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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Citrus Waste Biomass Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

Waste and biomass as energy resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Organic fuels can be manufactured by converting major sources of continuously renewable nonfossil carbon to synfuels that are interchangeable with, or can be substituted for, natural gas and petroleum-derived fuels. Promising sources of this carbon are waste materials, such as urban refuse, and biomass produced from solar energy by photosynthesis. The development of this concept is presented in this paper. The broad scope of the technology and its potential impact on energy supplies are reviewed. The renewable feature of both wastes and biomass makes them valuable natural resources that inevitably will be fully developed and commercialized as sources of energy-intensive products and synfuels. The perpetual availability of organic fuels will permit the conservation of valuable fossil fuel reserves, and, as time passes, offer a long-term solution to independence from foreign energy supplies and fossil fuel depletion.

Klass, Donald L.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Local Option - Solar, Wind and Biomass Energy Systems Exemption |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Solar, Wind and Biomass Energy Systems Exemption Local Option - Solar, Wind and Biomass Energy Systems Exemption Local Option - Solar, Wind and Biomass Energy Systems Exemption < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Buying & Making Electricity Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 01/01/1991 State New York Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption for 15 years (unless local jurisdiction has opted out) Provider Office of Real Property Tax Services Section 487 of the New York State Real Property Tax Law provides a 15-year real property tax exemption for solar, wind energy, and farm-waste energy

4

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

Grady, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Chen, Guang Jiong (Fayetteville, AR)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

6

Table F24: Wood and Biomass Waste Consumption Estimates, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F24: Wood and Biomass Waste Consumption Estimates, 2011 State Wood Wood and Biomass Waste a Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power ...

7

Local Option - Solar, Wind & Biomass Energy Systems Exemption...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar, Wind & Biomass Energy Systems Exemption Local Option - Solar, Wind & Biomass Energy Systems Exemption Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Savings For...

8

Biomass Energy - Focus on Wood Waste  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

application for wood waste as a fuel is in the co-firing of conventional coal-fired boilers, which means using biomass as a supplementary energy source in high- efficiency...

9

Biomass processing and solar process heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rate at which biomass can supply useful energy depends on the available integrated solar flux density over the year, the photosynthesis yield, the harvest factor, the energy gain, and the conversion efficiency of biomass into the desired energy carrier. Using these factors, an equation is presented to determine the area required for a given annual demand. In particular, the production of ethanol from biomass is considered, based on recent data from the national alcohol program Proalcool in Brazil. Finally, an estimate is given how solar process heat can improve the yield of alcohol or provide other base material for the chemical industry such as ethylene and synthesis gas from biomass. 9 references, 4 tables.

Sizmann, R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption  

Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption ... Able to digest multiple types of waste, including bovine, equine, and poultry manure

11

Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption  

Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption Contact Information: Jeremy Nelson Phone: 970.491.7100 Email: ...

12

Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water ...  

Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption Contact Information: Jeremy Nelson Phone: 970.491.7100 Email: ...

13

Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption  

The enormous amount of biomass waste created by animal feeding operations releases methane, a valuable fuel but also a greenhouse gas, and other pollutants into the environment. Waste digesters reduce this pollution by converting the waste into ...

14

Biomass Control in Waste Air Biotrickling Filters by Protozoan Predation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Control in Waste Air Biotrickling Filters by Protozoan Predation Huub H. J. Cox, Marc A as a means of biomass control. Wet biomass for- mation in 23.6-L reactors over a 77-day period was reduced in the biotrickling filter enriched with protozoa. The lower rate of biomass accumulation after the addi- tion

15

Rapid Solar-Thermal Conversion of Biomass to Syngas  

perform biomass gasification or pyrolysis for production of hydrogen, synthesis gas, liquid fuels, or other hydrocarbon based chemicals. The methods of the invention use solar thermal energy as the energy source for the biomass pyrolysis or ...

16

Application of Biomass Waste Materials in the Nano Mineral Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of the biomass waste material were effectively applied to the nano-sized minerals synthesis under conrolled boundry experimenta conditions.

17

Integrated solar receiver/biomass gasifier research  

SciTech Connect

Processes for producing liquid fuels from olefin-rich pyrolysis gases obtained from fast pyrolysis of biomass are being developed by J. Kuester at Arizona State University and J. Diebold at the Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, Calif. In the Diebold process the biomass, carried by steam, is blown through an entrained bed gasifier. The olefins are then separated from the rest of the reaction products and polymerized thermally to gasoline; the other gases are used as fuel for the process. The Kuester process uses a fluidized bed gasifier and a catalytic Fischer-Tropsch reactor which converts the olefins, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide into n-propanol and paraffinic hydrocarbons. The advantages over the Diebold process are shorter residence time and elimination of the gas separation requirement. One disadvantage is the low octane rating of the fuel. As part of the solar thermal program at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), an entrained bed reactor/receiver for fast pyrolysis of biomass is being developed for use with either the Diebold or Kuester process. This system is discussed.

Benham, C.; Bergeron, P.; Bessler, G.; Bohn, M.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Facility Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Kent County, Michigan Coordinates 43.0097027°, -85.520024° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0097027,"lon":-85.520024,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

19

PRODUCTION OF NEW BIOMASS/WASTE-CONTAINING SOLID FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CQ Inc. and its team members (ALSTOM Power Inc., Bliss Industries, McFadden Machine Company, and industry advisors from coal-burning utilities, equipment manufacturers, and the pellet fuels industry) addressed the objectives of the Department of Energy and industry to produce economical, new solid fuels from coal, biomass, and waste materials that reduce emissions from coal-fired boilers. This project builds on the team's commercial experience in composite fuels for energy production. The electric utility industry is interested in the use of biomass and wastes as fuel to reduce both emissions and fuel costs. In addition to these benefits, utilities also recognize the business advantage of consuming the waste byproducts of customers both to retain customers and to improve the public image of the industry. Unfortunately, biomass and waste byproducts can be troublesome fuels because of low bulk density, high moisture content, variable composition, handling and feeding problems, and inadequate information about combustion and emissions characteristics. Current methods of co-firing biomass and wastes either use a separate fuel receiving, storage, and boiler feed system, or mass burn the biomass by simply mixing it with coal on the storage pile. For biomass or biomass-containing composite fuels to be extensively used in the U.S., especially in the steam market, a lower cost method of producing these fuels must be developed that includes both moisture reduction and pelletization or agglomeration for necessary fuel density and ease of handling. Further, this method of fuel production must be applicable to a variety of combinations of biomass, wastes, and coal; economically competitive with current fuels; and provide environmental benefits compared with coal. Notable accomplishments from the work performed in Phase I of this project include the development of three standard fuel formulations from mixtures of coal fines, biomass, and waste materials that can be used in existing boilers, evaluation of these composite fuels to determine their applicability to the major combustor types, development of preliminary designs and economic projections for commercial facilities producing up to 200,000 tons per year of biomass/waste-containing fuels, and the development of dewatering technologies to reduce the moisture content of high-moisture biomass and waste materials during the pelletization process.

David J. Akers; Glenn A. Shirey; Zalman Zitron; Charles Q. Maney

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

Regional Waste Systems Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Regional Waste Systems Biomass Facility Facility Regional Waste Systems Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Cumberland County, Maine Coordinates 43.8132979°, -70.3870587° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.8132979,"lon":-70.3870587,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Co-processing of agricultural and biomass waste with coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major thrust of our research program is the use of waste materials as co-liquefaction agents for the first-stage conversion of coal to liquid fuels. By fulfilling one or more of the roles of an expensive solvent in the direct coal liquefaction (DCL) process, the waste material is disposed off ex-landfill, and may improve the overall economics of DCL. Work in our group has concentrated on co-liquefaction with waste rubber tires, some results from which are presented elsewhere in these Preprints. In this paper, we report on preliminary results with agricultural and biomass-type waste as co-liquefaction agents.

Stiller, A.H.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Wann, Ji-Perng [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Biomass: solar energy from farms and forests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass as an energy source is discussed. Thermochemical and biological conversion methods are presented. Bioenergy in use today and in the future is reported. Some current research programs are summarized. (DC)

Grace, A.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste December 6, 2011 - 3:57pm Addthis Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of Washington DNR. Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of

24

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste December 6, 2011 - 3:57pm Addthis Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of Washington DNR. Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of

25

Grand Traverse Band Renewable Energy Feasibility Study in Wind, Biomass and Solar  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for wind, biomass, solar on the Grand Traverse Band tribal lands from 2005 - 2008

Suzanne McSawby, Project Director

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Conversion system overview assessment. Volume III. Solar thermal/coal or biomass derived fuels  

SciTech Connect

The three volumes of this report cover three distinct areas of solar energy research: solar thermoelectrics, solar-wind hybrid systems, and synthetic fuels derived with solar thermal energy. Volume III deals with the conversion of synthetic fuels with solar thermal heat. The method is a hybrid combination of solar energy with either coal or biomass. A preliminary assessment of this technology is made by calculating the cost of fuel produced as a function of the cost of coal and biomass. It is shown that within the projected ranges of coal, biomass, and solar thermal costs, there are conditions when solar synthetic fuels with solar thermal heat will become cost-competitive.

Copeland, R. J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Production of New Biomass/Waste-Containing Solid Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CQ Inc. and its industry partners--PBS Coals, Inc. (Friedens, Pennsylvania), American Fiber Resources (Fairmont, West Virginia), Allegheny Energy Supply (Williamsport, Maryland), and the Heritage Research Group (Indianapolis, Indiana)--addressed the objectives of the Department of Energy and industry to produce economical, new solid fuels from coal, biomass, and waste materials that reduce emissions from coal-fired boilers. This project builds on the team's commercial experience in composite fuels for energy production. The electric utility industry is interested in the use of biomass and wastes as fuel to reduce both emissions and fuel costs. In addition to these benefits, utilities also recognize the business advantage of consuming the waste byproducts of customers both to retain customers and to improve the public image of the industry. Unfortunately, biomass and waste byproducts can be troublesome fuels because of low bulk density, high moisture content, variable composition, handling and feeding problems, and inadequate information about combustion and emissions characteristics. Current methods of co-firing biomass and wastes either use a separate fuel receiving, storage, and boiler feed system, or mass burn the biomass by simply mixing it with coal on the storage pile. For biomass or biomass-containing composite fuels to be extensively used in the U.S., especially in the steam market, a lower cost method of producing these fuels must be developed that is applicable to a variety of combinations of biomass, wastes, and coal; economically competitive with current fuels; and provides environmental benefits compared with coal. During Phase I of this project (January 1999 to July 2000), several biomass/waste materials were evaluated for potential use in a composite fuel. As a result of that work and the team's commercial experience in composite fuels for energy production, paper mill sludge and coal were selected for further evaluation and demonstration in Phase II. In Phase II (June 2001 to December 2004), the project team demonstrated the GranuFlow technology as part of a process to combine paper sludge and coal to produce a composite fuel with combustion and handling characteristics acceptable to existing boilers and fuel handling systems. Bench-scale studies were performed at DOE-NETL, followed by full-scale commercial demonstrations to produce the composite fuel in a 400-tph coal cleaning plant and combustion tests at a 90-MW power plant boiler to evaluate impacts on fuel handling, boiler operations and performance, and emissions. A circuit was successfully installed to re-pulp and inject paper sludge into the fine coal dewatering circuit of a commercial coal-cleaning plant to produce 5,000 tons of a ''composite'' fuel containing about 5% paper sludge. Subsequent combustion tests showed that boiler efficiency and stability were not compromised when the composite fuel was blended with the boiler's normal coal supply. Firing of the composite fuel blend did not have any significant impact on emissions as compared to the normal coal supply, and it did not cause any excursions beyond Title V regulatory limits; all emissions were well within regulatory limits. SO{sub 2} emissions decreased during the composite fuel blend tests as a result of its higher heat content and slightly lower sulfur content as compared to the normal coal supply. The composite fuel contained an extremely high proportion of fines because the parent coal (feedstock to the coal-cleaning plant) is a ''soft'' coal (HGI > 90) and contained a high proportion of fines. The composite fuel was produced and combustion-tested under record wet conditions for the local area. In spite of these conditions, full load was obtained by the boiler when firing the composite fuel blend, and testing was completed without any handling or combustion problems beyond those typically associated with wet coal. Fuel handling and pulverizer performance (mill capacity and outlet temperatures) could become greater concerns when firing composite fuels which contain higher percent

Glenn A. Shirey; David J. Akers

2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

28

Guideline for implementing Co-generation based on Biomass waste from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guideline for implementing Co-generation based on Biomass waste from Thai Industries - through-generation based on Biomass waste from Thai Industries - through implementation and organisation of Industrial biomasse ressourcer fra det omkringliggende nærområde kan erhverves, og hvilke der er interessante

29

Modelling of a solar-powered supercritical water biomass gasifier Laurance A Watson1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling of a solar-powered supercritical water biomass gasifier Laurance A Watson1 , John D Pye2 to efficiently gasify biomass would offer one potential source of sustainable hydrocarbons and deliver desirable

30

Rural electrification: Waste biomass Russian northern territories. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this pre-feasibility evaluation is to examine the economic and technical feasibility of replacing distillate fuel with local waste biomass in the village of Verkhni-Ozerski, Arkhangelsk Region, Russia. This village is evaluated as a pilot location representing the off-grid villages in the Russian Northern Territories. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has agreed to provide technical assistance to the Ministry of Fuel and Energy (MFE). MFE has identified the Northern Territories as a priority area requiring NREL`s assistance. The program initially affects about 900 off-grid villages. Biomass and wind energy, and to a lesser extent small hydro (depending on resource availability) are expected to play the dominant role in the program, Geothermal energy may also have a role in the Russian Far East. The Arkhangelsk, Kariela, and Krasnoyarsk Regions, all in the Russian Northern Territories, have abundant forest resources and forest products industries, making them strong candidates for implementation of small-scale waste biomass-to-energy projects. The 900 or so villages included in the renewable energy program span nine administrative regions and autonomous republics. The regional authorities in the Northern Territories proposed these villages to MFE for consideration in the renewable energy program according to the following selection criteria: (a) Remote off-grid location, (b) high cost of transporting fuel, old age of existing power generation equipment, and (d) preliminary determination as to availability of alternative energy resources. Inclusion of indigenous minorities in the program was also heavily emphasized. The prefeasibility study demonstrates that the project merits continuation and a full feasibility analysis. The demonstrated rate of return and net positive cash flow, the willingness of Onegales and local/regional authorities to cooperate, and the immense social benefits are all good reasons to continue the project.

Adamian, S. [ECOTRADE, Inc., Glendale, CA (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Strategic Analysis of Biomass and Waste Fuels for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass, waste fuels, and power technologies based on advanced combustion and gasification show promise for renewable baseload generation. Utilities can use the results of this study to evaluate the potential performance and cost of biomass and waste fuel-fired power plants in their systems and examine fuel use in integrated resource plans.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

CHEMICAL REMOVAL OF BIOMASS FROM WASTE AIR BIOTRICKLING FILTERS: SCREENING OF CHEMICALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL REMOVAL OF BIOMASS FROM WASTE AIR BIOTRICKLING FILTERS: SCREENING OF CHEMICALS for the removal of excess biomass from biotrickling ®lters for waste air treatment. Although the experiment/v) NaOH, 0.26 and 1.31% (w/v) NaClO and 11.3% (w/v) H2O2 resulted in a biomass removal signi

33

Co-generation and Co-production Opportunities with Biomass and Waste Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes a status update on the use of gasification technologies for biomass and waste fuels, either in dedicated plants or as partial feedstocks in larger fossil fuel plants. Some specific projects that have used gasification and combustion of biomass and waste for power generation and the co-generation of power and district heat or process steam, particularly in Europe, are reviewed in more detail. Regulatory and tax incentives for renewable and biomass projects have been in place in most W...

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

A Survey of State Clean Energy Fund Support for Biomass August 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy technologies, two of which involved biomass projects: · Tier 1 (biomass, waste tire and solar" and defines renewable energy as "solar energy, wind, ocean thermal energy, wave or tidal energy, fuel cells combustion. Support for Biomass Projects Projects involving biomass (as well as wind or solar energy

35

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources....

36

MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Facility MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

Rough cost estimates of solar thermal/coal or biomass-derived fuels. [Hybrid approach: solar thermal plus either coal or biomass  

SciTech Connect

The production of a synthetic fuel from a solar thermal resource could provide a means of replacing critical liquid and gaseous fossil fuels. The solar thermal resource is large and economics favors a southwestern site. A synthetic fuel would provide a desirable product and a means of transporting solar thermal energy to large load centers outside the southwest. This paper presents cost data for one method of producing synthetic methane. A hybrid approach was chosen, a combination of solar thermal and either coal or biomass. The magnitude of the solar thermal resource is estimated as well as projected cost. Cost projections for coal and biomass are accumulated. The cost of synthetic gas from a hybrid and a conventional fuel source are compared.

Copeland, R. J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Energy Basics: Biomass Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Share this resource Biomass Biofuels Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biomass Resources Biomass resources include any...

39

Problems and opportunities fr solar energy in biomass, pyrolysis, and gasification  

SciTech Connect

Passive solar input for drying crops and wood already make a significant input to the US energy budget, and active solar drying, requiring temperatures below 200/sup 0/C, can easily make an important substitution for fossil fuels in drying. Pyrolysis of biomass typically requires less than 1.6 MBtu/dry ton at a temperature of 500/sup 0/C, and this could potentially be supplied by direct solar heating. The heat input is likely to be by indirect heating of a solid, liquid or gas heat-transfer agent. Fast pyrolysis requires modest heat inputs with high heat-transfer rates at temperatures over 900/sup 0/C and thus may be particularly suited to focusing collectors as energy sources. Char gasification, using steam or CO/sub 2/, requires large energy inputs at temperatures over 900/sup 0/C and thus is the least likely field of application of solar energy. Ultimately, the large scale application of solar energy to biomass pyrolysis and gasification will depend on the relative cost of direct solar versus biomass inputs. Biomass energy inputs now typically cost 1 to 3 $/MBtu; when direct solar heat costs begin to approach this level, we may begin to use direct solar process heat for biomass conversion.

Reed, T.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Agricultural-Waste Biomass for Hydrogen Adsorption via Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additional infiltration of this biomass carbon via silicon melt and vapor is attempted for the production of silicon carbide material structures with more favorable...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Mississippi University Research Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass: Production of Alternative Fuels from Waste Biomass Initiative  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Mississippi Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass was formed via funding from the US Department of Energy's EPSCoR Program, which is administered by the Office of Basic Science. Funding was approved in July of 1999 and received by participating Mississippi institutions by 2000. The project was funded via two 3-year phases of operation (the second phase was awarded based on the high merits observed from the first 3-year phase), with funding ending in 2007. The mission of the Consortium was to promote the utilization of biomass, both cultured and waste derived, for the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. These scientific efforts, although generally basic in nature, are key to the development of future industries within the Southeastern United States. In this proposal, the majority of the efforts performed under the DOE EPSCoR funding were focused primarily toward the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks and biogas from waste products. However, some of the individual projects within this program investigated the production of other products from biomass feeds (i.e. acetic acid and biogas) along with materials to facilitate the more efficient production of chemicals from biomass. Mississippi is a leading state in terms of raw biomass production. Its top industries are timber, poultry production, and row crop agriculture. However, for all of its vast amounts of biomass produced on an annual basis, only a small percentage of the biomass is actually industrially produced into products, with the bulk of the biomass being wasted. This situation is actually quite representative of many Southeastern US states. The research and development efforts performed attempted to further develop promising chemical production techniques that use Mississippi biomass feedstocks. The three processes that were the primary areas of interest for ethanol production were syngas fermentation, acid hydrolysis followed by hydrolyzate fermentation, and enzymatic conversion. All three of these processes are of particular interest to states in the Southeastern US since the agricultural products produced in this region are highly variable in terms of actual crop, production quantity, and the ability of land areas to support a particular type of crop. This greatly differs from the Midwestern US where most of this region's agricultural land supports one to two primary crops, such as corn and soybean. Therefore, developing processes which are relatively flexible in terms of biomass feedstock is key to the southeastern region of the US if this area is going to be a 'player' in the developing biomass to chemicals arena. With regard to the fermentation of syngas, research was directed toward developing improved biocatalysts through organism discovery and optimization, improving ethanol/acetic acid separations, evaluating potential bacterial contaminants, and assessing the use of innovative fermentors that are better suited for supporting syngas fermentation. Acid hydrolysis research was directed toward improved conversion yields and rates, acid recovery using membranes, optimization of fermenting organisms, and hydrolyzate characterization with changing feedstocks. Additionally, a series of development efforts addressed novel separation techniques for the separation of key chemicals from fermentation activities. Biogas related research focused on key factors hindering the widespread use of digester technologies in non-traditional industries. The digestion of acetic acids and other fermentation wastewaters was studied and methods used to optimize the process were undertaken. Additionally, novel laboratory methods were designed along with improved methods of digester operation. A search for better performing digester consortia was initiated coupled with improved methods to initiate their activity within digester environments. The third activity of the consortium generally studied the production of 'other' chemicals from waste biomass materials found in Mississippi. The two primary examples of this activity are production of chem

Drs. Mark E. Zapp; Todd French; Lewis Brown; Clifford George; Rafael Hernandez; Marvin Salin (from Mississippie State University); Drs. Huey-Min Hwang, Ken Lee, Yi Zhang; Maria Begonia (from Jackson State University); Drs. Clint Williford; Al Mikell (from the University of Mississippi); Drs. Robert Moore; Roger Hester (from the University of Southern Mississippi).

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Issues Impacting Refractory Service Life in Biomass/Waste Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different carbon sources are used, or are being considered, as feedstock for gasifiers; including natural gas, coal, petroleum coke, and biomass. Biomass has been used with limited success because of issues such as ash impurity interactions with the refractory liner, which will be discussed in this paper.

Bennett, J.P.; Kwong, K.-S.; Powell, C.A.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

COMPACTING BIOMASS AND MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTES TO FORM AND UPGRADED FUEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass waste materials exist in large quantity in every city and in numerous industrial plants such as wood processing plants and waste paper collection centers. Through minimum processing, such waste materials can be turned into a solid fuel for combustion at existing coal-fired power plants. Use of such biomass fuel reduces the amount of coal used, and hence reduces the greenhouse effect and global warming, while at the same time it reduces the use of land for landfill and the associated problems. The carbon-dioxide resulting from burning biomass fuel is recycled through plant growth and hence does not contribute to global warming. Biomass fuel also contains little sulfur and hence does not contribute to acid rain problems. Notwithstanding the environmental desirability of using biomass waste materials, not much of them are used currently due to the need to densify the waste materials and the high cost of conventional methods of densification such as pelletizing and briquetting. The purpose of this project was to test a unique new method of biomass densification developed from recent research in coal log pipeline (CLP). The new method can produce large agglomerates of biomass materials called ''biomass logs'' which are more than 100 times larger and 30% denser than conventional ''pellets'' or ''briquettes''. The Phase I project was to perform extensive laboratory tests and an economic analysis to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the biomass log fuel (BLF). A variety of biomass waste materials, including wood processing residues such as sawdust, mulch and chips of various types of wood, combustibles that are found in municipal solid waste stream such as paper, plastics and textiles, energy crops including willows and switch grass, and yard waste including tree trimmings, fallen leaves, and lawn grass, were tested by using this new compaction technology developed at Capsule Pipeline Research Center (CPRC), University of Missouri-Columbia (MU). The compaction conditions, including compaction pressure, pressure holding time, back pressure, moisture content, particle size and shape, piston and mold geometry and roughness, and binder for the materials were studied and optimized. The properties of the compacted products--biomass logs--were evaluated in terms of physical, mechanical, and combustion characteristics. An economic analysis of this technology for anticipated future commercial operations was performed. It was found that the compaction pressure and the moisture content of the biomass materials are critical for producing high-quality biomass logs. For most biomass materials, dense and strong logs can be produced under room temperature without binder and at a pressure of 70 MPa (10,000 psi), approximately. A few types of the materials tested such as sawdust and grass need a minimum pressure of 100 MPa (15,000 psi) in order to produce good logs. The appropriate moisture range for compacting waste paper into good logs is 5-20%, and the optimum moisture is in the neighborhood of 13%. For the woody materials and yard waste, the appropriate moisture range is narrower: 5-13%, and the optimum is 8-9%. The compacted logs have a dry density of 0.8 to 1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, corresponding to a wet density of 0.9 to 1.1 g/cm{sup 3}, approximately. The logs have high strength and high resistance to impact and abrasion, but are feeble to water and hence need to be protected from water or rain. They also have good long-term performance under normal environmental conditions, and can be stored for a long time without significant deterioration. Such high-density and high-strength logs not only facilitate handling, transportation, and storage, but also increase the energy content of biomass per unit volume. After being transported to power plants and crushed, the biomass logs can be co-fired with coal to generate electricity.

Henry Liu; Yadong Li

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Thermodynamic Data for Biomass Conversion and Waste Incineration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

l b l l q,(net) 4202 cal g i qv(net) 17580 J g- 83 JENEBE 15 Agricultural Residues CORN STOVER; solid; Material is considered biomass fuel and has proximate analysis values...

45

16th North American Waste to Energy Conference-May 2008 CO2 Enhanced Steam Gasification of Biomass Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16th North American Waste to Energy Conference-May 2008 CO2 Enhanced Steam Gasification of Biomass of the decomposition of various biomass feedstocks and their conversion to gaseous fuels such as hydrogen. The steam temperatures: above 500o C for the herbaceous and non-wood samples and above 650o C for the wood biomass fuels

46

Biomass Gasification: An Alternative Solution to Animal Waste Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The overall goal of this research was to evaluate gasification of animal waste as an alternative manure management strategy, from the standpoints of syngas production (more)

Wu, Hanjing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Introduction to Renewable Energy Biomass Captured solar energy from biological systems currently plays a large role in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to Renewable Energy ­ Biomass Captured solar energy from biological systems currently of biomass for large-scale energy services could help reduce the greenhouse gas intensity of the energy be processed and utilized in a similar manner to fossil fuels with lower net emissions of CO2. Biomass energy

Nur, Amos

48

Illinois biomass resources: annual crops and residues; canning and food-processing wastes. Preliminary assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Illinois, a major agricultural and food-processing state, produces vast amounts of renewable plant material having potential for energy production. This biomass, in the form of annual crops, crop residues, and food-processing wastes, can be converted to alternative fuels (such as ethanol) and industrial chemicals (such as furfural, ethylene, and xylene). The present study provides a preliminary assessment of these Illinois biomass resources, including (a) an appraisal of the effects of their use on both agriculture and industry; (b) an analysis of biomass conversion systems; and (c) an environmental and economic evaluation of products that could be generated from biomass. It is estimated that, of the 39 x 10/sup 6/ tons of residues generated in 1978 in Illinois from seven main crops, about 85% was collectible. The thermal energy equivalent of this material is 658 x 10/sup 6/ Btu, or 0.66 quad. And by fermenting 10% of the corn grain grown in Illinois, some 323 million gallons of ethanol could have been produced in 1978. Another 3 million gallons of ethanol could have been produced in the same year from wastes generated by the state's food-processing establishments. Clearly, Illinois can strengthen its economy substantially by the development of industries that produce biomass-derived fuels and chemicals. In addition, a thorough evaluation should be made of the potential for using the state's less-exploitable land for the growing of additional biomass.

Antonopoulos, A A

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Rapid Solar-Thermal Conversion of Biomass to Syngas - Energy ...  

Production of synthesis gas or hydrogen by gasification or pyrolysis of biological feedstocks using solar-thermal energy. The invention provides processes that ...

50

Energy Basics: Biomass Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Share this resource Biomass Biofuels Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biomass Technologies Photo of a pair of hands...

51

Solar Bioethanol from Biomass Sugar Fermentation Shu Tian,1,5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GP-B-21 Solar Bioethanol from Biomass Sugar Fermentation Shu Tian,1,5 Oara Neumann,1 University, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. Bioethanol is a prime alternative fuel candidate that has the potential to considerably reduce our need for petroleum-based fuels. The production of bioethanol from cellulosic feedstock

52

NEW SOLID FUELS FROM COAL AND BIOMASS WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under DOE sponsorship, McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI), Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W), and Minergy Corporation developed and evaluated a sludge derived fuel (SDF) made from sewage sludge. Our approach is to dry and agglomerate the sludge, combine it with a fluxing agent, if necessary, and co-fire the resulting fuel with coal in a cyclone boiler to recover the energy and to vitrify mineral matter into a non-leachable product. This product can then be used in the construction industry. A literature search showed that there is significant variability of the sludge fuel properties from a given wastewater plant (seasonal and/or day-to-day changes) or from different wastewater plants. A large sewage sludge sample (30 tons) from a municipal wastewater treatment facility was collected, dried, pelletized and successfully co-fired with coal in a cyclone-equipped pilot. Several sludge particle size distributions were tested. Finer sludge particle size distributions, similar to the standard B and W size distribution for sub-bituminous coal, showed the best combustion and slagging performance. Up to 74.6% and 78.9% sludge was successfully co-fired with pulverized coal and with natural gas, respectively. An economic evaluation on a 25-MW power plant showed the viability of co-firing the optimum SDF in a power generation application. The return on equity was 22 to 31%, adequate to attract investors and allow a full-scale project to proceed. Additional market research and engineering will be required to verify the economic assumptions. Areas to focus on are: plant detail design and detail capital cost estimates, market research into possible project locations, sludge availability at the proposed project locations, market research into electric energy sales and renewable energy sales opportunities at the proposed project location. As a result of this program, wastes that are currently not being used and considered an environmental problem will be processed into a renewable fuel. These fuels will be converted to energy while reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from power generating boilers and mitigating global warming concerns. This report describes the sludge analysis, solid fuel preparation and production, combustion performance, environmental emissions and required equipment.

Hamid Farzan

2001-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

53

Leaching and toxicity behavior of coal-biomass waste cocombustion ashes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land disposal of ash residues, obtained from the cocombustion of Greek lignite with biomass wastes, is known to create problems due to the harmful constituents present. In this regard, the leachability of trace elements from lignite, biomass, and blends cocombustion ashes was investigated by using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). In this work, the toxicity of the aqueous leachates and the concentrations of the metals obtained from the leaching procedure were measured using the Microtox test (Vibrio fischen) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), respectively. The toxic effects of most leachates on Vibrio fischeri were found to be significantly low in both 45% and 82% screening test protocols. However, the liquid sample originating from olive kernels fly ash (FA4) caused the highest toxic effect in both protocols, which can be attributed to its relatively high concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn.

Skodras, G.; Prokopidou, M.; Sakellaropoulos, G.P. [Aristotle University in Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. for Chemical Engineering

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Other Biomass | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Other Biomass Other Biomass Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

55

Solar Thermal Conversion of Biomass to Synthesis Gas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-00335  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CRADA is established to facilitate the development of solar thermal technology to efficiently and economically convert biomass into useful products (synthesis gas and derivatives) that can replace fossil fuels. NREL's High Flux Solar Furnace will be utilized to validate system modeling, evaluate candidate reactor materials, conduct on-sun testing of the process, and assist in the development of solar process control system. This work is part of a DOE-USDA 3-year, $1M grant.

Netter, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Revised fact sheet describes the transpired solar collector that was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

57

IS DENSIFIED BIOMASS FUEL FROM AGRO-FORESTRY WASTE A SUSTAINABLE ENERGY OPTION?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Raw biomass material is bulky, high in void fraction, and very low in transportation efficiency. Furthermore, biomass dissipates quickly in harsh environments of high heat (more)

Linnig, William A., III

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Incentives Waste Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 172 Municipal Solid Waste Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 172) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Clean Energy Project Grants (Texas) State Grant Program Texas Commercial Industrial Utility Biomass Municipal Solid Waste No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Law (AEL) (Iowa) Renewables Portfolio Standard Iowa Investor-Owned Utility Anaerobic Digestion

59

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Pennsylvania Name Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Environmental Regulations Affected Technologies Biomass/Biogas, Coal with CCS, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy Storage, Fuel Cells, Geothermal Electric, Hydroelectric, Hydroelectric (Small), Natural Gas, Nuclear, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind energy Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

60

Biomass Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many types of biomassorganic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastesthat can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Ultraviolet reflector materials for solar detoxification of hazardous waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Organic waste detoxification requires cleavage of carbon bonds. Such reactions can be photo-driven by light that is energetic enough to disrupt such bonds. Alternately, light can be used to activate catalyst materials, which in turn can break organic bonds. In either case, photons with wavelengths less than 400 nm are required. Because the terrestrial solar resource below 400 nm is so small (roughly 3% of the available spectrum), highly efficient optical concentrators are needed that can withstand outdoor service conditions. In the past, optical elements for solar application have been designed to prevent ultraviolet (uv) radiation from reaching the reflective layer to avoid the potentially harmful effects of such light on the collector materials themselves. This effectively forfeits the uv part of the spectrum in return for some measure of protection against optical degradation. To optimize the cost/performance benefit of photochemical reaction systems, optical materials must be developed that are not only highly efficient but also inherently stable against the radiation they are designed to concentrate. The requirements of uv optical elements in terms of appropriate spectral bands and level of reflectance are established based upon the needs of photochemical applications. Relevant literature on uv reflector materials is reviewed which, along with discussions with industrial contacts, allows the establishment of a data base of currently available materials. Although a number of related technologies exist that require uv reflectors, to date little attention has been paid to achieving outdoor durability required for solar applications. 49 refs., 3 figs.

Jorgensen, G.; Govindarajan, R.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Biomass Gasification using Solar Thermal Energy M. Munzinger and K. Lovegrove  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

October 30, 2009. Accepted November 17, 2009. Biomass pyrolysis with biochar returned to soil dependent on the costs of feedstock production, pyrolysis, and the value of C offsets. Biomass sources-3). Biochar is the stable, carbon- rich charcoal that results from pyrolysis of biomass materials. Used

63

Woody Biomass Supply Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Woody biomass is the feedstock for the majority of biomass power producers. Woody biomass consists of bark and wood and is generally obtained as a byproduct or waste product. Approximately 40% of timber biomass is left behind in the form of slash, consisting of tree tops, branches, and stems after a timber harvest. Collecting and processing this residue provides the feedstock for many utility biomass projects. Additional sources of woody biomass include urban forestry, right-of-way clearance, and trees k...

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law provides a grant of a minimum $20 per bone-dry ton of qualified agricultural biomass, forest wood waste, urban wood waste, co-firing biomass, or storm-generated biomass that is provided to...

65

Small Modular Biomass Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet that provides an introduction to small modular biomass systems. These systems can help supply electricity to rural areas, businesses, and people without power. They use locally available biomass fuels such as wood, crop waste, and animal manures.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2013 Solar Innovations -HVAC and Waste Stream Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PENNSTATE Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2013 Solar Innovations - HVAC and Waste Stream Analysis Overview There are two problems that were voiced by Solar Innovations, HVAC system design and recycling stream improvement. The HVAC system was not providing even conditioning of office

Demirel, Melik C.

67

Energy Basics: Solar Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Solar...

68

Energy Basics: Solar Energy Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Solar...

69

Screening study for waste biomass to ethanol production facility using the Amoco process in New York State. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates the economic feasibility of locating biomass-to-ethanol waste conversion facilities in New York State. Part 1 of the study evaluates 74 potential sites in New York City and identifies two preferred sites on Staten, the Proctor Gamble and the Arthur Kill sites, for further consideration. Part 2 evaluates upstate New York and determines that four regions surrounding the urban centers of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse provide suitable areas from which to select specific sites for further consideration. A separate Appendix provides supplemental material supporting the evaluations. A conceptual design and economic viability evaluation were developed for a minimum-size facility capable of processing 500 tons per day (tpd) of biomass consisting of wood or paper, or a combination of the two for upstate regions. The facility would use Amoco`s biomass conversion technology and produce 49,000 gallons per day of ethanol and approximately 300 tpd of lignin solid by-product. For New York City, a 1,000-tpd processing facility was also evaluated to examine effects of economies of scale. The reports evaluate the feasibility of building a biomass conversion facility in terms of city and state economic, environmental, and community factors. Given the data obtained to date, including changing costs for feedstock and ethanol, the project is marginally attractive. A facility should be as large as possible and located in a New York State Economic Development Zone to take advantage of economic incentives. The facility should have on-site oxidation capabilities, which will make it more financially viable given the high cost of energy. 26 figs., 121 tabs.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

The role of biomass in California's hydrogen economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dimensions of both biomass supply and hydrogen demand. TheIn the process, optimal biomass supply chains are found. Twoproduction from waste biomass supply in California Hydrogen

Parker, Nathan C; Ogden, Joan; Fan, Yueyue

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

List of Passive Solar Space Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heat Incentives Space Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 278 Passive Solar Space Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 278) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alternative Energy and Energy Conservation Patent Exemption (Corporate) (Massachusetts) Industry Recruitment/Support Massachusetts Commercial Biomass Fuel Cells Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydroelectric energy Municipal Solid Waste Passive Solar Space Heat Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy and Energy Conservation Patent Exemption (Personal) (Massachusetts) Industry Recruitment/Support Massachusetts General Public/Consumer Biomass

72

Feasibility Study Using a Solar Evaporator to Reduce the Metalworking Fluid (MWF) Waste Stream  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar evaporator was designed, built, and operated to reduce the water-based metalworking fluid waste stream. The evaporator was setup in Waste Managements barrel lot inside one of the confinement areas. The unit processed three batches of waste fluid during the prototype testing. Initial tests removed 13% of the fluid waste stream. Subsequent modifications to the collector improved the rate to almost 20% per week. Evaluation of the risk during operation showed that even a small spill when associated with precipitation, and the unit placement within a confinement area, gave it the potential to contaminate more fluid that what it could save.

Lazarus, Lloyd

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

73

Los Alamos scientists advance biomass fuel production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Issues submit Los Alamos scientists advance biomass fuel production Adapting biomass waste molecules for energy production May 1, 2013 Lab research can yield energy from...

74

Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (BIGCC).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Conversion of biomass to energy does not contribute to the net increase of carbon dioxide in the environment, therefore the use of biomass waste as (more)

Yap, Mun Roy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Biomass and Biofuels Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Biomass and Biofuels Technology Marketing Summaries Here ... The methods of the invention use solar thermal energy as the energy source for the biomass pyrolysis or ...

76

Pilot-scale anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste and waste activated sludge in China: Effect of organic loading rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) was examined on a pilot-scale reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System performance and stability under OLR of 1.2, 2.4, 3.6, 4.8, 6.0 and 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} were analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} and HRT of 15d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With the increasing OLRs, pH values, VS removal rate and methane concentration decreased and VFA increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The changing of biogas production rate can be a practical approach to monitor and control anaerobic digestion system. - Abstract: The effects of organic loading rate on the performance and stability of anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) were investigated on a pilot-scale reactor. The results showed that stable operation was achieved with organic loading rates (OLR) of 1.2-8.0 kg volatile solid (VS) (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}, with VS reduction rates of 61.7-69.9%, and volumetric biogas production of 0.89-5.28 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}. A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} and hydraulic retention time of 15 days. With increasing OLRs, the anaerobic reactor showed a decrease in VS removal rate, average pH value and methane concentration, and a increase of volatile fatty acid concentration. By monitoring the biogas production rate (BPR), the anaerobic digestion system has a higher acidification risk under an OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}. This result remarks the possibility of relating bioreactor performance with BPR in order to better understand and monitor anaerobic digestion process.

Liu Xiao, E-mail: liuxiao07@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Wei; Shi Yunchun; Zheng Lei [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gao Xingbao [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Qiao Wei [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Zhou Yingjun [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nisikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Sol-Char: Producing Char from Waste using Solar Energy  

A recent Reinvent the Toilet Challenge put forth by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation called for researchers to develop sanitation solutions that are affordable and desirable to use, render fecal waste harmless within a short time-span, are ...

78

EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass utilization is one solution to our nations addiction to oil and fossil fuels. What is needed now is applied fundamental research that will cause economic technology development for the utilization of the diverse biomass resources in the United States. This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) applied fundamental research project contributes to the development of economical biomass utilization for energy, transportation fuels, and marketable chemicals using biorefinery methods that include thermochemical and fermentation processes. The fundamental and basic applied research supports the broad scientific objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program, especially in the area of developing alternative renewable biofuels, sustainable bioenergy, technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and environmental remediation. Its deliverables include 1) identifying and understanding environmental consequences of energy production from biomass, including the impacts on greenhouse gas production, carbon emission abatement, and utilization of waste biomass residues and 2) developing biology-based solutions that address DOE and national needs related to waste cleanup, hydrogen production from renewable biomass, biological and chemical processes for energy and fuel production, and environmental stewardship. This project serves the public purpose of encouraging good environmental stewardship by developing biomass-refining technologies that can dramatically increase domestic energy production to counter current trends of rising dependence upon petroleum imports. Decreasing the nations reliance on foreign oil and energy will enhance national security, the economy of rural communities, and future competitiveness. Although renewable energy has many forms, such as wind and solar, biomass is the only renewable energy source that can be governed through agricultural methods and that has an energy density that can realistically compete with, or even replace, petroleum and other fossil fuels in the near future. It is a primary domestic, sustainable, renewable energy resource that can supply liquid transportation fuels, chemicals, and energy that are currently produced from fossil sources, and it is a sustainable resource for a hydrogen-based economy in the future.

Zygarlicke, C.J.; Schmidt, D.D.; Olson, E.S.; Leroux, K.M.; Wocken, C.A.; Aulich, T.A.; WIlliams, K.D.

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

79

Biomass waste gasification - Can be the two stage process suitable for tar reduction and power generation?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of one stage (co-current) and two stage gasification of wood pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Original arrangement with grate-less reactor and upward moving bed of the pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two stage gasification leads to drastic reduction of tar content in gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One stage gasification produces gas with higher LHV at lower overall ER. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Content of ammonia in gas is lower in two stage moving bed gasification. - Abstract: A pilot scale gasification unit with novel co-current, updraft arrangement in the first stage and counter-current downdraft in the second stage was developed and exploited for studying effects of two stage gasification in comparison with one stage gasification of biomass (wood pellets) on fuel gas composition and attainable gas purity. Significant producer gas parameters (gas composition, heating value, content of tar compounds, content of inorganic gas impurities) were compared for the two stage and the one stage method of the gasification arrangement with only the upward moving bed (co-current updraft). The main novel features of the gasifier conception include grate-less reactor, upward moving bed of biomass particles (e.g. pellets) by means of a screw elevator with changeable rotational speed and gradual expanding diameter of the cylindrical reactor in the part above the upper end of the screw. The gasifier concept and arrangement are considered convenient for thermal power range 100-350 kW{sub th}. The second stage of the gasifier served mainly for tar compounds destruction/reforming by increased temperature (around 950 Degree-Sign C) and for gasification reaction of the fuel gas with char. The second stage used additional combustion of the fuel gas by preheated secondary air for attaining higher temperature and faster gasification of the remaining char from the first stage. The measurements of gas composition and tar compound contents confirmed superiority of the two stage gasification system, drastic decrease of aromatic compounds with two and higher number of benzene rings by 1-2 orders. On the other hand the two stage gasification (with overall ER = 0.71) led to substantial reduction of gas heating value (LHV = 3.15 MJ/Nm{sup 3}), elevation of gas volume and increase of nitrogen content in fuel gas. The increased temperature (>950 Degree-Sign C) at the entrance to the char bed caused also substantial decrease of ammonia content in fuel gas. The char with higher content of ash leaving the second stage presented only few mass% of the inlet biomass stream.

Sulc, Jindrich; Stojdl, Jiri; Richter, Miroslav; Popelka, Jan [Faculty of the Environment, Jan Evangelista Purkyne University in Usti nad Labem, Kralova Vysina 7, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Svoboda, Karel, E-mail: svoboda@icpf.cas.cz [Faculty of the Environment, Jan Evangelista Purkyne University in Usti nad Labem, Kralova Vysina 7, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the ASCR, v.v.i., Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Smetana, Jiri; Vacek, Jiri [D.S.K. Ltd., Ujezdecek - Dukla 264, 415 01 Teplice I (Czech Republic); Skoblja, Siarhei; Buryan, Petr [Dept. of Gas, Coke and Air protection, Institute of Chemical Technol., Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

2008 Solar Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DSIRE 2010a). Biomass Landfill Gas Hydro- power OtherBiomass Wind Hydro- power Other Wind Solar Solar Figure 4.1.

Price, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass: Biomass: Organic matter, including: agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid wastes, industrial wastes, and terrestrial and aquatic crops grown solely for energy purposes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Traditional and Thermal Use of Biomass Traditional use of biomass, particularly burning wood, is one of the oldest manners in which biomass has been utilized for energy. Traditional use of biomass is 14% of world energy usage which is on the same level as worldwide electricity usage. Most of this consumption comes from developing countries where traditional use of biomass accounts for 35% of primary energy usage [1] and greater than 75% of primary energy use is in the residential sector. The general trend in developing countries has been a

82

Acetylene from the co-pyrolysis of biomass and waste tires or coal in the H{sub 2}/Ar plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acetylene from carbon-containing materials via plasma pyrolysis is not only simple but also environmentally friendly. In this article, the acetylene produced from co-pyrolyzing biomass with waste tire or coal under the conditions of H{sub 2}/Ar DC arc plasma jet was investigated. The experimental results showed that the co-pyrolysis of mixture with biomass and waste tire or coal can improve largely the acetylene relative volume fraction (RVF) in gaseous products and the corresponding yield of acetylene. The change trends for the acetylene yield of plasma pyrolysis from mixture with raw sample properties were the same as relevant RVF. But the yield change trend with feeding rate is different from its RVF. The effects of the feeding rate of raw materials and the electric current of plasmatron on acetylene formation are also discussed.

Bao, W.; Cao, Q.; Lv, Y.; Chang, L. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Concentrating solar collector system for the evaporation of low-level radioactive waste water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently been awarded a grant under the Solar Federal Buildings Program to design, construct, and operate a high-temperature solar energy system for the processing of low-level radioactive waste water. Conceptual design studies have been completed, and detailed design work is under way for a solar system to produce process heat to evaporate 38,000 gal (143,830 L) of waste water per month. The system will use approximately 11,000 ft/sup 2/ (1022 m/sup 2/) of concentrating parabolic trough collectors operating at about 500/sup 0/F (262/sup 0/C). Construction of the system is anticipated to begin in 1981. Performance optimization of collector array size and configuration, storage medium and capacity, system operation, and control schemes are done using the active solar system simulator in the DOE-2 building energy analysis computer program. Results of this optimization are reported. This project represents a unique application of solar energy to an increasingly significant problem area in the energy field.

Diamond, S.C.; Cappiello, C.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Biomass for energy and materials Local technologies -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass for energy and materials Local technologies - in a global perspective Erik Steen Jensen Bioenergy and biomass Biosystems Department Risø National Laboratory Denmark #12;Biomass - a local resource, slaughterhouse waste. #12;Biomass characteristics · Biomass is a storable energy carrier, unlike electricity

85

Environmental sampling program for a solar evaporation pond for liquid radioactive wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) is evaluating solar evaporation as a method for disposal of liquid radioactive wastes. This report describes a sampling program designed to monitor possible escape of radioactivity to the environment from a solar evaporation pond prototype constructed at LASL. Background radioactivity levels at the pond site were determined from soil and vegetation analyses before construction. When the pond is operative, the sampling program will qualitatively and quantitatively detect the transport of radioactivity to the soil, air, and vegetation in the vicinity. Possible correlation of meteorological data with sampling results is being investigated and measures to control export of radioactivity by biological vectors are being assessed.

Romero, R.; Gunderson, T.C.; Talley, A.D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Thermo-chemical conversion of dairy waste based biomass through direct firing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing rates of manure produced from large dairies have increased concern for the environmental quality of nearby streams and watersheds. Typically the manure from the freestalls on these dairies is flushed with water to a mechanical separator. Here, flushed dairy biomass (DB) is parted into separated solids and separated liquid. The separated liquid is discharged into lagoons for treatment and eventual land application. This thesis proposes thermodynamic models for firing DB in small scale boiler systems that would eliminate land application and lagoons, which are being claimed to be the source of nutrient leaching and overloading. Fuel analysis of flushed DB from a dairy in central Texas show that it contains 93%moisture (%M), 3%ash (%A), and 4%combustibles (%Cb), while separated DB solids contain 81%M, 2%A, and 17%Cb. The dry, ash-free higher heating value of DB is approximately 20,000 kJ/kg. Using dry, ash-free results, computations can be made over ranges of %M and %A. For example, DB containing 70%M requires 9.74%Cb to vaporize all moisture and produce gaseous products of combustion at 373 K, but requires 17.82%Cb to burn in a regenerative combustor with a flame temperature of 1200 K. Separated solids that are pressed in an auger to 70%M (3%A and 27%Cb) can burn at 1200 K with exhaust temperatures of up to 1130 K and a minimum required heat exchanger effectiveness of 15%. Pressed solids can thus be fired in a boiler, where the remaining separated liquid can be used as feed water. The pressed solids only can release about 30% of the heat required to vaporize the remaining unclean feed water. However, pressed DB solids can be blended with drier fuels to vaporize almost all the unclean water. The low quality steam produced from the unclean water can be used in thermal processes on the farm. A similar system can be developed for vacuumed DB without the need to vaporize unclean feed water. As for large dairies with anaerobic digester systems already installed, directly firing the produced biogas in a small scale boiler system may be another way to similarly vaporize the remaining effluent.

Carlin, Nicholas Thomas

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Energy Basics: Concentrating Solar Power  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

88

Biomass Cofiring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass, primarily wood waste such as sawdust, has been cofired in over twenty utility coal-fired boilers in the United States at cofiring levels where the biomass provides from 1% to 10% of the heat input to the boiler. These guidelines present insights and conclusions from five years of EPRI assessment and testing of biomass cofiring and will enable utility engineers and power plant managers to evaluate their own options and plan their own tests.

1997-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

89

High-temperature photochemical destruction of toxic organic wastes using concentrated solar radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Application of concentrated solar energy has been proposed to be a viable waste disposal option. Specifically, this concept of solar induced high-temperature photochemistry is based on the synergistic contribution of concentrated infrared (IR) radiation, which acts as an intense heating source, and near ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS) radiation, which can induce destructive photochemical processes. Some significant advances have been made in the theoretical framework of high-temperature photochemical processes (Section 2) and development of experimental techniques for their study (Section 3). Basic thermal/photolytic studies have addressed the effect of temperature on the photochemical destruction of pure compounds (Section 4). Detailed studies of the destruction of reaction by-products have been conducted on selected waste molecules (Section 5). Some very limited results are available on the destruction of mixtures (Section 6). Fundamental spectroscopic studies have been recently initiated (Section 7). The results to date have been used to conduct some relatively simple scale-up studies of the solar detoxification process. More recent work has focused on destruction of compounds that do not directly absorb solar radiation. Research efforts have focused on homogeneous as well as heterogeneous methods of initiating destructive reaction pathways (Section 9). Although many conclusions at this point must be considered tentative due to lack of basic research, a clearer picture of the overall process is emerging (Section 10). However, much research remains to be performed and most follow several veins, including photochemical, spectroscopic, combustion kinetic, and engineering scale-up (Section 11).

Dellinger, B.; Graham, J.L.; Berman, J.M.; Taylor, P.H. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Environmental and institutional considerations in the development and implementation of biomass energy technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The photosynthetic energy stored in plant and organic waste materials in the United States amounts to approximately 40% of the nation's total energy consumption. Conversion of this energy to usable power sources is a complex process, involving many possible materials, conversion technologies, and energy products. Near-term biomass technologies are predominantly based on traditional fuel use and have the advantage over other solar technologies of fitting into existing tax and business practices. However, no other solar technology has the potential for such large environmental impacts. Unlike the conversion of sun, wind, and ocean thermal energy, the conversion of the biomass energy source, in the form of biomass residues and wastes, can create problems. Environmental impacts may be significant, and legal responses to these impacts are a key determinant to the widespread adoption of biomass technologies. This paper focuses on the major legal areas which will impact on biomass energy conversion. These include (1) the effect of existing state and federal legislation, (2) the role of regulatory agencies in the development of biomass energy, (3) governmental incentives to biomass development, and (4) legal issues surrounding the functioning of the technologies themselves. Emphasis is placed on the near-term technologies whose environmental impacts and institutional limitations are more readily identified. If biomass energy is to begin to achieve its apparently great potential, these questions must receive immediate attention.

Schwab, C.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Biomass Support for the China Renewable Energy Law: Feasibility Report -- Agricultural and Forestry Solid Wastes Power Generation Demonstration, December 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report on feasibility of using agricultural and forestry wastes for power generation in China

Not Available

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Sourcebook of methods of analysis for biomass and biomass-conversion processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the oil embargo of the 1970s, researchers around the world have made tremendous progress in developing and improving methods for converting biomass -- trees, plants, and organic wastes -- to useful fuels and chemicals. However, the lack of relevant standards and analytical methods has made comparison of results between laboratories and nations difficult. This Sourcebook of Methods of Analysis for Biomass and Biomass-Conversion Processes is the result of an international effort to begin to fill this gap. In 1986, the International Energy Agency began sponsorship of a Voluntary Standards Activity,'' designed to provide comparability of research results, increase research efficiency, and provide quality assurance to both researchers and industry. Canada, Finland, New Zealand, and the United States supported the activity initially; Italy joined in 1988. Major support also came from Energy, Mines and Resources Canada (E,M R); the US Department of Energy's Solar Technical Information Program (STIP); and the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The sourcebook presents titles and abstracts (when available) of methods relevant to all aspects of biomass conversion -- from analyzing feedstocks to evaluating performance of biofuels. The authors assembled the sourcebook at SERI by searching the literature, reviewing industrial standards, and soliciting suggestions from scientists in the field. In addition, Finland prepared a special report on measuring the efficiencies of small boilers and biomass stoves and furnaces.

Milne, T.A.; Brennan, A.H.; Glenn, B.H.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Covanta Fairfax Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search Name Covanta Fairfax Energy Biomass Facility Facility Covanta Fairfax Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Fairfax County,...

94

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana) Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)...

95

Screening study for waste biomass to ethanol production facility using the Amoco process in New York State. Appendices to the final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final report evaluates the economic feasibility of locating biomass-to-ethanol waste conversion facilities in New York State. Part 1 of the study evaluates 74 potential sites in New York City and identifies two preferred sites on Staten Island, the Proctor and Gamble and the Arthur Kill sites for further consideration. Part 2 evaluates upstate New York and determines that four regions surrounding the urban centers of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse provide suitable areas from which to select specific sites for further consideration. A conceptual design and economic viability evaluation were developed for a minimum-size facility capable of processing 500 tons per day (tpd) of biomass consisting of wood or paper, or a combination of the two for upstate regions. The facility would use Amoco`s biomass conversion technology and produce 49,000 gallons per day of ethanol and approximately 300 tpd of lignin solid by-product. For New York City, a 1,000-tpd processing facility was also evaluated to examine effects of economies of scale. The reports evaluate the feasibility of building a biomass conversion facility in terms of city and state economic, environmental, and community factors. Given the data obtained to date, including changing costs for feedstock and ethanol, the project is marginally attractive. A facility should be as large as possible and located in a New York State Economic Development Zone to take advantage of economic incentives. The facility should have on-site oxidation capabilities, which will make it more financially viable given the high cost of energy. This appendix to the final report provides supplemental material supporting the evaluations.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Biomass energy conversion workshop for industrial executives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rising costs of energy and the risks of uncertain energy supplies are increasingly familiar problems in industry. Bottom line profits and even the simple ability to operate can be affected by spiralling energy costs. An often overlooked alternative is the potential to turn industrial waste or residue into an energy source. On April 9 and 10, 1979, in Claremont, California, the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), the California Energy Commission (CEC), and the Western Solar Utilization Network (WSUN) held a workshop which provided industrial managers with current information on using residues and wastes as industrial energy sources. Successful industrial experiences were described by managers from the food processing and forest product industries, and direct combustion and low-Btu gasification equipment was described in detail. These speakers' presentations are contained in this document. Some major conclusions of the conference were: numerous current industrial applications of wastes and residues as fuels are economic and reliable; off-the-shelf technologies exist for converting biomass wastes and residues to energy; a variety of financial (tax credits) and institutional (PUC rate structures) incentives can help make these waste-to-energy projects more attractive to industry. However, many of these incentives are still being developed and their precise impact must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

None

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Definition: Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Biomass Organic matter, including: agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid wastes, industrial wastes, and terrestrial and aquatic crops grown solely for energy purposes.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Biomass is biological material derived from living, or recently living organisms. It most often refers to plants or plant-derived materials which are specifically called lignocellulosic biomass. As a renewable energy source, biomass can either be used directly via combustion to produce heat, or indirectly after converting it to various forms of biofuel. Conversion of biomass to biofuel can be achieved by different methods which are broadly classified into: thermal, chemical, and biochemical methods. Historically, humans have harnessed biomass-derived

98

NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment (Redirected from Biomass Resource Assessment Presentation) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Resource Assessment Presentation Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, Transportation Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps Website: www.nrel.gov/international/biomass_resource.html References: Biomass Resource Assessment at NREL (Int'l)[1] Logo: Biomass Resource Assessment Presentation Overview "Biomass resource assessments quantify the existing or potential biomass material in a given area. Biomass resources include agricultural crops and residues; dedicated energy crops; forestry products and residues; animal wastes; residues and byproducts from food, feed, fiber, wood, and materials

99

Technology assessment of solar energy systems: availability and impacts of woody biomass utilization in the Pacific Northwest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The estimates of the biomass resource base in the Northwest are reviewed for comparison with scenarios used and a preliminary analysis of the issues involved in the collection and use of forest residues as an energy resource is presented. Four issues are reviewed that may serve to constrain the total amount of wood residues available for use as fuel. (MHR)

Hopp, W.J.; Chockie, A.D.; Allwine, K.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

construction and demolition waste, land-clearing waste, scrap tires, medical waste, compost, and septage. July 12, 2013 Solar, Wind, and Energy Efficiency Easements and Rights...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Proceedings of the coordination meeting of contractors 'energy from biomass' (project E) (1st), held in Amsterdam on September 18-19, 1980 (Second Solar Energy R and D Programme, 1979-1983)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments to produce energy by converting agricultural wastes and specially grown catch crops into methane and/or methanol are underway. Technical as well as economic aspects of the utilization of wood wastes and the application of short rotation forestry methods to provide material for energy production are being studied. Algae cultivated in offshore and land-based situations are being used for the production of hydrocarbon gases. Biological routes for the conversion of biomass through anaerobic digestion and a pilot-scale fermentation process for ethanol production are described. Thermochemical routes for converting biomass include combustion, gasification and catalytic processes. Participants concluded that Europe was among the leaders in biomass to methanol technology.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment NREL-Biomass Resource Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biomass Resource Assessment Presentation Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, Transportation Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps Website: www.nrel.gov/international/biomass_resource.html References: Biomass Resource Assessment at NREL (Int'l)[1] Logo: Biomass Resource Assessment Presentation Overview "Biomass resource assessments quantify the existing or potential biomass material in a given area. Biomass resources include agricultural crops and residues; dedicated energy crops; forestry products and residues; animal wastes; residues and byproducts from food, feed, fiber, wood, and materials

103

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet) (Revised), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights System Size 300 ft 2 transpired solar collector Energy Production About 125 Btu/hr/ft 2 (400 W/m 2 ) of heat delivery under ideal conditions (full sun) Installation Date 1990 Motivation Provide solar-heated ventilation air to offset some of the heating with conventional electric resistance heaters Annual Savings 14,310 kWh (49 million Btu/yr) or about 26% of the energy required to heat the facility's ventilation air System Details Components Black, 300 ft 2 corrugated aluminum transpired solar collector with a porosity of 2%; bypass damper; two-speed 3000 CFM vane axial supply fan; electric duct heater; thermostat controller Storage None Loads 188 million Btu/year (55,038 kWh/year) winter average to heat 1,300 ft 2 Waste Handling Facility

104

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet) (Revised), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highlights Highlights System Size 300 ft 2 transpired solar collector Energy Production About 125 Btu/hr/ft 2 (400 W/m 2 ) of heat delivery under ideal conditions (full sun) Installation Date 1990 Motivation Provide solar-heated ventilation air to offset some of the heating with conventional electric resistance heaters Annual Savings 14,310 kWh (49 million Btu/yr) or about 26% of the energy required to heat the facility's ventilation air System Details Components Black, 300 ft 2 corrugated aluminum transpired solar collector with a porosity of 2%; bypass damper; two-speed 3000 CFM vane axial supply fan; electric duct heater; thermostat controller Storage None Loads 188 million Btu/year (55,038 kWh/year) winter average to heat 1,300 ft 2 Waste Handling Facility

105

Biomass Lignin Binder for Coal Fines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the production of a waste stream consisting of lignin from a dilute acid hydrolysis process for making ethanol fuel from cellulosic biomass. The lignin waste stream was then evaluated as a possible binder to hold coal fines in a useable form for fuel in a coal-fired power plant. The production and use of a lignin-rich waste stream is of interest because it would enable a biomass energy content in the fuel for the coal-fired power plant, while using waste coal and waste biomass. The ...

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

106

IEA/H2/TR-02/001 Hydrogen from Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advanced low cost technologies for producing hydrogen from biomass (gasification/pyrolysis, fermentation/NEAR ZERO EMISSIONSEMISSIONS Why Hydrogen? Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil Sequestration Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil Sequestration #12

107

Ris Energy Report 2 Biomass production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6.1 Risø Energy Report 2 Biomass production This chapter mainly concerns the production of ligno- cellulosic biomass for generating heat and power. To date, such material has been available almost exclusively in the form of surplus or waste biomass from forestry or agriculture. However, as the demand

108

Energie-Cits 2001 BIOMASS -WOOD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energie-Cités 2001 BIOMASS - WOOD Gasification / Cogeneration ARMAGH United Kingdom Gasification is transferring the combustible matters in organic waste or biomass into gas and pure char by burning the fuel via it allows biomass in small-scaled engines and co-generation units ­ which with conventional technologies

109

Southeastern United States Biomass Resource Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent financial incentives for renewable energy have stimulated interest in potential uses of biomass. In the southeastern United States, acquisition and integration of wood waste generated by sawmills and other wood processing companies is of specific interest to fossil plants. In this study, two biomass resource surveys were conducted and combined to assess cost implications of and potential for biomass cofiring in this region.

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

110

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the high price of the biomass from the Miramarbiomasstobesecuredunderlong?termcontractsatbetterprices. biomassandanydualfuel) Moisture,ash,andcarbonconcentrations(forweightcalculationsofinputfuelandfacilitywaste) Saleprice

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

November 2011 Competition for biomass among  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 2011 Competition for biomass among renewable energy policies: Liquid fuels to 20% by marketing year 2020/21. All renewable energies (biomass, hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal/192020/21: Based on assumed technology patterns, biomass supplies respond faster than competing renewable energy

Noble, James S.

112

Biomass Resources, Technologies, and Environmental Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass, a renewable energy source, is essentially solar energy captured and stored in plants via photosynthesis. For electric power generation organizations that have expertise and assets in combustion or gasification, biomass can be the most appropriate renewable energy source. This report addresses the size and cost of the biomass resource, while describing the technologies and environmental issues involved.

2004-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

113

Energy Basics: Power Tower Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

114

Energy Basics: Thermal Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

115

Energy Basics: Dish/Engine Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

116

Howard Waste Recycling Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Product London-based project developer and manufacturer of biomass feedstock for energy production. References Howard Waste Recycling Ltd1 LinkedIn Connections...

117

California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators Agency/Company /Organization: California Biomass Collaborative Partner: Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, University of California Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biofuels, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: biomass.ucdavis.edu/calculator.html Locality: California Cost: Free Provides energy cost and financial assessment tools for biomass power, bio gas, biomass combined heat and power, and landfill gas. Overview The California Biomass Collaborative provides energy cost and financial

118

Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: Arkansas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document consists of spreadsheets detailing in a county by county manner agricultural crop, agricultural waste, municipal waste and industrial waste in Arkansas that are potential biomass energy sources.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Biomass pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

120

Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) leads a large network of researchers and other partners to deliver innovative solar photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies that will make solar...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

List of Biomass Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 757 Biomass Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-757) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Net Metering (Arizona) Net Metering Arizona Commercial Industrial Residential Nonprofit Schools Local Government State Government Fed. Government Agricultural Institutional Solar Thermal Electric Photovoltaics Wind energy Biomass No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat

122

Solar Thermal/PV | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal/PV Thermal/PV Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

123

Biomass Stove Pollution Sam Beck ATOC-3500 Biomass energy accounts for about 15% of the world's primary energy consumption and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Stove Pollution Sam Beck ATOC-3500 Biomass energy accounts for about 15% of the world. Furthermore, biomass often accounts for more than 90% of the total rural energy supplies in developing countries. The traditional stoves in developing countries waste a lot of biomass, mainly because

Toohey, Darin W.

124

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

125

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

126

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solvent Systems Catalystic Biomass Liquefaction Investigatereactor Product collection Biomass liquefaction process12-13, 1980 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Biomass Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks.

128

Washington State biomass data book  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first edition of the Washington State Biomass Databook. It assess sources and approximate costs of biomass fuels, presents a view of current users, identifies potential users in the public and private sectors, and lists prices of competing energy resources. The summary describes key from data from the categories listed above. Part 1, Biomass Supply, presents data increasing levels of detail on agricultural residues, biogas, municipal solid waste, and wood waste. Part 2, Current Industrial and Commercial Use, demonstrates how biomass is successfully being used in existing facilities as an alternative fuel source. Part 3, Potential Demand, describes potential energy-intensive public and private sector facilities. Part 4, Prices of Competing Energy Resources, shows current suppliers of electricity and natural gas and compares utility company rates. 49 refs., 43 figs., 72 tabs.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Hydroelectric Power Wood Biomass Waste Biomass Wind Geothermal Solar Industrial Sector Total Consumption Hydroelectric Power Wood Biomass Waste ...

130

Membrane-Based Absorption Refrigeration Systems: Nanoengineered Membrane-Based Absorption Cooling for Buildings Using Unconcentrated Solar & Waste Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: UFL is improving a refrigeration system that uses low quality heat to provide the energy needed to drive cooling. This system, known as absorption refrigeration system (ARS), typically consists of large coils that transfer heat. Unfortunately, these large heat exchanger coils are responsible for bulkiness and high cost of ARS. UFL is using new materials as well as system design innovations to develop nanoengineered membranes to allow for enhanced heat exchange that reduces bulkiness. UFLs design allows for compact, cheaper and more reliable use of ARS that use solar or waste heat.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that generate electricity from wind or biomass. Companies that generate electricity from solar energy receive a tax incentive that varies annually according to the following...

132

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

incentive for companies that manufacture systems or components used to generate renewable energy, including biomass, solar, wind and hydro generation. October 16, 2013 Minnesota...

133

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

up to 20 years for real and personal property used to generate electricity from renewable energy resources including solar, wind, biomass*, fuel cells, geothermal or hydro....

134

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

utilities. Net metering is available to customers who generate electricity using solar energy, geothermal energy, wind energy, biomass energy, ocean energy, hydrogen,...

135

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

energy sources by 2015. Eligible renewable-energy resources include solar, biomass, biogas (methane from landfills and sewage treatment plants), and wind, as well as specific...

136

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

least 7.5% of its electric capacity from green energy sources by 2015. Eligible renewable-energy resources include solar, biomass, biogas (methane from landfills and sewage...

137

Waste to Energy Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste to Energy Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Waste to Energy Technologies Place Madrid, Spain Zip 28023 Sector Biomass Product Turn key WtEbiomass plant supplier...

138

Biomass Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes-that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007. Biomass technologies break down organic matter to release stored energy from the sun. The process used depends on the type of biomass and its

139

Biomass Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes-that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007. Biomass technologies break down organic matter to release stored energy from the sun. The process used depends on the type of biomass and its

140

Permitting Guidance for Biomass Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass power plants could contribute significantly to reaching U.S. targets for renewable energy and greenhouse gas emissions reduction. Achieving these goals will require the construction of many new biomass-fired units, as well as the conversion of existing coal-fired units to biomass combustion or co-fired units. New biomass units will require air, water use, wastewater, and, in some cases, solid waste permits. Existing fossil fuel-fired units that will be converted to dedicated biomass-fired units o...

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Forest Products Supply Chain --Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Products Supply Chain -- Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production or wood waste biomass · Map Indiana's wood waste for each potential bioenergy supply chain · Develop break-even analyses for transportation logistics of wood waste biomass Isaac S. Slaven Abstract: The purpose

142

Sol-Char: Producing Char from Waste using Solar Vaccine for ...  

for researchers to develop sanitation solutions that are affordable and ... and the need to treat the waste off-site once it is removed poses ... The innovative

143

UK Energy Statistics: Renewables and Waste, Commodity Balances (2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

403 403 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142288403 Varnish cache server UK Energy Statistics: Renewables and Waste, Commodity Balances (2010) Dataset Summary Description Annual commodity balances (supply, consumption) for renewables and waste in the UK from 1998 to 2009. Published as part of the Digest of UK energy statistics (DUKES), by the UK Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC). Waste includes: wood waste, farm waste, sewage gas, landfill gas, waste and tyres. Renewables includes: wood, plant-based biomass, geothermal and active solar heat, hydro, wind, wave and tidal, and liquid biofuels. These data were used to produce Tables 7.1 to 7.3 in the Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics 2010 (available: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/publications/dukes/348-dukes-2...).

144

Analysis of applications of solar technology for the treatment of chlorinated organic waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent work has demonstrated that concentrated solar energy can destroy many hazardous chemical that are of national concern including dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorinated solvents. A detailed systems analysis was performed to determine the applicability of solar detoxification to the treatment of chlorinated solvents. This work determined the cost of destruction of trichlorethylene (TCE) a using conventional and a solar-based technology were compared for this application. This work provides a basis for choosing an application in which solar energy can be used to its fullest potential to solve a growing national problem. 9 refs., 8 figs.

Glatzmaier, G C

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Biomass Cofiring in Coal-Fired Boilers - Federal Technology Alert  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

when needed. Unlike other renewable energy technologies like those based on solar and wind resources, biomass-based systems are available whenever they are needed. This helps...

146

YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Developing Engineered Fuel (Briquettes) Using Fly Ash from the Aquila Coal-Fired Power Plant in Canon City and Locally Available Biomass Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to explore the feasibility of producing engineered fuels from a combination of renewable and non renewable energy sources. The components are flyash (containing coal fines) and locally available biomass waste. The constraints were such that no other binder additives were to be added. Listed below are the main accomplishments of the project: (1) Determination of the carbon content of the flyash sample from the Aquila plant. It was found to be around 43%. (2) Experiments were carried out using a model which simulates the press process of a wood pellet machine, i.e. a bench press machine with a close chamber, to find out the ideal ratio of wood and fly ash to be mixed to get the desired briquette. The ideal ratio was found to have 60% wood and 40% flyash. (3) The moisture content required to produce the briquettes was found to be anything below 5.8%. (4) The most suitable pressure required to extract the lignin form the wood and cause the binding of the mixture was determined to be 3000psi. At this pressure, the briquettes withstood an average of 150psi on its lateral side. (5) An energy content analysis was performed and the BTU content was determined to be approximately 8912 BTU/lb. (6) The environmental analysis was carried out and no abnormalities were noted. (7) Industrial visits were made to pellet manufacturing plants to investigate the most suitable manufacturing process for the briquettes. (8) A simulation model of extrusion process was developed to explore the possibility of using a cattle feed plant operating on extrusion process to produce briquettes. (9) Attempt to produce 2 tons of briquettes was not successful. The research team conducted a trial production run at a Feed Mill in La Junta, CO to produce two (2) tons of briquettes using the extrusion process in place. The goal was to, immediately after producing the briquettes; send them through Aquila's current system to test the ability of the briquettes to flow through the system without requiring any equipment or process changes. (10) Although the above attempt failed, the plant is still interested in producing briquettes. (11) An economic analysis of investing in a production facility manufacturing such briquettes was conducted to determine the economic viability of the project. Such a project is estimated to have an internal rate of return of 14% and net present value of about $400,000. (12) An engineering independent study class (4 students) is now working on selecting a site near the power plant and determining the layout of the future plant that will produce briquettes.

H. Carrasco; H. Sarper

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

ANALYSIS OF THERMAL PLASMA ASSISTED WASTE-TO ENERGY Caroline Ducharme, Nickolas Themelis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................. 7 Gasification Direct Solar Gasification...................................................................... 11 Miscellaneous Gasification Processes.................................................... 11 Biomass

Columbia University

149

Biomass Interest Group Meeting Summary, June 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Biomass Interest Group (BIG) met June 29 and 30, 2004, at the offices of We Energies in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. This report summarizes the meeting, which included presentations on such topics as gasification, cofiring, waste digestion, and state legislation affecting the biomass energy industry. The BIG meets three times per year and its purpose is to evaluate, fund, discuss, and identify projects that produce power from biomass sources.

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

150

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste December 6, 2011 - 3:57pm Addthis Dale and...

151

Colusa Biomass Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colusa Biomass Energy Corporation Colusa Biomass Energy Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Colusa Biomass Energy Corporation Place Colusa, California Zip 95932 Sector Biomass Product Colusa Biomass Energy Corporation is dedicated to converting biomass to energy for transport, and holds a US patent to make ethanol from waste biomass. Coordinates 39.21418°, -122.008594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.21418,"lon":-122.008594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

152

Rankine cycle energy conversion system design considerations for low and intermediate temperature sensible heat sources. Geothermal, waste heat, and solar thermal conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design considerations are described for energy conversion systems for low and intermediate temperature sensible heat sources such as found in geothermal, waste heat, and solar-thermal applications. It is concluded that the most cost effective designs for the applications studied did not require the most efficient thermodynamic cycle, but that the efficiency of the energy conversion hardware can be a key factor.

Abbin, J.P. Jr.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Biomass power for rural development. Revised design report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The retrofit of Dunkirk Steam Station to fire biomass fuels is an important part of the Consortium's goal--demonstrating the viability of commercial scale willow energy crop production and conversion to power. The goal for th biomass facilities at Dunkirk is to reliably cofire a combination of wood wastes and willow biomass with coal at approximately 20% by heat input.

Neuhauser, Edward

1999-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

154

Russell Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Russell Biomass Jump to: navigation, search Name Russell Biomass Place Massachusetts Sector Biomass Product Russell Biomass, LLC is developing a 50MW biomass to energy project at...

155

Star Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Jump to: navigation, search Name Star Biomass Place India Sector Biomass Product Plans to set up biomass projects in Rajasthan. References Star Biomass1 LinkedIn...

156

Biomass Energy Program Grants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Energy Program Grants Biomass Energy Program Grants Biomass Energy Program Grants < Back Eligibility Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Maximum Rebate Varies Program Info Funding Source U.S. Department of Energy's State Energy Program (SEP) State Michigan Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Varies by solicitation; check website for each solicitation's details Provider Michigan Economic Development Corporation '''''The application window for the most recent grant opportunity closed November 26, 2012.''''' The Michigan Biomass Energy Program (MBEP) provides funding for state bioenergy and biofuels projects on a regular basis. Funding categories typically include biofuels and bioenergy education, biofuels

157

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as agricultural wastes and energy crops, also raisesacid hydrolysis. Energy Biomass Wastes 13:1281- 16. Green M,fraction. Energy from Biomass and Wastes 15:725-43. 2. Aden

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Superheater Corrosion Produced By Biomass Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 90% of the world's bioenergy is produced by burning renewable biomass fuels. Low-cost biomass fuels such as agricultural wastes typically contain more alkali metals and chlorine than conventional fuels. Although the efficiency of a boiler's steam cycle can be increased by raising its maximum steam temperature, alkali metals and chlorine released in biofuel boilers cause accelerated corrosion and fouling at high superheater steam temperatures. Most alloys that resist high temperature corrosion protect themselves with a surface layer of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. However, this Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be fluxed away by reactions that form alkali chromates or volatilized as chromic acid. This paper reviews recent research on superheater corrosion mechanisms and superheater alloy performance in biomass boilers firing black liquor, biomass fuels, blends of biomass with fossil fuels and municipal waste.

Sharp, William (Sandy) [SharpConsultant; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations; Keiser, James R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:25am Addthis Photo of two hands cupping wood chips pouring from a green dispenser. Biomass uses agriculture and forest residues to create energy. This page provides a brief overview of biomass energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply biomass within the Federal sector. Overview Biomass energy is fuel, heat, or electricity produced from organic materials such as plants, residues, and waste. These organic materials span several sources, including agriculture, forestry, primary and secondary mill residues, urban waste, landfill gases, wastewater treatment plants, and dedicated energy crops. Biomass energy takes many forms and can have a wide variety of applications

160

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for transportation fuel Concept developed at RIS? and DTU Anne Belinda Thomsen (RIS?) Birgitte K. Ahring (DTU) #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass: Biogas #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Pre-treatment Step Biomass is macerated The biomass is cut in small

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Science Activities in Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities in Biomass Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, genetics, distillation, agriculture, chemicalcarbon cycles, climatology, plants and energy resources...

162

Biomass Energy Production in California: The Case for a Biomass Policy Initiative; Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the 1980s California developed the largest and most divers biomass energy industry in the world. Biomass energy production has become an important component of the state's environmental infrastructure, diverting solid wastes from open burning and disposal in landfills to a beneficial use application.

Morris, G.

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

163

Biomass Energy Production in California: The Case for a Biomass Policy Initiative; Final Report  

SciTech Connect

During the 1980s California developed the largest and most divers biomass energy industry in the world. Biomass energy production has become an important component of the state's environmental infrastructure, diverting solid wastes from open burning and disposal in landfills to a beneficial use application.

Morris, G.

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

164

Testing of Biomass in a Transport Reactor Gasifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 200-hour gasification test was undertaken on biomass fuels from sources that include wood waste and a potential energy crop such as switchgrass. The test involved the design and construction of a feed system to allow 100% biomass to be continuously fed to the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center. Biomass performance was also assessed in a high-efficiency transport reactor gasifier, the centerpiece of an advanced biomass integrated ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

SERI biomass program annual technical report: 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The biomass with which this report is concerned includes aquatic plants, which can be converted into liquid fuels and chemicals; organic wastes (crop residues as well as animal and municipal wastes), from which biogas can be produced via anerobic digestion; and organic or inorganic waste streams, from which hydrogen can be produced by photobiological processes. The Biomass Program Office supports research in three areas which, although distinct, all use living organisms to create the desired products. The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) supports research on organisms that are themselves processed into the final products, while the Anaerobic Digestion (ADP) and Photo/Biological Hydrogen Program (P/BHP) deals with organisms that transform waste streams into energy products. The P/BHP is also investigating systems using water as a feedstock and cell-free systems which do not utilize living organisms. This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the SERI Biomass Program during FY 1982.

Bergeron, P.W.; Corder, R.E.; Hill, A.M.; Lindsey, H.; Lowenstein, M.Z.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Solar energy perspectives for public power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Perspectives on the utilization of solar energy for electricity production and thermal energy utilization by the public are briefly discussed. Wind energy conversion, biomass conversion, solar thermal, OTEC, photovoltaics, and solar heating and cooling are discussed. (WHK)

Woodley, N. H.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Municipal solid waste plants convert garbage to electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy.

168

Taylor Biomass Energy LLC TBE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Energy LLC TBE Biomass Energy LLC TBE Jump to: navigation, search Name Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE) Place Montgomery, New York Zip 12549-9900 Sector Biomass Product Montgomery-based municipal-solid-waste (MSW) recovery and recycling firm providing biomass gasification units in addition to operating its own gasifier plants. References Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE) is a company located in Montgomery, New York . References ↑ "Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Taylor_Biomass_Energy_LLC_TBE&oldid=352048" Categories:

169

US Biomass Energy Research Association BERA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Energy Research Association BERA Biomass Energy Research Association BERA Jump to: navigation, search Name US Biomass Energy Research Association (BERA) Place Washington, Washington, DC Zip DC 20003 Sector Biomass Product Aims to faciliate understanding and promotion of biomass energy or waste-to-energy systems. References US Biomass Energy Research Association (BERA)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. US Biomass Energy Research Association (BERA) is a company located in Washington, Washington, DC . References ↑ "US Biomass Energy Research Association (BERA)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=US_Biomass_Energy_Research_Association_BERA&oldid=352594

170

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy generation from wind, geothermal, biomass, and central station solar thermal, with a 5% annual increase in the real cost

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Schiller Biomass Con Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Schiller Biomass Con Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Schiller Biomass Con Biomass...

172

Ware Biomass Cogen Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ware Biomass Cogen Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ware Biomass Cogen Biomass...

173

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Projects Biomass Characterization Projects A photo of a magnified image on a computer screen. Many blue specks and lines in different sizes and shapes are visible on top of a white background. A microscopic image of biomass particles. Through biomass characterization projects, NREL researchers are exploring the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment and during processing. The characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a critical step in optimizing biomass conversion processes. Among NREL's biomass characterization projects are: Feedstock/Process Interface NREL is working to understand the effects of feedstock and feedstock pre-processing on the conversion process and vice versa. The objective of the task is to understand the characteristics of biomass feedstocks

174

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WOW operates in the energy efficiency field- one of the fastest growing energy sectors in the world today. The two key products - WOWGen and WOWClean provide more energy at cheaper cost and lower emissions. WOWGen - Power Generation from Industrial Waste Heat WOWClean - Multi Pollutant emission control system. Current power generation technology uses only 35% of the energy in a fossil fuel and converts it to useful output. The remaining 65% is discharged into the environment as waste heat at temperatures ranging from 300F to 1,200F. This waste heat can be captured using the WOWGen technology and turned into electricity. This efficiency is up to twice the rate of competing technologies. Compelling economics and current environmental policy are stimulating industry interest. WOWGen power plants can generate between 1 - 25 MW of electricity. Project payback is between two to five years with IRR of 15% 30%. Nearly anywhere industrial waste heat is present, the WOW products can be applied. Beneficial applications of heat recovery power generation can be found in Industry (e.g. steel, glass, cement, lime, pulp and paper, refining and petrochemicals), Power Generation (CHP, biomass, biofuel, traditional fuels, gasifiers, diesel engines) and Natural Gas (pipeline compression stations, processing plants). Sources such as stack flue gases, steam, diesel exhaust, hot oil or combinations of sources can be used to generate power. WOWGen can also be used with stand alone power plants burning fossil fuels or using renewable energy sources such as solar and biomass.

Romero, M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Minimising greenhouse gas emissions from biomass energy generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and `farmed wood' for electricity, heat and combined heat and power production (EC JRC, 2009). All of the life wood waste SRC chips Straw SRC chips SRC pellets Cofiring Biomass power plant Domestic boiler kgCO2per vary significantly ­ from about 10kgCO2e per MWh for waste products such as waste wood and MDF, up

Wynne, Randolph H.

176

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-11 019 UC-61 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,Catalytic Liquefaction of Biomass,n M, Seth, R. Djafar, G.of California. CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION QUARTERLY

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid Fuels from Biomass: "Catalyst Screening and KineticUC-61 (l, RCO osn CDL or BIOMASS CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION ManuCATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS Manu Seth, Roger Djafar,

Seth, Manu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Biomass Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Maps Biomass Maps These maps illustrate the biomass resources available in the United States by county. Biomass feedstock data are analyzed both statistically and graphically using a geographic information system (GIS). The following feedstock categories are evaluated: crop residues, forest residues, primary and secondary mill residues, urban wood waste, and methane emissions from manure management, landfills, and domestic wastewater treatment. Biomass Resources in the United States Map of Total Biomass Resources in the United States Total Resources by County Total Biomass per Square Kilometer These maps estimate the biomass resources currently available in the United States by county. They include the following feedstock categories: crop residues (5 year average: 2003-2007) forest and primary mill residues

179

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Biomass Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For areas with abundant supplies of biomass resources and for areas with limited wind and solar options, biomass energy projects might be a technically and economically viable means to achieve renewable energy goals and mandates. To minimize capital costs associated with these projects, biomass can be fired in a unit modified to fire 100% biomass fuels (that is, biomass repowering) or can be co-fired with coal in an existing coal-fired unit. Both of these methods use existing equipment and facilities. Th...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Capabilities Biomass Characterization Capabilities A photo of a man wearing a white lab coat and looking into a large microscope. A researcher uses an Atomic Force Microscope to image enzymes used in biochemical conversion. Through biomass characterization, NREL develops, refines, and validates rapid and cost-effective methods to determine the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment, as well as during bioconversion processing. Detailed and accurate characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a necessity for any biomass-to-biofuels conversion. Understanding how the individual biomass components and reaction products interact at each stage in the process is important for researchers. With a large inventory of standard biomass samples as reference materials,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Facility Tracy Biomass Sector Biomass Location San Joaquin County, California Coordinates 37.9175935°, -121.1710389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9175935,"lon":-121.1710389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

182

NREL: Biomass Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities At NREL's state-of-the-art biomass research facilities, researchers design and optimize processes to convert renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels and...

183

Catalytic conversion of biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Catalytic processes for conversion of biomass to transportation fuels have gained an increasing attention in sustainable energy production. The biomass can be converted to (more)

Calleja Aguado, Raquel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass Pyrolysis for Chemicals The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for (more)

Wild, Paul de

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

High-Speed Pipeline Revs Up Biomass Analysis (Fact Sheet), NREL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

containing at least 50% wastepaper, including 10% post consumer waste. High-Speed Pipeline Revs Up Biomass Analysis Photo by Patrick Corkery, NRELPIX 17132 NREL Highlights...

186

The Performance Of Clostridium Phytofermentans For Biofuels Production From Lignocellulosic Biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ethanol produced from lignocellulosic biomass is an alternative transportation fuel with the potential to lower greenhouse gas emissions and increase energy security. Source-separated organic waste (more)

Percy, Benjamin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

does not discharge to surface waters of the state, including systems which discharge waste onto or below land surface. October 16, 2013 Washington County - Solar Ordinance...

188

Federal Energy Management Program: Biomass Energy Resources and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Photo of two hands cupping wood chips pouring from a green dispenser. Biomass uses agriculture and forest residues to create energy. Photo of two men standing in front of large sugar cane plants. Sugar cane is used in Hawaii and other locations to produce energy and ethanol for alternative fuels. This page provides a brief overview of biomass energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply biomass within the Federal sector. Overview Biomass energy is fuel, heat, or electricity produced from organic materials such as plants, residues, and waste. These organic materials span several sources, including agriculture, forestry, primary and secondary mill residues, urban waste, landfill gases, wastewater treatment plants, and dedicated energy crops.

189

Fiscalini Farms Biomass Energy Project  

SciTech Connect

In this final report describes and documents research that was conducted by the Ecological Engineering Research Program (EERP) at the University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA) under subcontract to Fiscalini Farms LP for work under the Assistance Agreement DE-EE0001895 'Measurement and Evaluation of a Dairy Anaerobic Digestion/Power Generation System' from the United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory. Fiscalini Farms is operating a 710 kW biomass-energy power plant that uses bio-methane, generated from plant biomass, cheese whey, and cattle manure via mesophilic anaerobic digestion, to produce electricity using an internal combustion engine. The primary objectives of the project were to document baseline conditions for the anaerobic digester and the combined heat and power (CHP) system used for the dairy-based biomass-energy production. The baseline condition of the plant was evaluated in the context of regulatory and economic constraints. In this final report, the operation of the plant between start-up in 2009 and operation in 2010 are documented and an interpretation of the technical data is provided. An economic analysis of the biomass energy system was previously completed (Appendix A) and the results from that study are discussed briefly in this report. Results from the start-up and first year of operation indicate that mesophilic anaerobic digestion of agricultural biomass, combined with an internal combustion engine, is a reliable source of alternative electrical production. A major advantage of biomass energy facilities located on dairy farms appears to be their inherent stability and ability to produce a consistent, 24 hour supply of electricity. However, technical analysis indicated that the Fiscalini Farms system was operating below capacity and that economic sustainability would be improved by increasing loading of feedstocks to the digester. Additional operational modifications, such as increased utilization of waste heat and better documentation of potential of carbon credits, would also improve the economic outlook. Analysis of baseline operational conditions indicated that a reduction in methane emissions and other greenhouse gas savings resulted from implementation of the project. The project results indicate that using anaerobic digestion to produce bio-methane from agricultural biomass is a promising source of electricity, but that significant challenges need to be addressed before dairy-based biomass energy production can be fully integrated into an alternative energy economy. The biomass energy facility was found to be operating undercapacity. Economic analysis indicated a positive economic sustainability, even at the reduced power production levels demonstrated during the baseline period. However, increasing methane generation capacity (via the importation of biomass codigestate) will be critical for increasing electricity output and improving the long-term economic sustainability of the operation. Dairy-based biomass energy plants are operating under strict environmental regulations applicable to both power-production and confined animal facilities and novel approached are being applied to maintain minimal environmental impacts. The use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for nitrous oxide control and a biological hydrogen sulfide control system were tested at this facility. Results from this study suggest that biomass energy systems can be compliant with reasonable scientifically based air and water pollution control regulations. The most significant challenge for the development of biomass energy as a viable component of power production on a regional scale is likely to be the availability of energy-rich organic feedstocks. Additionally, there needs to be further development of regional expertise in digester and power plant operations. At the Fiscalini facility, power production was limited by the availability of biomass for methane generation, not the designed system capacity. During the baseline study period, feedstocks included manure, sudan grass silage, and

William Stringfellow; Mary Kay Camarillo; Jeremy Hanlon; Michael Jue; Chelsea Spier

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Biomass energy systems information user study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on biomass energy systems are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. This report is 1 of 10 discussing study results. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. Results from 12 biomass groups of respondents are analyzed in this report: Federally Funded Researchers (2 groups), Nonfederally Funded Researchers (2 groups), Representatives of Manufacturers (2 groups), Representatives of State Forestry Offices, Private Foresters, Forest Products Engineers, Educators, Cooperative Extension Service County Agents, and System Managers. The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Biomass treatment method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating biomass was developed that uses an apparatus which moves a biomass and dilute aqueous ammonia mixture through reaction chambers without compaction. The apparatus moves the biomass using a non-compressing piston. The resulting treated biomass is saccharified to produce fermentable sugars.

Friend, Julie (Claymont, DE); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, III; Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Lyons, Robert C. (Arvada, CO)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

192

Quantifying the economic potential of a biomass to olefin technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil is one of the most valuable natural resources in the world. Any technology that could possibly be used to conserve oil is worth studying. Biomass waste to olefin (WTO) technology replaces the use of oil as a feedstock. ...

Chiang, Nicholas (Nicholas Kuang Hua)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Development of METHANE de-NOX Reburn Process for Wood Waste and Biomass Fired Stoker Boilers - Final Report - METHANE de-NOX Reburn Technology Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to demonstrate the effectiveness of the METHANE de-NOX (MdN) Reburn process in the Forest Products Industry (FPI) to provide more efficient use of wood and sludge waste (biosolids) combustion for both energy generation and emissions reduction (specifically from nitrogen oxides (NOx)) and to promote the transfer of the technology to the wide range of wood waste-fired stoker boilers populating the FPI. This document, MdN Reburn Commercial Technology Manual, was prepared to be a resource to promote technology transfer and commercialization activities of MdN in the industry and to assist potential users understand its application and installation requirements. The Manual includes a compilation of MdN commercial design data from four different stoker boiler designs that were baseline tested as part of the development effort. Design information in the Manual include boiler CFD model studies, process design protocols, engineering data sheets and commercial installation drawings. Each design package is unique and implemented in a manner to meet specific mill requirements.

J. Rabovitser; B. Bryan; S. Wohadlo; S. Nester; J. Vaught; M. Tartan (Gas Technology Institute) L. Szymanski; R. Glickert (ESA Environmental Solutions)

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications.

Unknown

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Waste fuels are a significant energy source for U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ...

196

Woodland Biomass Power Ltd Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Woodland Biomass Power Ltd Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodland Biomass Power...

197

Fibrominn Biomass Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Fibrominn Biomass Power Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fibrominn Biomass Power...

198

Biodyne Congress Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Congress Biomass Facility Congress Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Biodyne Congress Biomass Facility Facility Biodyne Congress Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

199

WWTP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WWTP Biomass Facility WWTP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name WWTP Biomass Facility Facility WWTP Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Alameda County, California Coordinates 37.6016892°, -121.7195459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6016892,"lon":-121.7195459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

200

Biodyne Pontiac Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pontiac Biomass Facility Pontiac Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Biodyne Pontiac Biomass Facility Facility Biodyne Pontiac Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Livingston County, Illinois Coordinates 40.8688604°, -88.556531° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8688604,"lon":-88.556531,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NREL: Biomass Research - Richard L. Bain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Richard L. Bain Richard L. Bain Photo of Richard Bain Richard Bain is a Principal Engineer in the National Bioenergy Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. He has worked at NREL since 1990 and has extensive experience in the thermal conversion of biomass, municipal wastes, coal, and petroleum. He is a lead researcher in the area of production of transportation fuels and hydrogen via thermochemical conversion of biomass; technical advisor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) on biofuels demonstrations; and Task Leader for the International Energy Agency Bioenergy Annex Biomass Gasification Task. Dr. Bain manages biomass gasification research activities for the Fuel Cell Technologies Program at NREL and coordinates support to the USDA for

202

Wheelabrator Westchester Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Westchester Biomass Facility Westchester Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator Westchester Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator Westchester Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Westchester County, New York Coordinates 41.1220194°, -73.7948516° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.1220194,"lon":-73.7948516,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

203

Cargill Fertilizer Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cargill Fertilizer Biomass Facility Cargill Fertilizer Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cargill Fertilizer Biomass Facility Facility Cargill Fertilizer Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Hillsborough County, Florida Coordinates 27.9903597°, -82.3017728° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.9903597,"lon":-82.3017728,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

204

Covanta Haverhill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Covanta Haverhill Biomass Facility Covanta Haverhill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Covanta Haverhill Biomass Facility Facility Covanta Haverhill Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Essex County, Massachusetts Coordinates 42.7051144°, -70.9071236° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.7051144,"lon":-70.9071236,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

205

NREL: Biomass Research - Standard Biomass Analytical Procedures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the pertinent LAPs. Workbooks are available for: Wood (hardwood or softwood) Corn stover (corn stover feedstock) Biomass hydrolyzate (liquid fraction produced from...

206

Assessment of Biomass Resources in Afghanistan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Afghanistan is facing many challenges on its path of reconstruction and development. Among all its pressing needs, the country would benefit from the development and implementation of an energy strategy. In addition to conventional energy sources, the Afghan government is considering alternative options such as energy derived from renewable resources (wind, solar, biomass, geothermal). Biomass energy is derived from a variety of sources -- plant-based material and residues -- and can be used in various conversion processes to yield power, heat, steam, and fuel. This study provides policymakers and industry developers with information on the biomass resource potential in Afghanistan for power/heat generation and transportation fuels production. To achieve this goal, the study estimates the current biomass resources and evaluates the potential resources that could be used for energy purposes.

Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Hydrogen from Biomass for Urban Transportation Y. D. Yeboah (PI), K. B. Bota and Z. Wang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermochemical processes, which can convert wet biomass efficiently and economically. One of the novel. 1999) the biomass conversion technologies are mostly physical/chemical processing, thermo-chemical their support. Aalborg, September, 2010 Saqib Sohail Toor I #12;ABSTRACT Application of biomass and waste

208

BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report, (unpublished, 1979). Biomass Project Progress 31.Operations, vol. 2 of Biomass Energy (Stanford: StanfordPhotosynthethic Pathway Biomass Energy Production," ~c:_! _

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Solar Power Systems Find A Professional Solar Energy Installer For Any  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Power Systems Find A Professional Solar Energy Installer For Any Type Of System www.CleanEnergyAuthority.com Install Solar Panels Enter Your Zip Code & Connect To Pre-Screened Solar Panel Installers www.ServiceMagic.com Biomass Pumps Reliable metering for apps from microflow to scale-up & pilot plant www.isco.com The Solar

Lovley, Derek

210

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts proceeded, and Carbona completed the gasifier island design package. Nexant has completed the balance of plant support systems design and the design for the biomass feed system. Work on the Technoeconomic Study is proceeding. Approximately 75% of the specified hardware quotations have been received at the end of the reporting period. A meeting is scheduled for July 23 rd and 24 th to review the preliminary cost estimates. GTI presented a status review update of the project at the DOE/NETL contractor's review meeting in Pittsburgh on June 21st.

Unknown

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI assembles an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on conducting tests of biomass feedstock samples on the 2 inch mini-bench gasifier.

Unknown

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI assembles an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1 During this Performance Period work efforts focused on conducting tests of biomass feedstock samples on the 2 inch mini-bench gasifier. The gasification tests were completed. The GTI U-GAS model was used to check some of the early test results against the model predictions. Additional modeling will be completed to further verify the model predictions and actual results.

Unknown

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Natural gas and waste coal fines were evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. A design was developed for a cofiring combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures in a power generation boiler, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. Following the preliminary design, GTI evaluated the gasification characteristics of selected feedstocks for the project. To conduct this work, GTI assembled an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test were used to confirm the process design completed in Phase Task 1. As a result of the testing and modeling effort, the selected biomass feedstocks gasified very well, with a carbon conversion of over 98% and individual gas component yields that matched the RENUGAS{reg_sign} model. As a result of this work, the facility appears very attractive from a commercial standpoint. Similar facilities can be profitable if they have access to low cost fuels and have attractive wholesale or retail electrical rates for electricity sales. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. Phase II has not been approved for construction at this time.

Francis S. Lau

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts proceeded, and Carbona completed the gasifier island design package. Nexant has completed the balance of plant support systems design and the design for the biomass feed system. Work on the Technoeconomic Study is proceeding. Approximately 75% of the specified hardware quotations have been received at the end of the reporting period. A meeting is scheduled for July 23 rd and 24 th to review the preliminary cost estimates. GTI presented a status review update of the project at the DOE/NETL contractor's review meeting in Pittsburgh on June 21st.

Unknown

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI assembles an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on conducting tests of biomass feedstock samples on the 2 inch mini-bench gasifier.

Unknown

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Solar Energy Education. Solar solutions: Reader, Part III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A collection of magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy is presented in this booklet. This is the third of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader books. The articles provide brief discussions on the various applications of solar energy including: heat, photovoltaics; wind, hydro, and biomass. A glossary of terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Biomass for Electricity Generation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper examines issues affecting the uses of biomass for electricity generation. The methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System to account for various types of biomass is discussed, and the underlying assumptions are explained.

Zia Haq

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Biomass Energy Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Biomass Energy Program assists businesses in installing biomass energy systems. Program participants receive up to $75,000 in interest subsidy payments to help defray the interest expense on...

219

TORREFACTION OF BIOMASS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Torrefaction is a thermo-chemical pre-treatment of biomass within a narrow temperature range from 200C to 300C, where mostly the hemicellulose components of a biomass depolymerise. (more)

Dhungana, Alok

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Biomass One Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Facility Biomass One Sector Biomass Owner Biomass One LP Location White City, Oregon Coordinates 42.4333333°, -122.8338889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4333333,"lon":-122.8338889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass November 30, 2011 - 12:08pm Addthis ThermoChem Recovery International's process demonstration unit -- where wood waste and forest residue is converted into renewable fuel. | Courtesy of TRI. ThermoChem Recovery International's process demonstration unit -- where wood waste and forest residue is converted into renewable fuel. | Courtesy of TRI. Paul Bryan Biomass Program Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy After a rigorous testing process, Energy Department project partners at ThermoChem Recovery International (TRI) have validated a process that converts wood waste and forest residue into clean, renewable fuel. Pilot validation is a key milestone for biofuels companies like TRI. With

222

Biomass Cofiring Update 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy source. When cofired with coal in a plant that would normally fire 100% coal as the fuel, biomass becomes a renewable source of electricityfor that fraction of electricity that is generated from the biomass fraction of the heat in the fuel mix to the power plant. For electric power generation organizations that have coal-fired generation, cofiring biomass with coal will often be the lowest-cost form of renewable power.

2003-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

223

Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stand in North ­ This study is part of a larger project aimed at quantifying the biomass and biomass increment been developed to estimate the biomass and biomass increment of coarse, small and fine roots of trees

Recanati, Catherine

224

AVAILABLE NOW! Biomass Funding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AVAILABLE NOW! Biomass Funding Guide 2010 The Forestry Commission and the Humber Rural Partnership (co-ordinated by East Riding of Yorkshire Council) have jointly produced a biomass funding guide fuel prices continue to rise, and the emerging biomass sector is well-placed to make a significant

225

Review of the Regional Biomass Energy Program: Technical projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article summarizes technical projects of the regional Biomass Energy Program. Projects included are as follows: economic impact studies for renewable energy resources; alternative liquid fuels; Wood pellets fuels forum; residential fuel wood consumption; waste to energy decision-makers guide; fuel assessment for cogeneration facilities; municipal solid waste combustion characteristics.

Lusk, P.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

NREL: Biomass Research - Alexandre Chapeaux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

biofuels with industrial partners. Alex's research areas of interest are: Integrated biomass processing High solids biomass conversion Fermentation development Separation...

227

Best Practices for Siting Solar Photovoltaics on Municipal Solid Waste Landfills. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed this best practices document to address common technical challenges for siting solar photovoltaics (PV) on municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The purpose of this document is to promote the use of MSW landfills for solar energy systems. Closed landfills and portions of active landfills with closed cells represent thousands of acres of property that may be suitable for siting solar photovoltaics (PV). These closed landfills may be suitable for near-term construction, making these sites strong candidate to take advantage of the 30% Federal Business Energy Investment Tax Credit. It was prepared in response to the increasing interest in siting renewable energy on landfills from solar developers; landfill owners; and federal, state, and local governments. It contains examples of solar PV projects on landfills and technical considerations and best practices that were gathered from examining the implementation of several of these projects.

Kiatreungwattana, K.; Mosey, G.; Jones-Johnson, S.; Dufficy, C.; Bourg, J.; Conroy, A.; Keenan, M.; Michaud, W.; Brown, K.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to Design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications.

Unknown

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

BNL | Biomass Burns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Aerosols from biomass burning are recognized to perturb Earth's climate through the direct effect (both scattering and absorption of incoming shortwave radiation), the semi-direct effect (evaporation of cloud drops due to absorbing aerosols), and indirect effects (by influencing cloud formation and precipitation. Biomass burning is an important aerosol source, providing an estimated 40% of anthropogenically influenced fine carbonaceous particles (Bond, et al., 2004; Andrea and Rosenfeld, 2008). Primary organic aerosol (POA) from open biomass burns and biofuel comprises the largest component of primary organic aerosol mass emissions at northern temperate latitudes (de Gouw and Jimenez, 2009). Data from the IMPROVE

230

Life Cycle Assessment: Using Wildland Biomass to Generate Electrical Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California faces significant threats from wildfire due to excessive accumulations of forest and wildland fuels. Much of this fuel loading is in the form of small-diameter woody material, or biomass. Fire suppression over the past century, combined with intensive forest management and a generally warmer and wetter climate, has led to increasingly dense vegetation. When wildfires occur, the heavy accumulation of biomass often makes those fires larger and more severe. The increase in forest biomass threatens public health and safety, watersheds, and wildlife habitat with unacceptable losses to wildfire. Public land management agencies and private landowners are focusing efforts on treating biomass to reduce wildfire hazards. These treatments typically create a significant volume of biomass wood waste. California law and policy, as well as several studies, assert a range of benefits associated with removing and using biomass from forests, as well as from agricultural

I. The Problem

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Biomass thermochemical conversion program. 1985 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research on this conversion technology for renewable energy through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The Program is part of DOE's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, Office of Renewable Technologies. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1985. 32 figs., 4 tabs.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Environmental analysis of biomass-ethanol facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the environmental regulatory requirements for several process configurations of a biomass-to-ethanol facility. It also evaluates the impact of two feedstocks (municipal solid waste [MSW] and agricultural residues) and three facility sizes (1000, 2000, and 3000 dry tons per day [dtpd]) on the environmental requirements. The basic biomass ethanol process has five major steps: (1) Milling, (2) Pretreatment, (3) Cofermentation, (4) Enzyme production, (5) Product recovery. Each step could have environmental impacts and thus be subject to regulation. Facilities that process 2000 dtpd of MSW or agricultural residues would produce 69 and 79 million gallons of ethanol, respectively.

Corbus, D.; Putsche, V.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Understanding Biomass Feedstock Variability  

SciTech Connect

If the singular goal of biomass logistics and the design of biomass feedstock supply systems is to reduce the per ton supply cost of biomass, these systems may very well develop with ultimate unintended consequences of highly variable and reduced quality biomass feedstocks. This paper demonstrates that due to inherent species variabilities, production conditions, and differing harvest, collection, and storage practices, this is a very real scenario that biomass producers and suppliers as well as conversion developers should be aware of. Biomass feedstock attributes of ash, carbohydrates, moisture, and particle morphology will be discussed. We will also discuss specifications for these attributes, inherent variability of these attributes in biomass feedstocks, and approaches and solutions for reducing variability for improving feedstock quality.

Kevin L. Kenney; William A. Smith; Garold L. Gresham; Tyler L. Westover

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on completion of the Topical Report, summarizing the design and techno-economic study of the project's feasibility. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE contracts for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI will assemble an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1.

Unknown

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on completion of the Topical Report, summarizing the design and techno-economic study of the project's feasibility. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE contracts for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of 2002. GTI worked with DOE to develop the Statement of Work for the supplemental activities. DOE granted an interim extension of the project until the end of January 2002 to complete the contract paperwork. GTI worked with Calla Energy to develop request for continued funding to proceed with Phase II, submitted to DOE on November 1, 2001.

Unknown

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on completion of the Topical Report, summarizing the design and techno-economic study of the project's feasibility. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE contracts for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI will assemble an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1.

Unknown

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on completion of the Topical Report, summarizing the design and techno-economic study of the project's feasibility. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE contracts for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI will assemble an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1.

Unknown

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI assembles an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1 During this Performance Period work efforts focused on conducting tests of biomass feedstock samples on the 2 inch mini-bench gasifier. GTI determined that the mini-bench feed system could not handle ''raw'' biomass samples. These clogged the fuel feed screw. GTI determined that palletized samples would operate well in the mini-bench unit. Two sources of this material were identified that had similar properties to the raw fuel. Testing with these materials is proceeding.

Unknown

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

First biomass conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings, Volume 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference was designed to provide a national and international forum to support the development of a viable biomass industry. Although papers on research activities and technologies under development that address industry problems comprised part of this conference, an effort was made to focus on scale-up and demonstration projects, technology transfer to end users, and commercial applications of biomass and wastes. The conference was divided into these major subject areas: Resource Base, Power Production, Transportation Fuels, Chemicals and Products, Environmental Issues, Commercializing Biomass Projects, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. The papers in this third volume deal with Environmental Issues, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. Concerning Environmental Issues, the following topics are emphasized: Global Climate Change, Biomass Utilization, Biofuel Test Procedures, and Commercialization of Biomass Products. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A study of algal biomass potential in selected Canadian regions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A dynamic assessment model has been developed for evaluating the potential algal biomass and extracted biocrude productivity and costs, using nutrient and water resources available from waste streams in four regions of Canada (western British Columbia, Alberta oil fields, southern Ontario, and Nova Scotia). The purpose of this model is to help identify optimal locations in Canada for algae cultivation and biofuel production. The model uses spatially referenced data across the four regions for nitrogen and phosphorous loads in municipal wastewaters, and CO{sub 2} in exhaust streams from a variety of large industrial sources. Other data inputs include land cover, and solar insolation. Model users can develop estimates of resource potential by manipulating model assumptions in a graphic user interface, and updated results are viewed in real time. Resource potential by location can be viewed in terms of biomass production potential, potential CO{sub 2} fixed, biocrude production potential, and area required. The cost of producing algal biomass can be estimated using an approximation of the distance to move CO{sub 2} and water to the desired land parcel and an estimation of capital and operating costs for a theoretical open pond facility. Preliminary results suggest that in most cases, the CO{sub 2} resource is plentiful compared to other necessary nutrients (especially nitrogen), and that siting and prospects for successful large-scale algae cultivation efforts in Canada will be driven by availability of those other nutrients and the efficiency with which they can be used and re-used. Cost curves based on optimal possible siting of an open pond system are shown. The cost of energy for maintaining optimal growth temperatures is not considered in this effort, and additional research in this area, which has not been well studied at these latitudes, will be important in refining the costs of algal biomass production. The model will be used by NRC-IMB Canada to identify promising locations for both demonstration and pilot-scale algal cultivation projects, including the production potential of using wastewater, and potential land use considerations.

Passell, Howard David; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste. The chapter establishes specific regulations for biomass facilities, which includes permitting, siting, operation, safety guidelines, and closing requirements. Siting regulations include setbacks from waste handling areas for state facilities (1000 feet from jails, schools), requirements for not siting

242

Materials Recovery from Wastes, Batteries, and Co/Ni, Precious ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... 91-100]Recovery of Gold by Using Biomass Wastes Containing Polyphenol Compounds[pp. 101-109]The Advantages of Recycling Metallic...

243

Combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system for solar-thermal steam-electric power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance and economics of the combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system concept for solar-thermal steam-electric plants have been evaluated. Based on the computer simulation of the operation of southwest-sited solar-thermal plants, it has been determined that the combined pond-tower concept has significant cost and performance advantages over conventional dry cooling systems. Use of a thermal storage pond as a component of the dry cooling system allows a significant reduction in the required dry cooling heat exchange capacity and the associated parasitic power consumption. Importantly, it has been concluded that the combined pond-tower dry cooling system concept can be employed to economically maintain steam condensing temperatures at levels normally achieved with conventional evaporative cooling systems. An evaluation of alternative thermal storage pond design concepts has revealed that a stratified vertical-flow cut-and-fill reservoir with conventional membrane lining and covering would yield the best overall system performance at the least cost.

Guyer, E.C.; Bourne, J.G.; Brownell, D.L.; Rose, R.M.

1979-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

Biomass/Biogas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass/Biogas Biomass/Biogas < Biomass Jump to: navigation, search Agricultural residues are defined as the residues from production of the following crops. * Corn * Wheat * Soybeans * Cotton * Sorghum * Barley * Oats * Rice * Rye * Canola * Beans * Peas * Peanuts * Potatoes * Safflower * Sunflower * Sugarcane * Flaxseed Forest residues are defined as logging residues and other removals. These include material already utilized as well as material that is disposed as waste. Logging residues are the unused portions of trees cut by logging (tops and branches) and left to be burned or decay in the woods. Other removals include trees removed as a part of thinning projects, land clearings, and forest health uses that are not directly associated with round wood product harvests. Primary mill residues include wood materials

245

Atlantic Biomass Conversions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conversions Inc Conversions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Atlantic Biomass Conversions Inc Place Frederick, Maryland Sector Biomass Product Atlantic Biomass Conversions is working on a system and a genetically modified bacteria to convert sugar beet pulp waste into methanol. Coordinates 45.836395°, -98.507249° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.836395,"lon":-98.507249,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

246

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities A photo of a series of large metal tanks connected by a network of pipes. Only the top portion of the tanks is visible above the metal floor grate. Each tank has a round porthole on the top. Two men examine one of the tanks at the far end of the floor. Sugars are converted into ethanol in fermentation tanks. This ethanol is then separated, purified, and recovered for use as a transportation fuel. NREL biomass researchers and scientists have strong capabilities in many facets of biomass technology that support the cost-effective conversion of biomass to biofuels-capabilities that are in demand. The NREL biomass staff partners with other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities at every stage of the biomass-to-biofuels conversion process. For these partners, our biomass

247

Complex pendulum biomass sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

248

Biomass for Electricity Generation - Table 9  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Biomass for Electricity Generation : Biomass for Electricity Generation. Table 9. Biomass-Fired Electricity Generation ...

249

Biomass for Electricity Generation - Table 3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Biomass for Electricity Generation : Biomass for Electricity Generation. Table 3. Biomass Resources by Price: Quantities ...

250

Biomass Cofiring Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook has been prepared as a 147how tomanual for those interested in biomass cofiring in cyclone- or pulverized-coal-fired boilers. It contains information regarding all aspects of biomass cofiring, including biomass materials and procurement, handling, storage, pulverizing, feeding, gaseous emissions, ash handling, and general economics. It relies on actual utility experience over the past many years from plants mainly in the United States, but some experience also in Europe and Australia. Many ...

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

251

Engine fuels from biomass  

SciTech Connect

Methods discussed for the conversion of biomass to engine fuels include the production of producer gas, anaerobic fermentation to give biogas, fermentation of sugars and starches to give EtOH, and the production of synthesis gas for conversion to MeOH or hydrocarbons. Also discussed are the suitability of these fuels for particular engines, biomass availability, and the economics of biomass-derived engine fuels.

Parker, H.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Biomass Gasification Syngas Cleanup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 2012, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published report 1023994, Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Biomass Gasification, prepared by CH2M HILL Engineers, Inc. (CH2M HILL). It provided a global overview of commercially available biomass gasification technologies that can be used for power production in the 25- to 50-MWe range. The report provided detailed descriptions of biomass gasification technologies, typical operational parameters, emissions information, and ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

253

Advanced Biomass Gasification Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE has a major initiative under way to demonstrate two high-efficiency gasification systems for converting biomass into electricity. As this fact sheet explains, the Biomass Power Program is cost-sharing two scale-up projects with industry in Hawaii and Vermont that, if successful, will provide substantial market pull for U.S. biomass technologies, and provide a significant market edge over competing foreign technologies.

Not Available

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Biomass Gasification Technology Commercialization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable cost and performance data on biomass gasification technology is scarce because of limited experience with utility-scale gasification projects and the reluctance of vendors to share proprietary information. The lack of this information is a major obstacle to the implementation of biomass gasification-based power projects in the U.S. market. To address this problem, this report presents four case studies for bioenergy projects involving biomass gasification technologies: A utility-scale indirect c...

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Hydrogen production from biomass .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass energy encompasses a broad category of energy derived from plants and animals as well as the residual materials from each. Hydrogen gas is an (more)

Hahn, John J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrometer analyzes vapors during the gasification and pyrolysis processes. NREL's biomass projects are designed to advance the production of liquid transportation fuels from...

257

Co-firing biomass  

SciTech Connect

Concern about global warming has altered the landscape for fossil-fuel combustion. The advantages and challenges of co-firing biomass and coal are discussed. 2 photos.

Hunt, T.; Tennant, D. [Hunt, Guillot & Associates LLC (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Biomass Processing Photolibrary  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Research related to bioenergy is a major focus in the U.S. as science agencies, universities, and commercial labs seek to create new energy-efficient fuels. The Biomass Processing Project is one of the funded projects of the joint USDA-DOE Biomass Research and Development Initiative. The Biomass Processing Photolibrary has numerous images, but there are no accompanying abstracts to explain what you are seeing. The project website, however, makes available the full text of presentations and publications and also includes an exhaustive biomass glossary that is being developed into an ASAE Standard.

259

Florida Biomass Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Biomass Energy, LLC Place Florida Sector Biomass Product Florida-based biomass project developer. References Florida Biomass Energy, LLC1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

260

SunShot Concentrating Solar Power Program Review 2013 - Speakers  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Power (CSP), Concentrating PV (CPV), as well as run-of-river hydro, geothermal, and biomass power projects. Highlight Presentation Speakers Daniel Chen, Business...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Biomass and Other Unconventional Energy Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In light of the unstable costs of fuels, it is prudent of industries to seek alternative sources of energy whose costs are more predictable than the prices of oil and gas. This paper will examine the use of biomass as fuel, focusing on the potential benefits to industries. Industries have used the waste generated within their own plants as fuel, or have cooperated with municipal governments in seeking energy sources based on municipal solid waste. A discussion of the activities of local governments is included, but it should be noted that the priorities of industry and government, although compatible, do not always coincide.

Gershman, H. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Handbook of biomass downdraft gasifier engine systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This handbook has been prepared by the Solar Energy Research Institute under the US Department of Energy /bold Solar Technical Information Program/. It is intended as a guide to the design, testing, operation, and manufacture of small-scale (less than 200 kW (270 hp)) gasifiers. A great deal of the information will be useful for all levels of biomass gasification. The handbook is meant to be a practical guide to gasifier systems, and a minimum amount of space is devoted to questions of more theoretical interest.

Reed, T B; Das, A

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Bioenergy and emerging biomass conversion technologies Hanne stergrd, Ris National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark DTU, Denmark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioenergy and emerging biomass conversion technologies Hanne ?stergård, Risø National Laboratory in the Agricultural Outlook from OECD-FAO, these predictions may be misleading and biomass may increase more rapidly Biomass and waste Hydro Nuclear Gas Oil Coal Fig 1 Total primary energy supply3 · The transport sector

264

Economic Development Through Biomass Systems Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current research has shown the economic feasibility of integrated biomass systems using willow as an energy crop feedstock along with available wood wastes. Utility members in the Empire State Biopower Consortium anticipate conversion of four pulverized-coal plants for co-firing at 10% by heat content. Co-firing would be a prelude to repowering with a high-efficiency biopower system by 2012.

1995-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

265

Biomass Reburning - Modeling/Engineering Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. The second reporting period (January 1- March 31) included kinetic modeling of the reburning process while firing natural gas and biomass. Modeling was done with a kinetic mechanism that combined reactions relevant to reburning from GRI-Mech 2.11 with SNCR reactions. Experimental data obtained in a 1 MMBtu/h Boiler Simulator Facility (BSF) for reburning with natural gas and biomass were modeled using the ODF kinetic code. System was treated as a series of four one-dimensional reactors. Modeling of natural gas reburning qualitatively agrees with experimental data for a wide range of initial conditions. Modeling of furniture waste reburning does not qualitatively match experimental data due to a number of model simplifications. Future work will concentrate on improving the basic reburning model to give quantitative agreement with experiments and on search for better representation of biomass composition in kinetic modeling. Experimental data on biomass reburning are included in Appendix 3. These data were obtained during the reporting period in the scope of a coordinated program funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Peter M. Maly; Vitali V. Lissianski; Vladimir M. Zamansky

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Biomass Reburning: Modeling/Engineering Studies  

SciTech Connect

Reburning is a mature fuel staging NO{sub x} control technology which has been successfully demonstrated at full scale by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) and others on numerous occasions. Based on chemical kinetic modeling and experimental combustion studies, EER is currently developing novel concepts to improve the efficiency of the basic gas reburning process and to utilize various renewable and waste fuels for NO{sub x} control. This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. Basic and advanced biomass reburning have the potential to achieve 60-90+% NO{sub x} control in coal fired boilers at a significantly lower cost than SCR. The scope of work includes modeling studies (kinetic, CFD, and physical modeling), experimental evaluation of slagging and fouling associated with biomass reburning, and economic study of biomass handling requirements. Project participants include: EER, FETC R and D group, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation and Antares, Inc. Most of the combustion experiments on development of biomass reburning technologies are being conducted in the scope of coordinated SBIR program funded by USDA. The first reporting period (October 1--December 31, 1997) included preparation of project management plan and organization of project kick-off meeting at DOE FETC. The quarterly report briefly describes the management plan and presents basic information about the kick-off meeting.

Vladimir M. Zamansky

1998-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY) .......................................................................... 91 Appendix 10: Power Plant Analysis for Conversion of Forest Remediation Biomass) ......................................................................................................................... 111 Appendix 12: Biomass to Energy Project Team, Committee Members, and Project Advisors

268

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY to treatment prescriptions and anticipated outputs of sawlogs and biomass fuel? How many individual operations biomass fuel removed. Typically in plantations. 50% No harvest treatment

269

biomass | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

biomass biomass Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

270

EA-1957: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE is proposing to provide funding to Placer County, California to construct and operate a two-megawatt wood-to-energy biomass facility at the Eastern Regional Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and Landfill in unincorporated Placer County. The wood?to?energy biomass facility would use a gasification technology. The fuel supply for the proposed project would be solely woody biomass, derived from a variety of sources including hazardous fuels residuals, forest thinning and harvest residuals, and Wildland Urban Interface sourced waste materials from residential and commercial property defensible space clearing and property management activities.

271

Carbon Material Based Heat Exchanger for Waste Heat Recovery ...  

Industrial processing plants Nuclear power Solar power ... Carbon Material Based Heat Exchanger for Waste Heat Recovery from Engine Exhaust Contact:

272

NREL: Biomass Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and green algae and gas bubbles can be seen floating in the liquid. Through biomass research, NREL is developing technologies to convert biomass-plant matter such as...

273

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY study. The Biomass to Energy (B2E) Project is exploring the ecological and economic consequences

274

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY Citation: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 2009. Biomass to Energy: Forest

275

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY and continuously between the earth's biomass and atmosphere. From a greenhouse gas perspective, forest treatments

276

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY .................................................................................... 33 3.3 BIOMASS POWER PLANT OPERATION MODELS AND DATA

277

Multi-functional biomass systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass can play a role in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions by substituting conventional materials and supplying biomass based fuels. Main reason for the low share (more)

Dornburg, Veronika

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Prospects for investment in solar energy  

SciTech Connect

The prospects for solar energy and the growth of the solar industry are discussed. Some misconceptions, capital requirements, energy payback, and growth rate are reviewed. Technologies briefly discussed in the order in which they will likely be commercialized are: conservation, passive solar, biomass, flat plate collectors for water and space heating, wind power, solar ponds, photovoltaics, concentrating collectors for high temperature heat and electricity generation, ocean thermal energy conversion systems, and the solar power satellite. (MCW)

Edesess, M.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Interactions between Energy Efficiency Programs funded under the Recovery Act and Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar, geothermal, hydro, biogas, biomass, waste to fuel,to-energy/biomass, landfill/biogas and geothermal energy.

Goldman, Charles A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CC Hydropower Nuclear Power Solar Wind Power Biomass & otherCC Hydropower Nuclear Power Solar Wind Power Biomass/wasteBiomass/waste Wind Power Solar Nuclear Power Hydropower NG,

Zheng, Nina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

net-metering law applies to systems up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that generate electricity using solar, wind, hydro, biogas from animal waste, or combined heat and power...

282

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that generate electricity using solar, wind, hydro, biogas from animal waste, or combined heat and power technologies (including fuel cells). All...

283

Hydropyrolysis of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of biomass was investigated. Experimental runs using the biomass (Poplar wood sawdust) were performed using a tubular reactor of dimensions 1 inch inside diameter and 8 feet long heated at a temperature of 800 C and pressures between 450 and 750 psig. At low heat-up rate the reaction precedes in two steps. First pyrolysis takes place at temperatures of 300 to 400 c and subsequent hydropyrolysis takes place at 700 C and above. This is also confirmed by pressurized thermogravimetric analysis (PTGA). Under conditions of rapid heat-up at higher temperatures and higher hydrogen pressure gasification and hydrogasification of biomass is especially effective in producing carbon monoxide and methane. An overall conversion of 88 to 90 wt % of biomass was obtained. This value is in agreement with the previous work of flash pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of biomass for rapid heat-up and short residence time. Initial rates of biomass conversion indicate that the rate increases significantly with increase in hydrogen pressure. At 800 C and 755 psig the initial rate of biomass conversion to gases is 0.92 1/min.

Kobayashi, Atsushi; Steinberg, M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

OpenEI - biomass  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Biomass Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/827 Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

License
Type of License: 

285

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials Biomass production potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 1 Biomass production potentials in Central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios Final report of WP3 of the VIEWLS project, funded by DG-Tren #12;WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 2 Report Biomass production potentials in central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios

286

Effect of Pretreatment on the Properties of Agricultural Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural waste disposal is becoming a problem due to its increasing production and potential pollution. As a kind of biomass, agricultural waste can be used as a sustainable and renewable source of energy. Agricultural waste disposal is of great ... Keywords: agricultural waste, animal manure, acid washing, pyrolysis

Zhang Shouyu; Wang Jian; Wang Xiu-Jun; Peng Dingmao; Takayuki Takarada

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

CLC of biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developments on Developments on Chemical Looping Combustion of Biomass Laihong Shen Jiahua Wu Jun Xiao Rui Xiao Southeast University Nanjing, China 2 th U.S. - China Symposium on CO 2 Emissions Control Science & Technology Hangzhou, China May 28-30, 2008 Overview  Introduction  Technical approach  Experiments on chemical looping combustion of biomass  Conclusions Climate change is a result of burning too much coal, oil and gas.... We need to capture CO 2 in any way ! Introduction CCS is the world's best chance to have a major & immediate impact on CO 2 emission reduction Introduction Introduction  Biomass is renewable energy with zero CO 2 emission  A way to capture CO 2 from biomass ?  If so, a quick way to reduce CO 2 content in the atmosphere Normal combustion

288

Biomass | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy » Energy » Biomass Biomass Learn how the Energy Department is working to sustainably transform the nation's abundant renewable resources into biomass energy. Featured Energy 101 | Algae-to-Fuel A behind-the-scenes video of how oil from algae is extracted and refined to create clean, renewable transportation fuel. Oregon Hospital Heats Up with a Biomass Boiler Using money from the Recovery Act, Blue Mountain Hospital replaced one of its 1950s crude oil boilers with a wood-pellet boiler -- saving the hospital about $100,000 a year in heating costs. | Photo courtesy of the Oregon Department of Energy. Highlighting how a rural Oregon hospital was able to cut its heating bills while stimulating the local economy. Ceres: Making Biofuels Bigger and Better A Ceres researcher evaluates the performance of biofuel crops. | Photo courtesy of Ceres, Inc.

289

Energy Basics: Biomass Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from...

290

CLC of biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developments on Chemical Looping Combustion of Biomass Laihong Shen Jiahua Wu Jun Xiao Rui Xiao Southeast University Nanjing, China 2 th U.S. - China Symposium on CO 2 Emissions...

291

Biomass: Biogas Generator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

waste for biogas production. Some feel that organic plant waste should be used for compost, and that manure should be used for fertilizer. They point out that a lot of natural...

292

BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12; #12;© Crown copyright 2007 ISBN: 978 0 7559 6506 9 Scottish% recyclable. #12;A BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12;#12;1 CONTENTS FOREWORD 3 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 5 2. INTRODUCTION 9 3. WIDER CONTEXT 13 4. SCOTLAND'S ROLE IN THE UK BIOMASS STRATEGY 17 5. BIOMASS HEATING 23 6

293

Program on Technology Innovation: Gasification Testing of Various Biomasses in Untreated and Pretreated (Leached) Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching of biomass to remove/eliminate troublesome constituents, such as alkali metals, chlorine, sulfur, and phosphorus, presents the opportunity to solve many of the problems found when firing and/or cofiring low-cost and low-grade agricultural biomasses, grasses, and waste materials for energy or production of biofuels. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has fostered projects for the development and testing of this potential game-changing biomass pretreatment technology since 2010. As part ...

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

294

Biomass gasification integration in recuperative gas turbine cycles and recuperative fuel cell integrated gas turbine cycles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? A multi-reactor, multi-temperature, waste-heat driven biomass thermochemical converter is proposed and simulated in the process simulation tool Aspen Plus?. The thermochemical converter is in (more)

Lver, Kristian Aase

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Flash hydrogenation of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed to obtain process chemistry information on the rapid hydrogenation of biomass (wood and other agricultural products) to produce light liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels and feedstocks. The process is referred to as Flash Hydropyrolysis. The information will be of use in the design and evaluation of processes for the conversion of biomass to synthetic fuels and petrochemical feedstocks. Results obtained in an initial experiment are discussed.

Steinberg, M

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Biomass cogeneration. A business assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide serves as an overview of the biomass cogeneration area and provides direction for more detailed analysis. The business assessment is based in part on discussions with key officials from firms that have adopted biomass cogeneration systems and from organizations such as utilities, state and federal agencies, and banks that would be directly involved in a biomass cogeneration project. The guide is organized into five chapters: biomass cogeneration systems, biomass cogeneration business considerations, biomass cogeneration economics, biomass cogeneration project planning, and case studies.

Skelton, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

List of Solar Space Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heat Incentives Space Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 499 Solar Space Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 499) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat

298

Waste2Energy Holdings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Holdings Holdings Jump to: navigation, search Name Waste2Energy Holdings Place Greenville, South Carolina Zip 29609 Sector Biomass, Renewable Energy Product The Waste2Energy Holdings is a supplier of proprietary gasification technology designed to convert municipal solid waste, biomass and other solid waste streams traditionally destined for landfill into clean renewable energy. References Waste2Energy Holdings[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Waste2Energy Holdings is a company located in Greenville, South Carolina . References ↑ "Waste2Energy Holdings" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Waste2Energy_Holdings&oldid=352938

299

Environmental issues related to biomass: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Now that public attention has grown increasingly focused on environmentalism and climate change, the commercial use of biomass could greatly accelerate. Renewable feedstocks like biomass can provide better environmentally balanced sources of energy and other nonfood products than fossil fuels. The future of biomass is uncertain, however, because public attention focuses on both its potential and its challenges. This paper is divided into five sections. Section 2 briefly addresses economic environmental issues. The extent to which externalities are accounted for in the market price of fuels plays a significant role in determining both the ultimate size of biofuel markets and the extent of the environmental benefits of feedstock cultivation and conversion processes. Sections 3 and 4 catalog the main hazards and benefits that are likely to arise in the large-scale commercialization of biomass fuel and note where the major uncertainties lay. Environmental issues arise with the cultivation of each feedstock and with each step in the process of its conversion to fuel. Feedstocks are discussed in Section 3 in terms of three main groups: wastes, energy crops, and traditional agricultural crops. In Section 4, conversion processes are also divided into three groups, on the basis of the end energy carrier: gas, liquid, and solid and electricity. Section 5 provides a conclusion and summary.

Hughes, M. [Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Energy; Ranney, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Solar air conditioning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of a hybrid solar-assisted air conditioning system that combines a vapor compression section for sensible cooling with a desiccant section for dehumidification and that uses both solar energy and condenser waste heat to drive the dehumidifier has been under way for the last two years (1981 and 1982). The results of this research are included in this report: utilizing solar energy in an economical way has proven quite difficult.

Robison, H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Biomass Power Association (BPA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Power Association (BPA) Biomass Power Association (BPA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Power Association (BPA) Agency/Company /Organization: Biomass Power Association Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.usabiomass.org Cost: Free References: Biomass Power Association[1] The website includes information on biomass power basics, renewable electricity standards, and updates on legislation affecting biomass power plants. Overview "The Biomass Power Association is the nation's leading organization working to expand and advance the use of clean, renewable biomass

302

Analysis of International Policies In The Solar Electricity Sector: Lessons for India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost renewables, such as wind, hydro and biomass, to meet their objective of achieving higher clean energycost renewables, such as wind, hydro and biomass, compared to solar power to meet their objectives of achieving higher clean energy

Deshmukh, Ranjit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Batch slurry photocatalytic reactors for the generation of hydrogen from sulfide and sulfite waste streams under solar irradiation  

SciTech Connect

In this study, two solar slurry photocatalytic reactors i.e., batch reactor (BR) and batch recycle reactor with continuous supply of inert gas (BRRwCG) were developed for comparing their performance. The performance of the photocatalytic reactors were evaluated based on the generation of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from water containing sodium sulfide (Na{sub 2}S) and sodium sulfite (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}) ions. The photoreactor of capacity 300 mL was developed with UV-vis transparent walls. The catalytic powders ((CdS/ZnS)/Ag{sub 2}S + (RuO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2})) were kept suspended by means of magnetic stirrer in the BR and gas bubbling and recycling of the suspension in the BRRwCG. The rate constant was found to be 120.86 (einstein{sup -1}) for the BRRwCG whereas, for the BR it was found to be only 10.92 (einstein{sup -1}). The higher rate constant was due to the fast desorption of products and suppression of e{sup -}/h{sup +} recombination. (author)

Priya, R.; Kanmani, S. [Centre for Environmental Studies, Anna University, Chennai (India)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

A survey of state clean energy fund support for biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and other renewable energy projects through three productionrenewable energy as solar energy, wind, ocean thermal energy, wave or tidal energy, fuel cells, landfill gas, hydrogen productionrenewable biomass projects per the State of Illinois definition of the term, which includes dedicated crops grown for energy production

Fitzgerald, Garrett; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Researchers at NREL use biomass process and sustainability analyses to understand the economic, technical, and global impacts of biomass conversion technologies. These analyses reveal the economic feasibility and environmental benefits of biomass technologies and are useful for government, regulators, and the private sector. NREL's Energy Analysis Office integrates and supports the energy analysis functions at NREL. Among NREL's projects in biomass process and sustainability analyses are: Life Cycle Assessment of Energy Independence and Security Act for Ethanol NREL is determining the life cycle environmental impacts of the ethanol portion of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA mandates

306

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations

307

Utilization of biocatalysts in cellulose waste minimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the principal component of biomass and, therefore, a major source of waste that is either buried or burned. Examples of biomass waste include agricultural crop residues, forestry products, and municipal wastes. Recycling of this waste is important for energy conservation as well as waste minimization and there is some probability that in the future biomass could become a major energy source and replace fossil fuels that are currently used for fuels and chemicals production. It has been estimated that in the United States, between 100-450 million dry tons of agricultural waste are produced annually, approximately 6 million dry tons of animal waste, and of the 190 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated annually, approximately two-thirds is cellulosic in nature and over one-third is paper waste. Interestingly, more than 70% of MSW is landfilled or burned, however landfill space is becoming increasingly scarce. On a smaller scale, important cellulosic products such as cellulose acetate also present waste problems; an estimated 43 thousand tons of cellulose ester waste are generated annually in the United States. Biocatalysts could be used in cellulose waste minimization and this chapter describes their characteristics and potential in bioconversion and bioremediation processes.

Woodward, J.; Evans, B.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Wheelabrator North Broward Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wheelabrator North Broward Biomass Facility Wheelabrator North Broward Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator North Broward Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator North Broward Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Broward County, Florida Coordinates 26.190096°, -80.365865° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.190096,"lon":-80.365865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

309

Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hampden County, Massachusetts Coordinates 42.1172314°, -72.6624209° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1172314,"lon":-72.6624209,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

310

Bay Resource Management Center Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center Biomass Facility Center Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bay Resource Management Center Biomass Facility Facility Bay Resource Management Center Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Bay County, Florida Coordinates 30.1805306°, -85.684578° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.1805306,"lon":-85.684578,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

311

Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hillsborough County, Florida Coordinates 27.9903597°, -82.3017728° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.9903597,"lon":-82.3017728,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

312

Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Facility Gas Utilization Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location San Diego County, California Coordinates 33.0933809°, -116.6081653° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0933809,"lon":-116.6081653,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

313

Penobscot Energy Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Penobscot Energy Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Penobscot Energy Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Penobscot County, Maine Coordinates 45.3230777°, -68.5806727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.3230777,"lon":-68.5806727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

314

Montenay Montgomery LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montenay Montgomery LP Biomass Facility Montenay Montgomery LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Montenay Montgomery LP Biomass Facility Facility Montenay Montgomery LP Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Montgomery County, Pennsylvania Coordinates 40.2290075°, -75.3878525° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2290075,"lon":-75.3878525,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

315

Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Facility Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

316

Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility Facility Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Miami-Dade County, Florida Coordinates 25.7889689°, -80.2264393° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.7889689,"lon":-80.2264393,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

317

Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Southeast Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

318

Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility Facility Total Energy Facilities Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

319

Covanta Bristol Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Covanta Bristol Energy Biomass Facility Covanta Bristol Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Covanta Bristol Energy Biomass Facility Facility Covanta Bristol Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.7924343°, -72.8042797° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7924343,"lon":-72.8042797,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

320

North County Regional Resource Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Resource Biomass Facility Regional Resource Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name North County Regional Resource Biomass Facility Facility North County Regional Resource Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Palm Beach County, Florida Coordinates 26.6514503°, -80.2767327° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.6514503,"lon":-80.2767327,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Wheelabrator South Broward Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Broward Biomass Facility South Broward Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator South Broward Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator South Broward Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Broward County, Florida Coordinates 26.190096°, -80.365865° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.190096,"lon":-80.365865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

322

WWTP Power Generation Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Generation Station Biomass Facility Power Generation Station Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name WWTP Power Generation Station Biomass Facility Facility WWTP Power Generation Station Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Alameda County, California Coordinates 37.6016892°, -121.7195459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6016892,"lon":-121.7195459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

323

Covanta Hennepin Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hennepin Energy Biomass Facility Hennepin Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Covanta Hennepin Energy Biomass Facility Facility Covanta Hennepin Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hennepin County, Minnesota Coordinates 45.0208911°, -93.5094574° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.0208911,"lon":-93.5094574,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

324

Martinez Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Plt Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Martinez Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Plt Biomass Facility Martinez Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Plt Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Martinez Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Plt Biomass Facility Facility Martinez Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Plt Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Contra Costa County, California Coordinates 37.8534093°, -121.9017954° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.8534093,"lon":-121.9017954,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

325

Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility Facility Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location San Joaquin County, California Coordinates 37.9175935°, -121.1710389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9175935,"lon":-121.1710389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

326

Middlesex Generating Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Middlesex Generating Facility Biomass Facility Middlesex Generating Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Middlesex Generating Facility Biomass Facility Facility Middlesex Generating Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Middlesex County, New Jersey Coordinates 40.4111363°, -74.3587473° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4111363,"lon":-74.3587473,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

327

Southside Water Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Southside Water Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Facility Southside Water Reclamation Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Bernalillo County, New Mexico Coordinates 35.0177854°, -106.6291304° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.0177854,"lon":-106.6291304,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

328

Covanta Mid-Connecticut Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mid-Connecticut Energy Biomass Facility Mid-Connecticut Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Covanta Mid-Connecticut Energy Biomass Facility Facility Covanta Mid-Connecticut Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.7924343°, -72.8042797° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7924343,"lon":-72.8042797,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

329

Wheelabrator Millbury Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wheelabrator Millbury Facility Biomass Facility Wheelabrator Millbury Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator Millbury Facility Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator Millbury Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Worcester County, Massachusetts Coordinates 42.4096528°, -71.8571331° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4096528,"lon":-71.8571331,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

330

Plant No 2 Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

No 2 Biomass Facility No 2 Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Plant No 2 Biomass Facility Facility Plant No 2 Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708°, -117.8311428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

331

Rhodia Houston Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodia Houston Plant Biomass Facility Rhodia Houston Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rhodia Houston Plant Biomass Facility Facility Rhodia Houston Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Harris County, Texas Coordinates 29.7751825°, -95.3102505° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.7751825,"lon":-95.3102505,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

332

Covanta Stanislaus Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stanislaus Energy Biomass Facility Stanislaus Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Covanta Stanislaus Energy Biomass Facility Facility Covanta Stanislaus Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Stanislaus County, California Coordinates 37.5090711°, -120.9876321° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.5090711,"lon":-120.9876321,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

333

Commerce Refuse To Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Refuse To Energy Biomass Facility Refuse To Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Commerce Refuse To Energy Biomass Facility Facility Commerce Refuse To Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

334

Covanta Babylon Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Babylon Energy Biomass Facility Babylon Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Covanta Babylon Energy Biomass Facility Facility Covanta Babylon Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

335

Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Facility Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Adams County, Colorado Coordinates 39.8398269°, -104.1930918° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8398269,"lon":-104.1930918,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

336

McKay Bay Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McKay Bay Facility Biomass Facility McKay Bay Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name McKay Bay Facility Biomass Facility Facility McKay Bay Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hillsborough County, Florida Coordinates 27.9903597°, -82.3017728° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.9903597,"lon":-82.3017728,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

337

Fourche Creek Wastewater Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fourche Creek Wastewater Biomass Facility Fourche Creek Wastewater Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fourche Creek Wastewater Biomass Facility Facility Fourche Creek Wastewater Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Pulaski County, Arkansas Coordinates 34.7538615°, -92.2236667° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.7538615,"lon":-92.2236667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

338

Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Montgomery County Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Montgomery County, Maryland Coordinates 39.1547426°, -77.2405153° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1547426,"lon":-77.2405153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

339

West Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name West Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility Facility West Point Treatment Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location King County, Washington Coordinates 47.5480339°, -121.9836029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.5480339,"lon":-121.9836029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

340

Biomass resource potential using energy crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass energy crops can provide a significant and environmentally beneficial source of renewable energy feedstocks for the future. They can revitalize the agricultural sector of the US economy by providing profitable uses for marginal cropland. Energy crops include fast-growing trees, perennial grasses, and annual grasses, all capable of collecting solar energy and storing it as cellulosic compounds for several months to several years. Once solar energy is thus captured, it can be converted by means of currently available technologies to a wide variety of energy products such as electricity, heat, liquid transportation fuels, and gases. Experimental results from field trials have generated optimism that selected and improved energy crops, established on cropland with moderate limitations for crop production, have the potential for producing high yields. Both trees and grasses, under very good growing conditions, have produced average annual yields of 20 to 40 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1}. Sorghum has shown especially high yields in the Midwest. Hybrids between sugar cane and its wild relatives, called energy cane, have yielded as much as 50 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} in Florida. These experimental results demonstrate that some species have the genetic potential for very rapid growth rates. New wood energy crop systems developed by the Department of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program offer, at a minimum, a 100% increase in biomass production rates over the 2 to 4 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} of dry leafless woody biomass produced by most natural forest systems. Experimental data indicate that short rotation wood crops established on cropland with moderate limitations are capable of producing biomass yields of 8--20 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} with a present average about 11 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} on typical cropland sites.

Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Martin, S.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2009 Team California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A solar hot water system that uses waste heat from the chiller to preheat potable water Solar panels in two series that generate up to 8.1 kW of direct current power, which is...

342

Technical evaluation of the waste-to-oil process development facility at Albany, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The broad objective of ERDA's solar energy program at Albany, Oregon, is to develop biomass-to-synfuel technology in the Albany process development facility, which is now nearing completion. In the study reported here, the process development plant design was reevaluated, and a number of modifications and additions are recommended to facilitate and accelerate development of biomass conversion processes. Sketches of the recommended modifications and estimates of costs and installation time schedules have been provided. It has been found expedient to implement some of these modifications before construction is completed. Biomass-to-synfuel processes under development or under consideration elsewhere have been reviewed, and some have been identified that are appropriate for further development at Albany. Potential environmental impacts associated with the operation of the Albany, Oregon, facility were reviewed to identify the magnitude of the impacts and the effects of any resultant operational constraints. Two discrete environmental impact categories have been identified with respect to process development operation. These are (1) production, storage, and disposal of product oil and residual solid, liquid, and gaseous waste; and (2) disturbances to the local community. An assessment has been made of unit process waste discharges and mitigation procedures, environmental setting and community considerations, possible operational constraints, and monitoring programs.

Houle, E.H.; Ciriello, S.F.; Ergun, S.; Basuino, D.J.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

November 2011 Model documentation for biomass,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 November 2011 Model documentation for biomass, cellulosic biofuels, renewable of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;3 Contents Biomass.....................................................................................................................................................4 Variables in the biomass module

Noble, James S.

344

Successful biomass (wood pellets ) implementation in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Successful biomass (wood pellets ) implementation in Estonia Biomass Utilisation of Local in Estonia in 1995 - 2002 Regional Energy Centres in Estonia http://www.managenergy.net/conference/biomass

345

Florida Biomass Energy Consortium | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consortium Jump to: navigation, search Name Florida Biomass Energy Consortium Place Florida Sector Biomass Product Association of biomass energy companies. References Florida...

346

Haryana Biomass Power Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haryana Biomass Power Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Haryana Biomass Power Ltd. Place Mumbai, Haryana, India Zip 400025 Sector Biomass Product This is a JV consortium between...

347

Algae Biomass Summit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Algae Biomass Summit Algae Biomass Summit September 30, 2013 12:00PM EDT to October 3, 2013 12:00PM EDT Algae Biomass Summit...

348

PRETREATMENT OF BIOMASS PRIOR TO LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UC-61 PRETREATMENT OF BIOMASS PRIOR TO LIQUEFACTION Larry L.10093 PRETREATMENT OF BIOMASS PRIOR TO LIQUEFACTION Larry L.hydrolytic pretreatment to biomass feedstocks, higher acid

Schaleger, Larry L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Category:Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass category. Pages in category "Biomass" This category contains only the following page. B Biomass Scenario Model Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCatego...

350

Tribal Renewable Energy Curriculum Foundational Course: Biomass...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Tribal Renewable Energy Curriculum Foundational Course: Biomass Watch the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy foundational course webinar on biomass renewable...

351

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels,LLC UCSDBiomasstoPower EconomicFeasibilityFigure1:WestBiofuelsBiomassGasificationtoPowerrates... 31 UCSDBiomasstoPower?Feasibility

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hebei Jiantou Biomass Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jiantou Biomass Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Hebei Jiantou Biomass Power Place Jinzhou, Hebei Province, China Zip 50000 Sector Biomass Product A company engages in...

353

Chowchilla Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chowchilla Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chowchilla Biomass Facility Facility Chowchilla Sector Biomass Owner London Economics Location Chowchilla, California...

354

Wheelabrator Saugus Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wheelabrator Saugus Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator Saugus Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator Saugus Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid...

355

Northeast regional biomass program. Retrospective, 1983--1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ten years ago, when Congress initiated the Regional Biomass Energy Program, biomass fuel use in the Northeast was limited primarily to the forest products industry and residential wood stoves. An enduring form of energy as old as settlement in the region, residential wood-burning now takes its place beside modern biomass combustion systems in schools and other institutions, industrial cogeneration facilities, and utility-scale power plants. Biomass today represents more than 95 percent of all renewable energy consumed in the Northeast: a little more than one-half quadrillion BTUs yearly, or five percent of the region`s total energy demand. Yet given the region`s abundance of overstocked forests, municipal solid waste and processed wood residues, this represents just a fraction of the energy potential the biomass resource has to offer.This report provides an account of the work of the Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) over it`s first ten years. The NRBP has undertaken projects to promote the use of biomass energy and technologies.

Savitt, S.; Morgan, S. [eds.] [Citizens Conservation Corp., Boston, MA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Benchmarking Biomass Gasification Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Gasification Technologies for Biomass Gasification Technologies for Fuels, Chemicals and Hydrogen Production Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Jared P. Ciferno John J. Marano June 2002 i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to express their appreciation to all individuals who contributed to the successful completion of this project and the preparation of this report. This includes Dr. Phillip Goldberg of the U.S. DOE, Dr. Howard McIlvried of SAIC, and Ms. Pamela Spath of NREL who provided data used in the analysis and peer review. Financial support for this project was cost shared between the Gasification Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Biomass Power Program within the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

357

Sustainable Biomass Supply Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) aims to displace 30% of the 2004 gasoline use (60 billion gal/yr) with biofuels by 2030 as outlined in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which will require 700 million tons of biomass to be sustainably delivered to biorefineries annually. Lignocellulosic biomass will make an important contribution towards meeting DOEs ethanol production goals. For the biofuels industry to be an economically viable enterprise, the feedstock supply system (i.e., moving the biomass from the field to the refinery) cannot contribute more that 30% of the total cost of the biofuel production. The Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis and Kansas State University are developing a set of tools for identifying economical, sustainable feedstocks on a regional basis based on biorefinery siting.

Erin Searcy; Dave Muth; Erin Wilkerson; Shahab Sokansanj; Bryan Jenkins; Peter Titman; Nathan Parker; Quinn Hart; Richard Nelson

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

APS Biomass I Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

APS Biomass I Biomass Facility APS Biomass I Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name APS Biomass I Biomass Facility Facility APS Biomass I Sector Biomass Location Arizona Coordinates 34.0489281°, -111.0937311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0489281,"lon":-111.0937311,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

359

Research on Common Biomass Pyrolysis Production of Biomass ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Textural parameters analysis revealed the caloric value of biomass carbons between 32 MJ/kg and 34 MJ/kg. It also indicated that the surface of biomass carbon...

360

Minimally refined biomass fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

Pearson, Richard K. (Pleasanton, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fixed Bed Biomass Gasifier  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report details work performed by Gazogen to develop a novel biomass gasifier for producimg electricity from commercially available hardwood chips. The research conducted by Gazogen under this grant was intended to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new means of producing electricity from wood chips and other biomass and carbonaceous fuels. The technical feasibility of the technology has been furthered as a result of the DOE grant, and work is expected to continue. The economic feasibility can only be shown when all operational problems have been overocme. The technology could eventually provide a means of producing electricity on a decentralized basis from sustainably cultivated plants or plant by-products.

Carl Bielenberg

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

process streams. Handb. Bioethanol:395-415. 10. Ehrman T.solid waste used as bioethanol sources and its relatedof cellulosic biomass into bioethanol as an alternative

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

364

List of Solar Water Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Water Heat Incentives Solar Water Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 920 Solar Water Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-920) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - GEOSmart Financing Program (Arizona) Utility Loan Program Arizona Residential Solar Water Heat Photovoltaics No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas

365

List of Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Process Heat Incentives Process Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 204 Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 204) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat

366

Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass May 27, 2010 - 12:59pm Addthis When construction is complete in 2011, Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s biomass steam plant will be fueled by roughly 50,000 tons of waste wood per year. | Illustration Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory When construction is complete in 2011, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's biomass steam plant will be fueled by roughly 50,000 tons of waste wood per year. | Illustration Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Lindsay Gsell Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be saving nearly $4 million a year by switching a portion of their current natural gas-fueled steam plant for one powered by biofuel. The move is part of an Energy Savings

367

Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass May 27, 2010 - 12:59pm Addthis When construction is complete in 2011, Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s biomass steam plant will be fueled by roughly 50,000 tons of waste wood per year. | Illustration Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory When construction is complete in 2011, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's biomass steam plant will be fueled by roughly 50,000 tons of waste wood per year. | Illustration Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Lindsay Gsell Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be saving nearly $4 million a year by switching a portion of their current natural gas-fueled steam plant for one powered by biofuel. The move is part of an Energy Savings

368

The potential impact of externalities considerations on the market for biomass power technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the current status of externalities considerations--nonmarket costs and benefits--in state and utility electricity resource planning processes and determines how externalities considerations might help or hinder the development of biomass power plants. It provides an overview of biomass resources and technologies, including their market status and environmental impacts; reviews the current treatment of externalities in the states; and documents the perspectives of key utility, regulatory, and industry representatives concerning externalities considerations. The authors make the following recommendations to the biomass industry: (1) the wood and agricultural waste industries should work toward having states and utilities recognize that wood and agricultural waste are greenhouse gas neutral resources because of carbon sequestration during growth; (2) the biomass industry should emphasize nonenvironmental benefits such as economic development and job creation; and (3) the biomass industry should pursue and support efforts to establish renewable energy set-asides or ``green`` requests for proposals.

Swezey, B.G.; Porter, K.L.; Feher, J.S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Biomass Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Technologies August 14, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic...

370

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY and dead vegetative material that have been removed from the landscape (either sent as biomass to the power

371

ENERGY FROM BIOMASS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integrated- gasifier steam-injected gasturbine (BIGISTIG) cogenerationsystemsis carried out here. A detailed!l!ledin a companionpaperprepared for this conference. 781 #12;BIOMASS-GASIFIER ~.INJECTED GAS TURBINE COGENERA110N FOR THE CANE). Biomassintegrated-gasifier/steam-injectedgas-turbine (BIG/STIG) cogenerationtechnologyand prospectsfor its use

372

Waste Material Management: Energy and materials for industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This booklet describes DOE`s Waste Material Management (WMM) programs, which are designed to help tap the potential of waste materials. Four programs are described in general terms: Industrial Waste Reduction, Waste Utilization and Conversion, Energy from Municipal Waste, and Solar Industrial Applications.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

"EMM Region","PC","IGCC","PC","Conv. CT","Adv. CT","Conv. CC","Adv. CC","Adv. CC w/CCS","Fuel Cell","Nuclear","Biomass","MSW","On-shore Wind","Off-shore Wind","Solar Thermal","Solar PV"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Regional cost adjustments for technologies modeled by NEMS by Electric Market Modul (EMM) region 10,11" Regional cost adjustments for technologies modeled by NEMS by Electric Market Modul (EMM) region 10,11" "EMM Region","PC","IGCC","PC","Conv. CT","Adv. CT","Conv. CC","Adv. CC","Adv. CC w/CCS","Fuel Cell","Nuclear","Biomass","MSW","On-shore Wind","Off-shore Wind","Solar Thermal","Solar PV" ,,,"w/CCS" "1 (ERCT)",0.91,0.92,0.92,0.93,0.95,0.91,0.92,0.9,0.96,0.96,0.93,0.93,0.95,0.92,0.86,0.87 "2 (FRCC)",0.92,0.93,0.94,0.93,0.93,0.91,0.92,0.92,0.97,0.97,0.94,0.94,"N/A","N/A",0.89,0.9 "3 (MROE)",1.01,1.01,0.99,0.99,1.01,0.99,0.99,0.97,0.99,1.01,0.99,0.98,0.99,0.97,"N/A",0.96

374

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and investigations. The legislation also states responsibilities of generators and transporters of hazardous waste as well as responsibilities of hazardous waste storage and treatment facility and hazardous waste disposal site operators. There

375

3, 503539, 2006 Biomass OSSEs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OSD 3, 503­539, 2006 Biomass OSSEs G. Crispi et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions for biomass assimilation G. Crispi, M. Pacciaroni, and D. Viezzoli Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Correspondence to: G. Crispi (gcrispi@ogs.trieste.it) 503 #12;OSD 3, 503­539, 2006 Biomass OSSEs G. Crispi et al

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

376

5, 21032130, 2008 Biomass Pantanal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 5, 2103­2130, 2008 Biomass Pantanal J. Sch¨ongart et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction dynamics in aboveground coarse wood biomass of wetland forests in the northern Pantanal, Brazil J. Sch of the European Geosciences Union. 2103 #12;BGD 5, 2103­2130, 2008 Biomass Pantanal J. Sch¨ongart et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

377

5, 27912831, 2005 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 5, 2791­2831, 2005 Biomass burning emissions P. Guyon et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction measurements of trace gas and aerosol particle emissions from biomass burning in Amazonia P. Guyon1 , G. Frank1. 2791 #12;ACPD 5, 2791­2831, 2005 Biomass burning emissions P. Guyon et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

378

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY not substantively affect the findings or recommendations of the study. 2. Introduction The Biomass to Energy (B2E) Project is developing a comprehensive forest biomass-to- electricity model to identify and analyze

379

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;5-2 #12;APPENDIX 5: BIOMASS TO ENERGY PROJECT:WILDLIFE HABITAT EVALUATION 1. Authors: Patricia Manley Ross management scenarios. We evaluated the potential effects of biomass removal scenarios on biological diversity

380

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY as a result of emerging biomass opportunities on private industrial and public multiple-use lands (tracked in the vegetation domain) and the quantity of biomass consumed by the wildfire (tracked

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;12-2 #12;Appendix 12: Biomass to Energy Project Team, Committee Members and Project Advisors Research Team. Nechodom's background is in biomass energy policy development and public policy research. Peter Stine

382

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;10-2 #12;Appendix 10: Power Plant Analysis for Conversion of Forest Remediation Biomass to Renewable Fuels and Electricity 1. Report to the Biomass to Energy Project (B2E) Principal Authors: Dennis Schuetzle, TSS

383

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;6-2 #12;APPENDIX 6: Cumulative Watershed Effects Analysis for the Biomass to Energy Project 1. Principal the findings or recommendations of the study. Cumulative watershed effects (CWE) of the Biomass to Energy (B2E

384

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY or recommendations of the study. 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Domain Description The study area for the Biomass to Energy (B2 and environmental costs and benefits of using forest biomass to generate electrical power while changing fire

385

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability Stephen Kaffka Department of Plant Sciences University of California, Davis & California Biomass Collaborative February 2008 #12;E x p e c t e d d u r 9 ) ---------Biomass era----------- --?????????? #12;By 2025, every source of energy

California at Davis, University of

386

7, 1733917366, 2007 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA wet season experiment C. H. Mari a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Tracing biomass burning plumes from. Mari (marc@aero.obs-mip.fr) 17339 #12;ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

387

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential Prepared for: Massachusetts Division of Energy;#12;Executive Summary In Massachusetts, biomass energy has typically meant wood chips derived from the region's extensive forest cover. Yet nationally, biomass energy from dedicated energy crops and from crop residues

Schweik, Charles M.

388

6, 60816124, 2006 Modeling biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 6, 6081­6124, 2006 Modeling biomass smoke injection into the LS (part II) G. Luderer et al Chemistry and Physics Discussions Modeling of biomass smoke injection into the lower stratosphere by a large Correspondence to: G. Luderer (gunnar@mpch-mainz.mpg.de) 6081 #12;ACPD 6, 6081­6124, 2006 Modeling biomass smoke

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

389

Abundance,Biomass, and Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abundance,Biomass, and Production Daniel B.Hayes,James R.Bence,Thomas J.Kwak, and Bradley E, the proportion of fish present that are #12;Abundance,Biomass,and Production 329 detected (i.e., sightability; available at http://www.ruwpa.st-and.ac.uk/distance/). #12;Abundance,Biomass,and Production 331 Box 8

Kwak, Thomas J.

390

Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings For Bioenergy Biofuels...

391

Biomass and Biofuels Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Biofuels produced from biomass provide a promising alternative to fossil fuels. Biomass is an inexpensive, readily available and renewable resource.

392

Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned...

393

Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for Southeastern Forests February 2012 #12;This Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for Southeastern Forests study was conducted by the Biomass Energy Resource Center Biomass Energy Resource Center Kamalesh Doshi Biomass Energy Resource Center Hillary Emick Biomass Energy

394

NREL: Biomass Research - Thomas Foust  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thomas Foust Thomas Foust Photo of Thomas Foust Dr. Thomas Foust is an internationally recognized expert in the biomass field. His areas of expertise include feedstock production, biomass-to-fuels conversion technologies, and environmental and societal sustainability issues associated with biofuels. He has more than 20 years of research and research management experience, specializing in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. As National Bioenergy Center Director, Dr. Foust guides and directs NREL's research efforts to develop biomass conversion technologies via biochemical and thermochemical routes, as well as critical research areas addressing the sustainability of biofuels. This research focuses on developing the necessary science and technology for converting biomass to biofuels,

395

EA-1957: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA 7: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA EA-1957: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA SUMMARY DOE is proposing to provide funding to Placer County, California to construct and operate a two-megawatt wood-to-energy biomass facility at the Eastern Regional Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and Landfill in unincorporated Placer County. The wood-to-energy biomass facility would use a gasification technology. The fuel supply for the proposed project would be solely woody biomass, derived from a variety of sources including hazardous fuels residuals, forest thinning and harvest residuals, and Wildland Urban Interface sourced waste materials from residential and commercial property defensible space clearing and property management activities

396

A-sLEACH : An Advanced Solar Aware Leach Protocol for Energy Efficient Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar),1 relies on relatively mature technology, and has a relatively large current share of energy of "new renewable energy," including biomass, solar, wind, and all non-hydro renewables combined (11.6% vs alliance to support a feed-in law for renewable-energy sources, including wind, solar, small biomass

Ma, Bin

397

Biomass: Potato Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTATO POWER POTATO POWER Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, chemical/carbon cycles, plants, energy resources/transformations) Grade Level: Grades 2 to 3 Small groups (3 to 4) Time: 30 to 40 minutes Summary: Students assemble a potato battery that will power a digital clock. This shows the connection between renewable energy from biomass and its application. Provided by the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and BP America Inc. BIOPOWER - POTATO POWER Purpose: Can a potato power a clock? Materials:  A potato  A paper plate  Two pennies  Two galvanized nails  Three 8 inch insulated copper wire, with 2 inches of the insulation removed from the ends  A digital clock (with places for wire attachment)

398

Clean fractionation of biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R & D) that uses `green` feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. New alternatives for American industry may lie in the nation`s forests and fields. The AF program is conducting ongoing research on a clean fractionation process. This project is designed to convert biomass into materials that can be used for chemical processes and products. Clean fractionation separates a single feedstock into individual components cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Catalyzed gasification of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Catalyzed biomass gasification studies are being conducted by Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories. Investigations are being carried out concurrently at the bench and process development unit scales. These studies are designed to test the technical and economic feasibility of producing specific gaseous products from biomass by enhancing its reactivity and product specificity through the use of specific catalysts. The program is directed at controlling the gasification reaction through the use of specific catalytic agents to produce desired products including synthetic natural gas, ammonia synthesis gas (H/sub 2//N/sub 2/), hydrogen, or syn gas (H/sub 2//CO). Such gaseous products are currently produced in tonnage quantities from non-renewable carbonaceous resources, e.g., natural gas and petroleum. The production of high yields of these specified gases from biomass is accomplished through optimization of gasification conditions and proper choice of catalytic agents. For instance, high yields of synthetic natural gas can be attained through gasification with steam in the presence of gasification catalyst such as trona (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ . NaHCO/sub 3/ . 2H/sub 2/O) and a nickel methanation catalyst. The gasification catalyst enhances the steam-biomass reaction while the methanation catalyst converts gaseous intermediates from this reaction to methane, the most thermodynamically stable hydrocarbon product. This direct conversion to synthetic natural gas represents a significant advancement in the classical approach of producing synthetic natural gas from carbonaceous substrates through several unit operations. A status report, which includes experimental data and results of the program is presented.

Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.; Mudge, L.K.; Mitchell, D.H.; Cox, J.L.

1978-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

400

Analysis of International Policies In The Solar Electricity Sector: Lessons for India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal Gas turbines Large Hydro Wind power Small Hydro Biomassas wind, hydro and biomass, compared to solar power to meetof solar power Thermal Nuclear Wind Hydro-electric Geo-

Deshmukh, Ranjit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Program on Technology Innovation: Biomass Leaching/Washing Laboratory-Scale Pilot Plant Equipment Selection and Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching of biomass to remove troublesome constituents such as alkali metals, chlorine, sulfur, and phosphorus is an opportunity to solve the many problems facing the ability of firing and/or cofiring low-cost and low-grade agricultural biomass and waste materials for the production of energy and biofuels. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is interested in fostering the development of this potential game-changing biomass preteatment technology. As part of this endeavor, EPRI sponsored through ...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

402

List of Solar Pool Heating Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heating Incentives Heating Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 118 Solar Pool Heating Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 118) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Personal Property Tax Exemption (Michigan) Property Tax Incentive Michigan Commercial Industrial Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Microturbines Photovoltaics

403

A Probabilistic Inventory Analysis of Biomass for the State of Texas for Cellulosic Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural and forestry wastes for the use of creating cellulosic ethanol were inventoried for each county in Texas. A simple forecast was created for each of the agricultural wastes and then a multivariate empirical distribution was used to simulate the range of biomass available by county and district. The probability that a district could support a 25, 50, 75, or 100 million gallon cellulosic ethanol plant is estimated from the Monte Carlo simulation results. Biomass in Texas is concentrated in the Northern and Eastern areas of the state. The areas of South and West Texas have little to no biomass available to use for cellulosic ethanol. The North East, South East, and Upper Coast districts include forestry waste that increase the amount of available biomass. With 100 percent certainty the North East and South East districts can support four 100 million gallon cellulosic ethanol plants each. The research found that there is more than enough biomass to support numerous cellulosic ethanol plants in Texas, and decision makers can use the results of this study to identify regions of low and high risk for available biomass from agricultural and forestry waste.

Gleinser, Matthew A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Lyonsdale Biomass LLC Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lyonsdale Biomass LLC Biomass Facility Facility Lyonsdale Biomass LLC Sector Biomass Location Lewis County, New York Coordinates 43.840112°, -75.4344727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.840112,"lon":-75.4344727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

405

Biomass One LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LP Biomass Facility LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Biomass One LP Biomass Facility Facility Biomass One LP Sector Biomass Location Jackson County, Oregon Coordinates 42.334535°, -122.7646577° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.334535,"lon":-122.7646577,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

406

1994 Washington State directory of Biomass Energy Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the fourth edition of the Washington Directory of Biomass Energy Facilities, the first edition was published in 1987. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of and basic information about known biomass producers and users within the state to help demonstrate the importance of biomass energy in fueling our state`s energy needs. In 1992 (latest statistical year), estimates show that the industrial sector in Washington consumed nearly 128 trillion Btu of electricity, nearly 49.5 trillion Btu of petroleum, over 82.2 trillion Btu of natural gas, and over 4.2 trillion Btu of coal. Facilities listed in this directory generated approximately 114 trillion Btu of biomass energy - 93 trillion were consumed from waste wood and spent chemicals. In the total industrial energy picture, wood residues and chemical cooking liquors placed second only to electricity. This directory is divided into four main sections biogas production, biomass combustion, ethanol production, and solid fuel processing facilities. Each section contains maps and tables summarizing the information for each type of biomass. Provided in the back of the directory for reference are a conversion table, a table of abbreviations, a glossary, and an index. Chapter 1 deals with biogas production from both landfills and sewage treatment plants in the state. Biogas produced from garbage and sewage can be scrubbed and used to generate electricity. At the present time, biogas collected at landfills is being flared on-site, however four landfills are investigating the feasibility of gas recovery for energy. Landfill biogas accounted for approximately 6 percent of the total biomass reported. Sewage treatment biogas accounted for 0.6 percent. Biogas generated from sewage treatment plants is primarily used for space and process heat, only one facility presently scrubs and sells methane. Together, landfill and sewage treatment plant biogas represented over 6.6 percent of the total biomass reported.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

SC-RISE LECTURE SERIES BRIGHT HORIZONS IN SOLAR ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SC-RISE LECTURE SERIES BRIGHT HORIZONS IN SOLAR ENERGY Sustainable Energy Opportunities, Options are being developed including biomass, geothermal, hydropower, ocean thermal energy conversion, solar electric, solar thermal, and wind. However, such aspects as low energy density, siting, and temporal

408

Solar energy research and development: program balance. Annex, Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An evaluation of federal research, development, and demonstration options on solar energy is presented. This assessment treats seven groups of solar energy technologies: solar heating and cooling of buildings, agricultural and industrial process heat, biomass, photovoltaics, thermal power, wind, and ocean thermal energy conversion. The evaluation methodology is presented in detail. (MHR)

None

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Supercritical Water Gasification of Biomass & Biomass Model Compounds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is an innovative, modern, and effective destruction process for the treatment of organic compounds. Hydrogen production using SCWG of biomass or (more)

Youssef, Emhemmed A.E.A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Remotely sensed heat anomalies linked with Amazonian forest biomass declines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Amazonian forest biomass declines Michael Toomey, 1 Darof aboveground living biomass (p biomass declines, Geophys. Res.

Toomey, M.; Roberts, D. A.; Still, C.; Goulden, M. L.; McFadden, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

State and Regional Biomass Partnerships  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northeast Regional Biomass Program successfully employed a three pronged approach to build the regional capacity, networks, and reliable information needed to advance biomass and bioenergy technologies and markets. The approach included support for state-based, multi-agency biomass working groups; direct technical assistance to states and private developers; and extensive networking and partnership-building activities to share objective information and best practices.

Handley, Rick; Stubbs, Anne D.

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

412

Catalysis in biomass gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of these studies is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of producing specific gas products by catalytic gasification of biomass. Catalyst performance is a key factor in the feasibility of catalytic gasification processes. The results of studies designed to gain a fundamental understanding of catalytic mechanisms and causes of deactivation, and discussion of the state-of-the-art of related catalytic processes are presented. Experiments with primary and secondary catalysts were conducted in a 5-cm-diameter, continuous-wood-feed, fixed-catalyst-bed reactor. The primary catalysts used in the experiments were alkali carbonates mixed with the biomass feed; the secondary catalysts included nickel or other transition metals on supports such as alumina, silica, or silica-alumina. The primary catalysts were found to influence wood pyrolysis as well as the char/steam reaction. Secondary catalysts were used in a fixed-bed configuration to direct gas phase reactions. Results of the performance of these catalysts are presented. Secondary catalysts were found to be highly effective for conversion of biomass to specific gas products: synthesis gases and methane-rich gas. With an active catalyst, equilibrium gas composition are obtained, and all liquid pyrolysis products are converted to gases. The major cause of catalyst deactivation was carbon deposition, or coking. Loss of surface area by sintering was also inportant. Catalyst deactivation by sulfur poisoning was observed when bagasse was used as the feedstock for catalytic gasification. Mechanisms of catalyst activity and deactivation are discussed. Model compounds (methane, ethylene, and phenol) were used to determine coking behavior of catalysts. Carbon deposition is more prevalent with ethylene and phenol than with methane. Catalyst formulations that are resistant to carbon deposition are presented. 60 references, 10 figures, 21 tables.

Baker, E.G.; Mudge, L.K.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass  

SciTech Connect

Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the carbohydrate structures as they have been further reacted to phenolic Aldol condensation products. The bio-oil

Elliott, Douglas C.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

414

Biomass power for rural development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a proven option for electricity generation. A diverse range of biopower producers includes electric utilities, independent power producers, and the pulp and paper industry. To help expand opportunities for biomass power production, the U.S. Department of Energy established the Biopower Program and is sponsoring efforts to increase the productivity of dedicated energy crops. The Program aims to double biomass conversion efficiencies, thus reducing biomass power generation costs. These efforts will promote industrial and agricultural growth, improve the environment, create jobs, increase U.S. energy security, and provide new export markets.

Shepherd, P.

2000-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

415

Biomass Engineering Prize Competition Announced  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 7/30/2010 12:00:00 AM... The DownEast 2010 Biomass Engineering Prize Competition is seeking innovative solutions focused on revitalizing an...

416

Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Steelmaking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Steelmaking. Author(s), Shiju Thomas, Paul Cha, Steven J McKnight, Vincent A Bouma, Andrew L Petrik,

417

Biomass Databook ed4.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Energy Data Book Center for Transportation Analysis 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 For more information please contact: Stacy Davis (865) 946-1256...

418

NREL: Biomass Research - Daniel Inman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

us to examine the feasibility of alternative process configurations. Learn more about Biomass Technology Analysis at NREL. System Dynamics I am also interested in dynamic modeling...

419

Biomass Rapid Analysis Network (BRAN)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Helping the emerging biotechnology industry develop new tools and methods for real-time analysis of biomass feedstocks, process intermediates and The Biomass Rapid Analysis Network is designed to fast track the development of modern tools and methods for biomass analysis to accelerate the development of the emerging industry. The network will be led by industry and organized and coordinated through the National Renewable Energy Lab. The network will provide training and other activities of interest to BRAN members. BRAN members will share the cost and work of rapid analysis method development, validate the new methods, and work together to develop the training for the future biomass conversion workforce.

Not Available

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

PERFORMANCE OF AN EXPERIMENTAL SOLAR-DRIVEN ABSORPTION AIR CONDITIONER--ANNUAL REPORT JULY 1975-SEPT. 1976  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the waste heat. The solar heating and cooling program ofheating. The heat source can be either a back-up system, or the solar

Dao, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The DOE Solar Thermal Electric Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Electric Program is managed by the Solar thermal and biomass Power division which is part of the Office of utility Technologies. The focus of the Program is to commercialize solar electric technologies. In this regard, three major projects are currently being pursued in trough, central receiver, and dish/Stirling electric power generation. This paper describes these three projects and the activities at the National laboratories that support them.

Mancini, T.R.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

System and process for biomass treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system including an apparatus is presented for treatment of biomass that allows successful biomass treatment at a high solids dry weight of biomass in the biomass mixture. The design of the system provides extensive distribution of a reactant by spreading the reactant over the biomass as the reactant is introduced through an injection lance, while the biomass is rotated using baffles. The apparatus system to provide extensive assimilation of the reactant into biomass using baffles to lift and drop the biomass, as well as attrition media which fall onto the biomass, to enhance the treatment process.

Dunson, Jr., James B; Tucker, III, Melvin P; Elander, Richard T; Lyons, Robert C

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

423

Biomass Allocation Model - Comparing alternative uses of scarce...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Allocation Model - Comparing alternative uses of scarce biomass energy resource through estimations of future biomass use for liquid fuels and electricity. Title Biomass...

424

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses A photo of a woman and four men, all wearing hard hats and looking into a large square bin of dried corn stover. One man is using a white scoop to pick up some of the material and another man holds some in his hand. Members of Congress visit NREL's cellulosic ethanol pilot plant. A team of NREL researchers uses biomass process and sustainability analyses to bridge the gap between research and commercial operations, which is critical for the scale-up of biomass conversion technology. Among NREL's biomass analysis capabilities are: Life cycle assessments Technoeconomic analysis Sensitivity analysis Strategic analysis. Life Cycle Assessments Conducting full life cycle assessments is important for determining the

425

Program on Technology Innovation: Biomass Leaching Pre-Treatment Technology Bench Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The leaching of biomass to remove or eliminate troublesome constituents such as alkali metals, chlorine, sulfur, and phosphorus presents an opportunity to solve many problems associated with firing and cofiring low-cost and low-grade agricultural biomass and waste materials to produce energy and biofuels. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has taken interest in fostering the development of this potentially game-changing technology. As part of this endeavor, EPRI, through the Technology Innovati...

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

426

The value of the benefits of U.S. biomass power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass power has always been used to generate power in the forest products industry, but its widespread use for supplying power to the US grid is a relatively recent phenomenon. Today independent biomass power generators supply 11 billion kWh/yr to the national electricity grid and, in the process, provide an environmentally superior disposal service for 22 million tons/yr of solid waste

Morris, G.

2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

427

Preparation of a cost data bank for DOE/Biomass Energy Systems Branch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study deals with the preparation of a biomass conversion technology and cost data bank for the Biomass Energy Systems Branch (BES) of DOE/SOLAR. When completed, it may be used with an appropriate methodology to analyze the complex issues of research program planning and analysis. In addition, future market penetration of BES products may be projected, and the options available to the Federal Government to influence the outcome of BES products marketing may also be examined.

Kam, A.Y.; Dickenson, R.L.; Jones, J.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington's industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state's total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state's energy needs.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington`s industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state`s total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state`s energy needs.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington's industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state's total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state's energy needs.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

List of Solar Thermal Electric Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Incentives Electric Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 548 Solar Thermal Electric Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-548) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Net Metering (Arizona) Net Metering Arizona Commercial Industrial Residential Nonprofit Schools Local Government State Government Fed. Government Agricultural Institutional Solar Thermal Electric Photovoltaics Wind energy Biomass No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional

432

Solar energy legal bibliography. Final report. [160 references  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Legal Bibliography is a compilation of approximately 160 solar publications abstracted for their legal and policy content (through October 1978). Emphasis is on legal barriers and incentives to solar energy development. Abstracts are arranged under the following categories: Antitrust, Biomass, Building Codes, Consumer Protection, Environmental Aspects, Federal Legislation and Programs, Financing/Insurance, International Law, Labor, Land Use (Covenants, Easements, Nuisance, Zoning), Local Legislation and Programs, Ocean Energy, Patents and Licenses, Photovoltaics, Solar Access Rights, Solar Heating and Cooling, Solar Thermal Power Systems, Standards, State Legislation and Programs, Tax Law, Tort Liability, Utilities, Warranties, Wind Resources, and General Solar Law.

Seeley, D.; Euser, B.; Joyce, C.; Morgan, G. H.; Laitos, J. G.; Adams, A.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Biomass & Bioenergy, 2010, 34(7), 923-930, doi:10.1016/j.biombioe.2010.01.039. EEEnnneeerrrgggyyy rrreeeqqquuuiiirrreeemmmeeennnttt fffooorrr fffiiinnneee gggrrriiinnndddiiinnnggg ooofff tttooorrrrrreeefffiiieeeddd wwwooooooddd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and `farmed wood' for electricity, heat and combined heat and power production (EC JRC, 2009). All of the life wood waste SRC chips Straw SRC chips SRC pellets Cofiring Biomass power plant Domestic boiler kgCO2per vary significantly ­ from about 10kgCO2e per MWh for waste products such as waste wood and MDF, up

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

434

Process for concentrated biomass saccharification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes for saccharification of pretreated biomass to obtain high concentrations of fermentable sugars are provided. Specifically, a process was developed that uses a fed batch approach with particle size reduction to provide a high dry weight of biomass content enzymatic saccharification reaction, which produces a high sugars concentration hydrolysate, using a low cost reactor system.

Hennessey, Susan M. (Avondale, PA); Seapan, Mayis (Landenberg, PA); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

435

OUT Success Stories: Biomass Gasifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The world's first demonstration of an efficient, low-pressure biomass gasifier capable of producing a high-quality fuel is now operating in Vermont. The gasifier converts 200 tons of solid biomass per day into a clean-burning gas with a high energy content for electricity generation.

Jones, J.

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With Uranium Bioremediation at Rifle transformation and biomass accumulation, both of which can alter the flow field and potentially bioremediation to understand the biogeochemical processes and to quantify the biomass and mineral transformation/ accumulation

Hubbard, Susan

437

NQAATechnical Memorandum NMFS BIOMASS-BASEDMODELSAND HARVESTINGPOLICIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NQAATechnical Memorandum NMFS APRIL BIOMASS-BASEDMODELSAND HARVESTINGPOLICIES FORWASHINGTON corrpletsformalreview,editorialamtrd,ordetailedediting. APRIL 1990 BIOMASS-BASEDMODELSAND HARVESTINGPOLICIES rockfish (S.jordani). A biomass-based delay- difference model with knife-edge recruitment appeared

438

BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION EFFORTS IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

icat ion Preheat zone Biomass liquefaction Tubular reactor (design is shown in Figure 7, C I Biomass ua efaction Fic LBL Process BiOMASS t NON-REVERS lNG CYCLONE CONDENSER (

Ergun, Sabri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Biomass Electricity in California Elizabeth K. Stoltzfus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Electricity in California Elizabeth K. Stoltzfus Energy and Resources Group University would also like to thank Bryan Jenkins and other members of the California Biomass Collaborative............................................................................................................................. 1 1.1 Biomass Electricity in California Today

Kammen, Daniel M.

440

Treatment of biomass to obtain fermentable sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Biomass is pretreated using a low concentration of aqueous ammonia at high biomass concentration. Pretreated biomass is further hydrolyzed with a saccharification enzyme consortium. Fermentable sugars released by saccharification may be utilized for the production of target chemicals by fermentation.

Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Tucker, Melvin (Lakewood, CO); Elander, Richard (Evergreen, CO); Hennessey, Susan M. (Avondale, PA)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Biomass Webinar Text Version | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Webinar Text Version Biomass Webinar Text Version Dowload the text version of the audio from the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar on biomass. DOE Office of Indian Energy...

442

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Oregon Department of Energy provides a tax credit for agricultural producers or collectors of biomass. The credit can be used for eligible biomass used to produce biofuel; biomass used in...

443

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with greater supply of biomass, such as northernareasof highersupplywillenablebiomasstobesecuredsupplyoffeedstockis keycomponentindevelopingaviablebiomass

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Biomass power and state renewable energy policies under electric industry restructuring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several states are pursuing policies to foster renewable energy as part of efforts to restructure state electric power markets. The primary policies that states are pursuing for renewables are system benefits charges (SBCs) and renewable portfolio standards (RPSs). However, the eligibility of biomass under state RPS and SBC policies is in question in some states. Eligibility restrictions may make it difficult for biomass power companies to access these policies. Moreover, legislative language governing the eligibility of biomass power is sometimes vague and difficult to interpret. This paper provides an overview of state RPS and SBC policies and focuses on the eligibility of biomass power. For this paper, the authors define biomass power as using wood and agricultural residues and landfill methane, but not waste-to-energy, to produce energy.

Porter, K.; Wiser, R.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

First Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings, Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference was designed to provide a national and international forum to support the development of a viable biomass industry. Although papers on research activities and technologies under development that address industry problems comprised part of this conference, an effort was made to focus on scale-up and demonstration projects, technology transfer to end users, and commercial applications of biomass and wastes. The conference was divided into these major subject areas: Resource Base, Power Production, Transportation Fuels, Chemicals and Products, Environmental Issues, Commercializing Biomass Projects, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. The papers in this second volume cover Transportation Fuels, and Chemicals and Products. Transportation Fuels topics include: Biodiesel, Pyrolytic Liquids, Ethanol, Methanol and Ethers, and Commercialization. The Chemicals and Products section includes specific topics in: Research, Technology Transfer, and Commercial Systems. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

EA-1841: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass 41: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass Montgomery Project in the Town of Montgomery, Orange County, New York EA-1841: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass Montgomery Project in the Town of Montgomery, Orange County, New York Summary Taylor Biomass, LLC (Taylor) submitted an application to DOE for a Federal loan guarantee to support the construction and startup of a biomass gasification-to energy facility at a 95-acre recycling facility in the Town of Montgomery, Orange County, NY. The Project would involve the construction of a Post-Collection Separation Facility, a Gasification System and a Combined Cycle Gas Turbine Power Island. The Post-Collection Separation Facility would accept 950 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW), construction and demolition debris, and 100 tons of

447

NREL: Biomass Research - Amie Sluiter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amie Sluiter Amie Sluiter Amie Sluiter (aka Amie D. Sluiter, Amie Havercamp) is a scientist at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Bioenergy Center in Golden, Colorado. Research Interests Amie Sluiter began research in the biomass-to-ethanol field in 1996. She joined the Biomass Analysis Technologies team to provide compositional analysis data on biomass feedstocks and process intermediates for use in pretreatment models and techno-economic analyses. The results of wet chemical analysis provide guidance on feedstock handling, pretreatment conditions, economic viability, and life cycle analyses. Amie Sluiter has investigated a number of biomass analysis methods and is an author on 11 Laboratory Analytical Procedures (LAPs), which are being used industry-wide. She has taught full biomass compositional analysis

448

Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent development in biomass gasification is the use of a pressurized water processing environment in order that drying of the biomass can be avoided. This paper reviews the research undertaken developing this new option for biomass gasification. This review does not cover wet oxidation or near-atmospheric-pressure steam-gasification of biomass. Laboratory research on hydrothermal gasification of biomass focusing on the use of catalysts is reviewed here, and a companion review focuses on non-catalytic processing. Research includes liquid-phase, sub-critical processing as well as super-critical water processing. The use of heterogeneous catalysts in such a system allows effective operation at lower temperatures, and the issues around the use of catalysts are presented. This review attempts to show the potential of this new processing concept by comparing the various options under development and the results of the research.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

449

Review of the potential for biomass resources and conversion technology. Final report, Jan-Jul 83  

SciTech Connect

Biomass resources include dedicated energy crops, forestry/agricultural residues, and certain organic fractions of wastes. The magnitude of the resource base, the extent to which it can be devoted to methane production, the quantity of methane that can be produced, and the cost of the methane are issues that are addressed in this study. Research needs include improvement of agricultural production methods, especially regarding problems caused by the seasonal nature of biomass production. Reduction of capital investment per unit of methane could be achieved by development of membrane gas clean up systems or combination biomass storage/fermentation systems, are examples of advanced technologies.

Lipinsky, E.S.; Jenkins, D.M.; Young, B.A.; Sheppard, W.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

NREL: Biomass Research - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Below are news stories related to NREL biomass research. Subscribe to the RSS feed RSS . Learn about RSS. November 7, 2013 NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station Locations Released iPhone users now have access to a free application that locates fueling stations offering alternative fuels, including electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, e85 Ethanol, propane and hydrogen. The Energy Department's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the new mobile application for DOE's Clean Cities program. Clean Cities supports local stakeholders across the country in an effort to cut petroleum use in transportation. August 21, 2013 Can "Drop-In" Biofuels Solve Integration Issues? Lab works to create biofuels indistinguishable from conventional

451

Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

Thomas Mason

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

452

Chinese Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Chinese Station Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chinese Station Biomass Facility Facility...

453

SPI Lincoln Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon SPI Lincoln Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name SPI Lincoln Biomass Facility Facility SPI...

454

Montgomery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Montgomery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Montgomery Biomass Facility Facility...

455

Deblois Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Deblois Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Deblois Biomass Facility Facility Deblois...

456

West Enfield Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon West Enfield Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name West Enfield Biomass Facility Facility West...

457

MM Nashville Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon MM Nashville Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name MM Nashville Biomass Facility Facility MM...

458

Olokele Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Olokele Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Olokele Biomass Facility Facility Olokele...

459

Pennsbury Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Pennsbury Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pennsbury Biomass Facility Facility...

460

Celanese Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Celanese Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Celanese Biomass Facility Facility Celanese...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Central LF Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Central LF Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Central LF Biomass Facility Facility...

462

US Sugar Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon US Sugar Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name US Sugar Biomass Facility Facility US Sugar...

463

Rocklin Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Rocklin Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rocklin Biomass Facility Facility Rocklin...

464

Glendale Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Glendale Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glendale Biomass Facility Facility Glendale...

465

SPI Quincy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon SPI Quincy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name SPI Quincy Biomass Facility Facility SPI...

466

Kettle Falls Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Kettle Falls Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kettle Falls Biomass Facility Facility...

467

DG Whitefield Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon DG Whitefield Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name DG Whitefield Biomass Facility Facility DG...

468

Viking Northumberland Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Viking Northumberland Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Viking Northumberland Biomass Facility...

469

Livermore Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Livermore Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Livermore Biomass Facility Facility...

470

Mecca Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Mecca Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mecca Biomass Facility Facility Mecca...

471

Oxnard Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Oxnard Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Oxnard Biomass Facility Facility Oxnard...

472

Westwood Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Westwood Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Westwood Biomass Facility Facility Westwood...

473

Buckeye Florida Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Buckeye Florida Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Buckeye Florida Biomass Facility Facility...

474

Wilmarth Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Wilmarth Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wilmarth Biomass Facility Facility Wilmarth...

475

El Nido Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon El Nido Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name El Nido Biomass Facility Facility El Nido...

476

Dinuba Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Dinuba Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Dinuba Biomass Facility Facility Dinuba...

477

Stratton Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Stratton Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Stratton Biomass Facility Facility Stratton...

478

Jonesboro Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Jonesboro Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jonesboro Biomass Facility Facility...

479

Broome County Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Broome County Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Broome County Biomass Facility Facility...

480

Salinas Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Salinas Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Salinas Biomass Facility Facility Salinas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste biomass solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Coventry LFG Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Coventry LFG Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Coventry LFG Biomass Facility Facility...

482

Lanchester Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Lanchester Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lanchester Biomass Facility Facility...

483

Troy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Troy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Troy Biomass Facility Facility Troy Sector...

484

SPI Loyalton Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon SPI Loyalton Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name SPI Loyalton Biomass Facility Facility SPI...

485

Sherman Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Sherman Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Sherman Biomass Facility Facility Sherman...

486

Craven County Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Craven County Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Craven County Biomass Facility Facility...

487

Warren Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Warren Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warren Biomass Facility Facility Warren...

488

Collins Pine Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Collins Pine Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Collins Pine Biomass Facility Facility...

489

Davis County Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Davis County Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Davis County Biomass Facility Facility...

490

Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility Facility...

491

Putney Basketville Site Biomass CHP Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publications. 25 5 Bioenergy Overview Biopower, or biomass power, is the use of biomass to generate electricity. Biopower system technologies include direct-firing,...

492

BSCL Use Plan: Solving Biomass Recalcitrance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical report describing NREL's new Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory (BSCL). The BSCL was constructed to provide the most modern commercial surface characterization equipment for studying biomass surfaces.

Himmel, M.; Vinzant, T.; Bower, S.; Jechura, J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Utility Promoters for Biomass Feedstock Biotechnology ...  

Technology Marketing Summary. Genetic optimization of biomass is necessary to improve the rates and final yields of sugar release from woody biomass.