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1

Hydraulic waste energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water distribution systems are typically a municipality's largest consumer of energy and greatest expense. The water distribution network has varying pressure requirements due to the age of the pipeline and topographical differences. Certain circumstances require installation of pressure reducing devices in the pipeline to lower the water pressure in the system. The consequence of this action is that the hydraulic energy supplied by the high lift or booster pumps is wasted in the process of reducing the pressure. A possible solution to capture the waste hydraulic energy is to install an in-line electricity generating turbine. Energy recovery using in-line turbine systems is an emerging technology. Due to the lack of technical and other relevant information on in-line turbine system installations, questions of constructability and legal issues over the power service contract have yet to be answered. This study seeks to resolve these questions and document the findings so that other communities may utilize this information. 10 figs.

Lederer, C.C.; Thomas, A.H.; McGuire, J.L. (Detroit Buildings and Safety Engineering Dept., MI (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Hydraulic waste energy recovery, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy required for booster station operation is supplied by the electrical utility company and has an associated cost. Energy removed by pressure reducing valves in the system is lost or wasted. The objective of this project is to capture the wasted hydraulic energy with in-line turbines. In this application, the in-line turbines act as pressure reducing valves while removing energy from the water distribution system and converting it to electrical energy. The North Service Center pumping station was selected for the pilot program due to the availability of a wide range in pressure drop and flow, which are necessary for hydraulic energy recovery. The research performed during this project resulted in documentation of technical, economic, installation, and operational information necessary for local government officials to make an informed judgement as it relates to in-line turbine generation.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Energy Recovery from Municipal Solid WasteEnergy Recovery from Municipal Solid Waste WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADAWASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Recovery from Municipal Solid WasteEnergy Recovery from Municipal Solid Waste WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADAWASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADA #12;UNIQUE PROCESSUNIQUE PROCESS DEVELOPED PRIMARY SIZE REDUCTION Stones / Inert Soil Enricher COARSE FLUFF SORTING Large stone, Tyres etc. HOT AIR

Columbia University

4

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: The potential for energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > The amount of waste available for energy recovery is significantly higher than the Unsorted Residual Waste (URW). > Its energy potential is always higher than the complement to 100% of the Source Separation Level (SSL). > Increasing SSL has marginal effects on the potential for energy recovery. > Variations in the composition of the waste fed to WtE plants affect only marginally their performances. > A large WtE plant with a treatment capacity some times higher than a small plant achieves electric efficiency appreciably higher. - Abstract: This article is part of a set of six coordinated papers reporting the main findings of a research project carried out by five Italian universities on 'Material and energy recovery in Integrated Waste Management Systems (IWMS)'. An overview of the project and a summary of the most relevant results can be found in the introductory article of the series. This paper describes the work related to the evaluation of mass and energy balances, which has consisted of three major efforts (i) development of a model for quantifying the energy content and the elemental compositions of the waste streams appearing in a IWMS; (ii) upgrade of an earlier model to predict the performances of Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants; (iii) evaluation of mass and energy balances of all the scenarios and the recovery paths considered in the project. Results show that not only the amount of material available for energy recovery is significantly higher than the Unsorted Residual Waste (URW) left after Separate Collection (SC), because selection and recycling generate significant amounts of residues, but its heating value is higher than that of the original, gross waste. Therefore, the energy potential of what is left after recycling is always higher than the complement to 100% of the Source Separation Level (SSL). Also, increasing SSL has marginal effects on the potential for energy recovery: nearly doubling SSL (from 35% to 65%) reduces the energy potential only by one fourth. Consequently, even at high SSL energy recovery is a fundamental step of a sustainable waste management system. Variations of SSL do bring about variations of the composition, heating value and moisture content of the material fed to WtE plants, but these variations (i) are smaller than one can expect; (ii) have marginal effects on the performances of the WtE plant. These considerations suggest that the mere value of SSL is not a good indicator of the quality of the waste management system, nor of its energy and environmental outcome. Given the well-known dependence of the efficiency of steam power plants with their power output, the efficiency of energy recovery crucially depends on the size of the IWMS served by the WtE plant. A fivefold increase of the amount of gross waste handled in the IWMS (from 150,000 to 750,000 tons per year of gross waste) allows increasing the electric efficiencies of the WtE plant by about 6-7 percentage points (from 21-23% to 28.5% circa).

Consonni, Stefano [Department of Energy, Politecnico di Milano, Via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milan (Italy); LEAP - Laboratorio Energia Ambiente Piacenza, Via Bixio 27, 29100 Piacenza (Italy); Vigano, Federico, E-mail: federico.vigano@polimi.it [Department of Energy, Politecnico di Milano, Via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milan (Italy); LEAP -Laboratorio Energia Ambiente Piacenza, Via Bixio 27, 29100 Piacenza (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

MHRC System Concept ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with...

6

Waste Heat Recovery System: Lightweight Thermal Energy Recovery (LIGHTER) System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GM is using shape memory alloys that require as little as a 10°C temperature difference to convert low-grade waste heat into mechanical energy. When a stretched wire made of shape memory alloy is heated, it shrinks back to its pre-stretched length. When the wire cools back down, it becomes more pliable and can revert to its original stretched shape. This expansion and contraction can be used directly as mechanical energy output or used to drive an electric generator. Shape memory alloy heat engines have been around for decades, but the few devices that engineers have built were too complex, required fluid baths, and had insufficient cycle life for practical use. GM is working to create a prototype that is practical for commercial applications and capable of operating with either air- or fluid-based heat sources. GM’s shape memory alloy based heat engine is also designed for use in a variety of non-vehicle applications. For example, it can be used to harvest non-vehicle heat sources, such as domestic and industrial waste heat and natural geothermal heat, and in HVAC systems and generators.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Hydraulic waste energy recovery, Phase 2. A technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy required for booster station operation is supplied by the electrical utility company and has an associated cost. Energy removed by pressure reducing valves in the system is lost or wasted. The objective of this project is to capture the wasted hydraulic energy with in-line turbines. In this application, the in-line turbines act as pressure reducing valves while removing energy from the water distribution system and converting it to electrical energy. The North Service Center pumping station was selected for the pilot program due to the availability of a wide range in pressure drop and flow, which are necessary for hydraulic energy recovery. The research performed during this project resulted in documentation of technical, economic, installation, and operational information necessary for local government officials to make an informed judgement as it relates to in-line turbine generation.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Immediate Deployment of Waste Energy Recovery Technologies at Multi Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verso Paper Corp. implemented a portfolio of 13 commercially available proven industrial technologies each exceeding 30% minimum threshold efficiency and at least 25% efficiency increase. These sub-projects are a direct result of a grant received from the Department of Energy (DOE) through its FOA 0000044 (Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficient Industrial Equipment), which was funded by the American Recovery Act. These were installed at 3 sites in 2 states and are helping to reduce Verso costs, making the facilities more competitive. This created approximately 100 construction jobs (FTE's) and reduced impacted Verso facilities' expense budgets. These sub-projects were deployed at Verso paper mills located in Jay, Maine, Bucksport, Maine, and Sartell, Minnesota. The paper mills are the economic engines of the rural communities in which these mills are located. Reinvestment in waste energy recovery capital improvements is providing a stimulus to help maintain domestic jobs and to competitively position the US pulp and paper industry with rising energy costs. Energy efficiency improvements are also providing a positive environmental impact by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the quantity of wastewater treated and discharged, and fossil fuel demand. As a result of these projects, when fully operating, Verso realized a total of approximately 1.5 TBtu/Year reduction in overall energy consumption, which is 119% of the project objectives. Note that three paper machines have since been permanently curtailed. However even with these shutdowns, the company still met its energy objectives. Note also that the Sartell mill's paper machine is down due to a recent fire which damaged the mill's electrical infrastructure (the company has not decided on the mill's future).

Dennis Castonguay

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

9

Engine Waste Heat Recovery Concept Demonstration | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof Energy 12, 2004DepartmentWaste Heat Recovery Concept

10

Low Temperature Waste Energy Recovery at Chemical Plants and Refineries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

candidates of waste heat recovery technologies that might have an application in these industries. Four technologies that met the criteria of the Advisory Committee included: organic rankine cycle (ORC), absorption refrigeration and chilling, Kalina cycle...

Ferland, K.; papar, R.; Quinn, J.; Kumar, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Energy efficiency of substance and energy recovery of selected waste fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to reduce the ecological impact of resource exploitation, the EU calls for sustainable options to increase the efficiency and productivity of the utilization of natural resources. This target can only be achieved by considering resource recovery from waste comprehensively. However, waste management measures have to be investigated critically and all aspects of substance-related recycling and energy recovery have to be carefully balanced. This article compares recovery methods for selected waste fractions with regard to their energy efficiency. Whether material recycling or energy recovery is the most energy efficient solution, is a question of particular relevance with regard to the following waste fractions: paper and cardboard, plastics and biowaste and also indirectly metals. For the described material categories material recycling has advantages compared to energy recovery. In accordance with the improved energy efficiency of substance opposed to energy recovery, substance-related recycling causes lower emissions of green house gases. For the fractions paper and cardboard, plastics, biowaste and metals it becomes apparent, that intensification of the separate collection systems in combination with a more intensive use of sorting technologies can increase the extent of material recycling. Collection and sorting systems must be coordinated. The objective of the overall system must be to achieve an optimum of the highest possible recovery rates in combination with a high quality of recyclables. The energy efficiency of substance related recycling of biowaste can be increased by intensifying the use of anaerobic technologies. In order to increase the energy efficiency of the overall system, the energy efficiencies of energy recovery plants must be increased so that the waste unsuitable for substance recycling is recycled or treated with the highest possible energy yield.

Fricke, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.fricke@tu-bs.de [Technical University of Braunschweig, Leichtweiss-Institute, Department of Waste and Resource Management, Beethovenstrasse 51a, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Bahr, Tobias, E-mail: t.bahr@tu-bs.de [Technical University of Braunschweig, Leichtweiss-Institute, Department of Waste and Resource Management, Beethovenstrasse 51a, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Bidlingmaier, Werner, E-mail: werner.bidlingmaier@uni-weimar.de [Bauhaus-Universitaet Weimar, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Waste Management, Coudraystrasse 7, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Springer, Christian, E-mail: christian.springer@uni-weimar.de [Bauhaus-Universitaet Weimar, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Waste Management, Coudraystrasse 7, 99423 Weimar (Germany)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartment ofEnergyEnergyBetterMake Fuels andBiodiesel

13

Energy recovery from solid waste fuels using advanced gasification technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the mid-1980s, TPS Termiska Processer AB has been working on the development of an atmospheric-pressure gasification process. A major aim at the start of this work was the generation of fuel gas from indigenous fuels to Sweden (i.e. biomass). As the economic climate changed and awareness of the damage to the environment caused by the use of fossil fuels in power generation equipment increased, the aim of the development work at TPS was changed to applying the process to heat and power generation from feedstocks such as biomass and solid wastes. Compared with modern waste incineration with heat recovery, the gasification process will permit an increase in electricity output of up to 50%. The gasification process being developed is based on an atmospheric-pressure circulating fluidized bed gasifier coupled to a tar-cracking vessel. The gas produced from this process is then cooled and cleaned in conventional equipment. The energy-rich gas produced is clean enough to be fired in a gas boiler without requiring extensive flue gas cleaning, as is normally required in conventional waste incineration plants. Producing clean fuel gas in this manner, which facilitates the use of efficient gas-fired boilers, means that overall plant electrical efficiencies of close to 30% can be achieved. TPS has performed a considerable amount of pilot plant testing on waste fuels in their gasification/gas cleaning pilot plant in Sweden. Two gasifiers of TPS design have been in operation in Greve-in-Chianti, italy since 1992. This plant processes 200 tonnes of RDF (refuse-derived fuel) per day.

Morris, M.; Waldheim, L. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)] [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste. Keywords Anaerobic digestion; food waste; brown water; biogas; co-digestion INTRODUCTION-cal/m3 , biogas has been widely used in heating digesters and gas engines (Wang et al., 2007LIM J.W. Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery Jun Wei LIM

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

15

Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

Burnley, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.burnley@open.ac.uk [Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Phillips, Rhiannon, E-mail: rhiannon.jones@environment-agency.gov.uk [Strategy Unit, Welsh Assembly Government, Ty Cambria, 29 Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 0TP (United Kingdom); Coleman, Terry, E-mail: terry.coleman@erm.com [Environmental Resources Management Ltd, Eaton House, Wallbrook Court, North Hinksey Lane, Oxford OX2 0QS (United Kingdom); Rampling, Terence, E-mail: twa.rampling@hotmail.com [7 Thurlow Close, Old Town Stevenage, Herts SG1 4SD (United Kingdom)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Evaluation of Industrial Energy Options for Cogeneration, Waste Heat Recovery and Alternative Fuel Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the energy options available to Missouri industrial firms in the areas of cogeneration, waste heat recovery, and coal and alternative fuel utilization. The project, being performed by Synergic Resources Corporation...

Hencey, S.; Hinkle, B.; Limaye, D. R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Waste Energy Analysis Recovery for a Typical Food Processing Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An energy analysis made for the Joan of Arc Food Processing Plant in St. Francisville, Louisiana indicated that a significant quantity of waste heat energy was being released to the atmosphere in the forms of low quality steam and hot flue gases...

Miller, P. H.; Mann, L., Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Recovery of Energy and Chrome from Leather Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds can result in a saving of some 25 million dollars per year for the industry. The paper presents a pyrolysis method for handling leather tanning wastes to recover energy and chromium compounds for use in the tanning process. Energy and cost savings...

Muralidhara, H. S.; Maggin, B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Battleground Energy Recovery Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and ï?· Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

Daniel Bullock

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Nanjing Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3Informationof Energy Calculator29 JumpNamaNanjing Green Waste

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Recovery | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is onModelingFederal EnergyWaste Heat Waste Heat - - to to -

22

GreenWaste Recovery Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: EnergyGrasslandsGreen2V Jump to: navigation,GreenRayGreenWaste

23

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

24

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: Project overview and main results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > The source separation level (SSL) of waste management system does not qualify adequately the system. > Separately collecting organic waste gives less advantages than packaging materials. > Recycling packaging materials (metals, glass, plastics, paper) is always attractive. > Composting and anaerobic digestion of organic waste gives questionable outcomes. > The critical threshold of optimal recycling seems to be a SSL of 50%. - Abstract: This paper describes the context, the basic assumptions and the main findings of a joint research project aimed at identifying the optimal breakdown between material recovery and energy recovery from municipal solid waste (MSW) in the framework of integrated waste management systems (IWMS). The project was carried out from 2007 to 2009 by five research groups at Politecnico di Milano, the Universities of Bologna and Trento, and the Bocconi University (Milan), with funding from the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR). Since the optimization of IWMSs by analytical methods is practically impossible, the search for the most attractive strategy was carried out by comparing a number of relevant recovery paths from the point of view of mass and energy flows, technological features, environmental impact and economics. The main focus has been on mature processes applicable to MSW in Italy and Europe. Results show that, contrary to a rather widespread opinion, increasing the source separation level (SSL) has a very marginal effects on energy efficiency. What does generate very significant variations in energy efficiency is scale, i.e. the size of the waste-to-energy (WTE) plant. The mere value of SSL is inadequate to qualify the recovery system. The energy and environmental outcome of recovery depends not only on 'how much' source separation is carried out, but rather on 'how' a given SSL is reached.

Consonni, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.consonni@polimi.it [Department of Energy, Politecnico di Milano, Via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milan (Italy); Giugliano, Michele [DIIAR, Environmental Section, Politecnico di Milano, P.za L. Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Massarutto, Antonio [Dse, Universita degli Studi di Udine and IEFE, Via Tomadini 30/a, 33100 Udine (Italy); Ragazzi, Marco [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Saccani, Cesare [DIEM, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 2, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Recovery Act: Waste Energy Project at AK Steel Corporation Middletown  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (“Air Products”) began development of a project to beneficially utilize waste blast furnace “topgas” generated in the course of the iron-making process at AK Steel Corporation’s Middletown, Ohio works. In early 2010, Air Products was awarded DOE Assistance Agreement DE-EE002736 to further develop and build the combined-cycle power generation facility. In June 2012, Air Products and AK Steel Corporation terminated work when it was determined that the project would not be economically viable at that time nor in the foreseeable future. The project would have achieved the FOA-0000044 Statement of Project Objectives by demonstrating, at a commercial scale, the technology to capture, treat, and convert blast furnace topgas into electric power and thermal energy.

Joyce, Jeffrey

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recovery and reuse of industrial waste heat may be limited if an energy source cannot be fully utilized in an otherwise available out of phase or unequal capacity end-use process. This paper summarizes the results of a technical and economic...

McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Potential for Materials and Energy RecoveryPotential for Materials and Energy Recovery the Municipal Solid Wastes (the Municipal Solid Wastes (MSWMSW) of Beograd) of Beograd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential for Materials and Energy RecoveryPotential for Materials and Energy Recovery fromfrom%) and glass (15%). · Recovery of energy by anaerobic digestion: The natural organics in MSW react anaerobically (in absence of O2).to form methane gas · Recovery of soil nutrients: By aerobic composting (in

Columbia University

29

Energy recovery from waste incineration: Assessing the importance of district heating networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste incineration contributes with 20% of the heat supplied to the more than 400 district heating networks in Denmark. In evaluation of the environmental consequences of this heat production, the typical approach has been to assume that other (fossil) fuels could be saved on a 1:1 basis (e.g. 1 GJ of waste heat delivered substitutes for 1 GJ of coal-based heat). This paper investigates consequences of waste-based heat substitution in two specific Danish district heating networks and the energy-associated interactions between the plants connected to these networks. Despite almost equal electricity and heat efficiencies at the waste incinerators connected to the two district heating networks, the energy and CO{sub 2} accounts showed significantly different results: waste incineration in one network caused a CO{sub 2} saving of 48 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ energy input while in the other network a load of 43 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ. This was caused mainly by differences in operation mode and fuel types of the other heat producing plants attached to the networks. The paper clearly indicates that simple evaluations of waste-to-energy efficiencies at the incinerator are insufficient for assessing the consequences of heat substitution in district heating network systems. The paper also shows that using national averages for heat substitution will not provide a correct answer: local conditions need to be addressed thoroughly otherwise we may fail to assess correctly the heat recovery from waste incineration.

Fruergaard, T.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Astrup, T., E-mail: tha@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Design and management for resource recovery. Volume 1. Energy from waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 16 chapters in this volume represent a large fraction of the technical presentations made at the July 1979 Engineerng Foundation Conference, Municipal solid waste as a resource: the problem and the promise. This conference was held at a time when commercial interest in recovering resources from solid waste entered a growth phase and when the economics of energy recovery from waste improved dramatically. The purpose of the meeting, in Henniker, NH, was to deal openly with some of the past problems and look to the future to see if in fact the nagging early difficulties could be overcome. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 16 chapters, all of which were selected for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 2 will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

Frankiewicz, T.C. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: A life-cycle costing approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > The study aims at assessing economic performance of alternative scenarios of MSW. > The approach is the life-cycle costing (LCC). > Waste technologies must be considered as complementary into an integrated strategy. - Abstract: A critical assumption of studies assessing comparatively waste management options concerns the constant average cost for selective collection regardless the source separation level (SSL) reached, and the neglect of the mass constraint. The present study compares alternative waste management scenarios through the development of a desktop model that tries to remove the above assumption. Several alternative scenarios based on different combinations of energy and materials recovery are applied to two imaginary areas modelled in order to represent a typical Northern Italian setting. External costs and benefits implied by scenarios are also considered. Scenarios are compared on the base of the full cost for treating the total waste generated in the area. The model investigates the factors that influence the relative convenience of alternative scenarios.

Massarutto, Antonio [University of Udine, Udine (Italy); IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy); Carli, Alessandro de, E-mail: alessandro.decarli@unibocconi.it [IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy); Graffi, Matteo [University of Udine, Udine (Italy); IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems. An evaluation based on life cycle assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the environmental results, integrated with those arising from mass and energy balances, of a research project on the comparative analysis of strategies for material and energy recovery from waste, funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research. The project, involving the cooperation of five University research groups, was devoted to the optimisation of material and energy recovery activities within integrated municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems. Four scenarios of separate collection (overall value of 35%, 50% without the collection of food waste, 50% including the collection of food waste, 65%) were defined for the implementation of energetic, environmental and economic balances. Two sizes of integrated MSW management system (IWMS) were considered: a metropolitan area, with a gross MSW production of 750,000 t/year and an average province, with a gross MSW production of 150,000 t/year. The environmental analysis was conducted using Life Cycle Assessment methodology (LCA), for both material and energy recovery activities. In order to avoid allocation we have used the technique of the expansion of the system boundaries. This means taking into consideration the impact on the environment related to the waste management activities in comparison with the avoided impacts related to the saving of raw materials and primary energy. Under the hypotheses of the study, both for the large and for the small IWMS, the energetic and environmental benefits are higher than the energetic and environmental impacts for all the scenarios analysed in terms of all the indicators considered: the scenario with 50% separate collection in a drop-off scheme excluding food waste shows the most promising perspectives, mainly arising from the highest collection (and recycling) of all the packaging materials, which is the activity giving the biggest energetic and environmental benefits. Main conclusions of the study in the general field of the assessment of the environmental performance of any integrated waste management scheme address the importance of properly defining, beyond the design value assumed for the separate collection as a whole, also the yields of each material recovered; particular significance is finally related to the amount of residues deriving from material recovery activities, resulting on average in the order of 20% of the collected materials.

Giugliano, Michele; Cernuschi, Stefano [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Grosso, Mario, E-mail: mario.grosso@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, Lucia [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Recovery Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment of Energy While dryWashington's

34

Vehicle Technologies Office: Waste Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012Nuclear GuideReport |(GATE)Department of

35

Quantum Well Thermoelectrics and Waste Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartment of EnergyQualifiedQualityTransfer

36

Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept. ofUSA RSDepartment of Energy Updated31,CoolFeedwater

37

Department of Energy plan for recovery and utilization of nuclear byproducts from defense wastes. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear wastes from the defense production cycle contain many uniquely useful, intrinsically valuable, and strategically important materials. These materials have a wide range of known and potential applications in food technology, agriculture, energy, public health, medicine, industrial technology, and national security. Furthermore, their removal from the nuclear waste stream can facilitate waste management and yield economic, safety, and environmental advantages in the management and disposal of the residual nuclear wastes that have no redemptive value. This document is the program plan for implementing the recovery and beneficial use of these valuable materials. An Executive Summary of this document, DOE/DP-0013, Vol. 1, January 1983, is available. Program policy, goals and strategy are stated in Section 2. Implementation tasks, schedule and funding are detailed in Section 3. The remaining five sections and the appendixes provide necessary background information to support these two sections. Section 4 reviews some of the unique properties of the individual byproduct materials and describes both demonstrated and potential applications. The amounts of byproduct materials that are available now for research and demonstration purposes, and the amounts that could be recovered in the future for expanded applications are detailed in Section 5. Section 6 describes the effects byproduct recovery and utilization have on the management and final disposal of nuclear wastes. The institutional issues that affect the recovery, processing and utilization of nuclear byproducts are discussed in Section 7. Finally, Section 8 presents a generalized mathematical process by which applications can be evaluated and prioritized (rank-ordered) to provide planning data for program management.

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Thermoelectrics have unique advantages for...

39

Thermoeconomic optimization of sensible heat thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the feasibility of employing thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery such as using mass-burning water-wall incinerators and topping steam turbines. Sensible thermal storage is considered in rectangular cross-sectioned channels through which is passed unused process steam at 1,307 kPa/250 C (175 psig/482 F) during the storage period and feedwater at 1,307 kPa/102 C (175 psig/216 F) during the recovery period. In determining the optimum storage configuration, it is found that the economic feasibility is a function of mass and specific heat of the material and surface area of the channel as well as cost of material and fabrication. Economic considerations included typical cash flows of capital charges, energy revenues, operation and maintenance, and income taxes. Cast concrete is determined to be a potentially attractive storage medium.

Abdul-Razzak, H.A. [Texas A and M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Porter, R.W. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Advanced Energy and Water Recovery Technology from Low Grade Waste Heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project has developed a nanoporous membrane based water vapor separation technology that can be used for recovering energy and water from low-temperature industrial waste gas streams with high moisture contents. This kind of exhaust stream is widely present in many industrial processes including the forest products and paper industry, food industry, chemical industry, cement industry, metal industry, and petroleum industry. The technology can recover not only the sensible heat but also high-purity water along with its considerable latent heat. Waste heats from such streams are considered very difficult to recover by conventional technology because of poor heat transfer performance of heat-exchanger type equipment at low temperature and moisture-related corrosion issues. During the one-year Concept Definition stage of the project, the goal was to prove the concept and technology in the laboratory and identify any issues that need to be addressed in future development of this technology. In this project, computational modeling and simulation have been conducted to investigate the performance of a nanoporous material based technology, transport membrane condenser (TMC), for waste heat and water recovery from low grade industrial flue gases. A series of theoretical and computational analyses have provided insight and support in advanced TMC design and experiments. Experimental study revealed condensation and convection through the porous membrane bundle was greatly improved over an impermeable tube bundle, because of the membrane capillary condensation mechanism and the continuous evacuation of the condensate film or droplets through the membrane pores. Convection Nusselt number in flue gas side for the porous membrane tube bundle is 50% to 80% higher than those for the impermeable stainless steel tube bundle. The condensation rates for the porous membrane tube bundle also increase 60% to 80%. Parametric study for the porous membrane tube bundle heat transfer performance was also done, which shows this heat transfer enhancement approach works well in a wide parameters range for typical flue gas conditions. Better understanding of condensing heat transfer mechanism for porous membrane heat transfer surfaces, shows higher condensation and heat transfer rates than non-permeable tubes, due to existence of the porous membrane walls. Laboratory testing has documented increased TMC performance with increased exhaust gas moisture content levels, which has exponentially increased potential markets for the product. The TMC technology can uniquely enhance waste heat recovery in tandem with water vapor recovery for many other industrial processes such as drying, wet and dry scrubber exhaust gases, dewatering, and water chilling. A new metallic substrate membrane tube development and molded TMC part fabrication method, provides an economical way to expand this technology for scaled up applications with less than 3 year payback expectation. A detailed market study shows a broad application area for this advanced waste heat and water recovery technology. A commercialization partner has been lined up to expand this technology to this big market. This research work led to new findings on the TMC working mechanism to improve its performance, better scale up design approaches, and economical part fabrication methods. Field evaluation work needs to be done to verify the TMC real world performance, and get acceptance from the industry, and pave the way for our commercial partner to put it into a much larger waste heat and waste water recovery market. This project is addressing the priority areas specified for DOE Industrial Technologies Program's (ITP's): Energy Intensive Processes (EIP) Portfolio - Waste Heat Minimization and Recovery platform.

Dexin Wang

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

LCA of local strategies for energy recovery from waste in England, applied to a large municipal flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An intense waste management (WM) planning activity is currently undergoing in England to build the infrastructure necessary to treat residual wastes, increase recycling levels and the recovery of energy from waste. From the analyses of local WM strategic and planning documents we have identified the emerging of three different energy recovery strategies: established combustion of residual waste; pre-treatment of residual waste and energy recovery from Solid Recovered Fuel in a dedicated plant, usually assumed to be a gasifier; pre-treatment of residual waste and reliance on the market to accept the 'fuel from waste' so produced. Each energy recovery strategy will result in a different solution in terms of the technology selected; moreover, on the basis of the favoured solution, the total number, scale and location of thermal treatment plants built in England will dramatically change. To support the evaluation and comparison of these three WM strategy in terms of global environmental impacts, energy recovery possibilities and performance with respect to changing 'fuel from waste' market conditions, the LCA comparison of eight alternative WM scenarios for a real case study dealing with a large flow of municipal wastes was performed with the modelling tool WRATE. The large flow of waste modelled allowed to formulate and assess realistic alternative WM scenarios and to design infrastructural systems which are likely to correspond to those submitted for approval to the local authorities. The results show that all alternative scenarios contribute to saving abiotic resources and reducing global warming potential. Particularly relevant to the current English debate, the performance of a scenario was shown to depend not from the thermal treatment technology but from a combination of parameters, among which most relevant are the efficiency of energy recovery processes (both electricity and heat) and the calorific value of residual waste and pre-treated material. The contribution and relative importance of recycling and treatment/recovery processes change with the impact category. The lack of reprocessing plants in the area of the case study has shown the relevance of transport distances for recyclate material in reducing the efficiency of a WM system. Highly relevant to the current English WM infrastructural debate, these results for the first time highlight the risk of a significant reduction in the energy that could be recovered by local WM strategies relying only on the market to dispose of the 'fuel from waste' in a non dedicated plant in the case that the SRF had to be sent to landfill for lack of treatment capacity.

Tunesi, Simonetta, E-mail: s.tunesi@ucl.ac.uk [Environment Institute, University College London, Pearson Building, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

43

Life-cycle-assessment of the historical development of air pollution control and energy recovery in waste incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incineration of municipal solid waste is a debated waste management technology. In some countries it is the main waste management option whereas in other countries it has been disregarded. The main discussion point on waste incineration is the release of air emissions from the combustion of the waste, but also the energy recovery efficiency has a large importance. The historical development of air pollution control in waste incineration was studied through life-cycle-assessment modelling of eight different air pollution control technologies. The results showed a drastic reduction in the release of air emissions and consequently a significant reduction in the potential environmental impacts of waste incineration. Improvements of a factor 0.85-174 were obtained in the different impact potentials as technology developed from no emission control at all, to the best available emission control technologies of today (2010). The importance of efficient energy recovery was studied through seven different combinations of heat and electricity recovery, which were modelled to substitute energy produced from either coal or natural gas. The best air pollution control technology was used at the incinerator. It was found that when substituting coal based energy production total net savings were obtained in both the standard and toxic impact categories. However, if the substituted energy production was based on natural gas, only the most efficient recovery options yielded net savings with respect to the standard impacts. With regards to the toxic impact categories, emissions from the waste incineration process were always larger than those from the avoided energy production based on natural gas. The results shows that the potential environmental impacts from air emissions have decreased drastically during the last 35 years and that these impacts can be partly or fully offset by recovering energy which otherwise should have been produced from fossil fuels like coal or natural gas.

Damgaard, Anders, E-mail: and@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Riber, Christian [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Fruergaard, Thilde [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Hulgaard, Tore [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Waste heat recovery system for recapturing energy after engine aftertreatment systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery (WHR) system including a Rankine cycle (RC) subsystem for converting heat of exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine, and an internal combustion engine including the same. The WHR system includes an exhaust gas heat exchanger that is fluidly coupled downstream of an exhaust aftertreatment system and is adapted to transfer heat from the exhaust gas to a working fluid of the RC subsystem. An energy conversion device is fluidly coupled to the exhaust gas heat exchanger and is adapted to receive the vaporized working fluid and convert the energy of the transferred heat. The WHR system includes a control module adapted to control at least one parameter of the RC subsystem based on a detected aftertreatment event of a predetermined thermal management strategy of the aftertreatment system.

Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

45

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen? Business Overview WOW operates in the energy efficiency field - one of the fastest growing energy sectors in the world today. The two key products - WOWGen? and WOWClean? provide more... energy at cheaper cost and lower emissions. ? WOWGen? - Power Generation from Industrial Waste Heat ? WOWClean? - Multi Pollutant emission control system Current power generation technology uses only 35% of the energy in a fossil fuel...

Romero, M.

47

Experimental investigation of the quality characteristics of agricultural plastic wastes regarding their recycling and energy recovery potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definition of parameters characterising agricultural plastic waste (APW) quality. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of samples to determine APW quality for recycling or energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Majority of APW samples from various countries have very good quality for recycling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upper limit of 50% w/w soil contamination in APW acceptable for energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chlorine and heavy metals content in APW below the lowest limit for energy recovery. - Abstract: A holistic environmentally sound waste management scheme that transforms agricultural plastic waste (APW) streams into labelled guaranteed quality commodities freely traded in open market has been developed by the European research project LabelAgriWaste. The APW quality is defined by the APW material requirements, translated to technical specifications, for recycling or energy recovery. The present work investigates the characteristics of the APW quality and the key factors affecting it from the introduction of the virgin product to the market to the APW stream reaching the disposer. Samples of APW from different countries were traced from their application to the field through their storage phase and transportation to the final destination. The test results showed that the majority of APW retained their mechanical properties after their use preserving a 'very good quality' for recycling in terms of degradation. The degree of soil contamination concerning the APW recycling and energy recovery potential fluctuates depending on the agricultural plastic category and application. The chlorine and heavy metal content of the tested APW materials was much lower than the maximum acceptable limits for their potential use in cement industries.

Briassoulis, D., E-mail: briassou@aua.gr [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E. [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Antiohos, S.K., E-mail: santiohos@titan.gr [Titan Cement Company S.A., Group R and D and Quality Department, Kamari Plant, P.O. Box 18, 19200 Elefsina (Greece); Papadi, C., E-mail: c.papadi@polyeco.gr [Polyeco S.A., 16 km National Road Athens-Korinthos, Aspropyrgos 19300 (Greece)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Assessing recycling versus incineration of key materials in municipal waste: The importance of efficient energy recovery and transport distances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the environmental impact of recycling and incineration of household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling of paper, glass, steel and aluminium is better than incineration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling and incineration of cardboard and plastic can be equally good alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclables can be transported long distances and still have environmental benefits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper has a higher environmental benefit than recyclables found in smaller amounts. - Abstract: Recycling of materials from municipal solid waste is commonly considered to be superior to any other waste treatment alternative. For the material fractions with a significant energy content this might not be the case if the treatment alternative is a waste-to-energy plant with high energy recovery rates. The environmental impacts from recycling and from incineration of six material fractions in household waste have been compared through life cycle assessment assuming high-performance technologies for material recycling as well as for waste incineration. The results showed that there are environmental benefits when recycling paper, glass, steel and aluminium instead of incinerating it. For cardboard and plastic the results were more unclear, depending on the level of energy recovery at the incineration plant, the system boundaries chosen and which impact category was in focus. Further, the environmental impact potentials from collection, pre-treatment and transport was compared to the environmental benefit from recycling and this showed that with the right means of transport, recyclables can in most cases be transported long distances. However, the results also showed that recycling of some of the material fractions can only contribute marginally in improving the overall waste management system taking into consideration their limited content in average Danish household waste.

Merrild, Hanna [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Larsen, Anna W., E-mail: awla@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Waste Steam Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applicable to other sources of steam. The interaction of the recovery system with the plant's steam/power system has been included. Typical operating economics have been prepared. It was found that the profitability of most recovery schemes is generally...

Kleinfeld, J. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Heat Recovery From Solid Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

areas of evaluation, including the cost of fuel, cost of solid waste disposal, plant energy requirements, available technology, etc....

Underwood, O. W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Opportunities and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Generator Development for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

52

Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

Resource recovery - a byproduct of hazardous waste incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three principal areas of a chlorinated hydrocarbon waste disposal system for a typical vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) facility are described: the incinerator, the energy-recovery system, and the byproduct-recovery system. The overall efficiency of the energy- and *byproduct-recovery systems is dependent on the optimization of the primary combustor. An example is presented in table form which lists typical waste quantities for the plant and operating costs, including utility requirements for the incinerator system, the quench, absorber and scrubber. Savings that can result by the addition of the energy- and acid-recovery systems can pay for the waste disposal system and return money to the plant.

Santoleri, J.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric...

55

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradley Nickell02-03 AUDITMotionWhen LifeDRAFT -

56

Energy recovery system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to an improved wet air oxidation system and method for reducing the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of waste water used from scrubbers of coal gasification plants, with this COD reduction being sufficient to effectively eliminate waste water as an environmental pollutant. The improvement of the present invention is provided by heating the air used in the oxidation process to a temperature substantially equal to the temperature in the oxidation reactor before compressing or pressurizing the air. The compression of the already hot air further heats the air which is then passed in heat exchange with gaseous products of the oxidation reaction for "superheating" the gaseous products prior to the use thereof in turbines as the driving fluid. The superheating of the gaseous products significantly minimizes condensation of gaseous products in the turbine so as to provide a substantially greater recovery of mechanical energy from the process than heretofore achieved.

Moore, Albert S. (Morgantown, WV); Verhoff, Francis H. (Morgantown, WV)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Energy and materials savings from gases and solid waste recovery in the iron and steel industry in Brazil: An industrial ecology approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper attempts to investigate, from an entropic point of view, the role of selected technologies in the production, transformation, consumption and release of energy and materials in the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil. In a quantitative analysis, the potential for energy and materials savings with recovery of heat, gases and tar are evaluated for the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil. The technologies for heat recovery of gases include Coke Dry Quenching (CDQ), applied only in one of the five Brazilian coke integrated steel plants, Top Gas Pressure Recovery Turbines (TPRT), recovery of Coke Oven Gas (COG), recovery of Blast Furnace Gas (BFG), recovery of BOF gas, recovery of tar, and thermal plant. Results indicate that, in a technical scenario, some 5.1 TWh of electricity can be generated if these technologies are applied to recover these remaining secondary fuels in the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil, which is equivalent to some 45% of current total electricity consumption in the integrated plants in the country. Finally, solid waste control technologies, including options available for collection and treatment, are discussed. Estimates using the best practice methodology show that solid waste generation in the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil reached approximately 18 million metric tons in 1994, of which 28% can be recirculated if the best practice available in the country is applied thoroughly.

Costa, M.M.; Schaeffer, R.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

59

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

60

An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe An overview presentation of R&D...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...

62

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat...

63

Thermoelectric recovery of waste heat -- Case studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of waste heat as an energy source for thermoelectric generation largely removes the constraint for the wide scale application of this technology imposed by its relatively low conversion efficiency (typically about 5%). Paradoxically, in some parasitic applications, a low conversion efficiency can be viewed as a distinct advantage. However, commercially available thermoelectric modules are designed primarily for refrigerating applications and are less reliable when operated at elevated temperatures. Consequently, a major factor which determines the economic competitiveness of thermoelectric recovery of waste heat is the cost per watt divided by the mean-time between module failures. In this paper is reported the development of a waste, warm water powered thermoelectric generator, one target in a NEDO sponsored project to economically recover waste heat. As an application of this technology case studies are considered in which thermoelectric generators are operated in both active and parasitic modes to generate electrical power for a central heating system. It is concluded that, in applications when the supply of heat essentially is free as with waste heat, thermoelectrics can compete economically with conventional methods of electrical power generation. Also, in this situation, and when the generating system is operated in a parasitic mode, conversion efficiency is not an important consideration.

Rowe, M.D.; Min, G.; Williams, S.G.K.; Aoune, A. [Cardiff School of Engineering (United Kingdom). Div. of Electronic Engineering; Matsuura, Kenji [Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Kuznetsov, V.L. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Fu, L.W. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Microelectronics Inst.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Prospects for energy recovery from plastic waste gasifiers by means of MHD topping cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper the authors present a feasibility study of a combined MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) and steam turbine plant in which the working gas is made of burnt plastic waste. The possibility of MHD retrofit of existing plant, especially fed by fossil fuel, is well known, and has been studied both for its economical and environmental benefits. The environmental impact and the elimination of pollution agents has become a prime necessity in waste digestion. Furthermore, plants in which the production of electrical power by means of burnt gases produced in the digestion process have been designed and built. In this field an MHD integration plant could be very attractive. This feasibility study has been developed by simulating an ideal plant with a plastic incinerator, an MHD device and conventional steam turbines. As a result, the simulations have indicated economic and environmental advantages with notable efficiency improvements in the generation of electrical power.

Geri, A.; Verdone, N.; Salvini, A.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

ISWA Study Tour WASTE-TO-ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Waste Treatment and Energy Recovery" Fundamentals of drying, pyrolysis, gasification, and combustionISWA Study Tour WASTE-TO-ENERGY Programme, June 22-27, 2014 Czech Republic Austria Seminar;Practice Seminar on Sustainable Waste Management in Europe based on Prevention, Recycling, Recovery

66

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organic Rankine cycle waste heat power conversion system. ”Cycle (ORC) System for Waste Heat Recovery. ” Journal ofRankine Cycles in Waste Heat Uti- lizing Processes. ”

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This revised ITP tip sheet on feedwater economizers for waste heat recovery provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Pennsylvania Solid Waste- Resource Recovery Development Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act promotes the construction and the application of solid waste disposal/processing and resource recovery systems that preserve and enhance the quality of air, water, and land resources. The...

69

[Waste water heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production capabilities for and field testing of the heat recovery system are described briefly. Drawings are included.

Not Available

1993-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

70

Recovery of radioisotopes from nuclear waste for radio-scintillator-luminescence energy applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extraction of the light weight radioisotopes (LWR) 89Sr/90Sr, from the expended nuclear bars in the Fukushima reactor, should have decreased the extent of contamination during the course of the accident. 89Sr applications could pay for the extraction of 89Sr/90Sr from nuclear residues. Added value could be obtained by using 89Sr for cancer treatments. Known technologies could be used to relate into innovative ways LWR, to obtain nuclear energy at battery scale. LWR interact by contact with scintillators converting \\beta-radiation into light-energy. This would lead to manufacturing scintillator lamps which operate independently of other source of energy. These lamps could be used to generate photoelectric energy. Engineering of radioisotopes scintillator photovoltaic cells, would lead to devices without moving parts.

Alfred Bennun

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

71

Recovery of radioisotopes from nuclear waste for radio-scintillator-luminescence energy applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extraction of the light weight radioisotopes (LWR) 89Sr/90Sr, from the expended nuclear bars in the Fukushima reactor, should have decreased the extent of contamination during the course of the accident. 89Sr applications could pay for the extraction of 89Sr/90Sr from nuclear residues. Added value could be obtained by using 89Sr for cancer treatments. Known technologies could be used to relate into innovative ways LWR, to obtain nuclear energy at battery scale. LWR interact by contact with scintillators converting \\beta-radiation into light-energy. This would lead to manufacturing scintillator lamps which operate independently of other source of energy. These lamps could be used to generate photoelectric energy. Engineering of radioisotopes scintillator photovoltaic cells, would lead to devices without moving parts.

Bennun, Alfred

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

73

Cylinder wall waste heat recovery from liquid-cooled internal combustion engines utilizing thermoelectric generators.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This report is a dissertation proposal that focuses on the energy balance within an internal combustion engine with a unique coolant-based waste heat recovery… (more)

Armstead, John Randall

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Composites for Multi-energy conversion & waste heat recovery | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codestheatfor Optimized SCRUnderbodyof Energy

75

Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Energy Tips No.3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A feedwater economizer reduces steam boiler fuel requirements by transferring heat from the flue gas to incoming feedwater. Boiler flue gases are often rejected to the stack at temperatures more than 100 F to 150 F higher than the temperature of the generated steam. Generally, boiler efficiency can be increased by 1% for every 40 F reduction in flue gas temperature. By recovering waste heat, an economizer can often reduce fuel requirements by 5% to 10% and pay for itself in less than 2 years. The table provides examples of the potential for heat recovery.

Not Available

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat recovery from refrigeration machines is a concept which has great potential for implementation in many businesses. If a parallel requirement for refrigeration and hot water exists, the installation of a system to provide hot water as a by...

Jackson, H. Z.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Solid Waste Resource Recovery Financing Act (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The State of Texas encourages the processing of solid waste for the purpose of extracting, converting to energy, or otherwise separating and preparing solid waste for reuse. This Act provides for...

78

2008 DOE FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Documents & Publications Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles Development of a 100-Watt High...

79

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power...

80

Olefin Recovery from Chemical Industry Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop a membrane process to separate olefins from paraffins in waste gas streams as an alternative to flaring or distillation. Flaring these streams wastes their chemical feedstock value; distillation is energy and capital cost intensive, particularly for small waste streams.

A.R. Da Costa; R. Daniels; A. Jariwala; Z. He; A. Morisato; I. Pinnau; J.G. Wijmans

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Waste water treatment and metal recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste water treatment and metal recovery Nickel catalysts for hydrogen production Nickel and single versions of which contained cobalt, chromium, carbon, molybdenum, tungsten, and nickel. In 1911 and 1912% on their stainless steel production. The company paid sizable dividends to its owners until it was dissolved

Braun, Paul

82

Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Presentation: Caterpillar Inc. 2002deerhopmann.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Diesel...

83

Exhaust Gas Energy Recovery Technology Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exhaust waste heat recovery systems have the potential to significantly improve vehicle fuel economy for conventional and hybrid electric powertrains spanning passenger to heavy truck applications. This chapter discusses thermodynamic considerations and three classes of energy recovery technologies which are under development for vehicle applications. More specifically, this chapter describes the state-of-the-art in exhaust WHR as well as challenges and opportunities for thermodynamic power cycles, thermoelectric devices, and turbo-compounding systems.

Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartment ofEnergyEnergyBetterMake Fuels andBiodieselJohn

85

Low-temperature waste-heat recovery in the food and paper industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential of low-temperature waste-heat recovery technology is examined. An examination of barriers to impede waste-heat recovery is made and research programs are identified. Extensive information and data are presented in the following chapters: Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Food Industry; Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Pulp and Paper Industry; Industries' Economic Analysis of Energy Conservation Projects; Industrial Waste Heat Recovery (selection of heat-recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, simplified procedure for selection of heat recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, selection of heat pumps for industrial applications); Institutional Aspects of Industrial Energy Conservation (economic motivation for energy conservation and the industrial response, intrafirm idea channels and their sources, evaluation and approval of plant improvement projects, reported barriers to adopting waste heat recovery projects and recommendations for government involvement, and the final chapter is a summary with major conclusions given. Additional information is given in two appendices on the potential waste heat recovery in a cheese plant (calculation) and conditions for optimum exchanger size and break-even fuel cost. (MCW)

Foell, W.K.; Lund, D.; Mitchell, J.W.; Ray, D.; Stevenson, R.; TenWolde, A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: ScopeDepartment1, 2011 DRAFTofBio-OilEnergyCombustion |MHRC

87

Experimental and life cycle assessment analysis of gas emission from mechanically–biologically pretreated waste in a landfill with energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Bio-methane landfill emissions from different period (0, 4, 8, 16 weeks) MTB waste have been evaluated. • Electrical energy recoverable from landfill gas ranges from 11 to about 90 kW h/tonne. • Correlation between oxygen uptake, energy recovery and anaerobic gas production shows R{sup 2} ranging from 0.78 to 0.98. • LCA demonstrate that global impact related to gaseous emissions achieve minimum for 4 week of MBT. - Abstract: The global gaseous emissions produced by landfilling the Mechanically Sorted Organic Fraction (MSOF) with different weeks of Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) was evaluated for an existing waste management system. One MBT facility and a landfill with internal combustion engines fuelled by the landfill gas for electrical energy production operate in the waste management system considered. An experimental apparatus was used to simulate 0, 4, 8 and 16 weeks of aerobic stabilization and the consequent biogas potential (Nl/kg) of a large sample of MSOF withdrawn from the full-scale MBT. Stabilization achieved by the waste was evaluated by dynamic oxygen uptake and fermentation tests. Good correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}), ranging from 0.7668 to 0.9772, were found between oxygen uptake, fermentation and anaerobic test values. On the basis of the results of several anaerobic tests, the methane production rate k (year{sup ?1}) was evaluated. k ranged from 0.436 to 0.308 year{sup ?1} and the bio-methane potential from 37 to 12 N m{sup 3}/tonne, respectively, for the MSOF with 0 and 16 weeks of treatment. Energy recovery from landfill gas ranged from about 11 to 90 kW h per tonne of disposed MSOF depending on the different scenario investigated. Life cycle analysis showed that the scenario with 0 weeks of pre-treatment has the highest weighted global impact even if opposite results were obtained with respect to the single impact criteria. MSOF pre-treatment periods longer than 4 weeks showed rather negligible variation in the global impact of system emissions.

Di Maria, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.dimaria@unipg.it; Sordi, Alessio; Micale, Caterina

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Mobile power plants : waste body heat recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel methods to convert waste metabolic heat into useful and useable amounts of electricity were studied. Thermoelectric, magneto hydrodynamic, and piezo-electric energy conversions at the desired scope were evaluated to ...

Gibbons, Jonathan S. (Jonathan Scott), 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Recovery Plan  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation | Department of EnergyDepartmentEnergy WRPSWasteActivites WasteWaste

90

Resource Recovery from Waste Research Grant Outcomes Grant Holder Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/1 Professor Kirk Semple Developing a suite of novel land conditioners and plant fertilizers from the wasteResource Recovery from Waste Research Grant Outcomes Grant Reference Grant Holder Title Science Excellence Ranking NE/L013908/1 Dr Devin Sapsford In situ recovery of resources from waste repositories 8 1

91

An integrated appraisal of energy recovery options in the United Kingdom using solid recovered fuel derived from municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports an integrated appraisal of options for utilising solid recovered fuels (SRF) (derived from municipal solid waste, MSW) in energy intensive industries within the United Kingdom (UK). Four potential co-combustion scenarios have been identified following discussions with industry stakeholders. These scenarios have been evaluated using (a) an existing energy and mass flow framework model, (b) a semi-quantitative risk analysis, (c) an environmental assessment and (d) a financial assessment. A summary of results from these evaluations for the four different scenarios is presented. For the given ranges of assumptions; SRF co-combustion with coal in cement kilns was found to be the optimal scenario followed by co-combustion of SRF in coal-fired power plants. The biogenic fraction in SRF (ca. 70%) reduces greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions significantly ({approx}2500 g CO{sub 2} eqvt./kg DS SRF in co-fired cement kilns and {approx}1500 g CO{sub 2} eqvt./kg DS SRF in co-fired power plants). Potential reductions in electricity or heat production occurred through using a lower calorific value (CV) fuel. This could be compensated for by savings in fuel costs (from SRF having a gate fee) and grants aimed at reducing GHG emission to encourage the use of fuels with high biomass fractions. Total revenues generated from coal-fired power plants appear to be the highest ( Pounds 95/t SRF) from the four scenarios. However overall, cement kilns appear to be the best option due to the low technological risks, environmental emissions and fuel cost. Additionally, cement kiln operators have good experience of handling waste derived fuels. The scenarios involving co-combustion of SRF with MSW and biomass were less favourable due to higher environmental risks and technical issues.

Garg, A.; Smith, R. [Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Hill, D. [DPH Environment and Energy Ltd., c/o Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T. [Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Simms, N.J. [Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: n.j.simms@cranfield.ac.uk

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Trubocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound Technology 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Caterpillar Inc. 2003deeralgrain.pdf...

93

Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Waste Heat Reduction and...

94

Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Overview of progress in TE waste heat recovery from sedan gasoline-engine exhaust, TE HVAC system in hybrid sedan, and establishing targets for cost, power density, packaging,...

95

Solid Waste Disposal Resource Recovery Facilities Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes local governing bodies to form joint agencies to advance the collection, transfer, processing of solid waste, recovery of resources, and sales of recovered resources in...

96

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Recovery Engineering and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient n-type Skutterudites...

97

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

98

Waste-heat recovery in batch processes using heat storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste-heat recovery in batch processes has been studied using the pinch-point method. The aim of the work has been to investigate theoretical and practical approaches to the design of heat-exchanger networks, including heat storage, for waste-heat recovery in batch processes. The study is limited to the incorporation of energy-storage systems based on fixed-temperature variable-mass stores. The background for preferring this to the alternatives (variable-temperature fixed-mass and constant-mass constant-temperature (latent-heat) stores) is given. It is shown that the maximum energy-saving targets as calculated by the pinch-point method (time average model, TAM) can be achieved by locating energy stores at either end of each process stream. This theoretically large number of heat-storage tanks (twice the number of process streams) can be reduced to just a few tanks. A simple procedure for determining a number of heat-storage tanks sufficient to achieve the maximum energy-saving targets as calculated by the pinch-point method is described. This procedure relies on combinatorial considerations, and could therefore be labeled the combinatorial method for incorporation of heat storage in heat-exchanger networks. Qualitative arguments justifying the procedure are presented. For simple systems, waste-heat recovery systems with only three heat-storage temperatures (a hot storage, a cold storage, and a heat store at the pinch temperature) often can achieve the maximum energy-saving targets. Through case studies, six of which are presented, it is found that a theoretically large number of heat-storage tanks (twice the number of process streams) can be reduced to just a few tanks. The description of these six cases is intended to be sufficiently detailed to serve as benchmark cases for development of alternative methods.

Stoltze, S.; Mikkelsen, J.; Lorentzen, B.; Petersen, P.M.; Qvale, B. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Lab. for Energetics

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details: Thermoelectric generators, waste heat recovery, automotive exhaust, skutterudites INTRODUCTION In part I

Xu, Xianfan

100

Resource recovery waste heat boiler upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste heat boilers installed in a 360 TPD waste to energy plant were identified as the bottle neck for an effort to increase plant capacity. These boilers were successfully modified to accommodate the increase of plant capacity to 408 TPD, improve steam cycle performance and reduce boiler tube failures. The project demonstrated how engineering and operation can work together to identify problems and develop solutions that satisfy engineering, operation, and financial objectives. Plant checking and testing, design review and specification development, installation and operation results are presented.

Kuten, P.; McClanahan, D.E. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Gehring, P.R.; Toto, M.L. [SRRI, Springfield, MA (United States); Davis, J.J. [Deltak, Minon, MN (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Department of Energy plan for recovery and utilization of nuclear byproducts from defense wastes. Volume 1. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear byproducts are a major national resource that has yet to be incorporated into the economy. The current Defense Byproducts Program is designed to match specific military and commercial needs with the availability of valuable products which are currently treated as waste at considerable expense in waste management costs. This program plan focuses on a few specific areas with the greatest potential for near-term development and application. It also recognizes the need for a continuing effort to develop new applications for byproducts and to continue to assess the impacts on waste management. The entire program has been, and will continue to be structured so as to ensure the safety of the public and maintain the purity of the environment. Social and institutional concerns have been recognized and will be handled appropriately. A significant effort will be undertaken to inform the public of the benefits of byproduct use and of the care being taken to ensure safe, efficient operation.

None

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management system - An Italian case study on the quality of MSW data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper analyses the way numerical data on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) quantities are recorded, processed and then reported for six of the most meaningful Italian Districts and shows the difficulties found during the comparison of these Districts, starting from the lack of homogeneity and the fragmentation of the data indispensable to make this critical analysis. These aspects are often ignored, but data certainty are the basis for serious MSW planning. In particular, the paper focuses on overall Source Separation Level (SSL) definition and on the influence that Special Waste (SW) assimilated to MSW has on it. An investigation was then necessary to identify new parameters in place of overall SSL. Moreover, these parameters are not only important for a waste management system performance measure, but are fundamental in order to design and check management plan and to identify possible actions to improve it.

Bianchini, A.; Pellegrini, M. [DIEM, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 2, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Saccani, C., E-mail: cesare.saccani@unibo.it [DIEM, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 2, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

104

(www.wtert.gr) Waste-to-Energy Research &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ WTERT (www.wtert.gr) 1 Waste-to-Energy Research & Technology Council WTERT Greece ­ SYNERGIA Dr. Efstratios Kalogirou is the President of Waste-to-Energy Research & Technology Council (WTERT.S.A. (cooperating with Professor N. Themelis) , in the scientific fields: energy recovery from solid wastes, potable

105

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by GMZ Energy Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about nanostructured high...

106

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Recovery Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory30,WP-073.99 4.22PrimaryWaste

107

Energy recovery system using an organic rankine cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermodynamic system for waste heat recovery, using an organic rankine cycle is provided which employs a single organic heat transferring fluid to recover heat energy from two waste heat streams having differing waste heat temperatures. Separate high and low temperature boilers provide high and low pressure vapor streams that are routed into an integrated turbine assembly having dual turbines mounted on a common shaft. Each turbine is appropriately sized for the pressure ratio of each stream.

Ernst, Timothy C

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Identification of existing waste heat recovery and process improvement technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General information is provided on waste heat recovery opportunities. The currently available equipment for high- and low-temperature applications are described. Other equipment related to wasteheat recovery equipment such as components, instruments and controls, and cleaning equipment is discussed briefly. A description of the microcomputer data base is included. Suppliers of waste heat equipment are mentioned throughout the report, with specific contacts, addresses, and telephone numbers provided in an Appendix.

Watts, R.L.; Dodge, R.E.; Smith, S.A.; Ames, K.R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Use of the GranuFlow Process in Coal Preparation Plants to Improve Energy Recovery and Reduce Coal Processing Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the increasing use of screen-bowl centrifuges in today's fine coal cleaning circuits, a significant amount of low-ash, high-Btu coal can be lost during the dewatering step due to the difficulty in capturing coal of this size consist (< 100 mesh or 0.15mm). The GranuFlow{trademark} technology, developed and patented by an in-house research group at DOE-NETL, involves the addition of an emulsified mixture of high-molecular-weight hydrocarbons to a slurry of finesized coal before cleaning and/or mechanical dewatering. The binder selectively agglomerates the coal, but not the clays or other mineral matter. In practice, the binder is applied so as to contact the finest possible size fraction first (for example, froth flotation product) as agglomeration of this fraction produces the best result for a given concentration of binder. Increasing the size consist of the fine-sized coal stream reduces the loss of coal solids to the waste effluent streams from the screen bowl centrifuge circuit. In addition, the agglomerated coal dewaters better and is less dusty. The binder can also serve as a flotation conditioner and may provide freeze protection. The overall objective of the project is to generate all necessary information and data required to commercialize the GranuFlow{trademark} Technology. The technology was evaluated under full-scale operating conditions at three commercial coal preparation plants to determine operating performance and economics. The handling, storage, and combustion properties of the coal produced by this process were compared to untreated coal during a power plant combustion test.

Glenn A. Shirey; David J. Akers

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Waste Heat Recovery Methods for the UBC Microbrewery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into Waste Heat Recovery Methods for the UBC Microbrewery Nazanin Bahrami, Michael Huang, Aldrich Huang Heat Recovery Methods for the UBC Microbrewery Written By: Nazanin Bahrami (45179090) Michael Huang. Flue gas recovery and separation can recover 26% of the total heat energy, and can reduce the GHG

111

Steelcase's Closed-Loop Energy Recovery System Results in $250,000 Savings Annually  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steelcase Inc. put a closed-loop energy recovery system into operation in August, 1980, with the installation of a $1.1 million waste incinerator. The system provides steam for process applications in the company's main complex. Processable waste...

Wege, P. M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling telluride TEMs. Key words: Thermoelectric generators, waste heat recovery, automotive exhaust, skutterudites bismuth telluride are considered for thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for conversion of waste heat from

Xu, Xianfan

113

Solid Waste Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute expresses the strong support of the State of Wisconsin for the reduction of the amount of solid waste generated, the reuse, recycling and composting of solid waste, and resource...

114

CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CEWEP - Confederation of European Waste-to- Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A B-1000 Brussels Tel. : +32 (0)2 770 63 11 Fax : +32 (0)2 770 68 14 info@cewep.eu www.cewep.eu 1 Waste-to-Energy: towards recovery CEWEP welcomes that `energy recovery' should cover the use of waste for generating energy through

Columbia University

115

Audit Report on "Waste Processing and Recovery Act Acceleration Efforts for Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste at the Hanford Site"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management's (EM), Richland Operations Office (Richland), is responsible for disposing of the Hanford Site's (Hanford) transuranic (TRU) waste, including nearly 12,000 cubic meters of radioactive contact-handled TRU wastes. Prior to disposing of this waste at the Department's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Richland must certify that it meets WIPP's waste acceptance criteria. To be certified, the waste must be characterized, screened for prohibited items, treated (if necessary) and placed into a satisfactory disposal container. In a February 2008 amendment to an existing Record of Decision (Decision), the Department announced its plan to ship up to 8,764 cubic meters of contact-handled TRU waste from Hanford and other waste generator sites to the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) at Idaho's National Laboratory (INL) for processing and certification prior to disposal at WIPP. The Department decided to maximize the use of the AMWTP's automated waste processing capabilities to compact and, thereby, reduce the volume of contact-handled TRU waste. Compaction reduces the number of shipments and permits WIPP to more efficiently use its limited TRU waste disposal capacity. The Decision noted that the use of AMWTP would avoid the time and expense of establishing a processing capability at other sites. In May 2009, EM allocated $229 million of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) funds to support Hanford's Solid Waste Program, including Hanford's contact-handled TRU waste. Besides providing jobs, these funds were intended to accelerate cleanup in the short term. We initiated this audit to determine whether the Department was effectively using Recovery Act funds to accelerate processing of Hanford's contact-handled TRU waste. Relying on the availability of Recovery Act funds, the Department changed course and approved an alternative plan that could increase costs by about $25 million by processing Hanford TRU-waste on-site rather than at AMWTP. Further, under the newly adopted alternative approach, the Department would fail to achieve the previously anticipated reductions in volume associated with the use of existing AMWTP waste compaction capabilities.

None

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Energy Recovery Potential from Wastewater Utilities through Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Energy Recovery Potential from Wastewater Utilities through Innovation Lauren Fillmore, Senior Program Director, Water Environment Research Foundation

117

Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery, Energy Tips: STEAM, Steam Tip Sheet #3 (Fact Sheet), Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwo New12.'6/0.2 ......Uranium LeaseThrough the Use ofPROGRAM

118

HVAC Energy Recovery Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENRECO has prepared this paper on HVAC energy recovery to provide the engineer with an overview of the design engineering as well as the economic analysis considerations necessary to evaluate the potential benefits of energy recovery....

Kinnier, R. J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Recovery of fissile materials from nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for recovering fissile materials such as uranium, and plutonium, and rare earth elements, from complex waste feed material, and converting the remaining wastes into a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. The waste feed is mixed with a dissolution glass formed of lead oxide and boron oxide resulting in oxidation, dehalogenation, and dissolution of metal oxides. Carbon is added to remove lead oxide, and a boron oxide fusion melt is produced. The fusion melt is essentially devoid of organic materials and halogens, and is easily and rapidly dissolved in nitric acid. After dissolution, uranium, plutonium and rare earth elements are separated from the acid and recovered by processes such as PUREX or ion exchange. The remaining acid waste stream is vitrified to produce a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. Potential waste feed materials include plutonium scrap and residue, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, organic material and other carbon-containing material.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

An Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

our dependence on petroleum-based fuels, paper, glass, and agricultural and automotive and hence improve our merchandise .trade balance. equipment industries have all had proven success with heat recovery projects. Solar, wind, geothermal, oil shale...

Darby, D. F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Waste to Energy Time Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEMINAR Waste to Energy Time Activities 9:30-9:40 Brief introduction of participants 9:40-10:10 Presentation of Dr. Kalogirou, "Waste to Energy: An Integral Part of Worldwide Sustainable Waste Management" 10. Sofia Bethanis, "Production of synthetic aggregates for use in structural concrete from waste to energy

122

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geo-thermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat ingeothermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat inthermal energy, geo/ocean-thermal energy, wasted heat in

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Steelmaker Matches Recovery Act Funds to Save Energy & Reduce...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and installed with DOE Recovery Act Funding. Blast Furnace Gas Recovery Boiler Provides Steam and Power at Steel Mill More Documents & Publications Capturing Waste Gas: Saves...

124

Assessment of opportunities to increase the recovery and recycling rates of waste oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste oil represents an important energy resource that, if properly managed and reused, would reduce US dependence on imported fuels. Literature and current practice regarding waste oil generation, regulations, collection, and reuse were reviewed to identify research needs and approaches to increase the recovery and recycling of this resource. The review revealed the need for research to address the following three waste oil challenges: (1) recover and recycle waste oil that is currently disposed of or misused; (2) identify and implement lubricating oil source and loss reduction opportunities; and (3) develop and foster an effective waste oil recycling infrastructure that is based on energy savings, reduced environment at impacts, and competitive economics. The United States could save an estimated 140 {times} 1012 Btu/yr in energy by meeting these challenges.

Graziano, D.J.; Daniels, E.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Waste Heat Recovery from High Temperature Off-Gases from Electric Arc Furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article presents a study and review of available waste heat in high temperature Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) off gases and heat recovery techniques/methods from these gases. It gives details of the quality and quantity of the sensible and chemical waste heat in typical EAF off gases, energy savings potential by recovering part of this heat, a comprehensive review of currently used waste heat recovery methods and potential for use of advanced designs to achieve a much higher level of heat recovery including scrap preheating, steam production and electric power generation. Based on our preliminary analysis, currently, for all electric arc furnaces used in the US steel industry, the energy savings potential is equivalent to approximately 31 trillion Btu per year or 32.7 peta Joules per year (approximately $182 million US dollars/year). This article describes the EAF off-gas enthalpy model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate available and recoverable heat energy for a given stream of exhaust gases coming out of one or multiple EAF furnaces. This Excel based model calculates sensible and chemical enthalpy of the EAF off-gases during tap to tap time accounting for variation in quantity and quality of off gases. The model can be used to estimate energy saved through scrap preheating and other possible uses such as steam generation and electric power generation using off gas waste heat. This article includes a review of the historical development of existing waste heat recovery methods, their operations, and advantages/limitations of these methods. This paper also describes a program to develop and test advanced concepts for scrap preheating, steam production and electricity generation through use of waste heat recovery from the chemical and sensible heat contained in the EAF off gases with addition of minimum amount of dilution or cooling air upstream of pollution control equipment such as bag houses.

Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Thekdi, Arvind [E3M Inc; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration in a Meat Processing Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A case study is reviewed on a heat recovery system installed in a meat processing facility to preheat water for the plant hot water supply. The system utilizes waste superheat from the facility's 1,350-ton ammonia refrigeration system. The heat...

Murphy, W. T.; Woods, B. E.; Gerdes, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act...

128

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cleanup Waste Management Waste Management July 15, 2014 Energy Expos Students work in groups to create hands-on exhibits about the energy sources that power the nation, ways to...

129

Catalytic bromine recovery from HBr waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste HBr is formed during the bromination of many organic molecules, such as flame retardants, pharmaceuticals, and agricultural chemicals. For over 50 years attempts to recover the bromine from waste HBr by catalytic oxidation have been unsuccessful due to low catalyst activity and stability. The discovery of a new high-activity catalysts with excellent long-term stability and life capable of high HBr conversion below 300{degrees}C has made catalytic oxidation of waste HBr commercially feasible. The oxidation of anhydrous HBr using oxygen is highly exothermic, giving an adiabatic temperature rise of 2000{degrees}C. Use of 48 wt% HBr in the oxidation reduces the adiabatic temperature rise to only 300{degrees}C. A multitubular heat exchanger type of reactor can then be used to manage the heat. A 5,000 kg/yr pilot plant was built to verify the performance of the catalyst, the suitability of the reactor materials of construction, and the multibular reactor concept. The pilot unit has a single full-scale reactor tube 4 m long and 2.54 cm in diameter with a hot oil jacket for heat management. Excellent catalyst stability was observed during a 600 h catalyst-life test. HBr conversion of 99% was maintained throughout the run, and over 360 kg of bromine was produced. The temperature at a localized hot spot near the reactor inlet was only 15-20{degrees}C above the reactor inlet temperature, indicating efficient heat management.

Schubert, P.F.; Beatty, R.D.; Mahajan, S. [Catalytica Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Recovery Act Funding Leads to Record Year for Transuranic Waste Shipments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With the help of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received the most transuranic waste shipments in a single year since waste operations began...

131

Use of photovoltaics for waste heat recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for recovering waste heat in the form of radiated light, e.g. red visible light and/or infrared light includes a housing having a viewing window, and a photovoltaic cell mounted in the housing in a relationship to the viewing window, wherein rays of radiated light pass through the viewing window and impinge on surface of the photovoltaic cell. The housing and/or the cell are cooled so that the device can be used with a furnace for an industrial process, e.g. mounting the device with a view of the interior of the heating chamber of a glass making furnace. In this manner, the rays of the radiated light generated during the melting of glass batch materials in the heating chamber pass through the viewing window and impinge on the surface of the photovoltaic cells to generate electric current which is passed onto an electric load.

Polcyn, Adam D

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

132

Resource Recovery from Solid Waste (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes the state's support for the expansion and development of industries and commercial establishments which provide markets for materials and energy which can be recovered...

133

Waste treatment and metal recovery at the Robbins Company  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Robbins Company, of Attleboro, Massachusetts, a medium-sized jewelry manufacturing and plating company, installed a new wastewater treatment and metal recovery system, which forms a closed-loop, completed in February, 1988. The company now generates very small quantities of hazardous wastes non-contact cooling water from the annealing furnaces, and intends to complete it`s water conservation program by installing one or more chillers on the furnaces. Since 1986, chemical usage has dropped 81.8%, hazardous waste generation 89% and water usage by 47.7%, generating an annual savings of over $71,000.

Clark, P.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartment ofof EnergyMotion

135

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Using Heat Pipes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For almost a decade now, heat pipes with secondary finned surfaces have been utilized in counter flow heat exchangers to recover sensible energy from industrial exhaust gases. Over 3,000 such heat exchangers are now in service, recovering...

Ruch, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Department of Energy Completes Five Recovery Act Projects - Moves...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Five Recovery Act Projects - Moves Closer to Completing Recovery Act Funded Work at Oak Ridge Site Department of Energy Completes Five Recovery Act Projects - Moves Closer to...

137

Evaluation of a fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system. A technical case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsors research and development (R&D) to improve the energy efficiency of American industry and to provide for fuel flexibility. Large amounts of heat escape regularly through the waste-gas streams of industrial processes, particularly those processes that use furnaces, kilns, and calciners. Recovering this waste heat will conserve energy; however, the extremely high temperatures and corrosive nature of many flue and exhaust gases make conventional heat recovery difficult. One solution is a waste-heat recovery system that can withstand the high temperatures and rids itself of corrosion-causing particulates. OIT and Aerojet Energy Conversion Company recently completed a joint project to develop just such a system and to evaluate its long-term operation. This technology, called fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery (FBWHR), offers several advantages over conventional heat recovery, including high gas-side heat-transfer coefficients and a self-cleaning capability. The FBWHR system can recover heat from high-temperature, dirty waste-gas streams, such as those found in the metals, glass, cement, chemical, and petroleum-refining industries. In this multiyear R&D project, Aerojet designed and fabricated an FBWHR system that recovers heat from the corrosive flue gases of aluminum melt furnaces to produce process steam for the plant. The system was installed on a 34-million-Btu/h furnace used to melt aluminum scrap at ALCOA`s Massena, New York plant. During a successful one-year field test, the system produced 26 million lb of 175-psig saturated steam, recovering as much as 28% of the fuel energy input to the furnace.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Evaluation of a fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsors research and development (R D) to improve the energy efficiency of American industry and to provide for fuel flexibility. Large amounts of heat escape regularly through the waste-gas streams of industrial processes, particularly those processes that use furnaces, kilns, and calciners. Recovering this waste heat will conserve energy; however, the extremely high temperatures and corrosive nature of many flue and exhaust gases make conventional heat recovery difficult. One solution is a waste-heat recovery system that can withstand the high temperatures and rids itself of corrosion-causing particulates. OIT and Aerojet Energy Conversion Company recently completed a joint project to develop just such a system and to evaluate its long-term operation. This technology, called fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery (FBWHR), offers several advantages over conventional heat recovery, including high gas-side heat-transfer coefficients and a self-cleaning capability. The FBWHR system can recover heat from high-temperature, dirty waste-gas streams, such as those found in the metals, glass, cement, chemical, and petroleum-refining industries. In this multiyear R D project, Aerojet designed and fabricated an FBWHR system that recovers heat from the corrosive flue gases of aluminum melt furnaces to produce process steam for the plant. The system was installed on a 34-million-Btu/h furnace used to melt aluminum scrap at ALCOA's Massena, New York plant. During a successful one-year field test, the system produced 26 million lb of 175-psig saturated steam, recovering as much as 28% of the fuel energy input to the furnace.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Waste-to-Energy 25 Years Later: Technology with a Past, Present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solution Quite a Ride: UpsQuite a Ride: Ups MacArthur Resource Recovery Facility Islip, New York #12; Waste-to-energy Falls, New York #12; European Union: waste-to- energy preferable to landfills European Union directives and Consulting Federation of New York Solid Waste Associations Solid Waste/Recycling Conference Federation of New

Columbia University

140

Exhaust Energy Recovery | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof EnergyHouse11 DOEExhaust energy recovery proposed to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Exhaust Energy Recovery | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof EnergyHouse11 DOEExhaust energy recovery proposed

142

Exhaust Energy Recovery | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof EnergyHouse11 DOEExhaust energy recovery

143

Exhaust Energy Recovery | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof EnergyHouse11 DOEExhaust energy recovery2010 DOE Vehicle

144

Exhaust Energy Recovery | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof EnergyHouse11 DOEExhaust energy recovery2010 DOE

145

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda, November 5-6, 2014, Arlington, Virginia....

146

Waste-to-Energy Forum  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The tenth in a series of planned U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development forums, this Tribal Leader Forum will focus on waste-to-energy...

147

Increase of unit efficiency by improved waste heat recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For coal-fired power plants with flue gas desulfurization by wet scrubbing and desulfurized exhaust gas discharge via cooling tower, a further improvement of new power plant efficiency is possible by exhaust gas heat recovery. The waste heat of exhaust gas is extracted in a flue gas cooler before the wet scrubber and recovered for combustion air and/or feedwater heating by either direct or indirect coupling of heat transfer. Different process configurations for heat recovery system are described and evaluated with regard to net unit improvement. For unite firing bituminous coal an increase of net unit efficiency of 0.25 to 0.7 percentage points and for lignite 0.7 to 1.6 percentage points can be realized depending on the process configurations of the heat recovery systems.

Bauer, G.; Lankes, F.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected plants · 8% (non-incinerable waste) and incineration ash goes to the offshore Semakau Landfill · To reach

Columbia University

149

Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act, ARRA, clean energy projects...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Recovery & Reinvestment Act, ARRA, clean energy projects, energy efficiency, smart grid, alternative fuels, geothermal energy American Recovery & Reinvestment Act, ARRA, clean...

151

Audit Report: The Department of Energy's American Recovery and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - California State Energy Program Audit Report: The Department of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - California...

152

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

three Recovery Act-funded Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. February 28, 2014 Smart Meter Investments Yield Positive Results in Maine Central Maine Power's (CMP) SGIG...

153

Department of ENENG/ME Spring 2012 Waste Heat Recovery for Small Engine Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of ENENG/ME Spring 2012 Waste Heat Recovery for Small Engine Applications Overview The purpose of this capstone project is to research, test, and apply waste heat recovery, engine temperatures, and various applications. These explored heat recovery technologies were

Demirel, Melik C.

154

Energy Recovery from Potato Chip Fryers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design, operating characteristics, and energy savings from an energy recovery system employed on a potato chip fryer which became operational in December, 1979, is discussed. The design incorporates a modification to an odor control system which...

McKee, H. B.; Kympton, H. W.; Arnold, J. W.; Paisan, J. J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Waste heat recovery in automobile engines : potential solutions and benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Less than 30% of the energy in a gallon of gasoline reaches the wheels of a typical car; most of the remaining energy is lost as heat. Since most of the energy consumed by an internal combustion engine is wasted, capturing ...

Ruiz, Joaquin G., 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

EXERGY ANALYSIS AND ENTROPY GENERATION MINIMIZATION OF THERMOELECTRIC WASTE HEAT RECOVERY FOR ELECTRONICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy recovery from waste heat is attracting more and more attention. All electronic systems consume electricity but only a fraction of it is used for information processing and for human interfaces, such as displays. Lots of energy is dissipated as heat. There are some discussions on waste heat recovery from the electronic systems such as laptop computers. However the efficiency of energy conversion for such utilization is not very attractive due to the maximum allowable temperature of the heat source devices. This leads to very low limits of Carnot efficiency. In contrast to thermodynamic heat engines, Brayton cycle, free piston Stirling engines, etc., authors previously reported that thermoelectric (TE) can be a cost-effective device if the TE and the heat sink are co-optimized, and if some parasitic effects could be reduced. Since the heat already exists and it is free, the additional cost and energy payback time are the key measures to evaluate the value of the energy recovery system. In this report, we will start with the optimum model of the TE power generation system. Then, theoretical maximum output, cost impact and energy payback are evaluated in the examples of electronics system. Entropy Generation Minimization (EGM) is a method already familiar in thermal management of electronics. The optimum thermoelectric waste heat recovery design is compared with the EGM approach. Exergy analysis evaluates the useful energy flow in the optimum TE system. This comprehensive analysis is used to predict the potential future impact of the TE material development, as the dimensionless figure-ofmerit (ZT) is improved.

Kazuaki Yazawa; Ali Shakouri

157

Optimum energy and by-product recovery in chlorinated hydrocarbon disposal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper covers the three principal areas of a chlorinated hydrocarbon waste disposal system for a typical vinyl chloride monomer facility. These are the incineration, the energy recovery system, and the by-product recovery system. It is shown that the overall efficiency of the energy and by-product recovery systems is dependent on the optimization of the primary combustor (incineration system). 11 refs.

Santoleri, J.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Recycling of Wasted Energy : ThermalOF THE DISSERTATION Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste heat Pyroelectric energy3 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Heat4 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Relaxor

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

EA-1862: Oneida Seven Generation Corporation Waste-To-Energy System, Ashwaubenon, Wisconsin  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Oneida’s Energy Recovery Project would construct and operate a solid waste-to-electricity power plant on vacant property within the Bayport Industrial Center in the City of Green Bay, Brown County, Wisconsin. This energy recovery process would involve bringing municipal solid waste into the plant for sizing (shredding), sorting (removing recyclable material), and conveying into one of three pyrolytic gasification systems.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Leaching studies for tin recovery from waste e-scrap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are the most essential components of all electrical and electronic equipments, which contain noteworthy quantity of metals, some of which are toxic to life and all of which are valuable resources. Therefore, recycling of PCBs is necessary for the safe disposal/utilization of these metals. Present paper is a part of developing Indo-Korean recycling technique consists of organic swelling pre-treatment technique for the liberation of thin layer of metallic sheet and the treatment of epoxy resin to remove/recover toxic soldering material. To optimize the parameters required for recovery of tin from waste PCBs, initially the bench scale studies were carried out using fresh solder (containing 52.6% Sn and 47.3% Pb) varying the acid concentration, temperature, mixing time and pulp density. The experimental data indicate that 95.79% of tin was leached out from solder material using 5.5 M HCl at fixed pulp density 50 g/L and temperature 90 Degree-Sign C in mixing time 165 min. Kinetic studies followed the chemical reaction controlled dense constant size cylindrical particles with activation energy of 117.68 kJ/mol. However, 97.79% of tin was found to be leached out from solder materials of liberated swelled epoxy resin using 4.5 M HCl at 90 Degree-Sign C, mixing time 60 min and pulp density 50 g/L. From the leach liquor of solder materials of epoxy resin, the precipitate of sodium stannate as value added product was obtained at pH 1.9. The Pb from the leach residue was removed by using 0.1 M nitric acid at 90 Degree-Sign C in mixing time 45 min and pulp density 10 g/L. The metal free epoxy resin could be disposed-of safely/used as filling material without affecting the environment.

Jha, Manis Kumar, E-mail: maniskrjha@gmail.com [Metal Extraction and Forming Division, National Metallurgical Laboratory (NML), Jamshedpur 831 007 (India); Choubey, Pankaj Kumar; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumari, Archana [Metal Extraction and Forming Division, National Metallurgical Laboratory (NML), Jamshedpur 831 007 (India); Lee, Jae-chun, E-mail: jclee@kigam.re.kr [Mineral Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kumar, Vinay [Metal Extraction and Forming Division, National Metallurgical Laboratory (NML), Jamshedpur 831 007 (India); Jeong, Jinki [Mineral Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Press Release Von Roll Inova to build the UK's largest energy-from-waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and regenerative heat recovery is used to boost the plant's overall energy efficiency. The majority of the wastePress Release Von Roll Inova to build the UK's largest energy-from-waste plant Zürich, September, 1 Roll Inova will build the UK's largest energy-from-waste facility. The contract is worth approximately

Columbia University

163

Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chinese translation of ITP fact sheet about installing Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces. For most fuel-fired heating equipment, a large amount of the heat supplied is wasted as exhaust or flue gases. In furnaces, air and fuel are mixed and burned to generate heat, some of which is transferred to the heating device and its load. When the heat transfer reaches its practical limit, the spent combustion gases are removed from the furnace via a flue or stack. At this point, these gases still hold considerable thermal energy. In many systems, this is the greatest single heat loss. The energy efficiency can often be increased by using waste heat gas recovery systems to capture and use some of the energy in the flue gas. For natural gas-based systems, the amount of heat contained in the flue gases as a percentage of the heat input in a heating system can be estimated by using Figure 1. Exhaust gas loss or waste heat depends on flue gas temperature and its mass flow, or in practical terms, excess air resulting from combustion air supply and air leakage into the furnace. The excess air can be estimated by measuring oxygen percentage in the flue gases.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Waste heat recovery steam curves with unfired HRSGs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compilation of waste heat recovery steam curves for a sampling of gas turbines ranging in output from around 1 MW to more than 200 MW is presented. The gas turbine output data shown with each set of curves differs from the values given in the Performance Specifications section of the Handbook. That's because the values have been calculated to reflect the effects of a 4 inch inlet and 10 inch outlet pressure drop on power output (lower), heat rate (higher), mass flow (higher), and exhaust temperature (higher).

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Process for the recovery of curium-244 from nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process has been designed for the recovery of curium from purex waste. Curium and americium are separated from the lanthanides by a TALSPEAK extraction process using differential extraction. Equations were derived for the estimation of the economically optimum conditions for the extraction using laboratory batch extraction data. The preparation of feed for the extraction involves the removal of nitric acid from the Purex waste by vaporization under reduced pressure, the leaching of soluble nitrates from the resulting cake, and the oxalate precipitation of a pure lanthanide-actinide fraction. Final separation of the curium from americium is done by ion-exchange. The steps of the process, except ion-exchange, were tested on a laboratory scale and workable conditions were determined.

Posey, J.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Maximization of revenues for power sales from a solid waste resources recovery facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report discusses the actual implementation of the best alternative in selling electrical power generated by an existing waste-to-energy facility, the Metro-Dade County Resources Recovery Plant. After the plant processes and extracts various products out of the municipal solid waste, it burns it to produce electrical power. The price for buying power to satisfy the internal needs of our Resources Recovery Facility (RRF) is substantially higher than the power price for selling electricity to any other entity. Therefore, without any further analysis, it was decided to first satisfy those internal needs and then export the excess power. Various alternatives were thoroughly explored as to what to do with the excess power. Selling power to the power utilities or utilizing the power in other facilities were the primary options.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Energy Recovery Systems...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Recovery Systems and Controlling Exhaust Gases Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Energy Recovery Systems and Controlling Exhaust Gases The typical internal...

168

Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery Act for Nevada Geothermal Project Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery Act for Nevada...

169

Mineral Recovery Creates Revenue Stream for Geothermal Energy...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Mineral Recovery Creates Revenue Stream for Geothermal Energy Development Mineral Recovery Creates Revenue Stream for Geothermal Energy Development January 21, 2014 - 12:00am...

170

Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Recovery...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Recovery Program Plan Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Recovery Program Plan Microsoft Word - OE PSRP June 5 2009...

171

Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry A...

172

Treasury, Energy Announce More Than $2 Billion in Recovery Act...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Recovery Act to increase US manufacturing output, improve energy efficiency, and develop alternative sources of energy." The Recovery Act created a new tax credit program by...

173

RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle...

174

Laboratories for the 21st Century Best Practices: Energy Recovery...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laboratories for the 21st Century Best Practices: Energy Recovery in Laboratory Facilities Laboratories for the 21st Century Best Practices: Energy Recovery in Laboratory...

175

California's Energy Recovery and Reinvestment Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency measures - $25 million · Green Job Workforce - $20 millionGreen Job Workforce $20 million · EnergyCalifornia's Energy Recovery and Reinvestment Act P I iti tiProgram Initiatives November 18, 2009 Director Economic Stimulus Program California Energy CommissionCalifornia Energy Commission #12

176

Evaluation of Waste Heat Recovery and Utilization from Residential Appliances and Fixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary In every home irrespective of its size, location, age, or efficiency, heat in the form of drainwater or dryer exhaust is wasted. Although from a waste stream, this energy has the potential for being captured, possibly stored, and then reused for preheating hot water or air thereby saving operating costs to the homeowner. In applications such as a shower and possibly a dryer, waste heat is produced at the same time as energy is used, so that a heat exchanger to capture the waste energy and return it to the supply is all that is needed. In other applications such as capturing the energy in drainwater from a tub, dishwasher, or washing machine, the availability of waste heat might not coincide with an immediate use for energy, and consequently a heat exchanger system with heat storage capacity (i.e. a regenerator) would be necessary. This study describes a two-house experimental evaluation of a system designed to capture waste heat from the shower, dishwasher clothes washer and dryer, and to use this waste heat to offset some of the hot water energy needs of the house. Although each house was unoccupied, they were fitted with equipment that would completely simulate the heat loads and behavior of human occupants including operating the appliances and fixtures on a demand schedule identical to Building American protocol (Hendron, 2009). The heat recovery system combined (1) a gravity-film heat exchanger (GFX) installed in a vertical section of drainline, (2) a heat exchanger for capturing dryer exhaust heat, (3) a preheat tank for storing the captured heat, and (4) a small recirculation pump and controls, so that the system could be operated anytime that waste heat from the shower, dishwasher, clothes washer and dryer, and in any combination was produced. The study found capturing energy from the dishwasher and clothes washer to be a challenge since those two appliances dump waste water over a short time interval. Controls based on the status of the dump valve on these two appliances would have eliminated uncertainty in knowing when waste water was flowing and the recovery system operated. The study also suggested that capture of dryer exhaust heat to heat incoming air to the dryer should be examined as an alternative to using drying exhaust energy for water heating. The study found that over a 6-week test period, the system in each house was able to recover on average approximately 3000 W-h of waste heat daily from these appliance and showers with slightly less on simulated weekdays and slightly more on simulated weekends which were heavy wash/dry days. Most of these energy savings were due to the shower/GFX operation, and the least savings were for the dishwasher/GFX operation. Overall, the value of the 3000 W-h of displaced energy would have been $0.27/day based on an electricity price of $.09/kWh. Although small for today s convention house, these savings are significant for a home designed to approach maximum affordable efficiency where daily operating costs for the whole house are less than a dollar per day. In 2010 the actual measured cost of energy in one of the simulated occupancy houses which waste heat recovery testing was undertaken was $0.77/day.

Tomlinson, John J [ORNL; Christian, Jeff [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in hybrid vehicles to reduce their oil use, vehicle emissions and fuel costs. March 7, 2013 Fair Oaks Farms and AMP Americas Transform Waste into Fuel Learn how an Indiana dairy...

178

AUSTRIA SHOWCASE WASTE-to-ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 AUSTRIA SHOWCASE WASTE-to-ENERGY in AUSTRIA AECC Aberdeen Exhibition & Conference Center management in EU countries · Separated collection: Recycling and Waste-to-Energy · Development of emission standards for waste incineration · Examples for Waste-to-Energy projects in Austria · Waste-to-Energy

179

Waste Heat Doesn't Have to be a Waste of Money- The American & Efird Heat Recovery Project: A First for the Textile Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"WASTE HEAT DOESN'T HAVE TO BE A WASTE OF MONEY" THE AMERICAN & EFIRD HEAT RECOVERY PROJECT: A FIRST FOR THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY STEVE W. SMITH, P.E., Program Manager Electrotechnology Sales Duke Power Company Charlotte, NC In 1989 American... and finishing Finishing Plant was targeted as an ideal operations recover energy from their site for a process heat pump installation. wastewater discharges usjng shell and tube Over a three year period, 1987-1990, Duke heat exchangers and preheat incoming...

Smith, S. W.

180

Solid Waste as an Energy Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. PROCESS The solLd waste energy conversion system bullt by Kelley Company consists of a combustion unit and an energy recovery boLler. The combustion unit uses a two stage process; the refuse is fLrst converted to gases by a pyrolysis process... wlll be conslderably lower than the temperature that woulq be achleved If stoichiometrlc air to fuel ratlo was malntained. The resulting temperatures In the pyrolysis chamber ranges from 1200 0 to 1500 o P. The low a lr lnput, as compared wlth...

Erlandsson, K. I.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Waste heat recovery systems in the sugar industry: An Indian perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article identifies the key role of the sugar industry in the rural development of developing countries. The Indian sugar industry, already second largest among the country`s processing industries, shows even greater potential, according to the Plan Documents (shown in a table). The potential of waste heat in sugar processing plants, which produce white crystal sugar using the double sulphitation clarification process, is estimated at 5757.9 KJ/kg of sugar. Efficient waste heat recovery (WHR) systems could help arrest the trend of increasing production costs. This would help the sugar industry not only in India, but in many other countries as well. The innovative methods suggested and discussed briefly in this article include dehydration of prepared cane, bagasse drying, and juice heating using waste heat. These methods can reduce the cost of energy in sugar production by at least 10% and improve efficiency and productivity.

Madnaik, S.D.; Jadhav, M.G. [Walchand Inst. of Tech., Maharashtra (India)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A ground-coupled storage heat pump system with waste heat recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on an experimental single-family residence that was constructed to demonstrate integration of waste heat recovery and seasonal energy storage using both a ventilating and a ground-coupled heat pump. Called the Idaho energy Conservation Technology House, it combines superinsulated home construction with a ventilating hot water heater and a ground coupled water-to-water heat pump system. The ground heat exchangers are designed to economically promote seasonal and waste heat storage. Construction of the house was completed in the spring of 1989. Located in Moscow, Idaho, the house is occupied by a family of three. The 3,500 ft{sup 2} (325 m{sup 2}) two-story house combines several unique sub-systems that all interact to minimize energy consumption for space heating and cooling, and domestic hot water.

Drown, D.C.; Braven, K.R.D. (Univ. of Idaho, ID (US)); Kast, T.P. (Thermal Dynamic Towers, Boulder, CO (US))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Determinants of sustainability in solid waste management - The Gianyar Waste Recovery Project in Indonesia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our assessment tool helps evaluate success factors in solid waste projects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Success of the composting plant in Indonesia is linked to its community integration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appropriate technology is not a main determining success factor for sustainability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structured assessment of 'best practices' can enhance replication in other cities. - Abstract: According to most experts, integrated and sustainable solid waste management should not only be given top priority, but must go beyond technical aspects to include various key elements of sustainability to ensure success of any solid waste project. Aside from project sustainable impacts, the overall enabling environment is the key feature determining performance and success of an integrated and affordable solid waste system. This paper describes a project-specific approach to assess typical success or failure factors. A questionnaire-based assessment method covers issues of: (i) social mobilisation and acceptance (social element), (ii) stakeholder, legal and institutional arrangements comprising roles, responsibilities and management functions (institutional element); (iii) financial and operational requirements, as well as cost recovery mechanisms (economic element). The Gianyar Waste Recovery Project in Bali, Indonesia was analysed using this integrated assessment method. The results clearly identified chief characteristics, key factors to consider when planning country wide replication but also major barriers and obstacles which must be overcome to ensure project sustainability. The Gianyar project consists of a composting unit processing 60 tons of municipal waste per day from 500,000 inhabitants, including manual waste segregation and subsequent composting of the biodegradable organic fraction.

Zurbruegg, Christian, E-mail: zurbrugg@eawag.ch [Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries (Sandec), Ueberlandstrasse 133, P.O. Box 611, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Gfrerer, Margareth, E-mail: margareth.gfrerer@gmx.net [Faculty of Engineering, University of Indonesia, Depok Campus, 16424 Jakarta (Indonesia); Ashadi, Henki, E-mail: henki@eng.ui.ac.id [Faculty of Engineering, University of Indonesia, Depok Campus, 16424 Jakarta (Indonesia); Brenner, Werner, E-mail: werner.brenner@gmx.at [Faculty of Engineering, University of Indonesia, Depok Campus, 16424 Jakarta (Indonesia); Kueper, David, E-mail: dkuper@indo.net.id [Yayasan Pemilahan Sampah Temesi, Temsi-Gianyar, Bali (Indonesia)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and Launches theResidentialRecovery Act State SummariesPast

185

Thermal Energy Storage/Heat Recovery and Energy Conservation in Food Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discharges can be made more economically attrac tank holding several thousand gallons of water tive by incorporating thermal energy storage in a maintained at 128-130?F. This scald tank is con heat recovery system. Thermal energy storage can stantly... the ultimate energy end use. of wasting this hot water to the plant drain, a heat A project conducted by the Georgia Tech exchanger was installed at the Gold Kist plant to Engineering Experiment Station to demonstrate preheat scald tank makeup water...

Combes, R. S.; Boykin, W. B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Energy utilization: municipal waste incineration. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment is made of the technical and economical feasibility of converting municipal waste into useful and useable energy. The concept presented involves retrofitting an existing municipal incinerator with the systems and equipment necessary to produce process steam and electric power. The concept is economically attractive since the cost of necessary waste heat recovery equipment is usually a comparatively small percentage of the cost of the original incinerator installation. Technical data obtained from presently operating incinerators designed specifically for generating energy, documents the technical feasibility and stipulates certain design constraints. The investigation includes a cost summary; description of process and facilities; conceptual design; economic analysis; derivation of costs; itemized estimated costs; design and construction schedule; and some drawings.

LaBeck, M.F.

1981-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

187

WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key...

188

Energy implications of integrated solid waste management systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study develops estimates of energy use and recovery from managing municipal solid waste (MSW) under various collection, processing, and disposal scenarios. We estimate use and recovery -- or energy balance -- resulting from MSW management activities such as waste collection, transport, processing, and disposal, as well as indirect use and recovery linked to secondary materials manufacturing using recycled materials. In our analysis, secondary materials manufacturing displaces virgin materials manufacturing for 13 representative products. Energy implications are expressed as coefficients that measure the net energy saving (or use) of displacing products made from virgin versus recycled materials. Using data developed for the 1992 New York City Master Plan as a starting point, we apply our method to an analysis of various collection systems and 30 types of facilities to illustrate bow energy balances shift as management systems are modified. In sum, all four scenarios show a positive energy balance indicating the energy and advantage of integrated systems versus reliance on one or few technology options. That is, energy produced or saved exceeds the energy used to operate the solid waste system. The largest energy use impacts are attributable to processing, including materials separation and composting. Collection and transportation energy are relatively minor contributors. The largest two contributors to net energy savings are waste combustion and energy saved by processing recycled versus virgin materials. An accompanying spatial analysis methodology allocates energy use and recovery to New York City, New York State outside the city, the U.S., and outside the U.S. Our analytical approach is embodied in a spreadsheet model that can be used by energy and solid waste analysts to estimate impacts of management scenarios at the state and substate level.

Little, R.E.; McClain, G.; Becker, M.; Ligon, P.; Shapiro, K.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 31, 2013. December 18, 2013 BPA Wins Platts Global Energy Award for Grid Optimization Platts awarded the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) a Global Energy Award for...

190

EnergyEfficiency Energy:Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EnergyEfficiency­ Energy:Waste Copyright © 2012 by Taylor & Francis. All rights reserved equivalence; the c is the speed of light in a vacuum); thus, mass and energy are interrelated. Mass and energy cars and trains, and boats and planes. It bakes food and keeps it frozen for storage. Energy lights our

Kostic, Milivoje M.

191

Energy Secretary Chu Announces $138 Million in Recovery Act Funding...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

38 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in Ohio Energy Secretary Chu Announces 138 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in Ohio March 31,...

192

Energy Secretary Chu Announces $148 million in Recovery Act Funding...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

48 million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New York Energy Secretary Chu Announces 148 million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New York...

193

Energy Secretary Chu Announces $384 Million in Recovery Act Funding...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

384 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New Mexico Energy Secretary Chu Announces 384 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New...

194

ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers biomass-firedboilers.pdf More Documents &...

195

Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery Act for Nevada Geothermal Project Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery Act for Nevada Geothermal Project September...

196

Treasury, Energy Surpass $1 Billion Milestone in Recovery Act...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Secretary Steven Chu hosted a group of clean energy developers and manufacturers at the White House to discuss how the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act) is...

197

Energy Secretary Chu Announces $79 Million in Recovery Act Funding...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

79 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in Kentucky Energy Secretary Chu Announces 79 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in Kentucky...

198

Municipal solid waste combustion: Waste-to-energy technologies, regulations, and modern facilities in USEPA Region V  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Table of Contents: Incinerator operations (Waste preprocessing, combustion, emissions characterization and emission control, process monitoring, heat recovery, and residual ash management); Waste-to-energy regulations (Permitting requirements and operating regulations on both state and Federal levels); Case studies of EPA Region V waste-to-energy facilities (Polk County, Minnesota; Jackson County, Michigan; La Crosse, Wisconsin; Kent County, Michigan; Elk River, Minnesota; Indianapolis, Indiana); Evaluation; and Conclusions.

Sullivan, P.M.; Hallenbeck, W.H.; Brenniman, G.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

An LCA model for waste incineration enhanced with new technologies for metal recovery and application to the case of Switzerland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • An enhanced process-based LCA model for MSWI is featured and applied in case study. • LCA modeling of recent technological developments for metal recovery from fly ash. • Net release from Swiss MSWI 133 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne waste from attributional LCA perspective. • Net savings from a consequential LCA perspective reach up to 303 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne waste. • Impacts according to ReCiPe and CExD show similar pattern to climate change. - Abstract: A process model of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) and new technologies for metal recovery from combustion residues was developed. The environmental impact is modeled as a function of waste composition as well as waste treatment and material recovery technologies. The model includes combustion with a grate incinerator, several flue gas treatment technologies, electricity and steam production from waste heat recovery, metal recovery from slag and fly ash, and landfilling of residues and can be tailored to specific plants and sites (software tools can be downloaded free of charge). Application of the model to Switzerland shows that the treatment of one tonne of municipal solid waste results on average in 425 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. generated in the incineration process, and 54 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. accrue in upstream processes such as waste transport and the production of operating materials. Downstream processes, i.e. residue disposal, generates 5 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Savings from energy recovery are in the range of 67 to 752 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. depending on the assumptions regarding the substituted energy production, while the recovery of metals from slag and fly ash currently results in a net saving of approximately 35 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. A similar impact pattern is observed when assessing the MSWI model for aggregated environmental impacts (ReCiPe) and for non-renewable resource consumption (cumulative exergy demand), except that direct emissions have less and no relevance, respectively, on the total score. The study illustrates that MSWI plants can be an important element of industrial ecology as they provide waste disposal services and can help to close material and energetic cycles.

Boesch, Michael E. [Aveny GmbH, Schwandenholzstr. 212, CH-8046 Zürich (Switzerland); Vadenbo, Carl, E-mail: vadenbo@ifu.baug.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Schafmattstrasse 6, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Saner, Dominik [Swiss Post, Communications, Politics and Social Responsibility, Viktoriastrasse 21, P.O. Box, CH-3030 Berne (Switzerland); Huter, Christoph [City of Zürich, ERZ Entsorgung - Recycling Zürich, Hagenholzstrasse 110, P.O. Box, CH-8050 Zürich (Switzerland); Hellweg, Stefanie [ETH Zurich, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Schafmattstrasse 6, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy.gov series -- Smart Grid Week -- highlights efforts across the country to transform the nation's electric grid. Learn how you can share your own thoughts and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Department of Energy - Recovery Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

339 en Municipal Utilities' Investment in Smart Grid Technologies Improves Services and Lowers Costs http:energy.govoearticlesmunicipal-utilities-investment-smart-grid-technol...

202

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartmentEnergyFrequency | Department ofMay 14, 2014November 2,

203

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartmentEnergyFrequency | Department ofMay 14, 2014November 2,Total

204

Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is [dis]associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Gorski, A.J.; Daniels, E.J.

1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

205

Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

Harkness, John B. L. (Naperville, IL); Gorski, Anthony J. (Woodridge, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergy DataRemediated | Department ofEnergyAbout FEMP »

207

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heat from athermal energy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Recycling and recovery routes of plastic solid waste (PSW): A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plastic solid waste (PSW) presents challenges and opportunities to societies regardless of their sustainability awareness and technological advances. In this paper, recent progress in the recycling and recovery of PSW is reviewed. A special emphasis is paid on waste generated from polyolefinic sources, which makes up a great percentage of our daily single-life cycle plastic products. The four routes of PSW treatment are detailed and discussed covering primary (re-extrusion), secondary (mechanical), tertiary (chemical) and quaternary (energy recovery) schemes and technologies. Primary recycling, which involves the re-introduction of clean scrap of single polymer to the extrusion cycle in order to produce products of the similar material, is commonly applied in the processing line itself but rarely applied among recyclers, as recycling materials rarely possess the required quality. The various waste products, consisting of either end-of-life or production (scrap) waste, are the feedstock of secondary techniques, thereby generally reduced in size to a more desirable shape and form, such as pellets, flakes or powders, depending on the source, shape and usability. Tertiary treatment schemes have contributed greatly to the recycling status of PSW in recent years. Advanced thermo-chemical treatment methods cover a wide range of technologies and produce either fuels or petrochemical feedstock. Nowadays, non-catalytic thermal cracking (thermolysis) is receiving renewed attention, due to the fact of added value on a crude oil barrel and its very valuable yielded products. But a fact remains that advanced thermo-chemical recycling of PSW (namely polyolefins) still lacks the proper design and kinetic background to target certain desired products and/or chemicals. Energy recovery was found to be an attainable solution to PSW in general and municipal solid waste (MSW) in particular. The amount of energy produced in kilns and reactors applied in this route is sufficiently investigated up to the point of operation, but not in terms of integration with either petrochemical or converting plants. Although primary and secondary recycling schemes are well established and widely applied, it is concluded that many of the PSW tertiary and quaternary treatment schemes appear to be robust and worthy of additional investigation.

Al-Salem, S.M. [Centre for CO-2 Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Process Engineering, University College London (UCL), Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.al-salem@ucl.ac.uk; Lettieri, P.; Baeyens, J. [Centre for CO-2 Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Process Engineering, University College London (UCL), Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |Rebecca MatulkaDeliveryUpdated November 2011LAS

210

Energy from Waste: Preparing Today for Tomorrow's Energy Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--has been a pioneer in the research and development of resource recovery systems. Work in the areas of pyrolysis, froth flotation for glass recovery and eddy current separation for aluminum recovery has been sponsored for many years. Occidental in 1977...-8. 9. J. W. Regan, J. F. Mullen, R. D. Nickerson, "Suspension Firing of Solid Waste Fuels," American Power Conference, 1969. 10. L. J. Westin, "Spreader Stoker Steam Generators Combined with Industrial Waste Incineration," ASME Grates...

Krueger, R. P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »ExchangeDepartment ofManagementManagement Records

212

Heat recovery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridorPart A PermitValles Caldera, New Mexico

213

Recovery Act Recipient Data | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Recovery Act Recipient Data Recovery Act Recipient Data A listing of all Recovery Act recipients and their allocations. Updated weekly. recoveryactfunding.xls More Documents &...

214

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gets Free Cooling Through Waste Heat Recovery. Washington,Process Integration and Waste Heat Recovery in Lithuanianto make good use of waste heat and solar energy." Progress

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Wastes from plutonium conversion and scrap recovery operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report deals with the handling of defense-related wastes associated with plutonium processing. It first defines the different waste categories along with the techniques used to assess waste content. It then discusses the various treatment approaches used in recovering plutonium from scrap. Next, it addresses the various waste management approaches necessary to handle all wastes. Finally, there is a discussion of some future areas for processing with emphasis on waste reduction. 91 refs., 25 figs., 4 tabs.

Christensen, D.C.; Bowersox, D.F.; McKerley, B.J.; Nance, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Recovery Newsletters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research | DepartmentDepartmentHatch,DepartmentDeliveryMay 1,Here youOctober 1, 2011

217

Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces; Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) Energy Tips - Process Heating Tip Sheet #8 (Fact Sheet).  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S.Indianaof Energy2-02 InspectionS10IS00719IG-17

218

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Heat4 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using RelaxorWaste heat Pyroelectric energy

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biological thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heatpower plants, solar thermal energy, geothermal energy, oceansolar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Industrial HVAC Air-to-Air Energy Recovery Retrofit Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Retrofitting air-to-air energy recovery equipment is relatively simply to design and easy to install. Additionally, HVAC energy recovery is almost risk free when compared to process retrofit. Life cycle cost analysis is the best way to illustrate...

Graham, E. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery and Climate Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Overview of progress in TE waste heat recovery from sedan gasoline-engine exhaust, TE HVAC system in hybrid sedan, and establishing targets for cost, power density, packaging, durability, and systems integration

222

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by GenTherm at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about thermoelectric waste heat recovery...

223

Process Waste Heat Recovery in the Food Industry - A System Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis of an industrial waste heat recovery system concept is discussed. For example purposes, a food processing plant operating an ammonia refrigeration system for storage and blast freezing is considered. Heat is withdrawn from...

Lundberg, W. L.; Mutone, G. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Bypass valve and coolant flow controls for optimum temperatures in waste heat recovery systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Implementing an optimized waste heat recovery system includes calculating a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a heat exchanger of a waste heat recovery system, and predicting a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a material flowing through a channel of the waste heat recovery system. Upon determining the rate of change in the temperature of the material is predicted to be higher than the rate of change in the temperature of the heat exchanger, the optimized waste heat recovery system calculates a valve position and timing for the channel that is configurable for achieving a rate of material flow that is determined to produce and maintain a defined threshold temperature of the heat exchanger, and actuates the valve according to the calculated valve position and calculated timing.

Meisner, Gregory P

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

225

California Energy Commission GUIDANCE ON WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Energy Commission GUIDANCE GUIDANCE ON WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANS FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY) obtain waste management plans for each proposed project receiving funding under the Energy Efficiency of waste. The Energy Commission is providing the following guidance to assist recipients of EECBG Program

226

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is onModelingFederal EnergyWaste Heat WasteDepartment of

227

Waste heat recovery: Textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning descriptions and evaluations of waste heat recovery operations used in the textile industry. Heat recovery and utilization from wastewater streams, flue gas, finishing processes, dyeing operations, and air jet systems are presented. The use of waste heat for space heating and process preheating is considered. (Contains a minimum of 162 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Evaluate Supply and Recovery of Woody Biomass for Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass Recovery DataContrasting Woody Biomass Recovery Data Forest Biomass Supply in the Southeastern4/11/2011 1 Evaluate Supply and Recovery of Woody Biomass for Energy Production from Natural. Other studies of biomass supply have supply have assumedassumed a technical recovery rate

Gray, Matthew

229

A Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to achieve proposed fuel economy requirements, engines must make better use of the available fuel energy. Regardless of how efficient the engine is, there will still be a significant fraction of the fuel energy that is rejected in the exhaust and coolant streams. One viable technology for recovering this waste heat is an Organic Rankine Cycle. This cycle heats a working fluid using these heat streams and expands the fluid through a turbine to produce shaft power. The present work was the development of such a system applied to a light duty diesel engine. This lab demonstration was designed to maximize the peak brake thermal efficiency of the engine, and the combined system achieved an efficiency of 44.4%. The design of the system is discussed, as are the experimental performance results. The system potential at typical operating conditions was evaluated to determine the practicality of installing such a system in a vehicle.

Briggs, Thomas E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Nafziger, Eric J [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

[Waste water heat recovery system]. Final report, September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production capabilities for and field testing of the heat recovery system are described briefly. Drawings are included.

Not Available

1993-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

231

Towards model-based control of a steam Rankine process for engine waste heat recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards model-based control of a steam Rankine process for engine waste heat recovery Johan Peralez steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery from a spark-ignition engine, focusing in particular results on a steam process for SI engines, [3] on generic control issues and [4] which provides a comp

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

232

The Beckett System Recovery and Utilization of Low Grade Waste Heat From Flue Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE BECKETT SYSTEM RECOVERY AND UTILIZATION OF LOW GRADE WASTE HEAT FROM FLUE GAS Wilfred R. Henderson Blenkhorn & Sawle Ltd. St. Catharines, Ontario Joseph F. DeBiase John Deere WeIland I%rks WeIland, Ontario ABSTRACT The Beckett Heat Recovery...

Henderson, W. R.; DeBiase, J. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Improved energy recovery from geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of a liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir in response to production from different horizons is studied using numerical simulation methods. The Olkaria geothermal field in Kenya is used as an example where a two-phase vapor-dominated zone overlies the main liquid-dominated reservoir. The possibility of improving energy recovery from vapor-dominated reservoirs by tapping deeper horizons is considered.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Waste to Energy: Biogas CHP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Southside Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Cogeneration Project November 9, 2011 2011 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference ?Turning Waste Into Energy? What to Expect ? ? Southside Overview ? Wastewater Treatment Process... gallons per day ? Processes and disposes over 150 tons of solids/day from both of the City?s wastewater treatment plants What is Biogas? ? Biogas is the methane (CH4) produced as a by-product of the anaerobic digestion process at the Southside...

Wagner, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Towards Energy and Resource Efficient Manufacturing: A Processes and Systems Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industry by Cascade Use of waste Energy, Energy Conversion.186] Sternlicht B (1982) Waste Energy Recovery: An Excellentterms of reuse of waste and lost energy streams. Enterprise/

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -- Florida State Energy Program"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) provides grants to states, territories, and the District of Columbia to support their energy priorities through the State Energy Program (SEP). The SEP provides Federal financial assistance to carry out energy efficiency and renewable energy projects that meet each state's unique energy needs while also addressing national goals such as energy security. Federal funding is based on a grant formula that takes into account population and energy consumption. The SEP emphasizes the state's role as the decision maker and administrator for the program. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) expanded the SEP, authorizing $3.1 billion in grants. Based on existing grant formulas and after reviewing state-level plans, EERE made awards to states. The State of Florida's Energy Office (Florida) was allocated $126 million - a 90-fold increase over Florida's average annual SEP grant of $1.4 million. Per the Recovery Act, this funding must be obligated by September 30, 2010, and spent by April 30, 2012. As of March 10, 2010, Florida had expended $13.2 million of the SEP Recovery Act funds. Florida planned to use its grant funds to undertake activities that would preserve and create jobs; save energy; increase renewable energy sources; and, reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To accomplish Recovery Act objectives, states could either fund new or expand existing projects. As a condition of the awards, EERE required states to develop and implement sound internal controls over the use of Recovery Act funds. Based on the significant increase in funding from the Recovery Act, we initiated this review to determine whether Florida had internal controls in place to provide assurance that the goals of the SEP and Recovery Act will be met and accomplished efficiently and effectively. We identified weaknesses in the implementation of SEP Recovery Act projects that have adversely impacted Florida's ability to meet the goals of the SEP and the Recovery Act. Specifically: (1) Florida used about $8.3 million to pay for activities that did not meet the intent of the Recovery Act to create new or save existing jobs. With the approval of the Department, Florida used these funds to pay for rebates related to solar energy projects that had been completed prior to passage of the Recovery Act; (2) State officials did not meet Florida's program goals to obligate all Recovery Act funds by January 1, 2010, thus delaying projects and preventing them from achieving the desired stimulative economic impact. Obligations were delayed because Florida officials selected a number of projects that either required a lengthy review and approval process or were specifically prohibited. In June 2009, the Department notified Florida that a number of projects would not be approved; however, as of April 1, 2010, the State had not acted to name replacement projects or move funds to other projects; (3) Florida officials had not ensured that 7 of the 18 award requirements for Recovery Act funding promulgated by the Department had been passed down to sub-recipients of the award, as required; and, (4) Certain internal control weaknesses that could jeopardize the program and increase the risk of fraud, waste and abuse were identified in the Solar Energy System Incentives Program during our September 2009 visit to Florida. These included a lack of separation of duties related to the processing of rebates and deficiencies in the written procedures for grant managers to review and approve rebates. From a forward looking perspective, absent aggressive corrective action, these weaknesses threaten Florida's efforts to meet future Recovery Act goals. In response to our review, Florida took corrective action to incorporate the additional award requirements in sub-recipient documents. It also instituted additional controls to correct the internal control weaknesses we identified. More, however, needs to be done with respect to Department oversight. This report details the circumstances sur

None

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The potential environmental gains from recycling waste plastics: Simulation of transferring recycling and recovery technologies to Shenyang, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Urban symbiosis creates compatibility of industrial development and waste management. {yields} Mechanical technology leads to more CO{sub 2} emission reduction. {yields} Energy recovery technology leads to more fossil fuel saving. {yields} Clean energy makes recycling technologies cleaner. {yields} Demand management is crucial for realizing potential environmental gains of recycling. - Abstract: With the increasing attention on developing a low-carbon economy, it is necessary to seek appropriate ways on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through innovative municipal solid waste management (MSWM), such as urban symbiosis. However, quantitative assessments on the environmental benefits of urban symbiosis, especially in developing countries, are limited because only a limited number of planned synergistic activities have been successful and it is difficult to acquire detailed inventory data from private companies. This paper modifies and applies a two-step simulation system and used it to assess the potential environmental benefits, including the reduction of GHG emissions and saving of fossil fuels, by employing various Japanese plastics recycling/energy-recovery technologies in Shenyang, China. The results showed that among various recycling/energy-recovery technologies, the mechanical waste plastics recycling technology, which produces concrete formwork boards (NF boards), has the greatest potential in terms of reducing GHG emissions (1.66 kg CO{sub 2}e/kg plastics), whereas the technology for the production of refuse plastic fuel (RPF) has the greatest potential on saving fossil fuel consumption (0.77 kgce/kg-plastics). Additional benefits can be gained by applying combined technologies that cascade the utilization of waste plastics. Moreover, the development of clean energy in conjunction with the promotion of new waste plastics recycling programs could contribute to additional reductions in GHG emissions and fossil fuel consumption.

Chen Xudong, E-mail: chen.xudong@nies.go.jp [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya City 464-8601 (Japan); Xi Fengming [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Geng Yong, E-mail: gengyong@iae.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Fujita, Tsuyoshi [National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya City 464-8601 (Japan)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

High efficiency waste to energy facility -- Pilot plant design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste To Energy facilities are commonly acceptable to the environment and give benefits in two main areas: one is a hygienic waste disposal and another is waste heat energy recovery to save fossil fuel consumption. Recovered energy is used for electricity supply, and it is required to increase the efficiency of refuse to electric energy conversion, and to spread the plant construction throughout the country of Japan, by the government. The national project started in 1992, and pilot plant design details were established in 1995. The objective of the project is to get 30% of energy conversion efficiency through the measure by raising the steam temperature and pressure to 500 C and 9.8 MPa respectively. The pilot plant is operating under the design conditions, which verify the success of applied technologies. This paper describes key technologies which were used to design the refuse burning boiler, which generates the highest steam temperature and pressure steam.

Orita, Norihiko; Kawahara, Yuuzou; Takahashi, Kazuyoshi; Yamauchi, Toru; Hosoda, Takuo

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Cummins Waste Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebratePartners with Siemens onSiteDepartment ofMay 16, 2013

240

Material Recovery and Waste Form Development FY 2014 Accomplishments Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Develop advanced nuclear fuel cycle separation and waste management technologies that improve current fuel cycle performance and enable a sustainable fuel cycle, with minimal processing, waste generation, and potential for material diversion.

Lori Braase

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality manages solid waste for the state of Louisiana under the authority of the Solid Waste Management and Resource Recover Law. The Department makes...

242

Energy Conservation Within the Paper Machine Room  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their startling waste of energy, the corrective measures taken to reduce this waste of energy, the potential for waste recovery and equipment available for waste heat recovery. Areas under study include the press section, paper machine dryer section, and machine...

Walker, P. J.; Erskine, K. J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Energy balance for uranium recovery from seawater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy return on investment (EROI) of an energy resource is the ratio of the energy it ultimately produces to the energy used to recover it. EROI is a key viability measure for a new recovery technology, particularly in its early stages of development when financial cost assessment would be premature or highly uncertain. This paper estimates the EROI of uranium recovery from seawater via a braid adsorbent technology. In this paper, the energy cost of obtaining uranium from seawater is assessed by breaking the production chain into three processes: adsorbent production, adsorbent deployment and mooring, and uranium elution and purification. Both direct and embodied energy inputs are considered. Direct energy is the energy used by the processes themselves, while embodied energy is used to fabricate their material, equipment or chemical inputs. If the uranium is used in a once-through fuel cycle, the braid adsorbent technology EROI ranges from 12 to 27, depending on still-uncertain performance and system design parameters. It is highly sensitive to the adsorbent capacity in grams of U captured per kg of adsorbent as well as to potential economies in chemical use. This compares to an EROI of ca. 300 for contemporary terrestrial mining. It is important to note that these figures only consider the mineral extraction step in the fuel cycle. At a reference performance level of 2.76 g U recovered per kg adsorbent immersed, the largest energy consumers are the chemicals used in adsorbent production (63%), anchor chain mooring system fabrication and operations (17%), and unit processes in the adsorbent production step (12%). (authors)

Schneider, E.; Lindner, H. [The University of Texas, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

141 Open ORC Systemfor Open Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC)138 Evaporatorof an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) System for Waste Heat

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Energy Savings By Recovery of Condensate From Steam Heating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recovery and utilization of condensate has a remarkable energy saving effect if the following are properly done: 1) Determination of a correct and reasonable recovery plan; 2) Selection of bleed valve with good performance; 3) Solving...

Cheng, W. S.; Zhi, C. S.

246

Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Attend Grand Opening of Recovery...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to Attend Grand Opening of Recovery Act-Funded A123 Systems Battery Plant Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Attend Grand Opening of Recovery Act-Funded A123 Systems Battery Plant...

247

Recovery Act Milestones | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation. Speakers Matt Rogers...

248

Waste Heat Recovery from the Advanced Test Reactor Secondary Coolant Loop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigated the feasibility of using a waste heat recovery system (WHRS) to recover heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) secondary coolant system (SCS). This heat would be used to preheat air for space heating of the reactor building, thus reducing energy consumption, carbon footprint, and energy costs. Currently, the waste heat from the reactor is rejected to the atmosphere via a four-cell, induced-draft cooling tower. Potential energy and cost savings are 929 kW and $285K/yr. The WHRS would extract a tertiary coolant stream from the SCS loop and pump it to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, from which the heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air supplied to the heating and ventilation system. The use of glycol was proposed to avoid the freezing issues that plagued and ultimately caused the failure of a WHRS installed at the ATR in the 1980s. This study assessed the potential installation of a new WHRS for technical, logistical, and economic feasibility.

Donna Post Guillen

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Energy from Waste November 4, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Generation of renewable electrical power and/or steam U.S. EPA has stated that Energy from Waste is one Waste Combustion (MWC) · Power plant that combusts MSW and other non-hazardous wastes as fuel/Covanta JV · Own / operate 4 EfW facilities 5 #12;6 A typical Contains enough energy to power a 50 watt light

Columbia University

250

Energy and solid/hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

None

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical–biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Compared systems achieve primary energy savings between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste.} • Savings magnitude is foremost determined by chosen primary energy and materials production. • Energy consumption and process losses can be upset by increased technology efficiency. • Material recovery accounts for significant shares of primary energy savings. • Direct waste-to-energy is highly efficient if cogeneration (CHP) is possible. - Abstract: Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical–biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste}, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 3–9.5%, 1–18% and 1–8% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat recovery, the biodrying MBS-based system achieved the highest savings, on the condition of SRF co-combustion. As a sensitivity scenario, alternative utilisation of SRF in cement kilns was modelled. It supported similar or higher net savings for all pre-treatment systems compared to mass combustion WtE, except when WtE CHP was possible in the first two background energy scenarios. Recovery of plastics for recycling before energy recovery increased net energy savings in most scenario variations, over those of full stream combustion. Sensitivity to assumptions regarding virgin plastic substitution was tested and was found to mostly favour plastic recovery.

Cimpan, Ciprian, E-mail: cic@kbm.sdu.dk; Wenzel, Henrik

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Application of molten salt oxidation for the minimization and recovery of plutonium-238 contaminated wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the technical and economic feasibility of molten salt oxidation technology as a volume reduction and recovery process for {sup 238}Pu contaminated waste. Combustible low-level waste material contaminated with {sup 238}Pu residue is destroyed by oxidation in a 900 C molten salt reaction vessel. The combustible waste is destroyed creating carbon dioxide and steam and a small amount of ash and insoluble {sup 2328}Pu in the spent salt. The valuable {sup 238}Pu is recycled using aqueous recovery techniques. Experimental test results for this technology indicate a plutonium recovery efficiency of 99%. Molten salt oxidation stabilizes the waste converting it to a non-combustible waste. Thus installation and use of molten salt oxidation technology will substantially reduce the volume of {sup 238}Pu contaminated waste. Cost-effectiveness evaluations of molten salt oxidation indicate a significant cost savings when compared to the present plans to package, or re-package, certify and transport these wastes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for permanent disposal. Clear and distinct cost advantages exist for MSO when the monetary value of the recovered {sup 238}Pu is considered.

Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Enhanced Oil Recovery | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember 2011DistrictLLC | Department ofEnhanced Oil Recovery

254

IDAHO RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S. Department of EnergyKickoff MeetingIDAHO RECOVERY ACT

255

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Waste Treatment Baseline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program (GNEP) is designed to demonstrate a proliferation-resistant and sustainable integrated nuclear fuel cycle that can be commercialized and used internationally. Alternative stabilization concepts for byproducts and waste streams generated by fuel recycling processes were evaluated and a baseline of waste forms was recommended for the safe disposition of waste streams. Waste forms are recommended based on the demonstrated or expected commercial practicability and technical maturity of the processes needed to make the waste forms, and performance of the waste form materials when disposed. Significant issues remain in developing technologies to process some of the wastes into the recommended waste forms, and a detailed analysis of technology readiness and availability may lead to the choice of a different waste form than what is recommended herein. Evolving regulations could also affect the selection of waste forms.

Dirk Gombert; William Ebert; James Marra; Robert Jubin; John Vienna

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Energy Recovery Linacs for Light Source Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Recovery Linacs are being considered for applications in present and future light sources. ERLs take advantage of the continuous operation of superconducting rf cavities to accelerate high average current beams with low losses. The electrons can be directed through bends, undulators, and wigglers for high brightness x ray production. They are then decelerated to low energy, recovering power so as to minimize the required rf drive and electrical draw. When this approach is coupled with advanced continuous wave injectors, very high power, ultra-short electron pulse trains of very high brightness can be achieved. This paper will review the status of worldwide programs and discuss the technology challenges to provide such beams for photon production.

George Neil

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop November 5, 2014 9:00AM EST to November 6, 2014 12:00PM EST DoubleTree Hotel Crystal City 300 Army Navy...

258

Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants By Fluidized Beds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustor is classified as a nonhaz ardous waste similar to fly ash. As such, the sol ids may be disposed in a landfill after obtaining the appropriate permits. The waste solids are coal ash, calcium sulfate, cal cium oxide, and inerts, all ingredients...; a mix 0 clay, limestone, and fly ash is melted into clinker The recoverable waste heat streams from this proc shown in Figure 1. Both a traditional design integrated design are shown. II: W Z 2100? F o ...J

Fraley, L. D.; Ksiao, H. K.; Thunem, C. B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Recovery Act: Enhancing State Energy Assurance | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

emergencies to assess the restoration and recovery times of any supply disruptions; to train appropriate personnel on energy infrastructure and supply systems; and conduct and...

260

Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Conventional Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermoelectric (TE) generators convert heat directly into electricity when a temperature gradient is applied across junctions of two dissimilar metals. The devices could increase the fuel economy of conventional vehicles by recapturing part of the waste heat from engine exhaust and generating electricity to power accessory loads. A simple vehicle and engine waste heat model showed that a Class 8 truck presents the least challenging requirements for TE system efficiency, mass, and cost; these trucks have a fairly high amount of exhaust waste heat, have low mass sensitivity, and travel many miles per year. These factors help maximize fuel savings and economic benefits. A driving/duty cycle analysis shows strong sensitivity of waste heat, and thus TE system electrical output, to vehicle speed and driving cycle. With a typical alternator, a TE system could allow electrification of 8%-15% of a Class 8 truck's accessories for 2%-3% fuel savings. More research should reduce system cost and improve economics.

Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

State Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Plan (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The State supports the "good management of solid waste and the conservation of natural resources through the promotion or development of systems to collect, separate, reclaim, recycle, and dispose...

262

La Hague Legacy Waste Recovery Program: Scope, Progress and Issues -12080  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant inventory of process waste of varying natures and quantities has been generated during the thirty years of operation of UP2 400 facility on the site of La Hague, France. The retrieval, packaging and final storage of such an inventory has never been achieved before in France and thus requires the design and qualification of new processes, equipment, and waste packages. Following AREVA strategic decisions and French safety authority requirements, the legacy waste program has begun around the year 2000 and is scheduled to be completed around the year 2025. It is under the responsibility of AREVA Site Value Development Project teams. For each category of waste to be recovered, AREVA teams conducted detailed investigations, defined recovery modes, treatment processes, as well as final waste package forms, which they subsequently submitted to French safety and waste management authorities. A Task force initiative was subsequently launched to optimize the program cost and scenario, and lead to an optimization of about 15% of the entire program. The qualification of processes and waste packages required a significant amount of research and development which is now well under way for processes, and scheduled to be completed in 2015. Preparation work has begun on several installations to clear space for the construction of future retrieval facilities, scheduled to begin in the coming three years. La Hague Legacy waste retrieval program represents a significant challenge in the sense that it covers a significant variety and quantity of waste needing recovery and reconditioning, with tight financial objectives and a binding recovery schedule. During the past five years, AREVA SVD successfully conducted design, research, development, and qualification activities which lead to the definition of qualified processes and waste packages for each retrieval program. Preparation work and supplier consultations are now on-going, in order to meet our objectives of beginning retrieval operations in compliance with our commitments to the safety authorities, in 2015 and 2016. (author)

Chabeuf, Jean-Michel [AREVA Site Value Development Business Unit, La Hague Site (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

How to Put the Dollar Value on Waste Heat Recovery in the Process Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Steam savings or steam generation 2. Fuel savings (in case of combustion air preheat or fuel preheat) 3. Power generation (Rankine cycle) Traditionally waste heat recovery was judged on its Btu recovery. If from a 100 MM Btu/hr fue 1 fired heater... 8 MM Btu/hr were stack losses and 2 MM Btu/hr were lost to the atmosphere via exposed areas, then the t~OfF-fl!.2efficiency of the heater was claimed to be 100 or 90%. By this way of reasoning, a further improvement in heat recovery from...

Campagne, W. V. L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

An energy recovery filter for HVDC systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper investigates the use of a novel filter arrangement for eliminating harmonic instability. The CIGRE benchmark model is selected as the base system. Presented in the paper is an example of harmonic instability which is first eliminated using a conventional low Q filter. Subsequently an energy recovery filter (ER-filter) replaces the conventional low Q filter. It is shown that the ER-filter provides similar performance with a fraction of the power loss when compared with a low Q filter. The dynamic performance of the ER-filter is also demonstrated via the simulations of system start-up and faults. The tool used for this investigation is an electromagnetic transient simulation program.

Jiang, X.; Gole, A.M. (Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Process for recovery of palladium from nuclear fuel reprocessing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Palladium is selectively removed from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing waste by adding sugar to a strong nitric acid solution of the waste to partially denitrate the solution and cause formation of an insoluble palladium compound. The process includes the steps of: (a) adjusting the nitric acid content of the starting solution to about 10 M; (b) adding 50% sucrose solution in an amount sufficient to effect the precipitation of the palladium compound; (c) heating the solution at reflux temperature until precipitation is complete; and (d) centrifuging the solution to separate the precipitated palladium compound from the supernatant liquid.

Campbell, D.O.; Buxton, S.R.

1980-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

266

Waste-to-Energy Workshop Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key technical barriers to the commercial deployment of liquid transportation fuels from waste feedstocks. As a part of this effort, BETO is organizing a Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping workshop. Workshop participants will join facilitated breakout sessions to discuss anaerobic digestion, hydrothermal liquefaction, and other processes that make productive use of wastewater residuals, biosolids, foodstuffs, and organic municipal solid waste. These discussions will be synthesized and used in developing a waste-to-energy technology roadmap.

267

Waste Minimization: A Hidden Energy Savings?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE MINIMIZATION: A HIDDEN ENERGY SAVINGS? R. 1. GOOD Principal Engineer, Environmental Protection and Energy Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Company, Inc. Seadrift, Texas ABSTRACT Several changes in the last few years have forced a re...-examination of waste generation within the petro chemical industry. In today's political/regulatory arena, industrial waste, both hazardous and non hazardous, has become an extreme potential liability in handling, storing, and disposal. Traditional methods...

Good, R. L.; Hunt, K. E.

268

WASTE HEAT RECOVERY USING THERMOELECTRIC DEVICES IN THE LIGHT METALS INDUSTRY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently discovered thermoelectric materials and associated manufacturing techniques (nanostructures, thin-film super lattice, quantum wells...) have been characterized with thermal to electric energy conversion efficiencies of 12-25+%. These advances allow the manufacture of small-area, high-energy flux (350 W/cm2 input) thermoelectric generating (TEG) devices that operate at high temperatures (~750°C). TEG technology offers the potential for large-scale conversion of waste heat from the exhaust gases of electrolytic cells (e.g., Hall-Hèroult cells) and from aluminum, magnesium, metal and glass melting furnaces. This paper provides an analysis of the potential energy recovery and of the engineering issues that are expected when integrating TEG systems into existing manufacturing processes. The TEG module must be engineered for low-cost, easy insertion and simple operation in order to be incorporated into existing manufacturing operations. Heat transfer on both the hot and cold-side of these devices will require new materials, surface treatments and design concepts for their efficient operation.

Choate, William T.; Hendricks, Terry J.; Majumdar, Rajita

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Progress in reliable high temperature segmented thermoelectric devices and potential for producing electricity from waste heat from energy intensive industrial processes and transportation vehicles exhaust are discussed

270

Energy or compost from green waste? - A CO{sub 2} - Based assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Green waste is increasingly extracted from the material recycling chain and, as a result of the financial subsidy arising from the German renewable energy law for the generation of energy from renewable raw materials; it is fed into the energy recovery process in biomass power stations. A reduction in climate relevant gases is also linked to the material recovery of green waste - in particular when using composts gained from the process as a new raw material in different types of potting compost and plant culture media as a replacement for peat. Unlike energy recovery, material valorisation is not currently subsidised. Through the analysis of material and energy valorisation methods for green waste, with particular emphasis on primary resource consumption and CO{sub 2}-balance, it could be determined that the use of green waste for energy generation and its recovery for material and peat replacement purposes can be considered to be on a par. Based on energy recovery or material oriented scenarios, it can be further deduced that no method on its own will achieve the desired outcome and that a combination of recycling processes is more likely to lead to a significant decrease of greenhouse gas emissions.

Kranert, Martin, E-mail: martin.kranert@iswa.uni-stuttgart.d [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institute for Sanitary Engineering, Water Quality and Solid Waste Management, Bandtaele 2, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Gottschall, Ralf; Bruns, Christian [Humus and Erden Kontor GmbH, Karlsbrunnenstrasse 11, D-37249 Neu-Eichenberg (Germany); Hafner, Gerold [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institute for Sanitary Engineering, Water Quality and Solid Waste Management, Bandtaele 2, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

272

Advanced Thermoelectric Materials for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery in Process Industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the project was to integrate advanced thermoelectric materials into a power generation device that could convert waste heat from an industrial process to electricity with an efficiency approaching 20%. Advanced thermoelectric materials were developed with figure-of-merit ZT of 1.5 at 275 degrees C. These materials were not successfully integrated into a power generation device. However, waste heat recovery was demonstrated from an industrial process (the combustion exhaust gas stream of an oxyfuel-fired flat glass melting furnace) using a commercially available (5% efficiency) thermoelectric generator coupled to a heat pipe. It was concluded that significant improvements both in thermoelectric material figure-of-merit and in cost-effective methods for capturing heat would be required to make thermoelectric waste heat recovery viable for widespread industrial application.

Adam Polcyn; Moe Khaleel

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

273

Zero Waste, Renewable Energy & Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Dioxins & Furans · The `State of Waste' in the US · WTE Technologies · Thermal Recycling ­ Turnkey dangerous wastes in the form of gases and ash, often creating entirely new hazards, like dioxins and furans

Columbia University

274

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The followingDirectLowDiscussion Page

275

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Waste Heat Recovery for Usage by a Rooftop Greenhouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into Waste Heat Recovery for Usage by a Rooftop Greenhouse Rohit Singla, Jeremy Lord, Jorden Hetherington Investigation into Waste Heat Recovery for Usage by a Rooftop Greenhouse April 4, 2013 Dr. Naoko Ellis APSC 262 of this waste heat recovery method. Constraints that are taken into this investigation include various factors

276

Waste and Climate Change ISWA WHITE PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste prevention, recycling and reuse, biological treatment with land use of products, energy recoveryWaste and Climate Change ISWA WHITE PAPER #12;Preface 3 Re-evaluating waste: ISWA key messages 4 ISWA Commitments 6 Introduction 7 Technologies 8 Material recovery 14 Organic recovery 16 Energy

277

Waste Heat Powered Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit for LPG Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An emerging DOE-sponsored technology has been deployed. The technology recovers light ends from a catalytic reformer plant using waste heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration. It is deployed at the 17,000 bpd Bloomfield, New Mexico refinery of Western Refining Company. The technology recovers approximately 50,000 barrels per year of liquefied petroleum gas that was formerly being flared. The elimination of the flare also reduces CO2 emissions by 17,000 tons per year, plus tons per year reductions in NOx, CO, and VOCs. The waste heat is supplied directly to the absorption unit from the Unifiner effluent. The added cooling of that stream relieves a bottleneck formerly present due to restricted availability of cooling water. The 350oF Unifiner effluent is cooled to 260oF. The catalytic reformer vent gas is directly chilled to minus 25oF, and the FCC column overhead reflux is chilled by 25oF glycol. Notwithstanding a substantial cost overrun and schedule slippage, this project can now be considered a success: it is both profitable and highly beneficial to the environment. The capabilities of directly-integrated waste-heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration and their benefits to the refining industry have been demonstrated.

Donald C, Energy Concepts Co.; Lauber, Eric, Western Refining Co.

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

278

Fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system development: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major energy loss in industry is the heat content of the flue gases from industrial process heaters. One effective way to utilize the energy, which is applicable to all processes, is to preheat the combustion air for the process heater. Although recuperators are available to preheat this air when the flue gases are clean, recuperators to recover the heat from dirty and corrosive flue gases do not exist. The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) system is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, recirculating alumina particles are heated by the flue gas in a raining bed. The hot particles are then removed from the bed and placed in a fluidized bed where they are fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is preheated. The cooled particles are then returned to the raining bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry. In this final report, the design, development, fabrication, and installation of a full-scale FBWHR system is detailed.

Patch, K.D.; Cole, W.E.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 7, Appendix E -- Material recovery/material recycling technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enthusiasm for and commitment to recycling of municipal solid wastes is based on several intuitive benefits: Conservation of landfill capacity; Conservation of non-renewable natural resources and energy sources; Minimization of the perceived potential environmental impacts of MSW combustion and landfilling; Minimization of disposal costs, both directly and through material resale credits. In this discussion, ``recycling`` refers to materials recovered from the waste stream. It excludes scrap materials that are recovered and reused during industrial manufacturing processes and prompt industrial scrap. Materials recycling is an integral part of several solid waste management options. For example, in the preparation of refuse-derived fuel (RDF), ferrous metals are typically removed from the waste stream both before and after shredding. Similarly, composting facilities, often include processes for recovering inert recyclable materials such as ferrous and nonferrous metals, glass, Plastics, and paper. While these two technologies have as their primary objectives the production of RDF and compost, respectively, the demonstrated recovery of recyclables emphasizes the inherent compatibility of recycling with these MSW management strategies. This appendix discusses several technology options with regard to separating recyclables at the source of generation, the methods available for collecting and transporting these materials to a MRF, the market requirements for post-consumer recycled materials, and the process unit operations. Mixed waste MRFs associated with mass bum plants are also presented.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry - Fact Sheet, 2014 Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy Presentation-given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership...

282

JET MIXING ANALYSIS FOR SRS HIGH-LEVEL WASTE RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. The slurry pump may be fixed in position or they may rotate depending on the specific mixing requirements. The high-level waste in Tank 48 contains insoluble solids in the form of potassium tetraphenyl borate compounds (KTPB), monosodium titanate (MST), and sludge. Tank 48 is equipped with 4 slurry pumps, which are intended to suspend the insoluble solids prior to transfer of the waste to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) process. The FBSR process is being designed for a normal feed of 3.05 wt% insoluble solids. A chemical characterization study has shown the insoluble solids concentration is approximately 3.05 wt% when well-mixed. The project is requesting a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) mixing study from SRNL to determine the solids behavior with 2, 3, and 4 slurry pumps in operation and an estimate of the insoluble solids concentration at the suction of the transfer pump to the FBSR process. The impact of cooling coils is not considered in the current work. The work consists of two principal objectives by taking a CFD approach: (1) To estimate insoluble solids concentration transferred from Tank 48 to the Waste Feed Tank in the FBSR process and (2) To assess the impact of different combinations of four slurry pumps on insoluble solids suspension and mixing in Tank 48. For this work, several different combinations of a maximum of four pumps are considered to determine the resulting flow patterns and local flow velocities which are thought to be associated with sludge particle mixing. Two different elevations of pump nozzles are used for an assessment of the flow patterns on the tank mixing. Pump design and operating parameters used for the analysis are summarized in Table 1. The baseline pump orientations are chosen by the previous work [Lee et. al, 2008] and the initial engineering judgement for the conservative flow estimate since the modeling results for the other pump orientations are compared with the baseline results. As shown in Table 1, the present study assumes that each slurry pump has 900 gpm flowrate for the tank mixing analysis, although the Standard Operating Procedure for Tank 48 currently limits the actual pump speed and flowrate to a value less than 900 gpm for a 29 inch liquid level. Table 2 shows material properties and weight distributions for the solids to be modeled for the mixing analysis in Tank 48.

Lee, S.

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

283

Sewage sludge drying by energy recovery from OFMSW composting: Preliminary feasibility evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • The aim is to support the drying of sewage sludge, using a solar greenhouse. • The system allows the exploitation of heat available from OFMSW aerobic process. • Another aim is to face the problem of OFMSW treatment, in particular food waste. • Energy and mass balances are presented for a case study. - Abstract: In this paper an original energy recovery method from composting is analyzed. The integrated system exploits the heat available from the aerobic biochemical process in order to support the drying of sewage sludge, using a specific solar greenhouse. The aim is to tackle the problem of organic waste treatment, with specific regard to food waste. This is done by optimizing the energy consumption of the aerobic process of composting, using the heat produced to solve a second important waste management problem such as the sewage waste treatment. Energy and mass balances are presented in a preliminary feasibility study. Referring to a composting plant with a capacity of 15,000 t/y of food waste, the estimation of the power from recovered heat for the entire plant resulted about 42 kW. The results demonstrated that the energy recoverable can cover part of the heat necessary for the treatment of sludge generated by the population served by the composting plant (in terms of food waste and green waste collection). The addition of a renewable source such as solar energy could cover the residual energy demand. The approach is presented in detail in order for it to be replicated in other case studies or at full scale applications.

Rada, Elena Cristina; Ragazzi, Marco; Villotti, Stefano [University of Trento, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, via Mesiano 77, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Torretta, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.torretta@uninsubria.it [Insubria University of Varese, Department of Biotechnologies and Life Sciences, Via G.B. Vico 46, I-21100 Varese (Italy)

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Conversion of Waste to Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 13-16, 1980 and 10% combustibles (hydrogen and hydro carbons) is incinerated at 1400?F. ~ecause of the quantity of inerts, supplemental natural gas firing with a grid burner is required to maintain the required... thermocouples. A Wobbe index analyzer compensates fuel gas flow measure ment for changes in composition. A three element feedwater control system maintai~s water level. Modular, controlled air solid waste incinerators/heat recovery systems are now...

John, T.; Cheek, L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Recovery Act State Summaries | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and Launches theResidentialRecovery Act State Summaries Recovery

286

Fossil energy waste management. Technology status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of the Fossil Energy Waste Management (FE WM) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Waste Management Program is to identify and develop optimal strategies to manage solid by-products from advanced coal technologies for the purpose of ensuring the competitiveness of advanced coal technologies as a future energy source. The projects in the Fossil Energy Waste Management Program are divided into three types of activities: Waste Characterization, Disposal Technologies, and Utilization Technologies. This technology status report includes a discussion on barriers to increased use of coal by-products. Also, the major technical and nontechnical challenges currently being addressed by the FE WM program are discussed. A bibliography of 96 citations and a list of project contacts is included if the reader is interested in obtaining additional information about the FE WM program.

Bossart, S.J.; Newman, D.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a reciprocat- ing steam engine (SE). ” Energy, 34:1315–5 ? 1): the steam flows out of the engine, and the pressure

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Novel thermoelectric generator for stationary power waste heat recovery .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Internal combustion engines produce much excess heat that is vented to the atmosphere through the exhaust fluid. Use of solid-state thermoelectric (TE) energy conversion technology… (more)

Engelke, Kylan Wynn.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Technological options for management of hazardous wastes from US Department of Energy facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides comprehensive information on the technological options for management of hazardous wastes generated at facilities owned or operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE). These facilities annually generate a large quantity of wastes that could be deemed hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Included in these wastes are liquids or solids containing polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, heavy metals, waste oils, spent solvents, acids, bases, carcinogens, and numerous other pollutants. Some of these wastes consist of nonnuclear hazardous chemicals; others are mixed wastes containing radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. Nearly 20 unit processes and disposal methods are presented in this report. They were selected on the basis of their proven utility in waste management and potential applicability at DOE sites. These technological options fall into five categories: physical processes, chemical processes, waste exchange, fixation, and ultimate disposal. The options can be employed for either resource recovery, waste detoxification, volume reduction, or perpetual storage. Detailed descriptions of each technological option are presented, including information on process performance, cost, energy and environmental considerations, waste management of applications, and potential applications at DOE sites. 131 references, 25 figures, 23 tables.

Chiu, S.; Newsom, D.; Barisas, S.; Humphrey, J.; Fradkin, L.; Surles, T.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO ENERGY IN SMALL-benefit analysis by the author of a waste to energy (WTE) plant in Montevideo, Uruguay; the second part are that it is the most proven waste- to-energy technology in the world, has demonstrated high plant availability (>90

291

SOLIDIFICATION OF THE HANFORD LAW WASTE STREAM PRODUCED AS A RESULT OF NEAR-TANK CONTINUOUS SLUDGE LEACHING AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), is responsible for the remediation and stabilization of the Hanford Site tank farms, including 53 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wasted waste contained in 177 underground tanks. The plan calls for all waste retrieved from the tanks to be transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The WTP will consist of three primary facilities including pretreatment facilities for Low Activity Waste (LAW) to remove aluminum, chromium and other solids and radioisotopes that are undesirable in the High Level Waste (HLW) stream. Removal of aluminum from HLW sludge can be accomplished through continuous sludge leaching of the aluminum from the HLW sludge as sodium aluminate; however, this process will introduce a significant amount of sodium hydroxide into the waste stream and consequently will increase the volume of waste to be dispositioned. A sodium recovery process is needed to remove the sodium hydroxide and recycle it back to the aluminum dissolution process. The resulting LAW waste stream has a high concentration of aluminum and sodium and will require alternative immobilization methods. Five waste forms were evaluated for immobilization of LAW at Hanford after the sodium recovery process. The waste forms considered for these two waste streams include low temperature processes (Saltstone/Cast stone and geopolymers), intermediate temperature processes (steam reforming and phosphate glasses) and high temperature processes (vitrification). These immobilization methods and the waste forms produced were evaluated for (1) compliance with the Performance Assessment (PA) requirements for disposal at the IDF, (2) waste form volume (waste loading), and (3) compatibility with the tank farms and systems. The iron phosphate glasses tested using the product consistency test had normalized release rates lower than the waste form requirements although the CCC glasses had higher release rates than the quenched glasses. However, the waste form failed to meet the vapor hydration test criteria listed in the WTP contract. In addition, the waste loading in the phosphate glasses were not as high as other candidate waste forms. Vitrification of HLW waste as borosilicate glass is a proven process; however the HLW and LAW streams at Hanford can vary significantly from waste currently being immobilized. The ccc glasses show lower release rates for B and Na than the quenched glasses and all glasses meet the acceptance criterion of < 4 g/L. Glass samples spiked with Re{sub 2}O{sub 7} also passed the PCT test. However, further vapor hydration testing must be performed since all the samples cracked and the test could not be performed. The waste loading of the iron phosphate and borosilicate glasses are approximately 20 and 25% respectively. The steam reforming process produced the predicted waste form for both the high and low aluminate waste streams. The predicted waste loadings for the monolithic samples is approximately 39%, which is higher than the glass waste forms; however, at the time of this report, no monolithic samples were made and therefore compliance with the PA cannot be determined. The waste loading in the geopolymer is approximately 40% but can vary with the sodium hydroxide content in the waste stream. Initial geopolymer mixes revealed compressive strengths that are greater than 500 psi for the low aluminate mixes and less than 500 psi for the high aluminate mixes. Further work testing needs to be performed to formulate a geopolymer waste form made using a high aluminate salt solution. A cementitious waste form has the advantage that the process is performed at ambient conditions and is a proven process currently in use for LAW disposal. The Saltstone/Cast Stone formulated using low and high aluminate salt solutions retained at least 97% of the Re that was added to the mix as a dopant. While this data is promising, additional leaching testing must be performed to show compliance with the PA. Compressive strength tests must also be performed on the Cast Ston

Reigel, M.; Johnson, F.; Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

292

Solvent extraction and recovery of the transuranic elements from waste solutions using the TRUEX process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-level liquid waste is produced during the processing of irradiated nuclear fuel by the PUREX process. In some cases the treatment of metallurgical scrap to recover the plutonium values also generates a nitric acid waste solution. Both waste solutions contain sufficient concentrations of transuranic elements (mostly /sup 241/Am) to require handling and disposal as a TRU waste. This paper describes a recently developed solvent extraction/recovery process called TRUEX (transuranium extraction) which is designed to reduce the TRU concentration in nitric waste solutions to <100 nCi/g of disposed form (1,2). (In the USA, non-TRU waste is defined as <100 nCi of TRU/g of disposed form.) The process utilizes PUREX process solvent (TBP in a normal paraffinic hydrocarbon or carbon tetrachloride) modified by a small concentration of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (abbrev. CMPO). The presence of CMPO enables the modified PUREX process solvent to extract trivalent actinides as well as tetra- and hexavalent actinides. A major feature of the TRUEX process is that is is applicable to waste solutions containing a wide range of nitric acid, salt, and fission product concentrations and at the same time is very compatible with existing liquid-liquid extraction technology as usually practiced in a fuel reprocessing plant. To date the process has been tested on two different types of synthetic waste solutions. The first solution is a typical high-level nitric acid waste and the second a typical waste solution generated in metallurgical scrap processing. Results are discussed. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Schulz, W.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

WIPP Uses Recovery Act Funding to Reduce Nuclear Waste Footprint |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment of Energy While dry storageMarch| DepartmentofCarlsbadDepartment of

295

Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment of Energy While dryWashington's CentraliaWashingtonSystems |DRAFT

296

Thermoelectric Generator Development for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment ofPowered Vehicle |Department of

297

Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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298

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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299

Outphasing Energy Recovery Amplifier With Resistance Compression for Improved Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a new outphasing energy recovery amplifier (OPERA) which replaces the isolation resistor in the conventional matched combiner with a resistance-compressed rectifier for improved efficiency. The rectifier recovers ...

Godoy, Philip Andrew

300

An Investigation Of The Potential For Geothermal-Energy Recovery...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

For Geothermal-Energy Recovery In The Calgary Area In Southern Alberta, Canada, Using Petroleum-Exploration Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage » SearchEnergyDepartment ofCombustuion | Department(Septemberand Cleanup

302

Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwoVulnerabilities | DepartmentReactive Barrierof| Department

303

Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and Launches theResidentialRecoveryWaste and Save Energy this

304

Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping Workshop Agenda  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste-to-Energy Workshop Agenda November 5-6, 2014 DoubleTree Hotel Crystal City Arlington, VA 22202 Day 1: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 Time Activity 7:30 am Registration and...

305

IOWA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S. Department ofIOWA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT IOWA RECOVERY ACT

306

Mixed Waste Focus Area: Department of Energy complex needs report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a new approach in August of 1993 to environmental research and technology development. A key feature of this new approach included establishment of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to identify, develop, and implement needed technologies such that the major environmental management problems related to meeting DOE`s commitments for treatment of mixed wastes under the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA), and in accordance with the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can be addressed, while cost-effectively expending the funding resources. To define the deficiencies or needs of the EM customers, the MWFA analyzed Proposed Site Treatment Plans (PSTPs), as well as other applicable documents, and conducted site visits throughout the summer of 1995. Representatives from the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) at each site visited were requested to consult with the Focus Area to collaboratively define their technology needs. This report documents the needs, deficiencies, technology gaps, and opportunities for expedited treatment activities that were identified during the site visit process. The defined deficiencies and needs are categorized by waste type, namely Wastewaters, Combustible Organics, Sludges/Soils, Debris/Solids, and Unique Wastes, and will be prioritized based on the relative affect the deficiency has on the DOE Complex.

Roach, J.A.

1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System Advances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACCESS DOOR (TYPICAL) 1.. LEVEL . PUTFORII ?n'if~~??? FLUIDIZED L--lJ FLUE ';:S ! "'D I DUCT , PRQVISK>N FOR 14" I.P.S. : FLUE GAS . LFr UN! J-~DU~C~T~CL!:!:E~ANO~UT~? RE~':aL:"-~L_--WL:!:!J~~~=:IAIR 1." I.P.S. PREHEATED COMBUSTION AIR... of six months. Data gathered will be used to evaluate performance, energy savings. and economic attractiveness of the FBWHR system. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This work was jointly funded by the Depart ment of Energy and Thermo Electron Corporation...

Patch, K. D.; Cole, W. E.

308

The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants By Ted Michaels The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants provides current information about the waste-to-energy sector in the United States. Since this Directory was last published in 2007, waste-to-energy capacity has increased for the first time in many

Columbia University

309

Waste site reclamation with recovery of radionuclides and metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for decontaminating radionuclides and other toxic metal-contaminate The U.S. government has certain rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016 between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities, Inc.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

310

Waste site reclamation with recovery of radionuclides and metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for decontaminating radionuclides and other toxic metal-contaminate The U.S. government has certain rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016 between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities, Inc.

Francis, Arokiasamy J. (Middle Island, NY); Dodge, Cleveland J. (Wading River, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Department of Energy Releases WIPP Recovery Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005Department ofDOE AccidentWasteZone ModelingCorporate Overview1

312

Solid waste disposal options: an optimum disposal model for the management of municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Solid Waste Disposal Act and shifted the emphasis from disposal practices to recycling, resource recovery, and energy conversion of wastes. ' The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) provided for the disposal of solid waste in such a... was constructed in 1930 in New York City. " But waste- to-energy technology development was hindered by poor reliability, poor efficiency, and low cost effectiveness. " The Resource Recovery Act of 1970 and RCRA of 1976, shifted the em- phasis in solid waste...

Haney, Brenda Ann

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Research Memo Energy Transfer and Recovery Efficiencies for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aware that conventional irreversible digi- tal logic technology, which dissipates the entire energy progress in the energy efficiency of digital technologies will Dr. Frank is employed by Florida StateResearch Memo Energy Transfer and Recovery Efficiencies for Adiabatic Charging with Various Driving

Frank, Michael P.

314

Supplementary Material Free energy recovery in single molecule experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplementary Material Free energy recovery in single molecule experiments Single molecule force measurements (experimental setup shown in Fig. S1) can be used to determine free-energy differences between the unfolding process and using the thermodynamic relation revWG = , we can estimate the RNA folding free energy

Ritort, Felix

315

Investigating potential light-duty efficiency improvements through simulation of turbo-compounding and waste-heat recovery systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to combustion irreversibility and heat loss to the coolant, through the exhaust, and by direct convection and radiation to the environment. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, achieving similar benefits for light-duty applications is complicated by transient, low-load operation at typical driving conditions and competition with the turbocharger and aftertreatment system for the limited thermal resources. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. The model is used to examine the effects of efficiency-improvement strategies such as cylinder deactivation, use of advanced materials and improved insulation to limit ambient heat loss, and turbo-compounding on the steady-state performance of the ORC system and the availability of thermal energy for downstream aftertreatment systems. Results from transient drive-cycle simulations are also presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and balancing the thermal requirements of waste-heat recovery, turbocharging or turbo-compounding, and exhaust aftertreatment.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Briggs, Thomas E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Opportunities and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery in the  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Engines |OpenEnergy 8Operations U.S.for

317

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent Company AgreesDesireeDepartment of Energy 1 DOE

318

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent Company AgreesDesireeDepartment of Energy 1

319

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent Company AgreesDesireeDepartment of Energy

320

An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Savannah River Site, Liquid Waste Program, Savannah River Remediation American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Benefits and Lessons Learned - 12559  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilizing funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the Liquid Waste Program at Savannah River site successfully executed forty-one design, procurement, construction, and operating activities in the period from September 2009 through December 2011. Project Management of the program included noteworthy practices involving safety, integrated project teams, communication, and cost, schedule and risk management. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure were accomplished. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually identified and applied to enhance the program. Investment of Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. The funding of a portion of the Liquid Waste Program at SRS by ARRA was a major success. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure was accomplished. Integrated Project Teams ensured quality products and services were provided to the Operations customers. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually reviewed and reapplied to enhance the program. Investment of Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. (authors)

Schmitz, Mark A.; Crouse, Thomas N. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste...

323

Incineration versus gasification: A comparison in waste to energy plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste thermodestruction has obvious advantages; nevertheless, it encounters problems not very easy to solve, such as those related to gas cleaning and to restricting standards for emission control. One important aspect is the possibility of heat recovery with production of valuable energy such as electric energy. A new technology, at least as far as its application to waste disposal (mainly municipal waste) is concerned, is represented by gasification. It becomes interesting to establish a comparison between this new technology and the traditional one. This comparison does not appear, however, to be very simple, since for gasification only few documented experiments can be found, and these are often difficult to relate to a common evaluation factor. The present paper describes the state of the art of the traditional technology in the thermodestruction field to define a comparison basis. Then, a general discussion is given for the gasification technology, emphasizing different possible solutions to allow for a quantitative evaluation. At last the various aspects of the problem (related to plant, environment, energy, economics, etc.) are specifically compared for the purpose of finding elements which allow for a quantitative evaluation or for emphasizing parameters useful for a final choice.

Ghezzi, U.; Pasini, S.; Ferri, L.D.A. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Energetica

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

Commercial treatability study capabilities for application to the US Department of Energy`s anticipated mixed waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA), which represents a national effort to develop and coordinate treatment solutions for mixed waste among all DOE facilities. The hazardous waste component of mixed waste is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), while the radioactive component is regulated under the Atomic Energy Act, as implemented by the DOE, making mixed waste one of the most complex types of waste for the DOE to manage. The MWFA has the mission to support technologies that meet the needs of the DOE`s waste management efforts to characterize, treat, and dispose of mixed waste being generated and stored throughout the DOE complex. The technologies to be supported must meet all regulatory requirements, provide cost and risk improvements over available technologies, and be acceptable to the public. The most notable features of the DOE`s mixed-waste streams are the wide diversity of waste matrices, volumes, radioactivity levels, and RCRA-regulated hazardous contaminants. Table 1-1 is constructed from data from the proposed site treatment plans developed by each DOE site and submitted to DOE Headquarters. The table shows the number of mixed-waste streams and their corresponding volumes. This table illustrates that the DOE has a relatively small number of large-volume mixed-waste streams and a large number of small-volume mixed-waste streams. There are 1,033 mixed-waste streams with volumes less than 1 cubic meter; 1,112 mixed-waste streams with volumes between 1 and 1,000 cubic meters; and only 61 mixed-waste streams with volumes exceeding 1,000 cubic meters.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Recovery and utilization of waste liquids in ultra-clean coal preparation by chemical leaching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal with ash lower than 1%, being called an ultra-clean coal, has many potential applications, such as a substitute for diesel fuel, production of carbon electrodes, superior activated carbon and other chemical materials. It is difficult to reduce coal ash to such a level by conventional coal preparation technology. By means of chemical leaching with the proper concentration of alkali and acid solutions, any coal can be deeply deashed to 1% ash level. However, the cost of chemical methods is higher than that of physical ones, additionally, the waste liquids would give rise to environmental pollution if used on a large scale. If the waste liquids from chemical preparation of ultra-clean coal can be recovered and utilized, so as to produce salable by-products, the cost of chemical leaching will be reduced. This processing will also solve the pollution problem of these waste liquids. This paper describes recovery and utilization methods for these liquids used in chemical leaching, including the recoveries of alkali, silica, sodium-salt and aluminium-salt. A preliminary estimate was made regarding its economic benefits. It shows that this research solves the two problems in the chemical preparation of ultra-clean coal. One is the high-cost and the other is environmental pollution. This research demonstrates good potential for the production of ultra-clean coal on an industrial scale.

Xu Zesheng; Shi Zhimin; Yang Qiaowen; Wang Xinguo [China Univ. of Mining and Technology, Beijing (China). Beijing Graduate School

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Energy Secretary Chu Announces $1.615 Billion in Recovery Act...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

.615 Billion in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in South Carolina Energy Secretary Chu Announces 1.615 Billion in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in...

327

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW SUITE 700 WASHINGTON, DC 20036 WWW Energy and Security Act of 2009 that was released as a discussion draft on March 31. While waste-to-energy gas reductions and renewable energy provided by waste-to-energy and if it implemented policies

Columbia University

329

Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

330

Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, February 1-July 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

Cole, W. E.; DeSaro, R.; Griffith, J.; Joshi, C.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Optimization of waste heat recovery boiler of a combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the details of a procedure developed for optimization of a waste heat recovery boiler (WHRB) of a combined cycle power plant (CCPP) using the program for performance prediction of a typical CCPP, details of which have been presented elsewhere (Seyedan et al., 1994). In order to illustrate the procedure, the optimum design of a WHRB for a typical CCPP (employing dual-pressure bottoming cycle) built by a prominent Indian company, has been carried out. The present design of a WHRB is taken as the base design and the newer designs generated by this procedure are compared with it to assess the extent of cost reduction possible.

Seyedan, B.; Dhar, P.L.; Gaur, R.R. [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Bindra, G.S. [Bharat Heavy Electrical Ltd., New Delhi (India)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

LPG recovery from refinery flare by waste heat powered absorption refrigeration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A waste heat powered ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit (ARU) has commenced operation at the Colorado Refining Company in Commerce City, Colorado. The ARU provides 85 tons of refrigeration at 30 F to refrigerate the net gas/treat gas stream, thereby recovering 65,000 barrels per year of LPG which formerly was flared or burned as fuel. The ARU is powered by the 290 F waste heat content of the reform reactor effluent. An additional 180 tons of refrigeration is available at the ARU to debottleneck the FCC plant wet gas compressors by cooling their inlet vapor. The ARU is directly integrated into the refinery processes, and uses enhanced, highly compact heat and mass exchange components. The refinery's investment will pay back in less than two years from increased recovery of salable product, and CO{sub 2} emissions are decreased by 10,000 tons per year in the Denver area.

Erickson, D.C.; Kelly, F.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Hydrogen recovery from extraterrestrial materials using microwave energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of recovering hydrogen from extraterrestrial materials (lunar and Martian soils, asteroids) using microwave energy is presented. Reasons for harvesting and origins and locations of hydrogen are reviewed. Problems of hydrogen recovery are discussed in terms of hydrogen release characteristics and microwave coupling to insulating materials. From results of studies of hydrogen diffusivities (oxides, glasses) and tritium release (oxides) as well as studies of microwave coupling to ilmenite, alkali basalt and ceramic oxides it is concluded that using microwave energy in hydrogen recovery from extraterrestrial materials could be the basis for a workable process.

Tucker, D.S.; Vaniman, D.T.; Anderson, J.L.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Feber, R.C. Jr.; Frost, H.M.; Meek, T.T.; Wallace, T.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Assessment of Tire Technologies and Practices for Potential Waste and Energy Use Reductions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Practices for Potential Waste and Energy Use ReductionsPractices for Potential Waste and Energy Use Reductions Maythe study involving research on waste and energy saving tire

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Regnier, Justin; Burke, Andy; Melaina, Marc W; Bremson, Joel; Keteltas, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Identifying Energy Waste through Dense Power Sensing and Utilization Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Energy Waste through Dense Power Sensing and Utilization Monitoring Maria Kazandjieva the efficiency of such a computing system requires detailed data of both en- ergy consumption and energy waste to differentiate energy used well from energy waste. This is an important difference from pre- vious work [8, 14

Stanford University

336

Funding Opportunity Announcement: Recovery Act ? Energy Efficiency...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Grants Funding opportunity announcement for the Energy Efficiency and Conversation Block Grants, an opportunity open from March 26, 2009 to May 26, 2009 for state applicants and...

337

Recovery Act Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartmentEnergyFrequency | Department ofMay 14, 2014 TheFebruary 28,

338

Recovery Act Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartmentEnergyFrequency | Department ofMay 14, 2014 TheFebruary

339

Recovery Act Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartmentEnergyFrequency | Department ofMay 14, 2014

340

Recovery Act Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartmentEnergyFrequency | Department ofMay 14, 2014November 2, 2010

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Recovery Act Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartmentEnergyFrequency | Department ofMay 14, 2014November 2,

342

Recovery Act SGDP | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartmentEnergyFrequency | Department ofMay 14, 2014November 2, View

343

Recovery Act Workforce Development | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartmentEnergyFrequency | Department ofMay 14, 2014November 2, Map

344

Recovery Act Recipient Data | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalancedDepartment ofColumbusReport # INL/EXT-06-11478Railcars |Projects |Recipient

345

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR8, 2013 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY7,Tank Waste and

346

Waste Heat Recovery From Stacks Using Direct-Contact Condensing Heat Exchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-06-69 Proceedings from the Eighth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, June 17-19, 1986 Solid fuels generally show lower recovery potential and, in the case of coals, contain sulfur as well. Wood fuels have high fuel-borne moisture content...

Thorn, W. F.

347

OE Recovery Act News | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy Second Quarter4,(National Renewable EnergyOFFICEMay

348

OE Recovery Act News | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy Second Quarter4,(National Renewable EnergyOFFICEMayJanuary 29,

349

OE Recovery Act Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJaredOakscience-based, appliedLeadership Patricia

350

OE Recovery Act Archive | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2011: PRESS RELEASE CenterPoint Energy has released survey results from a 500 participant smart meter In-Home Display pilot program showing that 71 percent of customers changed...

351

Hydraulically-actuated microscale traveling energy recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the demand for portable electrical power grows, alternatives to chemical stored energy may enable users with additional system capabilities. This thesis presents a miniature hydroelectric turbine system for use in ...

Robbins, Michael F. (Michael Frank)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

CHP, Waste Heat & District Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Applications 25 Oct 11 Today's Electric Grid What is CHP * ASHRAE Handbook: "Combined heat and power (CHP). Simultaneous production of electrical or mechanical energy and...

353

Application of Energy Saving Concepts to LPG Recovery Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inefficient compared to current standards. This paper deals with energy savings that may be effected for one such plant. Three basic ideas are evaluated:- o Use of Multi-Component Chilling (MCC). o Addition of an Expander. o Heat Recovery from Gas Turbine...

Carpenter, M. J.; Barnwell, J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

EA-1769: Battleground Energy Recovery Project, Harris County, Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide $1.94 million in cost-shared funding to the Houston Advanced Research Center for the Battleground Energy Recovery Project, which would produce 8 megawatts of electricity from high pressure steam generated by capturing heat that is currently lost at the Clean Harbors Deer Park facility. The proposed project was selected by the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to advance research and demonstration of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies.

355

EM Recovery Act Performance | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1:EnergyDecember 10, 2014 DOEEM-QA-001 Rev.FundingEM

356

OE Recovery Act Blog | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy(National RenewableNovember 3,July 11, 2013 Demand

357

OE Recovery Act Blog | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy(National RenewableNovember 3,July 11, 2013 DemandMay

358

OE Recovery Act Blog | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy(National RenewableNovember 3,July 11, 2013

359

OE Recovery Act Blog | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy(National RenewableNovember 3,July 11, 2013October 6,

360

OE Recovery Act News | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy(National RenewableNovember 3,July 11, 2013October

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ARIZONA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601 High IntegrityEnergy ( ARI ) Asset

362

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601 High IntegrityEnergy ( ARI ) AssetARKANSAS

363

Use of incomplete energy recovery for the energy compression of large energy spread charged particle beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of energy recovery for RF-base linear charged particle accelerators that allows energy recovery without large relative momentum spread of the particle beam involving first accelerating a waveform particle beam having a crest and a centroid with an injection energy E.sub.o with the centroid of the particle beam at a phase offset f.sub.o from the crest of the accelerating waveform to an energy E.sub.full and then recovering the beam energy centroid a phase f.sub.o+Df relative to the crest of the waveform particle beam such that (E.sub.full-E.sub.o)(1+cos(f.sub.o+Df))>dE/2 wherein dE=the full energy spread, dE/2=the full energy half spread and Df=the wave form phase distance.

Douglas, David R. (Newport News, VA); Benson, Stephen V. (Yorktown, VA)

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

364

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee onsupports high impact projectsMatt8 Image: Nuclear Materials

365

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee onsupports high impact projectsMatt8 Image: Nuclear

366

Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee onsupports high impact projectsMatt8 Image: NuclearWorkers

367

Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological Aspects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological Aspects Yuzhong Tan College of Engineering://www.funginstitute.berkeley.edu/sites/default/ les/SolidWasteToEnergy.pdf April 15, 2013 130 Blum Hall #5580 Berkeley, CA 94720-5580 | (510) 664 seeks to compare and evaluate each technology by reviewing waste to energy reports and seeking

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

368

Camargo Waste to Energy Power Plant Hamed Zamenian1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Camargo Waste to Energy Power Plant Hamed Zamenian1 , Eminou Nasser 1 , Matt Ray2 , Tom Iseley3 1 and Technology, IUPUI The Camargo Waste to Energy Power plant project is being proposed to dispose of Municipal are discarded in landfills. The Camargo Waste to Energy (WTE) power station is an opportunity to continue

Zhou, Yaoqi

369

Waste-To-Energy Feasibility Analysis: A Simulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste- To- Energy Feasibility Analysis: A Simulation Model Viet- An Duong College of Engineering://www.funginstitute.berkeley.edu/sites/default/ les/WasteToEnergy.pdf May 1, 2014 130 Blum Hall #5580 Berkeley, CA 94720-5580 | (510) 664-4337 | www of the main battles of our generation. Using waste to produce electricity can be a major source of energy

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

370

DOE/WIPP-12-3487 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND RECOVERY ACT AND SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL ACTDraft DOE/WIPP-12-3487 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico

371

Successes of the Recovery Act - January 2012 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4 Recovery Act/Buy American

372

Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased recycling efforts would not diminish the potential for incineration with energy recovery from waste and neither would have adverse impacts on the gate fee of the Waste-to-Energy plant. In general, the study highlighted the need for efficient planning in solid waste management, by taking into account multiple criteria and parameters and utilizing relevant tools and methodologies into this context.

Perkoulidis, G. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papageorgiou, A., E-mail: giou6@yahoo.g [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalogirou, S. [Waste to Energy Research and Technology Council (Greece)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Future Technologies to Enhance Geothermal Energy Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal power is a renewable, low-carbon option for producing base-load (i.e., low-intermittency) electricity. Improved technologies have the potential to access untapped geothermal energy sources, which experts estimate to be greater than 100,000 MWe. However, many technical challenges in areas such as exploration, drilling, reservoir engineering, and energy conversion must be addressed if the United States is to unlock the full potential of Earth's geothermal energy and displace fossil fuels. (For example, see Tester et al., 2006; Green and Nix, 2006; and Western Governors Association, 2006.) Achieving next-generation geothermal power requires both basic science and applied technology to identify prospective resources and effective extraction strategies. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a long history of research and development work in support of geothermal power. Key technologies include advances in scaling and brine chemistry, economic and resource assessment, direct use, exploration, geophysics, and geochemistry. For example, a high temperature, multi-spacing, multi-frequency downhole EM induction logging tool (GeoBILT) was developed jointly by LLNL and EMI to enable the detection and orientation of fractures and conductive zones within the reservoir (Figure 1). Livermore researchers also conducted studies to determine how best to stave off increased salinity in the Salton Sea, an important aquatic ecosystem in California. Since 1995, funding for LLNL's geothermal research has decreased, but the program continues to make important contributions to sustain the nation's energy future. The current efforts, which are highlighted in this report, focus on developing an Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) and on improving technologies for exploration, monitoring, characterization, and geochemistry. Future research will also focus on these areas.

Roberts, J J; Kaahaaina, N; Aines, R; Zucca, J; Foxall, B; Atkins-Duffin, C

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

374

Photocathodes for the energy recovery linacs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of existing and emerging technologies on electron sources that can service various Energy Recovering Linacs under consideration. Photocathodes that can deliver average currents from 1 mA to 1 A, the pros and cons associated with these cathodes are addressed. Status of emerging technologies such as secondary emitters, cesiated dispenser cathodes, field and photon assisted field emitters and super lattice photocathodes are also reviewed.

T. Rao; A. Burrill; X.Y. Chang; J. Smedley; T. Nishitani; C. Hernandez Garcia; M. Poelker; E. Seddon; F.E. Hannon; C.K. Sinclair; J. Lewellen; D. Feldman

2005-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

375

PHOTOCATHODES FOR THE ENERGY RECOVERY LINACS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of existing and emerging technologies on electron sources that can service various Energy Recovering Linacs under consideration. Photocathodes that can deliver average currents from 1 mA to 1 A, the pros and cons associated with these cathodes are addressed. Status of emerging technologies such as secondary emitters, cesiated dispenser cathodes, field and photon assisted field emitters and super lattice photocathodes are also reviewed.

RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.Y.; SMEDLEY, J.; ET AL.

2005-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

376

Recovery Act Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »ExchangeDepartment ofManagementManagement Records Management

377

Property:RecoveryFunding | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity Jump to: navigation,Website Property

378

Recovery Act Workforce Development | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromComments on NBP RFI:Department of

379

Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste-heat recovery allowing for energy reuse. The limited use of thermoelectric generatorswaste-heat recovery allowing for en- ergy reuse. The limited use of thermoelectric generators

Khan, Javed Miller

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Recovery Act: Clean Coal Power Initiative | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery Act: Clean Coal Power Initiative Recovery Act: Clean Coal Power Initiative A report detailling the Clean Coal Power initiative funded under the American Recovery and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Florida Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdf Flash2010-57.pdf Flash2010-57.pdfFletcher E.Florida Recovery Act

382

Department of Energy Releases WIPP Recovery Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files DataADVANCESDepartment of| DepartmentDepartment

383

Enhanced Oil Recovery | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department oftoTheseClickDepartment ofFeaturingThanks in part to

384

Recovery News Flashes | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research | DepartmentDepartmentHatch,DepartmentDeliveryMay 1,Here you

385

Supercritical Recovery Systems LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen, Minnesota:36052°,Sunfield,Farms BiomassSunwattEnergy

386

Feed Resource Recovery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37.California: Energy Resources44795°,FauquierGrantWashington:AutomobileFeed

387

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradley Nickell02-03 AUDITMotionWhenStatus andWaste

388

Transuranic Waste Tabletop | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012 Greenbuy3 Archive Transportation Fact ofATEnergyWaste

389

Waste Disposal | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory30,WP-073.99 4.22

390

Industrial Heat Recovery with Organic Rankine Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rising energy costs are encouraging energy intensive industries to investigate alternative means of waste heat recovery from process streams. The use of organic fluids in Rankine cycles offers improved potential for economical cogeneration from...

Hnat, J. G.; Patten, J. S.; Cutting, J. C.; Bartone, L. M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act encourages the establishment of regional waste management facilities and the cooperation of local waste management entities in order to streamline the management of municipal solid waste...

392

Waste-to-Energy | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartmentofTechnologiesusing Fuel

393

CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CEWEP - Confederation of European Waste-to- Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A B-1000 Brussels Tel energy from waste Waste-to-Energy A cost effective and reliable sustainable energy source Waste for additional renewable energy which can be exploited from municipal solid waste (MSW) and comparable waste

394

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan Summary for Interim reasctive Waste Treatment Area (IRWTA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This closure plan has been prepared for the interim Reactive Waste Treatment Area (IRWT'A) located at the Y-12 Pkmt in oak Ridge, Tennessee (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Identification TN 389-009-0001). The actions required to achieve closure of the IRWTA are outlined in this plan, which is being submitted in accordance with Tennessee Ruie 1200- 1-1 1-.0S(7) and Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G. The IRWTA was used to treat waste sodium and potassium (NaK) that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The location of the IRWT'A is shown in Figures 1 and 2, and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.

Collins, E.T.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Energy recovery and cogeneration from an existing municipal incinerator: Phase IIA progress report on final design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A feasibility study was prepared on energy recovery and cogeneration from and existing municipal incinerator in Wayne County, Michigan. The mechanical, electrical, structural, and instruments an controls equipment designs were established in sufficient depth to arrive at a construction cost estimate. The designs are described. All of the flue gas generated from each incinerator is directed into a waste heat boiler that will generate steam. A waste heat boiler will be provided for each of the three incinerators. Steam from these waste heat boilers will supply energy to two turbine-generators, which, in turn, will supply auxiliary power to the incinerator plant; the balance of the power will be sold to Detroit Edison Company (DEC). Exhaust steam from each turbine will be directed into a surface condenser operating under vacuum. The water to be supplied to each condenser will be recirculated water that has been cooled by means of a cooling tower. Other cooling water that could be subjected to oil contamination will be supplied from a separate recirculating water system. The water in this system will be cooled by an evaporative condenser. The main steam, boiler feedwater, and condensate systems will be similar to those used in central power stations. Flow diagrams for all systems, together with heat balances, electrical one-line diagrams, and plant layouts, are included in the Appendix. Also included in the Appendix are instruments and controls logic diagrams. (MCW)

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Recovery of valuable metals from scrap batteries of mobile phone. - Highlights: • Recovery of Co and Li from spent LIBs was performed by hydrometallurgical route. • Under the optimum condition, 99.1% of lithium and 70.0% of cobalt were leached. • The mechanism of the dissolution of lithium and cobalt was studied. • Activation energy for lithium and cobalt were found to be 32.4 kJ/mol and 59.81 kJ/mol, respectively. • After metal recovery, residue was washed before disposal to the environment. - Abstract: In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2 M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75 °C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1 ? (1 ? X){sup 1/3} = k{sub c}t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model ‘ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles’ i.e. 1 ? 3(1 ? X){sup 2/3} + 2(1 ? X) = k{sub c}t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution.

Jha, Manis Kumar, E-mail: mkjha@nmlindia.org; Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Waste to energy: The case of the Bolzano solid urban waste incineration plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most demanding problems of waste management was that of finding the means and the technology for converting, neutralizing and disposing of the refuse, without disturbing the delicate ecological equilibrium of the soil, water and air. Today, this problem is handled with the latest refuse incineration and Snamprogetti's combustion residue purification technologies, which in addition to substantial energy returns, also provide sufficient assurance of efficiency as well as health and environmental safety. In the present state of the art, these technologies make it possible to cut down on the use of dumps and landfills. In fact, such technologies permit to obtain an extremely small volume of inert residues, as well as very low dust and hydrochloric acid levels, and an infinitesimal concentration of micropollutants in the atmospheric emissions. Experience has shown that non-polluting incineration of unrecoverable wastes is feasible and the electricity obtained from the combustion heat is more than enough to run the plant and can be sold making the operation advantageous in economic terms. On the basis of this philosophy Snamprogetti designed and built an incineration at Bolzano on 1994, which was expanded in 1996 with a second line, for a total operating potential of 400 t/d of wastes. The plant included a heat recovery line with a steam boiler and a turbogenerator for the production of electricity. The steam turbine driving the generator could operate partly in the condensation mode, and partly in the bleeding mode to produce both electricity and steam. Implementation of the integrated program made provision for employment of the bled off steam to produce superheated water to feed the city's district heating network. A detailed assessment of the characteristics of the plant and its environmental efficiency is presented.

Nicolai, H.G.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Environmental assessment operation of the HB-Line facility and frame waste recovery process for production of Pu-238 oxide at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0948, addressing future operations of the HB-Line facility and the Frame Waste Recovery process at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, DOE has concluded that, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

OPERATIONAL ASPECTS OF HIGH POWER ENERGY RECOVERY LINACS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have been operating a high-power energy-recovery linac (ERL) at Jefferson Lab for several years. In the process we have learned quite a bit about both technical and physics limitations in high power ERLs. Several groups are now considering new ERLs that greatly increase either the energy, the current or both. We will present some of our findings on what to consider when designing, building, and operating a high power ERL. Our remarks for this paper are limited to lattice design and setup, magnets, vacuum chamber design, diagnostics, and beam stability.

Stephen Benson; David Douglas; Pavel Evtushenko; Kevin Jordan; George Neil; Paul Powers

2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

400

Nebraska Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthCommentsAugustNational ScienceEnergyNebraska Recovery Act State

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nevada Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthCommentsAugustNational ScienceEnergyNebraskaNevada Recovery Act

402

North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy Advanced Framing -Nissan:DepartmentDakota Recovery

403

Kansas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJennifer Somers AboutEnergyKansas Recovery Act State Memo

404

Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: EnergyGrasslandsGreen2V Jump to:GreenboxGreeneGas Recovery Biomass

405

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

breakthrough immobilization technologies. Currently projects are focusing on: In-tank sludge washing at Hanford Enhanced waste processing at Idaho, Hanford, and Savannah River...

406

Fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system development. Semiannual report, February 1, 1983-July 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major energy loss in industry is the heat content of the flue gases from industrial process heaters. One effective way to utilize this energy, which is applicable to all processes, is to preheat the combustion air from the process heater. Although recuperators are available to preheat this air when the flue gases are clean, recuperators to recover the heat from dirty and corrosive flue gases do not exist. The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry. In this report, the accomplishments of the proceeding six-month period are described.

Cole, W. E.; De Saro, R.; Joshi, C.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Investigating potential efficiency improvement for light-duty transportation applications through simulation of an organic Rankine cycle for waste-heat recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to heat loss and combustion irreversibility. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, the potential benefits of such a strategy for light-duty applications are unknown due to transient operation, low-load operation at typical driving conditions, and the added mass of the system. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. Results from steady-state and drive-cycle simulations are presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and competition between waste-heat recovery systems, turbochargers, aftertreatment devices, and other systems for the limited thermal resources.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Highlights from U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Recovery Act Projects  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This fact sheets highlights U.S. Department of Energy fuel cell projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act). More than 1,000 fuel cell systems have been deploy

409

RADIOLOGICAL CONTROLS FOR PLUTONIUM CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FROM 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINSHING PLANT (PFP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 232-Z facility at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant operated as a plutonium scrap incinerator for 11 years. Its mission was to recover residual plutonium through incinerating and/or leaching contaminated wastes and scrap material. Equipment failures, as well as spills, resulted in the release of radionuclides and other contamination to the building, along with small amounts to external soil. Based on the potential threat posed by the residual plutonium, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued an Action Memorandum to demolish Building 232-2, Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERC1.A) Non-Time Critical Removal Action Memorandum for Removal of the 232-2 Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (04-AMCP-0486).

MINETTE, M.J.

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

More Documents & Publications Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Vehicle Technologies Office...

411

Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Mike Waldron, 202586-4940 Addthis Related Articles Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Federal Judge Energy Secretary Chu, EPA Administrator...

412

Wilders Grove Solid Waste Services Center | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grove Solid Waste Services Center Project objective: Provide demonstration of Geothermal Heat Pumps viability on energy usage for future Service Centers planned by the City of...

413

Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry - Fact Sheet, 2014 2011 CHPIndustrial Distributed Energy R&D Portfolio Review - Summary Report Biogas Opportunities Roadmap...

414

Drain-Water Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005Department ofDOEDisability EmploymentDrain-Water Heat Recovery

415

EM Recovery Act Lessons Learned (Johnson) | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005Department ofDOEDisabilityContractorsRecovery Act Lessons Learned

416

Delaware Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealing With the Issues of NuclearHigh ImpactDelaware Recovery Act

417

Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Olsen Cycle on PZN-5.5PT Single Crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy converter for waste heat energy harvesting using co-L. “Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using heatNo.3, pp.035015, 2012. WASTE HEAT ENERGY HARVESTING USING

McKinley, Ian Meeker; Kandilian, Razmig; Pilon, Laurent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Olsen Cycle on PZN-5.5PT Single Crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy converter for waste heat energy harvesting using co-Pilon, L. “Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting usingNo.3, pp.035015, 2012. WASTE HEAT ENERGY HARVESTING USING

McKinley, Ian Meeker; Kandilian, Razmig; Pilon, Laurent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Energy Policy 33 (2005) 16911702 Paradise recovered: energy production and waste management in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Policy 33 (2005) 1691­1702 Paradise recovered: energy production and waste management the conclusions of a previous study by the authors regarding the competitiveness of waste-to-energy (WTE in the earlier study and the island is currently seeking to modernize its energy production and waste management

Columbia University

420

Quantification of the Potential Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(ICE). Energy from waste has an important role to play in improving energy security in the UK and1 waste up to 2020. To determine the potential2 contribution that energy recovery from residual shows that: potential energy recovery from these residual wastes could account for as much as 17

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

INFORMATION: Special Report on "Selected Department of Energy Program Efforts to Implement the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was enacted on February 17, 2009, to jumpstart the economy by creating or saving millions of jobs, spurring technological advances in health and science, and investing in the Nation's energy future. The Department of Energy received over $32.7 billion in Recovery Act funding for various science, energy, and environmental programs and initiatives. As of November 2009, the Department had obligated $18.3 billion of the Recovery Act funding, but only $1.4 billion had been spent. The Department's Offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Fossil Energy, Environmental Management, Science, and Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability received the majority of funding allocated to the Department, about $32.3 billion. Obligating these funds by the end of Fiscal Year 2010, as required by the Recovery Act, and overseeing their effective use in succeeding years, represents a massive workload increase for the Department's programs. The effort to date has strained existing resources. As has been widely acknowledged, any effort to disburse massive additional funding and to expeditiously initiate and complete projects increases the risk of fraud, waste and abuse. It is, therefore, important for the Department's program offices to assess and mitigate these risks to the maximum extent practicable. In this light, we initiated this review as an initial step in the Office of Inspector General's charge to determine whether the Department's major program offices had developed an effective approach for identifying and mitigating risks related to achieving the goals and objectives of the Recovery Act. The Department's program offices included in our review identified risks and planned mitigation strategies that, if successfully implemented and executed, should help achieve the goals and objectives of the Recovery Act. While each office identified risks unique to its respective areas of responsibility, there were a number of risks shared in common. These included the mechanical and substantive requirements related to the award and distribution of funds; program and project performance monitoring; and, program and project execution activities. In particular, the offices self-identified common risks such as: (1) The inability to award and distribute funds in a timely manner to achieve the goals of the Recovery Act; (2) The sufficiency of monitoring procedures and resources to, among other things, prevent and detect fraud, waste and abuse throughout the performance period of financial assistance awards and contracts; and (3) The inherent cost, schedule and performance risks associated with first-of-a-kind, innovative research and demonstration projects. Our review confirmed that the Department had begun to implement a number of strategies designed to mitigate these and other program-specific risks. Our testing, however, identified challenges to the effective implementation of these mitigation strategies that need to be addressed if the Department is to meet the goals and objectives established by the Recovery Act. At the time of our review: (1) Program staffing resources, critical to the success of all other mitigation strategies, remained inadequate both in numbers and qualifications (certifications and training) for positions in procurement and acquisition, project management, and monitoring and oversight functions; (2) Performance measures for achieving Recovery Act goals such as distributing funds in an expeditious manner had not always been established and included in performance plans, and, in financial assistance and contract documents; and (3) Programs had not consistently demonstrated that previously reported deficiencies, identified through audits, inspections, investigations and other oversight activities, had been considered in designing mitigation strategies for the Recovery Act related risks. As we noted in our Special Report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act at the Department of Energy (OAS-RA-09-01, March 2009) these sorts of deficiencies, which w

None

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

The First Recovery Act Funded Waste Shipment depart from the Advanced Mixed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2Different ImpactsTheRollingCompetitionWaste

423

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Specific Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactor TechnologyOFFICE: I Oak4 DOEProjectPlan | Department of

424

Recovery Act: Enhancing State Energy Assurance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartmentEnergyFrequency | Department ofMay 14, 2014November

425

Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High-Power High-efficiency Waste Heat Recovery for Electricity Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Large-dimension, high-ZT BiTe and Pb-based nanocomposites produced with a low-cost scalable process were used for development and testing of TE module prototypes, and demonstration of a waste heat recovery system

426

Energy Secretary Chu Announces $6 Billion in Recovery Act Funding...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

infrastructure and systems to transfer radioactive liquid waste from aging underground tanks to a waste treatment facility for immobilization and disposal. Accelerate design for...

427

Heavy Duty Roots Expander for Waste Heat Energy Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

428

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccess to OUO Access to OUOAlaskaMoney |of Energy Nuclear

429

Waste Heat Recovery and Recycling in Thermal Separation Processes: Distillation, Multi-Effect Evaporation (MEE) and Crystallization Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaporation and crystallization are key thermal separation processes for concentrating and purifying inorganic and organic products with energy consumption over 1,000 trillion Btu/yr. This project focused on a challenging task of recovering low-temperature latent heat that can have a paradigm shift in the way thermal process units will be designed and operated to achieve high-energy efficiency and significantly reduce the carbon footprint as well as water footprint. Moreover, this project has evaluated the technical merits of waste-heat powered thermal heat pumps for recovery of latent heat from distillation, multi-effect evaporation (MEE), and crystallization processes and recycling into the process. The Project Team has estimated the potential energy, economics and environmental benefits with the focus on reduction in CO2 emissions that can be realized by 2020, assuming successful development and commercialization of the technology being developed. Specifically, with aggressive industry-wide applications of heat recovery and recycling with absorption heat pumps, energy savings of about 26.7 trillion Btu/yr have been estimated for distillation process. The direct environmental benefits of this project are the reduced emissions of combustible products. The estimated major reduction in environmental pollutants in the distillation processes is in CO2 emission equivalent to 3.5 billion lbs/year. Energy consumption associated with water supply and treatments can vary between 1,900 kWh and 23,700 kWh per million-gallon water depending on sources of natural waters [US DOE, 2006]. Successful implementation of this technology would significantly reduce the demand for cooling-tower waters, and thereby the use and discharge of water treatment chemicals. The Project Team has also identified and characterized working fluid pairs for the moderate-temperature heat pump. For an MEE process, the two promising fluids are LiNO3+KNO3+NANO3 (53:28:19 ) and LiNO3+KNO3+NANO2(53:35:12). And for an H2O2 distillation process, the two promising fluids are Trifluoroethanol (TFE) + Triethylene Glycol Dimethyl ether (DMETEG) and Ammonia+ Water. Thermo-physical properties calculated by Aspen+ are reasonably accurate. Documentation of the installation of pilot-plants or full commercial units were not found in the literature for validating thermo-physical properties in an operating unit. Therefore, it is essential to install a pilot-scale unit to verify thermo-physical properties of working fluid pairs and validate the overall efficiency of the thermal heat pump at temperatures typical of distillation processes. For an HO2 process, the ammonia-water heat pump system is more compact and preferable than the TFE-DMETEG heat pump. The ammonia-water heat pump is therefore recommended for the H2O2 process. Based on the complex nature of the heat recovery system, we anticipated that capital costs could make investments financially unattractive where steam costs are low, especially where co-generation is involved. We believe that the enhanced heat transfer equipment has the potential to significantly improve the performance of TEE crystallizers, independent of the absorption heat-pump recovery system. Where steam costs are high, more detailed design/cost engineering will be required to verify the economic viability of the technology. Due to the long payback period estimated for the TEE open system, further studies on the TEE system are not warranted unless there are significant future improvements to heat pump technology. For the H2O2 distillation cycle heat pump waste heat recovery system, there were no significant process constraints and the estimated 5 years payback period is encouraging. We therefore recommend further developments of application of the thermal heat pump in the H2O2 distillation process with the focus on the technical and economic viability of heat exchangers equipped with the state-of-the-art enhancements. This will require additional funding for a prototype unit to validate enhanced thermal performances of heat transfer equipment, evaluat

Emmanuel A. Dada; Chandrakant B. Panchal; Luke K. Achenie; Aaron Reichl; Chris C. Thomas

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

430

Penobscot Energy Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent

431

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Chapter E, Appendix E1, Chapter L, Appendix L1: Volume 12, Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project was authorized by the US Department of Energy 5 (DOE) National Security and Military Applications of the Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-164). Its legislative mandate is to provide a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive waste resulting from national defense programs and activities. To fulfill this mandate, the WIPP facility has been designed to perform scientific investigations of the behavior of bedded salt as a repository medium and the interactions between the soft and radioactive wastes. In 1991, DOE proposed to initiate a experimental Test Phase designed to demonstrate the performance of the repository. The Test Phase activities involve experiments using transuranic (TRU) waste typical of the waste planned for future disposal at the WIPP facility. Much of this TRU waste is co-contaminated with chemical constituents which are defined as hazardous under HWMR-7, Pt. II, sec. 261. This waste is TRU mixed waste and is the subject of this application. Because geologic repositories, such as the WIPP facility, are defined under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as land disposal facilities, the groundwater monitoring requirements of HWMR-7, PLV, Subpart X, must be addressed. HWMR-7, Pt. V, Subpart X, must be addressed. This appendix demonstrates that groundwater monitoring is not needed in order to demonstrate compliance with the performance standards; therefore, HWMR-7, Pt.V, Subpart F, will not apply to the WIPP facility.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Bubblers Speed Nuclear Waste Processing at SRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding has supported installation of bubbler technology and related enhancements in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The improvements will accelerate the processing of radioactive waste into a safe, stable form for storage and permit expedited closure of underground waste tanks holding 37 million gallons of liquid nuclear waste.

None

2010-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

433

Bubblers Speed Nuclear Waste Processing at SRS  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

At the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding has supported installation of bubbler technology and related enhancements in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The improvements will accelerate the processing of radioactive waste into a safe, stable form for storage and permit expedited closure of underground waste tanks holding 37 million gallons of liquid nuclear waste.

None

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

434

The role of waste-to-energy in integrated waste management: A life cycle assessment perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management has become a major issue in terms of environmental impacts. It has become the focus of local, state and federal regulations, which generally tend to promote the reduce/re-use/recycle/incinerate/landfill environmental hierarchy. At the same time, the Waste Industry capital requirements have increased in order of magnitude since the beginning of the 80`s. The driving forces of further capital requirements for the Waste Management Industry will be the impact of public policies set today and goals set by politicians. Therefore, it appears extremely important for the Waste Industry to correctly analyze and forecast the real environmental and financial costs of waste management practices in order to: discuss with the local, state and federal agencies on more rational grounds; forecast the right investments in new technologies (recycling networks and plants, incinerators with heat recovery, modern landfill). The aim of this paper is to provide an example of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) project in the waste management field that raised surprising issues on otherwise unchallenged waste management practices.

Besnainou, J. [Ecobalance, Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Energy from Waste: A good practice guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

including central and local Government, the public and professional waste managers. Since the publication of a more sustainable approach to waste management, involving public participation, greater levels new to municipal waste management, and drawing on good practice from the UK and overseas, I am sure

Columbia University

436

Energy Recovery Linac cavity at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Recovery Linac cavity at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear...

437

High Current Energy Recovery Linac at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

High Current Energy Recovery Linac at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of...

438

ITP Distributed Energy: State of Washington Clean Energy Opportunity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

potential including clean heat and power (CHP)cogeneration, waste heat recovery for power and heat, and district energy. This brief white paper by the Northwest Clean Energy...

439

Waste Management & Research172 Waste Manage Res 2003: 21: 172177  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: Waste incineration, PVC (polyvinylchloride), energy recovery, material recycling, HCLWaste Management & Research172 Waste Manage Res 2003: 21: 172­177 Printed in UK ­ all rights reserved Copyright © ISWA 2003 Waste Management & Research ISSN 0734­242X In many market segments

Columbia University

440

Pressurized Oxidative Recovery of Energy from Biomass Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was conducted to evaluate the technical feasibility of using pressurized oxyfuel, the ThermoEnergy Integrated Power System (TIPS), to recover energy from biomass. The study was focused on two fronts—computer simulation of the TIPS plant and corrosion testing to determine the best materials of construction for the critical heat exchanger components of the process. The goals were to demonstrate that a successful strategy of applying the TIPS process to wood waste could be achieved. To fully investigate the technical and economic benefits of using TIPS, it was necessary to model a conventional air-fired biomass power plant for comparison purposes. The TIPS process recovers and utilizes the latent heat of vaporization of water entrained in the fuel or produced during combustion. This latent heat energy is unavailable in the ambient processes. An average composition of wood waste based on data from the Pacific Northwest, Pacific Southwest, and the South was used for the study. The high moisture content of wood waste is a major advantage of the TIPS process. The process can utilize the higher heating value of the fuel by condensing most of the water vapor in the flue gas and making the flue gas a useful source of heat. This is a considerable thermal efficiency gain over conventional power plants which use the lower heating value of the fuel. The elevated pressure also allows TIPS the option of recovering CO2 at near ambient temperatures with high purity oxygen used in combustion. Unlike ambient pressure processes which need high energy multi-stage CO2 compression to supply pipeline quality product, TIPS is able to simply pump the CO2 liquid using very little auxiliary power. In this study, a 15.0 MWe net biomass power plant was modeled, and when a CO2 pump was included it only used 0.1 MWe auxiliary power. The need for refrigeration is eliminated at such pressures resulting in significant energy, capital, and operating and maintenance savings. Since wood waste is a fuel with a high moisture and hydrogen content, it is one of the best applications for TIPS. The only way to fully utilize the latent heat is by using a pressurized system and the oxy-fuel approach allows for carbon capture and easier emission control. Pressurized operation also allows for easier emission control than atmospheric oxyfuel because presence of infiltration air in the atmospheric case. For the case of wood waste as the fuel however, the ability of TIPS to fully utilize the heat of condensation is the most valuable advantage of the process. The project research showed that titanium alloys were the best materials of construction for the heat exchangers. All other materials tested failed to withstand even brief periods in the harsh environment (high temperature, acidic, and oxidizing conditions). Titanium was able to survive due to the formation of a stable TiO2 passivation layer.

M. Misra

2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Program Final Report - Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We conducted a vehicle analysis to assess the feasibility of thermoelectric technology for waste heat recovery and conversion to useful electrical power and found that eliminating the 500 W of electrical power generated by the alternator corresponded to about a 7% increase in fuel economy (FE) for a small car and about 6% for a full size truck. Electric power targets of 300 W were established for city and highway driving cycles for this project. We obtained critical vehicle level information for these driving cycles that enabled a high-level design and performance analysis of radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems for several potential vehicle platforms, and we identified the location and geometric envelopes of the radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems. Based on this analysis, we selected the Chevrolet Suburban as the most suitable demonstration vehicle for this project. Our modeling and thermal analysis assessment of a radiator-based thermoelectric generator (TEG), however, revealed severe practical limitations. Specifically the small temperature difference of 100°C or less between the engine coolant and ambient air results in a low Carnot conversion efficiency, and thermal resistance associated with air convection would reduce this conversion efficiency even further. We therefore decided not to pursue a radiator-based waste heat recovery system and focused only on the exhaust gas. Our overall approach was to combine science and engineering: (1) existing and newly developed TE materials were carefully selected and characterized by the material researcher members of our team, and most of the material property results were validated by our research partners, and (2) system engineers worked closely with vehicle engineers to ensure that accurate vehicle-level information was used for developing subsystem models and designs, and the subsystem output was analyzed for potential fuel economy gains. We incorporated material, module, subsystem, and integration costs into the material selection criteria in order to balance various materials, module and subsystem design, and vehicle integration options. Our work on advanced TE materials development and on TEG system design, assembly, vehicle integration, and testing proceeded in parallel efforts. Results from our two preliminary prototype TEGs using only Bi-Te TE modules allowed us to solve various mechanical challenges and to finalize and fine tune aspects of the design and implementation. Our materials research effort led us to quickly abandon work on PbTe and focus on the skutterudite materials due to their superior mechanical performance and suitability at automotive exhaust gas operating temperatures. We synthesized a sufficiently large quantity of skutterudite material for module fabrication for our third and final prototype. Our TEG#3 is the first of its kind to contain state-of-the-art skutterudite-based TE modules to be installed and tested on a production vehicle. The design, which consisted of 24 skutterudite modules and 18 Bi-Te modules, attempted to optimize electrical power generation by using these two kinds of TE modules that have their peak performance temperatures matched to the actual temperature profile of the TEG during operation. The performance of TEG#3 was limited by the maximum temperature allowable for the Bi-Te TE modules located in the colder end of the TEG, resulting in the operating temperature for the skutterudite modules to be considerably below optimum. We measured the power output for (1) the complete TEG (25 Watts) and (2) an individual TE module series string (1/3 of the TEG) operated at a 60°C higher temperature (19 Watts). We estimate that under optimum operating temperature conditions, TEG#3 will generate about 235 Watts. With additional improvements in thermal and electrical interfaces, temperature homogeneity, and power conditioning, we estimate TEG#3 could deliver a power output of about 425 Watts.

Gregory Meisner

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite TE modules were...

443

Puente Hills Energy Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity Jump to:USGSMeanReservoirTempUtility, Inc.GroupCounty,

444

Solvent recycle/recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Engine System Approach to Exhaust Energy Recovery | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof Energy 12, 2004Department ofEnforcingVehicleof2Engine

446

Gills Onions Advanced Energy Recovery System | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCostAnalysis GeothermalEnergy GeothermalGet startedGills

447

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act, ARRA, clean energy projects, energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment ofEnergy Natural Gas:Austin, TMOAB, Utah - Moving 2.4Continued3

448

Capacitive energy storage and recovery for synchrotron magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Feasibility studies on capacitive energy storage and recovery in the main-ring synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex were conducted by circuit simulation. The estimated load fluctuation was 96 MVA in total for dipole magnets, which is likely to induce a serious disturbance in the main grid. It was found that the energy stored in the magnets after the excitation period can be recovered to the storage capacitor by controlling the voltage across the energy-storage capacitor using a pulse-width-modulation converter and reused in the next operational cycle. It was also found that the power fluctuation in the main grid can be reduced to 12 MVA. An experimental evaluation of an aluminum metalized film capacitor revealed that capacitance loss was induced by a fluctuating voltage applied to the storage capacitor when applying the proposed method. The capacitance loss was induced by corona discharge around the edges of segmented electrodes of a self-healing capacitor. The use of aluminum-zinc alloy was evaluated as a countermeasure to mitigate the effect induced by the corona discharge. For a zinc content of 8%, which was optimized experimentally, a capacitor with a sufficient life time expectancy of 20 years and a working potential gradient of 250 V/?m was developed.

Koseki, K., E-mail: kunio.koseki@kek.jp [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Energy-efficient modification of reduction-melting for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • We recovered Pb from cathode ray tube funnel glass using reduction melting process. • We modified the melting process to achieve Pb recovery with low energy consumption. • Pb in the funnel glass is efficiently recovered at 1000 °C by adding Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. • Pb remaining in the glass after reduction melting is extracted with 1 M HCl. • 98% of Pb in the funnel glass was recovered by reduction melting and HCl leaching. - Abstract: Lead can be recovered from funnel glass of waste cathode ray tubes via reduction melting. While low-temperature melting is necessary for reduced energy consumption, previously proposed methods required high melting temperatures (1400 °C) for the reduction melting. In this study, the reduction melting of the funnel glass was performed at 900–1000 °C using a lab-scale reactor with varying concentrations of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at different melting temperatures and melting times. The optimum Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} dosage and melting temperature for efficient lead recovery was 0.5 g per 1 g of the funnel glass and 1000 °C respectively. By the reduction melting with the mentioned conditions, 92% of the lead in the funnel glass was recovered in 60 min. However, further lead recovery was difficult because the rate of the lead recovery decreased as with the recovery of increasing quantity of the lead from the glass. Thus, the lead remaining in the glass after the reduction melting was extracted with 1 M HCl, and the lead recovery improved to 98%.

Okada, Takashi, E-mail: t-okada@u-fukui.ac.jp; Yonezawa, Susumu

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

A Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (CED), life cycle based, for industrial waste management decision making  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • We developed a methodology useful to environmentally compare industrial waste management options. • The methodology uses a Net Energy Demand indicator which is life cycle based. • The method was simplified to be widely used, thus avoiding cost driven decisions. • This methodology is useful for governments to promote the best environmental options. • This methodology can be widely used by other countries or regions around the world. - Abstract: Life cycle thinking is a good approach to be used for environmental decision-support, although the complexity of the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies sometimes prevents their wide use. The purpose of this paper is to show how LCA methodology can be simplified to be more useful for certain applications. In order to improve waste management in Catalonia (Spain), a Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (LCA-based) has been used to obtain four mathematical models to help the government in the decision of preventing or allowing a specific waste from going out of the borders. The conceptual equations and all the subsequent developments and assumptions made to obtain the simplified models are presented. One of the four models is discussed in detail, presenting the final simplified equation to be subsequently used by the government in decision making. The resulting model has been found to be scientifically robust, simple to implement and, above all, fulfilling its purpose: the limitation of waste transport out of Catalonia unless the waste recovery operations are significantly better and justify this transport.

Puig, Rita, E-mail: rita.puig@eei.upc.edu [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Fullana-i-Palmer, Pere [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Baquero, Grau; Riba, Jordi-Roger [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Bala, Alba [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Engineering/design of a co-generation waste-to-energy facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five hundred fifteen thousand tons of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is being generated every day in America. At present 68% of this trash is dumped into landfill operations. As the amount of garbage is increasing daily, the amount of land reserved for landfills is diminishing rapidly. With the sentiment of the public that you produce it, you keep it, the import-export of waste between the counties and states for the landfills, no longer appears to be feasible, especially when combined with expensive disposal costs. One method of reducing the quantity of waste sent to landfills is through the use of waste-to-energy facilities - the technology of resource recovery - the technology of today INCINERATION. All cogeneration projects are not alike. This paper examines several aspects of the electrical system of a particular municipal solid waste-to-energy project at Charleston, S.C. which includes plant auxiliary loads as well as a utility interconnection through a step-up transformer.

Bajaj, K.S.; Virgilio, R.J. (Foster Wheeler USA Corp., Clinton, NJ (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Waste-to-energy plants face costly emissions-control upgrades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One treatment method of municipal solid waste, incineration, has fallen in and out of public favor. In the 1970s, emerging consciousness of the threat to groundwater posed by leaking landfills made incineration an attractive option. Prompted by disrupted energy supplies and steeply rising prices, more than 100 municipalities began to generate electricity from the heat produced by burning trash. In the 1990s, the pendulum of public enthusiasm has swung away from incineration. Energy prices have declined dramatically, and safety and siting concerns complicate new projects. A recent Supreme Court decision ruled that municipal incinerator ash must be tested as hazardous waste and disposed accordingly if levels of such pollutants as cadmium and lead exceed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act limits. So-called flow control regulations, which allowed municipalities to apportion garbage disposal to ensure steady supplies to incinerators, also have been struck down. EPA is tackling the issue of air emissions from waste-to-energy and non-energy-producing municipal waste combustors. Emissions guidelines for MWCs and new-source performance standards for new units, proposed Sept. 20 under Sec. 129 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, are the culmination of a stalled and litigated initiative dating back to the CAA Amendments of 1977.

McIlvaine, R.W.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Waste utilization as an energy source: Municipal wastes. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the utilization of municipal wastes as an energy source. Articles discuss energy derived from incineration/combustion, refuse-derived fuels, co-firing municipal waste and standard fuels, landfill gas production, sewage combustion, and other waste-to-energy technologies. Citations address economics and efficiencies of various schemes to utilize municipal waste products as energy sources. (Contains a minimum of 130 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr PRESS RELEASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr 1 PRESS RELEASE INTERNATIONAL INTENSIVE COURSE " Waste to Energy as an Integral Part of Sustainable Waste Management Worldwide: The case of Baku event focus on state of the art technologies for sustainable waste management, entitled "Waste to Energy

455

District Energy Technologies | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

through the centralized system. District energy systems often operate with combined heat and power (CHP) and waste heat recovery technologies. Learn more about district...

456

SolidEnergy Systems | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste...

457

Energy Management by Recycling of Vehicle Waste Oil in Pakistan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: Pakistan has been suffering from an energy crisis for about half a decade now. The power crisis is proving to be unbearable, so importing huge amount of hydrocarbons from abroad to meet its energy needs. This study therefore focuses on the analysis of energy and environmental benefits for vehicle waste lubricant oil pertaining to its reuse by means of: (i) regain the heating value of used oils in a combustion process and (ii) recycling of waste oil to make fresh oil products. The waste oil samples were tested by ICP method and the test results were compared with standard requirements. It was found that the matter could effectively be solved by means of waste oil management practices together with collection centers, transports and processors by encouraging and financial help for the recycling industry. The importance and worth of this work concludes minor levels of hazardous elements when regained the heating value from the waste lubricating oil.

Hassan Ali Durrani

458

THE MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF A NOVEL APPROACH TO MAXIMIZE WASTE RECOVERY IN A LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NASA has been evaluating closed-loop atmosphere revitalization architectures that include carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction technologies. The CO2 and steam (H2O) co-electrolysis process is one of the reduction options that NASA has investigated. Utilizing recent advances in the fuel cell technology sector, the Idaho National Laboratory, INL, has developed a CO2 and H2O co-electrolysis process to produce oxygen and syngas (carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2) mixture) for terrestrial (energy production) application. The technology is a combined process that involves steam electrolysis, CO2 electrolysis, and the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Two process models were developed to evaluate novel approaches for energy storage and resource recovery in a life support system. In the first model, products from the INL co-electrolysis process are combined to produce methanol fuel. In the second co-electrolysis, products are separated with a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process. In both models the fuels are burned with added oxygen to produce H2O and CO2, the original reactants. For both processes, the overall power increases as the syngas ratio, H2/CO, increases because more water is needed to produce more hydrogen at a set CO2 incoming flow rate. The power for the methanol cases is less than pressure swing adsorption, PSA, because heat is available from the methanol reactor to preheat the water and carbon dioxide entering the co-electrolysis process.

Michael G. McKellar; Rick A. Wood; Carl M. Stoots; Lila Mulloth; Bernadette Luna

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Research on the Integration Characteristics of Cooling Energy Recovery from Room Exhausting Cool Air in Summer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently, the design and construction of buildings and building energy systems are far from reasonable. The requirement and consumption of primary energy resources is aggravated, the use of building energy is free and wasteful, and pollution...

Zhang, W.; Wu, J.; Wei, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Sustainable Waste Management in Africa Accra, Ghana, May 26th-30th, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and will encompass the full hierarchy of waste management from materials recovery (recycling) to energy recovery (Waste-to-Energy or WTE), and sanitary landfilling with methane capture. The organizing committeeSustainable Waste Management in Africa Accra, Ghana, May 26th-30th, 2014 The Earth Engineering

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Using Biosurfactants Produced from Agriculture Process Waste Streams to Improve Oil Recovery in Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of our research during the first 30 months (10/01/2004 to 03/31/2007) of the original three-year project cycle. The project was terminated early due to DOE budget cuts. This was a joint project between the Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) at the University of Kansas and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective was to evaluate the use of low-cost biosurfactants produced from agriculture process waste streams to improve oil recovery in fractured carbonate reservoirs through wettability mediation. Biosurfactant for this project was produced using Bacillus subtilis 21332 and purified potato starch as the growth medium. The INL team produced the biosurfactant and characterized it as surfactin. INL supplied surfactin as required for the tests at KU as well as providing other microbiological services. Interfacial tension (IFT) between Soltrol 130 and both potential benchmark chemical surfactants and crude surfactin was measured over a range of concentrations. The performance of the crude surfactin preparation in reducing IFT was greater than any of the synthetic compounds throughout the concentration range studied but at low concentrations, sodium laureth sulfate (SLS) was closest to the surfactin, and was used as the benchmark in subsequent studies. Core characterization was carried out using both traditional flooding techniques to find porosity and permeability; and NMR/MRI to image cores and identify pore architecture and degree of heterogeneity. A cleaning regime was identified and developed to remove organic materials from cores and crushed carbonate rock. This allowed cores to be fully characterized and returned to a reproducible wettability state when coupled with a crude-oil aging regime. Rapid wettability assessments for crushed matrix material were developed, and used to inform slower Amott wettability tests. Initial static absorption experiments exposed limitations in the use of HPLC and TOC to determine surfactant concentrations. To reliably quantify both benchmark surfactants and surfactin, a surfactant ion-selective electrode was used as an indicator in the potentiometric titration of the anionic surfactants with Hyamine 1622. The wettability change mediated by dilute solutions of a commercial preparation of SLS (STEOL CS-330) and surfactin was assessed using two-phase separation, and water flotation techniques; and surfactant loss due to retention and adsorption on the rock was determined. Qualitative tests indicated that on a molar basis, surfactin is more effective than STEOL CS-330 in altering wettability of crushed Lansing-Kansas City carbonates from oil-wet to water-wet state. Adsorption isotherms of STEOL CS-330 and surfactin on crushed Lansing-Kansas City outcrop and reservoir material showed that surfactin has higher specific adsorption on these oomoldic carbonates. Amott wettability studies confirmed that cleaned cores are mixed-wet, and that the aging procedure renders them oil-wet. Tests of aged cores with no initial water saturation resulted in very little spontaneous oil production, suggesting that water-wet pathways into the matrix are required for wettability change to occur. Further investigation of spontaneous imbibition and forced imbibition of water and surfactant solutions into LKC cores under a variety of conditions--cleaned vs. crude oil-aged; oil saturated vs. initial water saturation; flooded with surfactant vs. not flooded--indicated that in water-wet or intermediate wet cores, sodium laureth sulfate is more effective at enhancing spontaneous imbibition through wettability change. However, in more oil-wet systems, surfactin at the same concentration performs significantly better.

Stephen Johnson; Mehdi Salehi; Karl Eisert; Sandra Fox

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

462

Virginia Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Act State Memo Virginia has substantial natural resources, including coal and natural gas. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on...

463

Disaster Response and Recovery Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Department of Health and Human Services to evaluate, assess, and mitigate the impacts of climate change on their disaster recovery and response programs. Under the Stafford Act,...

464

Faces of the Recovery Act: Sun Catalytix | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sun Catalytix Faces of the Recovery Act: Sun Catalytix Addthis Description At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dan Nocera talks about Sun Catalytix, the next generation...

465

RD & D priorities for energy production and resource conservation from municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) needs and priorities associated with municipal solid waste (MSW) management technologies that conserve or produce energy or resources. The changing character of MSW waste management and the public`s heightened awareness of its real and perceived benefits and costs creates opportunities for RD&D in MSW technologies. Increased recycling, for example, creates new opportunities for energy, chemicals, and materials recovery. New technologies to control and monitor emissions from MSW combustion facilities are available for further improvement or application. Furthermore, emerging waste-to-energy technologies may offer environmental, economic, and other advantages. Given these developments, DOE identified a need to assess the RD&D needs and pdodties and carefully target RD&D efforts to help solve the carbon`s waste management problem and further the National Energy Strategy. This report presents such an assessment. It identifies and Documents RD&D needs and priorities in the broad area of MSW resource . recovery, focusing on efforts to make MSW management technologies commercially viable or to improve their commercial deployment over a 5 to l0 year period. Panels of technical experts identifies 279 RD&D needs in 12 technology areas, ranking about one-fifth of these needs as priorities. A ``Peer Review Group`` identified mass-burn combustion, ``systems studies,`` landfill gas, and ash utilization and disposal as high priority areas for RD&D based on cost and the impacts of further RD&D. The results of this assessment are intended to provide guidance to DOE concerning possible future RD&D projects.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

Radioactive mixed waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT (ARRA) REPORTING PROCESS California Energy Commission PAGE 1 OF 26  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT (ARRA) REPORTING PROCESS California Energy Commission PAGE 1 OF 26 Rev. 2/1/10 The California Energy Commission ARRA Reporting Process Reference Guide...................................................................3 ARRA SUBRECIPIENT REPORTING PROCESS

469

Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, 1 August 1982-31 January 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

Cole, W.E.; DeSaro, R.; Joshi, C.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, 1 August 1981-31 January 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

Cole, W. E.; DeSaro, R.; Joshi, C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approach for Generating Renewable Energy with SimultaneousCombining Recovery of Renewable Energy with Geologic Storage

Pruess, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Dow's Energy/WRAP Contest- A 12-Yr Energy and Waste Reduction Success Story  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOW'S ENERGY/WRAP CONTEST A 12-YR ENERGY AND WASTE REDUCTION SUCCESS STORY Kenneth E. Nelson, Manager, Energy Conservation, Dow U.S.A. ABSTRACT Keeping employees interested in saving energy and reducing waste is a constant challenge. Ideally... conservation program in 1981. It took the form of an annual Contest. In 1983, the Contest scope was expanded to included yield improvement, and in 1987, Dow's WRAP (Waste Reduction Always Pays) program was added. The Contest has been enormously successful...

Nelson, K. E.

473

Energy Conservation and Waste Reduction in the Metal Fabrication Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reductions of energy use and waste generation can help manufacturers to be more profitable and more environmentally acceptable. Industrial Assessment Centers located at universities throughout the United States, funded by the U.S. Department...

Kirk, M. C. Jr.; Looby, G. P.

474

Mathematical Analysis of a Novel Approach to Maximize Waste Recovery in a Life Support System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NASA has been evaluating closed-loop atmosphere revitalization architectures carbon dioxide, CO2, reduction technologies. The CO2 and steam, H2O, co-electrolysis process is another option that NASA has investigated. Utilizing recent advances in the fuel cell technology sector, the Idaho National Laboratory, INL, has developed a CO2 and H2O co-electrolysis process to produce oxygen and syngas (carbon monoxide, CO and hydrogen, H2 mixture) for terrestrial (energy production) application. The technology is a combined process that involves steam electrolysis, CO2 electrolysis, and the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Two process models were developed to evaluate novel approaches for waster recovery in a life support system. The first is a model INL co-electrolysis process combined with a methanol production process. The second is the INL co-electrolysis process combined with a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process. For both processes, the overall power increases as the syngas ratio, H2/CO, increases because more water is needed to produce more hydrogen at a set CO2 incoming flow rate. The power for the methanol cases is less than the PSA because heat is available from the methanol reactor to preheat the water and carbon dioxide entering the co-electrolysis process.

Michael G. McKellar; Rick A. Wood; Carl M. Stoots; Lila Mulloth; Bernadette Luna

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Combined Municipal Solid Waste and biomass system optimization for district energy applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Combined energy conversion of MSW and agricultural residue biomass is examined. • The model optimizes the financial yield of the investment. • Several system specifications are optimally defined by the optimization model. • The application to a case study in Greece shows positive financial yield. • The investment is mostly sensitive on the interest rate, the investment cost and the heating oil price. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) disposal has been a controversial issue in many countries over the past years, due to disagreement among the various stakeholders on the waste management policies and technologies to be adopted. One of the ways of treating/disposing MSW is energy recovery, as waste is considered to contain a considerable amount of bio-waste and therefore can lead to renewable energy production. The overall efficiency can be very high in the cases of co-generation or tri-generation. In this paper a model is presented, aiming to support decision makers in issues relating to Municipal Solid Waste energy recovery. The idea of using more fuel sources, including MSW and agricultural residue biomass that may exist in a rural area, is explored. The model aims at optimizing the system specifications, such as the capacity of the base-load Waste-to-Energy facility, the capacity of the peak-load biomass boiler and the location of the facility. Furthermore, it defines the quantity of each potential fuel source that should be used annually, in order to maximize the financial yield of the investment. The results of an energy tri-generation case study application at a rural area of Greece, using mixed MSW and biomass, indicate positive financial yield of investment. In addition, a sensitivity analysis is performed on the effect of the most important parameters of the model on the optimum solution, pinpointing the parameters of interest rate, investment cost and heating oil price, as those requiring the attention of the decision makers. Finally, the sensitivity analysis is enhanced by a stochastic analysis to determine the effect of the volatility of parameters on the robustness of the model and the solution obtained.

Rentizelas, Athanasios A., E-mail: arent@central.ntua.gr; Tolis, Athanasios I., E-mail: atol@central.ntua.gr; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P., E-mail: itat@central.ntua.gr

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Advanced Membrane Separation Technologies for Energy Recovery from Industrial Process Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recovery of energy from relatively low-temperature waste streams is a goal that has not been achieved on any large scale. Heat exchangers do not operate efficiently with low-temperature streams and thus require such large heat exchanger surface areas that they are not practical. Condensing economizers offer one option for heat recovery from such streams, but they have not been widely implemented by industry. A promising alternative to these heat exchangers and economizers is a prototype ceramic membrane system using transport membrane technology for separation of water vapor and recovery of heat. This system was successfully tested by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) on a natural gas fired boiler where the flue gas is relatively clean and free of contaminants. However, since the tubes of the prototype system were constructed of aluminum oxide, the brittle nature of the tubes limited the robustness of the system and even limited the length of tubes that could be used. In order to improve the robustness of the membrane tubes and make the system more suitable for industrial applications, this project was initiated with the objective of developing a system with materials that would permit the system to function successfully on a larger scale and in contaminated and potentially corrosive industrial environments. This required identifying likely industrial environments and the hazards associated with those environments. Based on the hazardous components in these environments, candidate metallic materials were identified that are expected to have sufficient strength, thermal conductivity and corrosion resistance to permit production of longer tubes that could function in the industrial environments identified. Tests were conducted to determine the corrosion resistance of these candidate alloys, and the feasibility of forming these materials into porous substrates was assessed. Once the most promising metallic materials were identified, the ability to form an alumina membrane layer on the surface of the metallic tubes was evaluated. Evaluation of this new style of membrane tube involved exposure to SO{sub 2} containing gases as well as to materials with a potential for fouling. Once the choice of substrate and membrane materials and design were confirmed, about 150 tubes were fabricated and assembled into three modules. These modules were mounted on an industrial size boiler and their performance carefully monitored during a limited testing period. The positive results of this performance test confirm the feasibility of utilizing such a system for recovery of heat and water from industrial waste streams. The improved module design along with use of long metallic substrate tubes with a ceramic membrane on the outer surface resulted in the successful, limited scale demonstration of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in the GTI test facility. This test showed this technology can successfully recover a significant amount of heat and water from gaseous waste streams. However, before industry will make the investment to install a full scale TMC, a full scale system will need to be constructed, installed and successfully operated at a few industrial sites. Companies were identified that had an interest in serving as a host site for a demonstration system.

Keiser, J.R.; Wang, D. (Gas Technology Institute); Bischoff, B.; Ciora (Media and Process Technology); Radhakrishnan, B.; Gorti, S.B.

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

477

Waste To Energy -Strategies and Payoffs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, expanding the steam through back pressure turbines to generate electricity. Some plants used to gen erate so much power through cogeneration and hydro that they became power companies also. The hard ware involved in this type of cogeneration system has... the wastes to make steam? The answer is that under some circumstances the cost of the electric generation equipment would be marginally unattrac tive, but for the majority of American industry, the design of new waste to steam facilities should include...

Gilbert, J. S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

DESIGN FOR A 1.3 MW, 13 MEV BEAM DUMP FOR AN ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is dumped at an energy close to the injection energy. This energy is chosen a 100 mA average current ERL as a synchrotron radiation source. The 13 MeV optimum injection energy resulting from the abrupt thermal cycles associated with beam trips is a potential failure mechanism. We

479

Haiti: Feasibility of Waste-to-Energy Options at the Trutier Waste Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides further analysis of the feasibility of a waste-to-energy (WTE) facility in the area near Port-au-Prince, Haiti. NREL's previous analysis and reports identified anaerobic digestion (AD) as the optimal WTE technology at the facility. Building on the prior analyses, this report evaluates the conceptual financial and technical viability of implementing a combined waste management and electrical power production strategy by constructing a WTE facility at the existing Trutier waste site north of Port-au-Prince.

Conrad, M. D.; Hunsberger, R.; Ness, J. E.; Harris, T.; Raibley, T.; Ursillo, P.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Phase-Shifted Full Bridge DC-DC Converter with Energy Recovery Clamp and Reduced Circulating Current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the switch conduction and turn-off losses achieved by an energy recovery secondary clamp circuit an improved PSFB DC-DC converter using only a modified energy recovery clamp circuit attached at the secondaryPhase-Shifted Full Bridge DC-DC Converter with Energy Recovery Clamp and Reduced Circulating

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste energy recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

An experimental study of waste heat recovery from a residential refrigerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the design, construction, and testing of an integrated heat recovery system which has been designed both to enhance the performance of a residential refrigerator and simultaneously to provide preheated water for an electric hot water heater. A commercial, indirect-heated hot water tank was retrofitted with suitable tubing to permit it to serve as a water cooled condenser for a residential refrigerator. This condenser operates in parallel with the air-cooled condenser tubing of the refrigerator so that either one or the other is active when the refrigerator is running. The refrigerator was housed in a controlled-environment chamber, and it was instrumented so that its performance could be monitored carefully in conjunction with the water pre-heating system. The system has been tested under a variety of hot water usage protocols, and the resulting data set has provided significantly insight into issues associated with commercial implementation of the concept. For the case of no water usage, the system was able to provide a 35 C temperature rise in the storage tank after about 100 hours of continuous operation, with no detectable deterioration of the refrigerator performance. Preliminary tests with simulations of high water usage, low water usage, and family water usage indicate a possible 18--20% energy savings for hot water over a long period of operation. Although the economic viability for such a system in a residential environment would appear to be sub-marginal, the potential for such a system associated with commercial-scale refrigeration clearly warrants further study, particularly for climates for which air conditioning heat rejection is highly seasonal.

Clark, R.A.; Smith, R.N.; Jensen, M.K. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

482

PowerNet: Energy Use & Energy Waste powernet.stanford.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PowerNet: Energy Use & Energy Waste powernet.stanford.edu 345,281 kWh $ 36,255 Device Type Measured lights, etc. Current Energy Use of Computing Systems Monday: Holiday What About Waste? Network Traffic on Core Switches Label Switch Type Active Ports (gigabit each) Data trace (# days) a HP 5412zl 120 150 b

Levis, Philip

483

One Woman's Road to Recovery | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

19, 2010 - 6:04pm Addthis One Woman's Road to Recovery Jo Napolitano Media Specialist, Argonne National Laboratory Editor's Note: Cross-posted from Argonne National Lab's Portraits...

484

Reverse logistics and large-scale material recovery from electronics waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste consolidation is a crucial step in the development of cost-effective, nation-wide material reclamation networks. This thesis project investigates typical and conformational tendencies of a hypothetical end-of-life ...

Krones, Jonathan Seth

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Mineralogical and physical considerations related to the separation and recovery of constituents from aluminum smelter by-products and wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several by-products and waste products of aluminum smelting were characterized mineralogically and physically, in order to evaluate the potential for their decontamination or separation and recovery into valuable products using mineral processing techniques. The test samples were selected from among Bayer process red mud, bath-alumina mixture, cleaned anode butts, anode recycle residues, spent potlining, saltcake and fluorogypsum. Several of these materials were shown to be composed either of highly liberated, potentially separable mineral phases, or of locked minerals which could be partially liberated by grinding to smaller but practical particle sizes. An analysis of specific physical properties of the liberated constituent mineral phases was accompanied by preliminary experimental evaluation of their separability. An assessment was made of potential mineral processing techniques including size and form differentiation, gravitational and magnetic field separation, flotation, separation based on surface charging phenomena or work function, and pneumatic tabling. The results confirmed the suitability of low-cost physical separation techniques for the treatment of some by-products and wastes. This paper presents results of a preliminary evaluation of two smelter products. The conference paper will analyze and discuss in more detail the potential for the mineral processing of these and other smelter by-products and wastes.

Plumpton, A.J.; Wilhelmy, J.F.; Blackburn, D.; Caouette, J.L. [Centre de Recherches Minerales, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Recovery of fissile materials from plutonium residues, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new process is proposed that converts complex feeds containing fissile materials into a chemical form that allows the use of existing technologies (such as PUREX and ion exchange) to recover the fissile materials and convert the resultant wastes to glass. Potential feed materials include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and (3) uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, and organics. 14 refs., 4 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z