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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Carbon Material Based Heat Exchanger for Waste Heat Recovery ...  

Industrial processing plants Nuclear power Solar power ... Carbon Material Based Heat Exchanger for Waste Heat Recovery from Engine Exhaust Contact:

2

An Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recovery of waste heat energy is one element of a complete energy conservation plan. In addition to contributing to the goal of saving energy, utilization of waste heat is also an important source of cost savings. This presentation details the steps necessary to develop a good waste heat recovery plan. The necessity of performing a complete waste heat audit is detailed, together with guidelines to selecting waste heat recovery projects. The economic analysis of potential projects, and the art of selling these projects to management are discussed. Also included are brief descriptions of the various types of heat exchangers commonly used in industry today.

Darby, D. F.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Using Heat Pipes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For almost a decade now, heat pipes with secondary finned surfaces have been utilized in counter flow heat exchangers to recover sensible energy from industrial exhaust gases. Over 3,000 such heat exchangers are now in service, recovering an estimated energy equivalent of nearly 1.1 million barrels of oil annually. Energy recovered by these units has been used to either preheat process supply air or to heat plant comfort make-up air. Heat pipe heat exchangers have been applied to an ever-expanding variety of industrial processes. One notable application in recent years has been for combustion airs preheat of fired heaters in petroleum refineries and petrochemical plants. Another recent development has been a waste heat recovery boiler using heat pipes. This device has a number of advantageous features. Field operational experience of several units in service has been excellent.

Ruch, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Heat Recovery From Solid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More opportunity exists today for the successful implementation of resource recovery projects than at any other period. However, that doesn't mean that energy/resource recovery exists for everyone. You must have a favorable match of all the critical areas of evaluation, including the cost of fuel, cost of solid waste disposal, plant energy requirements, available technology, etc.

Underwood, O. W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment - Cross-cutting Research and Development Priorities Speaker(s): Sachin Nimbalkar Date: January 17, 2013 - 11:00am...

6

Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on feedwater economizers for waste heat recovery provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment - Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment - Cross-cutting Research and Development Priorities Speaker(s): Sachin Nimbalkar Date: January 17, 2013 - 11:00am Location: 90-2063 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Aimee McKane Waste heat is generated from several industrial systems used in manufacturing. The waste heat sources are distributed throughout a plant. The largest source for most industries is exhaust / flue gases or heated air from heating systems. This includes the high temperature gases from burners in process heating, lower temperature gases from heat treat, dryers, and heaters, heat from heat exchangers, cooling liquids and gases etc. The previous studies and direct contact with the industry as well as equipment suppliers have shown that a large amount of waste heat is not

8

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WOW operates in the energy efficiency field- one of the fastest growing energy sectors in the world today. The two key products - WOWGen® and WOWClean® provide more energy at cheaper cost and lower emissions. •WOWGen® - Power Generation from Industrial Waste Heat •WOWClean® - Multi Pollutant emission control system. Current power generation technology uses only 35% of the energy in a fossil fuel and converts it to useful output. The remaining 65% is discharged into the environment as waste heat at temperatures ranging from 300°F to 1,200°F. This waste heat can be captured using the WOWGen® technology and turned into electricity. This efficiency is up to twice the rate of competing technologies. Compelling economics and current environmental policy are stimulating industry interest. WOWGen® power plants can generate between 1 - 25 MW of electricity. Project payback is between two to five years with IRR of 15% 30%. Nearly anywhere industrial waste heat is present, the WOW products can be applied. Beneficial applications of heat recovery power generation can be found in Industry (e.g. steel, glass, cement, lime, pulp and paper, refining and petrochemicals), Power Generation (CHP, biomass, biofuel, traditional fuels, gasifiers, diesel engines) and Natural Gas (pipeline compression stations, processing plants). Sources such as stack flue gases, steam, diesel exhaust, hot oil or combinations of sources can be used to generate power. WOWGen® can also be used with stand alone power plants burning fossil fuels or using renewable energy sources such as solar and biomass.

Romero, M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Waste Heat Recovery in Industrial Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-temperature waste heat streams account for the majority of the industrial waste heat inventory. With a reference temperature of 60°F (16°C), 65% of the waste heat is below 450°F (232°C) and 99% is below 1,200°F (649°C). With a reference temperature of 300°F (149°C), 14% of the waste heat is below 450°F, and 96% is below 1,200°F. Waste heat is concentrated in a few industrial manufacturing sectors. Based on a review of 21 manufacturing sectors, the top two sectors that produce waste heat are petroleu...

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

10

Waste Heat Recovery and Furnace Technology - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Each source of waste heat is listed together with the assessment for potential cogeneration or direct recovery. The overall impact on energy ...

11

AHEX-A New, Combined Waste Heat Recovery and Emission ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, AHEX-A New, Combined Waste Heat Recovery and Emission Control System for Anode Bake Furnaces. Author(s), Anders Kenneth Sorhuus, ...

12

Waste water heat recovery appliance. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An efficient convective waste heat recovery heat exchanger was designed and tested. The prototype appliance was designed for use in laundromats and other small commercial operations which use large amounts of hot water. Information on general characteristics of the coin-op laundry business, energy use in laundromats, energy saving resources already in use, and the potential market for energy saving devices in laundromats was collected through a literature search and interviews with local laundromat operators in Fort Collins, Colorado. A brief survey of time-use patterns in two local laundromats was conducted. The results were used, with additional information from interviews with owners, as the basis for the statistical model developed. Mathematical models for the advanced and conventional types were developed and the resulting computer program listed. Computer simulations were made using a variety of parameters; for example, different load profiles, hold-up volumes, wall resistances, and wall areas. The computer simulation results are discussed with regard to the overall conclusions. Various materials were explored for use in fabricating the appliance. Resistance to corrosion, workability, and overall suitability for laundromat installations were considered for each material.

Chapin, H.D.; Armstrong, P.R.; Chapin, F.A.W.

1983-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

13

Mobile power plants : waste body heat recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Novel methods to convert waste metabolic heat into useful and useable amounts of electricity were studied. Thermoelectric, magneto hydrodynamic, and piezo-electric energy conversions at the desired scope were evaluated to ...

Gibbons, Jonathan S. (Jonathan Scott), 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

RANKINE CYCLE WASTE HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM - Energy Innovation Portal  

This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a ...

15

Use of photovoltaics for waste heat recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for recovering waste heat in the form of radiated light, e.g. red visible light and/or infrared light includes a housing having a viewing window, and a photovoltaic cell mounted in the housing in a relationship to the viewing window, wherein rays of radiated light pass through the viewing window and impinge on surface of the photovoltaic cell. The housing and/or the cell are cooled so that the device can be used with a furnace for an industrial process, e.g. mounting the device with a view of the interior of the heating chamber of a glass making furnace. In this manner, the rays of the radiated light generated during the melting of glass batch materials in the heating chamber pass through the viewing window and impinge on the surface of the photovoltaic cells to generate electric current which is passed onto an electric load.

Polcyn, Adam D

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

16

Application Research of Evaporative Cooling in the Waste Heat Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaporative condenser is one kind of high-efficient and energy-water saving heat exchange equipment, which has been widely applied in many engineering fields. The theory and product characteristic of evaporative condenser is introduced in this paper. ... Keywords: Evaporative condenser, Waste heat recovery, Energy saving, Water saving

Zhijiang Wu; Nan Wang; Gongsheng Zhu

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Waste Heat Recovery System: Lightweight Thermal Energy Recovery (LIGHTER) System  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GM is using shape memory alloys that require as little as a 10°C temperature difference to convert low-grade waste heat into mechanical energy. When a stretched wire made of shape memory alloy is heated, it shrinks back to its pre-stretched length. When the wire cools back down, it becomes more pliable and can revert to its original stretched shape. This expansion and contraction can be used directly as mechanical energy output or used to drive an electric generator. Shape memory alloy heat engines have been around for decades, but the few devices that engineers have built were too complex, required fluid baths, and had insufficient cycle life for practical use. GM is working to create a prototype that is practical for commercial applications and capable of operating with either air- or fluid-based heat sources. GM’s shape memory alloy based heat engine is also designed for use in a variety of non-vehicle applications. For example, it can be used to harvest non-vehicle heat sources, such as domestic and industrial waste heat and natural geothermal heat, and in HVAC systems and generators.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration in a Meat Processing Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A case study is reviewed on a heat recovery system installed in a meat processing facility to preheat water for the plant hot water supply. The system utilizes waste superheat from the facility's 1,350-ton ammonia refrigeration system. The heat recovery system consists of a shell and tube heat exchanger (16"? x 14'0") installed in the compressor hot gas discharge line. Water is recirculated from a 23,000-gallon tempered water storage tank to the heat exchanger by a circulating pump at the rate of 100 gallons per minute. All make-up water to the plant hot water system is supplied from this tempered water storage tank, which is maintained at a constant filled level. Tests to determine the actual rate of heat recovery were conducted from October 3, 1979 to October 12, 1979, disclosing an average usage of 147,000 gallons of hot water daily. These tests illustrated a varied heat recovery of from 0.5 to 1.0 million BTU per hour. The deviations were the result of both changing refrigeration demands and compressor operating modes. An average of 16 million BTU per day was realized, resulting in reduced boiler fuel costs of $30,000 annually, based on the present $.80 per gallon #2 fuel oil price. At the total installed cost of $79,000, including test instrumentation, the project was found to be economically viable. The study has demonstrated the technical and economic feasibility of refrigeration waste heat recovery as a positive energy conservation strategy which has broad applications in industry and commerce.

Murphy, W. T.; Woods, B. E.; Gerdes, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Cogeneration Waste Heat Recovery at a Coke Calcining Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PSE Inc. recently completed the design, construction and start-up of a cogeneration plant in which waste heat in the high temperature flue gases of three existing coke calcining kilns is recovered to produce process steam and electrical energy. The heat previously exhausted to the atmosphere is now converted to steam by waste heat recovery boilers. Eighty percent of the steam produced is metered for sale to a major oil refinery, while the remainder passes through a steam turbine generator and is used for deaeration and feedwater heating. The electricity produced is used for the plant auxiliaries and sold to the local utility. Many design concepts were incorporated into the plant which provided for high plant availability, reliability and energy efficiency. This paper will show how these concepts were implemented and incorporated into the detailed design of the plant while making cogeneration a cost effective way to save conventional fuels. Operating data since plant start-up will also be presented.

Coles, R. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Waste Heat Recovery – Submerged Arc Furnaces (SAF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Submerged Arc Furnaces are used to produce high temperature alloys. These furnaces typically run at 3000°F using high voltage electricity along with metallurgical carbon to reduce metal oxides to pure elemental form. The process as currently designed consumes power and fuel that yields an energy efficiency of approximately 40% (Total Btu’s required to reduce to elemental form/ Btu Input). The vast majority of heat is lost to the atmosphere or cooling water system. The furnaces can be modified to recover this heat and convert it to power. The system will then reduce the amount of purchased power by approximately 25% without any additional use of fuel. The cost of this power is virtually unchanged over the life of the project because of the use of capital to displace fuel consumed from the purchased power source.

O'Brien, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Waste Heat Recovery by Organic Fluid Rankine Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of Organic Rankine Cycle for waste heat recovery presents several characteristics which are analyzed in details. After a short comparison with steam cycles, the Organic Rankine Cycle is described : its simplicity is shown and achievable efficiencies versus heat source temperature are given. Available fluids are presented. The choice of the fluid allows a good adaptation to temperature and power for each application. The most interesting field for Organic Rankine Cycles are low mechanical powers of a few megawatts and medium temperatures, about 500 C/600 C, for flue gas. The very simple technology of turbines is shown. Three examples are presented. The first one is a test loop of 300 thermal kW built in BERTIN & Cie laboratory to experiment a supersonic turbine designed by the same company for organic vapor at 250 C. The second gives the main characteristics of recovery from exhaust gas of Diesel engines. The last deals with possible recovery from air quenching of clinker in cement plants.

Verneau, A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants By Fluidized Beds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Not too many years ago energy costs and efficiencies were virtually ignored by corporate decision makers. The prevailing attitude was 'my business is manufacturing and my capital is best spent improving and expanding my manufacturing capacity.' With energy now contributing a significant fraction of the overall product cost in many industries, there is general recognition that control of fuel and electric costs is just as important to remaining competitive as is improving manufacturing methods. This is particularly true in the cement industry. Cement manufacture consists of mining and grinding rocks, melting them to form clinkers, then grinding those clinkers to a powder. Through recovery of waste heat and inclusion of technology such as flash calciners, the industry has reduced the fuel requirement per ton of cement from about 7 million Btu per ton in old plants to less than 3 million Btu per ton in the most modern plants.

Fraley, L. D.; Ksiao, H. K.; Thunem, C. B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

High temperature heat pipes for waste heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

Operation of heat pipes in air at temperatures above 1200/sup 0/K has been accomplished using SiC as a shell material and a chemical vapor deposit (CVD) tungsten inner liner for protection of the ceramic from the sodium working fluid. The CVD tungsten has been used as a distribution wick for the gravity assisted heat pipe through the development of a columnar tungsten surface structure, achieved by control of the metal vapor deposition rate. Wick performance has been demonstrated in tests at approximately 2 kW throughput with a 19-mm-i.d. SiC heat pipe. Operation of ceramic heat pipes in repeated start cycle tests has demonstrated their ability to withstand temperature rise rates of greater than 1.2 K/s.

Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Conventional Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermoelectric (TE) generators convert heat directly into electricity when a temperature gradient is applied across junctions of two dissimilar metals. The devices could increase the fuel economy of conventional vehicles by recapturing part of the waste heat from engine exhaust and generating electricity to power accessory loads. A simple vehicle and engine waste heat model showed that a Class 8 truck presents the least challenging requirements for TE system efficiency, mass, and cost; these trucks have a fairly high amount of exhaust waste heat, have low mass sensitivity, and travel many miles per year. These factors help maximize fuel savings and economic benefits. A driving/duty cycle analysis shows strong sensitivity of waste heat, and thus TE system electrical output, to vehicle speed and driving cycle. With a typical alternator, a TE system could allow electrification of 8%-15% of a Class 8 truck's accessories for 2%-3% fuel savings. More research should reduce system cost and improve economics.

Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities: An Update on Industrial High Temperature Heat Pump Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is estimated that as much as 20% to 50% of energy consumed is lost via waste heat contained in streams of exhaust gases and hot liquids, as well as through conduction, convection or radiation emanating from the surface of hot equipment. It is also estimated that in some cases, such as industrial furnaces, efficiency improvements resulting from waste heat recovery can improve efficiency by 10% to as much as 50%. This technical update is a continuation of research conducted by the Electric Power ...

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

27

Renewable energy of waste heat recovery system for automobiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system to recover waste heat comprised of eight thermoelectric generators (TEGs) to convert heat from the exhaust pipe of an automobile to electrical energy has been constructed. Simulations and experiments for the thermoelectric module in this system are undertaken to assess the feasibility of these applications. In order to estimate the temperature difference between thermoelectric elements

Cheng-Ting Hsu; Da-Jeng Yao; Ke-Jyun Ye; Ben Yu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Design and development of eco-friendly alcohol engine fitted with waste heat recovery system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper discusses the design and development of an eco-friendly alcohol engine fitted with the waste heat recovery system as a remedial alternative to the existing commonly used internal combustion engine. With the present trends in Internal ...

G. Vijayan Iyer; Nikos E. Mastorakis

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Mild Hybrid System in Combination with Waste Heat Recovery for Commercial Vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Performance of two different waste heat recovery systems (one based on Rankine cycle and the other one using thermoelectricity) combined with non-hybrid, mild-hybrid and… (more)

Namakian, Mohsen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Conventional Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Thermoelectric (TE) generators convert heat directly into electricity when a temperature gradient is applied across junctions of two dissimilar metals. The devices could increase the fuel economy of conventional vehicles by recapturing part of the waste heat from engine exhaust and generating electricity to power accessory loads. A simple vehicle and engine waste heat model showed that a Class 8 truck presents the least challenging requirements for TE system efficiency, mass, and cost; these trucks have a fairly high amount of exhaust waste heat, have low mass sensitivity, and travel many miles per year. These factors help maximize fuel savings and economic benefits. A driving/duty cycle analysis shows strong sensitivity of waste heat, and thus TE system electrical output, to vehicle speed and driving cycle. With a typical alternator, a TE system could allow electrification of 8%-15% of a Class 8 truck's accessories for 2%-3% fuel savings. More research should reduce system cost and improve economics.

Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Waste heat recovery in automobile engines : potential solutions and benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Less than 30% of the energy in a gallon of gasoline reaches the wheels of a typical car; most of the remaining energy is lost as heat. Since most of the energy consumed by an internal combustion engine is wasted, capturing ...

Ruiz, Joaquin G., 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Waste Heat Powered Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit for LPG Recovery  

SciTech Connect

An emerging DOE-sponsored technology has been deployed. The technology recovers light ends from a catalytic reformer plant using waste heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration. It is deployed at the 17,000 bpd Bloomfield, New Mexico refinery of Western Refining Company. The technology recovers approximately 50,000 barrels per year of liquefied petroleum gas that was formerly being flared. The elimination of the flare also reduces CO2 emissions by 17,000 tons per year, plus tons per year reductions in NOx, CO, and VOCs. The waste heat is supplied directly to the absorption unit from the Unifiner effluent. The added cooling of that stream relieves a bottleneck formerly present due to restricted availability of cooling water. The 350oF Unifiner effluent is cooled to 260oF. The catalytic reformer vent gas is directly chilled to minus 25oF, and the FCC column overhead reflux is chilled by 25oF glycol. Notwithstanding a substantial cost overrun and schedule slippage, this project can now be considered a success: it is both profitable and highly beneficial to the environment. The capabilities of directly-integrated waste-heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration and their benefits to the refining industry have been demonstrated.

Donald C, Energy Concepts Co.; Lauber, Eric, Western Refining Co.

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

33

Energy recovery from waste incineration: Assessing the importance of district heating networks  

SciTech Connect

Municipal solid waste incineration contributes with 20% of the heat supplied to the more than 400 district heating networks in Denmark. In evaluation of the environmental consequences of this heat production, the typical approach has been to assume that other (fossil) fuels could be saved on a 1:1 basis (e.g. 1 GJ of waste heat delivered substitutes for 1 GJ of coal-based heat). This paper investigates consequences of waste-based heat substitution in two specific Danish district heating networks and the energy-associated interactions between the plants connected to these networks. Despite almost equal electricity and heat efficiencies at the waste incinerators connected to the two district heating networks, the energy and CO{sub 2} accounts showed significantly different results: waste incineration in one network caused a CO{sub 2} saving of 48 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ energy input while in the other network a load of 43 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ. This was caused mainly by differences in operation mode and fuel types of the other heat producing plants attached to the networks. The paper clearly indicates that simple evaluations of waste-to-energy efficiencies at the incinerator are insufficient for assessing the consequences of heat substitution in district heating network systems. The paper also shows that using national averages for heat substitution will not provide a correct answer: local conditions need to be addressed thoroughly otherwise we may fail to assess correctly the heat recovery from waste incineration.

Fruergaard, T.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Astrup, T., E-mail: tha@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Advanced Thermoelectric Materials for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery in Process Industries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the project was to integrate advanced thermoelectric materials into a power generation device that could convert waste heat from an industrial process to electricity with an efficiency approaching 20%. Advanced thermoelectric materials were developed with figure-of-merit ZT of 1.5 at 275 degrees C. These materials were not successfully integrated into a power generation device. However, waste heat recovery was demonstrated from an industrial process (the combustion exhaust gas stream of an oxyfuel-fired flat glass melting furnace) using a commercially available (5% efficiency) thermoelectric generator coupled to a heat pipe. It was concluded that significant improvements both in thermoelectric material figure-of-merit and in cost-effective methods for capturing heat would be required to make thermoelectric waste heat recovery viable for widespread industrial application.

Adam Polcyn; Moe Khaleel

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

35

Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Chinese translation of ITP fact sheet about installing Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces. For most fuel-fired heating equipment, a large amount of the heat supplied is wasted as exhaust or flue gases. In furnaces, air and fuel are mixed and burned to generate heat, some of which is transferred to the heating device and its load. When the heat transfer reaches its practical limit, the spent combustion gases are removed from the furnace via a flue or stack. At this point, these gases still hold considerable thermal energy. In many systems, this is the greatest single heat loss. The energy efficiency can often be increased by using waste heat gas recovery systems to capture and use some of the energy in the flue gas. For natural gas-based systems, the amount of heat contained in the flue gases as a percentage of the heat input in a heating system can be estimated by using Figure 1. Exhaust gas loss or waste heat depends on flue gas temperature and its mass flow, or in practical terms, excess air resulting from combustion air supply and air leakage into the furnace. The excess air can be estimated by measuring oxygen percentage in the flue gases.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Smelting Exhaust Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a cost efficient capture of more valuable heat (higher exergy), heat exchangers should operate on the exhaust gases upstream of the gas treatment plants.

37

Evaluation of Waste Heat Recovery and Utilization from Residential Appliances and Fixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Summary In every home irrespective of its size, location, age, or efficiency, heat in the form of drainwater or dryer exhaust is wasted. Although from a waste stream, this energy has the potential for being captured, possibly stored, and then reused for preheating hot water or air thereby saving operating costs to the homeowner. In applications such as a shower and possibly a dryer, waste heat is produced at the same time as energy is used, so that a heat exchanger to capture the waste energy and return it to the supply is all that is needed. In other applications such as capturing the energy in drainwater from a tub, dishwasher, or washing machine, the availability of waste heat might not coincide with an immediate use for energy, and consequently a heat exchanger system with heat storage capacity (i.e. a regenerator) would be necessary. This study describes a two-house experimental evaluation of a system designed to capture waste heat from the shower, dishwasher clothes washer and dryer, and to use this waste heat to offset some of the hot water energy needs of the house. Although each house was unoccupied, they were fitted with equipment that would completely simulate the heat loads and behavior of human occupants including operating the appliances and fixtures on a demand schedule identical to Building American protocol (Hendron, 2009). The heat recovery system combined (1) a gravity-film heat exchanger (GFX) installed in a vertical section of drainline, (2) a heat exchanger for capturing dryer exhaust heat, (3) a preheat tank for storing the captured heat, and (4) a small recirculation pump and controls, so that the system could be operated anytime that waste heat from the shower, dishwasher, clothes washer and dryer, and in any combination was produced. The study found capturing energy from the dishwasher and clothes washer to be a challenge since those two appliances dump waste water over a short time interval. Controls based on the status of the dump valve on these two appliances would have eliminated uncertainty in knowing when waste water was flowing and the recovery system operated. The study also suggested that capture of dryer exhaust heat to heat incoming air to the dryer should be examined as an alternative to using drying exhaust energy for water heating. The study found that over a 6-week test period, the system in each house was able to recover on average approximately 3000 W-h of waste heat daily from these appliance and showers with slightly less on simulated weekdays and slightly more on simulated weekends which were heavy wash/dry days. Most of these energy savings were due to the shower/GFX operation, and the least savings were for the dishwasher/GFX operation. Overall, the value of the 3000 W-h of displaced energy would have been $0.27/day based on an electricity price of $.09/kWh. Although small for today s convention house, these savings are significant for a home designed to approach maximum affordable efficiency where daily operating costs for the whole house are less than a dollar per day. In 2010 the actual measured cost of energy in one of the simulated occupancy houses which waste heat recovery testing was undertaken was $0.77/day.

Tomlinson, John J [ORNL; Christian, Jeff [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Waste Heat Recovery From Stacks Using Direct-Contact Condensing Heat Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flue gases exiting the stack of a boiler create thermal losses normally amounting to 15 to 20 percent of the high heating value of the fuel fired. By capturing and using this lost energy using condensing heat recovery, the overall efficiency of the system can be raised to over 95 percent. This paper reviews the origins of stack heat losses, direct contact condensing heat recovery processes, the Rocket Research Company CON-X condensing recuperator equipment and systems, site specific case studies and fuels and condensate acidity. A detailed example of the determination of the magnitude of stack heat losses is presented along with a methodology for the reader to make a preliminary heat recovery evaluation.

Thorn, W. F.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Waste Heat Recovery Trial from Aluminum Reduction Cell Exhaust ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using heat exchangers with in-line and staggered tube arrangements placed before fume treatment plant (FTP) we will be able to recover enough amount of ...

40

Advanced Energy and Water Recovery Technology from Low Grade Waste Heat  

SciTech Connect

The project has developed a nanoporous membrane based water vapor separation technology that can be used for recovering energy and water from low-temperature industrial waste gas streams with high moisture contents. This kind of exhaust stream is widely present in many industrial processes including the forest products and paper industry, food industry, chemical industry, cement industry, metal industry, and petroleum industry. The technology can recover not only the sensible heat but also high-purity water along with its considerable latent heat. Waste heats from such streams are considered very difficult to recover by conventional technology because of poor heat transfer performance of heat-exchanger type equipment at low temperature and moisture-related corrosion issues. During the one-year Concept Definition stage of the project, the goal was to prove the concept and technology in the laboratory and identify any issues that need to be addressed in future development of this technology. In this project, computational modeling and simulation have been conducted to investigate the performance of a nanoporous material based technology, transport membrane condenser (TMC), for waste heat and water recovery from low grade industrial flue gases. A series of theoretical and computational analyses have provided insight and support in advanced TMC design and experiments. Experimental study revealed condensation and convection through the porous membrane bundle was greatly improved over an impermeable tube bundle, because of the membrane capillary condensation mechanism and the continuous evacuation of the condensate film or droplets through the membrane pores. Convection Nusselt number in flue gas side for the porous membrane tube bundle is 50% to 80% higher than those for the impermeable stainless steel tube bundle. The condensation rates for the porous membrane tube bundle also increase 60% to 80%. Parametric study for the porous membrane tube bundle heat transfer performance was also done, which shows this heat transfer enhancement approach works well in a wide parameters range for typical flue gas conditions. Better understanding of condensing heat transfer mechanism for porous membrane heat transfer surfaces, shows higher condensation and heat transfer rates than non-permeable tubes, due to existence of the porous membrane walls. Laboratory testing has documented increased TMC performance with increased exhaust gas moisture content levels, which has exponentially increased potential markets for the product. The TMC technology can uniquely enhance waste heat recovery in tandem with water vapor recovery for many other industrial processes such as drying, wet and dry scrubber exhaust gases, dewatering, and water chilling. A new metallic substrate membrane tube development and molded TMC part fabrication method, provides an economical way to expand this technology for scaled up applications with less than 3 year payback expectation. A detailed market study shows a broad application area for this advanced waste heat and water recovery technology. A commercialization partner has been lined up to expand this technology to this big market. This research work led to new findings on the TMC working mechanism to improve its performance, better scale up design approaches, and economical part fabrication methods. Field evaluation work needs to be done to verify the TMC real world performance, and get acceptance from the industry, and pave the way for our commercial partner to put it into a much larger waste heat and waste water recovery market. This project is addressing the priority areas specified for DOE Industrial Technologies Program's (ITP's): Energy Intensive Processes (EIP) Portfolio - Waste Heat Minimization and Recovery platform.

Dexin Wang

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat pipe support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Futhermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swages end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe, and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

42

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat pipe support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Furthermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swaged end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe, and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

43

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat pipe support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Furthermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swaged end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

44

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Furthermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swaged end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe, and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

45

Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recovery and reuse of industrial waste heat may be limited if an energy source cannot be fully utilized in an otherwise available out of phase or unequal capacity end-use process. This paper summarizes the results of a technical and economic evaluation involving process data from 12 industrial plants to determine if thermal energy storage (TES) systems can be used with commercially available energy management equipment to enhance the recovery and utilization of industrial waste heat. Results showing estimated installed costs, net energy savings, economic benefits, and utility impact are presented at both single plant and industry levels for 14 of 24 applications having after tax ROR's in excess of 20 percent. Maximum energy and cost savings for 9 of these 14 systems are shown to be conditional on the use of TES.

McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Waste Heat Recovery from the Advanced Test Reactor Secondary Coolant Loop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the feasibility of using a waste heat recovery system (WHRS) to recover heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) secondary coolant system (SCS). This heat would be used to preheat air for space heating of the reactor building, thus reducing energy consumption, carbon footprint, and energy costs. Currently, the waste heat from the reactor is rejected to the atmosphere via a four-cell, induced-draft cooling tower. Potential energy and cost savings are 929 kW and $285K/yr. The WHRS would extract a tertiary coolant stream from the SCS loop and pump it to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, from which the heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air supplied to the heating and ventilation system. The use of glycol was proposed to avoid the freezing issues that plagued and ultimately caused the failure of a WHRS installed at the ATR in the 1980s. This study assessed the potential installation of a new WHRS for technical, logistical, and economic feasibility.

Donna Post Guillen

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cement industry is the most energy-intensive industry in the United States in terms of energy cost as a percentage of the product according to a 1973 report by the Cost of Living Council. Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver Division, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been completed and illustrates very attractive cost benefits realized from waste heat recovery/thermal storage systems. This paper will identify and quantify the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, establish uses of this energy, exhibit various energy storage concepts, and present a methodology for selection of most promising energy storage systems. Two storage systems show the best promise - rock beds and draw salt storage. Thermal performance and detailed economic analyses have been performed on these systems and will be presented. Through use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 1013 BTU per year, or an equivalent of 4.0 x 10 barrels of oil per year, can be conserved. Attractive rates of return on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for utilization and further development.

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Waste Heat Doesn't Have to be a Waste of Money- The American & Efird Heat Recovery Project: A First for the Textile Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1989 American & Efird, Inc., decided to upgrade their heat recovery system at its Dyeing & Finishing Plant in Mt. Holly, North Carolina. They chose an electric industrial process heat pump to enhance heat recovery and to lower operating costs. This application of the industrial process heat pump was the first of its kind in the American textile industry and was the result of a three year cooperative effort between American & Efird, Inc. and Duke Power Company. This innovative application of heat pump technology has allowed American & Efird to gain additional boiler capacity, lower waste water discharge temperatures and achieve significant energy savings. Duke Power will gain an additional 572,000 KWH in annual sales, of which approximately 70 percent will occur during off-peak hours, and American & Efird will enjoy lower overall energy costs.

Smith, S. W.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Organic Rankine Cycle Systems for Waste Heat Recovery in Refineries and Chemical Process Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of a low temperature Rankine cycle system using R-113 working fluid for recovery and conversion of process waste heat is described for typical applications in oil refineries and chemical plants. The system is designed to produce electric power from waste heat available in a temperature range from 180oF to 400oF. The design of a new ORC turbo generator uniquely adapted to applications of this type is presented. The unit has been designed for power outputs from 3/4 to 2 1/2 MW and turbine inlet temperatures from 170 to 260oF. The machine design has eliminated the need for shaft seals, shaft couplings and the usual lube oil console normally required for turbine-generator units. Results of prototype tests of a 1 MW unit are presented. A product package and recommended division of responsibilities between purchaser, A&E company and supplier is presented for installations in refineries and process plants. The product package covers the electrical power range from 3/4 to 5 MW and waste heat streams from 20 to 130 million BTU/hr.

Meacher, J. S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Evaluation of Industrial Energy Options for Cogeneration, Waste Heat Recovery and Alternative Fuel Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the energy options available to Missouri industrial firms in the areas of cogeneration, waste heat recovery, and coal and alternative fuel utilization. The project, being performed by Synergic Resources Corporation for the Missouri Division of Energy, identifies and evaluates technological options and describes the current status of various energy resource conservation technologies applicable industry and the economic, institutional and regulatory factors which could affect the implementation and use of these energy technologies. An industrial energy manual has been prepared, identifying technologies with significant potential for application in a specific company or plant. Six site-specific industrial case studies have been performed for industries considered suitable for cogeneration, waste heat recovery or alternative fuel use. These case studies, selected after a formal screening process, evaluate actual plant conditions and economics for Missouri industrial establishments. It is hoped that these case studies will show, by example, some of the elements that make energy resource conservation technologies economically a technically feasible in the real world.

Hencey, S.; Hinkle, B.; Limaye, D. R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Heat Recovery from Coal Gasifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with heat recovery from pressurized entrained and fixed bed coal gasifiers for steam generation. High temperature waste heat, from slagging entrained flow coal gasifier, can be recovered effectively in a series of radiant and convection waste heat boilers. Medium level waste heat leaving fixed bed type gasifiers can be recovered more economically by convection type boilers or shell and tube heat exchangers. An economic analysis for the steam generation and process heat exchanger is presented. Steam generated from the waste heat boiler is used to drive steam turbines for power generation or air compressors for the oxygen plant. Low level heat recovered by process heat exchangers is used to heat product gas or support the energy requirement of the gasification plant. The mechanical design for pressure vessel shell and boiler tubes is discussed. The design considers metallurgical requirements associated with hydrogen rich, high temperature, and high pressure atmosphere.

Wen, H.; Lou, S. C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Mass and Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last few years heat recovery was under spot and in air conditioning fields usually we use heat recovery by different types of heat exchangers. The heat exchanging between the exhaust air from the building with the fresh air to the building (air to air heat exchanger). In my papers I use (water to air heat exchanger) as a heat recovery and I use the water as a mass recovery. The source of mass and heat recovery is the condensate water which we were dispose and connect it to the drain lines.

Hindawai, S. M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Waste Steam Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An examination has been made of the recovery of waste steam by three techniques: direct heat exchange to process, mechanical compression, and thermocompression. Near atmospheric steam sources were considered, but the techniques developed are equally applicable to other sources of steam. The interaction of the recovery system with the plant's steam/power system has been included. Typical operating economics have been prepared. It was found that the profitability of most recovery schemes is generally dependent on the techniques used, the existing steam/power system, and the relative costs of steam and power. However, there will always be site-specific factors to consider. It is shown that direct heat exchange and thermocompression will always yield an energy profit when interacting with PRVs in the powerhouse. A set of typical comparisons between the three recovery techniques, interacting with various powerhouse and plant steam system configurations, is presented. A brief outline of the analysis techniques needed to prepare the comparison is also shown. Only operating costs are examined; capital costs are so size - and site-specific as to be impossible to generalize. The operating cost savings may be used to give an indication of investment potential.

Kleinfeld, J. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Low Level Heat Recovery Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With today's high fuel prices, energy conservation projects to utilize low level waste heat have become more attractive. Exxon Chemical Company Central Engineering has been developing guidelines and assessing the potential for application of low level heat recovery technology. This paper discusses heat distribution systems, latest developments in absorption refrigeration and organic Rankine cycles, and pressure, minimization possibilities. The relative merits and economics of the various possibilities and some guidelines on when they should be considered will be presented.

O'Brien, W. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Applications of thermal energy storage to process heat and waste heat recovery in the primary aluminum industry. Final report, September 1977-September 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study entitled, Applications of Thermal Energy Storage to Process Heat and Waste Heat Recovery in the Primary Aluminum Industry are presented. In this preliminary study, a system has been identified by which the large amounts of low-grade waste energy in the primary pollution control system gas stream can be utilized for comfort heating in nearby communities. Energy is stored in the form of hot water, contained in conventional, insulated steel tanks, enabling a more efficient utilization of the constant energy source by the cyclical energy demand. Less expensive energy storage means (heated ponds, aquifers), when they become fully characterized, will allow even more cost-competitive systems. Extensive design tradeoff studies have been performed. These tradeoff studies indicate that a heating demand equivalent to 12,000 single-family residences can be supplied by the energy from the Intalco plant. Using a 30-year payback criterion (consistent with utility planning practice), the average cost of energy supplied over the system useful life is predicted at one-third the average cost of fossil fuel. The study clearly shows that the utilization of waste energy from aluminum plants is both technically and economically attractive. The program included a detailed survey of all aluminum plants within the United States, allowing the site specific analyses to be extrapolated to a national basis. Should waste heat recovery systems be implemented by 1985, a national yearly savings of 6.5 million barrels of oil can be realized.

Katter, L.B.; Hoskins, R.L.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Program Final Report - Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We conducted a vehicle analysis to assess the feasibility of thermoelectric technology for waste heat recovery and conversion to useful electrical power and found that eliminating the 500 W of electrical power generated by the alternator corresponded to about a 7% increase in fuel economy (FE) for a small car and about 6% for a full size truck. Electric power targets of 300 W were established for city and highway driving cycles for this project. We obtained critical vehicle level information for these driving cycles that enabled a high-level design and performance analysis of radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems for several potential vehicle platforms, and we identified the location and geometric envelopes of the radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems. Based on this analysis, we selected the Chevrolet Suburban as the most suitable demonstration vehicle for this project. Our modeling and thermal analysis assessment of a radiator-based thermoelectric generator (TEG), however, revealed severe practical limitations. Specifically the small temperature difference of 100°C or less between the engine coolant and ambient air results in a low Carnot conversion efficiency, and thermal resistance associated with air convection would reduce this conversion efficiency even further. We therefore decided not to pursue a radiator-based waste heat recovery system and focused only on the exhaust gas. Our overall approach was to combine science and engineering: (1) existing and newly developed TE materials were carefully selected and characterized by the material researcher members of our team, and most of the material property results were validated by our research partners, and (2) system engineers worked closely with vehicle engineers to ensure that accurate vehicle-level information was used for developing subsystem models and designs, and the subsystem output was analyzed for potential fuel economy gains. We incorporated material, module, subsystem, and integration costs into the material selection criteria in order to balance various materials, module and subsystem design, and vehicle integration options. Our work on advanced TE materials development and on TEG system design, assembly, vehicle integration, and testing proceeded in parallel efforts. Results from our two preliminary prototype TEGs using only Bi-Te TE modules allowed us to solve various mechanical challenges and to finalize and fine tune aspects of the design and implementation. Our materials research effort led us to quickly abandon work on PbTe and focus on the skutterudite materials due to their superior mechanical performance and suitability at automotive exhaust gas operating temperatures. We synthesized a sufficiently large quantity of skutterudite material for module fabrication for our third and final prototype. Our TEG#3 is the first of its kind to contain state-of-the-art skutterudite-based TE modules to be installed and tested on a production vehicle. The design, which consisted of 24 skutterudite modules and 18 Bi-Te modules, attempted to optimize electrical power generation by using these two kinds of TE modules that have their peak performance temperatures matched to the actual temperature profile of the TEG during operation. The performance of TEG#3 was limited by the maximum temperature allowable for the Bi-Te TE modules located in the colder end of the TEG, resulting in the operating temperature for the skutterudite modules to be considerably below optimum. We measured the power output for (1) the complete TEG (25 Watts) and (2) an individual TE module series string (1/3 of the TEG) operated at a 60°C higher temperature (19 Watts). We estimate that under optimum operating temperature conditions, TEG#3 will generate about 235 Watts. With additional improvements in thermal and electrical interfaces, temperature homogeneity, and power conditioning, we estimate TEG#3 could deliver a power output of about 425 Watts.

Gregory Meisner

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Hybrid Vehicles: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using advanced materials, thermoelectric conversion of efficiencies on the order of 20% may be possible in the near future. Thermoelectric generators offer potential to increase vehicle fuel economy by recapturing a portion of the waste heat from the engine exhaust and generating electricity to power vehicle accessory or traction loads.

Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Investigating potential light-duty efficiency improvements through simulation of turbo-compounding and waste-heat recovery systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to combustion irreversibility and heat loss to the coolant, through the exhaust, and by direct convection and radiation to the environment. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, achieving similar benefits for light-duty applications is complicated by transient, low-load operation at typical driving conditions and competition with the turbocharger and aftertreatment system for the limited thermal resources. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. The model is used to examine the effects of efficiency-improvement strategies such as cylinder deactivation, use of advanced materials and improved insulation to limit ambient heat loss, and turbo-compounding on the steady-state performance of the ORC system and the availability of thermal energy for downstream aftertreatment systems. Results from transient drive-cycle simulations are also presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and balancing the thermal requirements of waste-heat recovery, turbocharging or turbo-compounding, and exhaust aftertreatment.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Briggs, Thomas E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical brief is a guide to help plant operators reduce waste heat losses associated with process heating equipment.

Not Available

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Laundry heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect

A laundry heat recovery system includes a heat exchanger associated with each dryer in the system, the heat exchanger being positioned within the exhaust system of the dryer. A controller responsive to the water temperature of the heat exchangers and the water storage for the washer selectively circulates the water through a closed loop system whereby the water within the exchangers is preheated by the associated dryers. By venting the exhaust air through the heat exchanger, the air is dehumidified to permit recirculation of the heated air into the dryer.

Alio, P.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Teton Coin Op Laundry: heat recovery unit. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Experience with a heat recovery unit using Freon 11 refrigerant as a transfer medium is reported. Heat exchangers were fabricated for use in dryer stacks and the waste heat was used in heating the water for the laundry. (MHR)

1984-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

62

Industrial Heat Recovery - 1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two years ago I summarized 20 years of experience on Industrial Heat Recovery for the Energy-source Technology Conference and Exhibition held in New Orleans, Louisiana. At the end of that paper I concluded with brief advice on 'How to specify heat recovery equipment.' The two years which have elapsed since then have convinced me that proper specification assures the most reliable equipment at the lowest price. The most economical specification describes the operating and site data but leaves the design details for the supplier. A true specialist will be able to provide you with the latest technology at the best possible price. This paper explores the impact of specifications on heat recovery equipment and its associated cost.

Csathy, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Waste Heat Recovery and Recycling in Thermal Separation Processes: Distillation, Multi-Effect Evaporation (MEE) and Crystallization Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaporation and crystallization are key thermal separation processes for concentrating and purifying inorganic and organic products with energy consumption over 1,000 trillion Btu/yr. This project focused on a challenging task of recovering low-temperature latent heat that can have a paradigm shift in the way thermal process units will be designed and operated to achieve high-energy efficiency and significantly reduce the carbon footprint as well as water footprint. Moreover, this project has evaluated the technical merits of waste-heat powered thermal heat pumps for recovery of latent heat from distillation, multi-effect evaporation (MEE), and crystallization processes and recycling into the process. The Project Team has estimated the potential energy, economics and environmental benefits with the focus on reduction in CO2 emissions that can be realized by 2020, assuming successful development and commercialization of the technology being developed. Specifically, with aggressive industry-wide applications of heat recovery and recycling with absorption heat pumps, energy savings of about 26.7 trillion Btu/yr have been estimated for distillation process. The direct environmental benefits of this project are the reduced emissions of combustible products. The estimated major reduction in environmental pollutants in the distillation processes is in CO2 emission equivalent to 3.5 billion lbs/year. Energy consumption associated with water supply and treatments can vary between 1,900 kWh and 23,700 kWh per million-gallon water depending on sources of natural waters [US DOE, 2006]. Successful implementation of this technology would significantly reduce the demand for cooling-tower waters, and thereby the use and discharge of water treatment chemicals. The Project Team has also identified and characterized working fluid pairs for the moderate-temperature heat pump. For an MEE process, the two promising fluids are LiNO3+KNO3+NANO3 (53:28:19 ) and LiNO3+KNO3+NANO2(53:35:12). And for an H2O2 distillation process, the two promising fluids are Trifluoroethanol (TFE) + Triethylene Glycol Dimethyl ether (DMETEG) and Ammonia+ Water. Thermo-physical properties calculated by Aspen+ are reasonably accurate. Documentation of the installation of pilot-plants or full commercial units were not found in the literature for validating thermo-physical properties in an operating unit. Therefore, it is essential to install a pilot-scale unit to verify thermo-physical properties of working fluid pairs and validate the overall efficiency of the thermal heat pump at temperatures typical of distillation processes. For an HO2 process, the ammonia-water heat pump system is more compact and preferable than the TFE-DMETEG heat pump. The ammonia-water heat pump is therefore recommended for the H2O2 process. Based on the complex nature of the heat recovery system, we anticipated that capital costs could make investments financially unattractive where steam costs are low, especially where co-generation is involved. We believe that the enhanced heat transfer equipment has the potential to significantly improve the performance of TEE crystallizers, independent of the absorption heat-pump recovery system. Where steam costs are high, more detailed design/cost engineering will be required to verify the economic viability of the technology. Due to the long payback period estimated for the TEE open system, further studies on the TEE system are not warranted unless there are significant future improvements to heat pump technology. For the H2O2 distillation cycle heat pump waste heat recovery system, there were no significant process constraints and the estimated 5 years payback period is encouraging. We therefore recommend further developments of application of the thermal heat pump in the H2O2 distillation process with the focus on the technical and economic viability of heat exchangers equipped with the state-of-the-art enhancements. This will require additional funding for a prototype unit to validate enhanced thermal performances of heat transfer equipment, evaluat

Emmanuel A. Dada; Chandrakant B. Panchal; Luke K. Achenie; Aaron Reichl; Chris C. Thomas

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

64

Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas) Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation...

65

Distributed Generation Heat Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic and environmental drivers are promoting the adoption of combined heat and power (CHP) systems. Technology advances have produced new and improved distributed generation (DG) units that can be coupled with heat recovery hardware to create CHP systems. Performance characteristics vary considerably among DG options, and it is important to understand how these characteristics influence the selection of CHP systems that will meet both electric and thermal site loads.

2002-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

66

Heat Recovery Boilers for Process Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat recovery boilers are widely used in process plants for recovering energy from various waste gas streams, either from the consideration of process or of economy. Sulfuric, as well as nitric, acid plant heat recovery boilers are examples of the use of heat recovery due primarily to process considerations. On the other hand, cost and payback are main considerations in the case of gas turbine and incineration plants, where large quantities of gases are exhausted at temperatures varying from 800°F to 1800°F. This gas, when recovered, can result in a large energy savings and steam production. This paper attempts to outline some of the engineering considerations in the design of heat recovery boilers for turbine exhaust applications (combined cycle, cogeneration mode), incineration plants (solid waste, fume) and chemical plants (reformer, sulfuric acid, nitric acid).

Ganapathy, V.; Rentz, J.; Flanagan, D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Low Grade Waste Heat Driven Desalination and SO2 Scrubbing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 15% of the electricity required to produce aluminum is lost as waste heat ... An Overview of Energy Consumption and Waste Generation in the Recovery of ...

68

Commercial laundry heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect

In a commercial laundry that is connected to a source of fresh water and generates heated waste water, a method is described for recovering heat from the heated waste comprising the steps of: (a) pumping the heated waste water through a heat exchanger; (b) introducing fresh water into the heat exchanger to receive heat from the waste water through a heat transfer effected by the heat exchanger; (c) withdrawing a first proportion of the heated fresh water at a first temperature; (d) conveying the first proportion of the heated fresh water to cold water storage tank; (e) withdrawing a second proportion of the heated fresh water at a second temperature higher than the first temperature; (f) conveying the second proportion of the heated fresh water to a hot water storage tank.

Kaufmann, R.O.

1986-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

Reduced energy consumption by massive thermoelectric waste heat recovery in light duty trucks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the EC funded HEATRECAR project is to reduce the energy consumption and curb CO2 emissions of vehicles by massively harvesting electrical energy from the exhaust system and re-use this energy to supply electrical components within the vehicle or to feed the power train of hybrid electrical vehicles. HEATRECAR is targeting light duty trucks and focuses on the development and the optimization of a Thermo Electric Generator (TEG) including heat exchanger

D. Magnetto; G. Vidiella

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Wastewater heat recovery apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Wastewater heat recovery apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat recovery system is described with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature. 6 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Waste Heat Recapture from Supermarket Refrigeration Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine the potential energy savings associated with improved utilization of waste heat from supermarket refrigeration systems. Existing and advanced strategies for waste heat recovery in supermarkets were analyzed, including options from advanced sources such as combined heat and power (CHP), micro-turbines and fuel cells.

Fricke, Brian A [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Investigating potential efficiency improvement for light-duty transportation applications through simulation of an organic Rankine cycle for waste-heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to heat loss and combustion irreversibility. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, the potential benefits of such a strategy for light-duty applications are unknown due to transient operation, low-load operation at typical driving conditions, and the added mass of the system. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. Results from steady-state and drive-cycle simulations are presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and competition between waste-heat recovery systems, turbochargers, aftertreatment devices, and other systems for the limited thermal resources.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Waste Heat Recovery Modellering.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? SammanfattningI ett tidigare projekt, utfört under våren 2010, modellerades och simulerades en ånggenerator i GT-SUITE för att analysera och jämföra dess resultat med de… (more)

Rojas Tena, Fernando

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Heat Pump for High School Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heat pump system used for recycling and reusing waste heat in s high school bathroom was minutely analyzed in its coefficient of performance, onetime utilization ratio of energy, economic property and so on. The results showed that this system has good economic property, can conserve energy and protects the environment. Therefore, there is a large potential for its development. In addition, three projects using this system are presented and contrasted, which indicate that a joint system that uses both the heat pump and heat exchanger to recycle waste heat is a preferable option.

Huang, K.; Wang, H.; Zhou, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Heat Recovery in Building Envelopes  

SciTech Connect

Infiltration has traditionally been assumed to contribute to the energy load of a building by an amount equal to the product of the infiltration flow rate and the enthalpy difference between inside and outside. Application of such a simple formula may produce an unreasonably high contribution because of heat recovery within the building envelope. Previous laboratory and simulation research has indicated that such heat transfer between the infiltrating air and walls may be substantial. In this study, Computational Fluid Dynamics was used to simulate sensible heat transfer in typical envelope constructions. The results show that the traditional method may over-predict the infiltration energy load by up to 95 percent at low leakage rates. A simplified physical model has been developed and used to predict the infiltration heat recovery based on the Peclet number of the flow and the fraction of the building envelope active in infiltration heat recovery.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Leaching Studies for Metals Recovery from Waste Printed Wiring ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Leaching Studies for Metals Recovery from Waste Printed Wiring ... of the Chemical Changes and Surface Properties of Carbonated Waste Cement ... Flux for Basic Oxygen Steel Making Using Waste Oxides of Steel Plant ... Heat Treatment of Black Dross for the Production of a Value Added Material - A

78

Waste Heat Utilization to Increase Energy Efficiency in the Metals ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This system will produce electricity, and/or process steam. • Low grade: ... or Save Conflict]. Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery Options for Metals Industry.

79

Automatic flue gas heat recovery system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic flue gas heat recovery system for supplementing or replacing a conventional, separate hot water system. In the example described, the heat recovery system is applied to a pizza restaurant where large quantities of heat energy are normally wasted up an oven chimney stack, and large quantities of hot water also are required for restaurant operations. An electric motor driven pump circulates water in a closed loop between a storage tank and a heat exchanger tube located in the oven chimney stack. A thermostat control automatically starts the pump when the oven heats the chimney stack to an effective water heating temperature. When temperature in the storage tank reaches a predetermined maximum, the thermostat control stops the pump, opens a drain valve, and dumps water quickly and completely from the heat exchanger tube. Three different embodiments are shown and described illustrating systems with one or more storage tanks and one or more pumps. In the plural storage tank embodiments, an existing hot water heating tank may be converted for use to augment a main tank supplied with the present system.

Whalen, D.A.

1983-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

80

Field Performance of Heat Recovery Chillers and Heat Recovery Heat Pumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat recovery chillers and heat recovery heat pumps operate at high efficiency and excellent economy by simultaneously providing both heating and cooling. Although this technology has been in use for more than thirty years and all major chiller manufacturers offer heat recovery models, applications are not yet widespread. One of the barriers to using this technology is the lack of measured performance information on the devices. This project was undertaken to identify and summarize existing sources of pe...

1994-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Final Report: Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research and development (R&D) project exemplifies a shared public private commitment to advance the development of energy efficient industrial technologies that will reduce the U.S. dependence upon foreign oil, provide energy savings and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate a Direct Evaporator for the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for the conversion of waste heat from gas turbine exhaust to electricity. In conventional ORCs, the heat from the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to a hydrocarbon based working fluid by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. The Direct Evaporator accomplishes preheating, evaporation and superheating of the working fluid by a heat exchanger placed within the exhaust gas stream. Direct Evaporation is simpler and up to 15% less expensive than conventional ORCs, since the secondary oil loop and associated equipment can be eliminated. However, in the past, Direct Evaporation has been avoided due to technical challenges imposed by decomposition and flammability of the working fluid. The purpose of this project was to retire key risks and overcome the technical barriers to implementing an ORC with Direct Evaporation. R&D was conducted through a partnership between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and General Electric (GE) Global Research Center (GRC). The project consisted of four research tasks: (1) Detailed Design & Modeling of the ORC Direct Evaporator, (2) Design and Construction of Partial Prototype Direct Evaporator Test Facility, (3) Working Fluid Decomposition Chemical Analyses, and (4) Prototype Evaluation. Issues pertinent to the selection of an ORC working fluid, along with thermodynamic and design considerations of the direct evaporator, were identified. The FMEA (Failure modes and effects analysis) and HAZOP (Hazards and operability analysis) safety studies performed to mitigate risks are described, followed by a discussion of the flammability analysis of the direct evaporator. A testbed was constructed and the prototype demonstrated at the GE GRC Niskayuna facility.

Donna Post Guillen; Jalal Zia

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Drain Water Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery June 15, 2012 - 6:20pm Addthis Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. How does it work? Use heat from water you've already used to preheat more hot water, reducing your water heating costs. Any hot water that goes down the drain carries away energy with it. That's typically 80%-90% of the energy used to heat water in a home. Drain-water (or greywater) heat recovery systems capture this energy from water you've already used (for example, to shower, wash dishes, or wash clothing) to preheat cold water entering the water heater or going to other water fixtures. This reduces the amount of energy needed for water heating. How It Works Drain-water heat recovery technology works well with all types of water

83

Drain Water Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery June 15, 2012 - 6:20pm Addthis Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. How does it work? Use heat from water you've already used to preheat more hot water, reducing your water heating costs. Any hot water that goes down the drain carries away energy with it. That's typically 80%-90% of the energy used to heat water in a home. Drain-water (or greywater) heat recovery systems capture this energy from water you've already used (for example, to shower, wash dishes, or wash clothing) to preheat cold water entering the water heater or going to other water fixtures. This reduces the amount of energy needed for water heating. How It Works Drain-water heat recovery technology works well with all types of water

84

Commercial laundry heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect

Waste water of above ambient temperature in a commercial laundry is directed through a self-cleaning plate and frame heat exchanger to heat incoming fresh water. Some of the fresh water heated to a first temperature is directed to a cold water storage tank to raise the water therein above ambient temperature which results in substantially lessened downstream requirements for heat input with commensurate cost reductions. The remainder of the fresh water is heated to a higher second temperature and is directed to a hot water storage tank. A system of valves regulates the temperature of the water flowing into each of the hot and cold water storage tanks to maintain a preset temperature in each of the storage tanks.

Kaufmann, R.O.

1983-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Heat recovery in building envelopes  

SciTech Connect

Infiltration has traditionally been assumed to contribute to the energy load of a building by an amount equal to the product of the infiltration flow rate and the enthalpy difference between inside and outside. Some studies have indicated that application of such a simple formula may produce an unreasonably high contribution because of heat recovery within the building envelope. The major objective of this study was to provide an improved prediction of the energy load due to infiltration by introducing a correction factor that multiplies the expression for the conventional load. This paper discusses simplified analytical modeling and CFD simulations that examine infiltration heat recovery (IHR) in an attempt to quantify the magnitude of this effect for typical building envelopes. For comparison, we will also briefly examine the results of some full-scale field measurements of IHR based on infiltration rates and energy use in real buildings. The results of this work showed that for houses with insulated walls the heat recovery is negligible due to the small fraction of the envelope that participates in heat exchange with the infiltrating air. However; there is the potential for IHR to have a significant effect for higher participation dynamic walls/ceilings or uninsulated walls. This result implies that the existing methods for evaluating infiltration related building loads provide adequate results for typical buildings.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Industrial Plate Exchangers Heat Recovery and Fouling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plate and Frame Heat Exchangers have special characteristics for both fouling and heat recovery. These are discussed in general then related to two industrial examples.

Cross, P. H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L ABORATORY Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery andequal opportunity employer. Distributed Generation with Heatenergy resources (DER), distributed generation (DG), and

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Direct Refrigeration from Heat Recovery Using 2-Stage Absorption Chillers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the cost of some fossil fuels has moderated, the importance of energy conservation by heat recovery has not diminished. The application of waste heat generated steam to produce chilled water is not new. However, there is a newly developed absorption chiller which can produce chilled water 44% more efficiently than the conventional single stage absorption chillers. The new 2-stage parallel flow system makes the chiller package more compact, more efficient, and easier to operate. Many types of waste heat, not just steam, can be used directly in this new chiller without the need for costly recovery and conversion systems.

Hufford, P. E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The First Recovery Act Funded Waste Shipment depart from the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The First Recovery Act Funded Waste Shipment departs from the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Facility A shipment of mixed low-level waste left DOEs Advanced Mixed Waste...

90

Recovery, recycle and reuse of industrial wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book discusses the elimination of industrial wastes through the application of recycle, recovery and reuse technology. An overview is provided of how various processes can recover potential contaminants for eventual reuse. Chapters include resource recovery from hazardous waste, sorption, molecular separation, phase transition, chemical modifications, physical dispersion and separation.

Noll, K.E.; Haas, C.N.; Schmidt, C.; Kodukula, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage ‡energy resources (DER), distributed generation (DG), andload of Figure 2. distributed generation of part or all of

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper discusses the applications of Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation. Consultants, plant engineers and plant developers can evaluate the steam side performance of HRSGs and arrive at the optimum system which matches the needs of the process plant, cogeneration or combined cycle plant. There is no need to design the HRSG per se and hence simulation is a valuable tool for anyone interested in evaluating the HRSG performance even before it is designed. It can also save a lot of time for specification writers as they need not guess how the steam side performance will vary with different gas/steam parameters. A few examples are given to show how simulation methods can be applied to real life problems.

Ganapathy, V.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Recovery, reuse, and recycle of industrial waste  

SciTech Connect

The major goal of this work is to produce a document useful in planning efforts aimed at elimination of industrial wastes through the application of recycle, recovery, and reuse technology. The pollutants considered in this study are basically organic and inorganic by-products from wastewater effluents, solid residue and gaseous emissions from industrial operations. The first section contains chapters on methodology currently available for recovery of industrial and hazardous waste, and developing technology for recycle, reuse and recovery. The second section contains chapters on 5 technical categories, used for recovery namely, sorption, molecular separation, phase transition, chemical modification, and physical dispersion and separation.

Noll, K.E.; Haas, C.N.; Schmidt, C.; Kodukula, P.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Contained recovery of oily waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for recovering oily waste from oily waste accumulations underground comprising sweeping the oily waste accumulation with hot water to recover said oily waste, wherein said area treated is isolated from surrounding groundwater hydraulically. The hot water may be reinjected after the hot-water displacement or may be treated to conform to any discharge requirements.

Johnson, Jr., Lyle A. (Laramie, WY); Sudduth, Bruce C. (Laramie, WY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Recovery Act Funding Leads to Record Year for Transuranic Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received the most transuranic waste shipments in a single year since waste operations...

96

Pennsylvania Solid Waste- Resource Recovery Development Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act promotes the construction and the application of solid waste disposal/processing and resource recovery systems that preserve and enhance the quality of air, water, and land resources. The...

97

Waste Energy Analysis Recovery for a Typical Food Processing Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An energy analysis made for the Joan of Arc Food Processing Plant in St. Francisville, Louisiana indicated that a significant quantity of waste heat energy was being released to the atmosphere in the forms of low quality steam and hot flue gases. Additional analysis, measurements, and observations over a period of 12 months resulted in an evaluation of the losses as well as recommended methods for the effective recovery of the waste heat energy. The waste energy recovery results in significant savings in energy costs as well as a reduction in the consumption of scarce fuel. The research was supported by the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources, College of Engineering, Louisiana State University, and the Joan of Arc Company, St. Francisville, Louisiana.

Miller, P. H.; Mann, L., Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Heat recovery anti-icing system  

SciTech Connect

A heat recovery anti-icing system is disclosed. The heat recovery system includes a blower which removes air from the air flow path of a combustion turbine power generating system and circulates the air through a heat exchanger located in the exhaust stack of the combustion turbine. The heated air circulating through the heat exchanger is returned to an inlet filter compartment in the air flow path so as to maintain the temperature of the air in the inlet filter compartment at an elevated level.

Cummins, J.R.

1982-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

99

High-temperature waste-heat-stream selection and characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four types of industrial high-temperature, corrosive waste heat streams are selected that could yield significant energy savings if improved heat recovery systems were available. These waste heat streams are the flue gases from steel soaking pits, steel reheat furnaces, aluminum remelt furnaces, and glass melting furnaces. Available information on the temperature, pressure, flow, and composition of these flue gases is given. Also reviewed are analyses of corrosion products and fouling deposits resulting from the interaction of these flue gases with materials in flues and heat recovery systems.

Wikoff, P.M.; Wiggins, D.J.; Tallman, R.L.; Forkel, C.E.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Heat recovery in building envelopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating Research Facility (AHHRF) located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The house is of standard wood

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Heat recovery in a laundry system  

SciTech Connect

In a laundry system including a washer, a dryer, and a water heater, improvement is disclosed of using a heat pipe to recover waste heat, whether it be from the hot air exhaust of the dryer or from the conductive losses from the dryer and to transfer that heat to the feed water of the water heater.

George, O.F.

1981-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Low Temperature Waste Energy Recovery at Chemical Plants and Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies to economically recover low-temperature waste energy in chemical plants and refineries are the holy grail of industrial energy efficiency. Low temperature waste energy streams were defined by the Texas Industries of the Future Chemical and Refining Sectors Advisory Committee as streams with a temperature below 400 degrees F. Their waste energy streams were also characterized as to state, flow rate, heat content, source and temperature. These criteria were then used to identify potential candidates of waste heat recovery technologies that might have an application in these industries. Four technologies that met the criteria of the Advisory Committee included: organic rankine cycle (ORC), absorption refrigeration and chilling, Kalina cycle, and fuel cell technologies. This paper characterizes each of these technologies, technical specifications, limitations, potential costs/ payback and commercialization status as was discussed in the Technology Forum held in Houston, TX in May 2012 (TXIOF 2012).

Ferland, K.; papar, R.; Quinn, J.; Kumar, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Property:Heat Recovery Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name Heat Recovery Utility Property Type Page Description The purpose of Distributed Generation heat recovery This is a property of type Page. Retrieved from...

104

Waste heat steams ahead with injection technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Owners of Commercial-Industrial-Institutional buildings whose thermal usage is too variable to implement cogeneration are looking to a gasturbine steam-injection technology, called the Cheng Cycle, to reduce their energy costs. The Cheng Cycle uses industrial components-a gas-turbine generating set, a waste-heat recovery steam generator and system controls-in a thermodynamically optimized mode. In the process, steam produced from waste heat can be used for space or process heating or to increase the electrical output of a gas turbine. The process was patented in 1974 by Dr. Dah Yu Cheng, of the University of Santa Clara, Santa Clara, Calif. When a plant's thermal needs fall because of production or temperature changes, unused steam is directed back to the turbine to increase electrical output. As thermal requirements rise, the process is reversed and needed steam is channeled to plant uses.

Shepherd, S.; Koloseus, C.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

White Paper for U.S. Army Rapid Equipping Force: Waste Heat Recovery with Thermoelectric and Lithium-Ion Hybrid Power System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By harvesting waste heat from engine exhaust and storing it in light-weight high-capacity modules, it is believed that the need for energy transport by convoys can be lowered significantly. By storing this power during operation, substantial electrical power can be provided during long periods of silent operation, while the engines are not operating. It is proposed to investigate the potential of installing efficient thermoelectric generators on the exhaust systems of trucks and other vehicles to generate electrical power from the waste heat contained in the exhaust and to store that power in advanced power packs comprised of polymer-gel lithium ion batteries. Efficient inexpensive methods for production of the thermoelectric generator are also proposed. The technology that exists at LLNL, as well as that which exists at industrial partners, all have high technology readiness level (TRL). Work is needed for integration and deployment.

Farmer, J C

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

106

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Materials Selection Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A considerable number of failures have occurred over the past decade in heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs). Many of these failures are attributed to poor design, improper operation, poor fabrication, or poor installation practices, but a number of them are attributed directly to improper material selection. In March 2004, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published the first heat recovery steam generator materials selection and repair guidelines (HRSG Material Selection and Repair Guidelin...

2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

107

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Heat4 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using RelaxorWaste heat Pyroelectric energy

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum Well Structures and Recovery of Waste Heat from Heavy Duty Trucks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objectives of Phase I were: (a) carry out cost, performance and system level models, (b) quantify the cost benefits of cathodic arc and heterogeneous nanocomposites over sputtered material, (c) evaluate the expected power output of the proposed thermoelectric materials and predict the efficiency and power output of an integrated TE module, (d) define market acceptance criteria by engaging Caterpillar's truck OEMs, potential customers and dealers and identify high-level criteria for a waste heat thermoelectric generator (TEG), (e) identify potential TEG concepts, and (f) establish cost/kWatt targets as well as a breakdown of subsystem component cost targets for the commercially viable TEG.

Willigan, Rhonda

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Waste to Energy Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Dataset, Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.wte.org/ Cost: Free The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. Overview The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. The website includes information on waste-to-energy basics

110

Crude Distillation Unit Heat Recovery Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Baytown's Pipe Still 3 is a 95,000 barrel per day crude distillation unit. A comprehensive heat recovery and energy utilization study was done on Pipe Still 3 after a preliminary cursory study had indicated that an overall look at the total picture could produce much better results than a series of improvements done piecemeal. The study did meet its objective by identifying the maximum heat recovery that is technically and economically feasible. It showed a potential for dramatic improvement - a 39 percent reduction in fuel, plus a 43 percent increase in the quantity of process steam generated, equivalent to a 48 percent reduction in net energy consumed. Techniques employed included a Source/Sink Profile (which is described later); a combining of oil heating, steam generation, and air preheat to best advantage; and a computer program to design the required heat exchanger trains.

John, P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality manages solid waste for the state of Louisiana under the authority of the Solid Waste Management and Resource Recover Law. The Department makes rules and regulations that establish standards governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery and reuse, and disposal of solid waste; implement a management program that

112

Low Temperature Heat Recovery for Boiler Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low temperature corrosion proof heat exchangers designed to reduce boiler flue gas temperatures to 150°F or lower are now being commercially operated on gas, oil and coal fired boilers. These heat exchangers, when applied to boiler flue gas, are commonly called condensing economizers. It has traditionally been common practice in the boiler industry to not reduce flue gas temperatures below the 300°F to 400°F range. This barrier has now been broken by the development and application of corrosion proof heat exchanger technology. This opens up a vast reservior of untapped recoverable energy that can be recovered and reused as an energy source. The successful recovery of this heat and the optimum use of it are the fundemental goals of the technology presented in this paper. This Recovered Low Level Heat Is Normally Used To Heat Cold Make-up Water Or Combustion Air.

Shook, J. R.; Luttenberger, D. B.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Thermal Energy Storage/Heat Recovery and Energy Conservation in Food Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern food processing operations often require that the temperature of the processed foodstuff be raised or lowered. These operations result in energy consumption by refrigeration or heating systems, and a portion of this energy can be recovered from waste heat streams for reuse in the processing operations. This paper addresses the recovery of waste heat and the storage of thermal energy as a means of energy conservation in food processing. An energy conservation project in a poultry processing plant sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and conducted by Georgia Tech is used as an illustrative example of potential applications of heat recovery and thermal energy storage.

Combes, R. S.; Boykin, W. B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness. [Geothermally heated]. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An engineering and economic study was made to determine a practical balance of selected agribusiness subsystems resulting in realistic estimated produce yields for a geothermally heated system known as the Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness. The subsystem cycles for an average application at an unspecified hydrothermal resources site in the western United States utilize waste and by-products from their companion cycles insofar as practicable. Based on conservative estimates of current controlled environment yields, produce wholesale market prices, production costs, and capital investment required, it appears that the family-operation-sized TERSA module presents the potential for marginal recovery of all capital investment costs. In addition to family- or small-cooperative-farming groups, TERSA has potential users in food-oriented corporations and large-cooperative-agribusiness operations. The following topics are considered in detail: greenhouse tomatoes and cucumbers; fish farming; mushroom culture; biogas generation; integration methodology; hydrothermal fluids and heat exchanger selection; and the system. 133 references. (MHR)

Fogleman, S.F.; Fisher, L.A.; Black, A.R.; Singh, D.P.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams  

SciTech Connect

The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Solid Waste Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling Solid Waste Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Natural Resources This statute expresses the strong support of the State of Wisconsin for the reduction of the amount of solid waste generated, the reuse, recycling and composting of solid waste, and resource recovery from solid waste. The statute also notes that research, development and innovation in the design, management and operation of solid waste reduction, reuse, recycling,

117

Heat Recovery Design Considerations for Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design and integration of the heat recovery section, which includes the steam generation, auxiliary firing, and steam turbine modules, is critical to the overall performance and economics of cogeneration, systems. In gas turbine topping cogeneration systems, over two-thirds of the energy is in the exhaust gases leaving the gas turbine. In bottoming cycles, where steam and/or electrical power are generated from heating process exhaust streams, the heat recovery design is of primary concern. John Zink Company, since 1929, has specialized in the development, design, and fabrication of energy efficient equipment for the industrial and commercial markets. The paper outlines the design, installation and performance of recently supplied gas turbine cogeneration heat recovery systems. It also describes; several bottoming cycle thermal system designs applied to incinerators, process heaters, refinery secondary reformers and FCC units. Overall parameters and general trends in the design and application of cogeneration thermal systems are presented. New equipment and system designs to reduce pollution and increase overall system efficiency are also reviewed.

Pasquinelli, D. M.; Burns, E. D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

WIPP Uses Recovery Act Funding to Reduce Nuclear Waste Footprint |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uses Recovery Act Funding to Reduce Nuclear Waste Footprint Uses Recovery Act Funding to Reduce Nuclear Waste Footprint WIPP Uses Recovery Act Funding to Reduce Nuclear Waste Footprint August 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill www.wipp.energy.gov 575-234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) reduced the nuclear waste footprint by using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds to expedite the clean up of five transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites and to make important infrastructure improvements at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Expediting TRU waste shipments supports DOE's goal to dispose of 90 percent of legacy TRU waste by 2015, saving taxpayers million of dollars in storage and maintenance costs. Recovery Act funds allowed highly trained teams to safely prepare and load

119

Waste Heat Management Options: Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Management Options Heat Management Options Industrial Process Heating Systems By Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi E-mail: athekdi@e3minc.com E3M, Inc. August 20, 2009 2 Source of Waste Heat in Industries * Steam Generation * Fluid Heating * Calcining * Drying * Heat Treating * Metal Heating * Metal and Non-metal Melting * Smelting, agglomeration etc. * Curing and Forming * Other Heating Waste heat is everywhere! Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc 3 Waste Heat Sources from Process Heating Equipment * Hot gases - combustion products - Temperature from 300 deg. F. to 3000 deg.F. * Radiation-Convection heat loss - From temperature source of 500 deg. F. to 2500 deg. F. * Sensible-latent heat in heated product - From temperature 400 deg. F. to 2200 deg. F. * Cooling water or other liquids - Temperature from 100 deg. F. to 180 deg. F.

120

Heat recovery device for exhaust flues  

SciTech Connect

The heat recovery device has a flue pipe assembly including a section of standard flue pipe carrying a plurality of hollow, cylindrical heating tubes extending diametrically through the flue pipe section in axially spaced, parallel relationship and a separate housing defining an air flow chamber surrounding a portion of the flue pipe section. A fan inside the housing draws ambient air into the housing through an ambient air inlet located on the same side of the flue pipe assembly as the inlet of the heating tubes and propels a flow of air both through the heating tubes and over the outer surface of the flue pipe section towards a heated air outlet located on the same side of the flue pipe section as the discharge ends of the heating tubes. The flue pipe assembly is removably mounted on the housing so it can be removed in the event it fatigues and/or becomes plugged with carbon or creosote deposits during use. A thermostat on the flue pipe section turns the fan on and off when the temperature in the flue pipe section is respectively above and below a predetermined temperature. The total open area of the ambient air inlet and the heated air outlet is large enough so that, in the event the fan is inoperative, the natural flow of ambient air through the heating tubes and over the outer surface of the flue pipe is sufficient to prevent the flue pipe section from overheating.

Knoch, D. G.

1985-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Materials Selection Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials selection is both an art and a science. There is no single material that is the optimal choice for a given application. For example, subtle changes such as the design, fabrication, and quality control specification for a high-pressure superheater (HPSH) tube-to-header connection can alter the choice of the optimal tube material. Minor changes to the component's operating environment can also alter the materials selection choice. What was an ideal tube material in a baseloaded heat recovery stea...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

122

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Cycle Chemistry Instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective monitoring of the purity of water and steam is an integral part of any productive cycle chemistry monitoring program. The Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) cycle chemistry guidelines identified a group of core monitoring parameters that are considered the minimum requirements. Meeting these requirements is part of EPRI's cycle chemistry benchmarking criteria for HRSGs. In addition to the core parameters, many chemistry parameters might need to be ...

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

123

Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Deposits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under-deposit corrosion represents the second leading mechanism of chemistry-influenced heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failures (HTFs) and third leading cause of major availability losses. This report was prepared, in recognition of the lack of information, to assemble the state of knowledge on deposition in HRSG high-pressure (HP) evaporator tubing and to identify the major deficiencies in that knowledge. Findings of this effort can be used to establish immediate remediation and correction of...

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

124

Remote Inspection Device - Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) have become more complex over the last 15 years, operating with multiple pressures and temperatures, operators have experienced more types of HRSG tube failures (HTFs). This report provides information on how nondestructive evaluation (NDE) can be combined with newly developed HRSG repair tooling so that operators can detect damaged tubes and verify that repaired tubes do not contain welding defects that might be detrimental to the life of the component.

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

125

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Procurement Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), particularly those equipped with advanced gas turbines that are subjected to periods of frequent cyclic operation, have experienced premature pressure part failures resulting from excessive thermal mechanical fatigue damage. The very competitive power generation marketplace has resulted in the lowest installed cost often taking precedence over medium- and long-term durability and operating costs. The procurement of engineer, procure, and construct ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

Hydraulic waste energy recovery, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect

The energy required for booster station operation is supplied by the electrical utility company and has an associated cost. Energy removed by pressure reducing valves in the system is lost or wasted. The objective of this project is to capture the wasted hydraulic energy with in-line turbines. In this application, the in-line turbines act as pressure reducing valves while removing energy from the water distribution system and converting it to electrical energy. The North Service Center pumping station was selected for the pilot program due to the availability of a wide range in pressure drop and flow, which are necessary for hydraulic energy recovery. The research performed during this project resulted in documentation of technical, economic, installation, and operational information necessary for local government officials to make an informed judgement as it relates to in-line turbine generation.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Design of Heat Exchanger for Heat Recovery in CHP Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to review issues related to the design of heat recovery unit in Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems. To meet specific needs of CHP systems, configurations can be altered to affect different factors of the design. Before the design process can begin, product specifications, such as steam or water pressures and temperatures, and equipment, such as absorption chillers and heat exchangers, need to be identified and defined. The Energy Engineering Laboratory of the Mechanical Engineering Department of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and the Louisiana Industrial Assessment Center has been donated an 800kW diesel turbine and a 100 ton absorption chiller from industries. This equipment needs to be integrated with a heat exchanger to work as a Combined Heat and Power system for the University which will supplement the chilled water supply and electricity. The design constraints of the heat recovery unit are the specifications of the turbine and the chiller which cannot be altered.

Kozman, T. A.; Kaur, B.; Lee, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Solid Waste Disposal Resource Recovery Facilities Act (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes local governing bodies to form joint agencies to advance the collection, transfer, processing of solid waste, recovery of resources, and sales of recovered resources in...

129

Materials Recovery from Wastes, Batteries, and Co/Ni, Precious ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... 91-100]Recovery of Gold by Using Biomass Wastes Containing Polyphenol Compounds[pp. 101-109]The Advantages of Recycling Metallic ...

130

Mechanical Recycling of Electronic Wastes for Materials Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching Toxicity of Pb and Ba Containing in Cathode Ray Tube Glasses by SEP -TCLP · Mechanical Recycling of Electronic Wastes for Materials Recovery.

131

Recovery of Copper from Printed Circuit Boards Waste by Bioleaching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching Toxicity of Pb and Ba Containing in Cathode Ray Tube Glasses by SEP -TCLP · Mechanical Recycling of Electronic Wastes for Materials Recovery.

132

Copper Recovery from Printed Circuit Board of E-Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching Toxicity of Pb and Ba Containing in Cathode Ray Tube Glasses by SEP -TCLP · Mechanical Recycling of Electronic Wastes for Materials Recovery.

133

Vanadium and Molybdenum Recovery from Industrial Wastes Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective Recovery of Gold from E-wastes by Using Cellulosic Wastes · Stabilization of Chromium-Based Slags with FeS2 and FeSO4 · Sulphide Precipitation ...

134

Lead Recovery from Waste CRT Glass by Hydrofluoric Acid and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective Recovery of Gold from E-wastes by Using Cellulosic Wastes · Stabilization of Chromium-Based Slags with FeS2 and FeSO4 · Sulphide Precipitation ...

135

Recovery Act Funding Leads to Record Year for Transuranic Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

With the help of Ameri- can Recovery and Reinvestment Act fund- ing, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received the most transuranic waste ship- ments in a single year since...

136

Recovery of Iron from Waste Slag of Pyrite Processing Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective Recovery of Gold from E-wastes by Using Cellulosic Wastes · Stabilization of Chromium-Based Slags with FeS2 and FeSO4 · Sulphide Precipitation ...

137

Battleground Energy Recovery Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and ï?· Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

Daniel Bullock

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Boiler Blowdown Heat Recovery Project Reduces Steam System Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

produced. Much of this heat can be recovered by routing the blown down liquid through a heat exchanger that preheats the boiler's makeup water. A boiler blowdown heat recovery...

139

Economic Options for Upgrading Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are at least six major types of equipment that upgrade waste heat: (1) thermocompressor; (2) electric drive compressor heat pump; (3) absorption heat pump; (4) high temperature heat powered compressor heat pump; (5) reverse absorption heat pump; and (6) waste heat driven compressor heat pump. Some of these are not widely known, and there has been a tendency to ascribe the characteristics and limitations of the most well-known member to all members of the group. This paper demonstrates the wide variation that actually exists between the different options, and highlights the considerations necessary to ensure the most economic choice for a particular application.

Erickson, D. C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Wastewater heat recovery method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy efficiency+ power plant energy efficiency+ Home Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas. How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature? Links: The technology of Condensing Flue Gas Heat Recovery natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building

142

Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Chemical Cleaning Guidelines Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A considerable number of combined cycle units with heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) were installed over the past two decades worldwide, and the design complexity and operating pressures of these units increased significantly during this period. One of the goals of EPRI's Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Dependability Program 88 is to minimize availability losses associated with HRSG tube failures. To support its members operating combined cycle units, EPRI published Heat Recovery Steam Generato...

2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

143

Examination of Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous EPRI reports have documented problems associated with operation and maintenance of complex heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs). The EPRI report Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failure Manual (1004503) provides information about known HRSG tube failures and necessary steps that can be taken to diagnose and prevent similar problems. The EPRI report Delivering High Reliability Heat Recovery Steam Generators (1004240) provides guidance for continued and reliable operation of HRSGs from initial...

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

An Environment Friendly Energy Recovery Technology: Municipal Solid Waste Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy from waste, is a perspective source to replace fossil fuels in the future, municipal solid waste (MSW) gasification is a new technique for waste treatment. MSW can be combusted directly to generate heat and electricity, and by means of gasification ... Keywords: municipal solid waste, gasification, incineration

Lei Ma; Chuanhua Liao; Yuezhao Zhu; Haijun Chen; Yanghuiqin Ding

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Milestone Report #2: Direct Evaporator Leak and Flammability Analysis Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct evaporator is a simplified heat exchange system for an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) that generates electricity from a gas turbine exhaust stream. Typically, the heat of the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to the ORC by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. In this project, the goal is to design a direct evaporator where the working fluid is evaporated in the exhaust gas heat exchanger. By eliminating one of the heat exchangers and the intermediate oil loop, the overall ORC system cost can be reduced by approximately 15%. However, placing a heat exchanger operating with a flammable hydrocarbon working fluid directly in the hot exhaust gas stream presents potential safety risks. The purpose of the analyses presented in this report is to assess the flammability of the selected working fluid in the hot exhaust gas stream stemming from a potential leak in the evaporator. Ignition delay time for cyclopentane at temperatures and pressure corresponding to direct evaporator operation was obtained for several equivalence ratios. Results of a computational fluid dynamic analysis of a pinhole leak scenario are given.

Donna Post Guillen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Simplify heat recovery steam generator evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) are widely used in process and power plants, refineries and in several cogeneration/combined cycle systems. They are usually designed for a set of gas and steam conditions but often operate under different parameters due to plant constraints, steam demand, different ambient conditions (which affect the gas flow and exhaust gas temperature in a gas turbine plant), etc. As a result, the gas and steam temperature profiles in the HRSG, steam production and the steam temperature differ from the design conditions, affecting the entire plant performance and economics. Also, consultants and process engineers who are involved in evaluating the performance of the steam system as a whole, often would like to simulate the performance of an HRSG under different gas flows, inlet gas temperature and analysis, steam pressure and feed water temperature to optimize the entire steam system and select proper auxiliaries such as steam turbines, condensers, deaerators, etc.

Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (US))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Design of a heat recovery steam generator  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine in the size range of 20,000 hp (14.9 MW) was retrofitted with a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The HRSG produces high pressure superheated steam for use in a steam turbine. Supplementary firing is used to more than double the steam production over the unfired case. Because of many unusual constraints, an innovative design of the HRSG was formulated. These design constraints included: a wide range of operating conditions was to be accommodated; very limited space in the existing plant; and a desire to limit the field construction work necessary in order to provide a short turnaround time. This paper discusses the design used to satisfy these conditions.

Logeais, D.R.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Immediate Deployment of Waste Energy Recovery Technologies at Multi Sites  

SciTech Connect

Verso Paper Corp. implemented a portfolio of 13 commercially available proven industrial technologies each exceeding 30% minimum threshold efficiency and at least 25% efficiency increase. These sub-projects are a direct result of a grant received from the Department of Energy (DOE) through its FOA 0000044 (Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficient Industrial Equipment), which was funded by the American Recovery Act. These were installed at 3 sites in 2 states and are helping to reduce Verso costs, making the facilities more competitive. This created approximately 100 construction jobs (FTE's) and reduced impacted Verso facilities' expense budgets. These sub-projects were deployed at Verso paper mills located in Jay, Maine, Bucksport, Maine, and Sartell, Minnesota. The paper mills are the economic engines of the rural communities in which these mills are located. Reinvestment in waste energy recovery capital improvements is providing a stimulus to help maintain domestic jobs and to competitively position the US pulp and paper industry with rising energy costs. Energy efficiency improvements are also providing a positive environmental impact by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the quantity of wastewater treated and discharged, and fossil fuel demand. As a result of these projects, when fully operating, Verso realized a total of approximately 1.5 TBtu/Year reduction in overall energy consumption, which is 119% of the project objectives. Note that three paper machines have since been permanently curtailed. However even with these shutdowns, the company still met its energy objectives. Note also that the Sartell mill's paper machine is down due to a recent fire which damaged the mill's electrical infrastructure (the company has not decided on the mill's future).

Dennis Castonguay

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

149

A Cross-Flow Ceramic Heat Recuperator for Industrial Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With increasing fuel costs, the efficient use of fuel is very important to the U.S. process heat industries. Increase in fuel usage efficiency can be obtained by transferring the waste exhaust heat to the cold combustion air. The metallic recuperators currently available suffer from problems of creep, corrosion and oxidation, particularly at high temperatures. The Department of Energy and GTE Products corporation have pursued a jointly funded venture, Contract No. EX-76-C-Q1-2162, to establish performance criteria and demonstrate a cross-flow ceramic heat recuperator for high temperature industrial heat recovery applications. The immediate goals of the ceramic recuperator project were to demonstrate a heat exchanger capable of handling high temperatures (1600-2400oF), that is compact with a high surface area and with costs comparable to the lower temperature metal heat exchangers. This paper describes the basic GTE Products Corporation design and details the design basis, the predicted recuperator performance, the ceramic and housing materials, the recuperator design procedure and the fabrication and assembly. The data provided includes NTU-Effectiveness and low friction and heat transfer ("f" and "J") plots.

Gonzalez, J. M.; Cleveland, J. J.; Kohnken, K. H.; Rebello, W. J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Heat Integration and Heat Recovery at a Large Chemical Manufacturing Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Honeywell chemical plant located in Hopewell, Virginia includes processing units that purify raw phenol, react the phenol with hydrogen to form crude cyclohexanone, and purify the crude cyclohexanone. In order to reduce energy usage, two opportunities for heat recovery and heat integration were identified. A feasibility study and economic analysis were performed on the two opportunities, and both projects were implemented. The first project utilized the heat contained in a distillation process overheads stream to preheat the raw material entering the distillation process. This was accomplished via a heat exchanger, and reduced the utility steam requirement by 10,000 pph. The second project utilized the heat generated by the hydrogenation reaction (in the form of waste heat steam) to preheat the feed material in an adjacent process. This was accomplished via a heat exchanger, and reduced the utility steam requirement by 8,000 pph. These two energy projects required $1.1 million of capital and saved $1.0 million in utility steam annually.

Togna, K .A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Combined heat recovery and make-up water heating system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cogeneration plant is described comprising in combination: a first stage source of hot gas; a duct having an inlet for receiving the hot gas and an outlet stack open to the atmosphere; a second stage recovery heat steam generator including an evaporator situated in the duct, and economizer in the duct downstream of the evaporator, and steam drum fluidly connected to the evaporator and the economizer; feedwater supply means including a deaerator heater and feedwater pump for supplying deaerated feedwater to the steam drum through the economizer; makeup water supply means including a makeup pump for delivering makeup water to the deaerator heater; means fluidly connected to the steam drum for supplying auxiliary steam to the deaerator heater; and heat exchanger means located between the deaerator and the economizer, for transferring heat from the feedwater to the makeup water, thereby increasing the temperature of the makeup water delivered to the deaerator and decreasing the temperature of the feedwater delivered to the economizer, without fluid exchange.

Kim, S.Y.

1988-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

152

List of Heat recovery Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

recovery Incentives recovery Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 174 Heat recovery Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 174) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP Ohio - Commercial Custom Project Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Boilers Central Air conditioners Chillers Custom/Others pending approval Furnaces Heat pumps Heat recovery Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Processing and Manufacturing Equipment Refrigerators Yes AEP Ohio - Commercial Self Direct Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government

153

Recovery of Mercury From Contaminated Liquid Wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Base Contract program emphasized the manufacture and testing of superior sorbents for mercury removal, testing of the sorption process at a DOE site, and determination of the regeneration conditions in the laboratory. During this project, ADA Technologies, Inc. demonstrated the following key elements of a successful regenerable mercury sorption process: (1) sorbents that have a high capacity for dissolved, ionic mercury; (2) removal of ionic mercury at greater than 99% efficiency; and (3) thermal regeneration of the spent sorbent. ADA's process is based on the highly efficient and selective sorption of mercury by noble metals. Contaminated liquid flows through two packed columns that contain microporous sorbent particles on which a noble metal has been finely dispersed. A third column is held in reserve. When the sorbent is loaded with mercury to the point of breakthrough at the outlet of the second column, the first column is taken off-line and the flow of contaminated liquid is switched to the second and third columns. The spent column is regenerated by heating. A small flow of purge gas carries the desorbed mercury to a capture unit where the liquid mercury is recovered. Laboratory-scale tests with mercuric chloride solutions demonstrated the sorbents' ability to remove mercury from contaminated wastewater. Isotherms on surrogate wastes from DOE's Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee showed greater than 99.9% mercury removal. Laboratory- and pilot-scale tests on actual Y-12 Plant wastes were also successful. Mercury concentrations were reduced to less than 1 ppt from a starting concentration of 1,000 ppt. The treatment objective was 50 ppt. The sorption unit showed 10 ppt discharge after six months. Laboratory-scale tests demonstrated the feasibility of sorbent regeneration. Results show that sorption behavior is not affected after four cycles.

1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

154

THE ECONOMICS OF ENERGY RECOVERY FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTE INCINERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

re covery system or heat exchanger is to lower the gas temperature as a means of extracting energy GAS I IN t system to be responsive. In all probability a pre heated combustion chamber +·· .. ...,. .... + .. . ·- - + + ·· .. J. J. +. ". · · ..l- f. .. , STACK FIG.10 WASTE GAS INCINERATOR WITH HEAT EXCHANGER FOR OIL HEATING

Columbia University

155

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy; Grid systems; Optimization; Heat flow; Financialof grid power and by utilizing combined heat and power (CHP)

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Design of heat-recovery and seed-recovery units in MHD power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Crucial and limiting engineering and materials problems associated with the design of an MHD steam bottoming plant are discussed. Existing experimental and theoretical results on corrosion, fouling and deposits, potassium seed recovery and regeneration, are reviewed. The state of knowledge regarding the design of heat recovery and seed recovery units for coal-fired MHD plants is inadequate at the present time.

Bergman, P.D.; Joubert, J.I.; Demski, R.J.; Bienstock, D.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Assessment of Feasibility of the Beneficial Use of Waste Heat from the Advanced Test Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report investigates the feasibility of using waste heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). A proposed glycol waste heat recovery system was assessed for technical and economic feasibility. The system under consideration would use waste heat from the ATR secondary coolant system to preheat air for space heating of TRA-670. A tertiary coolant stream would be extracted from the secondary coolant system loop and pumped to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, where heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air in the heating and ventilation system. Historical data from Advanced Test Reactor operations over the past 10 years indicates that heat from the reactor coolant was available (when needed for heating) for 43.5% of the year on average. Potential energy cost savings by using the waste heat to preheat intake air is $242K/yr. Technical, safety, and logistics considerations of the glycol waste heat recovery system are outlined. Other opportunities for using waste heat and reducing water usage at ATR are considered.

Donna P. Guillen

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Using Waste Heat for External Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This DOE Industrial Technologies Program tip sheet describes the savings resulting from using waste heat from high-temperature industrial processes for lower temperature processes, like oven-drying.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Recovery of Magnesium from Waste Effluent in Nickel Laterite ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Eliminating the environmental threat caused by waste ... Characterization of the Chemical Changes and Surface Properties of Carbonated Waste Cement ... Flux for Basic Oxygen Steel Making Using Waste Oxides of Steel Plant ... Heat Treatment of Black Dross for the Production of a Value Added Material ...

160

Solid Waste Resource Recovery Financing Act (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The State of Texas encourages the processing of solid waste for the purpose of extracting, converting to energy, or otherwise separating and preparing solid waste for reuse. This Act provides for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Waste heat rejection from geothermal power stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study of waste heat rejection from geothermal power stations is concerned only with the heat rejected from the power cycle. The heat contained in reinjected or otherwise discharged geothermal fluids is not included with the waste heat considered here. The heat contained in the underflow from the flashtanks in such systems is not considered as part of the heat rejected from the power cycle. By following this definition of the waste heat to be rejected, various methods of waste heat dissipation are discussed without regard for the particular arrangement to obtain heat from the geothermal source. Recent conceptual design studies made for 50-MW(e) geothermal power stations at Heber and Niland, California, are of particular interst. The former uses a flashed-steam system and the latter a binary cycle that uses isopentane. In last-quarter 1976 dollars, the total estimated capital costs were about $750/kW and production costs about 50 mills/kWhr. If wet/dry towers were used to conserve 50% of the water evaporation at Heber, production costs would be about 65 mills/kWhr.

Robertson, R.C.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Apparatus for recovery of heat from exhaust gases of dryer  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus and method are disclosed for recovery of heat from exhaust gases of dryers and return of heat to the dryer system. Fresh air is drawn through a plurality of tubes in heat exchange relation to heated exhaust gases and introduced into the drying system without intermingling of contaminated exhaust gases with the heated fresh air. The apparatus and method have particular utility in gas-fired commercial and industrial laundry dryers.

Winstel, F.H.

1977-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

163

CFD Simulation of Infiltration Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomenclature Cp= specific heat capacity of air (1006 J/kg K) CP,= specific heat capacity of insulation solidJ/kg K) CPW specific heat capacity of wall sheathing (1200

Buchanan, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Doubling combined heat and power capacity in the UnitedCost Savings from Heat Storage Capacity Figure 49. LargeR 2 = 0.6683 Heat Storage Capacity (kWh) Fig. 48 Weekday

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between heat storage costs and capacity can be determineda given kWh of heat storage capacity is worth to a typicalequation (22) sets the heat storage capacity to the maximum

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electricity and natural gas DER No Heat Storage: thefired natural gas AC (a) Capacity of heat storage unit (but no heat storage, a 200 kW natural gas reciprocating

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electricity and natural gas DER No Heat Storage: therecovery and storage) utility electricity and natural gasbut no heat storage, a 200 kW natural gas reciprocating

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Enhancement of automotive exhaust heat recovery by thermoelectric devices  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to improve automobile fuel economy, an experimental study is undertaken to explore practical aspects of implementing thermoelectric devices for exhaust gas energy recovery. A highly instrumented apparatus consisting of a hot (exhaust gas) and a cold (coolant liquid) side rectangular ducts enclosing the thermoelectric elements has been built. Measurements of thermoelectric voltage output and flow and surface temperatures were acquired and analyzed to investigate the power generation and heat transfer properties of the apparatus. Effects of inserting aluminum wool packing material inside the hot side duct on augmentation of heat transfer from the gas stream to duct walls were studied. Data were collected for both the unpacked and packed cases to allow for detection of packing influence on flow and surface temperatures. Effects of gas and coolant inlet temperatures as well as gas flow rate on the thermoelectric power output were examined. The results indicate that thermoelectric power production is increased at higher gas inlet temperature or flow rate. However, thermoelectric power generation decreases with a higher coolant temperature as a consequence of the reduced hot-cold side temperature differential. For the hot-side duct, a large temperature gradient exists between the gas and solid surface temperature due to poor heat transfer through the gaseous medium. Adding the packing material inside the exhaust duct enhanced heat transfer and hence raised hot-side duct surface temperatures and thermoelectric power compared to the unpacked duct, particularly where the gas-to-surface temperature differential is highest. Therefore it is recommended that packing of exhaust duct becomes common practice in thermoelectric waste energy harvesting applications.

Ibrahim, Essam [Alabama A& M University, Normal; Szybist, James P [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Method of and apparatus for recovery of waste energy  

SciTech Connect

A holding tank receives waste water from a dishwasher or laundry machine having a rinse cycle and at least one wash cycle. A pump moves the waste water through a heat exchanger at the same time that the rinse cycle requires hot water from a hot water heater. The cold water feed for the hot water heater is also passed in countercurrent heat exchange relationship with the waste water to provide warmed or heated makeup water at the same time that hot water is being withdrawn therefrom. The cooled waste water from the heat exchanger may be collected in a tank and supplied to any one or more of several additional devices, such as a water cooled refrigerant compressor, a grease extraction ventilator having water contact means, a waste food grinder, etc. The ventilator and compressor may also be placed in series, while the cooling water heated in the compressor is recirculated to the heat exchanger. The holding tank may be mounted directly beneath the dishwasher, or the holding tank and countercurrent heat exchanger may be placed in a common housing, with the holding tank beneath the heat exchanger and a pump to transfer the waste water from the holding tank to the appropriate tubes of the coils of the heat exchanger, from which waste water may be discharged into a discharge area adjacent the holding tank. A removable screen for the waste water may be provided above the holding tank in each instance. When a discharge area is adjacent the holding tank, the screen will be self-cleaning, due to flow of incoming waste water across the screen and into the discharge area, when the screen is occluded.

Molitor, V. D.

1985-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

170

Using Waste Heat for External Processes (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Chinese translation of the Using Waste Heat for External Processes fact sheet. Provides suggestions on how to use waste heat in industrial applications. The temperature of exhaust gases from fuel-fired industrial processes depends mainly on the process temperature and the waste heat recovery method. Figure 1 shows the heat lost in exhaust gases at various exhaust gas temperatures and percentages of excess air. Energy from gases exhausted from higher temperature processes (primary processes) can be recovered and used for lower temperature processes (secondary processes). One example is to generate steam using waste heat boilers for the fluid heaters used in petroleum crude processing. In addition, many companies install heat exchangers on the exhaust stacks of furnaces and ovens to produce hot water or to generate hot air for space heating.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Recovery of fissile materials from nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering fissile materials such as uranium, and plutonium, and rare earth elements, from complex waste feed material, and converting the remaining wastes into a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. The waste feed is mixed with a dissolution glass formed of lead oxide and boron oxide resulting in oxidation, dehalogenation, and dissolution of metal oxides. Carbon is added to remove lead oxide, and a boron oxide fusion melt is produced. The fusion melt is essentially devoid of organic materials and halogens, and is easily and rapidly dissolved in nitric acid. After dissolution, uranium, plutonium, and rare earth elements are separated from the acid and recovered by processes such as PUREX or ion exchange. The remaining acid waste stream is vitrified to produce a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. Potential waste feed materials include plutonium scrap and residue, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, organic material and other carbon-containing material.

Forsberg, Charles W.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Recovery of fissile materials from nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for recovering fissile materials such as uranium, and plutonium, and rare earth elements, from complex waste feed material, and converting the remaining wastes into a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. The waste feed is mixed with a dissolution glass formed of lead oxide and boron oxide resulting in oxidation, dehalogenation, and dissolution of metal oxides. Carbon is added to remove lead oxide, and a boron oxide fusion melt is produced. The fusion melt is essentially devoid of organic materials and halogens, and is easily and rapidly dissolved in nitric acid. After dissolution, uranium, plutonium and rare earth elements are separated from the acid and recovered by processes such as PUREX or ion exchange. The remaining acid waste stream is vitrified to produce a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. Potential waste feed materials include plutonium scrap and residue, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, organic material and other carbon-containing material.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Waste Heat Recovery - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... Effect of Materials on the Autoignition of Cyclopentane: Donna Guillen1; 1Idaho National Laboratory Cyclopentane, a flammable hydrocarbon, ...

174

Miniaturized stirling engines for waste heat recovery.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Portable electronic devices have made a profound impact on our society and economy due to their widespread use for computation, communications, and entertainment. The performance… (more)

Lemaire, Lacey-Lynne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Open-loop heat-recovery dryer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drying apparatus is disclosed that includes a drum and an open-loop airflow pathway originating at an ambient air inlet, passing through the drum, and terminating at an exhaust outlet. A passive heat exchanger is included for passively transferring heat from air flowing from the drum toward the exhaust outlet to air flowing from the ambient air inlet toward the drum. A heat pump is also included for actively transferring heat from air flowing from the passive heat exchanger toward the exhaust outlet to air flowing from the passive heat exchanger toward the drum. A heating element is also included for further heating air flowing from the heat pump toward the drum.

TeGrotenhuis, Ward Evan

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

176

Guidelines on Optimizing Heat Recovery Steam Generator Drains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Severe thermal-mechanical fatigue damage to the superheaters (SHs), reheaters (RHs), and steam piping of horizontal-gas-path heat recovery steam generators due primarily to ineffective drainage of the condensate that is generated in superheaters and reheaters at every startup continues to be a significant industry problem that results in avoidable deterioration of unit reliability and significant unnecessary maintenance costs. This report will assist operators in guiding heat recovery steam generator (HR...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

177

Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Chemical Cleaning Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined cycle units with heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) represent a substantial fraction of the new fossil generating capacity installed around the world since the 1990s. One of the goals of the EPRI HRSG Dependability Program is to make availability losses due to tube failures very low, no more than one per year. An earlier guideline, "Interim Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Combined Cycle Heat Recovery Steam Generators" (EPRI Report TR-110051), shows organizations how to set up chemistry progra...

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

178

Field Guide: Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In conventional and combined-cycle plants, boiler and heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failures have been the main availability problem for as long as reliable statistics have been kept for each generating source. The three volumes of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Boiler and Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failures: Theory and Practice (1012757) present an in-depth description of the various HRSG and degradation mechanisms, providing plant owners and operators with the t...

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Field Guide: Heat Recovery Steam Generator Outage Inspection Pocket Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) pose a unique set of operational challenges, due in part to their rapid startup capabilities and high operating efficiencies. Among these challenges are the difficulty of inspection and repair, which are complicated by limited access as well as the complexity of the equipment. To help members address these challenges, the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Heat Recovery Steam Generator Dependability program has added this field guide to its comprehensive s...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

180

Minewater heat recovery project. Final Technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report consists of three sections: (1) Design, experimental testing and performance analysis of the 20-ft long DBHE (Downhole Bundle Heat Exchanger); (2) Modified design of mine water heat exchanger; and (3) Performance tests on mine water heat exchanger. Appendices summarize design calculations, discuss the scope of the work tasks, and present a diary of the progress throughout the research and development project.

NONE

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nanjing Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co Ltd Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Nanjing Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co. Ltd Place Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 210024 Sector Biomass Product Chinese biomass project developer. The company developed a landfill gas plant in Nanjing, China. Coordinates 32.0485°, 118.778969° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.0485,"lon":118.778969,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

182

Cascade heat recovery with coproduct gas production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the integration of a chemical absorption separation of oxygen and nitrogen from air with a combustion process is set forth wherein excess temperature availability from the combustion process is more effectively utilized to desorb oxygen product from the absorbent and then the sensible heat and absorption reaction heat is further utilized to produce a high temperature process stream. The oxygen may be utilized to enrich the combustion process wherein the high temperature heat for desorption is conducted in a heat exchange preferably performed with a pressure differential of less than 10 atmospheres which provides considerable flexibility in the heat exchange. 4 figs.

Brown, W.R.; Cassano, A.A.; Dunbobbin, B.R.; Rao, P.; Erickson, D.C.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

183

Cascade heat recovery with coproduct gas production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the integration of a chemical absorption separation of oxygen and nitrogen from air with a combustion process is set forth wherein excess temperature availability from the combustion process is more effectively utilized to desorb oxygen product from the absorbent and then the sensible heat and absorption reaction heat is further utilized to produce a high temperature process stream. The oxygen may be utilized to enrich the combustion process wherein the high temperature heat for desorption is conducted in a heat exchange preferably performed with a pressure differential of less than 10 atmospheres which provides considerable flexibility in the heat exchange.

Brown, William R. (Zionsville, PA); Cassano, Anthony A. (Allentown, PA); Dunbobbin, Brian R. (Allentown, PA); Rao, Pradip (Allentown, PA); Erickson, Donald C. (Annapolis, MD)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

selection of on-site power generation with combined heat andsingle-cycle thermal power generation is typically lesshighly centralized power generation and delivery system

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involved, supplemental absorption cooling allows downsizingwater heating and for absorption cooling) in a day SHPricedisplaced by absorption cooling. The same principle applies

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Energy Recovery from Solid Waste for Small Cities - Has the Time Really Come?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The City of Longview, Texas is evaluating modular, two stage incineration with waste heat recovery to produce steam for sale to industrial consumers. An envisioned 150 tpd waste disposal facility would serve the area population of approximately 100,000. Estimates for operating cost and steam conversion efficiency were based on historical data obtained from a similar facility located in Salem, Virginia. The total projected break-even cost in 1982 for production of 150 psig saturated steam for a completely consumptive use was $7.95 per 1000 lb. The projected break-even cost in 1982 for 600 psi steam superheated to 700 deg. F for a consumptive use was $8.72 per 1000 lb. excluding the cost of water deionization facilities. These costs compare favorably with projected costs of steam production using natural gas as a boiler fuel but are not competitive when compared to use of locally available lignite. The results indicate that the time has come for smaller cities with a potential for industrial steam sales to consider energy recovery from solid waste using modular, two stage incinerations with waste heat recovery.

Winn, W. T., Jr.; Paxton, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

NITRIC ACID RECOVERY FROM WASTE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of nitric acid from aqueous nitrate solutions containing fission products as impurities is described. It is desirable to subject such solutions to concentration by evaporation since nitric acid is regenerated thereby. A difficulty, however, is that the highly radioactive fission product ruthenium is volatilized together with the nitric acid. It has been found that by adding nitrous acid, ruthenium volatilization is suppressed and reduced to a negligible degree so that the distillate obtained is practically free of ruthenium.

Wilson, A.S.

1959-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

188

ENERGY RECOVERY FROM SOLID WASTES: OPPORTUNITIES AND PROBLEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, proper type of energy load (no extreme variations in need or usage), and matching of manufacturing plantENERGY RECOVERY FROM SOLID WASTES: OPPORTUNITIES AND PROBLEMS · CHARLES O. VELZY Charles R Velzy in the energy from refuse field is survey ed including mass-burn, modular combustion, RDF combustion, pyrolysis

Columbia University

189

Cyanidation Recovery Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat Treatment of Black Dross for the Production of a Value Added Material ... Leaching Studies for Metals Recovery from Waste Printed Wiring Boards (PWBs).

190

New waste-heat refrigeration unit cuts flaring, reduces pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Planetec Utility Services Co. Inc. and Energy Concepts Co. (ECC), with the help of the US Department of Energy (DOE), developed and commissioned a unique waste-heat powered LPG recovery plant in August 1997 at the 30,000 b/d Denver refinery, operated by Ultramar Diamond Shamrock (UDS). This new environmentally friendly technology reduces flare emissions and the loss of salable liquid-petroleum products to the fuel-gas system. The waste heat ammonia absorption refrigeration plant (Whaarp) is the first technology of its kind to use low-temperature waste heat (295 F) to achieve sub-zero refrigeration temperatures ({minus}40 F) with the capability of dual temperature loads in a refinery setting. The ammonia absorption refrigeration is applied to the refinery`s fuel-gas makeup streams to condense over 180 b/d of salable liquid hydrocarbon products. The recovered liquid, about 64,000 bbl/year of LPG and gasoline, increases annual refinery profits by nearly $1 million, while substantially reducing air pollution emissions from the refinery`s flare.

Brant, B.; Brueske, S. [Planetec Utility Services Co., Inc., Evergreen, CO (United States); Erickson, D.; Papar, R. [Energy Concepts Co., Annapolis, MD (United States)

1998-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

191

TVA pilot greenhouse for waste heat research  

SciTech Connect

A pilot facility for evaluating the use of waste heat from power plants, both fossil-fueled and nuclear, to heat a greenhouse was designed and built at the TVA reservation at Muscle Shoals, Ala. The simulation of waste heat was from an electric hot water heater. The subjects to be evaluated included: greenhouse environmental control system operation during one year period under wide range of climatic conditions and the crop performance, i.e., yield and disease control under various controlled-environment conditions and with various rooting media conditions. The facility design, control instrumentation, tests performed, and operating conditions obtained for airflow, air temperature, and humidity are described. No information is included on the crops produced. It is concluded that the pilot facility is providing valuable guidelines for the design of a larger demonstration plant to be located at an operating power plant. (LCL)

King, L.D.; Furlong, W.K.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Property:Heat Recovery Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems Systems Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Heat Recovery Systems Property Type Page Description Distributed Data heat recovery systems Pages using the property "Heat Recovery Systems" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) C Capstone C30 + Unifin + Capstone C60 + Unifin HX + D Distributed Generation Study/10 West 66th Street Corp + Built-in + Distributed Generation Study/615 kW Waukesha Packaged System + Sondex PHE-Type SL140-TM-EE-190 +, Sondex PHE-Type SL140-TM-EE-150 +, Cain UTR1-810A17.5SSP + Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille + Built-in + Distributed Generation Study/Arrow Linen + Built-in + Distributed Generation Study/Dakota Station (Minnegasco) + Unifin + Distributed Generation Study/Elgin Community College + Beaird Maxim Model TRP-12 +

193

Method of and unit for recovery of waste energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transfer waste water from wash cycle of dishwasher to collection tank beneath heat exchanger surrounding hollow central space, pass waste water through dual tube heat exchanger in countercurrent relation to cool feed water for hot water heater in central space of heat exchanger, supply heat to water in heater, then hot water to dishwasher rinse. May circulate feed water downwardly through outer space of heater, formed by partition, to lower end of inner space, in which heat is supplied by electrical immersion heaters. Ends of tank of hot water may be semi-oval, semi-elliptical or the like, while partition may be sufficiently close to bottom of tank to produce a wire-drawing effect as inlet water flows from outer to inner space, thereby maintaining light or small particles which fall off electric heaters in circulation, so that such particles will be removed with hot water. Heavier particles will collect in bottom of tank and may be drained periodically.

Molitor, V. D.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Heating and cooling of municipal buildings with waste heat from ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of using waste heat from municipal water wells to replace natural gas for heating of the City Hall, Fire Station, and Community Hall in Wilmer, Texas was studied. At present, the 120/sup 0/F well water is cooled by dissipating the excess heat through evaporative cooling towers before entering the distribution system. The objective of the study was to determine the pumping cycle of the well and determine the amount of available heat from the water for a specified period. This data were correlated with the heating and cooling demand of the City's buildings, and a conceptual heat recovery system will be prepared. The system will use part or all of the excess heat from the water to heat the buildings, thereby eliminating the use of natural gas. The proposed geothermal retrofit of the existing natural gas heating system is not economical because the savings in natural gas does not offset the capital cost of the new equipment and the annual operating and maintenance costs. The fuel savings and power costs are a virtual trade-off over the 25-year period. The installation and operation of the system was estimated to cost $105,000 for 25 years which is an unamortized expense. In conclusion, retrofitting the City of Wilmer's municipal buildings is not feasible based on the economic analysis and fiscal projections as presented.

Morgan, D.S.; Hochgraf, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The Toxic-Release Inventory'' of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M's work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electricity generated by distributed energy resources (DER) located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumer requirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid. Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associated with transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricity delivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities to purchase energy when attractive. On-site thermal power generation is typically less efficient than central station generation, but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and utilizing combined heat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scale on-site generation to displace fuel purchases, then DER can become attractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts, the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressed using a mixed-integer linear programme, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, and information (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies, DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selecting the units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. In this paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion of the option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep an inventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lower costs even further by reducing off-peak generation and relying on storage. This and other effects of storages are demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in San Francisco, California, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacity of heat storage is calculated.

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

197

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

SciTech Connect

Electricity produced by distributed energy resources (DER)located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumerrequirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid.Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associatedwith transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricitydelivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities topurchase energy when attractive. On-site, single-cycle thermal powergeneration is typically less efficient than central station generation,but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and by utilizing combinedheat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scaleon-site thermal generation to displace fuel purchases, DER can becomeattractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts,the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressedusing a mixed-integer linear program, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, andinformation (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies,DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selectingthe units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. Inthis paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion ofthe option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep aninventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lowercosts even further by reducing lucrative peak-shaving generation whilerelying on storage to meet heat loads. This and other effects of storageare demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in SanFrancisco, California, USA, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacityof heat storage is calculated.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

198

Heat Recovery Considerations for Process Heaters and Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The largest single area for industrial energy conservation is in the improvement of combustion efficiencies for heaters and boilers. A number of methods can be employed to recover heat. The most common are by use of recuperative air preheaters, regenerative air preheaters and economizers. Relative advantages and applicability of the three methods are discussed. Analytical methods and correlations are presented which enable determination of size of unit, capital cost and operating cost for each of the three methods of heat recovery.

Kumar, A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Heat Recovery Consideration for Process Heaters and Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The largest single area for industrial energy conservation is in the improvement of combustion efficiencies for heaters and boilers. A number of methods can be employed to recover heat. The most common are by use of recuperative air preheaters, regenerative air preheaters and economizers. Relative advantages and applicability of the three methods are discussed. Analytical methods and correlations are presented which enable determination of size of unit, capital cost and operating cost for each of the three methods of heat recovery.

Kumar, A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Heat Recovery Considerations for Process Heaters and Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The largest single area for industrial energy conservation is in the improvement of combustion efficiencies for heaters and boilers. A number of methods can be employed to recover heat. The most common are by use of recuperative air preheaters, regenerative air preheaters and economizers. Relative advantages and applicability of the three methods are discussed. Analytical methods and correlations are presented which enable determination of size of unit, capital cost and operating cost for each of the three methods of heat recovery.

Kumar, A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Heat Recovery Considerations for Process Heaters and Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The largest single area for industrial energy conservation is in the improvement of combustion efficiencies for heaters and boilers. A number of methods can be employed to recover heat. The most common are by use of recuperative air preheaters, regenerative air preheaters and economizers. Relative advantages and applicability of the three methods are discussed. Analytical methods and correlations are presented which enable determination of size and unit, capital cost and operating cost for each of the three methods of heat recovery.

Kumar, A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Heat Recovery Consideration for Process Heaters and Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The largest single area for industrial energy conservation is in the improvement of combustion efficiencies for heaters and boilers. A number of methods can be employed to recover heat. The most common are by use of recuperative air preheaters, regenerative air preheaters and economizers. Relative advantages and applicability of the three methods are discussed. Analytical methods and correlations are presented which enable determination of size of unit, capital cost and operating cost for each of the three methods of heat recovery.

Kumar, A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

RECOVERY OF MERCURY FROM CONTAMINATED LIQUID WASTES  

SciTech Connect

Mercury was widely used in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons facilities, resulting in a broad range of mercury-contaminated wastes and wastewaters. Some of the mercury contamination has escaped to the local environment, particularly at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where approximately 330 metric tons of mercury were discharged to the environment between 1953 and 1963 (TN & Associates, 1998). Effective removal of mercury contamination from water is a complex and difficult problem. In particular, mercury treatment of natural waters is difficult because of the low regulatory standards. For example, the Environmental Protection Agency has established a national ambient water quality standard of 12 parts-per-trillion (ppt), whereas the standard is 1.8 ppt in the Great Lakes Region. In addition, mercury in the environment is typically present in several different forms, but sorption processes are rarely effective with more than one or two of these forms. To meet the low regulatory discharge limits, an effective sorption process must be able to address all forms of mercury present in the water. One approach is to apply different sorbents in series depending on the mercury speciation and the regulatory discharge limits. ADA Technologies, Inc. has developed four new sorbents to address the variety of mercury species present in industrial discharges and natural waters. Three of these sorbents have been field tested on contaminated creek water at the Y-12 Plant. Two of these sorbents have been successfully demonstrated very high removal efficiencies for soluble mercury species, reducing mercury concentrations at the outlet of a pilot-scale system to less than 12 ppt for as long as six months. The other sorbent tested at the Y-12 Plant targeted colloidal mercury not removed by standard sorption or filtration processes. At the Y-12 Plant, colloidal mercury appears to be associated with iron, so a sorbent that removes mercury-iron complexes in the presence of a magnetic field was evaluated. Field results indicated good removal of this mercury fraction from the Y-12 waters. In addition, this sorbent is easily regenerated by simply removing the magnetic field and flushing the columns with water. The fourth sorbent is still undergoing laboratory development, but results to date indicate exceptionally high mercury sorption capacity. The sorbent is capable of removing all forms of mercury typically present in natural and industrial waters, including Hg{sup 2+}, elemental mercury, methyl mercury, and colloidal mercury. The process possesses very fast kinetics, which allows for higher flow rates and smaller treatment units. These sorbent technologies, used in tandem or individually depending on the treatment needs, can provide DOE sites with a cost-effective method for reducing mercury concentrations to very low levels mandated by the regulatory community. In addition, the technologies do not generate significant amounts of secondary wastes for disposal. Furthermore, the need for improved water treatment technologies is not unique to the DOE. The new, stringent requirements on mercury concentrations impact other government agencies as well as the private sector. Some of the private-sector industries needing improved methods for removing mercury from water include mining, chloralkali production, chemical processing, and medical waste treatment. The next logical step is to deploy one or more of these sorbents at a contaminated DOE site or at a commercial facility needing improved mercury treatment technologies. A full-scale deployment is planned in fiscal year 2000.

Robin M. Stewart

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

204

Recovering Industrial Waste Heat by the Means of Thermoelectricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. When waste heat, geothermal heat and solar is the heat source, the cost of thermal input canRecovering Industrial Waste Heat by the Means of Thermoelectricity Spring 2010 Department available thermoelectric modules and to build a thermoelectric power generator demonstration unit

Kjelstrup, Signe

205

Method for controlling exhaust gas heat recovery systems in vehicles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of operating a vehicle including an engine, a transmission, an exhaust gas heat recovery (EGHR) heat exchanger, and an oil-to-water heat exchanger providing selective heat-exchange communication between the engine and transmission. The method includes controlling a two-way valve, which is configured to be set to one of an engine position and a transmission position. The engine position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the engine, but does not allow heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the oil-to-water heat exchanger. The transmission position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger, the oil-to-water heat exchanger, and the engine. The method also includes monitoring an ambient air temperature and comparing the monitored ambient air temperature to a predetermined cold ambient temperature. If the monitored ambient air temperature is greater than the predetermined cold ambient temperature, the two-way valve is set to the transmission position.

Spohn, Brian L.; Claypole, George M.; Starr, Richard D

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

206

Heat recovery and seed recovery development project: preliminary design report (PDR)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary design and performance characteristics are described of the 20 MWt heat recovery and seed recovery (HRSR) system to be fabricated, installed, and evaluated to provide a technological basis for the design of commercial size HRSR systems for coal-fired open-cycle MHD power plants. The system description and heat and material balances, equipment description and functional requirements, controls, interfacing systems, and operation and maintenance are detailed. Appendices include: (1) recommended environmental requirements for compliance with federal and state of Tennessee regulations, (2) channel and diffuser simulator, (3) equipment arrangement drawings, and (4) channel and diffuser simulator barrel drawings. (WHK)

Arkett, A. H.; Alexander, K. C.; Bolek, A. D.; Blackman, B. K.; Kurrle, P. E.; Tram, S. V.; Warren, A. M.; Ziobrowski, A. J.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Guidelines for the Nondestructive Examination of Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) have become more complex over the last 15 years, operating with multiple pressures and temperatures, operators have experienced an increasing suite of HRSG tube failures (HTFs). This report provides guidance on the performance of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of HRSGs so that operators will know what types of NDE to perform and where to perform them.

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

208

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES October 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES Carlsbad, NM - The recent completion of transuranic (TRU) waste cleanup at Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 in California brings the total number of sites cleared of TRU waste to 17. "Recovery Act funding has made this possible," Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Recovery Act Federal Project Director Casey Gadbury said of the VNC and LLNL cleanups funded with about $1.6 million in Recovery Act funds. "The cleanup of these and other small-quantity sites has been and will be accelerated because of the available Recovery Act funds."

209

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES October 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES Carlsbad, NM - The recent completion of transuranic (TRU) waste cleanup at Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 in California brings the total number of sites cleared of TRU waste to 17. "Recovery Act funding has made this possible," Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Recovery Act Federal Project Director Casey Gadbury said of the VNC and LLNL cleanups funded with about $1.6 million in Recovery Act funds. "The cleanup of these and other small-quantity sites has been and will be accelerated because of the available Recovery Act funds."

210

Model for determining modular heat recovery incinerator feasibility on air force installations. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study constructed a model to determine the feasibility of building municipal solid waste (MSW) fired modular heat recovery incinerators (HRIs) on Air Force installations. The model consisted of three gates. Gate one identified current federal regulatory air emission requirements for various HRI pollutants. It also specified two air pollution control configurations with emission reduction efficiencies capable of achieving these requirements. Gate two presented a life-cycle cost (LCC) economic analysis methodology. Operational and cost data for existing modular HRIs located in the United States facilitated the development of regression equations that estimate capital and annual operating costs for a modular HRI. Actual cost and operational information from a central heating plant at Wright-Patterson AFB, along with cost data from the regression equations, provided the basis for an example LCC analysis involving modular HRIs Results of this hypothetical evaluation showed that the LCC for the modular HRI alternatives were both less than the LCC of replacing the existing boiler. Gate three presented a Likert-scale survey to evaluate the sociopolitical acceptability of the proposed HRI. The survey results indicate the level of effort to process the HRI proposal in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act. Heat recovery, Incinerators, Waste management, Waste treatment.

Anderson, A.H.; Munnell, P.R.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Brayton Solvent Recovery Heat Pump Technology Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Brayton cycle technology was developed to reduce the temperature of gas streams containing solvents in order to condense and recover them. While the use of turbo compressor/expander machinery in conjunction with an energy recuperator is the basis for this heat pump process, many variations can be incorporated to optimize the total process for specific applications. Several process schemes will be discussed including both direct condensation and adsorption approaches. For situations where the solvent is at a relatively high concentration, such as tank filling operations, the direct condensation system is chosen. If the concentrations are low, which would be the case for an oven drying operation, activated carbon beds are used to concentrate the solvent. Many improvements on the first generation designs have been made in both process and the equipment components used for various commercial installations. Several specific applications have been identified as being well suited to take advantage of the features of this type of equipment.

Enneking, J. C.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Final Report. Conversion of Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilizing Hermetic Organic Rankine Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The design of waste heat recovery using the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engine is updated. Advances in power electronics with lower cost enable the use of a single shaft, high-speed generator eliminating wear items and allowing hermetic sealing of the working fluid. This allows maintenance free operation and a compact configuration that lowers cost, enabling new market opportunities.

Fuller, Robert L.

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

213

Fouling reduction characteristics of a no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger for flue gas heat recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In conventional flue gas heat recovery systems, the fouling by fly ashes and the related problems such as corrosion and cleaning are known to be major drawbacks. To overcome these problems, a single-riser no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger is devised and studied. Fouling and cleaning tests are performed for a uniquely designed fluidized bed-type heat exchanger to demonstrate the effect of particles on the fouling reduction and heat transfer enhancement. The tested heat exchanger model (1 m high and 54 mm internal diameter) is a gas-to-water type and composed of a main vertical tube and four auxiliary tubes through which particles circulate and transfer heat. Through the present study, the fouling on the heat transfer surface could successfully be simulated by controlling air-to-fuel ratios rather than introducing particles through an external feeder, which produced soft deposit layers with 1 to 1.5 mm thickness on the inside pipe wall. Flue gas temperature at the inlet of heat exchanger was maintained at 450{sup o}C at the gas volume rate of 0.738 to 0.768 CMM (0.0123 to 0.0128 m{sup 3}/sec). From the analyses of the measured data, heat transfer performances of the heat exchanger before and after fouling and with and without particles were evaluated. Results showed that soft deposits were easily removed by introducing glass bead particles, and also heat transfer performance increased two times by the particle circulation. In addition, it was found that this type of heat exchanger had high potential to recover heat of waste gases from furnaces, boilers, and incinerators effectively and to reduce fouling related problems.

Jun, Y.D.; Lee, K.B.; Islam, S.Z.; Ko, S.B. [Kongju National University, Kong Ju (Republic of Korea). Dept. for Mechanical Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

A Spin on Technology: Extracting Value from Wasted Heat | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Spin on Technology: Extracting Value from Wasted Heat A Spin on Technology: Extracting Value from Wasted Heat A Spin on Technology: Extracting Value from Wasted Heat November 12, 2010 - 2:12pm Addthis Ener-G-Rotors has developed a system that converts hot water and steam into electricity. | File photo Ener-G-Rotors has developed a system that converts hot water and steam into electricity. | File photo Joshua DeLung What are the key facts? This new system allows manufacturers to convert heated wastewater and steam to energy. $834,000 Recovery Act tax credit is helping Ener-G-Rotors startup to commercialize their product. A three year return on investment equals $42,000 savings on average each year using the GEN4 System. Wastewater and steam can be a challenging resource for manufacturers to manage. The heated wastewater and steam are either lost or must be cooled

215

Waste heat rejection from geothermal power stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste heat rejection systems for geothermal power stations have a significantly greater influence on plant operating performances and costs than do corresponding systems in fossil- and nuclear-fueled stations. With thermal efficiencies of only about 10%, geothermal power cycles can reject four times as much heat per kilowatt of output. Geothermal sites in the United States tend to be in water-short areas that could require use of more expensive wet/dry or dry-type cooling towers. With relatively low-temperature heat sources, the cycle economics are more sensitive to diurnal and seasonal variations in sink temperatures. Factors such as the necessity for hydrogen sulfide scrubbers in off-gas systems or the need to treat cooling tower blowdown before reinjection can add to the cost and complexity of goethermal waste heat rejection systems. Working fluids most commonly considered for geothermal cycles are water, ammonia, Freon-22, isobutane, and isopentane. Both low-level and barometric-leg direct-contact condensers are used, and reinforced concrete has been proposed for condenser vessels. Multipass surface condensers also have wide application. Corrosion problems at some locations have led to increased interest in titanium tubing. Studies at ORNL indicate that fluted vertical tubes can enhance condensing film coefficients by factors of 4 to 7.

Robertson, R C

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Retrofits for Improved Heat Rate and Availability: Circulating Water Heat Recovery Retrofits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Circulating water heat recovery is a means of directly increasing the thermal efficiency of a power plant. If only fuel savings are considered, the economic benefit is often only marginal. However, when increased megawatt output and heat-rate improvements are included in the economic analysis, such retrofits can be attractive, with break-even fuel costs sometimes approaching $1/million Btu.

1990-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

217

Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Olsen Cycle on PZN-5.5PT Single Crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy converter for waste heat energy harvesting using co-L. “Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using heatNo.3, pp.035015, 2012. WASTE HEAT ENERGY HARVESTING USING

McKinley, Ian Meeker; Kandilian, Razmig; Pilon, Laurent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Recovery of Energy and Chrome from Leather Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy requirements for the leather tanning industry are considerable and depend primarily on nonrenewable fuels such as oil and natural gas. However, some 50 percent, approximately 1.85 x 1012 BTU/year, of the energy needed to support the U.S. tanning industry may be met through an active conservation program. This program would be directed at the recovery of the energy available in the leather waste; the raw and finished tanned leather trimmings and cuttings resulting from tannery operations. At the present time, leather waste is being disposed of in landfills. This represents an environmental problem and a significant loss of potential energy and of valuable chromium compounds that can be utilized in the tanning process. Recovery of energy and chrome compounds can result in a saving of some 25 million dollars per year for the industry. The paper presents a pyrolysis method for handling leather tanning wastes to recover energy and chromium compounds for use in the tanning process. Energy and cost savings are estimated.

Muralidhara, H. S.; Maggin, B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Compilation of EPRI Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined-cycle units with heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) represent a substantial portion of new installed generation worldwide since the 1990s. Despite being relative new, these units have experienced a significant loss of availability and reliability due to tubing failures. Many of these failures are attributed to poor design, improper operation, weaknesses in fabrication, and poor installation practices. This product is a compilation of nine (9) key individual guidelines developed to address re...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Repair Welding Technologies For Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tube failures that occur in heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) are often caused by thermal stress or thermal shock associated with cyclic plant operation or by flow-accelerated corrosion. Many premature failures occur along the length of finned tubes or at attachment locations where tubes are joined to the upper or lower header. Because of current tube repair practices and limited access for welding, reoccurring failures are common.

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Monitoring and Controlling Carryover in Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimization of the cycle chemistry in the steam generating system of combined-cycle/heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) plants is vital to ensuring the efficient and reliable operation of the equipment. Monitoring of steam purity and drum carryover are core parameters for HRSG chemistry programs. Carryover is any solid, liquid, or vaporous contaminant that leaves the HRSG steam drum along with the steam. Carryover might be the result of the limited separation of the steam/water mixture in the steam dru...

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

222

Delivering High Reliability in Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite being relatively new, the worldwide fleet of combined-cycle units with heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) has exhibited a disappointing record with respect to reliability and availability in terms of HRSG tube failures (HTFs). This report identifies actions that—if implemented prior to commercial operation—should greatly improve the operational HRSG reliability.BackgroundWhen contemplating new combined-cycle units, the choices that can ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

223

LCA of local strategies for energy recovery from waste in England, applied to a large municipal flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intense waste management (WM) planning activity is currently undergoing in England to build the infrastructure necessary to treat residual wastes, increase recycling levels and the recovery of energy from waste. From the analyses of local WM strategic and planning documents we have identified the emerging of three different energy recovery strategies: established combustion of residual waste; pre-treatment of residual waste and energy recovery from Solid Recovered Fuel in a dedicated plant, usually assumed to be a gasifier; pre-treatment of residual waste and reliance on the market to accept the 'fuel from waste' so produced. Each energy recovery strategy will result in a different solution in terms of the technology selected; moreover, on the basis of the favoured solution, the total number, scale and location of thermal treatment plants built in England will dramatically change. To support the evaluation and comparison of these three WM strategy in terms of global environmental impacts, energy recovery possibilities and performance with respect to changing 'fuel from waste' market conditions, the LCA comparison of eight alternative WM scenarios for a real case study dealing with a large flow of municipal wastes was performed with the modelling tool WRATE. The large flow of waste modelled allowed to formulate and assess realistic alternative WM scenarios and to design infrastructural systems which are likely to correspond to those submitted for approval to the local authorities. The results show that all alternative scenarios contribute to saving abiotic resources and reducing global warming potential. Particularly relevant to the current English debate, the performance of a scenario was shown to depend not from the thermal treatment technology but from a combination of parameters, among which most relevant are the efficiency of energy recovery processes (both electricity and heat) and the calorific value of residual waste and pre-treated material. The contribution and relative importance of recycling and treatment/recovery processes change with the impact category. The lack of reprocessing plants in the area of the case study has shown the relevance of transport distances for recyclate material in reducing the efficiency of a WM system. Highly relevant to the current English WM infrastructural debate, these results for the first time highlight the risk of a significant reduction in the energy that could be recovered by local WM strategies relying only on the market to dispose of the 'fuel from waste' in a non dedicated plant in the case that the SRF had to be sent to landfill for lack of treatment capacity.

Tunesi, Simonetta, E-mail: s.tunesi@ucl.ac.uk [Environment Institute, University College London, Pearson Building, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Thermally Activated Desiccant Technology for Heat Recovery and Comfort  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Desiccant cooling is an important part of the diverse portfolio of Thermally Activated Technologies (TAT) designed for conversion of heat for the purpose of indoor air quality control. Thermally activated desiccant cooling incorporates a desiccant material that undergoes a cyclic process involving direct dehumidification of moist air and thermal regeneration. Desiccants fall into two categories: liquid and solid desiccants. Regardless of the type, solid or liquid, the governing principles of desiccant dehumidification systems are the same. In the dehumidification process, the vapor pressure of the moist air is higher than that of the desiccant, leading to transfer of moisture from the air to the desiccant material. By heating the desiccant, the vapor pressure differential is reversed in the regeneration process that drives the moisture from the desiccant. Figure 1 illustrates a rotary solid-desiccant dehumidifier. A burner or a thermally compatible source of waste heat can provide the required heat for regeneration.

Jalalzadeh, A. A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Hydraulic waste energy recovery, Phase 2. A technical report  

SciTech Connect

The energy required for booster station operation is supplied by the electrical utility company and has an associated cost. Energy removed by pressure reducing valves in the system is lost or wasted. The objective of this project is to capture the wasted hydraulic energy with in-line turbines. In this application, the in-line turbines act as pressure reducing valves while removing energy from the water distribution system and converting it to electrical energy. The North Service Center pumping station was selected for the pilot program due to the availability of a wide range in pressure drop and flow, which are necessary for hydraulic energy recovery. The research performed during this project resulted in documentation of technical, economic, installation, and operational information necessary for local government officials to make an informed judgement as it relates to in-line turbine generation.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Development and Evaluation of Brazed Joints for a Plate Microchnanel Heat Exchanger.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A brazing method is developed for high efficiency microchannel heat plate heat exchangers for waste heat recovery. Prototype elements for these heat exchangers are fabricated… (more)

Craymer, Kenneth L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

NETL: Development and Demonstration of Waste Heat Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

performance of the integrated PC plant and CO2 capture process. The HES system is a heat exchanger that extracts waste heat from flue gas exiting the power plant's...

228

Waste heat driven absorption refrigeration process and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Absorption cycle refrigeration processes and systems are provided which are driven by the sensible waste heat available from industrial processes and other sources. Systems are disclosed which provide a chilled water output which can be used for comfort conditioning or the like which utilize heat from sensible waste heat sources at temperatures of less than 170.degree. F. Countercurrent flow equipment is also provided to increase the efficiency of the systems and increase the utilization of available heat.

Wilkinson, William H. (Columbus, OH)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Waste heat boiler with feed mixing nozzle  

SciTech Connect

A waste heat boiler of the type which is particularly suited for use in marine applications and which incorporates a feed mixing nozzle that is operative for purposes of effecting, by utilizing steam taken from the steam generating bank, a preheating of the feedwater that is fed to the steam drum. In addition to the aforesaid feed mixing nozzle, the subject waste heat boiler includes a feedwater control valve, a steam drum, a circulation pump, a steam generating bank and a centrifugal water separator. The feedwater control valve is employed to modulate the flow rate of the incoming feedwater in order to maintain the desired level of water in the steam drum. In turn the latter steam drum is intended to function in the manner of a reservoir for the circulating water that through the operation of the circulating pump is supplied to the steam generating bank. The circulating water which is supplied to the steam generating bank is heated therein to saturation temperature, and steam is generated thus. A water-steam mixture is returned from the steam generating bank to the steam drum and is directed into the centrifugal water separator that is suitably located within the steam drum. It is in the centrifugal water separator that the separation of the water-steam mixture is effected such that water is returned to the lower portion of the steam drum and the steam is supplied to the upper portion of the steam drum. The preheating of the feedwater is accomplished by directing the incoming feedwater through an internal feed pipe to the mixing nozzle, the latter being positioned in the line through which the water-steam mixture is returned to the steam drum.

Mastronarde, Th.P.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects to someone by E-mail Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on AddThis.com...

231

Determinants of sustainability in solid waste management - The Gianyar Waste Recovery Project in Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our assessment tool helps evaluate success factors in solid waste projects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Success of the composting plant in Indonesia is linked to its community integration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appropriate technology is not a main determining success factor for sustainability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structured assessment of 'best practices' can enhance replication in other cities. - Abstract: According to most experts, integrated and sustainable solid waste management should not only be given top priority, but must go beyond technical aspects to include various key elements of sustainability to ensure success of any solid waste project. Aside from project sustainable impacts, the overall enabling environment is the key feature determining performance and success of an integrated and affordable solid waste system. This paper describes a project-specific approach to assess typical success or failure factors. A questionnaire-based assessment method covers issues of: (i) social mobilisation and acceptance (social element), (ii) stakeholder, legal and institutional arrangements comprising roles, responsibilities and management functions (institutional element); (iii) financial and operational requirements, as well as cost recovery mechanisms (economic element). The Gianyar Waste Recovery Project in Bali, Indonesia was analysed using this integrated assessment method. The results clearly identified chief characteristics, key factors to consider when planning country wide replication but also major barriers and obstacles which must be overcome to ensure project sustainability. The Gianyar project consists of a composting unit processing 60 tons of municipal waste per day from 500,000 inhabitants, including manual waste segregation and subsequent composting of the biodegradable organic fraction.

Zurbruegg, Christian, E-mail: zurbrugg@eawag.ch [Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries (Sandec), Ueberlandstrasse 133, P.O. Box 611, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Gfrerer, Margareth, E-mail: margareth.gfrerer@gmx.net [Faculty of Engineering, University of Indonesia, Depok Campus, 16424 Jakarta (Indonesia); Ashadi, Henki, E-mail: henki@eng.ui.ac.id [Faculty of Engineering, University of Indonesia, Depok Campus, 16424 Jakarta (Indonesia); Brenner, Werner, E-mail: werner.brenner@gmx.at [Faculty of Engineering, University of Indonesia, Depok Campus, 16424 Jakarta (Indonesia); Kueper, David, E-mail: dkuper@indo.net.id [Yayasan Pemilahan Sampah Temesi, Temsi-Gianyar, Bali (Indonesia)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Life-cycle-assessment of the historical development of air pollution control and energy recovery in waste incineration  

SciTech Connect

Incineration of municipal solid waste is a debated waste management technology. In some countries it is the main waste management option whereas in other countries it has been disregarded. The main discussion point on waste incineration is the release of air emissions from the combustion of the waste, but also the energy recovery efficiency has a large importance. The historical development of air pollution control in waste incineration was studied through life-cycle-assessment modelling of eight different air pollution control technologies. The results showed a drastic reduction in the release of air emissions and consequently a significant reduction in the potential environmental impacts of waste incineration. Improvements of a factor 0.85-174 were obtained in the different impact potentials as technology developed from no emission control at all, to the best available emission control technologies of today (2010). The importance of efficient energy recovery was studied through seven different combinations of heat and electricity recovery, which were modelled to substitute energy produced from either coal or natural gas. The best air pollution control technology was used at the incinerator. It was found that when substituting coal based energy production total net savings were obtained in both the standard and toxic impact categories. However, if the substituted energy production was based on natural gas, only the most efficient recovery options yielded net savings with respect to the standard impacts. With regards to the toxic impact categories, emissions from the waste incineration process were always larger than those from the avoided energy production based on natural gas. The results shows that the potential environmental impacts from air emissions have decreased drastically during the last 35 years and that these impacts can be partly or fully offset by recovering energy which otherwise should have been produced from fossil fuels like coal or natural gas.

Damgaard, Anders, E-mail: and@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Riber, Christian [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Fruergaard, Thilde [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Hulgaard, Tore [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Protecting the Investment in Heat Recovery with Boiler Economizers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many people consider energy to be a crisis in remission -- even with continuing high fuel costs. Some voice concern over the long term security of an investment in flue gas heat recovery equipment. The concern generally involves the ability of an economizer or air heater to continue to perform efficiently without corrosion. The recognized economic advantages of an economizer result from its ability to convert heat losses into sources of energy. One of the most productive means of obtaining reduced energy costs lies in the improvements of the efficiency of steam generating boilers. Industrial and institutional boilers operating at pressures of 75 psig or greater are excellent applications. The maximum gain that can be safely achieved is governed by a number of technical and physical limitations. Among these are considerations of the economics, temperatures of the flue gas and water, and the potential for corrosion. This paper will discuss the economic and practical considerations of an economizer installation.

Roethe, L. A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Effect of Heat Exchanger Material and Fouling on Thermoelectric Exhaust Heat Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is conducted in an effort to better understand and improve the performance of thermoelectric heat recovery systems for automotive use. For this purpose an experimental investigation of thermoelectrics in contact with clean and fouled heat exchangers of different materials is performed. The thermoelectric devices are tested on a bench-scale thermoelectric heat recovery apparatus that simulates automotive exhaust. The thermoelectric apparatus consists of a series of thermoelectric generators contacting a hot-side and a cold-side heat exchanger. The thermoelectric devices are tested with two different hot-side heat exchanger materials, stainless steel and aluminum, and at a range of simulated exhaust gas flowrates (40 to 150 slpm), exhaust gas temperatures (240 C and 280 C), and coolant-side temperatures (40 C and 80 C). It is observed that for higher exhaust gas flowrates, thermoelectric power output increases while overall system efficiency decreases. Degradation of the effectiveness of the EGR-type heat exchangers over a period of driving is also simulated by exposing the heat exchangers to diesel engine exhaust under thermophoretic conditions to form a deposit layer. For the fouled EGR-type heat exchangers, power output and system efficiency is observed to be significantly lower for all conditions tested. The study found, however, that heat exchanger material is the dominant factor in the ability of the system to convert heat to electricity with thermoelectric generators. This finding is thought to be unique to the heat exchangers used for this study, and not a universal trend for all system configurations.

Love, Norman [University of Texas, El Paso; Szybist, James P [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Organic Rankine Cycle System, Its Application to Extract Energy From Low Temperature Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conservation of energy by its recovery from low temperature waste heat is of increasing importance in today's world energy crisis. The Organic Rankine Cycle is a cost efficient and proven method of converting low temperature (200-400o F) waste heat to mechanical and/or electrical energy. Applying the Organic Rankine Cycle technology to typical liquid and mixed component condensing streams is described using actual examples. Selection of the organic working fluid is explored. The Rankine Cycle efficiency is directly dependent upon the temperature difference between its evaporating and condensing phases. The evaporating level is set by the heat source; therefore, to maximize efficiency, it is essential to obtain the lowest condensing temperature practical. Various condensing schemes are discussed emphasizing methods of optimizing the net output of the total system. Several Organic Rankine Cycle commercial applications are summarized with experience and general performance given. The economics and optimization techniques in typical applications including multiple heat sources are discussed.

Sawyer, R. H.; Ichikawa, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint The Hanford Site is looking greener these days after American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers revegetated 166 acres across 12 waste sites, planting over 1,100 pounds of seeds and about 280,000 pounds of mulch. The largest of the sites, known as the BC Control Area, is an approximately 13-square-mile area associated with a waste disposal system used during Hanford operations. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of

237

QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices.

Saeid Ghamaty; Sal Marchetti

2004-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

238

QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices.

Saeid Ghamaty; Sal Marchetti

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices.

Saeid Ghamaty; Sal Marchetti

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

240

Selective Recovery of Enriched Uranium from Inorganic Wastes  

SciTech Connect

Uranium as U(IV) and U(VI) can be selectively recovered from liquids and sludge containing metal precipitates, inorganic salts, sand and silt fines, debris, other contaminants, and slimes, which are very difficult to de-water. Chemical processes such as fuel manufacturing and uranium mining generate enriched and natural uranium-bearing wastes. This patented Framatome ANP (FANP) uranium recovery process reduces uranium losses, significantly offsets waste disposal costs, produces a solid waste that meets mixed-waste disposal requirements, and does not generate metal-contaminated liquids. At the head end of the process is a floating dredge that retrieves liquids, sludge, and slimes in the form of a slurry directly from the floor of a lined surface impoundment (lagoon). The slurry is transferred to and mixed in a feed tank with a turbine mixer and re-circulated to further break down the particles and enhance dissolution of uranium. This process uses direct steam injection and sodium hypochlorite addition to oxidize and dissolves any U(IV). Cellulose is added as a non-reactive filter aid to help filter slimes by giving body to the slurry. The slurry is pumped into a large recessed-chamber filter press then de-watered by a pressure cycle-controlled double-diaphragm pump. U(VI) captured in the filtrate from this process is then precipitated by conversion to U(IV) in another Framatome ANP-patented process which uses a strong reducing agent to crystallize and settle the U(IV) product. The product is then dewatered in a small filter press. To-date, over 3,000 Kgs of U at 3% U-235 enrichment were recovered from a 8100 m2 hypalon-lined surface impoundment which contained about 10,220 m3 of liquids and about 757 m3 of sludge. A total of 2,175 drums (0.208 m3 or 55 gallon each) of solid mixed-wastes have been packaged, shipped, and disposed. In addition, 9463 m3 of low-U liquids at <0.001 KgU/m3 were also further processed and disposed.

Kimura, R. T.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

Analysis of IECC2003 Chiller Heat Recovery for Service Water Heating Requirement for New York State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state of New York asked the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the requirement for Heat Recovery for Service Water Heating that exists in the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code to determine whether this requirement should be adopted into the New York State Energy Code. A typical hotel application that would trigger this requirement was examined using whole building simulation software to generate baseline annual chiller and service hot water loads, and a spreadsheet was used to examine the energy savings potential for heat recovery using hourly load files from the simulation. An example application meeting the code requirement was developed, and the energy savings, energy cost savings, and first costs for the heat recovery installation were developed. The calculated payback for this application was 6.3 years using 2002 New York state average energy costs. This payback met the minimum requirements for cost effectiveness established for the state of New York for updating the commercial energy conservation code.

Winiarski, David W.

2004-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Method for utilizing decay heat from radioactive nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Management of radioactive heat-producing waste material while safely utilizing the heat thereof is accomplished by encapsulating the wastes after a cooling period, transporting the capsules to a facility including a plurality of vertically disposed storage tubes, lowering the capsules as they arrive at the facility into the storage tubes, cooling the storage tubes by circulating a gas thereover, employing the so heated gas to obtain an economically beneficial result, and continually adding waste capsules to the facility as they arrive thereat over a substantial period of time.

Busey, H.M.

1974-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

Combustion testing and heat recovery study: Frank E. Van Lare Wastewater Treatment Plant, Monroe County. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the study were to record and analyze sludge management operations data and sludge incinerator combustion data; ascertain instrumentation and control needs; calculate heat balances for the incineration system; and determine the feasibility of different waste-heat recovery technologies for the Frank E. Van Lare (FEV) Wastewater Treatment Plant. As an integral part of this study, current and pending federal and state regulations were evaluated to establish their impact on furnace operation and subsequent heat recovery. Of significance is the effect of the recently promulgated Federal 40 CFR Part 503 regulations on the FEV facility. Part 503 regulations were signed into law in November 1992, and, with some exceptions, affected facilities must be in compliance by February 19, 1994. Those facilities requiring modifications or upgrades to their incineration or air pollution control equipment to meet Part 503 regulations must be in compliance by February 19, 1995.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Analysis and modelling of membrane heat exchanger in HVAC energy recovery systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The performance of membrane heat exchangers for HVAC total energy recovery systems was evaluated through experimentation and detailed system modelling. The operating principle of the… (more)

Nasif, Mohammad Shakir

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Study on the Mode of Power Plant Circulating Water Waste Heat Regenerative Thermal System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plant Circulating Water (PPCW) waste heat recycling is an important way of increasing a power plant’s primary energy ratio. According to the PPCW waste heat regenerative thermal system, the authors propose two modes of heat pump heat regenerative ... Keywords: heat pump, power plant circulating water (PPCW), waste heat recycling, energy saving

Bi Qingsheng; Ma Yanliang; Yang Zhifu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Workers Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint RICHLAND, Wash. - The Hanford Site is looking greener these days after American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers revegetated 166 acres across 12 waste sites, planting over 1,100 pounds of seeds and about 280,000 pounds of mulch. The largest of the sites, known as the BC Control Area, is an approximately 13-square-mile area associated with a waste disposal system used during Hanford operations. Recovery Act workers remediated and reseeded a densely contaminated 140- acre portion of that area after disposing of more than 370,000 tons of contaminated soil. Recovery Act workers employed by DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company have remediated 61 waste sites,

247

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Property:Heat Recovery Rating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rating Rating Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Heat Recovery Rating" Showing 22 pages using this property. D Distributed Generation Study/10 West 66th Street Corp + 300,000 + Distributed Generation Study/615 kW Waukesha Packaged System + 2,500,000 + Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille + 46,105 + Distributed Generation Study/Arrow Linen + 3,000,000 + Distributed Generation Study/Dakota Station (Minnegasco) + 290,000 + Distributed Generation Study/Elgin Community College + 11,200,000 + Distributed Generation Study/Emerling Farm + 2,000,000 + Distributed Generation Study/Floyd Bennett + 230,000 + Distributed Generation Study/Harbec Plastics + 3,750,000 + Distributed Generation Study/Hudson Valley Community College + 32,500,000 +

249

DOE Reaches Recovery Act Goal With Cleanup of All Legacy Transuranic Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reaches Recovery Act Goal With Cleanup of All Legacy Reaches Recovery Act Goal With Cleanup of All Legacy Transuranic Waste at Sandia National Laboratories DOE Reaches Recovery Act Goal With Cleanup of All Legacy Transuranic Waste at Sandia National Laboratories May 3, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill, U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office, (575) 234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M., May 3, 2012 -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed cleanup of the Cold War legacy transuranic (TRU) waste at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico when four shipments of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste from Sandia arrived at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M. for permanent disposal on May 2, 2012. The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) reached one of its final milestones under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) with the legacy TRU

250

Linear and nonlinear transient heat conduction in nuclear waste repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical solutions of thermal problems connected with the disposal of nuclear wastes are presented. Linear and nonlinear diffusion problems are analyzed considering time-dependent heat sources. Comparisons between the temperature distributions at a ...

C. A. Estrada-Gasca; M. H. Cobble

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Heat-recovery steam generators: Understand the basics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas turbines with heat-recovery steam generators (HRSGs) can be found in virtually every chemical process industries (CPI) plant. They can be operated in either the cogeneration mode or the combined-cycle mode. In the cogeneration mode, steam produced from the HRSG is mainly used for process applications, whereas in the combined-cycle mode, power is generated via a steam turbine generator. Recent trends in HRSG design include multiple-pressure units for maximum energy recovery, the use of high-temperature superheaters or reheaters in combined-cycle plants, and auxiliary firing for efficient steam generation. In addition, furnace firing is often employed in small capacity units when the exhaust gas is raised to temperatures of 2,400--3,000 F to maximize steam generation and thus improve fuel utilization. This article highlights some of the basic facts about gas turbine HRSGs. This information can help plant engineers, consultants, and those planning cogeneration projects make important decisions about the system and performance related aspects.

Ganapathy, V.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Recovery of valuable materials from waste liquid crystal display panel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Associated with the rapid development of the information and electronic industry, liquid crystal displays (LCDs) have been increasingly sold as displays. However, during the discarding at their end-of-life stage, significant environmental hazards, impacts on health and a loss of resources may occur, if the scraps are not managed in an appropriate way. In order to improve the efficiency of the recovery of valuable materials from waste LCDs panel in an environmentally sound manner, this study presents a combined recycling technology process on the basis of manual dismantling and chemical treatment of LCDs. Three key processes of this technology have been studied, including the separation of LCD polarizing film by thermal shock method the removal of liquid crystals between the glass substrates by the ultrasonic cleaning, and the recovery of indium metal from glass by dissolution. The results show that valuable materials (e.g. indium) and harmful substances (e.g. liquid crystals) could be efficiently recovered or separated through above-mentioned combined technology. The optimal conditions are: (1) the peak temperature of thermal shock to separate polarizing film, ranges from 230 to 240 deg. C, where pyrolysis could be avoided; (2) the ultrasonic-assisted cleaning was most efficient at a frequency of 40 KHz (P = 40 W) and the exposure of the substrate to industrial detergents for 10 min; and (3) indium separation from glass in a mix of concentrated hydrochloric acid at 38% and nitric acid at 69% (HCl:HNO{sub 3}:H{sub 2}O = 45:5:50, volume ratio). The indium separation process was conducted with an exposure time of 30 min at a constant temperature of 60 deg. C.

Li Jinhui [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University (China); Sino-Italia Environmental Energy Building, Room 804, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: jinhui@tsinghua.edu.cn; Gao Song; Duan Huabo; Liu Lili [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University (China)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Model based methodology development for energy recovery in flash heat exchange systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model based methodology development for energy recovery in flash heat exchange systems Problem with a condensing heat exchanger can be used when heat exchange is required between two streams and where at leastH, consistency etc.). To increase the efficiency of heat exchange, a cascade of these units in series can be used

McCarthy, John E.

254

Final report for the Iowa Livestock Industry Waste Characterization and Methane Recovery Information Dissemination Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes analytical methods, characterizes Iowa livestock wastes, determines fossil fuel displacement by methane use, assesses the market potential, and offers recommendations for the implementation of methane recovery technologies.

Garrison, M.V.; Richard, Thomas L

2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

255

Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

Burnley, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.burnley@open.ac.uk [Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Phillips, Rhiannon, E-mail: rhiannon.jones@environment-agency.gov.uk [Strategy Unit, Welsh Assembly Government, Ty Cambria, 29 Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 0TP (United Kingdom); Coleman, Terry, E-mail: terry.coleman@erm.com [Environmental Resources Management Ltd, Eaton House, Wallbrook Court, North Hinksey Lane, Oxford OX2 0QS (United Kingdom); Rampling, Terence, E-mail: twa.rampling@hotmail.com [7 Thurlow Close, Old Town Stevenage, Herts SG1 4SD (United Kingdom)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Absorptive Recycle of Distillation Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When the heat source available to a distillation process is at a significantly higher temperature than the reboiler temperature, there is unused availability (ability to perform work) in the heat supplied to the reboiler. Similarly, if the reflux condenser operates above ambient temperature, the rejected heat also contains unused availability. By incorporating an absorption heat pump (AHP) into the distillation process, these sources of unused availability can be tapped so as to recycle (and hence, conserve) up to 50% of the required distillation energy. In contrast to compressor driven heat pumps, this savings is accomplished without need for a separate substantial input of mechanical power. A different AHP configuration is used depending on whether the excess availability is in the source heat or reject heat. In the excessive source temperature case, the higher temperature source heat is applied to the AHP, which then supplies the total reboiler requirement and recycles half the reject heat, with the remainder being rejected conventionally. In the excessive reject temperature case, all the reject heat is supplied to a reverse absorption heat pump (HAHP) which recycles half to reboiler temperature while reducing the remainder to ambient temperature.

Erickson, D. C.; Lutz, E. J., Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Overview Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB) to cool process syngas. The gas enters satisfies all 3 design criteria. · Correlations relating our experimental results to a waste heat boiler

Demirel, Melik C.

258

QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce the technology for fabricating a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices. In this quarter Hi-Z has continued fabrication of the QW films and also continued development of joining techniques for fabricating the N and P legs into a couple. The upper operating temperature limit for these films is unknown and will be determined via the isothermal aging studies that are in progress. We are reporting on these studies in this report. The properties of the QW films that are being evaluated are Seebeck, thermal conductivity and thermal-to-electricity conversion efficiency.

Saeid Ghamaty

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce the technology for fabricating a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices. In this quarter Hi-Z has continued fabrication of the QW films and also continued development of joining techniques for fabricating the N and P legs into a couple. The upper operating temperature limit for these films is unknown and will be determined via the isothermal aging studies that are in progress. We are reporting on these studies in this report. The properties of the QW films that are being evaluated are Seebeck, thermal conductivity and thermal-to-electricity conversion efficiency.

Saeid Ghamaty

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce the technology for fabricating a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices. In this quarter Hi-Z has continued fabrication of the QW films and also continued development of joining techniques for fabricating the N and P legs into a couple. The upper operating temperature limit for these films is unknown and will be determined via the isothermal aging studies that are in progress. We are reporting on these studies in this report. The properties of the QW films that are being evaluated are Seebeck, thermal conductivity and thermal-to-electricity conversion efficiency.

Saeid Ghamaty

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce the technology for fabricating a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices. In this quarter Hi-Z has continued fabrication of the QW films and also continued development of joining techniques for fabricating the N and P legs into a couple. The upper operating temperature limit for these films is unknown and will be determined via the isothermal aging studies that are in progress. We are reporting on these studies in this report. The properties of the QW films that are being evaluated are Seebeck, thermal conductivity and thermal-to-electricity conversion efficiency.

Saeid Ghamaty

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers combined heat and power (CHP) technologies and their applications.

263

Induced draft fan innovation for heat recovery steam generators  

SciTech Connect

A first of its kind, induced draft (ID) heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) have been in service at a cogeneration facility since 1991. A preliminary engineering study considered a forced draft (FD) fan to supply combustion air to the HRSG duct burners (when the combustion turbine (CT) is out of service) as a traditional design; however, the study indicated that the FD fan may require the HRSG duct burner to be shut off following a CT trip and re-ignited after the FD fan was in service. Although the induced draft HRSG design cost more than the FD fan design, the induced draft design has improved the cogeneration facility's steam generation reliability by enabling the HRSG to remain in service following a CT trip. This paper briefly summarizes the preliminary engineering study that supported the decision to select the ID fan design. The paper also discusses the control system that operates the fresh-air louvers, duct burners, HRSG, and ID fan during a CT trip. Startup and operating experiences are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of the design. Lessons learned are also summarized for input into future induced draft HRSG designs.

Beasley, O.W.; Hutchins, E.C. (Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)); Predick, P.R.; Vavrek, J.M. (Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Heat Exchangers Fouling and Corrosion-A Detailed Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Aluminum Smelter Waste Heat Recovery Plant (Heat Exchangers Fouling and Corrosion-A Detailed Investigation). Author(s), Hadi Fanisalek, ...

265

Alternatives Generation and Analysis for Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document addresses the preferred combination of design and operational configurations to provide heat removal from high-level waste tanks during Phase 1 waste feed delivery to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding tank safety requirement limits. An interim decision for the preferred method to remove the heat from the high-level waste tanks during waste feed delivery operations is presented herein.

WILLIS, W.L.

2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE SOLIDIFICATION CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Design Authority is in the design stage of the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for the treatment and solidification of the radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The waste streams will be mixed with a cementitious dry mix in a 55-gallon waste container. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been performing the testing and evaluations to support technical decisions for the WSB. Engineering Modeling & Simulation Group was requested to evaluate the thermal performance of the 55-gallon drum containing hydration heat source associated with the current baseline cement waste form. A transient axi-symmetric heat transfer model for the drum partially filled with waste form cement has been developed and heat transfer calculations performed for the baseline design configurations. For this case, 65 percent of the drum volume was assumed to be filled with the waste form, which has transient hydration heat source, as one of the baseline conditions. A series of modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. The baseline modeling results show that the time to reach the maximum temperature of the 65 percent filled drum is about 32 hours when a 43 C initial cement temperature is assumed to be cooled by natural convection with 27 C external air. In addition, the results computed by the present model were compared with analytical solutions. The modeling results will be benchmarked against the prototypic test results. The verified model will be used for the evaluation of the thermal performance for the WSB drum. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

Lee, S.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Hanford Reaches Recovery Act Goal for Waste Cleanup Ahead of Schedule -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reaches Recovery Act Goal for Waste Cleanup Ahead of Reaches Recovery Act Goal for Waste Cleanup Ahead of Schedule - Workers Shipped 1,800 Cubic Meters for Treatment and Disposal Hanford Reaches Recovery Act Goal for Waste Cleanup Ahead of Schedule - Workers Shipped 1,800 Cubic Meters for Treatment and Disposal July 26, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov 509-376-6773 Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 RICHLAND, Wash. - Today, the Department of Energy Hanford Site announced it reached a cleanup goal more than two months ahead of schedule at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. Supported by funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, workers retrieved containers of contaminated material from storage buildings and underground storage trenches and prepared them for treatment

268

Hanford Reaches Recovery Act Goal for Waste Cleanup Ahead of Schedule -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reaches Recovery Act Goal for Waste Cleanup Ahead of Reaches Recovery Act Goal for Waste Cleanup Ahead of Schedule - Workers Shipped 1,800 Cubic Meters for Treatment and Disposal Hanford Reaches Recovery Act Goal for Waste Cleanup Ahead of Schedule - Workers Shipped 1,800 Cubic Meters for Treatment and Disposal July 26, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov 509-376-6773 Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 RICHLAND, Wash. - Today, the Department of Energy Hanford Site announced it reached a cleanup goal more than two months ahead of schedule at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. Supported by funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, workers retrieved containers of contaminated material from storage buildings and underground storage trenches and prepared them for treatment

269

Recovery of Tungsten from Waste Machining Alloy Scrap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure Water Leaching Molybdenum and Nickel from Mo-Ni Ore of Black Shale without Reagent · Rare Metals Separations with MRT · Recovery of Gold (Au) ...

270

Energy saving opportunities through heat recovery from cement processing kilns: a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a system for the utilization of dissipated heat from the surfaces of cement processing kilns at the Jordan Cement Factories in heating heavy fuel oil used in the burning process of these kilns. It is proposed that this can be achieved ... Keywords: Jordan, cement, energy efficiency, heat recovery, kilns

I. Al-Hinti; A. Al-Ghandoor; A. Al-Naji; M. Abu-Khashabeh; M. Joudeh; M. Al-Hattab

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Energy Savings By Recovery of Condensate From Steam Heating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recovery and utilization of condensate has a remarkable energy saving effect if the following are properly done: 1) Determination of a correct and reasonable recovery plan; 2) Selection of bleed valve with good performance; 3) Solving the problem of air bleeding, and 4) Scientific management of condensate system and bleed valve. If the above mentioned points are well dealt with, the recovery and utilization of condensate will be very beneficial.

Cheng, W. S.; Zhi, C. S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Recovery of Tritium from Pharmaceutical Mixed Waste Liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decontamination and Waste / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

W. T. Shmayda; R. D. Gallagher

273

Application of molten salt oxidation for the minimization and recovery of plutonium-238 contaminated wastes  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the technical and economic feasibility of molten salt oxidation technology as a volume reduction and recovery process for {sup 238}Pu contaminated waste. Combustible low-level waste material contaminated with {sup 238}Pu residue is destroyed by oxidation in a 900 C molten salt reaction vessel. The combustible waste is destroyed creating carbon dioxide and steam and a small amount of ash and insoluble {sup 2328}Pu in the spent salt. The valuable {sup 238}Pu is recycled using aqueous recovery techniques. Experimental test results for this technology indicate a plutonium recovery efficiency of 99%. Molten salt oxidation stabilizes the waste converting it to a non-combustible waste. Thus installation and use of molten salt oxidation technology will substantially reduce the volume of {sup 238}Pu contaminated waste. Cost-effectiveness evaluations of molten salt oxidation indicate a significant cost savings when compared to the present plans to package, or re-package, certify and transport these wastes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for permanent disposal. Clear and distinct cost advantages exist for MSO when the monetary value of the recovered {sup 238}Pu is considered.

Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Analysis of energy recovery potential using innovative technologies of waste gasification  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy recovery from waste by gasification was simulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two processes: high temperature gasification and gasification associated to plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two types of feeding waste: Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) and pulper residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different configurations for the energy cycles were considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison with performances from conventional Waste-to-Energy process. - Abstract: In this paper, two alternative thermo-chemical processes for waste treatment were analysed: high temperature gasification and gasification associated to plasma process. The two processes were analysed from the thermodynamic point of view, trying to reconstruct two simplified models, using appropriate simulation tools and some support data from existing/planned plants, able to predict the energy recovery performances by process application. In order to carry out a comparative analysis, the same waste stream input was considered as input to the two models and the generated results were compared. The performances were compared with those that can be obtained from conventional combustion with energy recovery process by means of steam turbine cycle. Results are reported in terms of energy recovery performance indicators as overall energy efficiency, specific energy production per unit of mass of entering waste, primary energy source savings, specific carbon dioxide production.

Lombardi, Lidia, E-mail: lidia.lombardi@unifit.it [Dipartimento di Energetica, University of Florence, via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy); Carnevale, Ennio [Dipartimento di Energetica, University of Florence, via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy); Corti, Andrea [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione, University of Siena, via Roma 56, 56100 Siena (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Recovery of Gold by Using Biomass Wastes Containing ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... TMS Member price: 10.00. Non-member price: 25.00. TMS Student Member price : 10.00. Product In Stock. Description New recovery method of ...

276

Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(below 400 degrees F) into electricity. The waste heat stream is diverted through a "hot heat exchanger" inside the system. A cooling stream is simultaneously diverted through the...

277

Recovery of transplutonium elements from nuclear reactor waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating actinide values from nitric acid waste solutions resulting from reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels comprises oxalate precipitation of the major portion of actinide and lanthanide values to provide a trivalent fraction suitable for subsequent actinide/lanthanide partition, exchange of actinide and lanthanide values in the supernate onto a suitable cation exchange resin to provide an intermediate-lived raffinate waste stream substantially free of actinides, and elution of the actinide values from the exchange resin. The eluate is then used to dissolve the trivalent oxalate fraction prior to actinide/lanthanide partition or may be combined with the reprocessing waste stream and recycled.

Campbell, David O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Buxton, Samuel R. (Wartburg, TN)

1977-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

278

Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United States repository development, such as seal system design, coupled process simulation, and application of performance assessment methodology, helps define a clear strategy for a heat-generating nuclear waste repository in salt.

Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Recovery and recycling practices in municipal solid waste management in Lagos, Nigeria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The population of Lagos, the largest city in Nigeria, increased seven times from 1950 to 1980 with a current population of over 10 million inhabitants. The majority of the city's residents are poor. The residents make a heavy demand on resources and, at the same time, generate large quantities of solid waste. Approximately 4 million tonnes of municipal solid waste (MSW) is generated annually in the city, including approximately 0.5 million of untreated industrial waste. This is approximately 1.1 kg/cap/day. Efforts by the various waste management agencies set up by the state government to keep its streets and neighborhoods clean have achieved only minimal success. This is because more than half of these wastes are left uncollected from the streets and the various locations due to the inadequacy and inefficiency of the waste management system. Whilst the benefits of proper solid waste management (SWM), such as increased revenues for municipal bodies, higher productivity rate, improved sanitation standards and better health conditions, cannot be overemphasized, it is important that there is a reduction in the quantity of recoverable materials in residential and commercial waste streams to minimize the problem of MSW disposal. This paper examines the status of recovery and recycling in current waste management practice in Lagos, Nigeria. Existing recovery and recycling patterns, recovery and recycling technologies, approaches to materials recycling, and the types of materials recovered from MSW are reviewed. Based on these, strategies for improving recovery and recycling practices in the management of MSW in Lagos, Nigeria are suggested.

Kofoworola, O.F. [Environment Division, Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi, 91 Prachauthit Road, Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)], E-mail: sholafemi28@yahoo.com

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

MONITORING WASTE HEAT REJECTION TO THE ENVIRONMENT VIA REMOTE SENSING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants typically use waste heat rejection systems such as cooling lakes and natural draft cooling towers. These systems are designed to reduce cooling water temperatures sufficiently to allow full power operation even during adverse meteorological conditions. After the power plant is operational, the performance of the cooling system is assessed. These assessments usually rely on measured temperatures of the cooling water after it has lost heat to the environment and is being pumped back into the power plant (cooling water inlet temperature). If the cooling system performance is not perceived to be optimal, the utility will collect additional data to determine why. This paper discusses the use of thermal imagery collected from aircraft and satellites combined with numerical simulation to better understand the dynamics and thermodynamics of nuclear power plant waste heat dissipation systems. The ANS meeting presentation will discuss analyses of several power plant cooling systems based on a combination of remote sensing data and hydrodynamic modeling.

Garrett, A

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

State Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Plan (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The State supports the "good management of solid waste and the conservation of natural resources through the promotion or development of systems to collect, separate, reclaim, recycle, and dispose...

282

Idaho Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded by Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 29, 2011 August 29, 2011 IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers successfully transferred 130 containers of remote-handled transuranic waste - each weighing up to 15 tons - to a facility for repackaging and shipment to a permanent disposal location. As part of a project funded by $90 million from the Recovery Act, the final shipment of the containers from the Materials and Fuels Com- plex recently arrived at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Each of the containers moved to INTEC is shielded and specially designed and fabricated for highly radioactive waste. Once at INTEC, the containers are cut open, emptied, and repackaged. After the waste is removed and put in casks, it is shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot

283

Vehicle Technologies Office: Waste Heat Recovery through Thermoelectri...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Combustion Engines...

284

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities in a Magnesium Silicothermic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

(Focus on Semi- Arid Climate) · Effect Of Batch Charging ... The Optimization of Gases and Thermal Energy in the Upper Zone of Electric Furnaces in Drenas.

285

Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar's Technology & Solutions Division conceived, designed, built and tested an electric turbocompound system for an on-highway heavy-duty truck engine. The heart of the system is a unique turbochargerr with an electric motor/generator mounted on the shaft between turbine and compressor wheels. When the power produced by the turbocharger turbine exceeds the power of the compressor, the excess power is converted to electrical power by the generator on the turbo shaft; that power is then used to help turn the crankshaft via an electric motor mounted in the engine flywheel housing. The net result is an improvement in engine fuel economy. The electric turbocompound system provides added control flexibility because it is capable of varying the amount of power extracted from the exhaust gases, thus allowing for control of engine boost. The system configuration and design, turbocharger features, control system development, and test results are presented.

Hopman, Ulrich,; Kruiswyk, Richard W.

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

286

Thermoelectric Coatings for Waste Heat Recovery and Photo ...  

An energy harvesting system for collecting energy from sources of thermal energy that exist in the environment and convert the energy to electricity. The system has N ...

287

Rock Smelting of Copper Ores with Waste Heat Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the potential energy and greenhouse gas benefits of a conceptual flowsheet of ... Quantifying the Export Flow of Used Electronics from the United States: The ...

288

Vehicle Technologies Office: Waste Heat Recovery through Thermoelectri...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

their transfer to mass production. Currently, the research focuses on using bulk thermoelectric materials that are available and have the best efficiency, as well as...

289

Heat pipe cooling system for underground, radioactive waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

An array of 37 heat pipes inserted through the central hole at the top of a radioactive waste storage tank will remove 100,000 Btu/h with a heat sink of 70/sup 0/F atmospheric air. Heat transfer inside the tank to the heat pipe is by natural convection. Heat rejection to outside air utilizes a blower to force air past the heat pipe condenser. The heat pipe evaporator section is axially finned, and is constructed of stainless steel. The working fluid is ammonia. The finned pipes are individually shrouded and extend 35 ft down into the tank air space. The hot tank air enters the shroud at the top of the tank and flows downward as it is cooled, with the resulting increased density furnishing the pressure difference for circulation. The cooled air discharges at the center of the tank above the sludge surface, flows radially outward, and picks up heat from the radioactive sludge. At the tank wall the heated air rises and then flows inward to comple the cycle.

Cooper, K.C.; Prenger, F.C.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Recovery Act-Funded Water Heating Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Performance (an efficiency measure) of up to 8. These next generation R-744 heat pump water heaters will be targeted for commercial use where cooling load is...

291

A novel heat recovery technology from an Aluminum reduction cell ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental setup consists of an electrical furnace which provides the simulated hot side walls, the control and measurement instruments, the heat ...

292

Heat Recovery from the Exhaust Gas of Aluminum Reduction Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased Energy Efficiency and Reduced HF Emissions with New Heat Exchanger · Industrial Test of Low-voltage Energy-saving Aluminum Reduction ...

293

Heat Recovery from Aluminium Reduction Cells - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three main heat sources (cathode sides, anode yokes, and gas) were combined in different ways, using different types of power cycles. The potential for ...

294

Optimization of Heat Recovery from the Precipitation Circuit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For this reason, plate heat exchangers are used both at inlet to Precipitation and in between precipitation stages at Vedanta Aluminium's Lanjigarh alumina ...

295

Recovery and removal of mercury from mixed wastes. Final report, September 1994--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

In recognition of the major environmental problem created by mercury contamination of wastes and soils at an estimated 200,000 sites along US natural gas and oil pipelines and at a number of government facilities, including Oak Ridge, Savannah River, Hanford, and Rocky Flats, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking an effective and economical process for removing mercury from various DOE waste streams in order to allow the base waste streams to be treated by means of conventional technologies. In response to the need for Unproved mercury decontamination technology, Mercury Recovery Services (MRS) has developed and commercialized a thermal treatment process for the recovery of mercury from contaminated soils and industrial wastes. The objectives of this program were to: demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the MRS process to successfully remove and recover mercury from low-level mixed waste containing mercury compounds (HgO, HgS, HgCl{sub 2}) and selected heavy metal compounds (PbO, CdO); determine optimum processing conditions required to consistently reduce the residual total mercury content to 1 mg/kg while rendering the treated product nontoxic as determined by TCLP methods; and provide an accurate estimate of the capital and operating costs for a commercial processing facility designed specifically to remove and recovery mercury from various waste streams of interest at DOE facilities. These objectives were achieved in a four-stage demonstration program described within with results.

Sutton, W.F.; Weyand, T.E.; Koshinski, C.J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

CHP, Waste Heat & District Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHP Technologies and Applications CHP Technologies and Applications 25 Oct 11 Today's Electric Grid What is CHP * ASHRAE Handbook: "Combined heat and power (CHP). Simultaneous production of electrical or mechanical energy and useful thermal energy from a single energy stream." * CHP is not a single technology but a suite of technologies that can use a variety of fuels to generate electricity or power at the point of use. * CHP technology can be deployed quickly, cost-effectively, and with few geographic limitations. 11/1/2011 Slide 6 5/20/11 Slide 7 What is CHP? * On-site generation of Power and Thermal Energy from a single fuel source * 'Conventional' grid based generators are located remote from thermal applications while CHP plants are located close to thermal applications

297

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: Project overview and main results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > The source separation level (SSL) of waste management system does not qualify adequately the system. > Separately collecting organic waste gives less advantages than packaging materials. > Recycling packaging materials (metals, glass, plastics, paper) is always attractive. > Composting and anaerobic digestion of organic waste gives questionable outcomes. > The critical threshold of optimal recycling seems to be a SSL of 50%. - Abstract: This paper describes the context, the basic assumptions and the main findings of a joint research project aimed at identifying the optimal breakdown between material recovery and energy recovery from municipal solid waste (MSW) in the framework of integrated waste management systems (IWMS). The project was carried out from 2007 to 2009 by five research groups at Politecnico di Milano, the Universities of Bologna and Trento, and the Bocconi University (Milan), with funding from the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR). Since the optimization of IWMSs by analytical methods is practically impossible, the search for the most attractive strategy was carried out by comparing a number of relevant recovery paths from the point of view of mass and energy flows, technological features, environmental impact and economics. The main focus has been on mature processes applicable to MSW in Italy and Europe. Results show that, contrary to a rather widespread opinion, increasing the source separation level (SSL) has a very marginal effects on energy efficiency. What does generate very significant variations in energy efficiency is scale, i.e. the size of the waste-to-energy (WTE) plant. The mere value of SSL is inadequate to qualify the recovery system. The energy and environmental outcome of recovery depends not only on 'how much' source separation is carried out, but rather on 'how' a given SSL is reached.

Consonni, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.consonni@polimi.it [Department of Energy, Politecnico di Milano, Via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milan (Italy); Giugliano, Michele [DIIAR, Environmental Section, Politecnico di Milano, P.za L. Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Massarutto, Antonio [Dse, Universita degli Studi di Udine and IEFE, Via Tomadini 30/a, 33100 Udine (Italy); Ragazzi, Marco [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Saccani, Cesare [DIEM, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 2, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Recovery Act-Funded Geothermal Heat Pump projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Heat Pump Geothermal Heat Pump projects Recovery Act-Funded Geothermal Heat Pump projects The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was allocated funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to conduct research into ground source heat pump technologies and applications. Projects funded by the Recovery Act include: Historic Train Depot with a Hybrid System Funding amount: $1.7 million 1001 South 15th Street Associates LLC - New School and Performing Arts Theater The facility is a 23,000 square foot historic train depot requiring a GHP with 206 tons of cooling capacity. The hybrid GHP system incorporates a dry cooler to improve efficiency and life cycle effectiveness of the system by seasonally rebalancing the ground temperature. Grants Award Summary Massive Project with Massive Job Creation and Carbon Savings

299

Heat pipe effects in nuclear waste isolation: a review  

SciTech Connect

The existence of fractures favors heat pipe development in a geologic repository as does a partially saturated medium. A number of geologic media are being considered as potential repository sites. Tuff is partially saturated and fractured, basalt and granite are saturated and fractured, salt is unfractured and saturated. Thus the most likely conditions for heat pipe formation occur in tuff while the least likely occur in salt. The relative permeability and capillary pressure dependences on saturation are of critical importance for predicting thermohydraulic behavior around a repository. Mineral redistribution in heat pipe systems near high-level waste packages emplaced in partially saturated formations may significantly affect fluid flow and heat transfer processes, and the chemical environment of the packages. We believe that a combined laboratory, field, and theoretical effort will be needed to identify the relevant physical and chemical processes, and the specific parameters applicable to a particular site. 25 refs., 1 fig.

Doughty, C.; Pruess, K.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Analysis & Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat"  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat" Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat" Rejection/Recycling Hybrid GHP Systems in Hot, Arid or Semiarid Climates Like Texas Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Analysis & Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat" Rejection/Recycling Hybrid GHP Systems in Hot, Arid or Semiarid Climates Like Texas Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 2: Data Gathering and Analysis Project Description As GHP systems offer substantial energy efficiency by leveraging earth's intrinsic thermal capacitance, they could play a pivotal role in achieving the DoE's Building Technologies Pro-gram's "zero energy" goal in heavily cooling-dominated climates. Moreover, SHR-augmented GHP systems, in particular, could play a vital role in reducing building energy consumption and limiting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in heavily cooling dominated states, like Texas, which are experiencing large increases in population and correspondingly, peak electricity demand. If only 0.1% of Texas,' Arizona's, New Mexico's and Nevada's nearly 15 million-or 15,000-homes were to install new (or convert their existing HVAC or heat pump system to) a full or hybrid GHP system, it would result in between $400 and $800 million USD of new economic activity, most of which would be domestic. Moreover, these 15,000 homes would cut their annual energy consumption-and concomitant GHG emissions-by roughly 40-70%; on average they would save about $1,000 USD in annual operating costs, collectively saving about $15 million USD annually. A conservative GHP industry estimate is that at least 900 people would be directly employed for every 10,000 GHP units installed.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Heat recovery in laundry yields 18-month payback  

SciTech Connect

A heat exchanger used to preheat hot water in a commercial laundry paid for itself in 19 months, despite a 10% increase in local natural gas rates. The Aurora, Illinois hospital commercial laundry chose a water-to-water shell and tube heat reclaimer system. A programmed control panel opens and closes valves at the proper temperature. Dirty water from the laundry cycle is screened to remove particles and returned to the heat exchanger to preheat incoming city water. Dirty water from the exchanger is discharged into the city sewer.

Hines, V.

1985-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

302

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIM J.W. Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery Jun Wei LIM, Singapore 639798 (E-mail: jwlim3@e.ntu.edu.sg) Abstract The anaerobic digestion of brown water (BW), food in a decentralized reactor via anaerobic digestion. The bio-methane potential of these substrates at different feed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

303

Evaluation of extractant-coated ferromagnetic microparticles for the recovery of hazardous metals from waste solution.  

SciTech Connect

A magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process was developed earlier at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This compact process was designed for the separation of transuranics (TRU) and radionuclides from the liquid waste streams that exist at many DOE sites, with an overall reduction in waste volume requiring disposal. The MACS process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractant/ion exchange materials with magnetic separation to provide an efficient chemical separation. Recently, the MACS process has been evaluated with acidic organophosphorus extractants for hazardous metal recovery from waste solutions. Moreover, process scale-up design issues have been addressed with respect to particle filtration and recovery. Two acidic organophosphorus compounds have been investigated for hazardous metal recovery, bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinic acid (Cyanex{reg_sign} 272) and bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid (Cyanex{reg_sign} 301). Coated onto magnetic microparticles, these extractants demonstrated superior recovery of hazardous metals from solution, relative to what was expected on the basis of results from solvent extraction experiments. The results illustrate the diverse applications of MACS technology for dilute waste streams. Preliminary process scale-up experiments with a high-gradient magnetic separator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have revealed that very low microparticle loss rates are possible.

Kaminski, M. D.

1998-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

304

Assessment of opportunities to increase the recovery and recycling rates of waste oils  

SciTech Connect

Waste oil represents an important energy resource that, if properly managed and reused, would reduce US dependence on imported fuels. Literature and current practice regarding waste oil generation, regulations, collection, and reuse were reviewed to identify research needs and approaches to increase the recovery and recycling of this resource. The review revealed the need for research to address the following three waste oil challenges: (1) recover and recycle waste oil that is currently disposed of or misused; (2) identify and implement lubricating oil source and loss reduction opportunities; and (3) develop and foster an effective waste oil recycling infrastructure that is based on energy savings, reduced environment at impacts, and competitive economics. The United States could save an estimated 140 {times} 1012 Btu/yr in energy by meeting these challenges.

Graziano, D.J.; Daniels, E.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Economic Analysis of a Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Air-Conditioning System in North China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the situation of waste water resource in north China and the characteristics and styles of a waste water resource heat pump system, and analyzes the economic feasibility of a waste water resource heat pump air-conditioning system including investment, operating fee and pay-back time. The results show that waste water resource heat pump air-conditioning system has a low investment, low operating fee and short payback time.

Chen, H.; Li, D.; Dai, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Energy Recovery By Direct Contact Gas-Liquid Heat Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy from hot gas discharge streams can be recovered by transfer directly to a coolant liquid in one of several available gas-liquid contacting devices. The design of the device is central to the theme of this paper, and experimental work has verified that the analogy between heat transfer and mass transfer can be used for design purposes. This enables the large amount of available mass transfer data for spray, packed and tray columns to be used for heat transfer calculations. Additional information is provided on flow arrangements for integrating direct contact exchangers into systems for recovering the energy transferred to the liquid.

Fair, J. R.; Bravo, J. L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is [dis]associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Gorski, A.J.; Daniels, E.J.

1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

308

JET MIXING ANALYSIS FOR SRS HIGH-LEVEL WASTE RECOVERY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. The slurry pump may be fixed in position or they may rotate depending on the specific mixing requirements. The high-level waste in Tank 48 contains insoluble solids in the form of potassium tetraphenyl borate compounds (KTPB), monosodium titanate (MST), and sludge. Tank 48 is equipped with 4 slurry pumps, which are intended to suspend the insoluble solids prior to transfer of the waste to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) process. The FBSR process is being designed for a normal feed of 3.05 wt% insoluble solids. A chemical characterization study has shown the insoluble solids concentration is approximately 3.05 wt% when well-mixed. The project is requesting a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) mixing study from SRNL to determine the solids behavior with 2, 3, and 4 slurry pumps in operation and an estimate of the insoluble solids concentration at the suction of the transfer pump to the FBSR process. The impact of cooling coils is not considered in the current work. The work consists of two principal objectives by taking a CFD approach: (1) To estimate insoluble solids concentration transferred from Tank 48 to the Waste Feed Tank in the FBSR process and (2) To assess the impact of different combinations of four slurry pumps on insoluble solids suspension and mixing in Tank 48. For this work, several different combinations of a maximum of four pumps are considered to determine the resulting flow patterns and local flow velocities which are thought to be associated with sludge particle mixing. Two different elevations of pump nozzles are used for an assessment of the flow patterns on the tank mixing. Pump design and operating parameters used for the analysis are summarized in Table 1. The baseline pump orientations are chosen by the previous work [Lee et. al, 2008] and the initial engineering judgement for the conservative flow estimate since the modeling results for the other pump orientations are compared with the baseline results. As shown in Table 1, the present study assumes that each slurry pump has 900 gpm flowrate for the tank mixing analysis, although the Standard Operating Procedure for Tank 48 currently limits the actual pump speed and flowrate to a value less than 900 gpm for a 29 inch liquid level. Table 2 shows material properties and weight distributions for the solids to be modeled for the mixing analysis in Tank 48.

Lee, S.

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

309

Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

Harkness, John B. L. (Naperville, IL); Gorski, Anthony J. (Woodridge, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Application of molten salt oxidation for the minimization and recovery of plutonium-238 contaminated wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molten salt oxidation (MSO) is proposed as a {sup 238}Pu waste treatment technology that should be developed for volume reduction and recovery of {sup 238}Pu and as an alternative to the transport and permanent disposal of {sup 238}Pu waste to the WIPP repository. In MSO technology, molten sodium carbonate salt at 800--900 C in a reaction vessel acts as a reaction media for wastes. The waste material is destroyed when injected into the molten salt, creating harmless carbon dioxide and steam and a small amount of ash in the spent salt. The spent salt can be treated using aqueous separation methods to reuse the salt and to recover 99.9% of the precious {sup 238}Pu that was in the waste. Tests of MSO technology have shown that the volume of combustible TRU waste can be reduced by a factor of at least twenty. Using this factor the present inventory of 574 TRU drums of {sup 238}Pu contaminated wastes is reduced to 30 drums. Further {sup 238}Pu waste costs of $22 million are avoided from not having to repackage 312 of the 574 drums to a drum total of more than 4,600 drums. MSO combined with aqueous processing of salts will recover approximately 1.7 kilograms of precious {sup 238}Pu valued at 4 million dollars (at $2,500/gram). Thus, installation and use of MSO technology at LANL will result in significant cost savings compared to present plans to transport and dispose {sup 238}Pu TRU waste to the WIPP site. Using a total net present value cost for the MSO project as $4.09 million over a five-year lifetime, the project can pay for itself after either recovery of 1.6 kg of Pu or through volume reduction of 818 drums or a combination of the two. These savings show a positive return on investment.

Wishau, R.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Recovery Act: Waste Energy Project at AK Steel Corporation Middletown  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2008, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (“Air Products”) began development of a project to beneficially utilize waste blast furnace “topgas” generated in the course of the iron-making process at AK Steel Corporation’s Middletown, Ohio works. In early 2010, Air Products was awarded DOE Assistance Agreement DE-EE002736 to further develop and build the combined-cycle power generation facility. In June 2012, Air Products and AK Steel Corporation terminated work when it was determined that the project would not be economically viable at that time nor in the foreseeable future. The project would have achieved the FOA-0000044 Statement of Project Objectives by demonstrating, at a commercial scale, the technology to capture, treat, and convert blast furnace topgas into electric power and thermal energy.

Joyce, Jeffrey

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

Heat Recovery in Distillation by Mechanical Vapor Recompression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant reduction in distillation tower energy requirements can be achieved by mechanical vapor recompression. Three design approaches for heating a distillation tower reboiler by mechanical vapor recompression are presented. The advantages of using a screw compressor are discussed in detail. An example of a xylene extraction tower is sited, illustrating the economic attractiveness in which a simple payback period of less than two years is achievable.

Becker, F. E.; Zakak, A. I.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Counter flow cooling drier with integrated heat recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drier apparatus for removing water or other liquids from various materials includes a mixer, drying chamber, separator and regenerator and a method for use of the apparatus. The material to be dried is mixed with a heated media to form a mixture which then passes through the chamber. While passing through the chamber, a comparatively cool fluid is passed counter current through the mixture so that the mixture becomes cooler and drier and the fluid becomes hotter and more saturated with moisture. The mixture is then separated into drier material and media. The media is transferred to the regenerator and heated therein by the hot fluid from the chamber and supplemental heat is supplied to bring the media to a preselected temperature for mixing with the incoming material to be dried. In a closed loop embodiment of the apparatus, the fluid is also recycled from the regenerator to the chamber and a chiller is utilized to reduce the temperature of the fluid to a preselected temperature and dew point temperature.

Shivvers, Steve D. (Prole, IA)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

314

Selective Recovery of Gold from E-wastes by Using Cellulosic Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technology was extended to prepare similar adsorption gels from cellulosic wastes like spent paper and spent cotton. These adsorption gels were tested for ...

315

Repowering reheat units with gas turbines: Final report. [Adding gas turbines and heat recovery to present units  

SciTech Connect

Although conventional repowering on nonreheat units replaces existing boilers with gas turbines and heat recovery steam generators, options investigated by Virginia Power use gas turbine waste heat to supplement, rather than replace, the output of existing steam generators. Virginia Power's experience in considering feedwater heater repowering (FHR) and hot windbox repowering (HWR) as repowering options is described here. Studying five plants identified as potential repowering candidates, investigators first evaluated FHR, which uses a gas turbine generator set equipped with an economizer to heat boiler feedwater. This reduces the steam turbine extraction flow and increases the steam turbine capacity. HWR, the second method investigated, routes the hot, relatively oxygen-rich exhaust flow from a gas turbine into the boiler windbox, eliminating the need for an air preheater. A boiler stack gas cooler then heats feedwater, again increasing turbine capacity by reducing extraction steam flow requirements for feedwater heating. FHR provided the lowest installed cost, especially at Mount Storm unit 3, a coal-fired minemouth plant. Use of a gas turbine to heat feedwater at this plant resulted in a $523/kW (1985) installed cost and 124-MWe unit capacity increase at a design incremental heat rate of 8600 Btu/kWh. FHR at Mount Storm units 1, 2, and 3 cost less overall than installation and operation of a new combined cycle. Although the findings and conclusions in this series of repowering reports are largely unique to the individual plants, units, and applications studied, other utilities performing repowering studies can draw on the types of consideration entertained, alternatives examined, and factors and rationale leading to rejection or acceptance of a given repowering approach. 12 figs., 12 tabs.

Rives, J.D.; Catina, J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Municipal waste incineration; An environmentally benign energy source for district heating  

SciTech Connect

Municipal solid waste should be regarded as a good fuel. Emissions from solid waste incineration can be kept within any reasonable limit. Compared with fossil fuels, waste can be regarded as a renewable source of energy that does not contribute to the greenhouse effect. Finally, waste incineration for district heating can be very economical.

Astrand, L.E. (Uppsala Energi AB, Uppsala (SE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

New and Existing Buildings Heating and Cooling Opportunities: Dedicated Heat Recovery Chiller  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Langfitt Langfitt U S Department of State Overseas Buildings Operations Mechanical Engineering Division *Engineers are working Harder AND Smarter *New Energy Economy *Heating Is Where The Opportunity Is  39% of total US energy goes into non-residential buildings.  Gas for heating is about 60% of energy used in a building  Gas for heating is at least 25% of total energy used in the US. Heat Generation System Heat Disposal System What's Wrong With This Picture? Keep the heat IN the system Don't run main plant equipment until necessary ! Less rejected heat Less gas consumption High Temp >160F with conventional boilers Hydronic heating... condensing style modular boilers. The entire heating system... designed for low temperature water, recommend maximum temperature of 135ºF.

318

Solvent extraction and recovery of the transuranic elements from waste solutions using the TRUEX process  

SciTech Connect

High-level liquid waste is produced during the processing of irradiated nuclear fuel by the PUREX process. In some cases the treatment of metallurgical scrap to recover the plutonium values also generates a nitric acid waste solution. Both waste solutions contain sufficient concentrations of transuranic elements (mostly /sup 241/Am) to require handling and disposal as a TRU waste. This paper describes a recently developed solvent extraction/recovery process called TRUEX (transuranium extraction) which is designed to reduce the TRU concentration in nitric waste solutions to <100 nCi/g of disposed form (1,2). (In the USA, non-TRU waste is defined as <100 nCi of TRU/g of disposed form.) The process utilizes PUREX process solvent (TBP in a normal paraffinic hydrocarbon or carbon tetrachloride) modified by a small concentration of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (abbrev. CMPO). The presence of CMPO enables the modified PUREX process solvent to extract trivalent actinides as well as tetra- and hexavalent actinides. A major feature of the TRUEX process is that is is applicable to waste solutions containing a wide range of nitric acid, salt, and fission product concentrations and at the same time is very compatible with existing liquid-liquid extraction technology as usually practiced in a fuel reprocessing plant. To date the process has been tested on two different types of synthetic waste solutions. The first solution is a typical high-level nitric acid waste and the second a typical waste solution generated in metallurgical scrap processing. Results are discussed. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Schulz, W.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Heat Recovery Steam Generators for Combined Cycle Applications: HRSG Procurement, Design, Construction, and Operation Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design alternatives and procurement approaches for heat recovery steam generators, supplemental firing duct burners, and ancillary steam systems are addressed in this report. Power engineers and project developers will find an up-to-date, comprehensive resource for planning, specification and preliminary design in support of combined cycle plant development.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Evaluating and Avoiding Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Damage Caused by Duct Burners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), supplemental firing in duct burners introduces the potential for serious HRSG tube failure and damage. Duct burners that are specified, designed, and operated properly can produce a number of significant benefits. This report will assist operators in accruing these benefits.

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

Development of Advanced Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques for Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contemporary heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) operate with multiple pressures and temperatures that can result in degradation and failure of key components such as HRSG drains. Periodic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of HRSGs can mitigate catastrophic component failure as well as facilitate effective maintenance planning through early detection of system damage. This technical update describes HRSG drain damage mechanisms and related NDE techniques.

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

323

Boiler and Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failures: Theory and Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler and heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failures have been the primary availability problem for operators of conventional and combined cycle plants for as long as reliable statistics have been kept for each generating source. This book provides owners and operators with the technical basis to address tube failures and create permanent solutions.

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

324

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Combustion Turbine Combined-Cycle Heat Recovery Steam Generator Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides information to assist personnel involved with the maintenance of the heat recovery steam generator at a combustion gas turbine combined cycle facility, including good maintenance practices, preventive maintenance techniques and troubleshooting guidance. BackgroundCombustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that can be unique to this particular type of power plant. As such, owners and ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Dynamic simulation model for non-supplementary firing triple-pressure heat recovery steam generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using the modular modeling method, a real-time dynamic simulation model for the non-supplementary tri-pressure reheat Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) is developed. On the basis of mass and energy conservation law, the paper discusses the model ... Keywords: HRSG, dynamic model, modular modelling, simulation

Ning Cui; Bing-Shu Wang; Xiang-Yang Gong; Jian-Qiang Gao

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Combined Cycle/Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSGs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cycle chemistry in combined cycle plants influences about 70 of the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failure mechanisms. These guidelines have been assembled to assist operators and chemists in developing an effective overall cycle chemistry program which will prevent HRSG tube failures (HTF).

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

327

Maximization of revenues for power sales from a solid waste resources recovery facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report discusses the actual implementation of the best alternative in selling electrical power generated by an existing waste-to-energy facility, the Metro-Dade County Resources Recovery Plant. After the plant processes and extracts various products out of the municipal solid waste, it burns it to produce electrical power. The price for buying power to satisfy the internal needs of our Resources Recovery Facility (RRF) is substantially higher than the power price for selling electricity to any other entity. Therefore, without any further analysis, it was decided to first satisfy those internal needs and then export the excess power. Various alternatives were thoroughly explored as to what to do with the excess power. Selling power to the power utilities or utilizing the power in other facilities were the primary options.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems. An evaluation based on life cycle assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the environmental results, integrated with those arising from mass and energy balances, of a research project on the comparative analysis of strategies for material and energy recovery from waste, funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research. The project, involving the cooperation of five University research groups, was devoted to the optimisation of material and energy recovery activities within integrated municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems. Four scenarios of separate collection (overall value of 35%, 50% without the collection of food waste, 50% including the collection of food waste, 65%) were defined for the implementation of energetic, environmental and economic balances. Two sizes of integrated MSW management system (IWMS) were considered: a metropolitan area, with a gross MSW production of 750,000 t/year and an average province, with a gross MSW production of 150,000 t/year. The environmental analysis was conducted using Life Cycle Assessment methodology (LCA), for both material and energy recovery activities. In order to avoid allocation we have used the technique of the expansion of the system boundaries. This means taking into consideration the impact on the environment related to the waste management activities in comparison with the avoided impacts related to the saving of raw materials and primary energy. Under the hypotheses of the study, both for the large and for the small IWMS, the energetic and environmental benefits are higher than the energetic and environmental impacts for all the scenarios analysed in terms of all the indicators considered: the scenario with 50% separate collection in a drop-off scheme excluding food waste shows the most promising perspectives, mainly arising from the highest collection (and recycling) of all the packaging materials, which is the activity giving the biggest energetic and environmental benefits. Main conclusions of the study in the general field of the assessment of the environmental performance of any integrated waste management scheme address the importance of properly defining, beyond the design value assumed for the separate collection as a whole, also the yields of each material recovered; particular significance is finally related to the amount of residues deriving from material recovery activities, resulting on average in the order of 20% of the collected materials.

Giugliano, Michele; Cernuschi, Stefano [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Grosso, Mario, E-mail: mario.grosso@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, Lucia [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Department of Energy plan for recovery and utilization of nuclear byproducts from defense wastes. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear wastes from the defense production cycle contain many uniquely useful, intrinsically valuable, and strategically important materials. These materials have a wide range of known and potential applications in food technology, agriculture, energy, public health, medicine, industrial technology, and national security. Furthermore, their removal from the nuclear waste stream can facilitate waste management and yield economic, safety, and environmental advantages in the management and disposal of the residual nuclear wastes that have no redemptive value. This document is the program plan for implementing the recovery and beneficial use of these valuable materials. An Executive Summary of this document, DOE/DP-0013, Vol. 1, January 1983, is available. Program policy, goals and strategy are stated in Section 2. Implementation tasks, schedule and funding are detailed in Section 3. The remaining five sections and the appendixes provide necessary background information to support these two sections. Section 4 reviews some of the unique properties of the individual byproduct materials and describes both demonstrated and potential applications. The amounts of byproduct materials that are available now for research and demonstration purposes, and the amounts that could be recovered in the future for expanded applications are detailed in Section 5. Section 6 describes the effects byproduct recovery and utilization have on the management and final disposal of nuclear wastes. The institutional issues that affect the recovery, processing and utilization of nuclear byproducts are discussed in Section 7. Finally, Section 8 presents a generalized mathematical process by which applications can be evaluated and prioritized (rank-ordered) to provide planning data for program management.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Modeling water seepage into heated waste emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into drifts at Yucca Mountain, Journal of ContaminantEMPLACEMENT DRIFTS AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN Jens Birkholzer, Sumitfor nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Heating of rock

Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Yvonne

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Waste, energy and the crisis of confidence: the American people and the history of resource recovery from 1965 to 2001.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??From the mid-1960s until the end of the 1970s, a type of municipal solid waste management known as resource recovery was expected to solve both… (more)

Gumm, Angela Shannon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Design of a tube bank waste heat reclaimer for residential heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Forced convection tube bank heat reclaimers are analyzed in detail for residential natural gas and oil-fired furnaces that are controlled by natural draft. Optimum reclaimer designs are obtained based on improved system efficiency, and considerations regarding manufacturing costs. Each reclaimer meets safety restrictions regarding allowable system pressure losses and minimum chimney gas temperatures. Reclaimer size and overall weight are also considered. Computer-generated solutions aid in determining heat recovery as a function of furnace fuel, furnace efficiency, ambient temperature, flue pipe size, and chimney height. The analysis considers a range of furnace efficiencies from 50 to 80%, and ambient temperatures from 0 to 60/sup 0/F, which are values considered typical for most domestic combustion heating equipment. Flue pipe sizes range from 4 to 6 inches in diameter and are 2 to 4 feet long. Chimney sizes range from 5 to 7 inches in equivalent diameter and include draft heights from 15 to 35 feet. The piping sizes correspond to furnace input capacities ranging from 50,000 to 170,000 Btu/h. For many domestic heating systems, the potential exists to recover the lost heat by as much as 30%, and to reduce fuel costs by as much as 15% by installing a flue pipe heat reclaimer.

Gretsinger, K.M.; Elias, T.I.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Waste Disposal and Recovery Act Efforts at the Oak Ridge Reservation,OAS-RA-L-12-01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Disposal and Recovery Act Waste Disposal and Recovery Act Efforts at the Oak Ridge Reservation INS-RA-L-12-01 December 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 16, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, OAK RIDGE OFFICE FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Waste Disposal and Recovery Act Efforts at the Oak Ridge Reservation" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's (Department) expends billions of dollars to clean up contaminated sites and dispose of hazardous waste. The Department's Oak Ridge Office (ORO) is responsible for processing and disposing of the Transuranic (TRU) waste on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including approximately 3,500 cubic meters of legacy remote-handled (RH) and contact-

334

Section 5.3.1 Heat-Recovery Water Heating: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat pumps, chillers, steam condensate lines, hot air associated with kitchen and laundry facilities, power-generation equipment (such as microturbines or fuel cells), and...

335

Municipal solid waste management in India: From waste disposal to recovery of resources?  

SciTech Connect

Unlike that of western countries, the solid waste of Asian cities is often comprised of 70-80% organic matter, dirt and dust. Composting is considered to be the best option to deal with the waste generated. Composting helps reduce the waste transported to and disposed of in landfills. During the course of the research, the author learned that several developing countries established large-scale composting plants that eventually failed for various reasons. The main flaw that led to the unsuccessful establishment of the plants was the lack of application of simple scientific methods to select the material to be composted. Landfills have also been widely unsuccessful in countries like India because the landfill sites have a very limited time frame of usage. The population of the developing countries is another factor that detrimentally impacts the function of landfill sites. As the population keeps increasing, the garbage quantity also increases, which, in turn, exhausts the landfill sites. Landfills are also becoming increasingly expensive because of the rising costs of construction and operation. Incineration, which can greatly reduce the amount of incoming municipal solid waste, is the second most common method for disposal in developed countries. However, incinerator ash may contain hazardous materials including heavy metals and organic compounds such as dioxins, etc. Recycling plays a large role in solid waste management, especially in cities in developing countries. None of the three methods mentioned here are free from problems. The aim of this study is thus to compare the three methods, keeping in mind the costs that would be incurred by the respective governments, and identify the most economical and best option possible to combat the waste disposal problem.

Narayana, Tapan [Hidayatullah National Law University, HNLU Bhawan, Civil Lines, Raipur 492001, Chhattisgarh (India)], E-mail: tapan.narayana@gmail.com

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Dynamic modeling and multivariable control of organic Rankine cycles in waste heat utilizing processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the dynamics of organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) in waste heat utilizing processes is investigated, and the physical model of a 100 kW waste heat utilizing process is established. In order to achieve both transient performance and steady-state ... Keywords: Linear quadratic regulator, Organic Rankine cycles, Process control

Jianhua Zhang; Wenfang Zhang; Guolian Hou; Fang Fang

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Draft report: application of organic Rankine cycle heat recovery systems to diesel powered marine vessels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analysis and results of an investigation of the application of organic Rankine cycle heat recovery systems to diesel-powered marine vessels are described. The program under which this study was conducted was sponsored jointly by the US Energy Research and Development Administration, the US Navy, and the US Maritime Administration. The overall objective of this study was to investigate diesel bottoming energy recovery systems, currently under development by three US concerns, to determine the potential for application to marine diesel propulsion and auxiliary systems. The study primarily focused on identifying the most promising vessel applications (considering vessel type, size, population density, operational duty cycle, etc.) so the relative economic and fuel conservation merits of energy recovery systems could be determined and assessed. Vessels in the current fleet and the projected 1985 fleet rated at 1000 BHP class and above were investigated.

Not Available

1977-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Geek-Up[5.20.2011]: Electricity from Waste Heat, Fuel from Sunlight |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5.20.2011]: Electricity from Waste Heat, Fuel from Sunlight 5.20.2011]: Electricity from Waste Heat, Fuel from Sunlight Geek-Up[5.20.2011]: Electricity from Waste Heat, Fuel from Sunlight May 20, 2011 - 5:53pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? 50 percent of the energy generated annually from all sources is lost as waste heat. Scientists have developed a high-efficiency thermal waste heat energy converter that actively cools electronic devices, photovoltaic cells, computers and other large industrial systems while generating electricity. Scientists have linked platinum nanoparticles with algae proteins, commandeering photosynthesis to produce hydrogen -- research that will help scientists harvest light with solar fuels. Thanks to scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the billions

339

Estimation of residual MSW heating value as a function of waste component recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recycling of packaging wastes may be compatible with incineration within integrated waste management systems. To study this, a mathematical model is presented to calculate the fraction composition of residual municipal solid waste (MSW) only as a function of the MSW fraction composition at source and recycling fractions of the different waste materials. The application of the model to the Lisbon region yielded results showing that the residual waste fraction composition depends both on the packaging wastes fraction at source and on the ratio between that fraction and the fraction of the same material, packaging and non-packaging, at source. This behaviour determines the variation of the residual waste LHV. For 100% of paper packaging recycling, LHV reduces 4.2% whereas this reduction is of 14.4% for 100% of packaging plastics recycling. For 100% of food waste recovery, LHV increases 36.8% due to the moisture fraction reduction of the residual waste. Additionally the results evidence that the negative impact of recycling paper and plastic packaging on the LHV may be compensated by recycling food waste and glass and metal packaging. This makes packaging materials recycling and food waste recovery compatible strategies with incineration within integrated waste management systems.

Magrinho, Alexandre [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Semiao, Viriato [Mechanical Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: ViriatoSemiao@ist.utl.pt

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Guidelines for the Nondestructive Examination of Heat Recovery Steam Generators, Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) have become more complex over the last 20 years, operating with multiple pressures and temperatures, operators have experienced an increasing suite of HRSG tube failures (HTFs). This report provides guidance on the performance of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of HRSGs so that operators will know what types of NDE to perform and where to perform them.BackgroundModern HRSGs have numerous varieties available within the ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Study for Snake Robot Technology for Inspection of Headers and Tubes in Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tubing is especially difficult to inspect using conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques because: The tubing is tightly bundled, with interior bundle tubing typically inaccessible by conventional equipment without cutting and later repairing the exterior tubes. The tubing is finned and, since ultrasonic techniques require solid contact with the tube, cannot be accessed unless the tubing is cut away. Access to the inside of the tubes is difficult, requi...

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

342

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Procurement Guideline: HRSG Design Best Practices and Specification for Cyclic Duty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of best practices for designing a new heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) for cycling and rapid start duty, including typical performance requirements and suggestions for design improvements to improve the HRSGs ability to handle cyclic operation. This document also provides a generic procurement specification for the definition and purchase of an HRSG for installation downstream of a combustion turbine. It includes both horizontal and vertical configuration options. The...

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

343

Evaluation of Thermal-, Creep-, and Corrosion-Fatigue of Heat Recovery Steam Generator Pressure Parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide fleet of combined cycle units with heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) has exhibited a disappointing track record with respect to reliability and availability in terms of fatigue HRSG tube failures (HTF) which are thermal transient driven. This report, which forms part of a series, will assist designer, owners, and operators with the technical basis to facilitate specifying, designing, and operating HRSG in a manner to minimize fatigue damage.

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Procurement Specification for Horizontal Gas Path Heat Recovery Steam Generator: Avoiding Thermal-Mechanical Fatigue Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), particularly those equipped with F-class gas turbines that are also subjected to periods of frequent cyclic operation, have experienced premature pressure part failures because of excessive thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) damage. The very competitive power generation marketplace has resulted in lowest installed cost often taking precedence over medium- and long-term durability and operating costs.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

345

HRSG Startup and Shutdown Guidelines for Avoiding Heat Recovery Steam Generator Pressure Part Failures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the damage to heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) pressure parts is caused by transiently high thermal-mechanical stresses that occur during shutdown and startup, along with cycle chemistry changes imposed by cyclic operation. Unit shutdown and startup impose considerably more potential for cumulative pressure part damage than stable on-load operation does. Essentially every HRSG damage mechanism is exacerbated by cyclic operationeither directly, through transiently high localized stresses appli...

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

346

Troubleshooting Guide for Thermal Transients in Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the period 2000-2009 EPRI developed ten reports and guidance documents on Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) thermal transients. Collectively, these documents provide the information required to identify, address, and minimize thermal transients in HRSG superheaters, reheaters, economizers, and evaporators. This summary report offers an overview of this EPRI work on HRSG transients organized to guide the reader to pertinent sections in the original reports and facilitate troubleshooting.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

347

Comprehensive Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Combined Cycle/Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSGs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of water and steam is central to ensuring combined cycle/heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) plant component availability and reliability. These guidelines for combined cycle/HRSG plants provide information on the application of all-volatile treatment (AVT), oxygenated treatment (OT), phosphate treatment (PT), caustic treatment (CT), and amine treatment. The guidelines will help operators reduce corrosion and deposition and thereby achieve significant operation and maintenance cost ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

348

Heat recovery steam generator outlet temperature control system for a combined cycle power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a command cycle electrical power plant including: a steam turbine and at least one set comprising a gas turbine, an afterburner and a heat recovery steam generator having an attemperator for supplying from an outlet thereof to the steam turbine superheated steam under steam turbine operating conditions requiring predetermined superheated steam temperature, flow and pressure; with the gas turbine and steam turbine each generating megawatts in accordance with a plant load demand; master control means being provided for controlling the steam turbine and the heat recovery steam generator so as to establish the steam operating conditions; the combination of: first control means responsive to the gas inlet temperature of the heat recovery steam generator and to the plant load demand for controlling the firing of the afterburner; second control means responsive to the superheated steam predetermined temperature and to superheated steam temperature from the outlet for controlling the attemperator between a closed and an open position; the first and second control means being operated concurrently to maintain the superheated steam outlet temperature while controlling the load of the gas turbine independently of the steam turbine operating conditions.

Martens, A.; Myers, G.A.; McCarty, W.L.; Wescott, K.R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Woven heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

Piscitella, R.R.

1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

350

Evaluation of Energy Recovery from Municipal Solid Waste in Oil-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five methods of energy recovery from municipal solid waste (MSW) in oil-fired power plants are evaluated: preparation and supplemental firing of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with oil in a utility boiler originally designed for coal firing; 100% firing of either RDF or MSW in a dedicated water-wall incinerator and use of the steam to drive a dedicated turbine generator unit; and 100% firing of RDF or MSW in a dedicated water-wall incinerator and integration of the steam into the power plant steam cycle.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Energy recovery from municipal solid waste, an environmental and safety mini-overview survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental and safety aspects of processing municipal solid wastes to recover energy and materials are reviewed in some detail. The state of the art in energy recovery, energy potential for the near and long-term, and constraints to commercialization are discussed. Under the environmental and safety aspects the state of the art, need for research and development, and need for coordination among federal agencies and private industry are considered. Eleven principal types of refuse-to-energy processes are described and a projected energy balance is derived for each process. (JSR)

Johnson, R.L.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning.

Font Vivanco, David, E-mail: font@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Puig Ventosa, Ignasi [ENT Environment and Management, Carrer Sant Joan 39, First Floor, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Gabarrell Durany, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

This report documents Phase 1 of a project conducted by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for the assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of VOC solvents from process gas streams. In Phase 1, MTI has evaluated solvent recovery applications within New York State (NYS), identified host sites willing to implement their application, and conducted a preliminary design of the equipment required. The design and applications were evaluated for technical and economic feasibility. The solvent recovery heat pump system concept resulting from the Phase 1 work is one of a mobile unit that would service multiple stationary adsorbers. A large percentage of solvent recovery applications within the state can be serviced by on-site carbon bed adsorbers that are desorbed at frequencies ranging from once per to once per month. In this way, many users can effectively share'' the substantial capital investment associated with the system's reverse Brayton hardware, providing it can be packaged as a mobile unit. In a typical operating scenario, a carbon adsorption module will be located permanently at the industrial site. The SLA will be ducted through the adsorber and the solvents removed, thus eliminating an air emission problem. Prior to VOC breakthrough, by schedule or by request, the mobile unit would arrive at the site to recover the concentrated solvent. An engine driven, natural gas fueled system, the mobile unit utilizes conditioned engine exhaust gases as the inert gas for desorption. Hot inert gas is directed through the carbon bed, heating it and volatilizing the adsorbed solvent. Using a revere Brayton-cycle refrigeration system to create low temperatures, the solvent vapors are condensed and collected from the inert gas stream. The solvent can then be recycled to the production process or sold for other uses and the adsorber returned to service.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents Phase 1 of a project conducted by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for the assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of VOC solvents from process gas streams. In Phase 1, MTI has evaluated solvent recovery applications within New York State (NYS), identified host sites willing to implement their application, and conducted a preliminary design of the equipment required. The design and applications were evaluated for technical and economic feasibility. The solvent recovery heat pump system concept resulting from the Phase 1 work is one of a mobile unit that would service multiple stationary adsorbers. A large percentage of solvent recovery applications within the state can be serviced by on-site carbon bed adsorbers that are desorbed at frequencies ranging from once per to once per month. In this way, many users can effectively ``share`` the substantial capital investment associated with the system`s reverse Brayton hardware, providing it can be packaged as a mobile unit. In a typical operating scenario, a carbon adsorption module will be located permanently at the industrial site. The SLA will be ducted through the adsorber and the solvents removed, thus eliminating an air emission problem. Prior to VOC breakthrough, by schedule or by request, the mobile unit would arrive at the site to recover the concentrated solvent. An engine driven, natural gas fueled system, the mobile unit utilizes conditioned engine exhaust gases as the inert gas for desorption. Hot inert gas is directed through the carbon bed, heating it and volatilizing the adsorbed solvent. Using a revere Brayton-cycle refrigeration system to create low temperatures, the solvent vapors are condensed and collected from the inert gas stream. The solvent can then be recycled to the production process or sold for other uses and the adsorber returned to service.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Proposed Design for a Coupled Ground-Source Heat Pump/Energy Recovery Ventilator System to Reduce Building Energy Demand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work presented in this thesis focuses on reducing the energy demand of a residential building by using a coupled ground-source heat pump/energy recovery ventilation… (more)

McDaniel, Matthew Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Solar Thermochemical Fuels Production: Solar Fuels via Partial Redox Cycles with Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The University of Minnesota is developing a solar thermochemical reactor that will efficiently produce fuel from sunlight, using solar energy to produce heat to break chemical bonds. The University of Minnesota is envisioning producing the fuel by using partial redox cycles and ceria-based reactive materials. The team will achieve unprecedented solar-to-fuel conversion efficiencies of more than 10% (where current state-of-the-art efficiency is 1%) by combined efforts and innovations in material development, and reactor design with effective heat recovery mechanisms and demonstration. This new technology will allow for the effective use of vast domestic solar resources to produce precursors to synthetic fuels that could replace gasoline.

None

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

357

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt This report summarizes efforts to simulate coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes occurring within a generic hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt; chemical processes of the system allow precipitation and dissolution of salt with elevated temperatures that drive water and water vapor flow around hot waste packages. Characterizing salt backfill processes is an important objective of the exercise. An evidence-based algorithm for mineral dehydration is also applied in the modeling. The Finite Element Heat and Mass transfer code (FEHM) is used to simulate coupled thermal,

358

Establishing the Technical Basis for Disposal of Heat-generating Waste in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establishing the Technical Basis for Disposal of Heat-generating Establishing the Technical Basis for Disposal of Heat-generating Waste in Salt Establishing the Technical Basis for Disposal of Heat-generating Waste in Salt The report summarizes available historic tests and the developed technical basis for disposal of heat-generating waste in salt, and the means by which a safety case for disposal of heat generating waste at a generic salt site can be initiated from the existing technical basis. Though the basis for a salt safety case is strong and has been made by the German repository program, RD&D programs continue in order to help reduce uncertainty, to improve understanding of certain complex processes, to demonstrate operational concepts, to confirm performance expectations, and to improve modeling capabilities utilizing the latest software platforms.

359

Process for the elimination of waste water produced upon the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of wash solution containing organic oxygen-carrier, with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the elimination of waste water falling out with the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of an organic oxygen carrier-containing washing solution with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur. The waste water is decomposed in a combustion chamber in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures between about 1000/sup 0/ and 1100/sup 0/ C. under such conditions that the mole ratio of H/sub 2/S:SO/sub 2/ in the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber amounts to at least 2:1. Sulfur falling out is separated and the sensible heat of the exhaust gas is utilized for steam generation. The cooled and desulfurized exhaust gas is added to the coking oven gas before the pre-cooling. Sulfur falling out from the washing solution in the oxidizer is separated out and lead into the combustion chamber together with the part of the washing solution discharged as waste water from the washing solution circulation. Preferred embodiments include that the sulfur loading of the waste water can amount to up to about 370 kg sulfur per m/sup 3/ waste water; having the cooling of sulfur-containing exhaust gas leaving the combustion chamber follow in a waste heat boiler and a sulfur condenser heated by pre-heated boiler feed water, from which condenser sulfur is discharged in liquid state.

Diemer, P.; Brake, W.; Dittmer, R.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

360

Molten salt oxidation of mixed wastes: Separation of radioactive materials and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is involved in a program to apply a molten salt oxidation (MSO) process to the treatment of mixed wastes at Oak Ridge and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Mixed wastes are defined as those wastes that contain both radioactive components, which are regulated by the atomic energy legislation, and hazardous waste components, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). A major part of our ORNL program involves the development of separation technologies that are necessary for the complete treatment of mixed wastes. The residues from the MSO treatment of the mixed wastes must be processed further to separate the radioactive components, to concentrate and recycle residues, or to convert the residues into forms acceptable for final disposal. This paper is a review of the MSO requirements for separation technologies, the information now available, and the concepts for our development studies.

Bell, J.T.; Haas, P.A.; Rudolph, J.C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load SouthernCombined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

Rose, Michael R.

362

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Water distillation using waste engine heat from an internal combustion engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To meet the needs of forward deployed soldiers and disaster relief personnel, a mobile water distillation system was designed and tested. This system uses waste engine heat from the exhaust flow of an internal combustion ...

Mears, Kevin S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Pressure recovery in a cylindrical heat pipe at high radial Reynolds numbers and at high Mach numbers  

SciTech Connect

The pressure recovery in a cylindrical heat pipe has been investigated. The experiments cover average radial Reynolds numbers between 5 and 150 and average Mach numbers up to the velocity of sound. During preliminary experiments in a cylindrical, gravity-assisted heat pipe at high Mach numbers large condensate flow instabilities were observed. As a consequence the heat pipe power varied strongly. Based on these observations an improved heat pipe design was made that resulted in steady operating conditions throughout the entire parameter range. This heat pipe is described. The pressure recovery was measured and compared with results from a two-dimensional analytical model for describing compressible vapor flow in heat pipes. Good agreement with the experimental data was found.

Haug, F.; Busse, C.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A JOULE-HEATED MELTER TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of joule-heated ceramic lined melters and their application to Hanford's low-activity waste.

KELLY SE

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

OpenEI Community - natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Increase Natural Gas Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency http://en.openei.org/community/group/increase-natural-gas-energy-efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas.How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature?read more natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat

368

Thermal engine driven heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for separating volatile organic compounds from a stream of process gas. An internal combustion engine drives a plurality of refrigeration systems, an electrical generator and an air compressor. The exhaust of the internal combustion engine drives an inert gas subsystem and a heater for the gas. A water jacket captures waste heat from the internal combustion engine and drives a second heater for the gas and possibly an additional refrigeration system for the supply of chilled water. The refrigeration systems mechanically driven by the internal combustion engine effect the precipitation of volatile organic compounds from the stream of gas.

Drake, Richard L. (Schenectady, NY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act encourages the establishment of regional waste management facilities and the cooperation of local waste management entities in order to streamline the management of municipal solid waste...

370

Parametric Analyses of Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general thermal hydraulics program GOTH-SNF was used to predict the thermal response of the waste in tanks 241-AY-102 and 241-AZ-102 when mixed by two 300 horsepower mixer pumps. This mixing was defined in terms of a specific waste retrieval scenario. Both dome and annulus ventilation system flow are necessary to maintain the waste within temperature control limits during the mixing operation and later during the sludge-settling portion of the scenario are defined.

TRUITT, J.B.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

371

Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds. Phase 1, Conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The ``Toxic-Release Inventory`` of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M`s work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes Jaschke, Helge Smedsrud, Sigurd Skogestad*, Henrik Manum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes J¨aschke, Helge@chemeng.ntnu.no off-line. This systematic approach is here applied to a waste incineration plant for district heating. In district heating networks, operators usually wish to ob- tain the lowest possible return temperature

Skogestad, Sigurd

373

Potential for Materials and Energy RecoveryPotential for Materials and Energy Recovery the Municipal Solid Wastes (the Municipal Solid Wastes (MSWMSW) of Beograd) of Beograd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

%) and glass (15%). · Recovery of energy by anaerobic digestion: The natural organics in MSW react anaerobically (in absence of O2).to form methane gas · Recovery of soil nutrients: By aerobic composting (in + 6.5O2 = 6CO2 + 5H2O + 23,000 kJ/kg On basis of chemical analysis, the average composition

Columbia University

374

Evaluation of a once-through heat recovery steam generator concept: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) evaluation of a once-through concept for a combined-cycle heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The project included a review of differences in reliability and maintainability characteristics of the once-through concept and a typical drum-type HRSG design. A special effort was placed on an investigation of the expected performance of the thin-wall alloy 800 boiler tubing used in the once-through HRSG. An analysis was performed by using the UNIRAM computer modeling methodology to compare the predicted availability of the once-through HRSG design with that of a drum-type system. The results of this project provide a basis for understanding the RAM characteristics of the once-through HRSG concept and identify areas where additional research may be beneficial in evaluating this new design for application within the utility industry. 28 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

Babione, R.A.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Experimental investigation of the quality characteristics of agricultural plastic wastes regarding their recycling and energy recovery potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definition of parameters characterising agricultural plastic waste (APW) quality. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of samples to determine APW quality for recycling or energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Majority of APW samples from various countries have very good quality for recycling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upper limit of 50% w/w soil contamination in APW acceptable for energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chlorine and heavy metals content in APW below the lowest limit for energy recovery. - Abstract: A holistic environmentally sound waste management scheme that transforms agricultural plastic waste (APW) streams into labelled guaranteed quality commodities freely traded in open market has been developed by the European research project LabelAgriWaste. The APW quality is defined by the APW material requirements, translated to technical specifications, for recycling or energy recovery. The present work investigates the characteristics of the APW quality and the key factors affecting it from the introduction of the virgin product to the market to the APW stream reaching the disposer. Samples of APW from different countries were traced from their application to the field through their storage phase and transportation to the final destination. The test results showed that the majority of APW retained their mechanical properties after their use preserving a 'very good quality' for recycling in terms of degradation. The degree of soil contamination concerning the APW recycling and energy recovery potential fluctuates depending on the agricultural plastic category and application. The chlorine and heavy metal content of the tested APW materials was much lower than the maximum acceptable limits for their potential use in cement industries.

Briassoulis, D., E-mail: briassou@aua.gr [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E. [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Antiohos, S.K., E-mail: santiohos@titan.gr [Titan Cement Company S.A., Group R and D and Quality Department, Kamari Plant, P.O. Box 18, 19200 Elefsina (Greece); Papadi, C., E-mail: c.papadi@polyeco.gr [Polyeco S.A., 16 km National Road Athens-Korinthos, Aspropyrgos 19300 (Greece)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Assessing recycling versus incineration of key materials in municipal waste: The importance of efficient energy recovery and transport distances  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the environmental impact of recycling and incineration of household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling of paper, glass, steel and aluminium is better than incineration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling and incineration of cardboard and plastic can be equally good alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclables can be transported long distances and still have environmental benefits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper has a higher environmental benefit than recyclables found in smaller amounts. - Abstract: Recycling of materials from municipal solid waste is commonly considered to be superior to any other waste treatment alternative. For the material fractions with a significant energy content this might not be the case if the treatment alternative is a waste-to-energy plant with high energy recovery rates. The environmental impacts from recycling and from incineration of six material fractions in household waste have been compared through life cycle assessment assuming high-performance technologies for material recycling as well as for waste incineration. The results showed that there are environmental benefits when recycling paper, glass, steel and aluminium instead of incinerating it. For cardboard and plastic the results were more unclear, depending on the level of energy recovery at the incineration plant, the system boundaries chosen and which impact category was in focus. Further, the environmental impact potentials from collection, pre-treatment and transport was compared to the environmental benefit from recycling and this showed that with the right means of transport, recyclables can in most cases be transported long distances. However, the results also showed that recycling of some of the material fractions can only contribute marginally in improving the overall waste management system taking into consideration their limited content in average Danish household waste.

Merrild, Hanna [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Larsen, Anna W., E-mail: awla@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Feasibility analysis of gasification for energy recovery from residual solid waste in Humboldt County.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This analysis investigates the feasibility of implementing a gasification system to process residual solid waste in Humboldt County. The Humboldt Waste Management Authority manages 70,000… (more)

Hervin, Kirstin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Waste heat from kitchen cuts hot water electricity 23%  

SciTech Connect

Heat recovered from the Hamburger Hamlet's kitchen in Bethesada, Maryland and used to pre-heat the million gallons of hot water used annually reduced hot water costs 23% and paid off the investment in 1.5 years. Potomac Electric initiated the installation of an air-to-water heat pump in the restaurant kitchen above the dishwasher at a cost of about $5300, with the restaurant obliged to reimburse the utility if performance was satisfactory. Outside water recirculates through storage tanks and the ceiling heat pump until it reaches the required 140/sup 0/F. The amount of electricity needed to bring the preheated water to that temperature was $3770 lower after the installation. Cooled air exhausted from the heat pump circulates throughout the kitchen.

Barber, J.

1984-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

379

Proceedings: International Conference on Boiler Tube Failures and Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Tube Failures and Inspections  

SciTech Connect

Tube failures remain the leading cause of availability loss in conventional fossil plants and combined cycle/heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) plants. These conference proceedings address state-of-the-art practices and techniques worldwide for understanding and reducing tube failures.

None

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Diagnostic/Troubleshooting Monitoring to Identify Damaging Cycle Chemistry or Thermal Transients in Heat Recovery Steam Generator Pressure Parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide fleet of combined cycle units with heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) has exhibited a disappointing track record with respect to reliability and availability in terms of HRSG tube failures (HTFs). This report will assist operators in identifying the harmful chemical and thermal transient excursions that lead to failure.

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Analysis of Organic Rankine Cycle for Low and Medium Grade Heat Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is an effective technique to generate power from low and medium temperature heat source, including industrial waste heat, solar heat, geothermal and biomass etc. Advantages of ORC are high efficiency, simple system, environment ... Keywords: organic Rankine cycle, new energy, waste heat recovery

Zhonghe Han, Yida Yu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Enhanced oil recovery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

All energy resources available from a geopressured geothermal reservoir are used for the production of pipeline quality gas using a high pressure separator/heat exchanger and a membrane separator, and recovering waste gas from both the membrane separator and a low pressure separator in tandem with the high pressure separator for use in enhanced oil recovery, or in powering a gas engine and turbine set. Liquid hydrocarbons are skimmed off the top of geothermal brine in the low pressure separator. High pressure brine from the geothermal well is used to drive a turbine/generator set before recovering waste gas in the first separator. Another turbine/generator set is provided in a supercritical binary power plant that uses propane as a working fluid in a closed cycle, and uses exhaust heat from the combustion engine and geothermal energy of the brine in the separator/heat exchanger to heat the propane.

Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Analysis & Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

nearly 15 million-or 15,000-homes were to install new (or convert their existing HVAC or heat pump system to) a full or hybrid GHP system, it would result in between 400...

384

Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program March 16, 2011 - 4:55pm Addthis Ener-G-Rotors' 5kW prototype system | courtesy of Ener-G-Rotors Ener-G-Rotors' 5kW prototype system | courtesy of Ener-G-Rotors April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs If you've ever driven by an industrial plant, you've probably noticed big white plumes rising from the tops of the facilities. While it might look like smoke or pollution at first glance, most of the time those white plumes are comprised of steam and heat, or what Ener-G-Rotors CEO Michael Newell calls waste heat. Mike and the researchers of Ener-G-Rotors are finding ways to use this

385

Waste-heat disposal from US Geothermal Power Plants: an update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the more interesting and significant methods that are currently being studied in the US for reducing waste heat dissipation system costs and water consumption are: (1) allowing plant power output to vary with ambient conditions; (2) use of ammonia to transport waste heat from the turbine condenser to air-cooled coils; (3) development of a plastic-membrane type wet/dry tower; (4) marketing of steam turbines that can tolerate a wider range of back pressures: (5) use of circulating water storage to delay heat dissipation until more favorable ambient conditions exist; (6) development of tubes with enhanced heat transfer surfaces to reduce condenser capital costs; and (7) use of evaporative condensers to reduce costs in binary cycles. Many of these projects involve large-scale tests that are now fully installed and producing some preliminary data.

Robertson, R.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Estimation of heat load in waste tanks using average vapor space temperatures  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a method for estimating the total heat load in a high-level waste tank with passive ventilation. This method relates the total heat load in the tank to the vapor space temperature and the depth of waste in the tank. Q{sub total} = C{sub f} (T{sub vapor space {minus}} T{sub air}) where: C{sub f} = Conversion factor = (R{sub o}k{sub soil}{sup *}area)/(z{sub tank} {minus} z{sub surface}); R{sub o} = Ratio of total heat load to heat out the top of the tank (function of waste height); Area = cross sectional area of the tank; k{sub soil} = thermal conductivity of soil; (z{sub tank} {minus} z{sub surface}) = effective depth of soil covering the top of tank; and (T{sub vapor space} {minus} T{sub air}) = mean temperature difference between vapor space and the ambient air at the surface. Three terms -- depth, area and ratio -- can be developed from geometrical considerations. The temperature difference is measured for each individual tank. The remaining term, the thermal conductivity, is estimated from the time-dependent component of the temperature signals coming from the periodic oscillations in the vapor space temperatures. Finally, using this equation, the total heat load for each of the ferrocyanide Watch List tanks is estimated. This provides a consistent way to rank ferrocyanide tanks according to heat load.

Crowe, R.D.; Kummerer, M.; Postma, A.K.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Mathematical Analysis of a Novel Approach to Maximize Waste Recovery in a Life Support System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NASA has been evaluating closed-loop atmosphere revitalization architectures carbon dioxide, CO2, reduction technologies. The CO2 and steam, H2O, co-electrolysis process is another option that NASA has investigated. Utilizing recent advances in the fuel cell technology sector, the Idaho National Laboratory, INL, has developed a CO2 and H2O co-electrolysis process to produce oxygen and syngas (carbon monoxide, CO and hydrogen, H2 mixture) for terrestrial (energy production) application. The technology is a combined process that involves steam electrolysis, CO2 electrolysis, and the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Two process models were developed to evaluate novel approaches for waster recovery in a life support system. The first is a model INL co-electrolysis process combined with a methanol production process. The second is the INL co-electrolysis process combined with a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process. For both processes, the overall power increases as the syngas ratio, H2/CO, increases because more water is needed to produce more hydrogen at a set CO2 incoming flow rate. The power for the methanol cases is less than the PSA because heat is available from the methanol reactor to preheat the water and carbon dioxide entering the co-electrolysis process.

Michael G. McKellar; Rick A. Wood; Carl M. Stoots; Lila Mulloth; Bernadette Luna

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

THE MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF A NOVEL APPROACH TO MAXIMIZE WASTE RECOVERY IN A LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NASA has been evaluating closed-loop atmosphere revitalization architectures that include carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction technologies. The CO2 and steam (H2O) co-electrolysis process is one of the reduction options that NASA has investigated. Utilizing recent advances in the fuel cell technology sector, the Idaho National Laboratory, INL, has developed a CO2 and H2O co-electrolysis process to produce oxygen and syngas (carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2) mixture) for terrestrial (energy production) application. The technology is a combined process that involves steam electrolysis, CO2 electrolysis, and the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Two process models were developed to evaluate novel approaches for energy storage and resource recovery in a life support system. In the first model, products from the INL co-electrolysis process are combined to produce methanol fuel. In the second co-electrolysis, products are separated with a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process. In both models the fuels are burned with added oxygen to produce H2O and CO2, the original reactants. For both processes, the overall power increases as the syngas ratio, H2/CO, increases because more water is needed to produce more hydrogen at a set CO2 incoming flow rate. The power for the methanol cases is less than pressure swing adsorption, PSA, because heat is available from the methanol reactor to preheat the water and carbon dioxide entering the co-electrolysis process.

Michael G. McKellar; Rick A. Wood; Carl M. Stoots; Lila Mulloth; Bernadette Luna

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Compact Ceramic Heat Exchangers for Corrosive Waste Gas Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of large ceramic heat exchangers is described and performance data given for units installed on steel industry soaking pits in the U.K. Operational experience since 1973 confirms that ceramic heat exchangers capable of operating with high airside pressures have long lives and low maintenance even when operating with dirty gases at 1350 deg. C and preheating combustion air to 800 deg. C. The design of compact units suitable for factory assembly is also described. Units have been developed for low temperature corrosive gas situations and have been applied to the pottery industry and are being developed for coal fired air heaters for the food industry.

Laws, W. R.; Reed, G. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FOR A COLLEGE CAMPUS THE HARRISONBURG, VIRGINIA WASTE-TO-ENERGY FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of installing the super-heaters, cooling towers, condensers and auxiliary equipment needed to make and cooling needs of the campus. This facility also has a small turbine that can be brought on line to produce Madison University central heating & cooling system. This facility uses a mass-burn style waste combustion

Columbia University

391

Nuclear heat-load limits for above-grade storage of solid transuranium wastes  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear safety and heat load limits were established for above-grade storage of transuranium (TRU) wastes. Nuclear safety limits were obtained from a study by J.L. Forstner and are summarized. Heat load limits are based on temperature calculations for TRU waste drums stored in concrete containers (hats), and results are summarized. Waste already in storage is within these limits. The limiting factors for individual drum heat load limits were (1) avoidance of temperatures in excess of 190/sup 0/F (decomposition temperature of anion resin) when anion resin is present in a concrete hat, and (2) avoidance of temperatures in excess of 450/sup 0/F (ignition temperature of paper) at any point inside a waste drum. The limiting factor for concrete had heat load limits was avoidance of temperatures in excess of 265/sup 0/F (melt point of high density polyethylene) at the drum liners. A temperature profile for drums and hats filled to recommended limits is shown. Equations and assumptions used were conservative.

Clontz, B.G.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Revised fact sheet describes the transpired solar collector that was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

393

Furnace and Heat Recovery Area Design and Analysis for Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the furnace and heat recovery area design and analysis task of the Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler study is to optimize the location and design of the furnace, burners, over-fire gas ports, and internal radiant surfaces. The furnace and heat recovery area were designed and analyzed using the FW-FIRE and HEATEX computer programs. The furnace is designed with opposed wall-firing burners and over-fire air ports. Water is circulated in the furnace by natural circulation to the waterwalls and divisional wall panels. Compared to the air-fired furnace, the oxygen-fired furnace requires only 65% of the surface area and 45% of the volume. Two oxygen-fired designs were simulated: (1) without over-fire air and (2) with 20% over-fire air. The maximum wall heat flux in the oxygen-fired furnace is more than double that of the air-fired furnace due to the higher flame temperature and higher H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} concentrations. The coal burnout for the oxygen-fired case is 100% due to a 500 F higher furnace temperature and higher concentration of O{sub 2}. Because of the higher furnace wall temperature of the oxygen-fired case compared to the air-fired case, furnace water wall material was upgraded from carbon steel to T91. The total heat transfer surface required in the oxygen-fired heat recovery area (HRA) is 25% less than the air-fired HRA due to more heat being absorbed in the oxygen-fired furnace and the greater molecular weight of the oxygen-fired flue gas. The HRA tube materials and wall thickness are practically the same for the air-fired and oxygen-fired design since the flue gas and water/steam temperature profiles encountered by the heat transfer banks are very similar.

Andrew Seltzer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Emission Control and Elimination Through The Use Of Condensation and Heat Recovery Technologies- A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing regulatory air requirements have created potential restrictions on current and future plant operations. Any process design that allows for the elimination of discharge points and the reduction of emissions at a major source can affect the strategic planning for the facility. This can provide critical flexibility, especially in fast-paced markets. Such a process design and implementation were undertaken at a ceramic capacitor manufacturing facility. This facility utilizes multiple small-scale solvent drying processes that emit volatile organic compounds (VOC's). These exhausts could be recirculated for the purposes of emission point elimination, heat recovery and solvent reuse. The aim was to create an environmental control process which would pay for itself within two to three years. An assessment of the alternatives was completed and standard HVAC-type condensation was selected. The unit operations for the proposed process consisted of a high efficiency air-to-air heat exchanger, cooling coil and a chiller. The air passing across the heat exchanger and coil would begin to dehumidify. In addition, solvents contained in the air stream would begin to condense to some equilibrium level and would be absorbed in the condensing water. Eventually, since there would be no addition of water in the process, the level of water in the condensate would fall off dramatically. A prototype unit capable of handling three ovens with a total air flow of 1200 ft3/min (cfm) was installed. The unit performed as expected with the exception that condensate concentrations remained low. Product testing was undertaken to ensure that returning air containing a low level of solvent would not adversely affect drying operations or product qualities. No adverse effects were found. Monitoring of the air stream verified solvent levels well below 5% of the lower explosive limit. Finally, a large-scale unit was constructed capable of handling up to 171 ovens at up to 68,000 cfm at a cost of $1.2M. At current levels of integration, cost avoidance (savings) performance is within 2% of predicted values. Projected payback is 18 months. Estimated volatile organic compound emission reduction is 100 tons per year.

Madewell, A. E.; Bullock, W. N.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Pyrolysis of plastic packaging waste: A comparison of plastic residuals from material recovery facilities with simulated plastic waste  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrolysis of plastic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of different samples: real waste, simulated and real waste + catalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of the effects of inorganic components in the pyrolysis products. - Abstract: Pyrolysis may be an alternative for the reclamation of rejected streams of waste from sorting plants where packing and packaging plastic waste is separated and classified. These rejected streams consist of many different materials (e.g., polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), aluminum, tetra-brik, and film) for which an attempt at complete separation is not technically possible or economically viable, and they are typically sent to landfills or incinerators. For this study, a simulated plastic mixture and a real waste sample from a sorting plant were pyrolyzed using a non-stirred semi-batch reactor. Red mud, a byproduct of the aluminum industry, was used as a catalyst. Despite the fact that the samples had a similar volume of material, there were noteworthy differences in the pyrolysis yields. The real waste sample resulted, after pyrolysis, in higher gas and solid yields and consequently produced less liquid. There were also significant differences noted in the compositions of the compared pyrolysis products.

Adrados, A., E-mail: aitziber_adrados@ehu.es [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Marco, I. de; Caballero, B.M.; Lopez, A.; Laresgoiti, M.F.; Torres, A. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Status of waste heat utilization and dual-purpose plant projects  

SciTech Connect

From joint meeting of the American Nuclear Society and the Atomic Industrial Forum and Nuclear Energy Exhibition; San Francisco, California, USA (11 Nov 1973). The use of power plant thermal effluents, in the form of warm water or steam, to heat buildings for raising both plant and animal food crops, in aquaculture to produce fish and seafood, in outdoor agriculture, and in industry for distilling water and processing chemicals is discussed and illustrated. Facilities engaged in studying each of these waste heat applications and the results of such studies are described. It is concluded that rising energy costs and diminishing natural supplies of food will provide the incentive for the funther development of commercial uses of waste heat from power plants. (LC L)

Beall, S.E. Jr.; Yarosh, M.M.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Energy recovery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an improved wet air oxidation system and method for reducing the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of waste water used from scrubbers of coal gasification plants, with this COD reduction being sufficient to effectively eliminate waste water as an environmental pollutant. The improvement of the present invention is provided by heating the air used in the oxidation process to a temperature substantially equal to the temperature in the oxidation reactor before compressing or pressurizing the air. The compression of the already hot air further heats the air which is then passed in heat exchange with gaseous products of the oxidation reaction for "superheating" the gaseous products prior to the use thereof in turbines as the driving fluid. The superheating of the gaseous products significantly minimizes condensation of gaseous products in the turbine so as to provide a substantially greater recovery of mechanical energy from the process than heretofore achieved.

Moore, Albert S. (Morgantown, WV); Verhoff, Francis H. (Morgantown, WV)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Repowering Fossil Steam Plants with Gas Turbines and Heat Recovery Steam Generators: Design Considerations, Economics, and Lessons L earned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes repowering fossil steam plants using gas turbines (GTs) and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) in combined-cycle mode. Design considerations and guidance, comparative economics, and lessons learned in the development of such projects are included. Various other methods of fossil plant repowering with GTs are also briefly discussed. The detailed results and comparisons that are provided relate specifically to a generic GT/HRSG repowering. Design parameters, limitations, schedulin...

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cascaded organic rankine cycles for waste heat utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pair of organic Rankine cycle systems (20, 25) are combined and their respective organic working fluids are chosen such that the organic working fluid of the first organic Rankine cycle is condensed at a condensation temperature that is well above the boiling point of the organic working fluid of the second organic Rankine style system, and a single common heat exchanger (23) is used for both the condenser of the first organic Rankine cycle system and the evaporator of the second organic Rankine cycle system. A preferred organic working fluid of the first system is toluene and that of the second organic working fluid is R245fa.

Radcliff, Thomas D. (Vernon, CT); Biederman, Bruce P. (West Hartford, CT); Brasz, Joost J. (Fayetteville, NY)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

400

Recovery of solid fuel from municipal solid waste by hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water was studied to recover solid fuel from MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More than 75% of carbon in MSW was recovered as char. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heating value of char was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyvinyl chloride was decomposed at 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa and was removed by washing. - Abstract: Hydrothermal treatments using subcritical water (HTSW) such as that at 234 Degree-Sign C and 3 MPa (LT condition) and 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa (HT condition) were investigated to recover solid fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW). Printing paper, dog food (DF), wooden chopsticks, and mixed plastic film and sheets of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene were prepared as model MSW components, in which polyvinylchloride (PVC) powder and sodium chloride were used to simulate Cl sources. While more than 75% of carbon in paper, DF, and wood was recovered as char under both LT and HT conditions, plastics did not degrade under either LT or HT conditions. The heating value (HV) of obtained char was 13,886-27,544 kJ/kg and was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Higher formation of fixed carbon and greater oxygen dissociation during HTSW were thought to improve the HV of char. Cl atoms added as PVC powder and sodium chloride to raw material remained in char after HTSW. However, most Cl originating from PVC was found to converse into soluble Cl compounds during HTSW under the HT condition and could be removed by washing. From these results, the merit of HTSW as a method of recovering solid fuel from MSW is considered to produce char with minimal carbon loss without a drying process prior to HTSW. In addition, Cl originating from PVC decomposes into soluble Cl compound under the HT condition. The combination of HTSW under the HT condition and char washing might improve the quality of char as alternative fuel.

Hwang, In-Hee, E-mail: hwang@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan); Aoyama, Hiroya; Matsuto, Toshihiko; Nakagishi, Tatsuhiro; Matsuo, Takayuki [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Using Biosurfactants Produced from Agriculture Process Waste Streams to Improve Oil Recovery in Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of our research during the first 30 months (10/01/2004 to 03/31/2007) of the original three-year project cycle. The project was terminated early due to DOE budget cuts. This was a joint project between the Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) at the University of Kansas and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective was to evaluate the use of low-cost biosurfactants produced from agriculture process waste streams to improve oil recovery in fractured carbonate reservoirs through wettability mediation. Biosurfactant for this project was produced using Bacillus subtilis 21332 and purified potato starch as the growth medium. The INL team produced the biosurfactant and characterized it as surfactin. INL supplied surfactin as required for the tests at KU as well as providing other microbiological services. Interfacial tension (IFT) between Soltrol 130 and both potential benchmark chemical surfactants and crude surfactin was measured over a range of concentrations. The performance of the crude surfactin preparation in reducing IFT was greater than any of the synthetic compounds throughout the concentration range studied but at low concentrations, sodium laureth sulfate (SLS) was closest to the surfactin, and was used as the benchmark in subsequent studies. Core characterization was carried out using both traditional flooding techniques to find porosity and permeability; and NMR/MRI to image cores and identify pore architecture and degree of heterogeneity. A cleaning regime was identified and developed to remove organic materials from cores and crushed carbonate rock. This allowed cores to be fully characterized and returned to a reproducible wettability state when coupled with a crude-oil aging regime. Rapid wettability assessments for crushed matrix material were developed, and used to inform slower Amott wettability tests. Initial static absorption experiments exposed limitations in the use of HPLC and TOC to determine surfactant concentrations. To reliably quantify both benchmark surfactants and surfactin, a surfactant ion-selective electrode was used as an indicator in the potentiometric titration of the anionic surfactants with Hyamine 1622. The wettability change mediated by dilute solutions of a commercial preparation of SLS (STEOL CS-330) and surfactin was assessed using two-phase separation, and water flotation techniques; and surfactant loss due to retention and adsorption on the rock was determined. Qualitative tests indicated that on a molar basis, surfactin is more effective than STEOL CS-330 in altering wettability of crushed Lansing-Kansas City carbonates from oil-wet to water-wet state. Adsorption isotherms of STEOL CS-330 and surfactin on crushed Lansing-Kansas City outcrop and reservoir material showed that surfactin has higher specific adsorption on these oomoldic carbonates. Amott wettability studies confirmed that cleaned cores are mixed-wet, and that the aging procedure renders them oil-wet. Tests of aged cores with no initial water saturation resulted in very little spontaneous oil production, suggesting that water-wet pathways into the matrix are required for wettability change to occur. Further investigation of spontaneous imbibition and forced imbibition of water and surfactant solutions into LKC cores under a variety of conditions--cleaned vs. crude oil-aged; oil saturated vs. initial water saturation; flooded with surfactant vs. not flooded--indicated that in water-wet or intermediate wet cores, sodium laureth sulfate is more effective at enhancing spontaneous imbibition through wettability change. However, in more oil-wet systems, surfactin at the same concentration performs significantly better.

Stephen Johnson; Mehdi Salehi; Karl Eisert; Sandra Fox

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

Heat-pipe effect on the transport of gaseous radionuclides released from a nuclear waste container  

SciTech Connect

When an unsaturated porous medium is subjected to a temperature gradient and the temperature is sufficiently high, vadose water is heated and vaporizes. Vapor flows under its pressure gradient towards colder regions where it condenses. Vaporization and condensation produce a liquid saturation gradient, creating a capillary pressure gradient inside the porous medium. Condensate flows towards the hot end under the influence of a capillary pressure gradient. This is a heat pipe in an unsaturated porous medium. We study analytically the transport of gaseous species released from a spent-fuel waste package, as affected by a time-dependent heat pipe in an unsaturated rock. For parameter values typical of a potential repository in partially saturated fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, we found that a heat pipe develops shortly after waste is buried, and the heat-pipe`s spatial extent is time-dependent. Water vapor movements produced by the heat pipe can significantly affect the migration of gaseous radionuclides. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Zhou, W.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Final Scientific/Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large centralized geothermal heat pump system was installed to provide ice making, space cooling, space heating, process water heating, and domestic hot water heating for an ice arena in Eagan Minnesota. This paper provides information related to the design and construction of the project. Additionally, operating conditions for 12 months after start-up are provided.

Nick Rosenberry, Harris Companies

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

404

Waste Equals Food: Developing a Sustainable Agriculture Support Cluster for a Proposed Resource Recovery Park in Puerto Rico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes and makes recommendations for plans to develop an eco-industrial park (EIP) in Puerto Rico. This project began with two basic goals: first, to supply cheaper energy to the island, which has suffered economic losses due to expensive energy; and second, to deal with the solid waste management problem. Thus, a proposal for a waste-to-energy (WTE) facility entered the picture, and close behind came an ambitious plan to convert the surrounding area into an EIP to be called the Renova Resource Recovery Park (RRRP). The EIP has been designed to include industries such as an existing paper mill, a steel casting plant, and a cement kiln. However, given the fact that the proposed site of RRRP is on abandoned sugar cane land, a new member was proposed – a sustainable agriculture cluster.

Alethea Abuyuan; Iona Hawken; Michael Newkirk; Roger Williams

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Kinetics Study on the Hydrometallurgical Recovery of Vanadium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this research, recovery of vanadium from LD converter slag of steelmaking plant ... of the Chemical Changes and Surface Properties of Carbonated Waste Cement ... Flux for Basic Oxygen Steel Making Using Waste Oxides of Steel Plant ... Heat Treatment of Black Dross for the Production of a Value Added Material - A

406

Ris DTU 09-06-08 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-to-energy technologies in the Pan-European NEEDS- TIMES model Waste incineration for electricity and heat, landfill gas legislation on waste Directives · Waste Framework Directive, 1975 (75/442/EEC) · Directive on the landfill be accepted as recovery) Avoid · Landfill #12;Risø DTU 09-06-08 4 European waste model Econometric model

407

Potential use of wood and agriculture wastes as steam generator fuel for thermal enhanced oil recovery. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Enhanced oil recovery by steam injection methods produces over 200,000 barrels per day of crude oil in California. A sizeable portion of the produced crude, up to 40% for some projects, may be burned to generate steam for injection into the reservoir. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential to use wood and agriculture wastes to replace crude oil as steam generator fuel. The Bakersfield area of California's San Joaquin Valley is the focus for this paper. Production from thermal EOR methods centers around Bakersfield and agriculture and wood wastes are available from the San Joaquin Valley and the nearby Sierra Nevada mountains. This paper documents the production of waste materials by county, estimated energy value of each material, and estimated transportation cost for each material. Both agriculture and wood wastes were found to be available in sizeable quantities and could become attractive steam generation fuels. However, some qualifications need to be made on the use of these materials. Transportation costs will probably limit the range of shipping these materials to perhaps 50 to 100 miles. Availability is subject to competition from existing and developing uses of these materials, such as energy sources in their immediate production area. Existing steam generators probably cannot be retrofitted to burn these materials. Fluidized bed combustion, or low Btu gasification, may be a good technology for utilization. FBC or FBG could accept a variety of waste materials. This will be important because the amount of any single waste may not be large enough to support the energy requirements of a good size thermal f a good size thermal EOR operation.

Kosstrin, H.M.; McDonald, R.K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Rankine cycle energy conversion system design considerations for low and intermediate temperature sensible heat sources. Geothermal, waste heat, and solar thermal conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design considerations are described for energy conversion systems for low and intermediate temperature sensible heat sources such as found in geothermal, waste heat, and solar-thermal applications. It is concluded that the most cost effective designs for the applications studied did not require the most efficient thermodynamic cycle, but that the efficiency of the energy conversion hardware can be a key factor.

Abbin, J.P. Jr.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Waste Heat from Distributed Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project was the development of ionic liquids to capture and utilize waste heat from distributed power generation systems. Ionic Liquids (ILs) are organic salts that are liquid at room temperature and they have the potential to make fundamental and far-reaching changes in the way we use energy. In particular, the focus of this project was fundamental research on the potential use of IL/CO2 mixtures in absorption-refrigeration systems. Such systems can provide cooling by utilizing waste heat from various sources, including distributed power generation. The basic objectives of the research were to design and synthesize ILs appropriate for the task, to measure and model thermophysical properties and phase behavior of ILs and IL/CO2 mixtures, and to model the performance of IL/CO2 absorption-refrigeration systems.

Joan F. Brennecke; Mihir Sen; Edward J. Maginn; Samuel Paolucci; Mark A. Stadtherr; Peter T. Disser; Mike Zdyb

2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

410

Incorporating Cold Cap Behavior in a Joule-heated Waste Glass Melter Model  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, an overview of Joule-heated waste glass melters used in the vitrification of high level waste (HLW) is presented, with a focus on the cold cap region. This region, in which feed-to-glass conversion reactions occur, is critical in determining the melting properties of any given glass melter. An existing 1D computer model of the cold cap, implemented in MATLAB, is described in detail. This model is a standalone model that calculates cold cap properties based on boundary conditions at the top and bottom of the cold cap. Efforts to couple this cold cap model with a 3D STAR-CCM+ model of a Joule-heated melter are then described. The coupling is being implemented in ModelCenter, a software integration tool. The ultimate goal of this model is to guide the specification of melter parameters that optimize glass quality and production rate.

Varija Agarwal; Donna Post Guillen

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Waste Classification based on Waste Form Heat Generation in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles Using the Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT) Model  

SciTech Connect

This study explores the impact of wastes generated from potential future fuel cycles and the issues presented by classifying these under current classification criteria, and discusses the possibility of a comprehensive and consistent characteristics-based classification framework based on new waste streams created from advanced fuel cycles. A static mass flow model, Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT), was used to calculate the composition of waste streams resulting from different nuclear fuel cycle choices. This analysis focuses on the impact of waste form heat load on waste classification practices, although classifying by metrics of radiotoxicity, mass, and volume is also possible. The value of separation of heat-generating fission products and actinides in different fuel cycles is discussed. It was shown that the benefits of reducing the short-term fission-product heat load of waste destined for geologic disposal are neglected under the current source-based radioactive waste classification system , and that it is useful to classify waste streams based on how favorable the impact of interim storage is in increasing repository capacity.

Denia Djokic; Steven J. Piet; Layne F. Pincock; Nick R. Soelberg

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Heat recovery and thermal storage : a study of the Massachusetts State Transportation Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the energy system at the Massachusetts State Transportation Building was conducted. This innovative energy system utilizes internal-source heat pumps and a water thermal storage system to provide building heating ...

Bjorklund, Abbe Ellen

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Novel selective surface flow (SSF{sup TM}) membranes for the recovery of hydrogren from waste gas streams. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The waste streams are off-gas streams from various chemical/refinery operations. In Phase I, the architecture of the membrane and the separation device were defined and demonstrated. The system consists of a shell-and-tube separator in which the gas to be separated is fed to the tube side, the product is collected as high pressure effluent and the permeate constitutes the waste/fuel stream. Each tube, which has the membrane coated on the interior, does the separation. A multi- tube separator device containing 1 ft{sup 2} membrane area was built and tested. The engineering data were used for designing a process for hydrogen recovery from a fluid catalytic cracker off-gas stream. First-pass economics showed that overall cost for hydrogen production is reduced by 35% vs on-purpose production of hydrogen by steam- methane reforming. The hydrogen recovery process using the SSF membrane results in at least 15% energy reduction and significant decrease in CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions.

Anand, M. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) of waste heat operated vapour absorption air conditioning system (VARS) incorporated in a building cogeneration system is presented and discussed. The life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) based on present worth cost (PWC) method, which covers the initial costs, operating costs, maintenance costs, replacement costs and salvage values is the useful tool to merit various cooling and power generation systems for building applications. A life cycle of 23 years was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller is estimated to be US $ 1.5 million which is about 71.5 % low compared to electric powered conventional vapour compression chiller. From the analysis it was found that the initial cost of VARS system was 125 % higher than that of VCRS, while the PWC of operating cost of VARS was 78.2 % lower compared to VCRS. The result shows that the waste heat operated VARS would be preferable from the view point of operating cost and green house gas emission reduction.

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Advanced Multi-Effect Distillation System for Desalination Using Waste Heat fromGas Brayton Cycles  

SciTech Connect

Generation IV high temperature reactor systems use closed gas Brayton Cycles to realize high thermal efficiency in the range of 40% to 60%. The waste heat is removed through coolers by water at substantially greater average temperature than in conventional Rankine steam cycles. This paper introduces an innovative Advanced Multi-Effect Distillation (AMED) design that can enable the production of substantial quantities of low-cost desalinated water using waste heat from closed gas Brayton cycles. A reference AMED design configuration, optimization models, and simplified economics analysis are presented. By using an AMED distillation system the waste heat from closed gas Brayton cycles can be fully utilized to desalinate brackish water and seawater without affecting the cycle thermal efficiency. Analysis shows that cogeneration of electricity and desalinated water can increase net revenues for several Brayton cycles while generating large quantities of potable water. The AMED combining with closed gas Brayton cycles could significantly improve the sustainability and economics of Generation IV high temperature reactors.

Haihua Zhao; Per F. Peterson

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Furnace and Heat Recovery Area Design and Analysis for Conceptual Design of Supercritical O2-Based PC Boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the furnace and heat recovery area design and analysis task of the Conceptual Design of Supercritical Oxygen-Based PC Boiler study is to optimize the location and design of the furnace, burners, over-fire gas ports, and internal radiant surfaces. The furnace and heat recovery area were designed and analyzed using the FW-FIRE, Siemens, and HEATEX computer programs. The furnace is designed with opposed wall-firing burners and over-fire air ports. Water is circulated in the furnace by forced circulation to the waterwalls at the periphery and divisional wall panels within the furnace. Compared to the air-fired furnace, the oxygen-fired furnace requires only 65% of the surface area and 45% of the volume. Two oxygen-fired designs were simulated: (1) with cryogenic air separation unit (ASU) and (2) with oxygen ion transport membrane (OITM). The maximum wall heat flux in the oxygen-fired furnace is more than double that of the air-fired furnace due to the higher flame temperature and higher H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} concentrations. The coal burnout for the oxygen-fired case is 100% due to a 500 F higher furnace temperature and higher concentration of O{sub 2}. Because of the higher furnace wall temperature of the oxygen-fired case compared to the air-fired case, furnace water wall material was upgraded from T2 to T92. Compared to the air-fired heat recovery area (HRA), the oxygen-fired HRA total heat transfer surface is 35% less for the cryogenic design and 13% less for the OITM design due to more heat being absorbed in the oxygen-fired furnace and the greater molecular weight of the oxygen-fired flue gas. The HRA tube materials and wall thickness are nearly the same for the air-fired and oxygen-fired design since the flue gas and water/steam temperature profiles encountered by the heat transfer banks are similar.

Andrew Seltzer

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Reverse logistics and large-scale material recovery from electronics waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste consolidation is a crucial step in the development of cost-effective, nation-wide material reclamation networks. This thesis project investigates typical and conformational tendencies of a hypothetical end-of-life ...

Krones, Jonathan Seth

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Recovery of fissile materials from plutonium residues, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes  

SciTech Connect

A new process is proposed that converts complex feeds containing fissile materials into a chemical form that allows the use of existing technologies (such as PUREX and ion exchange) to recover the fissile materials and convert the resultant wastes to glass. Potential feed materials include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and (3) uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, and organics. 14 refs., 4 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

SOLIDIFICATION OF THE HANFORD LAW WASTE STREAM PRODUCED AS A RESULT OF NEAR-TANK CONTINUOUS SLUDGE LEACHING AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE RECOVERY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), is responsible for the remediation and stabilization of the Hanford Site tank farms, including 53 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wasted waste contained in 177 underground tanks. The plan calls for all waste retrieved from the tanks to be transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The WTP will consist of three primary facilities including pretreatment facilities for Low Activity Waste (LAW) to remove aluminum, chromium and other solids and radioisotopes that are undesirable in the High Level Waste (HLW) stream. Removal of aluminum from HLW sludge can be accomplished through continuous sludge leaching of the aluminum from the HLW sludge as sodium aluminate; however, this process will introduce a significant amount of sodium hydroxide into the waste stream and consequently will increase the volume of waste to be dispositioned. A sodium recovery process is needed to remove the sodium hydroxide and recycle it back to the aluminum dissolution process. The resulting LAW waste stream has a high concentration of aluminum and sodium and will require alternative immobilization methods. Five waste forms were evaluated for immobilization of LAW at Hanford after the sodium recovery process. The waste forms considered for these two waste streams include low temperature processes (Saltstone/Cast stone and geopolymers), intermediate temperature processes (steam reforming and phosphate glasses) and high temperature processes (vitrification). These immobilization methods and the waste forms produced were evaluated for (1) compliance with the Performance Assessment (PA) requirements for disposal at the IDF, (2) waste form volume (waste loading), and (3) compatibility with the tank farms and systems. The iron phosphate glasses tested using the product consistency test had normalized release rates lower than the waste form requirements although the CCC glasses had higher release rates than the quenched glasses. However, the waste form failed to meet the vapor hydration test criteria listed in the WTP contract. In addition, the waste loading in the phosphate glasses were not as high as other candidate waste forms. Vitrification of HLW waste as borosilicate glass is a proven process; however the HLW and LAW streams at Hanford can vary significantly from waste currently being immobilized. The ccc glasses show lower release rates for B and Na than the quenched glasses and all glasses meet the acceptance criterion of < 4 g/L. Glass samples spiked with Re{sub 2}O{sub 7} also passed the PCT test. However, further vapor hydration testing must be performed since all the samples cracked and the test could not be performed. The waste loading of the iron phosphate and borosilicate glasses are approximately 20 and 25% respectively. The steam reforming process produced the predicted waste form for both the high and low aluminate waste streams. The predicted waste loadings for the monolithic samples is approximately 39%, which is higher than the glass waste forms; however, at the time of this report, no monolithic samples were made and therefore compliance with the PA cannot be determined. The waste loading in the geopolymer is approximately 40% but can vary with the sodium hydroxide content in the waste stream. Initial geopolymer mixes revealed compressive strengths that are greater than 500 psi for the low aluminate mixes and less than 500 psi for the high aluminate mixes. Further work testing needs to be performed to formulate a geopolymer waste form made using a high aluminate salt solution. A cementitious waste form has the advantage that the process is performed at ambient conditions and is a proven process currently in use for LAW disposal. The Saltstone/Cast Stone formulated using low and high aluminate salt solutions retained at least 97% of the Re that was added to the mix as a dopant. While this data is promising, additional leaching testing must be performed to show compliance with the PA. Compressive strength tests must also be performed on the Cast Ston

Reigel, M.; Johnson, F.; Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

420

Application of the VRV Air-Conditioning System Heat Recovery Series in Interior Zone and Analysis of its Energy Saving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To reduce the energy consumption of air conditioning systems, we can use the VRV air conditioning system to supply cold loads in the winter for rooms in the construction inner zone where cold loads need to be supplied. The VRV air-conditioning system of variable frequency technology can achieve the effect of energy conservation. In this article, we analyze the application of the VRV air conditioning system heat recovery series in the construction inner zone and its energy saving characteristics via a project example.

Zhang, Q.; Li, D.; Zhang, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste heat recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy recovery during expansion of compressed gas using power plant low-quality heat sources  

SciTech Connect

A method of recovering energy from a cool compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid is disclosed which includes incrementally expanding the compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid through a plurality of expansion engines and heating the gas, vapor, compressed liquid, or supercritical fluid entering at least one of the expansion engines with a low quality heat source. Expansion engines such as turbines and multiple expansions with heating are disclosed.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); O' Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR)

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

422

New Technology Demonstration of Microturbine with Heat Recovery at Fort Drum, New York  

SciTech Connect

This report replaces PNNL-14417 and documents a project to demonstrate and evaluate a combined heat and power-configured microturbine system.

Friedrich, Michele; Armstrong, Peter R.; Smith, David L.

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

Resource recovery potential from secondary components of segregated municipal solid wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for decentralized biogas plants to be operated in the vicinity. We characterized the fermen- tation potential of six differently for each of the feedstocks to obtain a higher gas recovery. Bagasse produced the largest fraction-systems. The existing centralized collection and open landfill systems are gradually becoming expensive and will need

Columbia University

424

Recovery of Valuable Chlorosilane Intermediates by a Novel Waste Conversion Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From 1994 to 2001, Dow Corning studied a waste recycling process to recover direct process residues (DPR) resulting from the production of silicone precursors. Over the course of eight years, Dow Corning constructed and operated a pilot plant, a small scale commercial plant, and a full scale plant. The process reacts DPR with hydrogen and chlorosilane monomers at high temperature and high pressure. The process converted 85% of the DPR to valuable chlorosilane monomers such as dimethyldichlorosilane and methyldichlorosilane. When feeding methyltrichlorosilane, the process converted 30% of the MeSiCl3 to other monomers. Alternate co-feed monomers were tested. By converting waste DPR to valuable intermediates, the technology significantly reduces waste from the basic silicones manufacturing process.

J. Ashley Brinson

2002-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

425

2011 CERN Waste Heat EN-CV February 28th 2011 Power Dissipated by the Cooling Towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2011 CERN Waste Heat EN-CV February 28th 2012 1 2011 Power Dissipated by the Cooling Towers The cooling circuits at CERN use evaporative open cooling towers to discharge into the atmosphere the heat towers per complex depend on the amount of cooling power required. LHC one cooling tower per even LHC

Wu, Sau Lan

426

Novel Solvent for the Simultaneous recovery of Radioactive Nuclides from Liquid Radioactive Wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to solvents, and methods, for selectively extracting and recovering radionuclides, especially cesium and strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive wastes. More specifically, the invention relates to extracting agent solvent compositions comprising complex organoboron compounds, substituted polyethylene glycols, and neutral organophosphorus compounds in a diluent. The preferred solvent comprises a chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, diphenyl-dibutylmethylenecarbamoylphosphine oxide, PEG-400, and a diluent of phenylpolyfluoroalkyl sulfone. The invention also provides a method of using the invention extracting agents to recover cesium, strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive waste.

Romanovskiy, Valeriy Nicholiavich; Smirnov, Lgor V.; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Todd, Terry A.; Brewer, Ken N.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

427

A Chronology of the Nashville, Tennessee Incinerator with Heat Recovery and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

densers and rejects the surplus heat to the chilling plant cooling tower system. Surplus steam may also disposal hopper. Bleed from the cooling towers is used for makeup to the scrubber recirculation system Heating and Cooling Facility MAURICE J. WILSON I. C. Thomasson & Associates, 1 nco Nashville, Tennessee

Columbia University

428

Heat Pipe Technology for Energy Conservation in the Process Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many applications for heat pipe technology have emerged in the relatively short time this technology has been known. Heat pipes incorporated in heat exchangers have been used in tens of thousands of successful heat recovery systems. These systems range from residential and commercial air-to-air heat exchangers to giant air preheaters for the process and utility industries. The heat pipe offers a unique, efficient heat transfer device that can recover valuable thermal energy resulting in reduced equipment and operating costs. Q-dot is the world leader in heat pipe technology and we have applied our expertise in engineering heat recovery products for the process industry. This paper discusses two such products, the heat pipe air preheater and waste heat recovery boiler. These heat pipe products have been used in many successful installations all over the world and some important, distinctive features of these systems will be presented.

Price, B. L. Jr.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Preliminary market analysis for Brayton cycle heat recovery system characterization program. Subtask 5. 2 of phase I program plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the task is to determine the market potential of the Brayton-cycle Subatmospheric System (SAS), especially as applied to the glass processing industry. Areas which impact the sales of the Brayton-cycle systems examined are: market size; opportunities for waste heat system installation (furnace rebuild and repair); pollution control on glass furnaces; equipment costs; equipment performance; and market growth potential. Supporting data were compiled for the glass industry inventory and are presented in Appendix A. Emission control techniques in the glass industry are discussed in Appendix B. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-08-31T23:59:59.000Z