sulfur in the slag reduces the chromium leach rate below regulatory limits. For the aluminum LLW, a 15% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 8.5 and a compressive strength of 4,350 pounds per square inch while meeting leach requirements. Likewise for zirconium LLW, a 30% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 8.3 and a compressive strength of 3,570 pounds per square inch.

Herbst, A.K.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

ZERO WASTE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of the thesis was to develop a clear vision on better waste management system. The thesis introduced the sustainable waste management along with (more)

Upadhyaya, Luv

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIFUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. Conclusions from this work include the following. The CSSX process is capable of reducing {sup 137}Cs in high level radioactive waste by a factor of more than 40,000 using five extraction, two scrub, and five strip stages. Tests demonstrated extraction and strip section stage efficiencies of greater than 93% for the Tank 49H waste test and greater than 88% for the simulant waste test. During a test with HLW, researchers processed 39 liters of Tank 49H solution and the waste raffinate had an average decontamination factor (DF) of 6.78E+04, with a maximum of 1.08E+05. A simulant waste solution ({approx}34.5 liters) with an initial Cs concentration of 83.1 mg/L was processed and had an average DF greater than 5.9E+03, with a maximum DF of greater than 6.6E+03. The difference may be attributable to differences in contactor stage efficiencies. Test results showed the solvent can be stripped of cesium and recycled for {approx}25 solvent turnovers without the occurrence of any measurable solvent degradation or negative effects from minor components. Based on the performance of the 12-stage 2-cm apparatus with the Tank 49H HLW, the projected DF for MCU with seven extraction, two scrub, and seven strip stages operating at a nominal efficiency of 90% is {approx}388,000. At 95% stage efficiency, the DF in MCU would be {approx}3.2 million. Carryover of organic solvent in aqueous streams (and aqueous in organic streams) was less than 0.1% when processing Tank 49H HLW. The entrained solvent concentration measured in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) was as much as {approx}140 mg/L, although that value may be overstated by as much as 50% due to modifier solubility in the DSS. The entrained solvent concentration was measured in the strip effluent (SE) and the results are pending. A steady-state concentration factor (CF) of 15.9 was achieved with Tank 49H HLW. Cesium distribution ratios [D(Cs)] were measured with non-radioactive Tank 49H waste simulant and actual Tank 49H waste. Below is a comparison of D(Cs) values of ESS and 2-cm tests. Batch Extraction-Strip-Scrub (ESS) tests yielded D(Cs) values for extraction of {approx}81-88 for tests with Tank 49H waste and waste simulant. The results from the 2-cm contactor tests were in agreement with values of 58-92 for the Tank 49H HLW test and 54-83 for the simulant waste test. These values are consistent with the reference D(Cs) for extraction of {approx}60. In tests with Tank 49H waste and waste simulant, batch ESS tests measured D(Cs) values for the two scrub stages as {approx}3.5-5.0 for the first scrub stage and {approx}1.0-3.0 for the second scrub stage. In the Tank 49H test, the D(Cs) values for the 2-cm test were far from the ESS values. A D(Cs) value of 161 was measured for the first scrub stage and 10.8 for the second scrub stage. The data suggest that the scrub stage is not operating as effectively as intended. For the simulant test, a D(Cs) value of 1.9 was measured for the first scrub stage; the sample from the second scrub stage was compromised. Measurements of the pH of all stage samples for the Tank 49H test showed that the pH for extraction and scrub stages was 14 and the pH for the strip stages was {approx}7. It is expected that the pH of the second scrub stage would be {approx}12-13. Batch ESS tests measured D(Cs) values for the strip stages to be {approx}0.002-0.010. A high value in Strip No.3 of a test with simulant solution has been attributed to issues associated with the limits of detection for the

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Caldwell, T.; Pak, D; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

340

Interim storage study report  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in the form of calcine and liquid and liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) will be processed to provide a stable waste form and prepare the waste to be transported to a permanent repository. Because a permanent repository will not be available when the waste is processed, the waste must be stored at ICPP in an Interim Storage Facility (ISF). This report documents consideration of an ISF for each of the waste processing options under consideration.

Rawlins, J.K.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Evaluation and compilation of DOE [Department of Energy] waste package test data; Biannual report, February 1988--July 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes evaluations by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of Department of Energy (DOE) activities on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for the six month period February 1988 through July 1988. Activities for the DOE Materials Characterization Center are reviewed for the period January 1988 through June 1988. A summary is given of the Yucca Mountain, Nevada disposal site activities. Short discussions relating to the reviewed publications are given and complete reviews and evaluations are included. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Interrante, C.; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.; Plante, E.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data; Volume 8: Biannual report, August 1989--January 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes evaluations by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of some of the Department of Energy (DOE) activities on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for the six-month period, August 1989--January 1990. This includes reviews of related materials research and plans, information on the Yucca Mountain, Nevada disposal site activities, and other information regarding supporting research and special assistance. Short discussions are given relating to the publications reviewed and complete reviews and evaluations are included. Reports of other work are included in the Appendices.

Interrante, C.G. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of High-Level Waste Management; Fraker, A.C.; Escalante, E. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (MSEL), Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Metallurgy Div.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

STATUS OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF IN-TANK/AT-TANK SEPARATIONS TECHNOLOGIES FOR FOR HIGH-LEVEL WASTE PROCESSING FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

SciTech Connect

Within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Technology Innovation and Development, the Office of Waste Processing manages a research and development program related to the treatment and disposition of radioactive waste. At the Savannah River (South Carolina) and Hanford (Washington) Sites, approximately 90 million gallons of waste are distributed among 226 storage tanks (grouped or collocated in 'tank farms'). This waste may be considered to contain mixed and stratified high activity and low activity constituent waste liquids, salts and sludges that are collectively managed as high level waste (HLW). A large majority of these wastes and associated facilities are unique to the DOE, meaning many of the programs to treat these materials are 'first-of-a-kind' and unprecedented in scope and complexity. As a result, the technologies required to disposition these wastes must be developed from basic principles, or require significant re-engineering to adapt to DOE's specific applications. Of particular interest recently, the development of In-tank or At-Tank separation processes have the potential to treat waste with high returns on financial investment. The primary objective associated with In-Tank or At-Tank separation processes is to accelerate waste processing. Insertion of the technologies will (1) maximize available tank space to efficiently support permanent waste disposition including vitrification; (2) treat problematic waste prior to transfer to the primary processing facilities at either site (i.e., Hanford's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) or Savannah River's Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF)); and (3) create a parallel treatment process to shorten the overall treatment duration. This paper will review the status of several of the R&D projects being developed by the U.S. DOE including insertion of the ion exchange (IX) technologies, such as Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at Savannah River. This has the potential to align the salt and sludge processing life cycle, thereby reducing the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) mission by 7 years. Additionally at the Hanford site, problematic waste streams, such as high boehmite and phosphate wastes, could be treated prior to receipt by WTP and thus dramatically improve the capacity of the facility to process HLW. Treatment of boehmite by continuous sludge leaching (CSL) before receipt by WTP will dramatically reduce the process cycle time for the WTP pretreatment facility, while treatment of phosphate will significantly reduce the number of HLW borosilicate glass canisters produced at the WTP. These and other promising technologies will be discussed.

Aaron, G.; Wilmarth, B.

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

344

Cementitious binder from fly ash and other industrial wastes  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, investigations were undertaken to formulate cementitious binder by judicious blending of fly ash with Portland cement as well as by admixing fly ash with calcined phosphogypsum, fluorogypsum, lime sludge, and chemical activators of different finenesses. The effect of addition of calcined clay in these types of binders was studied. Data showed that cementitious binders of high compressive strength and water retentivity can be produced. The strength of masonry mortars increased with the addition of chemical activators. The strength development of binders takes place through formation of ettringite. C-S-H, and C{sub 4}AH{sub 13}. The binders are eminently suitable for partial replacement (up to 25%) of the cement in concrete without any detrimental affect on the strength. The results showed that fly ash can be used in the range from 45% to 70% in formulating these binders along with other industrial wastes to help in mitigating environmental pollution.

Singh, M.; Garg, M. [Central Building Research Inst., Roorkee (India)] [Central Building Research Inst., Roorkee (India)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: A NEW PROCESS FOR CHEMICALLY CLEANING SAVANNAH RIVER WASTE TANKS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has 49 high level waste (HLW) tanks that must be emptied, cleaned, and closed as required by the Federal Facilities Agreement. The current method of chemical cleaning uses several hundred thousand gallons per tank of 8 weight percent (wt%) oxalic acid to partially dissolve and suspend residual waste and corrosion products such that the waste can be pumped out of the tank. This adds a significant quantity of sodium oxalate to the tanks and, if multiple tanks are cleaned, renders the waste incompatible with the downstream processing. Tank space is also insufficient to store this stream given the large number of tanks to be cleaned. Therefore, a search for a new cleaning process was initiated utilizing the TRIZ literature search approach, and Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination--Ultraviolet (CORD-UV), a mature technology currently used for decontamination and cleaning of commercial nuclear reactor primary cooling water loops, was identified. CORD-UV utilizes oxalic acid for sludge dissolution, but then decomposes the oxalic acid to carbon dioxide and water by UV treatment outside the system being treated. This allows reprecipitation and subsequent deposition of the sludge into a selected container without adding significant volume to that container, and without adding any new chemicals that would impact downstream treatment processes. Bench top and demonstration loop measurements on SRS tank sludge stimulant demonstrated the feasibility of applying CORD-UV for enhanced chemical cleaning of SRS HLW tanks.

Ketusky, E; Neil Davis, N; Renee Spires, R

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

347

APPLICATION OF MECHANICAL ACTIVATION TO PRODUCTION OF PYROCHLORE CERAMIC CONTAINING SIMULATED RARE-EARTH ACTINIDE FRACTION OF HLW  

SciTech Connect

Samples of zirconate pyrochlore ceramic (REE)2(Zr,U)2O7 (REE = La-Gd) containing simulated REE-An fraction of HLW were synthesized by two routes: (1) conventional cold compaction of oxide mixtures in pellets under pressure of 200 MPa and sintering of the pellets at 1550 C for 24 hours; and (2) using preliminary mechanical activation of oxide powders in a linear inductive rotator (LIV-0.5E) and a planetary mill - activator with hydrostatic yokes (AGO-2U) for 5 or 10 min. All the samples sintered at 1550 C were monolithic and dense with high mechanical integrity. As follows from X-ray diffraction (XRD) data, the ceramic sample produced without mechanical activation is composed of pyrochlore as major phase but contains also minor unreacted oxides. The samples prepared from pre-activated mixtures are composed of the pyrochlore structure phase only. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) data also show higher structural and compositional homogeneity of the samples prepared from mechanically activated batches. The samples produced from oxide mixtures mechanically activated in the LIV for 10 min were slightly contaminated with iron resulting in formation of minor perovskite structure phase not detected by XRD but seen on SEM-images of the samples. Comparison of the samples prepared from non-activated and activated batches showed higher density, lower open porosity, water uptake, and elemental leaching for the samples fabricated from mechanically activated oxide mixtures.

Stefanovsky, S.V.; Kirjanova, O.I.; Chizhevskaya, S.V.; Yudintsev, S.V.; Nikonov, B.S.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

348

Summary - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) for Low-Actvity Waste at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DBVS DBVS ETR Report Date: September 2006 ETR-3 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) for Low Activity Waste (LAW) at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with the safe retrieval, treatment and disposal of 53 million gallons of Hanford radioactive waste. The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being designed to treat and vitrify the High Level Waste (HLW) fraction in 20-25 years. The WTP is undersized for vitrifying the LAW fraction over the same time frame. The DOE is evaluating Bulk Vitrification as an alternative to increasing the size of the WTP LAW treatment process. Bulk vitrification is an in-container melting

349

Waste Determination and Section 3116 of the 2005 National Defense Authorization Act - HQ Perspective  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Level Waste Corporate Board Level Waste Corporate Board Section 3116 A H d t P ti A Headquarters Perspective Martin J. Letourneau Chair, Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group , p y p March 5, 2008 safety performance cleanup closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Section 3116 vs. DOE Order 435.1 * From a technical perspective, the criteria are essentially identical y * Both paths provide a methodology to treat and manage waste incidental to reprocessing as non-HLW * Section 3116 can only be applied in the states of South Carolina and Idaho * For consistency all future WIR Evaluations will be * For consistency, all future WIR Evaluations will be modeled after the Section 3116 process * One key difference is the regulatory responsibility of One key difference is the regulatory responsibility of

350

Statement of work for conceptual design of solidified high-level waste interim storage system project (phase I)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has embarked upon a course to acquire Hanford Site tank waste treatment and immobilization services using privatized facilities. This plan contains a two phased approach. Phase I is a ``proof-of-principle/commercial demonstration- scale`` effort and Phase II is a full-scale production effort. In accordance with the planned approach, interim storage (IS) and disposal of various products from privatized facilities are to be DOE furnished. The path forward adopted for Phase I solidification HLW IS entails use of Vaults 2 and 3 in the Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building, to be located in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This Statement of Work describes the work scope to be performed by the Architect-Engineer to prepare a conceptual design for the solidified HLW IS System.

Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

351

Control of high level radioactive waste-glass melters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A necessary step in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter feed preparation for the immobilization of High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) is reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0), permitting steam stripping of the Hg. Denitrition and associated NOx evolution is a secondary effect of the use of formic acid as the mercury-reducing agent. Under certain conditions the presence of transition or noble metals can result in significant formic acid decomposition, with associated CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} evolution. These processes can result in varying redox properties of melter feed, and varying sequential gaseous evolution of oxidants and hydrogen. Electrochemical methods for monitoring the competing processes are discussed. Laboratory scale techniques have been developed for simulating the large-scale reactions, investigating the relative effectiveness of the catalysts, and the effectiveness of catalytic poisons. The reversible nitrite poisoning of formic acid catalysts is discussed.

Bickford, D.F.; Coleman, C.J.; Hsu, C.L.W.; Eibling, R.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Nondestructive examination of DOE high-level waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

A number of DOE sites have buried tanks containing high-level waste. Tanks of particular interest am double-shell inside concrete cylinders. A program has been developed for the inservice inspection of the primary tank containing high-level waste (HLW), for testing of transfer lines and for the inspection of the concrete containment where possible. Emphasis is placed on the ultrasonic examination of selected areas of the primary tank, coupled with a leak-detection system capable of detecting small leaks through the wall of the primary tank. The NDE program is modelled after ASME Section XI in many respects, particularly with respects to the sampling protocol. Selected testing of concrete is planned to determine if there has been any significant degradation. The most probable failure mechanisms are corrosion-related so that the examination program gives major emphasis to possible locations for corrosion attack.

Bush, S.; Bandyopadhyay, K.; Kassir, M.; Mather, B.; Shewmon, P.; Streicher, M.; Thompson, B.; van Rooyen, D.; Weeks, J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Method for primary containment of cesium wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a cesium-retentive waste form, characterized by a high degree of compositional stability and mechanical integrity, is provided by subjecting a cesium-loaded zeolite to heat under conditions suitable for stabilizing the zeolite and immobilizing the cesium, and coating said zeolite for sufficient duration within a suitable environment with at least one dense layer of pyrolytic carbon to seal therein said cesium to produce a final, cesium-bearing waste form. Typically, the zeolite is stabilized and the cesium immobilized in less than four hours by confinement within an air environment maintained at about 600.degree. C. Coatings are thereafter applied by confining the calcined zeolite within a coating environment comprising inert fluidizing and carbon donor gases maintained at 1,000.degree. C. for a suitable duration.

Angelini, Peter (Oak Ridge, TN); Lackey, Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN); Blanco, Raymond E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bond, Walter D. (Knoxville, TN); Arnold, Jr., Wesley D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Summary of national and international fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide activities related to nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs are summarized. Several trends have developed in waste management strategy: All countries having to dispose of reprocessing wastes plan on conversion of the high-level waste (HLW) stream to a borosilicate glass and eventual emplacement of the glass logs, suitably packaged, in a deep geologic repository. Countries that must deal with plutonium-contaminated waste emphasize pluonium recovery, volume reduction and fixation in cement or bitumen in their treatment plans and expect to use deep geologic repositories for final disposal. Commercially available, classical engineering processing are being used worldwide to treat and immobilize low- and intermediate-level wastes (LLW, ILW); disposal to surface structures, shallow-land burial and deep-underground repositories, such as played-out mines, is being done widely with no obvious technical problems. Many countries have established extensive programs to prepare for construction and operation of geologic repositories. Geologic media being studied fall into three main classes: argillites (clay or shale); crystalline rock (granite, basalt, gneiss or gabbro); and evaporates (salt formations). Most nations plan to allow 30 years or longer between discharge of fuel from the reactor and emplacement of HLW or spent fuel is a repository to permit thermal and radioactive decay. Most repository designs are based on the mined-gallery concept, placing waste or spent fuel packages into shallow holes in the floor of the gallery. Many countries have established extensive and costly programs of site evaluation, repository development and safety assessment. Two other waste management problems are the subject of major R and D programs in several countries: stabilization of uranium mill tailing piles; and immobilization or disposal of contaminated nuclear facilities, namely reactors, fuel cycle plants and R and D laboratories.

Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

A comparision of TRUEX and CMP solvent extraction processes for actinide removal from ICPP wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is currently engaged in development efforts for the decontamination of high-level radioactive wastes generated from decades of nuclear fuel reprocessing. These wastes include several types of calcine, generated by high temperature solidification of reprocessing raffinates. In addition to calcine, there are smaller quantities of secondary wastes from decontamination and solvent wash activities which are typically referred to as sodium-bearing waste (SBW). Solvent extraction technologies based on octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO, the active extractant in the TRUEX process) and dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP, the active extractant in the CMP process) are being evaluated for actinide partitioning from these waste streams. Calcines must first be dissolved in an appropriate acidic solution prior to treatment in solvent extraction based processes. The SBW is currently stored as an acidic solution and readily amenable to liquid extraction techniques. Development efforts to date have revolved around defining and refining baseline flowsheets with the TRUEX and CMP processes for each waste stream. Another objective of this work was to determine which of these technologies are best suited for the treatment of ICPP wastes. Laboratory batch contacts were performed to identify relevant chemistry and distribution coefficients. This information was then used to establish baseline flowsheet configuration with regard to chemistry. The laboratory data were used to model the behavior of the actinides and other constituents in the wastes in countercurrent, continuous processes based on centrifugal contactor technology. The laboratory data and modelling results form the basis for comparison of the two processes.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Garn, T.G.; Law, J.D. [and others

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

A One System Integrated Approach to Simulant Selection for Hanford High Level Waste Mixing and Sampling Tests  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capabilities using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This represents one of the largest remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. Previous testing has focused on very specific TOC or WTP test objectives and consequently the simulants were narrowly focused on those test needs. A key attribute in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2010-2 is to ensure testing is performed with a simulant that represents the broad spectrum of Hanford waste. The One System Integrated Project Team is a new joint TOC and WTP organization intended to ensure technical integration of specific TOC and WTP systems and testing. A new approach to simulant definition has been mutually developed that will meet both TOC and WTP test objectives for the delivery and receipt of HLW. The process used to identify critical simulant characteristics, incorporate lessons learned from previous testing, and identify specific simulant targets that ensure TOC and WTP testing addresses the broad spectrum of Hanford waste characteristics that are important to mixing, sampling, and transfer performance are described.

Thien, Mike G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Barnes, Steve M. [URS, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

357

Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development of a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both combined waste stream options in terms of waste loading and/or decay time required before treatment. For Option 1, glass ceramics show an increase in waste loading of 15 mass % and reduction in decay time of 24 years. Decay times of {approx}50 years or longer are close to the expected age of the fuel that will be reprocessed when the modified open or closed fuel cycle is expected to be put into action. Option 2 shows a 2x to 2.5x increase in waste loading with decay times of only 45 years. Note that for Option 2 glass, the required decay time before treatment is only 35 years because of the waste loading limits related to the solubility of MoO{sub 3} in glass. If glass was evaluated for similar waste loadings as those achieved in Option 2 glass ceramics, the decay time would be significantly longer than 45 years. These glass ceramics are not optimized, but already they show the potential to dramatically reduce the amount of waste generated while still utilizing the proven processing technology used for glass production.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Sickafus, Kurt E.

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

358

Sintering and reactivity of CaCO{sub 3}-based sorbents for in situ CO{sub 2} capture in fluidized beds under realistic calcination conditions  

SciTech Connect

Sintering during calcination/carbonation may introduce substantial economic penalties for a CO{sub 2} looping cycle using limestone/dolomite-derived sorbents. Cyclic carbonation and calcination reactions were investigated for CO{sub 2} capture under fluidized bed combustion (FBC) conditions. The cyclic carbonation characteristics of CaCO{sub 3}-derived sorbents were compared at various calcination temperatures (700-925{sup o} C) and different gas stream compositions: pure -2 and a realistic calciner environment where high concentrations of CO{sub 2}>80-90% are expected. The conditions during carbonation were 700 {sup o}C and 15% CO{sub 2} in N{sub 2} and 0.18% or 0.50% SO{sub 2} in selected tests. Up to 20 calcination/carbonation cycles were conducted using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) apparatus. Three Canadian limestones were tested: Kelly Rock, Havelock, and Cadomin, using a prescreened particle size range of 400-650 {mu} m. Calcined Kelly Rock and Cadomin samples were hydrated by steam and examined. Sorbent reactivity was reduced whenever SO{sub 2} was introduced to either the calcining or carbonation streams. The multicyclic capture capacity of CaO for CO{sub 2} was substantially reduced at high concentrations of CO{sub 2} during the sorbent regeneration process and carbonation conversion of the Kelly Rock sample obtained after 20 cycles was only 10.5%. Hydrated sorbents performed better for CO{sub 2} capture but showed deterioration following calcination in high CO{sub 2} gas streams indicating that high CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} levels in the gas stream lead to lower CaO conversion because of enhanced sintering and irreversible formation of CaSO{sub 4}.

Lu, D.Y.; Hughes, R.W.; Anthony, E.J.; Manovic, V. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

SRNL PHASE 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE WTP WASTE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project is currently transitioning its emphasis from an engineering design and construction phase toward facility completion, start-up and commissioning. With this transition, the WTP Project has initiated more detailed assessments of the requirements that must be met during the actual processing of the Hanford Site tank waste. One particular area of interest is the waste qualification program. In general, the waste qualification program involves testing and analysis to demonstrate compliance with waste acceptance criteria, determine waste processability, and demonstrate laboratory-scale unit operations to support WTP operations. The testing and analysis are driven by data quality objectives (DQO) requirements necessary for meeting waste acceptance criteria for transfer of high-level wastes from the tank farms to the WTP, and for ensuring waste processability including proper glass formulations during processing within the WTP complex. Given the successful implementation of similar waste qualification efforts at the Savannah River Site (SRS) which were based on critical technical support and guidance from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), WTP requested subject matter experts (SMEs) from SRNL to support a technology exchange with respect to waste qualification programs in which a critical review of the WTP program could be initiated and lessons learned could be shared. The technology exchange was held on July 18-20, 2011 in Richland, Washington, and was the initial step in a multi-phased approach to support development and implementation of a successful waste qualification program at the WTP. The 3-day workshop was hosted by WTP with representatives from the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and SRNL in attendance as well as representatives from the US DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) and the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) Site Representative office. The purpose of the workshop was to share lessons learned and provide a technology exchange to support development of a technically defensible waste qualification program. The objective of this report is to provide a review, from SRNL's perspective, of the WTP waste qualification program as presented during the workshop. In addition to SRNL's perspective on the general approach to the waste qualification program, more detailed insight into the specific unit operations presented by WTP during the workshop is provided. This report also provides a general overview of the SRS qualification program which serves as a basis for a comparison between the two programs. Recommendations regarding specific steps are made based on the review and SRNL's lessons learned from qualification of SRS low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) to support maturation of the waste qualification program leading to WTP implementation.

Peeler, D.; Hansen, E.; Herman, C.; Marra, S.; Wilmarth, B.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

360

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste hlw calcine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Demonstration of the TRUEX process for the treatment of actual high activity tank waste at the INEEL using centrifugal contactors  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), formerly reprocessed spent nuclear fuel to recover fissionable uranium. The radioactive raffinates from the solvent extraction uranium recovery processes were converted to granular solids (calcine) in a high temperature fluidized bed. A secondary liquid waste stream was generated during the course of reprocessing, primarily from equipment decontamination between campaigns and solvent wash activities. This acidic tank waste cannot be directly calcined due to the high sodium content and has historically been blended with reprocessing raffinates or non-radioactive aluminum nitrate prior to calcination. Fuel reprocessing activities are no longer being performed at the ICPP, thereby eliminating the option of waste blending to deplete the waste inventory. Currently, approximately 5.7 million liters of high-activity waste are temporarily stored at the ICPP in large underground stainless-steel tanks. The United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare filed a Notice of Noncompliance in 1992 contending some of the underground waste storage tanks do not meet secondary containment. As part of a 1995 agreement between the State of Idaho, the Department of Energy, and the Department of Navy, the waste must be removed from the tanks by 2012. Treatment of the tank waste inventories by partitioning the radionuclides and immobilizing the resulting high-activity and low-activity waste streams is currently under evaluation. A recent peer review identified the most promising radionuclide separation technologies for evaluation. The Transuranic Extraction-(TRUEX) process was identified as a primary candidate for separation of the actinides from ICPP tank waste.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Time-Temperature-Transformation Study of Simulated Hanford Tank Waste (AZ-101) and Optimization of Glass Formulation for Processing Such Waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the current results of a study for the optimization of the quality of the wasteform to be produced by vitrification of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW). A simulant of the content of Hanford Tank AZ-101 has been used for the experiments. A first phase of the research focused on the wasteform composition and showed that a high quality and chemical-resistant wasteform can be formed incorporating 60 weight % of dried waste into a borosilicate glass enriched with zinc oxide and boric acid and provided some indication about the heat treatment of the melt. A second phase of the study, still in progress, refines these findings. A detailed crystallinity survey of the waste form after various heat treatments has been performed, culminating in the development of a time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram. The results of the first phase of research and preliminary results from the second phase are described.

Ramsey, W. G.; Kauffman, B. M.; Bricka, M.; Meaker, T. F.; Giordana, A.; Smith, J. D.; Miller, F. S.; Bohannan, E.; Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Jordan, J.; Venter, L.; Barletta, R. E.; Ramsey, A. A.; Maise, G. M.; Manowitz, B.; Steinberg, M.; Salzano, F.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

363

SMALL-SCALE TESTING OF PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The H-Canyon facility will be used to dissolve Pu metal for subsequent purification and conversion to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) using Phase II of HB-Line. To support the new mission, SRNL conducted a series of experiments to produce calcined plutonium (Pu) oxide and measure the physical properties and water adsorption of that material. This data will help define the process operating conditions and material handling steps for HB-Line. An anion exchange column experiment produced 1.4 L of a purified 52.6 g/L Pu solution. Over the next nine weeks, seven Pu(IV) oxalate precipitations were performed using the same stock Pu solution, with precipitator feed acidities ranging from 0.77 M to 3.0 M nitric acid and digestion times ranging from 5 to 30 minutes. Analysis of precipitator filtrate solutions showed Pu losses below 1% for all precipitations. The four larger precipitation batches matched the target oxalic acid addition time of 44 minutes within 4 minutes. The three smaller precipitation batches focused on evaluation of digestion time and the oxalic acid addition step ranged from 25-34 minutes because of pump limitations in the low flow range. Following the precipitations, 22 calcinations were performed in the range of 610-690 C, with the largest number of samples calcined at either 650 or 635 C. Characterization of the resulting PuO{sub 2} batches showed specific surface areas in the range of 5-14 m{sup 2}/g, with 16 of the 22 samples in the range of 5-10 m2/g. For samples analyzed with typical handling (exposed to ambient air for 15-45 minutes with relative humidities of 20-55%), the moisture content as measured by Mass Spectrometry ranged from 0.15 to 0.45 wt % and the total mass loss at 1000 C, as measured by TGA, ranged from 0.21 to 0.58 wt %. For the samples calcined between 635 and 650 C, the moisture content without extended exposure ranged from 0.20 to 0.38 wt %, and the TGA mass loss ranged from 0.26 to 0.46 wt %. Of these latter samples, the samples calcined at 650 C generally had lower specific surface areas and lower moisture contents than the samples calcined at 635 C, which matches expectations from the literature. Taken together, the TGA-MS results for samples handled at nominally 20-50% RH, without extended exposure, indicate that the Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation process followed by calcination at 635-650 C appears capable of producing PuO{sub 2} with moisture content < 0.5 wt% as required by the 3013 Standard. Exposures of PuO{sub 2} samples to ambient air for 3 or more hours generally showed modest mass gains that were primarily gains in moisture content. These results point to the need for a better understanding of the moisture absorption of PuO{sub 2} and serve as a warning that extended exposure times, particularly above the 50% RH level observed in this study will make the production of PuO{sub 2} with less than 0.5 wt % moisture more challenging. Samples analyzed in this study generally contained approximately 2 monolayer equivalents of moisture. In this study, the bulk of the moisture released from samples below 300 C, as did a significant portion of the CO{sub 2}. Samples in this study consistently released a minor amount of NO in the 40-300 C range, but no samples released CO or SO{sub 2}. TGA-MS results also showed that MS moisture content accounted for 80 {+-} 8% of the total mass loss at 1000 C measured by the TGA. The PuO{sub 2} samples produced had particles sizes that typically ranged from 0.2-88 {micro}m, with the mean particle size ranging from 6.4-9.3 {micro}m. The carbon content of ten different calcination batches ranged from 190-480 {micro}g C/g Pu, with an average value of 290 {micro}g C/g Pu. A statistical review of the calcination conditions and resulting SSA values showed that in both cases tested, calcination temperature had a significant effect on SSA, as expected from literature data. The statistical review also showed that batch size had a significant effect on SSA, but the narrow range of batch sizes tested is a compelling reason to set aside that result until tests

Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.; Scogin, J.; Daniel, G.; King, W.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

364

SMALL-SCALE TESTING OF PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION  

SciTech Connect

The H-Canyon facility will be used to dissolve Pu metal for subsequent purification and conversion to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) using Phase II of HB-Line. To support the new mission, SRNL conducted a series of experiments to produce calcined plutonium (Pu) oxide and measure the physical properties and water adsorption of that material. This data will help define the process operating conditions and material handling steps for HB-Line. An anion exchange column experiment produced 1.4 L of a purified 52.6 g/L Pu solution. Over the next nine weeks, seven Pu(IV) oxalate precipitations were performed using the same stock Pu solution, with precipitator feed acidities ranging from 0.77 M to 3.0 M nitric acid and digestion times ranging from 5 to 30 minutes. Analysis of precipitator filtrate solutions showed Pu losses below 1% for all precipitations. The four larger precipitation batches matched the target oxalic acid addition time of 44 minutes within 4 minutes. The three smaller precipitation batches focused on evaluation of digestion time and the oxalic acid addition step ranged from 25-34 minutes because of pump limitations in the low flow range. Following the precipitations, 22 calcinations were performed in the range of 610-690 C, with the largest number of samples calcined at either 650 or 635 C. Characterization of the resulting PuO{sub 2} batches showed specific surface areas in the range of 5-14 m{sup 2}/g, with 16 of the 22 samples in the range of 5-10 m2/g. For samples analyzed with typical handling (exposed to ambient air for 15-45 minutes with relative humidities of 20-55%), the moisture content as measured by Mass Spectrometry ranged from 0.15 to 0.45 wt % and the total mass loss at 1000 C, as measured by TGA, ranged from 0.21 to 0.58 wt %. For the samples calcined between 635 and 650 C, the moisture content without extended exposure ranged from 0.20 to 0.38 wt %, and the TGA mass loss ranged from 0.26 to 0.46 wt %. Of these latter samples, the samples calcined at 650 C generally had lower specific surface areas and lower moisture contents than the samples calcined at 635 C, which matches expectations from the literature. Taken together, the TGA-MS results for samples handled at nominally 20-50% RH, without extended exposure, indicate that the Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation process followed by calcination at 635-650 C appears capable of producing PuO{sub 2} with moisture content < 0.5 wt% as required by the 3013 Standard. Exposures of PuO{sub 2} samples to ambient air for 3 or more hours generally showed modest mass gains that were primarily gains in moisture content. These results point to the need for a better understanding of the moisture absorption of PuO{sub 2} and serve as a warning that extended exposure times, particularly above the 50% RH level observed in this study will make the production of PuO{sub 2} with less than 0.5 wt % moisture more challenging. Samples analyzed in this study generally contained approximately 2 monolayer equivalents of moisture. In this study, the bulk of the moisture released from samples below 300 C, as did a significant portion of the CO{sub 2}. Samples in this study consistently released a minor amount of NO in the 40-300 C range, but no samples released CO or SO{sub 2}. TGA-MS results also showed that MS moisture content accounted for 80 {+-} 8% of the total mass loss at 1000 C measured by the TGA. The PuO{sub 2} samples produced had particles sizes that typically ranged from 0.2-88 {micro}m, with the mean particle size ranging from 6.4-9.3 {micro}m. The carbon content of ten different calcination batches ranged from 190-480 {micro}g C/g Pu, with an average value of 290 {micro}g C/g Pu. A statistical review of the calcination conditions and resulting SSA values showed that in both cases tested, calcination temperature had a significant effect on SSA, as expected from literature data. The statistical review also showed that batch size had a significant effect on SSA, but the narrow range of batch sizes tested is a compelling reason to set aside that result until tests

Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.; Scogin, J.; Daniel, G.; King, W.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

365

Chemical cleaning of porous stainless steel cross-flow filter elements for nuclear waste applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) currently under construction for treatment of High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Hanford Site will rely on cross-flow ultrafiltration to provide solids-liquid separation as a core part of the treatment process. To optimize process throughput, periodic chemical cleaning of the porous stainless steel filter elements has been incorporated into the design of the plant. It is currently specified that chemical cleaning with nitric acid will occur after significant irreversible membrane fouling is observed. Irreversible fouling is defined as fouling that cannot be removed by backpulsing the filter. PNNL has investigated chemical cleaning processes as part of integrated tests with HLW simulants and with actual Hanford tank wastes. To quantify the effectiveness of chemical cleaning, the residual membrane resistance after cleaning was compared against the initial membrane resistance for each test in a series of long-term fouling tests. The impact of the small amount of residual resistance in these tests could not be separated from other parameters and the historical benchmark of >1 GPM/ft2 for clean water flux was determined to be an adequate metric for chemical cleaning. Using the results from these tests, a process optimization strategy is presented suggesting that for the simulant material under test, the value of chemical cleaning may be suspect. The period of enhanced filtration may not be enough to offset the down time required for chemical cleaning, without respect to the other associated costs.

Billing, Justin M.; Daniel, Richard C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

366

Steam Reforming Application for Treatment of DOE Sodium Bearing Tank Wastes at INL for ICP  

SciTech Connect

The patented THOR steam reforming waste treatment technology has been selected as the technology of choice for treatment of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). SBW is an acidic tank waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at INL. It consists primarily of waste from decontamination activities and laboratory wastes. SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid, alkali and aluminum nitrates, with minor amounts of many inorganic compounds including radionuclides, mainly cesium and strontium. The THOR steam reforming process will convert the SBW tank waste feed into a dry, solid, granular product. The THOR technology was selected to treat SBW, in part, because it can provide flexible disposal options to accommodate the final disposition path selected for SBW. THOR can produce a final end-product that will meet anticipated requirements for disposal as Remote-Handled TRU (RH-TRU) waste; and, with modifications, THOR can also produce a final endproduct that could be qualified for disposal as High Level Waste (HLW). SBW treatment will be take place within the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), a new facility that will be located at the INTEC. This paper provides an overview of the THOR process chemistry and process equipment being designed for the IWTU.

J. Bradley Mason; Kevin Ryan; Scott Roesener; Michael Cowen; Duane Schmoker; Pat Bacala; Bill Landman

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Automated Sampling and Sample Pneumatic Transport of High Level Tank Wastes at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development work, and design and engineering tasks performed, to provide a fully automated sampling system for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) project at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA. WTP is being built to enable the emptying and immobilization of highly active waste resulting from processing of irradiated nuclear fuel since the 1940's. The Hanford Tank Wastes are separated into Highly Level Waste (HLW), and Low Active Waste (LAW) fractions, which are separately immobilized by vitrification into borosilicate glass. Liquid samples must be taken of the waste and Glass Forming Chemicals (GFCs) before vitrification, and analyzed to insure the glass products will comply with specifications established in the WTP contract. This paper describes the non-radioactive testing of the sampling of the HLW and LAW melter feed simulants that was performed ahead of final equipment design. These trials were essential to demonstrate the effectiveness and repeatability of the integrated sampling system to collect representative samples, free of cross-contamination. Based on existing tried and proven equipment, the system design is tailored to meet the WTP project's specific needs. The design provides sampling capabilities from 47 separate sampling points and includes a pneumatic transport system to move the samples from the 3 separate facilities to the centralized analytical laboratory. The physical and rheological compositions of the waste simulants provided additional challenges in terms of the sample delivery, homogenization, and sample capture equipment design requirements. The activity levels of the actual waste forms, specified as 486 E9 Bq/liter (Cs-137), 1.92 E9 Bq/liter (Co-60), and 9.67 E9 Bq/liter (Eu-154), influenced the degree of automation provided, and justified the minimization of manual intervention needed to obtain and deliver samples from the process facilities to the analytical laboratories. Maintaining high integrity primary and secondary confinement, including during the cross-site transportation of the samples, is a key requirement that is achieved and assured at all times. (authors)

Phillips, C.; Richardson, J. E. [BNG America, 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA, 99354 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

High Level Waste System at SRS  

Tank Under Construction Tanks are built at grade and then backfilled with dirt to provide ... Hanford discussion. 2005-01-19 2005-01-19 HLW Overview ...

369

Technology Development for Nuclear Waste Stabilization I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... These systems have supported vitrification facilities at West Valley, DWPF and M- Area at Savannah River, WTP HLW and LAW at Hanford,...

370

Method for solidification of radioactive and other hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

Solidification of liquid radioactive waste, and other hazardous wastes, is accomplished by the method of the invention by incorporating the waste into a porous glass crystalline molded block. The porous block is first loaded with the liquid waste and then dehydrated and exposed to thermal treatment at 50-1,000.degree. C. The porous glass crystalline molded block consists of glass crystalline hollow microspheres separated from fly ash (cenospheres), resulting from incineration of fossil plant coals. In a preferred embodiment, the porous glass crystalline blocks are formed from perforated cenospheres of grain size -400+50, wherein the selected cenospheres are consolidated into the porous molded block with a binder, such as liquid silicate glass. The porous blocks are then subjected to repeated cycles of saturating with liquid waste, and drying, and after the last cycle the blocks are subjected to calcination to transform the dried salts to more stable oxides. Radioactive liquid waste can be further stabilized in the porous blocks by coating the internal surface of the block with metal oxides prior to adding the liquid waste, and by coating the outside of the block with a low-melting glass or a ceramic after the waste is loaded into the block.

Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana A. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Voskresenskaya, Elena N. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Kostin, Eduard M. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Pavlov, Vyacheslav F. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Revenko, Yurii A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Sharonova, Olga M. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Macheret, Yevgeny (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Hazardous Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   General refractory disposal options...D landfill (b) Characterized hazardous waste by TCLP

372

EPRI Review of Geologic Disposal for Used Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste: Volume II--U.S. Regulations for Geologic Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. efforts to site and construct a deep geologic repository for used fuel and high level radioactive waste (HLW) proceeded sporadically over a three-decade period from the late 1950s until 1982, when the U.S. Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) codifying a national approach for developing a deep geologic repository. Amendment of the NWPA in 1987 resulted in a number of dramatic changes in direction for the U.S. program, most notably the selection of Yucca Mountain as the only site of t...

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z