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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Better Batteries from Waste Sulfur - Materials Technology@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 04/28/2013. Transforming waste sulfur into lightweight plastic that could lead to better batteries for electric cars is possible through a new chemical

2

Waste Toolkit A-Z Battery recycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Toolkit A-Z Battery recycling How can I recycle batteries? The University Safety Office is responsible for arranging battery recycling for departments (see Contact at bottom of page). Colleges must make their own arrangements through a registered hazardous waste carrier. Batteries must not be put

Melham, Tom

3

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste Batteries, used or unwanted including lithium, alkaline, lead ­ acid or lithium aluminum hydride Chemical Waste Check Disposal of Toxics website for disposal options or Take to Bookstore Biological Waste Biological Waste Residential

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

4

The Domestic Battery, From A Chemical Perspective Craig Riley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Domestic Battery, From A Chemical Perspective Craig Riley Physics 222 A. LaRosa Project Report Winter 2001 The battery has been used for many years as a power source for the quick application the mechanics of this source. The following paragraphs will outline the history of the battery, its anatomy

La Rosa, Andres H.

5

Hazardous Chemical Waste Management Reference Guide for Laboratories 9 1 Identification of Hazardous Chemical Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Chemical Waste Management Reference Guide for Laboratories 9 1 · Identification of Hazardous Chemical Waste OBJECTIVES Do you know how to do the following? If you do, skip ahead a material must be considered a hazardous chemical waste by using the Radiological-Chemical

Ford, James

6

Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) Flow Battery for Stationary Energy Storage Applications Youngsik Kim* and Nina MahootcheianAsl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) Flow Battery for Stationary Energy Storage Applications Youngsik Kim in a Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) flow battery that can be used in a stationary energy storage application. Li

Zhou, Yaoqi

7

Boiler Chemical Cleaning Waste Management Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical cleaning to remove tube deposits/oxides that occur during unit operation or scale during unit commissioning from conventional fossil plants and combined cycle plants with heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) will result in the generation of a waste solution. The waste contains residual solvent and elevated levels of heavy metals (primarily iron and copper) in addition to rinse and passivation solutions. An earlier manual, Boiler Chemical Cleaning Wastes Management Manual (EPRI ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

8

A Chemical Potential 'Battery' for Superfluid 4He Weak Links  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research and development of superfluid weak links has been hindered by the absence of a source of dc chemical potential, similar to a simple battery or voltage source for analogous superconducting devices. We describe here a method for generating a dc chemical potential difference, {delta}{mu} across a weak link array in superfluid 4He. The presence of a {delta}{mu} forces quantum oscillations at a Josephson frequency, selectable by the adjustment of input power to a heater. We discuss a case in which the frequency locks onto a resonance feature where it exhibits remarkable stability, and amplitude magnification by a factor of 40.

Hoskinson, E.; Sato, Y.; Packard, R. E. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Penanen, K. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

9

Chemical Characterization of Fossil Fuel Combustion Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuel combustion wastes differ considerably in total composition and in the key chemical characteristics of their extracts, making leachate composition difficult to predict. A new mechanistic approach, however, shows promise for more-accurate prediction.

1987-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

10

Chemical aspects of nuclear waste treatment  

SciTech Connect

The chemical aspects of the treatment of gaseous, liquid, and solid wastes are discussed in overview. The role of chemistry and the chemical reactions in waste treatment are emphasized. Waste treatment methods encompass the chemistry of radioactive elements from every group of the periodic table. In most streams, the radioactive elements are present in relatively low concentrations and are often associated with moderately large amounts of process reagents, or materials. In general, it is desirable that waste treatment methods are based on chemistry that is selective for the concentration of radionuclides and does not require the addition of reagents that contribute significantly to the volume of the treated waste. Solvent extraction, ion exchange, and sorbent chemistry play a major role in waste treatment because of the high selectivity provided for many radionuclides. This paper deals with the chemistry of the onsite treatment methods that is typically used at nuclear installations and is not concerned with the chemistry of the various alternative materials proposed for long-term storage of nuclear wastes. The chemical aspects are discussed from a generic point of view in which the chemistry of important radionuclides is emphasized.

Bond, W.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Membrane filtration waste treatment technology comes of age in battery manufacturing plants  

SciTech Connect

A new waste treatment system from MEMTEK Corporation incorporates membrane filtration, and makes possible the effective treatment of waste streams containing a number of toxic heavy metals. Using this membrane technology, MEMTEK is capable of treating the wastewater in battery manufacturing plants to meet even the strictest limits imposed by local regulatory agencies and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Lead and zinc in the treated effluent are typically below 0.1 ppm. The typical battery manufacturing processes introduce metals, primarily lead, into plant effluents, especially from formation, battery wash, and laundry operation. Due to the high usage of acid in the plant, the wastewater is also usually of a low pH, typically 2 or less. The dissolved and particulate contaminants in this effluent must be removed to very low levels before the water can be released to the sewer or the environment. The waste treatment process is described.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Chemical Sciences and Engineering - US China Electric Vehicle and Battery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations Presentations View program in brief » View the Conference Booklet with program (pdf) » Plenary Sessions 4th US - China Electric Vehicle and Battery Technology Workshop, Dave Howell, US Department of Energy (pdf) U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Program Overview, Henry Kelly, US DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (pdf) EcoPartnerships: A model for US-China Energy Collaboration, David Fleshler, Case Western Reserve University and QIN Xingcai, Tianjin Lishen Battery Joint-Stock Co., Ltd. (pdf) Lishen Advanced Battery Development for EV and ESS, Qin Xingcai, Tianjin Lishen Battery Joint-Stock Co., Ltd. (pdf) EV R&D in CAERI, Xiaochang Ren, China Automotive Engineering Research Institute (pdf) Roundtable 1: Joint Battery Technology Roadmapping

13

Chemical Disposal The Office of Environmental Health & Safety operates a Chemical Waste Disposal Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Disposal Dec, 2011 Chemicals: The Office of Environmental Health & Safety operates a Chemical Waste Disposal Program where all University chemical waste is picked up and sent out for proper disposal. (There are some chemicals that they will not take because of their extreme hazards

Machel, Hans

14

Materials Recovery from Wastes, Batteries, and Co/Ni, Precious ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... 91-100]Recovery of Gold by Using Biomass Wastes Containing Polyphenol Compounds[pp. 101-109]The Advantages of Recycling Metallic...

15

Physical and chemical characteristics of candidate wastes for tailored ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tailored Ceramics offer a potential alternative to glass as an immobilization form for nuclear waste disposal. The form is applicable to the wide variety of existing wastes and may be tailored to suit the diverse environments being considered as disposal sites. Consideration of any waste product form, however, require extensive knowledge of the waste to be incorporated. A varity of waste types are under consideration for incorporation into a Tailored Ceramic form. This report integrates and summarizes chemical and physical characteristics of the candidate wastes. Included here are data on Savannah River Purex Process waste; Hanford bismuth phosphate, uranium recovery, redox, Purex, evaporator and residual liquid wastes; Idaho Falls calcine; Nuclear Fuel Services Purex and Thorex wastes and miscellaneous waste including estimated waste stream compositions produced by possible future commercial fuel reprocessing.

Mitchell, M.E.

1980-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES: which include all glass, plastic and metal bottles that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES: which include all glass, plastic and metal bottles that previously contained chemicals (hazardous or non-hazardous) are collected by CWS for recycling. Bottles should be dry and empty without chemical residue. Rinse and collect rinsate in chemical

Ungerleider, Leslie G.

17

Chemical Sciences and Engineering - US China Electric Vehicle and Battery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program View the Conference Booklet with program (pdf) » THURSDAY, AUGUST 4 Time Title, Speaker Plenary Session 9:00 AM Welcome and Orientation Welcome to Argonne by Eric Isaacs, Laboratory Director Orientation, Logistics and Workshop Format by Larry Johnson, Transportation Center Director 9:20 - 10:40 Technology Policy: US-China Collaboration on the Electric Vehicle Initiative Henry Kelly, USDOE Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ZHANG Zhihong, MOST, Deputy Director General, Department of New and High Technology WU Feng, Beijing Institute of Technology, Chief Scientist of National (973) Advance Secondary Battery Project Dave Howell, USDOE Vehicle Technologies Program, Team Lead, Hybrid Electric Systems 10:40 - 11:00 Tea/Coffee Break

18

System for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and system for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material having a high through-put. The solid waste material is added to an annular vessel (10) substantially filled with concentrated sulfuric acid. Concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide is added to the sulfuric acid within the annular vessel while the sulfuric acid is reacting with the solid waste. The solid waste is mixed within the sulfuric acid so that the solid waste is substantilly fully immersed during the reaction. The off gas from the reaction and the products slurry residue is removed from the vessel during the reaction.

Cowan, Richard G. (Kennewick, WA); Blasewitz, Albert G. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Chemical digestion of low level nuclear solid waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical digestion for treatment of low level combustible nuclear solid waste material is provided and comprises reacting the solid waste material with concentrated sulfuric acid at a temperature within the range of 230.degree.-300.degree.C and simultaneously and/or thereafter contacting the reacting mixture with concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide. In a special embodiment spent ion exchange resins are converted by this chemical digestion to noncombustible gases and a low volume noncombustible residue.

Cooley, Carl R. (Richland, WA); Lerch, Ronald E. (Richland, WA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and system for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. A fluidized bed including lime particles is operated at a temperature of at least 500.degree. C. by blowing gas having 20%/70% oxygen upwardly through the bed particles at a rate sufficient to fluidize same. A toxic organic waste material is fed into the fluidized bed where the organic waste material reacts with the lime forming CaCO.sub.3. The off gases are filtered and cooled to condense water which is separated. A portion of the calcium carbonate formed during operation of the fluidized bed is replaced with lime particles. The off gases from the fluidized bed after drying are recirculated until the toxic organic waste material in the bed is destroyed.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and system for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. A fluidized bed including lime particles is operated at a temperature of at least 500 C by blowing gas having 20%/70% oxygen upwardly through the bed particles at a rate sufficient to fluidize same. A toxic organic waste material is fed into the fluidized bed where the organic waste material reacts with the lime forming CaCO[sub 3]. The off gases are filtered and cooled to condense water which is separated. A portion of the calcium carbonate formed during operation of the fluidized bed is replaced with lime particles. The off gases from the fluidized bed after drying are recirculated until the toxic organic waste material in the bed is destroyed. 3 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

22

An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cleaners/chemicals, motor oil, batteries, and pesticides.Motor pools, shops, MFH Separation from non-metal components Collection container, collection service Waste Oil

Borglin, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500.degree. C. with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO.sub.2 gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO.sub.2 gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO.sub.2 absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Low Temperature Waste Energy Recovery at Chemical Plants and Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies to economically recover low-temperature waste energy in chemical plants and refineries are the holy grail of industrial energy efficiency. Low temperature waste energy streams were defined by the Texas Industries of the Future Chemical and Refining Sectors Advisory Committee as streams with a temperature below 400 degrees F. Their waste energy streams were also characterized as to state, flow rate, heat content, source and temperature. These criteria were then used to identify potential candidates of waste heat recovery technologies that might have an application in these industries. Four technologies that met the criteria of the Advisory Committee included: organic rankine cycle (ORC), absorption refrigeration and chilling, Kalina cycle, and fuel cell technologies. This paper characterizes each of these technologies, technical specifications, limitations, potential costs/ payback and commercialization status as was discussed in the Technology Forum held in Houston, TX in May 2012 (TXIOF 2012).

Ferland, K.; papar, R.; Quinn, J.; Kumar, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

CHEMICAL REMOVAL OF BIOMASS FROM WASTE AIR BIOTRICKLING FILTERS: SCREENING OF CHEMICALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL REMOVAL OF BIOMASS FROM WASTE AIR BIOTRICKLING FILTERS: SCREENING OF CHEMICALS for the removal of excess biomass from biotrickling ®lters for waste air treatment. Although the experiment/v) NaOH, 0.26 and 1.31% (w/v) NaClO and 11.3% (w/v) H2O2 resulted in a biomass removal signi

26

Battery cell feedthrough apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact, hermetic feedthrough apparatus comprising interfitting sleeve portions constructed of chemically-stable materials to permit unique battery designs and increase battery life and performance.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Physical/chemical treatment of mixed waste soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the results and findings of the demonstration testing of a physical/chemical treatment technology for mixed wastes. The principal objective of the tests was to demonstrate the capability of the low temperature thermal separation (LTTS) technology for rendering PCB-contaminated mixed waste soils as nonhazardous and acceptable for low level radioactive waste disposal. The demonstration testing of this technology was a jointly-conducted project by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Martin Marietta Energy Systems (Energy Systems) Waste Management Technology Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and IT Corporation. This pilot-scale demonstration program testing of IT's thermal separator technology in Oak Ridge was conducted as part of the DOE Model Program. This program has private industry, regulators, and universities helping to solve DOE waste management problems. Information gained from the DOE Model is shared with the participating organizations, other federal agencies, and regulatory agencies. The following represent the most significant findings from these demonstration tests: Thermal separation effectively separated PCB contamination from a mixed waste to enable the treated soil to be managed as low level radioactive waste. At the same operating conditions, mercury contamination of 0.8 ppM was reduced to less than 0.1 ppM. The majority of uranium and technetium in the waste feeds oil remained in the treated soil. Radionuclide concentration in cyclone solids is due to carry-over of entrained particles in the exit gas and not due to volatilization/condensation. Thermal separation also effectively treated all identified semi-volatile contaminants in the waste soil to below detection limits with the exception of di-n-butylphthalate in one of the two runs. 4 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Morris, M.I. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Alperin, E.S.; Fox, R.D. (IT Corp., Knoxville, TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important).

Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Plasma-chemical waste treatment of acid gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research to date has shown that a H{sub 2}S waste-treatment process based on plasma-chemical dissociation technology is compatible with refinery and high-carbon-oxide acid-gas streams. The minor amounts of impurities produced in the plasma-chemical reactor should be treatable by an internal catalytic reduction step. Furthermore, the plasma-chemical technology appears to be more efficient and more economical than the current technology. The principal key to achieving high conversions with relatively low energies of dissociation is the concept of the high-velocity, cyclonic-flow pattern in the plasma reaction zone coupled with the recycling of unconverted hydrogen sulfide. Future work will include testing the effects of components that might be carried over to the plasma reactor by ``upset`` conditions in the amine purification system of a plant and testing the plasma-chemical process on other industrial wastes streams that contain potentially valuable chemical reagents. The strategy for the commercialization of this technology is to form a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with the Institute of Hydrogen Energy and Plasma Technology of the Russian Scientific Center/Kurchatov Institute and with an American start-up company to develop an ``American`` version of the process and to build a commercial-scale demonstration unit in the United States. The timetable proposed would involve building a ``field test`` facility which would test the plasma-chemical reactor and sulfur recovery unit operations on an industrial hydrogen sulfide waste s at a scale large enough to obtain the energy and material balance data required for a final analysis of the commercial potential of this technology. The field test would then be followed by construction of a commercial demonstration unit in two to three years. The commercial demonstration unit would be a fully integrated plant consisting of one commercial-scale module.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.; Daniels, E.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes Print The deceivingly simple appearance of batteries masks their chemical complexity. A typical lithium-ion battery in a cell phone...

31

ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: A NEW PROCESS FOR CHEMICALLY CLEANING SAVANNAH RIVER WASTE TANKS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has 49 high level waste (HLW) tanks that must be emptied, cleaned, and closed as required by the Federal Facilities Agreement. The current method of chemical cleaning uses several hundred thousand gallons per tank of 8 weight percent (wt%) oxalic acid to partially dissolve and suspend residual waste and corrosion products such that the waste can be pumped out of the tank. This adds a significant quantity of sodium oxalate to the tanks and, if multiple tanks are cleaned, renders the waste incompatible with the downstream processing. Tank space is also insufficient to store this stream given the large number of tanks to be cleaned. Therefore, a search for a new cleaning process was initiated utilizing the TRIZ literature search approach, and Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination--Ultraviolet (CORD-UV), a mature technology currently used for decontamination and cleaning of commercial nuclear reactor primary cooling water loops, was identified. CORD-UV utilizes oxalic acid for sludge dissolution, but then decomposes the oxalic acid to carbon dioxide and water by UV treatment outside the system being treated. This allows reprecipitation and subsequent deposition of the sludge into a selected container without adding significant volume to that container, and without adding any new chemicals that would impact downstream treatment processes. Bench top and demonstration loop measurements on SRS tank sludge stimulant demonstrated the feasibility of applying CORD-UV for enhanced chemical cleaning of SRS HLW tanks.

Ketusky, E; Neil Davis, N; Renee Spires, R

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

32

Chemical tailoring of steam to remediate underground mixed waste contaminents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method to simultaneously remediate mixed-waste underground contamination, such as organic liquids, metals, and radionuclides involves chemical tailoring of steam for underground injection. Gases or chemicals are injected into a high pressure steam flow being injected via one or more injection wells to contaminated soil located beyond a depth where excavation is possible. The injection of the steam with gases or chemicals mobilizes contaminants, such as metals and organics, as the steam pushes the waste through the ground toward an extraction well having subatmospheric pressure (vacuum). The steam and mobilized contaminants are drawn in a substantially horizontal direction to the extraction well and withdrawn to a treatment point above ground. The heat and boiling action of the front of the steam flow enhance the mobilizing effects of the chemical or gas additives. The method may also be utilized for immobilization of metals by using an additive in the steam which causes precipitation of the metals into clusters large enough to limit their future migration, while removing any organic contaminants.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Udell, Kent S. (Berkeley, CA); Bruton, Carol J. (Livermore, CA); Carrigan, Charles R. (Tracy, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of transuranic wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document provides radiological, physical and chemical characterization data for transuranic radioactive wastes and transuranic radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program (PSPI). Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 139 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 39,380{sup 3} corresponding to a total mass of approximately 19,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats Plant generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Waste remediation using in situ magnetically assisted chemical separation  

SciTech Connect

The magnetically assisted chemical separation process (MACS) combines the selective and efficient separation afforded by chemical sorption with the magnetic recovery of ferromagnetic particles. This process is being developed for treating the underground storage tanks at Hanford. These waste streams contain cesium, strontium, and transuranics (TRU) that must be removed before this waste can be disposed of as grout. The separation process uses magnetic particles coated with either (1) a selective ion exchange material or an organic extractant containing solvent (for cesium and strontium removal) or (2) solvents for selective separation of TRU elements (e.g., TRUEX process). These coatings, by their chemical nature, selectively separate the contaminants onto the particles, which can then be recovered from the tank using a magnet. Once the particles are removed, the contaminants can either be left on the loaded particles and added to the glass feed slurry or stripped into a small volume of solution so that the extracting particles can be reused. The status of chemistry and separation process is discussed in this paper.

Nunez, L.; Buchholz, B.A.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Chemical Coagulation of Radioactive Wastes at High pH  

SciTech Connect

The waste treatment facility at Mound Laboratory was recently modified for the treatment of plutonium-bearing wastes. Prior to July 1, 1975, the facility had been run at pH 8.8; however, since the plant was modified it has been run at pH 11.3 with different chemical dosages. The improvement in effluent quality using the higher pH process (pH 11.3) has been dramatic. Prior to the changeover, the system effluent activity levels ranged from 2-3 dis/min/ml (9-14x10 to the minus 4 uCi/1) specific 238Pu; after the changeover effluent activity levels ranged from 0.3-0.5 dis/min/ml (1.4-2.3x10 to the minus 4 uCi/1) specific 238Pu. Total activity discharged (on a monthly basis) has been cut by more than a factor of 2, because of the changeover to the high pH process. Effluent levels are about as low as can be obtained in this type of waste treatment process.

Koenst, J. W.; Blane, D. E.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important). Reduction of nitrite ions is believed to be the most important source of ammonia. Whether by radiolytic or thermal routes, nitrite reduction reactions proceed through nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, the nitrosyl anion, and the hyponitrite anion. Nitrite ion is also converted into hydroxylamine, another important intermediate on the pathway to form ammonia. These reaction pathways additionally result in the formation of nitrous oxide and molecular nitrogen, whereas hydrogen formation is produced in a separate reaction sequence.

Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Battery construction. [miniaturized batteries  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of a battery having a battery cup and a battery cap which has a ridge portion to provide a battery chamber for accommodating a positive electrode, a negative electrode, and an electrolyte. The battery chamber has a contour at its outer periphery different from that of the sealing flanges of the battery cup and the battery cap. 11 figures.

Nishimura, H.; Nomura, Y.

1977-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

38

Batteries - HEV Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and component levels. A very detailed battery design model is used to establish these costs for different Li-Ion battery chemistries. The battery design model considers the...

39

Diffusion of inorganic chemical wastes in compacted clay  

SciTech Connect

The factors that were investigated included the water content/dry unit weight, the method of compaction, the mineralogy of the soil, and the concentration of the ions. The effective diffusion coefficients (D{asterisk}) of three anions (Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, and I{sup {minus}}) and three cations (K{sup +}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+}) in a simulated waste leachate were measured. Two clay soils (kaolinite and Lufkin clay) and a sand were used in the study. The clay samples were compacted and pre-soaked to minimize hydraulic gradients due to negative pore pressures. Mass balance calculations were performed to indicate possible sinks/sources in the diffusion system. The results of the diffusion tests were analyzed using two analytical solutions to Fick's second law and a commercially available semi-analytical solution. The D{asterisk} values for tests using high-concentration (0.04 N) leachate generally fell in the narrow range of about 4.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2}/s, and were relatively insensitive to compaction water content/dry unit weight and to compaction method. The variability in the results from the tests with low-concentration (0.013 N) leachate precluded any definite conclusions from these tests. The values of D{asterisk} measured in this study were compared to values from previous studies, and the D{asterisk} values from this study were found to be slightly conservative (i.e., high). However, the results of the tests may be affected by several chemical and physical factors, and care should be taken to ensure that the soils used in the tests are representative of those used in the application of the test results. Recommendations are made for estimating D{asterisk} values for use in the design of compacted clay barriers for the containment of inorganic chemical wastes.

Shackelford, C.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Technology Evaluation Workshop Report for Tank Waste Chemical Characterization  

SciTech Connect

A Tank Waste Chemical Characterization Technology Evaluation Workshop was held August 24--26, 1993. The workshop was intended to identify and evaluate technologies appropriate for the in situ and hot cell characterization of the chemical composition of Hanford waste tank materials. The participants were asked to identify technologies that show applicability to the needs and good prospects for deployment in the hot cell or tanks. They were also asked to identify the tasks required to pursue the development of specific technologies to deployment readiness. This report describes the findings of the workshop. Three focus areas were identified for detailed discussion: (1) elemental analysis, (2) molecular analysis, and (3) gas analysis. The technologies were restricted to those which do not require sample preparation. Attachment 1 contains the final workshop agenda and a complete list of attendees. An information package (Attachment 2) was provided to all participants in advance to provide information about the Hanford tank environment, needs, current characterization practices, potential deployment approaches, and the evaluation procedure. The participants also received a summary of potential technologies (Attachment 3). The workshop opened with a plenary session, describing the background and issues in more detail. Copies of these presentations are contained in Attachments 4, 5 and 6. This session was followed by breakout sessions in each of the three focus areas. The workshop closed with a plenary session where each focus group presented its findings. This report summarizes the findings of each of the focus groups. The evaluation criteria and information about specific technologies are tabulated at the end of each section in the report. The detailed notes from each focus group are contained in Attachments 7, 8 and 9.

Eberlein, S.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Battery cell feedthrough apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact, hermetic feedthrough apparatus is described comprising interfitting sleeve portions constructed of chemically-stable materials to permit unique battery designs and increase battery life and performance. 8 figs.

Kaun, T.D.

1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

42

Composition and production rate of pharmaceutical and chemical waste from Xanthi General Hospital in Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied pharmaceutical and chemical waste production in a Greek hospital. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total pharmaceutical waste was 12.4 {+-} 3.90 g/patient/d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total chemical waste was 5.8 {+-} 2.2 g/patient/d. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rates of pharmaceutical and chemical waste produced by Xanthi General Hospital in Greece (XGH). This information is important to design and cost management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical waste, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 233 kg pharmaceutical and 110 kg chemical waste was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of five working weeks. The total production of pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Total pharmaceutical waste was classified in three categories, vial waste comprising 51.1%, syringe waste with 11.4% and intravenous therapy (IV) waste with 37.5% w/w of the total. Vial pharmaceutical waste only was further classified in six major categories: antibiotics, digestive system drugs, analgesics, hormones, circulatory system drugs and 'other'. Production data below are presented as average (standard deviation in parenthesis). The unit production rates for total pharmaceutical waste for the hospital were 12.4 (3.90) g/patient/d and 24.6 (7.48) g/bed/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for vial waste 6.4 (1.6) g/patient/d and 13 (2.6) g/bed/d, (2) for syringe waste 1.4 (0.4) g/patient/d and 2.8 (0.8) g/bed/d and (3) for IV waste 4.6 (3.0) g/patient/d and 9.2 (5.9) g/bed/d. Total chemical waste was classified in four categories, chemical reagents comprising 18.2%, solvents with 52.3%, dyes and tracers with 18.2% and solid waste with 11.4% w/w of the total. The total production of chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Thus, the sum of pharmaceutical and chemical waste was 5.7% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. The unit production rates for total chemical waste for the hospital were 5.8 (2.2) g/patient/d and 1.1 (0.4) g/exam/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for reagents 1.7 (2.4) g/patient/d and 0.3 (0.4) g/examination/d, (2) for solvents 248 (127) g/patient/d and 192 (101) g/examination/d, (3) for dyes and tracers 4.7 (1.4) g/patient/d and 2.5 (0.9) g/examination/d and (4) for solid waste 54 (28) g/patient/d and 42 (22) g/examination/d.

Voudrias, Evangelos, E-mail: voudrias@env.duth.gr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, GR-671 00 Xanthi (Greece); Goudakou, Lambrini; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Softa, Aikaterini [Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, GR-671 00 Xanthi (Greece)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

This final hazard categorization (FHC) document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the commitments for the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks Remediation Project. The remediation activities analyzed in this FHC are based on recommended treatment and disposal alternatives described in the Engineering Evaluation for the Remediation to the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks (BHI 2005e).

T. M. Blakley; W. D. Schofield

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

44

Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of hazardous chemical waste to LBL`s Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). Hazardous chemical waste is a necessary byproduct of LBL`s research and technical support activities. This waste must be handled properly if LBL is to operate safely and provide adequate protection to staff and the environment. These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of hazardous chemical waste, can meet LBL`s acceptance criteria for hazardous chemical waste.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Hazardous chemical waste abatement, reduction, reuse, and recycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of waste abatement, reduction, reuse, and recycle processes is to minimize the need for waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. In many cases, this can be accomplished in a cost-effective manner since the economics of recovery and reuse are often more favorable than the disposal of the waste and purchase of new raw material. Consequently, there is increasing interest in technologies that produce less waste and provide for the recovery of resources from some waste streams. This paper discusses some of these technologies. Waste abatement (the substitution of a new low-waste process or material to reduce waste quantities) is discussed, and four examples are given. Waste reduction or modification (decreasing wastes by housekeeping practices, concentration methods, or simple in-plant treatment) technologies are presented with a focus on metals recovery and waste volume reduction. Waste reuse (direct reuse of a waste as a raw material, either as is, or with minor modification) examples discussed include solvent reuse and the utilization of fly ash in structural materials. Waste recycle and recovery (the recovery of resources from waste streams through the application of reprocessing technologies) is discussed using examples of solvent recovery and drum reclamation.

Rodgers, B.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Accelerated Chemical Aging of Crystalline Nuclear Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Science of Nuclear Waste Management ... thereof) will ultimately determine whether nuclear energy is deemed environmentally friendly.

47

Monitoring Data from the Chemical Waste Landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (2003 - 2006)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) was a 1.9 acre site used from 1962 until 1985 for disposal of chemical wastes. The wastes were generated by research at Sandia's laboratories. The excavation of the CWL and the removal of 2000 intact chemical containers was completed safely and successfully. Contaminated soils were also removed for treatment or disposal. An "in-site" chemiresistor sensor was developed for the project that provided continuous monitoring of volatile organic compounds in the air, soil, and water. The monitoring data, collected from March, 2003 through April, 2006 is summarized and presented at this website.

Ho, Cliff (Sandia National Laboratories)

48

Enhanced Chemical Cleaning: A New Process for Chemically Cleaning Savannah River Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) there are 49 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks that eventually must be emptied, cleaned, and closed. The current method of chemically cleaning SRS HLW tanks, commonly referred to as Bulk Oxalic Acid Cleaning (BOAC), requires about a half million liters (130,000 gallons) of 8 weight percent (wt%) oxalic acid to clean a single tank. During the cleaning, the oxalic acid acts as the solvent to digest sludge solids and insoluble salt solids, such that they can be suspended and pumped out of the tank. Because of the volume and concentration of acid used, a significant quantity of oxalate is added to the HLW process. This added oxalate significantly impacts downstream processing. In addition to the oxalate, the volume of liquid added competes for the limited available tank space. A search, therefore, was initiated for a new cleaning process. Using TRIZ (Teoriya Resheniya Izobretatelskikh Zadatch or roughly translated as the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving), Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination with Ultraviolet Light (CORD-UV{reg_sign}), a mature technology used in the commercial nuclear power industry was identified as an alternate technology. Similar to BOAC, CORD-UV{reg_sign} also uses oxalic acid as the solvent to dissolve the metal (hydr)oxide solids. CORD-UV{reg_sign} is different, however, since it uses photo-oxidation (via peroxide/UV or ozone/UV to form hydroxyl radicals) to decompose the spent oxalate into carbon dioxide and water. Since the oxalate is decomposed and off-gassed, CORD-UV{reg_sign} would not have the negative downstream oxalate process impacts of BOAC. With the oxalate destruction occurring physically outside the HLW tank, re-precipitation and transfer of the solids, as well as regeneration of the cleaning solution can be performed without adding additional solids, or a significant volume of liquid to the process. With a draft of the pre-conceptual Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) flowsheet, taking full advantage of the many CORD-UV{reg_sign} benefits, performance demonstration testing was initiated using available SRS sludge simulant. The demonstration testing confirmed that ECC is a viable technology, as it can dissolve greater than 90% of the sludge simulant and destroy greater than 90% of the oxalates. Additional simulant and real waste testing are planned.

Ketusky, Edward; Spires, Renee; Davis, Neil

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

49

Assessment of chemical vulnerabilities in the Hanford high-level waste tanks  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to summarize results of relevant data (tank farm and laboratory) and analysis related to potential chemical vulnerabilities of the Hanford Site waste tanks. Potential chemical safety vulnerabilities examined include spontaneous runaway reactions, condensed phase waste combustibility, and tank headspace flammability. The major conclusions of the report are the following: Spontaneous runaway reactions are not credible; condensed phase combustion is not likely; and periodic releases of flammable gas can be mitigated by interim stabilization.

Meacham, J.E. [and others

1996-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Chemical and mechanical performance properties for various final waste forms -- PSPI scoping study  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE is obtaining data on the performance properties of the various final waste forms that may be chosen as primary treatment products for the alpha-contaminated low-level and transuranic waste at the INEL`s Transuranic Storage Area. This report collects and compares selected properties that are key indicators of mechanical and chemical durability for Portland cement concrete, concrete formed under elevated temperature and pressure, sulfur polymer cement, borosilicate glass, and various forms of alumino-silicate glass, including in situ vitrification glass and various compositions of iron-enriched basalt (IEB) and iron-enriched basalt IV (IEB4). Compressive strength and impact resistance properties were used as performance indicators in comparative evaluation of the mechanical durability of each waste form, while various leachability data were used in comparative evaluation of each waste form`s chemical durability. The vitrified waste forms were generally more durable than the non-vitrified waste forms, with the iron-enriched alumino-silicate glasses and glass/ceramics exhibiting the most favorable chemical and mechanical durabilities. It appears that the addition of zirconia and titania to IEB (forming IEB4) increases the leach resistance of the lanthanides. The large compositional ranges for IEB and IEB4 more easily accommodate the compositions of the waste stored at the INEL than does the composition of borosilicate glass. It appears, however, that the large potential variation in IEB and IEB4 compositions resulting from differing waste feed compositions can impact waste form durability. Further work is needed to determine the range of waste stream feed compositions and rates of waste form cooling that will result in acceptable and optimized IEB or IEB4 waste form performance. 43 refs.

Farnsworth, R.K.; Larsen, E.D.; Sears, J.W.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Battery Types  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...and rechargeable batteries (Table 1A battery consists of a negative electrode (anode) from which electrons

52

Chemical overcharge protection of lithium and lithium-ion secondary batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention features the use of redox reagents, dissolved in non-aqueous electrolytes, to provide overcharge protection for cells having lithium metal or lithium-ion negative electrodes (anodes). In particular, the invention features the use of a class of compounds consisting of thianthrene and its derivatives as redox shuttle reagents to provide overcharge protection. Specific examples of this invention are thianthrene and 2,7-diacetyl thianthrene. One example of a rechargeable battery in which 2,7-diacetyl thianthrene is used has carbon negative electrode (anode) and spinet LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} positive electrode (cathode). 8 figs.

Abraham, K.M.; Rohan, J.F.; Foo, C.C.; Pasquariello, D.M.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

Chemical overcharge protection of lithium and lithium-ion secondary batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention features the use of redox reagents, dissolved in non-aqueous electrolytes, to provide overcharge protection for cells having lithium metal or lithium-ion negative electrodes (anodes). In particular, the invention features the use of a class of compounds consisting of thianthrene and its derivatives as redox shuttle reagents to provide overcharge protection. Specific examples of this invention are thianthrene and 2,7-diacetyl thianthrene. One example of a rechargeable battery in which 2,7-diacetyl thianthrene is used has carbon negative electrode (anode) and spinet LiMn.sub.2 O.sub.4 positive electrode (cathode).

Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA); Rohan, James F. (Cork City, IE); Foo, Conrad C. (Dedham, MA); Pasquariello, David M. (Pawtucket, RI)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Idaho Chemical Processing Plant low-activity waste grout stabilization development program FY-97 status report  

SciTech Connect

The general purpose of the Grout Development Program is to solidify and stabilize the liquid low-activity wastes (LAW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). It is anticipated that LAW will be produced from the following: (1) chemical separation of the tank farm high-activity sodium-bearing waste, (2) retrieval, dissolution, and chemical separation of the aluminum, zirconium, and sodium calcines, (3) facility decontamination processes, and (4) process equipment waste. Grout formulation studies for sodium-bearing LAW, including decontamination and process equipment waste, continued this fiscal year. A second task was to develop a grout formulation to solidify potential process residual heels in the tank farm vessels when the vessels are closed.

Herbst, A.K.; Marshall, D.W.; McCray, J.A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of low-level alpha contaminated wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document provides radiological, physical, and chemical characterization data for low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program. Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 97 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 25,450 m 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 12,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats-generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Chemical compatibility screening results of plastic packaging to mixed waste simulants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a chemical compatibility program for evaluating transportation packaging components for transporting mixed waste forms. We have performed the first phase of this experimental program to determine the effects of simulant mixed wastes on packaging materials. This effort involved the screening of 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to {approximately}3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14 day exposures to the waste simulants of 60 C. The seal materials or rubbers were tested using VTR (vapor transport rate) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criteria of {approximately}1 g/m{sup 2}/hr for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. It was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only VITON passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. It is anticipated that those materials with the lowest VTRs will be evaluated in the comprehensive phase of the program. For specific gravity testing of liner materials the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE were found to offer the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of additional alpha contaminated and mixed low-level waste for treatment at the advanced mixed waste treatment project  

SciTech Connect

This document provides physical, chemical, and radiological descriptive information for a portion of mixed waste that is potentially available for private sector treatment. The format and contents are designed to provide treatment vendors with preliminary information on the characteristics and properties for additional candidate portions of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and offsite mixed wastes not covered in the two previous characterization reports for the INEL-stored low-level alpha-contaminated and transuranic wastes. This report defines the waste, provides background information, briefly reviews the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (P.L. 102-386), and relates the Site Treatment Plans developed under the Federal Facility Compliance Act to the waste streams described herein. Each waste is summarized in a Waste Profile Sheet with text, charts, and tables of waste descriptive information for a particular waste stream. A discussion of the availability and uncertainty of data for these waste streams precedes the characterization descriptions.

Hutchinson, D.P.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

In situ chemical characterization of waste sludges using FTIR-based fiber optic sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characterization of unknown mixed wastes is a mandatory step in today`s climate of strict environmental regulations. Cleaning up the nuclear and chemical wastes that have accumulated for 50 years at the Hanford Site is the largest single cleanup task in the United States today. The wastes are stored temporarily in carbon steel single- and double-shell tanks that are buried in tank farms at the Site. In the 1950s, a process to scavenge radioactive cesium and other soluble radionuclides in the wastes was developed to create additional tank space for waste storage. This scavenging process involved treatment of the wastes with alkali cyanoferrates and nickel sulfate to precipitate {sup 137}Cs in the presence of nitrate oxidant. Recent safety issues have focused on the stability of cyanoferrate-bearing wastes with large quantities of nitrates and nitrites. Nitrate has been partially converted to nitrite as a result of radiolysis during more than 35 years of storage. The major safety issue is the possibility of the presence of local hot spots enriched in {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr that under optimum conditions can self-heat causing dry out and a potential runaway reaction of the cyanoferrates with the nitrates/nitrites). For waste tank safety, accurate data of the concentration and distribution of cyanoferrates in the tanks are needed. Because of the extensive sampling required and the highly restricted activities allowed in the tank farms, simulated tank wastes are used to provide an initial basis for identifying and quantifying realistic concerns prior to waste remediation. Fiber optics provide a tool for the remote and in situ characterization of hazardous and toxic materials. This study is focused on near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) fiber optic sensors for in situ chemical characterization of Hanford Site waste sludges.

Rebagay, T.V.; Dodd, D.A.; Jeppson, D.W.; Lockrem, L.L.; Blewett, G.R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Idaho Chemical Processing Plant spent fuel and waste management technology development program plan: 1994 Update  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has received spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim storage since 1951 and reprocessing since 1953. Until April 1992, the major activity of the ICPP was the reprocessing of SNF to recover fissile uranium and the management of the resulting high-level wastes (HLW). In 1992, DOE chose to discontinue reprocessing SNF for uranium recovery and shifted its focus toward the continued safe management and disposition of SNF and radioactive wastes accumulated through reprocessing activities. Currently, 1.8 million gallons of radioactive liquid wastes (1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid wastes and 0.3 million gallons of high-level liquid waste), 3,800 cubic meters of calcine waste, and 289 metric tons heavy metal of SNF are in inventory at the ICPP. Disposal of SNF and high-level waste (HLW) is planned for a repository. Preparation of SNF, HLW, and other radioactive wastes for disposal may include mechanical, physical, and/or chemical processes. This plan outlines the program strategy of the ICPP spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) to develop and demonstrate the technology required to ensure that SNF and radioactive waste will be properly stored and prepared for final disposal in accordance with regulatory drivers. This Plan presents a brief summary of each of the major elements of the SF&WMTDP; identifies key program assumptions and their bases; and outlines the key activities and decisions that must be completed to identify, develop, demonstrate, and implement a process(es) that will properly prepare the SNF and radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP for safe and efficient interim storage and final disposal.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Tabulation of thermodynamic data for chemical reactions involving 58 elements common to radioactive waste package systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rate of release and migration of radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository to the biosphere is dependent on chemical interactions between groundwater, the geologic host rock, and the radioactive waste package. For the purpose of this report, the waste package includes the wasteform, canister, overpack, and repository backfill. Chemical processes of interest include sorption (ion exchange), dissolution, complexation, and precipitation. Thermochemical data for complexation and precipitation calculations for 58 elements common to the radioactive waste package are presented. Standard free energies of formation of free ions, complexes, and solids are listed. Common logarithms of equilibrium constants (log K's) for speciation and precipitation reactions are listed. Unless noted otherwise, all data are for 298.15/sup 0/K and one atmosphere.

Benson, L.V.; Teague, L.S.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Organic chemical aging mechanisms: An annotated bibliography. Waste Tank Safety Program  

SciTech Connect

An annotated bibliography has been compiled of the potential chemical and radiological aging mechanisms of the organic constituents (non-ferrocyanide) that would likely be found in the UST at Hanford. The majority of the work that has been conducted on the aging of organic chemicals used for extraction and processing of nuclear materials has been in conjunction with the acid or PUREX type processes. At Hanford the waste being stored in the UST has been stabilized with caustic. The aging factors that were used in this work were radiolysis, hydrolysis and nitrite/nitrate oxidation. The purpose of this work was two-fold: to determine whether or not research had been or is currently being conducted on the species associated with the Hanford UST waste, either as a mixture or as individual chemicals or chemical functionalities, and to determine what areas of chemical aging need to be addressed by further research.

Samuels, W.D.; Camaioni, D.M.; Nelson, D.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Battery chargers  

SciTech Connect

A battery charger designed to be installed in a vehicle, and while utilizing a portion of this vehicle's electrical system, can be used to charge another vehicle's battery or batteries. This battery charger has a polarity sensor, and when properly connected to an external battery will automatically switch away from charging the internal battery to charging the external battery or batteries. And, when disconnected from the external battery or batteries will automatically switch back to charging the internal battery, thus making it an automatic vehicle to vehicle battery charger.

Winkler, H.L.

1984-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Idaho Chemical Processing Plant low-level waste grout stabilization development program FY-96 status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general purpose of the Grout Stabilization Development Program is to solidify and stabilize the liquid low-level wastes (LLW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). It is anticipated that LLW will be produced from the following: (1) chemical separation of the tank farm high-activity sodium-bearing waste; (2) retrieval, dissolution, and chemical separation of the aluminum, zirconium, and sodium calcines; (3) facility decontamination processes; and (4) process equipment waste. The main tasks completed this fiscal year as part of the program were chromium stabilization study for sodium-bearing waste and stabilization and solidification of LLW from aluminum and zirconium calcines. The projected LLW will be highly acidic and contain high amounts of nitrates. Both of these are detrimental to Portland cement chemistry; thus, methods to precondition the LLW and to cure the grout were explored. A thermal calcination process, called denitration, was developed to solidify the waste and destroy the nitrates. A three-way blend of Portland cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash was successfully tested. Grout cubes were prepared at various waste loadings to maximize loading while meeting compressive strength and leach resistance requirements. For the sodium LLW, a 25% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 3.5 and a compressive strength of 2,500 pounds per square inch while meeting leach, mix, and flow requirements. It was found that the sulfur in the slag reduces the chromium leach rate below regulatory limits. For the aluminum LLW, a 15% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 8.5 and a compressive strength of 4,350 pounds per square inch while meeting leach requirements. Likewise for zirconium LLW, a 30% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 8.3 and a compressive strength of 3,570 pounds per square inch.

Herbst, A.K.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Use of Chemical Pretreatment to Enhance Liquid Waste of Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details unique chemical pretreatment and processing techniques presently used by utilities in their nuclear plant liquid radwaste treatment programs. It presents specific utility experience from a number of plants employing these processing alternatives.

1999-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

65

Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a graphite-free lithium ion battery can be built, usingK (1990) Lithium Ion Rechargeable Battery. Prog. Batteriesion battery configurations, as all of the cycleable lithium

Doeff, Marca M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Chemical cleaning of porous stainless steel cross-flow filter elements for nuclear waste applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) currently under construction for treatment of High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Hanford Site will rely on cross-flow ultrafiltration to provide solids-liquid separation as a core part of the treatment process. To optimize process throughput, periodic chemical cleaning of the porous stainless steel filter elements has been incorporated into the design of the plant. It is currently specified that chemical cleaning with nitric acid will occur after significant irreversible membrane fouling is observed. Irreversible fouling is defined as fouling that cannot be removed by backpulsing the filter. PNNL has investigated chemical cleaning processes as part of integrated tests with HLW simulants and with actual Hanford tank wastes. To quantify the effectiveness of chemical cleaning, the residual membrane resistance after cleaning was compared against the initial membrane resistance for each test in a series of long-term fouling tests. The impact of the small amount of residual resistance in these tests could not be separated from other parameters and the historical benchmark of >1 GPM/ft2 for clean water flux was determined to be an adequate metric for chemical cleaning. Using the results from these tests, a process optimization strategy is presented suggesting that for the simulant material under test, the value of chemical cleaning may be suspect. The period of enhanced filtration may not be enough to offset the down time required for chemical cleaning, without respect to the other associated costs.

Billing, Justin M.; Daniel, Richard C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

67

Battery Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cranking batteries are not appropriate for extended use since disharging the battery deeply can rapidly destroy the thin plates. ...

68

Potential chemical hazards during retrieval of TRU waste drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory is implementing a program to retrieve a large number of transuranic (TRU) waste containers retrievably stored under earthen cover on three pads. The waste containers will be inspected and overpacked or repackaged as necessary. The majority of the containers are drums (> 16,000) and, as shown in Table 1,99.9% are 208-L (55-gal.) drums. The 208-L drums are reported to be of mild steel construction with removable lids and gaskets. The gaskets are believed to be permeable to hydrogen, but their permeability to volatile organic compounds (VOCS) is not known. As part of the retrieval operations, the drums will be penetrated and then fitted with a carbon-filter-containing venting device to ensure they do not contain flammable gases. A fully contained and high-efficiency air particulate (HEPA) filtered venting system with gas analysis capability for insertion of the vent device has been designed and is being constructed. A Hazards Analysis (HA) has been performed on the system to identify and evaluate potential accidents arising from the operation of the drum venting system.

Kosiewicz, S.T.; Thomas, C.C. Jr.; Sasser, M.K.; Foxx, C.L.; Gruetzmacher, K.M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Challenges in Future Li-Battery Research. Phil Trans. RoyalBatteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes Marca M. Doeffduring cell discharge. Battery-a device consisting of one or

Doeff, Marca M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has received spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim storage and reprocessing since 1953. Reprocessing of SNF has resulted in an existing inventory of 1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid waste and 3800 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of calcine, in addition to the 768 metric tons (MT) of SNF and various other fuel materials in inventory. To date, the major activity of the ICPP has been the reprocessing of SNF to recover fissile uranium; however, recent changes in world events have diminished the demand to recover and recycle this material. As a result, DOE has discontinued reprocessing SNF for uranium recovery, making the need to properly manage and dispose of these and future materials a high priority. In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, as amended, disposal of SNF and high-level waste (HLW) is planned for a geological repository. Preparation of SNF, HLW, and other radioactive wastes for disposal may include mechanical, physical, and/or chemical processes. This plan outlines the program strategy of the ICPP Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) to develop and demonstrate the technology required to ensure that SNF and radioactive waste will properly stored and prepared for final disposal. Program elements in support of acceptable interim storage and waste minimization include: developing and implementing improved radioactive waste treatment technologies; identifying and implementing enhanced decontamination and decommissioning techniques; developing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) recycle capabilities; and developing and implementing improved technologies for the interim storage of SNF.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals  

SciTech Connect

A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

72

Chemical Applications of Electrohydraulic Cavitation for Hazardous Waste Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have been investigating the fundamental chemistry and physics underlying the application of electrohydraulic cavitation as induced by pulsed-power plasma discharge in water, by spark-gap discharge in water (i.e., lithotripsy) and by pulsed (and/or continuous) ultrasonic irradiation (i.e., sonolysis) of water for the elimination of chlorinated hydrocarbons from water. These three different applications of electric power share a common physical thread, which involves hydraulic cavitation, production of shock waves, release of high energy light, production of hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen atoms, hydrogen peroxide and aquated electrons. The chemical changes of compounds in water pulsed with these different sources of power are induced in part by the violent collapse of cavitation bubbles.

Hoffmann, M. R.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Rechargeable Heat Battery's Secret Revealed: Solar Energy Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rechargeable Heat Battery Rechargeable Heat Battery's Secret Revealed Solar energy capture in chemical form makes it storable and transportable January 11, 2011 | Tags: Chemistry,...

74

CHARACTERIZATION OF INDIVIDUAL CHEMICAL REACTIONS CONSUMING ACID DURING NUCLEAR WASTE PROCESSING AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 136B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conversion of legacy radioactive high-level waste at the Savannah River Site into a stable glass waste form involves a chemical pretreatment process to prepare the waste for vitrification. Waste slurry is treated with nitric and formic acids to achieve certain goals. The total quantity of acid added to a batch of waste slurry is constrained by the catalytic activity of trace noble metal fission products in the waste that can convert formic acid into hydrogen gas at many hundreds of times the radiolytic hydrogen generation rate. A large block of experimental process simulations were performed to characterize the chemical reactions that consume acid prior to hydrogen generation. The analysis led to a new equation for predicting the quantity of acid required to process a given volume of waste slurry.

Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Newell, J.; Stone, M.

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

75

Preparation and Characterization of Chemical Plugs Based on Selected Hanford Waste Simulants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of preparation and characterization of chemical plugs based on selected Hanford Site waste simulants. Included are the results of chemical plug bench testing conducted in support of the M1/M6 Flow Loop Chemical Plugging/Unplugging Test (TP-RPP-WTP-495 Rev A). These results support the proposed plug simulants for the chemical plugging/ unplugging tests. Based on the available simulant data, a set of simulants was identified that would likely result in chemical plugs. The three types of chemical plugs that were generated and tested in this task consisted of: 1. Aluminum hydroxide (NAH), 2. Sodium aluminosilicate (NAS), and 3. Sodium aluminum phosphate (NAP). While both solvents, namely 2 molar (2 M) nitric acid (HNO3) and 2 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at 60C, used in these tests were effective in dissolving the chemical plugs, the 2 M nitric acid was significantly more effective in dissolving the NAH and NAS plugs. The caustic was only slightly more effecting at dissolving the NAP plug. In the bench-scale dissolution tests, hot (60C) 2 M nitric acid was the most effective solvent in that it completely dissolved both NAH and NAS chemical plugs much faster (1.5 2 x) than 2 M sodium hydroxide. So unless there are operational benefits for the use of caustic verses nitric acid, 2 M nitric acid heated to 60C C should be the solvent of choice for dissolving these chemical plugs. Flow-loop testing was planned to identify a combination of parameters such as pressure, flush solution, composition, and temperature that would effectively dissolve and flush each type of chemical plug from preformed chemical plugs in 3-inch-diameter and 4-feet-long pipe sections. However, based on a review of the results of the bench-top tests and technical discussions, the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Research and Technology (R&T), Engineering and Mechanical Systems (EMS), and Operations concluded that flow-loop testing of the chemically plugged pipe sections would not provide any additional information or useful data. The decision was communicated through a Sub Contract Change Notice (SCN-070) that included a revised scope as follows: Photographing the chemical plugs in the pipes before extrusion to compare the morphology of aged gels with that of fresh gels. Setting up an extrusion apparatus and extruding the chemical plugs. Documenting the qualitative observations on the efforts to remove the chemical plug materials from the pipe sections. Performing X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of extruded gel samples to detect any crystallization of gel during storage. Disposing of the extruded gel as a waste. Documenting the analytical results in a test report. There were no significant morphological differences between the fresh and aged plugs except for an overgrowth of small transparent crystals on the surface of the aged NAS gel plug. An initial pressure of 15 KPa for the NAS plug and from ~2 to 6 KPa for the NAH plug. Following extrusion, the NAP plug sections were thixotropic. The bulk of all the aged gel plugs consisted of amorphous material with nitratine constituting the crystalline phase. A separate question about the whether the current in-tank waste conditions will bound the future multi-tank blended feed conditions for the Waste Treatment Plant is outside the scope of this study.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Gunderson, Katie M.; Baum, Steven R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Poloski, Adam P.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

EA-437; Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and Process Waste Liquid Collection Systems Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

437; Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and 437; Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and Process Waste Liquid Collection Systems Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Idaho National Engineering Laboratory TABLE OF CONTENTS Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and Process Waste Liquid Collection Systems Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Idaho National Engineering Laboratory 1. INTRODUCTION 2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 2.1 Purpose and Need of the Proposed Action 2.2 Description of the Affected Facilities 2.3 Description of Proposed Action 2.4 Alternatives to the Proposed Action 2.5 Separate But Related Actions 3. AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Physical Environment 3.3 Biological Resources 3.4 Cultural Resources 3.5 Environmental Quality and Monitoring Programs

77

Battery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery module includes a plurality of battery cells and a system configured for passing a fluid past at least a portion of the plurality of battery cells in a parallel manner.

Dougherty, Thomas J; Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B; Andrew, Michael G

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

Soluble Lead Flow Battery: Soluble Lead Flow Battery Technology  

SciTech Connect

GRIDS Project: General Atomics is developing a flow battery technology based on chemistry similar to that used in the traditional lead-acid battery found in nearly every car on the road today. Flow batteries store energy in chemicals that are held in tanks outside the battery. When the energy is needed, the chemicals are pumped through the battery. Using the same basic chemistry as a traditional battery but storing its energy outside of the cell allows for the use of very low cost materials. The goal is to develop a system that is far more durable than todays lead-acid batteries, can be scaled to deliver megawatts of power, and which lowers the cost of energy storage below $100 per kilowatt hour.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Energy-saving cements obtained from chemical gypsum and other industrial wastes  

SciTech Connect

The main sources, properties and uses of chemical gypsum are reviewed and the possibility of its utilization for the manufacturing process of calcium sulfoaluminate cements is explored. In this process other industrial wastes, as sources of reactive silica and alumina, can be employed. Phosphogypsum, blast-furnace slag and fly ash were the main by-products investigated. The principal properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cements, such as synthesis, hydration and strength, were discussed. Some durability problems and suggested solutions were particularly emphasized.

Beretka, J. [CSIRO Div. of Building, Construction and Engineering, Highett, Victoria (Australia)] [CSIRO Div. of Building, Construction and Engineering, Highett, Victoria (Australia); Cioffi, R. [Univ. Degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione] [Univ. Degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione; Marroccoli, M.; Valenti, G.L. [Univ. della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell`Ambiente] [Univ. della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell`Ambiente

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batteries Batteries battery/cell diagram Battery/Cell Diagram Batteries are important to our everyday lives and show up in various consumer electronics and appliances, from MP3 players to laptops to our vehicles. Batteries play an important role in our vehicles and are gradually becoming more and more important as they assume energy storage responsibilities from fuel in vehicle propulsion systems. A battery is a device that stores chemical energy in its active materials and converts it, on demand, into electrical energy by means of an electrochemical reaction. An electrochemical reaction is a chemical reaction involving the transfer of electrons, and it is that reaction which creates electricity. There are three main parts of a battery: the anode, cathode, and electrolyte. The anode is the "fuel" electrode which gives up electrons to the external circuit to create the flow of electrons or electricity. The cathode is the oxidizing electrode which accepts electrons in the external circuit. Finally, the electrolyte carries the electric current, as ions, inside the cell, between the anode and cathode.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Technology development program for Idaho Chemical Processing Plant spent fuel and waste management  

SciTech Connect

Irradiated nuclear fuel has been reprocessed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) since 1953 to recover uranium-235 and krypton-85 for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The resulting acidic high-level liquid radioactive waste (HLLW) has been solidified to a high-level waste (HLW) calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless-steel bins enclosed in concrete vaults. Residual HLW and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless-steel underground tanks contained in concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also stored at INEL. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium. As a result of the decision to curtail reprocessing the ICPP Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development plan has been implemented to identify acceptable options for disposing of the (1) sodium-bearing liquid radioactive waste, (2) radioactive calcine, and (3) irradiated spent fuel stored at the INEL. The plan was developed jointly by DOE and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc., (WINCO) and with the concurrence of the State of Idaho.

Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.; Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Technology development program for Idaho Chemical Processing Plant spent fuel and waste management  

SciTech Connect

Acidic high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage at the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, and describes the Spent Fuel and HLW Technology program in more detail.

Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.; Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

REVIEW OF ALTERNATIVE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OPTIONS FOR SRS WASTE TANKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A literature review was conducted to support the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for Alternative Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (AECC) for sludge heel removal funded as part of the EM-21 Engineering and Technology program. The goal was to identify potential technologies or enhancements to the baseline oxalic acid cleaning process for chemically dissolving or mobilizing Savannah River Site (SRS) sludge heels. The issues with the potentially large volume of oxalate solids generated from the baseline process have driven an effort to find an improved or enhanced chemical cleaning technology for the tank heels. This literature review builds on a previous review conducted in 2003. A team was charged with evaluating the information in these reviews and developing recommendations of alternative technologies to pursue. The new information in this report supports the conclusion of the previous review that oxalic acid remains the chemical cleaning agent of choice for dissolving the metal oxides and hydroxides found in sludge heels in carbon steel tanks. The potential negative impact of large volumes of sodium oxalate on downstream processes indicates that the amount of oxalic acid used for chemical cleaning needs to be minimized as much as possible or the oxalic acid must be destroyed prior to pH adjustment in the receipt tank. The most straightforward way of minimizing the volume of oxalic acid needed for chemical cleaning is through more effective mechanical cleaning. Using a mineral acid to adjust the pH of the sludge prior to adding oxalic acid may also help to minimize the volume of oxalic acid used in chemical cleaning. If minimization of oxalic acid proves insufficient in reducing the volume of oxalate salts, several methods were found that could be used for oxalic acid destruction. For some waste tank heels, another acid or even caustic treatment (or pretreatment) might be more appropriate than the baseline oxalic acid cleaning process. Caustic treatment of high aluminum sludge heels may be appropriate as a means of reducing oxalic acid usage. Reagents other than oxalic acid may also be needed for removing actinide elements from the tank heels. A systems engineering evaluation (SEE) was performed on the various alternative chemical cleaning reagents and organic oxidation technologies discussed in the literature review. The objective of the evaluation was to develop a short list of chemical cleaning reagents and oxalic acid destruction methods that should be the focus of further research and development. The results of the SEE found that eight of the thirteen organic oxidation technologies scored relatively close together. Six of the chemical cleaning reagents were also recommended for further investigation. Based on the results of the SEE and plan set out in the TTQAP the following broad areas are recommended for future study as part of the AECC task: (1) Basic Chemistry of Sludge Dissolution in Oxalic Acid: A better understanding of the variables effecting dissolution of sludge species is needed to efficiently remove sludge heels while minimizing the use of oxalic acid or other chemical reagents. Tests should investigate the effects of pH, acid concentration, phase ratios, temperature, and kinetics of the dissolution reactions of sludge components with oxalic acid, mineral acids, and combinations of oxalic/mineral acids. Real waste sludge samples should be characterized to obtain additional data on the mineral phases present in sludge heels. (2) Simulant Development Program: Current sludge simulants developed by other programs for use in waste processing tests, while compositionally similar to real sludge waste, generally have more hydrated forms of the major metal phases and dissolve more easily in acids. Better simulants containing the mineral phases identified by real waste characterization should be developed to test chemical cleaning methods. (3) Oxalic Acid Oxidation Technologies: The two Mn based oxidation methods that scored highly in the SEE should be studied to evaluate long term potential. One of the AOP's

Hay, M.; Koopman, D.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Mixed waste chemical compatibility: A testing program for plastic packaging components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of hazardous and radioactive materials packaging is to enable these materials to be transported without posing a threat to the health or property of the general public. To achieve this aim, regulations in the United States have been written establishing general design requirements for such packagings. While no regulations have been written specifically for mixed waste packaging, regulations for the constituents of mixed wastes, i.e., hazardous and radioactive substances, have been codified by the US Department of Transportation (DOT, 49 CFR 173) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, 10 CFR 71). The design requirements for both hazardous [49 CFR 173.24 (e)(1)] and radioactive [49 CFR 173.412 (g)] materials packaging specify packaging compatibility, i.e., that the materials of the packaging @d any contents be chemically compatible with each other. Furthermore, Type A [49 CFR 173.412 (g)] and Type B (10 CFR 71.43) packaging design requirements stipulate that there be no significant chemical, galvanic, or other reaction between the materials and contents of the package. Based on these requirements, a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program was developed in the Transportation Systems Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The program attempts to assure any regulatory body that the issue of packaging material compatibility towards hazardous and radioactive materials has been addressed. This program has been described in considerable detail in an internal SNL document, the Chemical Compatibility Test Plan & Procedure Report (Nigrey 1993).

Nigrey, P.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Characterization of plutonium-bearing wastes by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of characterization studies of plutonium-bearing wastes produced at the US Department of Energy weapons production facilities. Several different solid wastes were characterized, including incinerator ash and ash heels from Rocky Flats Plant and Los Alamos National Laboratory; sand, stag, and crucible waste from Hanford; and LECO crucibles from the Savannah River Site. These materials were characterized by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy. The results showed the presence of discrete PuO{sub 2}PuO{sub 2{minus}x}, and Pu{sub 4}O{sub 7} phases, of about 1{mu}m or less in size, in all of the samples examined. In addition, a number of amorphous phases were present that contained plutonium. In all the ash and ash heel samples examined, plutonium phases were found that were completely surrounded by silicate matrices. Consequently, to achieve optimum plutonium recovery in any chemical extraction process, extraction would have to be coupled with ultrafine grinding to average particle sizes of less than 1 {mu}m to liberate the plutonium from the surrounding inert matrix.

Behrens, R.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Van Deventer, E.; Chaiko, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Battery charger  

SciTech Connect

A battery charging system for charging a battery from an ac source, including control rectifier means for rectifying the charging current, a pulse generator for triggering the rectifier to control the transmission of current to the battery, phase control means for timing the firing of the pulse generator according to the charge on the battery, and various control means for alternatively controlling the phase control means depending upon the charge on the battery; wherein current limiting means are provided for limiting the charging current according to the charge on the battery to protect the system from excessive current in the event a weak battery is being charged, a feedback circuit is provided for maintaining the charge on a battery to compensate for battery leakage, and circuitry is provided for equalizing the voltage between the respective cells of the battery.

Kisiel, E.

1980-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

87

Battery system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a battery system for use with a battery powered device. It comprises a battery pack, the battery pack including; battery cells; positive and negative terminals serially coupled to the battery cells, the positive terminal being adapted to deliver output current to a load and receive input current in the direction of charging current; circuit means coupled to the positive and negative terminals and producing at an analog output terminal an analog output signal related to the state of charge of the battery cells; and display means separate from the battery pack and the battery powered device and electrically coupled to the analog output terminal for producing a display indicating the state of charge of the battery cells in accordance with the analog output signal.

Sokira, T.J.

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Standard practices for dissolving glass containing radioactive and mixed waste for chemical and radiochemical analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These practices cover techniques suitable for dissolving glass samples that may contain nuclear wastes. These techniques used together or independently will produce solutions that can be analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), radiochemical methods and wet chemical techniques for major components, minor components and radionuclides. 1.2 One of the fusion practices and the microwave practice can be used in hot cells and shielded hoods after modification to meet local operational requirements. 1.3 The user of these practices must follow radiation protection guidelines in place for their specific laboratories. 1.4 Additional information relating to safety is included in the text. 1.5 The dissolution techniques described in these practices can be used for quality control of the feed materials and the product of plants vitrifying nuclear waste materials in glass. 1.6 These pr...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Pyrochemical treatment of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant high-level waste calcine  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), has reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuels for the US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1951 to recover uranium, krypton-85, and isolated fission products for interim treatment and immobilization. The acidic radioactive high-level liquid waste (HLLW) is routinely stored in stainless steel tanks and then, since 1963, calcined to form a dry granular solid. The resulting high-level waste (HLW) calcine is stored in seismically hardened stainless steel bins that are housed in underground concrete vaults. A research and development program has been established to determine the feasibility of treating ICPP HLW calcine using pyrochemical technology.This technology is described.

Todd, T.A.; DelDebbio, J.A.; Nelson, L.O.; Sharpsten, M.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Battery charger  

SciTech Connect

A battery charger can charge a battery from a primary power source having a peak voltage exceeding the maximum battery voltage independently producible by the battery. The charger has output terminals, a switch and a feedback circuit. The output terminals are adapted for connection to the battery. The switch can periodically couple the primary power source to the output terminals to raise their voltage above the maximum battery voltage. The feedback device is responsive to the charging occuring at the terminals for limiting the current thereto by varying the duty cycle of the switch.

Chernotsky, A.; Satz, R.

1984-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

91

Organic Rankine Cycle Systems for Waste Heat Recovery in Refineries and Chemical Process Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of a low temperature Rankine cycle system using R-113 working fluid for recovery and conversion of process waste heat is described for typical applications in oil refineries and chemical plants. The system is designed to produce electric power from waste heat available in a temperature range from 180oF to 400oF. The design of a new ORC turbo generator uniquely adapted to applications of this type is presented. The unit has been designed for power outputs from 3/4 to 2 1/2 MW and turbine inlet temperatures from 170 to 260oF. The machine design has eliminated the need for shaft seals, shaft couplings and the usual lube oil console normally required for turbine-generator units. Results of prototype tests of a 1 MW unit are presented. A product package and recommended division of responsibilities between purchaser, A&E company and supplier is presented for installations in refineries and process plants. The product package covers the electrical power range from 3/4 to 5 MW and waste heat streams from 20 to 130 million BTU/hr.

Meacher, J. S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Actinide partitioning from actual Idaho chemical processing plant acidic tank waste using centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.97% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 457 nCi/g in the feed to 0.12 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Iron was partially extracted by the TRUEX solvent, resulting in 23% of the Fe exiting in the strip product. Mercury was also extracted by the TRUEX solvent (76%) and stripped from the solvent in the 0.25 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} wash section.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Todd, T.A.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Recycle/reuse of boiler chemical cleaning wastes in wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler chemical cleaning wastes (BCCW) are generated by the periodic waterside cleaning of utility boilers to remove metallic deposits from boiler tube surfaces. Depending on boiler metallurgy, BCCW generally contain high concentrations of iron and copper or both, as well as other heavy metals such as chromium, lead, nickel, and zinc. BCCW treatment and disposal methods include precipitation, coponding in an ash pond, evaporation in the fireside of an operating boiler (for organic solvents), and contracted off-site disposal. Depending on the type of BCCW chemical treatment methods achieve varying degrees of success. BCCW which contain organic chelating agents can be especially difficult to treat to national pollutant discharge elimination system (NPDES) limits (1 mg/L for both iron and copper) with conventional lime precipitation.Research is being done to evaluate different BCCW treatment and disposal methods. One waste management option under consideration is reuse of BCCW in utility wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. To investigate this option, a series of laboratory tests were performed in which five different types of BCCW were added to the reaction tank of EPRI's bench-scale wet limestone FGD system. This paper presents the results and conclusions from this study.

Stohs, M.; Owens, D.R. (Radian Corp. (US)); Micheletti, W. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Batteries - Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Modeling Over the last few decades, a broad range of battery technologies have been examined at Argonne for transportation applications. Today the focus is on lithium-ion...

95

Battery Only:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Only: Acceleration 0-60 MPH Time: 57.8 seconds Acceleration 14 Mile Time: 27.7 seconds Acceleration 1 Mile Maximum Speed: 62.2 MPH Battery & Generator: Acceleration 0-60...

96

Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved. 1 fig.

Vijayan, S.; Wong, C.F.; Buckley, L.P.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

97

Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved.

Vijayan, Sivaraman (Deep River, CA); Wong, Chi F. (Pembroke, CA); Buckley, Leo P. (Deep River, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Battery Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2011 ... About this Symposium. Meeting, 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Battery Recycling. Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals...

99

Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing  

SciTech Connect

During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed.

Seymour, R.G.

1995-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

Particle Generation by Laser Ablation in Support of Chemical Analysis of High Level Mixed Waste from Plutonium Production Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigate particles produced by laser irradiation and their analysis by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (LA/ICP-MS), with a view towards optimizing particle production for analysis of high level waste materials and waste glass. LA/ICP-MS has considerable potential to increase the safety and speed of analysis required for the remediation of high level wastes from cold war plutonium production operations. In some sample types, notably the sodium nitrate-based wastes at Hanford and elsewhere, chemical analysis using typical laser conditions depends strongly on the details of sample history composition in a complex fashion, rendering the results of analysis uncertain. Conversely, waste glass materials appear to be better behaved and require different strategies to optimize analysis.

J. Thomas Dickinson; Michael L. Alexander

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - News & Highlights - Press  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Press Coverage 9 Press Coverage November 6, 2009 -- Clean Skies News An inside look at Argonne's battery research November 5, 2009 -- AllCarsElectric U.S. Army to test Argonne/EnerDel-developed battery chemistry for Hybrid Humvee October 20, 2009 -- Science Channel Argonne's Mark Peters and Monica Regalbuto talk recycling nuclear waste. September 22, 2009 -- GreenCarsReport.com Your Tax $$$ At Work: Argonne Lab's Better Batteries, Greener Fuels August 25, 2009 -- AllCarsElectric.com Scientists at Argonne Discover New Battery Chemical That Could Increase Durability and Decrease Cost of Li-Ion Technology Two researchers at the Argonne National Laboratory have discovered that adding less than a gram of a molecule they created can effectively control a lithium ion's battery voltage from increasing outside of the safe operating range.

102

Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lithium ion battery can be built, using LiVPO 4 F as both the anode and the cathode!ion battery configurations, as all of the cycleable lithium must originate from the cathode.

Doeff, Marca M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Smart battery controller for lithium/sulfur dioxide batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, the U.S. Army purchases millions of lithium sulfur dioxide batteries for use in portable electronics equipment. Because of their superior rate capability and service life over a wide variety of conditions, lithium batteries are the power source of choice for military equipment. There is no convenient method of determining the available energy remaining in partially used lithium batteries; hence, users do not take full advantage of all the available battery energy. Currently, users replace batteries before each mission, which leads to premature disposal, and results in the waste of millions of dollars in battery energy every year. Another problem of the lithium battery is that it is necessary to ensure complete discharge of the cells when the useful life of the battery has been expended, or when a hazardous condition exists; a hazardous condition may result in one or more of the cells venting. The Electronics Technology and Devices Laboratory has developed a working prototype of a smart battery controller (SBC) that addresses these problems.

Atwater, T.; Bard, A.; Testa, B.; Shader, W.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes Print Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes Print The deceivingly simple appearance of batteries masks their chemical complexity. A typical lithium-ion battery in a cell phone consists of trillions of particles. When a lithium-ion battery is charged or discharged lithium ions move from one electrode to another, filling and unfilling individual, variably-sized battery particles. The rates of these processes determine how much power a battery can deliver. Despite the technological innovations and widespread use of batteries, the mechanism behind charging and discharging particles remains largely a mystery, partly because it is difficult to visualize the motion of lithium ions for a significant number of battery particles at nanoscale resolution.

105

Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes Print Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes Print The deceivingly simple appearance of batteries masks their chemical complexity. A typical lithium-ion battery in a cell phone consists of trillions of particles. When a lithium-ion battery is charged or discharged lithium ions move from one electrode to another, filling and unfilling individual, variably-sized battery particles. The rates of these processes determine how much power a battery can deliver. Despite the technological innovations and widespread use of batteries, the mechanism behind charging and discharging particles remains largely a mystery, partly because it is difficult to visualize the motion of lithium ions for a significant number of battery particles at nanoscale resolution.

106

The production of chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1993--March 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic objective of this project is to convert waste streams from the food processing industry to usable fuels and chemicals using novel bioreactors. These bioreactors should allow economical utilization of waste (whey, waste sugars, waste starch, bottling wastes, candy wastes, molasses, and cellulosic wastes) by the production of ethanol, acetone/butanol, organic acids (acetic, lactic, and gluconic), yeast diacetyl flavor, and antifungal compounds. Continuous processes incorporating various processing improvements such as simultaneous product separation and immobilized cells are being developed to allow commercial scale utilization of waste stream. The production of ethanol by a continuous reactor-separator is the process closest to commercialization with a 7,500 liter pilot plant presently sited at an Iowa site to convert whey lactose to ethanol. Accomplishments during 1993 include installation and start-up of a 7,500 liter ICRS for ethanol production at an industry site in Iowa; Donation and installation of a 200 liter yeast pilot Plant to the project from Kenyon Enterprises; Modeling and testing of a low energy system for recovery of ethanol from vapor is using a solvent absorption/extractive distillation system; Simultaneous saccharification/fermentation of raw corn grits and starch in a stirred reactor/separator; Testing of the ability of `koji` process to ferment raw corn grits in a `no-cook` process.

Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, H.; Salicetti-Piazza, L.; Borgos-Rubio, N.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Electrochemical processes (i.e. inter-conversion between electric energy and chemical energy) are essential for rechargeable battery materials. Many  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) are essential for rechargeable battery materials. Many conversions between structural phases in the electrodes rechargeable battery cell. Both sensitivity and resolution are expected to be improved significantly with our in situ Li ion motion in a battery cell during the charge/discharge process, thus to understand ionic

Weston, Ken

108

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 2, Chemical constituents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Chemical Pretreatment And Enzymatic Hydrolysis Of Mixed Source-Separated Organic (SSO) And Wood Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper examines the effectiveness of two pretreatments on Source-Separated Organic waste (SSO) mixed with wood wastes: long term lime for SSO mixed with forestry (more)

Faye, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The destruction of hazardous chemical waste by oxidation in supercritical water  

SciTech Connect

The chemistry of oxidation in supercritical water is being investigated for development into a practical destruction process for hazardous chemical waste. In principle, a wide variety of waste streams might be treated by this technology, including those that are unsuitable for incineration because of high water content. To establish a basis for extrapolation of kinetic measurements to a variety of compounds, a mechanism is being developed for oxidation in supercritical water on the basis of conventional free-radical reactions, with modifications for high pressures and high concentrations of water. Global rate expressions for oxidation of methane and methanol in supercritical water have been determined. A base mechanism and modifications to the mechanism to account for the roles of hydrogen bonding and water dimer formation have been investigated for CO. On this limited basis, reasonable agreement between model and experimental results has been obtained. Further verification of the model with experimental results will provide insight into the roles of hydrogen bonding and water dimer formation in oxidation in supercritical water. 30 refs., 3 tabs.

Rofer, C.K.; Streit, G.E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

STATUS OF CHEMICAL CLEANING OF WASTE TANKS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT - 9114  

SciTech Connect

Chemical Cleaning is currently in progress for Tanks 5 and 6 at the Savannah River Site. The Chemical Cleaning process is being utilized to remove the residual waste heel remaining after completion of Mechanical Sludge Removal. This work is required to prepare the tanks for closure. Tanks 5 and 6 are 1950s vintage carbon steel waste tanks that do not meet current containment standards. These tanks are 22.9 meters (75 feet) in diameter, 7.5 meters (24.5 feet) in height, and have a capacity of 2.84E+6 liters (750,000 gallons). Chemical Cleaning adds 8 wt % oxalic acid to the carbon steel tank to dissolve the remaining sludge heel. The resulting acidic waste solution is transferred to Tank 7 where it is pH adjusted to minimize corrosion of the carbon steel tank. The Chemical Cleaning flowsheet includes multiple strikes of acid in each tank. Acid is delivered by tanker truck and is added to the tanks through a hose assembly connected to a pipe penetration through the tank top. The flowsheet also includes spray washing with acid and water. This paper includes an overview of the configuration required for Chemical Cleaning, the planned flowsheet, and an overview of technical concerns associated with the process. In addition, the current status of the Chemical Cleaning process in Tanks 5 and 6, lessons learned from the execution of the process, and the path forward for completion of cleaning in Tanks 5 and 6 will also be discussed.

Thaxton, D; Geoff Clendenen, G; Willie Gordon, W; Samuel Fink, S; Michael Poirier, M

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Battery Collection and Recycling in Europe: Five Years after the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper will also refer to the interface between the Batteries Directive and the Waste Electrical Equipment Directive, indeed, approximately 90 % by weight of...

114

Screening values for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals that Lack Established Occupational Exposure Limits  

SciTech Connect

Over 1,500 different volatile chemicals have been reported in the headspaces of tanks used to store high-level radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Concern about potential exposure of tank farm workers to these chemicals has prompted efforts to evaluate their toxicity, identify chemicals that pose the greatest risk, and incorporate that information into the tank farms industrial hygiene worker protection program. Established occupation exposure limits for individual chemicals and petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures have been used elsewhere to evaluate about 900 of the chemicals. In this report headspace concentration screening values were established for the remaining 600 chemicals using available industrial hygiene and toxicological data. Screening values were intended to be more than an order of magnitude below concentrations that may cause adverse health effects in workers, assuming a 40-hour/week occupational exposure. Screening values were compared to the maximum reported headspace concentrations.

Poet, Torka S.; Mast, Terryl J.; Huckaby, James L.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

115

Use of resin-bearing wastes from coke and coal chemicals production at the Novokuznetsk Metallurgical Combine  

SciTech Connect

The coke and coal chemicals plant at the Novokuznetsk Metallurgical Combine is making trial use of a technology that recycles waste products in 'tar ponds.' Specialists from the Ekomash company have installed a recycling unit in one area of the plant's dump, the unit including an inclined conveyor with a steam heater and a receiving hopper The coal preparation shop receives the wastes in a heated bin, where a screw mixes the wastes with pail of the charge for the coking ovens. The mixture subsequently travels along a moving conveyor belt together with the rest of the charge materials. The addition of up to 2% resin-bearing waste materials to the coal charge has not had any significant effect on the strength properties of the coke.

Kul'kova, T.N.; Yablochkin, N.V.; Gal'chenko, A.I.; Karyakina, E.A.; Litvinova, V.A.; Gorbach, D.A.

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Batteries - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Battery Research, Development, and Testing Advanced Battery Research, Development, and Testing Argonne's Research Argonne plays a major role in the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) energy storage program within its Office of Vehicle Technologies. Activities include: Developing advanced anode and cathode materials under DOE's longer term exploratory R&D program Leading DOE's applied R&D program focused on improving lithium-ion (Li-Ion) battery technology for use in transportation applications Developing higher capacity electrode materials and electrolyte systems that will increase the energy density of lithium batteries for extended electric range PHEV applications Conducting independent performance and life tests on other advanced (Li-Ion, Ni-MH, Pb-Acid) batteries. Argonne's R&D focus is on advanced lithium battery technologies to meet the energy storage needs of the light-duty vehicle market.

117

Battery technology handbook  

SciTech Connect

This book is a comprehensive reference work on the types of battery available, their characteristics and applications. Topics considered include introduction, guidelines to battery selection, battery characteristics, battery theory and design, battery performance evaluation, battery applications, battery charging, and battery supplies.

Crompton, T.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Battery separators  

SciTech Connect

Novel, improved battery separators carrying a plurality of polymeric ribs on at least one separator surface. The battery separators are produced by extruding a plurality of ribs in the form of molten polymeric rib providing material onto the surface of a battery separator to bond the material to the separator surface and cooling the extruded rib material to a solidified state. The molten polymeric rib providing material of this invention includes a mixture or blend of polypropylenes and an ethylene propylene diene terpolymer.

Battersby, W. R.

1984-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

119

Development of biological and chemical methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage facilities. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous chemicals in the environment have received ever increasing attention in recent years. In response to ongoing problems with hazardous waste management, Congress enacted the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976. In 1980, Congress adopted the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), commonly called Superfund to provide for emergency spill response and to clean up closed or inactive hazardous waste sites. Scientists and engineers have begun to respond to the hazardous waste challenge with research and development on treatment of waste streams as well as cleanup of polluted areas. The magnitude of the problem is just now beginning to be understood. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List as of September 13 1985, contained 318 proposed sites and 541 final sites (USEPA, 1985). Estimates of up to 30,000 sites containing hazardous wastes (1,200 to 2,000 of which present a serious threat to public health) have been made (Public Law 96-150). In addition to the large number of sites, the costs of cleanup using available technology are phenomenal. For example, a 10-acre toxic waste site in Ohio is to be cleaned up by removing chemicals from the site and treating the contaminated groundwater. The federal government has already spent more than $7 million to remove the most hazardous wastes and the groundwater decontamination alone is expected to take at least 10 years and cost $12 million. Another example of cleanup costs comes from the State of California Commission for Economic Development which predicts a bright economic future for the state except for the potential outlay of $40 billion for hazardous waste cleanup mandated by federal and state laws.

NONE

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Characterization of Waste Tar Associated with Abandoned Wood Chemical Plant Sites in Northwest Pennsylvania, USA  

SciTech Connect

Over 70 wood chemical plants operated in northern Pennsylvania between ca. 1890 and 1950, all located within 72 km of the New York state border. Their original purpose was to salvage the small unwanted hardwood trees left behind by the lumber mills, and to make charcoal, calcium acetate and methanol for a number of industrial uses via destructive distillation. At many old wood chemical plant sites, unknown quantities of wood tar remain as a residual contaminant and pose a pollution threat to aquatic life in nearby streams. Research on the composition and properties of residual wood tars from five abandoned industrial sites in Pennsylvania are described. Weathered wood tars were more viscous and contained fewer volatile and semivolatile organic compounds than did soil-buried tars. Phenol, 2-methylphenol (o-cresol), 4-methylphenol (p-cresol), and 2, 4-dimethylphenol were found in all sampled tars. These water-soluble phenolic compounds were released quasi-instantaneously in aqueous solution, followed by a slower rate of release, consistent with the behavior of similar compounds in other dense non-aqueous liquids. Air-exposed wood tar deposits developed a hard crust, which contained fewer volatiles and semivolatiles and had a higher softening point than other samples. These tars eroded to form a powdered soil colonized by lichens and mosses. Residual wood tar material found at one site was shown to be thermally altered, likely during the historical destruction of the chemical plant by fire. Recovered wood tar wastes have a relatively high heating value and may have use as a potential, but limited, alternate energy source.

Edendorn, H.M.; Severson, D. (Allegheny Institute of Natural History, Bradford, PA)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The removal of mercury from solid mixed waste using chemical leaching processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to evaluate chemical leaching as a technique to treat soils, sediments, and glass contaminated with either elemental mercury or a combination of several mercury species. Potassium iodide/iodine solutions were investigated as chemical leaching agents for contaminated soils and sediments. Clean, synthetic soil material and surrogate storm sewer sediments contaminated with mercury were treated with KI/I{sub 2} solutions. It was observed that these leaching solutions could reduce the mercury concentration in soil and sediments by 99.8%. Evaluation of selected posttreatment sediment samples revealed that leachable mercury levels in the treated solids exceeded RCRA requirements. The results of these studies suggest that KI/I{sub 2} leaching is a treatment process that can be used to remove large quantities of mercury from contaminated soils and sediments and may be the only treatment required if treatment goals are established on Hg residual concentrations in solid matrices. Fluorescent bulbs were used to simulate mercury contaminated glass mixed waste. To achieve mercury contamination levels similar to those found in larger bulbs such as those used in DOE facilities a small amount of Hg was added to the crushed bulbs. The most effective agents for leaching mercury from the crushed fluorescent bulbs were KI/I{sub 2}, NaOCl, and NaBr + acid. Radionuclide surrogates were added to both the EPA synthetic soil material and the crushed fluorescent bulbs to determine the fate of radionuclides following chemical leaching with the leaching agents determined to be the most promising. These experiments revealed that although over 98% of the dosed mercury solubilized and was found in the leaching solution, no Cerium was measured in the posttreatment leaching solution. This finding suggest that Uranium, for which Ce was used as a surrogate, would not solubilize during leaching of mercury contaminated soil or glass.

Gates, D.D.; Chao, K.K.; Cameron, P.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Battery Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... By the mid-1990's due to manufacturers changing the composition of ... for electric drive vehicles is dependent battery performance, cost, and...

123

Sodium--sulphur battery system. Annual report, May 19, 1975--May 19, 1976. [Dow Chemical U. S. A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of the hollow-glass-fiber sodium--sulfur battery progressed significantly. Glass fiber quality improved greatly, and the fiber spinning and assembly machinery was made capable of more uniform operation. Impurities in the sulfur, including H, C, Zn/sup + +/, and Al/sup + + +/, do not appear to affect cell lifetime, while impurities in the Na are important. The Ca and ''oxide'' contents of the Na must be held to low levels. Corrosion products of a 316 stainless steel case are harmless to at least 75-day lifetimes. The Mg content of aluminum alloys can leach out in the catholyte and cause cell resistance to increase. Lifetime does not seem to be a function of total current passed or current density across the fibers. On 1000-fiber, 0.5-Ah cells, over 1400 deep charge--discharge cycles were achieved in 75 days of operating life. A larger 5-Ah cell went through 130 cycles at over 80 percent depth. Cell resistance and capacity remained constant, even at the /sup 1///sub 2/ hour rate. At lesser depths of discharge, the cells lasted longer. Failure was usually in the fibers when ''dirty'' Na was used, and usually just below the tube sheet when ''clean'' Na was used. An updated estimate of ''cost for sale'' of the bare cell is approximately $23.15 per kWh, based on 0.8-kWh cells. 21 figures, 3 tables.

Levine, C.A.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Vehicle Battery Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Battery Basics Vehicle Battery Basics Vehicle Battery Basics November 22, 2013 - 1:58pm Addthis Batteries are essential for electric drive technologies such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and all-electric vehicles (AEVs). What is a Battery? A battery is a device that stores chemical energy and converts it on demand into electrical energy. It carries out this process through an electrochemical reaction, which is a chemical reaction involving the transfer of electrons. Batteries have three main parts, each of which plays a different role in the electrochemical reaction: the anode, cathode, and electrolyte. The anode is the "fuel" electrode (or "negative" part), which gives up electrons to the external circuit to create a flow of electrons, otherwise

125

Outlook for recycling large and small batteries in the future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although there are many kinds and varieties of batteries, batteries can be subdivided into two basic types, large lead-acid batteries and small disposable batteries. Small cells contain different metals depending upon the configuration. These materials include iron, zinc, nickel, cadmium, manganese, mercury, silver, and potassium. Recycling these materials is not economically attractive. Most small batteries are thrown away and constitute a small fraction of municipal solid waste (perhaps 1/10%). There is no effective energy savings or economic incentive for recycling and, with the exception of Ni-Cad batteries, no significant environmental incentive. Any recycle scheme would require a significant reward (probably financial) to the consumer for returning the scrap battery. Without a reward, recovery is unlikely. Large batteries of the lead-acid type are composed of lead, acid, and plastic. There is an established recycle mechanism for lead-acid batteries which works quite well. The regulations written under the Hazardous and Solid Waste Disposal Amendments (1985) favor more recycling efforts by scrap metal operators. The reason for this is that recycled batteries are exempt from EPA regulation. If batteries are not recycled, any generator disposing of 6 or more batteries per month is required to have a special EPA license or premit. Currently, working against this incentive is a decreasing demand and low market price for lead which affects waste battery salvage.

Dodds, J.; Goldsberry, J.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery: A Robust and Inexpensive Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery for Grid-Scale Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GRIDS Project: USC is developing an iron-air rechargeable battery for large-scale energy storage that could help integrate renewable energy sources into the electric grid. Iron-air batteries have the potential to store large amounts of energy at low costiron is inexpensive and abundant, while oxygen is freely obtained from the air we breathe. However, current iron-air battery technologies have suffered from low efficiency and short life spans. USC is working to dramatically increase the efficiency of the battery by placing chemical additives on the batterys iron-based electrode and restructuring the catalysts at the molecular level on the batterys air-based electrode. This can help the battery resist degradation and increase life span. The goal of the project is to develop a prototype iron-air battery at significantly cost lower than todays best commercial batteries.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Circulating current battery heater  

SciTech Connect

A circuit for heating energy storage devices such as batteries is provided. The circuit includes a pair of switches connected in a half-bridge configuration. Unidirectional current conduction devices are connected in parallel with each switch. A series resonant element for storing energy is connected from the energy storage device to the pair of switches. An energy storage device for intermediate storage of energy is connected in a loop with the series resonant element and one of the switches. The energy storage device which is being heated is connected in a loop with the series resonant element and the other switch. Energy from the heated energy storage device is transferred to the switched network and then recirculated back to the battery. The flow of energy through the battery causes internal power dissipation due to electrical to chemical conversion inefficiencies. The dissipated power causes the internal temperature of the battery to increase. Higher internal temperatures expand the cold temperature operating range and energy capacity utilization of the battery. As disclosed, either fixed frequency or variable frequency modulation schemes may be used to control the network.

Ashtiani, Cyrus N. (West Bloomfield, MI); Stuart, Thomas A. (Toledo, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Urban waste compost: Effects on physical, chemical, and biochemical soil properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-term field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of the additions of urban waste compost on the physical and chemical properties and enzymatic activities in a calcareous soil (Fluventic Xerochrept). Total Porosity (pores >50 pm measured on thin soil sections from undisturbed samples by image analysis) was greater in the plots treated with compost than the control plots due to a larger amount of elongated pores. In the amended plots total and humified organic C, Pb, Cu, and Zn showed a significant increase compared with nonamended plots. Enzymatic activities (L-asparaginase, arylsulphatase, dehydrogenase, phosphodiesterase, and alkaline phosphomonoesterase) were significantly enhanced by the compost addition thus indicating no inhibiting influence of the heavy metals present. The increased levels of the arylsulphatase, dehydrogenase, phosphodiesterase, and phosphomonoesterase activities were significantly correlated with total porosity: the first three with pores ranging from 50 to 1000 {mu}m, mainly with pores 50 to 200 {mu}m in size and phosphomonoesterase only with pores whose size was <500 {mu}m. L-asparaginase activity was not correlated with porosity. Only arylsulphatase, dehydrogenase, and phosphodiesterase were negatively correlated with bulk density. 44 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Giusquiani, P.L.; Gigliotti, G.; Businelli, D. [Istituto di Chimica Agraria dell`Universita, Perugia (Italy)] [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

European battery market  

SciTech Connect

The electric battery industry in Europe is discussed. As in any other part of the world, battery activity in Europe is dependent on people, prosperity, car numbers, and vehicle design. The European battery industry is discussed from the following viewpoints: battery performance, car design, battery production, marketing of batteries, battery life, and technology changes.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Battery loading device  

SciTech Connect

A battery loading device for loading a power source battery, built in small appliances having a battery loading chamber for selectively loading a number of cylindrical unit batteries or a one body type battery having the same voltage as a number of cylindrical unit batteries, whereby the one body type battery and the battery loading chamber are shaped similarly and asymmetrically in order to prevent the one body type battery from being inserted in the wrong direction.

Phara, T.; Suzuki, M.

1984-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

Battery pack  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A battery pack is described, having a center of mass, for use with a medical instrument including a latch, an ejector, and an electrical connector, the battery pack comprising: energy storage means for storing electrical energy; latch engagement means, physically coupled to the energy storage means, for engaging the latch; ejector engagement means, physically coupled to the energy storage means, for engaging the ejector; and connector engagement means, physically coupled to the energy storage means, for engaging the connector, the latch engagement means, ejector engagement means, and connector engagement means being substantially aligned in a plane offset from the center of mass of the battery pack.

Weaver, R.J.; Brittingham, D.C.; Basta, J.C.

1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

132

Principles of an Atomtronic Battery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An asymmetric atom trap is investigated as a means to implement a "battery" that supplies ultracold atoms to an atomtronic circuit. The battery model is derived from a scheme for continuous loading of a non-dissipative atom trap proposed by Roos et al.(Europhysics Letters V61, 187 (2003)). The trap is defined by longitudinal and transverse trap frequencies and corresponding trap energy heights. The battery's ability to supply power to a load is evaluated as a function of an input atom flux and power. For given trap parameters and input flux the battery is shown to have a resonantly optimum value of input power. The battery behavior can be cast in terms of an equivalent circuit model; specifically, for fixed input flux and power the battery is modeled in terms of a Th\\'{e}venin equivalent chemical potential and internal resistance. The internal resistance establishes the maximum power that can be supplied to a circuit, the heat that will be generated by the battery, and that noise will be imposed on the circuit. We argue that any means of implementing a battery for atomtronics can be represented by a Th\\'{e}venin equivalent and that its performance will likewise be determined by an internal resistance.

Alex A. Zozulya; Dana Z. Anderson

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

133

Battery Council International  

SciTech Connect

Forecasts of electric battery use, economic impacts of electric batteries, and battery technology and research were presented at the conference. (GHT)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a discussion of proposed experimental work, additional data analysis, and future modeling programs. These proposals have led to recent investigations into the mercury issue and the effect of co-precipitating noble metals which will be documented in two separate reports. SRS hydrogen generation work since 2002 will also be collected and summarized in a future report on the effect of noble metal-sludge matrix interactions on hydrogen generation. Other potential factors for experimental investigation include sludge composition variations related to both the washing process and to the insoluble species with particular attention given to the role of silver and to improving the understanding of the interaction of nitrite ion with the noble metals.

Koopman, D. C.

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Evaluation Study for Large Prismatic Lithium-Ion Cell Designs Using Multi-Scale Multi-Dimensional Battery Model (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Addresses battery requirements for electric vehicles using a model that evaluates physical-chemical processes in lithium-ion batteries, from atomic variations to vehicle interface controls.

Kim, G. H.; Smith, K.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Chemical Technology Division. Annual technical report, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1995 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (3) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (4) processes for separating and recovering selected elements from waste streams, concentrating low-level radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; (5) electrometallurgical treatment of different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (6) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems.

Laidler, J.J.; Myles, K.M.; Green, D.W.; McPheeters, C.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Bipolar battery  

SciTech Connect

A bipolar battery having a plurality of cells. The bipolar battery includes: a negative electrode; a positive electrode and a separator element disposed between the negative electrode and the positive electrode, the separator element electrically insulating the electrodes from one another; an electrolyte disposed within at least one of the negative electrode, the positive electrode and the separator element; and an electrode containment structure including a cup-like electrode holder.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Chemical and Charge Imbalance Induced by Radionuclide Decay: Effects on Waste Form Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a technical report summarizing the experimental and theoretical results for model waste form of aluminosilicate pollucite, obtained from January to September, 2012.

Jiang, Weilin; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

139

Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Battery: Hydrogen Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid Scale Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

GRIDS Project: LBNL is designing a flow battery for grid storage that relies on a hydrogen-bromine chemistry which could be more efficient, last longer and cost less than todays lead-acid batteries. Flow batteries are fundamentally different from traditional lead-acid batteries because the chemical reactants that provide their energy are stored in external tanks instead of inside the battery. A flow battery can provide more energy because all that is required to increase its storage capacity is to increase the size of the external tanks. The hydrogen-bromine reactants used by LBNL in its flow battery are inexpensive, long lasting, and provide power quickly. The cost of the design could be well below $100 per kilowatt hour, which would rival conventional grid-scale battery technologies.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The environmentally safe battery  

SciTech Connect

There are three aspects to an environmentally safe battery. The first deals with the manufacturing process, the second with the use of environmentally friendly materials, and the third with the disposal and/or recycling of spent units. In this paper, several ongoing programs at Sandia National Laboratories that relate to the environmentally conscious manufacturing of batteries, are discussed. The solvent substitution/elimination program is a two-pronged effort, aimed at identifying new solvents which are compatible with the environment, while at the same time developing dry process cleaning technology. The joining program is evaluating new solvents for flux removal as well as the development of fluxless soldering processes. In the area of welding, new cleaning processes are under study. Chemical microsensors are under development that are capable of identifying and quantifying single chemical species. These sensors have been used to monitor and improve processes using toxic/hazardous solvents. 1 ref., 1 fig.

Levy, S.C.; Brown, N.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Microsensors for in-situ chemical, physical, and radiological characterization of mixed waste. 1998 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

'A widespread need exists for portable, real-time, in-situ chemical, physical, and radiological sensors for characterization of mixed wastes, groundwater, contaminated solids, and process streams. None of the currently available technologies offer a clear path to the development of sensors that are miniature, cost-effective, selective, highly sensitive with a wide dynamic range, and have the ability to work in air or liquid while providing chemical, physical, and radiological information. The objective of this research program is to conduct the fundamental research necessary to develop microcantilever-based micromechanical sensors for in-situ characterization of groundwater, sediments, and mixed wastes. Chemical selectivity will be achieved by coupling surface modification chemistry with molecular recognition agents. Physical measurements of adsorption (absorption) induced deflection (bending) and resonance frequency variation of microcantilevers can be achieved with extreme precision resulting in ppb-ppt sensitivity. Good progress has been made in the first nine months of this project. Progress has been made in three focus areas: radiation detection, detection of heavy metals in water, modification of microcantilever surfaces for chemical selectivity, and pH measurement.'

Thundat, T.G.; Warmack, R.J.; Dabestani, R.; Britt, P.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Brown, G.M.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Use of Batch and Column Methodologies to Assess Utility Waste Leaching and Subsurface Chemical Attenuation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Often, a combination of batch and column methods is used in the laboratory to test wastes for leaching and attenuation potentials. This literature review addresses the strengths and limitations of using these two methods to predict leachate generation and subsequent attenuation at coal combustion waste management sites.

1991-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

143

Vehicle battery polarity indicator  

SciTech Connect

Battery jumper cables provide an effective means to connect a charged battery to a discharged battery. However, the electrodes of the batteries must be properly connected for charging to occur and to avoid damage to the batteries. A battery polarity indicator is interposed between a set of battery jumper cables to provide a visual/aural indication of relative battery polarity as well as a safety circuit to prevent electrical connection where polarities are reversed.

Cole, L.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

Battery charging system  

SciTech Connect

A battery charging system designed to charge a battery, especially a nickel-cadmium (Ni-cd) battery from a lead acid power supply without overcharging, and to charge uniformly a plurality of batteries in parallel is described. A non-linear resistance is utilized and is matched to the voltage difference of the power supply battery and the batteries being charged.

Komatsu, K.; Mabuchi, K.

1982-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

145

Lithium Rechargeable Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to obviate the deficiencies of currently used electrolytes in lithium rechargeable batteries, there is a compelling need for the development of solvent-free, highly conducting solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs). The problem will be addressed by synthesizing a new class of block copolymers and plasticizers, which will be used in the formulation of highly conducting electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries. The main objective of this Phase-I effort is to determine the efficacy and commercial prospects of new specifically designed SPEs for use in electric and hybrid electric vehicle (EV/HEV) batteries. This goal will be achieved by preparing the SPEs on a small scale with thorough analyses of their physical, chemical, thermal, mechanical and electrochemical properties. SPEs will play a key role in the formulation of next generation lithium-ion batteries and will have a major impact on the future development of EVs/HEVs and a broad range of consumer products, e.g., computers, camcorders, cell phones, cameras, and power tools.

Robert Filler, Zhong Shi and Braja Mandal

2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

146

Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batteries to someone by Batteries to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Batteries Battery Systems Applied Battery Research Long-Term Exploratory Research Ultracapacitors Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Batteries battery/cell diagram Battery/Cell Diagram Batteries are important to our everyday lives and show up in various

147

Better Batteries from Waste Sulfur  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 28, 2013 ... Although there are some industrial uses for sulfur, the amount generated from refining fossil fuels far outstrips the current need for the element.

148

Chemical and Charge Imbalance Induced by Radionuclide Decay: Effects on Waste Form Structure  

SciTech Connect

This is a milestone document covering the activities to validate theoretical calculations with experimental data for the effect of the decay of 90Sr to 90Zr on materials properties. This was done for a surragate waste form strontium titanate.

Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Jaffe, John E.; Jiang, Weilin; Strachan, Denis M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Simulation of chemical reaction fronts in anaerobic digestion of solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study for parallelisation of a code for a nonlinear system of evolution equations is presented. It describes the propagation of reaction fronts in anaerobic waste digestion. These occur as a consequence of heterogeneous initial distributions of ...

Hermann J. Eberl

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE I REPORT AUGUST 1997 - JULY 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In exploring methods to recycle boiler ash (BA) and waste water treatment sludge (WWTS), by-products generated from Keyspan's power plants, into commercially viable materials, we synthesized chemically bonded cements (CBC) offering the following three specific characteristics; (1) immobilization of hazardous heavy metals, such as Pb, Ni, and V, (2) rapid hardening and setting properties, and (3) development of high mechanical strength. The CBCs were prepared through an acid-base reaction between these by-products acting as the solid base reactants and the sodium polyphosphate solution as the cement-forming acid reactant, followed by a hydrating reaction. Furthermore, two additives, the calcium aluminate cements (CAC) and the calcium silicate cements (CSC) were incorporated into the CBC systems to improve their properties. Using a CBC formulation consisting of 53.8 wt% WWTS, 23.1 wt% CSC, and 23.1 wt% [40 wt% -(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}]{sub 2} the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) tests showed that the concentrations of Pb, Ni, and V metals leached out from the specimens were minimal. This formulation originally contained {approx} 28800 mg/kg of Pb, {approx} 6300 mg/kg of Ni, and {approx} 11130 mg/kg of V; the amounts leaching into the acid extraction fluid were only 0.15 mg/L of Pb, 0.15 mg/L of Ni, and 4.63 mgiL of V. On the other hand, CBC specimens derived from a formulation consisting of 42 wt% BA, 18 wt% CAC and 40 wt% [40 wt% -(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}] displayed an excellent compressive strength of 10.8 MPa at an early curing age of 2 hours after mixing at room temperature. The reason for its rapid hardening was due to a high exothermic energy evolved by the acid-base reaction. Furthermore, when these specimens were immersed for 28 days in water at 25 C, and exposed for 20 hours to steam at 80 C, a very high compressive strength of 3.32 MPa developed. Two physico-chemical factors played an important role in improving the mechanical strength of the specimens: One was the formation of two well-crystallized phases, hydroxyapatite [Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH)] and sodium vanadium sulfate hydrate [Na{sub 2}V(SO{sub 4}){sub 2},4H{sub 2}O], as the reaction products in the cement bodies; the other factor reflected the dense microstructure developed by the growth of these crystalline reaction products. Accordingly, the CBCs derived from these by-products have a high potential for use as remediating material for hazardous heavy metal-contaminated soils, as rapid-setting repair patching and filling materials for damaged roadways and bridge decks, and also as binders in precast concrete products, such as blocks, slabs, and pipes.

SUGAMA,T.; YAGER,K.A.

2002-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

RADIOACTIVE BATTERY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive battery which includes a capsule containing the active material and a thermopile associated therewith is presented. The capsule is both a shield to stop the radiations and thereby make the battery safe to use, and an energy conventer. The intense radioactive decay taking place inside is converted to useful heat at the capsule surface. The heat is conducted to the hot thermojunctions of a thermopile. The cold junctions of the thermopile are thermally insulated from the heat source, so that a temperature difference occurs between the hot and cold junctions, causing an electrical current of a constant magnitude to flow.

Birden, J.H.; Jordan, K.C.

1959-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

152

Laboratory apparatus and operating procedures for determining the long-term environmental fate of EOR chemicals and other waste fluids  

SciTech Connect

The objective of NIPER's EOR Environmental Compatibility project, BE3A, is to determine the compatibilities and potential long term environmental effects of EOR chemicals and injected waste fluids with reservoir fluids and rocks. To aid in this effort, a coreflooding system and injection/analysis procedures were designed. The system consists primarily of a Bureau of Mines stainless steel autoclave, or optional Hassler holder, pumps, and associated hardware. The system uses proven core flooding techniques, and may be used at moderately elevated temperatures and pressures. This report describes the apparatus and procedures involved in performing the research. 1 ref., 4 figs.

Kayser, M.B.; Collins, A.G.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may: cause or significantly...

154

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Shock absorbing battery housing  

SciTech Connect

A portable battery device is provided which dampens shock incident upon the battery device such that an electrical energizable apparatus connected to the battery device is subject to reduced shock whenever the battery device receives an impact. The battery device includes a battery housing of resilient shock absorbing material injection molded around an interconnecting structure which mechanically and electrically interconnects the battery housing to an electrically energizable apparatus.

McCartney, W.J.; Jacobs, J.D.; Keil, M.J.

1984-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

157

Universal battery terminal connector  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a universal battery terminal connector for connecting either a top post battery terminal or a side post battery terminal to a battery cable. The connector comprises an elongated electrically conductive body having: (a) first means for connection to a top post battery terminal; (b) second means for connection to a side post battery terminal, and (c) third means for receiving one end of a battery cable and providing an electrical connection therewith.

Norris, R.W.

1987-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

158

Battery separators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel, improved battery separator and process for making the separator. Essentially, the separator carries a plurality of polymeric ribs bonded to at least one surface and the ribs have alternating elevated segments of uniform maxiumum heights and depressed segments along the length of the ribs.

Le Bayon, R.; Faucon, R.; Legrix, J.

1984-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

159

Alkaline battery  

SciTech Connect

A zinc alkaline secondary battery is described having an excellent cycle characteristic, having a negative electrode which comprises a base layer of zinc active material incorporating cadmium metal and/or a cadmium compound and an outer layer made up of cadmium metal and/or a cadmium compound and applied to the surface of the base layer of zinc active material.

Furukawa, N.; Inoue, K.; Murakami, S.

1984-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

160

Studies Related to Chemical Mechanisms of Gas Formation in Hanford High-Level Nuclear Wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop a more detailed mechanistic understanding of the thermal reactions that lead to gas production in certain high-level waste storage tanks at the Hanford, Washington site. Prediction of the combustion hazard for these wastes and engineering parameters for waste processing depend upon both a knowledge of the composition of stored wastes and the changes that they undergo as a result of thermal and radiolytic decomposition. Since 1980 when Delagard first demonstrated that gas production (H2and N2O initially, later N2 and NH3)in the affected tanks was related to oxidative degradation of metal complexants present in the waste, periodic attempts have been made to develop detailed mechanisms by which the gases were formed. These studies have resulted in the postulation of a series of reactions that account for many of the observed products, but which involve several reactions for which there is limited, or no, precedent. For example, Al(OH)4 has been postulated to function as a Lewis acid to catalyze the reaction of nitrite ion with the metal complexants, NO is proposed as an intermediate, and the ratios of gaseous products may be a result of the partitioning of NO between two or more reactions. These reactions and intermediates have been the focus of this project since its inception in 1996.

E. Kent Barefield; Charles L. Liotta; Henry M. Neumann

2002-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering -Electrochemical Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home > Chemical Sciences & Engineering > Battery Testing * Members * Contact * Publications * Overview * EADL EES Home Electrochemical...

162

Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes  

SciTech Connect

The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and electric vehicles (EVs); a market predicted to be potentially ten times greater than that of consumer electronics. In fact, only Liion batteries can meet the requirements for PHEVs as set by the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), although they still fall slightly short of EV goals. In the case of Li-ion batteries, the trade-off between power and energy shown in Figure 1 is a function both of device design and the electrode materials that are used. Thus, a high power battery (e.g., one intended for an HEV) will not necessarily contain the same electrode materials as one designed for high energy (i.e., for an EV). As is shown in Figure 1, power translates into acceleration, and energy into range, or miles traveled, for vehicular uses. Furthermore, performance, cost, and abuse-tolerance requirements for traction batteries differ considerably from those for consumer electronics batteries. Vehicular applications are particularly sensitive to cost; currently, Li-ion batteries are priced at about $1000/kWh, whereas the USABC goal is $150/kWh. The three most expensive components of a Li-ion battery, no matter what the configuration, are the cathode, the separator, and the electrolyte. Reduction of cost has been one of the primary driving forces for the investigation of new cathode materials to replace expensive LiCoO{sub 2}, particularly for vehicular applications. Another extremely important factor is safety under abuse conditions such as overcharge. This is particularly relevant for the large battery packs intended for vehicular uses, which are designed with multiple cells wired in series arrays. Premature failure of one cell in a string may cause others to go into overcharge during passage of current. These considerations have led to the development of several different types of cathode materials, as will be covered in the next section. Because there is not yet one ideal material that can meet requirements for all applications, research into cathodes for Li-ion batteries is, as of this writ

Doeff, Marca M

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

163

Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes  

SciTech Connect

The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and electric vehicles (EVs); a market predicted to be potentially ten times greater than that of consumer electronics. In fact, only Liion batteries can meet the requirements for PHEVs as set by the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), although they still fall slightly short of EV goals. In the case of Li-ion batteries, the trade-off between power and energy shown in Figure 1 is a function both of device design and the electrode materials that are used. Thus, a high power battery (e.g., one intended for an HEV) will not necessarily contain the same electrode materials as one designed for high energy (i.e., for an EV). As is shown in Figure 1, power translates into acceleration, and energy into range, or miles traveled, for vehicular uses. Furthermore, performance, cost, and abuse-tolerance requirements for traction batteries differ considerably from those for consumer electronics batteries. Vehicular applications are particularly sensitive to cost; currently, Li-ion batteries are priced at about $1000/kWh, whereas the USABC goal is $150/kWh. The three most expensive components of a Li-ion battery, no matter what the configuration, are the cathode, the separator, and the electrolyte. Reduction of cost has been one of the primary driving forces for the investigation of new cathode materials to replace expensive LiCoO{sub 2}, particularly for vehicular applications. Another extremely important factor is safety under abuse conditions such as overcharge. This is particularly relevant for the large battery packs intended for vehicular uses, which are designed with multiple cells wired in series arrays. Premature failure of one cell in a string may cause others to go into overcharge during passage of current. These considerations have led to the development of several different types of cathode materials, as will be covered in the next section. Because there is not yet one ideal material that can meet requirements for all applications, research into cathodes for Li-ion batteries is, as of this

Doeff, Marca M

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

164

Bentonite alteration due to thermal-hydro-chemical processes during the early thermal period in a nuclear waste repository  

SciTech Connect

After closure of an underground nuclear waste repository, the decay of radionuclides will raise temperature in the repository, and the bentonite buffer will resaturate by water inflow from the surrounding host rock. The perturbations from these thermal and hydrological processes are expected to dissipate within hundreds to a few thousand years. Here, we investigate coupled thermal-hydro-chemical processes and their effects on the short-term performance of a potential nuclear waste repository located in a clay formation. Using a simplified geometric configuration and abstracted hydraulic parameters of the clayey formation, we examine geochemical processes, coupled with thermo-hydrologic phenomena, and potential changes in porosity near the waste container during the early thermal period. The developed models were used for evaluating the mineral alterations and potential changes in porosity of the buffer, which can affect the repository performance. The results indicate that mineral alteration and associated changes in porosity induced by early thermal and hydrological processes are relatively small and are expected to not significantly affect flow and transport properties. Chlorite precipitation was obtained in all simulation cases. A maximum of one percent volume fraction of chlorite could be formed, whose process may reduce swelling and sorption capacity of bentonite clay, affecting the performance of the repository. llitisation process was not obtained from the present simulations.

Xu, T.; Senger, R.; Finsterle, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Battery capacity indicator  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a battery capacity indicator for providing a continuous indication of battery capacity for a battery powered device. It comprises means for periodically effecting a first and a second positive discharge rate of the battery; voltage measurement means, for measuring the battery terminal voltage at the first and second positive discharge rates during the operation of the device, and for generating a differential battery voltage value in response thereto; memory means for storing a set of predetermined differential battery voltage values and a set of predetermined battery capacity values, each of the set of predetermined differential battery voltage values defining one of the set of predetermined battery capacity values; comparison means, coupled to the memory means and to the voltage measurement means, for comparing the measured differential battery voltage values with the set of predetermined differential battery voltage values, and for selecting the predetermined battery capacity value corresponding thereto.

Kunznicki, W.J.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

166

Metal-Air Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Battery charging system  

SciTech Connect

A highly efficient battery charging system is described in which the amperehour discharge of the battery is sensed for controlling the battery charging rate. The battery is charged at a relatively high charge rate during a first time period proportional to the extent of battery discharge and at a second lower rate thereafter.

Bilsky, H.W.; Callen, P.J.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

Using environmental risk assessment to evaluate chemical waste disposal in developing countries  

SciTech Connect

Rapid industrialization of countries in the Pacific Basin has been accompanied by dramatic increases in the manufacture, formulation, use, and disposal of hazardous materials and residuals. Countries, particularly those with more developed industrial economies, have implemented waste management strategies in various ways and to varying degrees. Although existing strategies provide useful guidance for developing and newly industrialized countries, each country must consider various factors as it independently develops approaches adapted to its particular circumstances. For example, individual strategies must take into account the types and quantities of wastes being generated or those projected to be generated as a result of anticipated economic development; the ability to access trained staff and capital for effective use of available technologies; the environmental and demographic setting of the alternative sites of the associated facilities; the perceptions as to what risks are acceptable relative to other possibly more traditional health and safety risks; and the institutions available for implementing the waste management strategy. This paper discusses how the principles of risk assessment and comparison can be a constructive force in thinking through these complex decisions and describes how a risk-based analysis contributed to the development of a hazardous waste management strategy in Thailand. 6 refs.

Habegger, L.; Fingleton, D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Liengcharernsit, W.; Hastings, P. (Thailand Development Research Inst., Bangkok (Thailand))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Chemical Engineering Division waste management programs. Quarterly report, January--March 1975  

SciTech Connect

Development work on the study of consolidation techniques for Zircaloy fuel-cladding hulls included scouting tests on volatility schemes for separating the zirconium as the volatile tetrachloride and ignition tests on several Zircaloy materials to further characterize the pyrophoric behavior of Zircaloy. All tests were with nonirradiated metal pending acquisition of irradiated samples. Installation is nearly complete of a glovebox facility for studies on the salvage of alpha-contaminated metals by pyrochemical methods. Disposal of a major portion of fission product tritium formed in light water reactor fuels by deep- well injection of the low-level aqueous waste from plants reprocessing such fuels is being evaluated. The question of siting is a very important factor in determining the feasibility of this particular disposal option. A review is given of the status of information for U. S. sedimentary basins, the areas most likely to be generally suitable for siting of waste wells. Work on the reliability of high-level-waste canisters included an examination of creep, shot- peening, and subcooling of the filler canister below storage temperatures, as methods of relieving stresses induced in canisters due to differential contraction of canister and glass during cooling. A method was investigated for relieving stresses in calcine-filled canisters. Properties of fission product oxides were examined to elucidate possible adverse corrosive effects at the canister-waste interface. (LK)

Steindler, M.J.; Levitz, N.M.; Mecham, W.J.; Seefeldt, W.B.; Trevorrow, L.E.; Winsch, I.O.; Cannon, T.F.; Gerding, T.J.; Kullen, B.J.; Webster, D.S.; Burris, L.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Experimental studies at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant on actinide partitioning from acidic nuclear wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastes generated at ICPP and in the reprocessing of LWR fuel is discussed separately. DHDECMP is used as extractant. Studies on DHDECMP purification and toxicity, diluent effects, reaction kinetics, radioloysis, mixer-settler performance, etc. are reported. 10 tables, 3 figures. (DLC)

McIssaac, L.D.; Baker, J.D.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Schroeder, N.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Background chemistry for chemical warfare agents and decontamination processes in support of delisting waste streams at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The State of Utah, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (DSHW), has declared residues resulting from the demilitarization, treatment, cleanup, and testing of military chemical agents to be hazardous wastes. These residues have been designated as corrosive, reactive, toxic, and acute hazardous (Hazardous Waste No. F999). The RCRA regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 260-280), the Utah Administrative Code (R-315), and other state hazardous waste programs list specific wastes as hazardous but allow generators to petition the regulator to {open_quotes}delist,{close_quotes} if it can be demonstrated that such wastes are not hazardous. The U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) believes that certain categories of F999 residues are not hazardous and has obtained assistance from Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to make the delisting demonstration. The objective of this project is to delist chemical agent decontaminated residues resulting from materials testing activities and to delist a remediation residue (e.g., contaminated soil). To delist these residues, it must be demonstrated that the residues (1) do not contain hazardous quantities of the listed agents; (2) do not contain hazardous quantities of constituents listed in 40 CFR Part 261, Appendix VIII; (3) do not exhibit other characteristics that could define the residues as hazardous; and (4) do not fail a series of acute toxicity tests. The first phase will focus on a subset of the F999 wastes generated at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), where the Army tests the effects of military chemical agents and agent-decontamination procedures on numerous military items. This effort is identified as Phase I of the Delisting Program. Subsequent phases will address other DPG chemical agent decontaminated residues and remediation wastes and similar residues at other installations.

Rosenblatt, D.H.; Small, M.J.; Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Secondary battery  

SciTech Connect

Secondary batteries are described with aqueous acid solutions of lead salts as electrolytes and inert electrode base plates which also contain redox systems in solution. These systems have a standard potential of from -0.1 to + 1.4 V relative to a standard hydrogen reference electrode, do not form insoluble compounds with the electrolytes and are not oxidized or reduced irreversibly by the active compositions applied to the electrode base plates, within their range of operating potentials.

Wurmb, R.; Beck, F.; Boehlke, K.

1978-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

173

Battery management system  

SciTech Connect

A battery management system is described, comprising: a main battery; main battery charging system means coupled to the main battery for charging the main battery during operation of the main battery charging system means; at least one auxiliary battery; primary switching means for coupling the auxiliary battery to a parallel configuration with the main battery charging system means and with the main battery, where upon both the main battery and the auxiliary battery are charged by the main battery charging system means, the primary switching means also being operable to decouple the auxiliary battery from the parallel configuration; and sensing means coupled to the primary switching means and operable to sense presence or absence of charging current from the main battery charging system means to the main battery, the sensing means being operable to activate the switching means for coupling the auxiliary battery into the parallel configuration during presence of the charging current, wherein the main battery charging system provides a charging signal to the main battery having an alternating current component, and wherein the sensing means includes transformer means coupled to the charging signal for inducing a voltage, the voltage being applied to a switching circuit of the switching means.

Albright, C.D.

1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

174

Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vehicles. In fact, every hybrid vehicle on the market currently uses Nickel-Metal-Hydride high-voltage batteries in its battery system. Lithium ion batteries appear to be the...

175

Battery separator material  

SciTech Connect

A novel, improved battery separator material particularly adaptable for use in maintenance free batteries. The battery separator material includes a diatomaceous earth filler, an acrylate copolymer binder and a combination of fibers comprising polyolefin, polyester and glass fibers.

Bodendorf, W. J.

1985-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

176

Battery-Recycling Chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The battery-recycling chain has changed dramatically over the past ten years. The changes have resulted from environmental regulation, changes in battery-processing technology, changes in battery distribution and sales techniques, changes in lead-smelting...

177

Battery depletion monitor  

SciTech Connect

A cmos inverter is used to compare pacemaker battery voltage to a referenced voltage. When the reference voltage exceeds the measured battery voltage, the inverter changes state to indicate battery depletion.

Lee, Y.S.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

178

Automating Personalized Battery Management on Smartphones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 Automating Battery Management . . . . . . .122 Battery Goal Setting UI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Power and Battery Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Falaki, Mohamamd Hossein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Chemical Engineering Division waste management programs. Quarterly report, April--June 1975  

SciTech Connect

Consolidation techniques for Zircaloy fuel-cladding hulls were studied. They included (1) further work on a pyrochemical-volatility scheme for separating the zirconium as the volatile tetrachloride and (2) ignition tests and shock- ignition tests on several Zircaloy materials to further characterize the pyrophoric behavior of Zircaloy and the impact on hulls management. Quantitative results on the reaction with molten zinc chloride are presented. A series of steel-melting experiments examined the compatibility of various crucible materials with the molten steel and provided information on the behavior (distribution) of CeO$sub 2$ and UO$sub 2$ (used as stand-ins for PuO$sub 2$). Examination of existing information on deep-well injection of industrial wastes and on low-level aqueous wastes from fuel reprocessing led to the conclusions that the technology is generally available from industrial practice, that costs are of the order of 10$sup -4$ mill/kWh, that environmental effects could be insignificant in normal operation (but could include contamination of groundwater and resources and also stimulation of minor earthquakes in maloperation), that legal constraints may be the most significant barrier to adopting the practice, and that the site of such an operation would best be at a fuel reprocessing plant located at one of the U. S. sedimentary basins. The conclusions and recommendations from a study of the reliability of high-level-waste canisters are presented. (auth)

Steindler, M.J.; Levitz, N.M.; Mecham, W.J.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Battery Standard Scenario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scenario: Fast Tracking a Battery Standard. ... with developing a new standard specifying quality controls for the development of batteries used in ...

182

Portable battery powered system  

SciTech Connect

In a exemplary embodiment, a battery conditioning system monitors battery conditioning and includes a memory for storing data based thereon; for example, data may be stored representative of available battery capacity as measured during a deep discharge cycle. With a microprocessor monitoring battery operation of a portable unit, a measure of remaining battery capacity can be calculated and displayed. Where the microprocessor is permanently secured to the battery so as to receive operating power therefrom during storage and handling, the performance of a given battery in actual use can be accurately judged since the battery system can itself maintain a count of accumulated hours of use and other relevant parameters.

Koenck, S. E.

1985-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

183

battery2.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAND2006-1982J Solid-State Environmentally Safe Battery for Replacing Lithium Batteries 1. Submitting Organization Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800, MS 1033 Albuquerque, NM...

184

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell phones, laptops, medical devices, and cars. As conventional lithium-ion batteries approach their theoretical energy-storage limits, new technologies are emerging to address the long-term energy-storage improvements needed for mobile systems, electric vehicles in particular. Battery performance depends on the dynamics of evolving electronic and chemical states that, despite advances in material synthesis and structural probes, remain elusive and largely unexplored. At Beamlines 8.0.1 and 9.3.2, researchers studied lithium-ion and lithium-air batteries, respectively, using soft x-ray spectroscopy techniques. The detailed information they obtained about the evolution of electronic and chemical states will be indispensable for understanding and optimizing better battery materials.

185

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell phones, laptops, medical devices, and cars. As conventional lithium-ion batteries approach their theoretical energy-storage limits, new technologies are emerging to address the long-term energy-storage improvements needed for mobile systems, electric vehicles in particular. Battery performance depends on the dynamics of evolving electronic and chemical states that, despite advances in material synthesis and structural probes, remain elusive and largely unexplored. At Beamlines 8.0.1 and 9.3.2, researchers studied lithium-ion and lithium-air batteries, respectively, using soft x-ray spectroscopy techniques. The detailed information they obtained about the evolution of electronic and chemical states will be indispensable for understanding and optimizing better battery materials.

186

CCE CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 VIII. Electrical Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 IX. Hazardous Waste: Hazardous Chemicals Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Appendix B: Means of Lab Waste Disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Appendix C: Where to put specific wastes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Appendix D

Elowitz, Michael

187

Smart battery controller for lithium/sulfur dioxide batteries. Technical report, Jan 89-Apr 91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, the U.S. Army purchases millions of lithium sulfur dioxide batteries for use in portable electronics equipment. Because of their superior rate capability and service life over a wide variety of conditions, lithium batteries are the power source of choice for military equipment. There is no convenient method of determining the available energy remaining in partially used lithium batteries; hence, users do not take full advantage of all the available battery energy. Currently, users replace batteries before each mission, which leads to premature disposal, and results in the waste of millions of dollars in battery energy every year. Another problem of the lithium battery is that it is necessary to ensure complete discharge of the cells when the useful life of the battery has been expended, or when a hazardous condition exists; a hazardous condition may result in one or more of the cells venting. The Electronics Technology and Devices Laboratory has developed a working prototype of a smart battery controller (SBC) that addresses these problems.

Atwater, T.; Bard, A.; Testa, B.; Shader, W.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Chemical Speciation of Strontium, Americium, and Curium in High Level Waste: Predictive Modeling of Phase Partitioning During Tank Processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to measure the effects of organic chelate complexation on the speciation and solubility of Sr and trivalent actinides under strongly basic, high carbonate conditions, similar to those present in high- level waste tanks at U.S. Department of Energy storage sites. We proposed, (1) extension to important chelates not previously studied; (2) studies of completing metal ions; and (3) specific studies using Am(III)/Cm(III). The chelate complexation studies would extend our previous research on EDTA, HEDTA, NTA, and IDA to citrate and oxalate. In addition, we propose to address the possible formation of mixed ligand- ligand complexes for Eu(III) in EDTA-HEDTA, EDTA-NTA, HEDTA-NTA, and ligand-carbonate solutions. The fundamental data on chemical speciation and solubility will be used to develop accurate thermodynamic models which are valid to high ionic strength.

CHOPPIN, GREGORY R.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Piezonuclear battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, a piezonuclear battery generates output power arising from the piezoelectric voltage produced from radioactive decay particles interacting with a piezoelectric medium. Radioactive particle energy may directly create an acoustic wave in the piezoelectric medium or a moderator may be used to generate collision particles for interacting with the medium. In one embodiment a radioactive material ({sup 252}Cf) with an output of about 1 microwatt produced a 12 nanowatt output (1.2% conversion efficiency) from a piezoelectric copolymer of vinylidene fluoride/trifluroethylene.

Bongianni, W.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Piezonuclear battery  

SciTech Connect

A piezonuclear battery generates output power arising from the piezoelectric voltage produced from radioactive decay particles interacting with a piezoelectric medium. Radioactive particle energy may directly create an acoustic wave in the piezoelectric medium or a moderator may be used to generate collision particles for interacting with the medium. In one embodiment a radioactive material (.sup.252 Cf) with an output of about 1 microwatt produced a 12 nanowatt output (1.2% conversion efficiency) from a piezoelectric copolymer of vinylidene fluoride/trifluorethylene.

Bongianni, Wayne L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Li-Ion and Other Advanced Battery Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scientist viewing computer screen scientist viewing computer screen Li-Ion and Other Advanced Battery Technologies The research aims to overcome the fundamental chemical and mechanical instabilities that have impeded the development of batteries for vehicles with acceptable range, acceleration, costs, lifetime, and safety. Its aim is to identify and better understand cell performance and lifetime limitations. These batteries have many other applications, in mobile electronic devices, for example. The work addresses synthesis of components into battery cells with determination of failure modes, materials synthesis and evaluation, advanced diagnostics, and improved electrochemical model development. This research involves: Battery development and analysis; Mathematical modeling; Sophisticated diagnostics;

192

Texas AgriLife Extension Service Procedure 24.01.01.X1.11 Hazardous Chemical Waste Disposal Page 1 of 2 Texas AgriLife Extension Service Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas AgriLife Extension Service Procedure 24.01.01.X1.11 Hazardous Chemical Waste Disposal Page 1 of 2 Texas AgriLife Extension Service Procedures 24.01.01.X1.11 HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL WASTE DISPOSAL, and federal regulations, and is enforced by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ

193

Standard test methods for determining chemical durability of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed waste glasses and multiphase glass ceramics: The product consistency test (PCT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These product consistency test methods A and B evaluate the chemical durability of homogeneous glasses, phase separated glasses, devitrified glasses, glass ceramics, and/or multiphase glass ceramic waste forms hereafter collectively referred to as glass waste forms by measuring the concentrations of the chemical species released to a test solution. 1.1.1 Test Method A is a seven-day chemical durability test performed at 90 2C in a leachant of ASTM-Type I water. The test method is static and conducted in stainless steel vessels. Test Method A can specifically be used to evaluate whether the chemical durability and elemental release characteristics of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed glass waste forms have been consistently controlled during production. This test method is applicable to radioactive and simulated glass waste forms as defined above. 1.1.2 Test Method B is a durability test that allows testing at various test durations, test temperatures, mesh size, mass of sample, leachant volume, a...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite - Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined HLW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the seventh year of the current grant (DE-FG02-05ER63966) we completed an exhaustive study of cold calcination and began work on the development of tank fill materials to fill empty tanks and control residuals. Cold calcination of low and high NOx low activity waste (LAW) SRS Tank 44 and Hanford AN-107 simulants, respectively with metallic Al + Si powders was evaluated. It was found that a combination of Al and Si powders could be used as reducing agents to reduce the nitrate and nitrite content of both low and high NOx LAW to low enough levels to allow the LAW to be solidified directly by mixing it with metakaolin and allowing it to cure at 90 C. During room temperature reactions, NOx was reduced and nitrogen was emitted as N2 or NH3. This was an important finding because now one can pretreat LAW at ambient temperatures which provides a low-temperature alternative to thermal calcination. The significant advantage of using Al and Si metals for denitration/denitrition of the LAW is the fact that the supernate could potentially be treated in situ in the waste tanks themselves. Tank fill materials based upon a hydroceramic binder have been formulated from mixtures of metakaolinite, Class F fly ash and Class C flue gas desulphurization (FGD) ash mixed with various concentrations of NaOH solution. These harden over a period of hours or days depending on composition. A systematic study of properties of the tank fill materials (leachability) and ability to adsorb and hold residuals is under way.

Grutzeck, Michael

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year's project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Battery cell soldering apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A battery cell soldering apparatus for coupling a plurality of battery cells within a battery casing comprises a support platform and a battery casing holder. The support platform operatively supports a soldering block including a plurality of soldering elements coupled to an electrical source together with a cooling means and control panel to control selectively the heating and cooling of the soldering block when the battery cells within the battery casing are held inverted in operative engagement with the plurality of soldering elements by the battery casing holder.

Alvarez, O.E.

1979-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

197

Battery life extender  

SciTech Connect

A battery life extender is described which comprises: (a) a housing disposed around the battery with terminals of the battery extending through top of the housing so that battery clamps can be attached thereto, the housing having an access opening in the top thereof; (b) means for stabilizing temperature of the battery within the housing during hot and cold weather conditions so as to extend operating life of the battery; and (c) a removable cover sized to fit over the access opening in the top of the housing so that the battery can be serviced without having to remove the housing or any part thereof.

Foti, M.; Embry, J.

1989-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

198

Safety Hazards of Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Hazards of Batteries Safety Hazards of Batteries Battery technology is at the heart of much of our technological revolution. One of the most prevalent rechargeable batteries in use today is the Lithium-ion battery. Cell phones, laptop computers, GPS systems, iPods, and even cars are now using lithium- ion rechargeable battery technology. In fact, you probably have a lithium-ion battery in your pocket or purse right now! Although lithium-ion batteries are very common there are some inherent dangers when using ANY battery. Lithium cells are like any other technology - if they are abused and not used for their intended purpose catastrophic results may occur, such as: first-, second-, and third-degree burns, respiratory problems, fires, explosions, and even death. Please handle the lithium-ion batteries with care and respect.

199

Waste Pickup Form User's Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Pickup Form User's Guide Updated: 3/13/12 #12;Introduction: Welcome to the Cal State University Fullerton Online Waste Pickup Form User's Guide. In this guide you will learn what you can use phosphorus-32) 3. To request a pickup of universal waste including light bulbs, aerosol cans, batteries

de Lijser, Peter

200

Battery Balancing at Xtreme Power.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Battery pack imbalance is one of the most pressing issues for companies involved in Battery Energy Storage. The importance of Battery Balancing with respect to (more)

Ganesan, Rahul

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Vehicle Technologies Office: Battery Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Systems to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Battery Systems on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Battery Systems on Twitter Bookmark...

202

Optima Batteries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Optima Batteries Jump to: navigation, search Name Optima Batteries Place Milwaukee, WI Website http:www.optimabatteries.com References Optima Batteries1 Information About...

203

Hybrid Electric Vehicles - HEV Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and component levels. A very detailed battery design model is used to establish these costs for different Li-Ion battery chemistries. The battery design model considers the...

204

Concentrations, profiles, and estimated human exposures for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans from electronic waste recycling facilities and a chemical industrial complex in Eastern China  

SciTech Connect

Electronic shredder waste and dust from e-waste facilities, and leaves and surface soil collected in the vicinity of a large scale e-waste recycling facility in Taizhou, Eastern China, were analyzed for total dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) including 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners. We also determined PCDD/Fs in surface agricultural soils from several provinces in China for comparison with soils from e-waste facilities. Concentrations of total PCDD/Fs were high in all of the matrices analyzed and ranged from 30.9 to 11,400 pg/g for shredder waste, 3460 to 9820 pg/g dry weight for leaves, 2560 to 148,000 pg/g dry weight for workshop-floor dust, and 854 to 10200 pg/g dry weight for soils. We also analyzed surface soils from a chemical industrial complex (a coke-oven plant, a coal-fired power plant, and a chlor-alkali plant) in Shanghai. Concentrations of total PCDD/Fs in surface soil from the chemical industrial complex were lower than the concentrations found in soils from e-waste recycling plants, but higher than the concentrations found in agricultural soils. Agricultural soils from six cities in China contained low levels of total PCDD/Fs. Profiles of dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) of 2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs in soils from e-waste facilities in Taizhou differed from the profiles found in agricultural soils. The estimated daily intakes of TEQs of PCDD/Fs via soil/dust ingestion and dermal exposure were 2 orders of magnitude higher in people at e-waste recycling facilities than in people at the chemical industrial site, implying greater health risk for humans from dioxin exposures at e-waste recycling facilities. The calculated TEQ exposures for e-waste workers from dust and soil ingestion alone were 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the exposures from soils in reference locations. 37 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Ma, J.; Kannan, K.; Cheng, J.; Horii, Y.; Wu, Q.; Wang, W. [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China). School of Environmental Science and Engineering

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

THE CHEMICAL AND RADIATION RESISTANCE OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE AS ENCOUNTERED IN THE NUCLEAR WASTE CLEANING PROCESSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is extremely resistant to gamma irradiation, caustic solution, and dilute nitric acid. PPS is the material of construction for the coalescers used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). After applying the equivalent of 16 years of gamma irradiation and several months of exposures to caustic solution, no dimensional changes nor chemical changes were detected in PPS whether the PPS was in fiber form or in a composite with E-glass fibers. However, PPS acts as a media for heterogeneous nucleation. In particular, PPS appears to favor aluminosilicate formation in saturated solutions of aluminum and silicon in caustic environments. Parallel testing, in progress, is examining the stability of PPS when exposed to the new solvent formulation under development for MCU. Preliminary data, after two months of exposure, PPS is remarkably stable to the new solvent.

Fondeur, F.

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

206

Portable battery powered system  

SciTech Connect

In an exemplary embodiment, a battery monitoring system includes sensors for monitoring battery parameters and a memory for storing data based thereon; for example, data may be stored representative of available battery capacity as measured during a deep discharge cycle, and by monitoring battery current thereafter during operation, a relatively accurate measure of remaining battery capacity becomes available. The battery monitoring system may include programmed processor circuitry and may be secured to the battery so as to receive operating power therefrom during storage and handling; thus, the performance of a given battery in actual use can be accurately judged since the battery system can itself maintain a count of accumulated hours of use and other relevant parameters.

Koenck, S.E.

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

Auxiliary battery charging terminal  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the present invention there is provided an auxiliary battery charging terminal that may selectively engage battery charging circuitry inside a portable radio pager. There is provided a current conducting cap having a downwardly and outwardly flared rim that deforms to lock under the crimped edge an insulating seal ring of a standard rechargeable cell by application of a compressive axial force. The auxiliary battery charging terminal is further provided with a central tip axially projecting upwardly from the cap. The auxiliary terminal may be further provided with a cap of reduced diameter to circumferentially engage the raised battery cathode terminal on the battery cell. A mating recess in a remote battery charging receptacle may receive the tip to captivate the battery cell against lateral displacement. The tip may be further provided with a rounded apex to relieve localized frictional forces upon insertion and removal of the battery cell from the remote battery charging receptacle.

Field, H.; Richter, R. E.

1985-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

208

Rechargeable electric battery system  

SciTech Connect

A rechargable battery, system and method for controlling its operation and the recharging thereof in order to prolong the useful life of the battery and to optimize its operation is disclosed. In one form, an electronic microprocessor is provided within or attached to the battery for receiving and processing electrical signals generated by one or more sensors of battery operational variable and for generating output signals which may be employed to control the charge of the battery and to display one or more variables concerned with the battery operation.

Lemelson, J.H.

1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Artificial neural network simulation of battery performance  

SciTech Connect

Although they appear deceptively simple, batteries embody a complex set of interacting physical and chemical processes. While the discrete engineering characteristics of a battery such as the physical dimensions of the individual components, are relatively straightforward to define explicitly, their myriad chemical and physical processes, including interactions, are much more difficult to accurately represent. Within this category are the diffusive and solubility characteristics of individual species, reaction kinetics and mechanisms of primary chemical species as well as intermediates, and growth and morphology characteristics of reaction products as influenced by environmental and operational use profiles. For this reason, development of analytical models that can consistently predict the performance of a battery has only been partially successful, even though significant resources have been applied to this problem. As an alternative approach, the authors have begun development of a non-phenomenological model for battery systems based on artificial neural networks. Both recurrent and non-recurrent forms of these networks have been successfully used to develop accurate representations of battery behavior. The connectionist normalized linear spline (CMLS) network has been implemented with a self-organizing layer to model a battery system with the generalized radial basis function net. Concurrently, efforts are under way to use the feedforward back propagation network to map the {open_quotes}state{close_quotes} of a battery system. Because of the complexity of battery systems, accurate representation of the input and output parameters has proven to be very important. This paper describes these initial feasibility studies as well as the current models and makes comparisons between predicted and actual performance.

O`Gorman, C.C.; Ingersoll, D.; Jungst, R.G.; Paez, T.L.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Battery cell for a primary battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A battery cell for a primary battery, particularly a flat cell battery to be activated on being taken into use, e.g., when submerged into water. The battery cell comprises a positive current collector and a negative electrode. A separator layer which, being in contact with the negative electrode, is disposed between said negative electrode and the positive current collector. A depolarizing layer containing a depolarizing agent is disposed between the positive current collector and the separate layer. An intermediate layer of a porous, electrically insulating, and water-absorbing material is disposed next to the positive current collector and arranged in contact with the depolarizing agent.

Hakkinen, A.

1984-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

211

Solar battery energizer  

SciTech Connect

A battery energizer for button batteries, such as zinc-silver oxide or zinc-mercuric oxide batteries, that are normally considered unchargeable, provides for energizing of the batteries in a safe and simple manner. A solar cell having a maximum current output (e.g., 20 milliamps) is operatively connected to terminals for releasably receiving a button battery. A light emitting diode, or like indicator, provides an indication of when the battery is fully energized, and additionally assists in preventing overenergization of the battery. The solar cell, terminals, LED, and the like can be mounted on a nonconductive material mounting plate which is mounted by a suction cup and hook to a window, adjacent a light bulb, or the like. A battery charger for conventional dry cell rechargeable batteries (such as nickel-cadmium batteries) utilizes the solar cells, and LED, and a zener diode connected in parallel with terminals. An adaptor may be provided with the terminal for adapting them for use with any conventional size dry cell battery, and a simple dummy battery may be utilized so that less than the full complement of batteries may be charged utilizing the charger.

Thompson, M. E.

1985-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

212

Battery charger polarity circuit control  

SciTech Connect

A normally open polarity sensing circuit is interposed between the charging current output of a battery charger and battery terminal clamps connected with a rechargeable storage battery. Normally open reed switches, closed by battery positive terminal potential, gates silicon controlled recitifiers for battery charging current flow according to the polarity of the battery.

Santilli, R.R.

1982-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

213

Modeling & Simulation - Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of Batteries for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Production of Batteries for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles battery assessment graph Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are currently being implemented in hybrid electric (HEV), plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV), and electric (EV) vehicles. While nickel metal-hydride will continue to be the battery chemistry of choice for some HEV models, Li-ion will be the dominate battery chemistry of the remaining market share for the near-future. Large government incentives are currently necessary for customer acceptance of the vehicles such as the Chevrolet Volt and Nissan Leaf. Understanding the parameters that control the cost of Li-ion will help researchers and policy makers understand the potential of Li-ion batteries to meet battery energy density and cost goals, thus enabling widespread adoption without incentives.

214

Batteries and Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collage of electric cars, plug, battery research lab Collage of electric cars, plug, battery research lab Batteries and Fuel Cells EETD researchers study the basic science and development of advanced batteries and fuel cells for transportation, electric grid storage, and other stationary applications. This research is aimed at developing more environmentally friendly technologies for generating and storing energy, including better batteries and fuel cells. Li-Ion and Other Advanced Battery Technologies Research conducted here on battery technology is aimed at developing low-cost rechargeable advanced electrochemical batteries for both automotive and stationary applications. The goal of fuel cell research is to provide the technologies for the successful commercialization of polymer-electrolyte and solid oxide fuel

215

Dual battery system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dual battery system is described, comprising: a primary first battery having a first open circuit voltage, the first battery including a first positive electrode, a first negative electrode, and a first electrolyte; a second battery having a second open circuit voltage less than the first open circuit voltage, the second battery including a second positive electrode, a second negative electrode, and a second electrolyte stored separately and isolated from the first electrolyte; a pair of positive and negative terminals; and electrical connections connecting the first and second batteries in parallel to the terminals so that, as current is drawn from the batteries, the amount of current drawn from each respective battery at a constant voltage level varies with the magnitude of the current.

Wruck, W.J.

1993-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

216

Aluminum ION Battery  

Lower cost because of abundant aluminum resources ... Li-ion battery (LiC 6 - Mn 2 O 4) 106 4.0 424 Al-ion battery (Al - Mn 2 O 4) 400 2.65 1,060

217

Manufacturer: Panasonic Battery Type: ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Specifi cations Manufacturer: Panasonic Battery Type: Nickel Metal Hydride Rated Capacity: 5.5 Ahr Rated Power: Not Available Nominal Pack Voltage: 158.4 VDC Nominal Cell...

218

BEST for batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Battery Energy Storage Test (BEST) Facility, Hillsborough Township, New Jersey, will investigate advanced battery performance, reliability, and economy and will verify system characteristics and performance in an actual utility environment.

Lihach, N.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Soldier power. Battery charging.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soldier power. Marine. Battery charging. Advertising. Remote. SOFC (NanoDynamics, AMI) 60 watts q SOFC #12;

Hong, Deog Ki

220

Anodes for Batteries  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this chapter is to discuss, "constructive corrosion" as it occurs in power generated devices, specifically batteries.

Windisch, Charles F.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

SLA battery separators  

SciTech Connect

Since they first appeared in the early 1970's, sealed lead acid (SLA) batteries have been a rapidly growing factor in the battery industry - in rechargeable, deep-cycle, and automotive storage systems. The key to these sealed batteries is the binderless, absorptive glass microfiber separator which permits the electrolyte to recombine after oxidation. The result is no free acid, no outgassing, and longer life. The batteries are described.

Fujita, Y.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Nickel/zinc batteries  

SciTech Connect

A review of the design, components, electrochemistry, operation and performance of nickel-zinc batteries is presented. 173 references. (WHK)

McBreen, J.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Primary and secondary ambient temperature lithium batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings collect papers on the subject of batteries. Topics include: lithium-oxygen batteries, lithium-sulphur batteries, metal-metal oxide batteries, metal-nonmetal batteries, spacecraft power supplies, electrochemistry, and battery containment materials.

Gabano, J.P.; Takehara, Z.; Bro, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste: Any laboratory waste, whether chemical or biological, containing radioactive material, should be disposed as radioactive waste. Radioactive waste should be removed from the laboratory to the departmental waste area, soon after finishing the experiment

Maoz, Shahar

225

battery, map parcel, med  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attic *** book teachest Servant dictionary scarf [11] Winery demijohn battery, map AuntLair X] EastAnnex battery[4] Cupboard2 [2] mask DeadEnd rucksack AlisonWriting [16] TinyBalcony [17] gold key. [2] Need new torch battery (see [4]) to enter. Then get painting. [3] To please aunt, must move

Rosenthal, Jeffrey S.

226

Servant dictionary battery, map  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attic *** book teachest Servant dictionary scarf [11] Winery demijohn battery, map AuntLair X] EastAnnex battery[4] Cupboard2 [2] mask DeadEnd rucksack AlisonWriting [16] TinyBalcony [17] gold key. [2] Need new torch battery (see [4]) to enter. Then get painting. [3] To please aunt, must move

Rosenthal, Jeffrey S.

227

Alkaline storage battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alkaline storage battery having located in a battery container a battery element comprising a positive electrode, a negative electrode, a separator and a gas ionizing auxiliary electrode, in which the gas ionizing electrode is contained in a bag of microporous film, is described.

Suzuki, S.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

228

Recycle of battery materials  

SciTech Connect

Studies were conducted on the recycling of advanced battery system components for six different battery systems. These include: Nickel/Zinc, Nickel/Iron, Zinc/Chlorine, Zinc/Bromine, Sodium/Sulfur, and Lithium-Aluminum/Iron Sulfide. For each battery system, one or more processes has been developed which would permit recycling of the major or active materials.

Pemsler, J.P.; Spitz, R.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Sodium sulfur battery seal  

SciTech Connect

This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which a flexible diaphragm sealing elements respectively engage opposite sides of a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

Topouzian, Armenag (Birmingham, MI)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Characterization of the Chemical Changes and Surface Properties ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The specific surface area and the CEC of waste cement increased with an ... Dissolution of Mixed Zinc-Carbon and Alkaline Battery Powders in Sulphuric Acid

231

Lithium sulfide compositions for battery electrolyte and battery electrode coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods of forming lithium-containing electrolytes are provided using wet chemical synthesis. In some examples, the lithium containing electroytes are composed of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7. The solid electrolyte may be a core shell material. In one embodiment, the core shell material includes a core of lithium sulfide (Li.sub.2S), a first shell of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7, and a second shell including one or .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7 and carbon. The lithium containing electrolytes may be incorporated into wet cell batteries or solid state batteries.

Liang, Chengdu; Liu, Zengcai; Fu, Wunjun; Lin, Zhan; Dudney, Nancy J; Howe, Jane Y; Rondinone, Adam J

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

232

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 2, Battery recycling and disposal  

SciTech Connect

Recycling and disposal of spent sodium-sulfur (Na/S) batteries are important issues that must be addressed as part of the commercialization process of Na/S battery-powered electric vehicles. The use of Na/S batteries in electric vehicles will result in significant environmental benefits, and the disposal of spent batteries should not detract from those benefits. In the United States, waste disposal is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Understanding these regulations will help in selecting recycling and disposal processes for Na/S batteries that are environmentally acceptable and cost effective. Treatment processes for spent Na/S battery wastes are in the beginning stages of development, so a final evaluation of the impact of RCRA regulations on these treatment processes is not possible. The objectives of tills report on battery recycling and disposal are as follows: Provide an overview of RCRA regulations and requirements as they apply to Na/S battery recycling and disposal so that battery developers can understand what is required of them to comply with these regulations; Analyze existing RCRA regulations for recycling and disposal and anticipated trends in these regulations and perform a preliminary regulatory analysis for potential battery disposal and recycling processes. This report assumes that long-term Na/S battery disposal processes will be capable of handling large quantities of spent batteries. The term disposal includes treatment processes that may incorporate recycling of battery constituents. The environmental regulations analyzed in this report are limited to US regulations. This report gives an overview of RCRA and discusses RCRA regulations governing Na/S battery disposal and a preliminary regulatory analysis for Na/S battery disposal.

Corbus, D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Breakthrough Flow Battery Cell Stack: Transformative Electrochemical Flow Storage System (TEFSS)  

SciTech Connect

GRIDS Project: UTRC is developing a flow battery with a unique design that provides significantly more power than today's flow battery systems. A flow battery is a cross between a traditional battery and a fuel cell. Flow batteries store their energy in external tanks instead of inside the cell itself. Flow batteries have traditionally been expensive because the battery cell stack, where the chemical reaction takes place, is costly. In this project, UTRC is developing a new stack design that achieves 10 times higher power than todays flow batteries. This high power output means the size of the cell stack can be smaller, reducing the amount of expensive materials that are needed. UTRCs flow battery will reduce the cost of storing electricity for the electric grid, making widespread use feasible.

None

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

234

Breakthrough Flow Battery Cell Stack: Transformative Electrochemical Flow Storage System (TEFSS)  

SciTech Connect

GRIDS Project: UTRC is developing a flow battery with a unique design that provides significantly more power than today's flow battery systems. A flow battery is a cross between a traditional battery and a fuel cell. Flow batteries store their energy in external tanks instead of inside the cell itself. Flow batteries have traditionally been expensive because the battery cell stack, where the chemical reaction takes place, is costly. In this project, UTRC is developing a new stack design that achieves 10 times higher power than todays flow batteries. This high power output means the size of the cell stack can be smaller, reducing the amount of expensive materials that are needed. UTRCs flow battery will reduce the cost of storing electricity for the electric grid, making widespread use feasible.

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

235

Battery condition indicator  

SciTech Connect

A battery condition indicator is described for indicating both the charge used and the life remaining in a rechargeable battery comprising: rate multiplying and counting means for indirectly measuring the charge useed by the battery between charges; means for supplying variable rate clock pulse to the rate multiplying and counting means, the rate of the clock pulses being a function of whether a high current consumption load is connected to the battery or not; timing means for measuring the total time in service of the battery; charge used display means responsive to the rate multiplying and counting means for providing an indication of the charge remaining in the battery; and age display means responsive to the timing means for providing an indication of the life or age of the battery.

Fernandez, E.A.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

236

Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of nickel metal-hydride batteries for electric vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies important environment, health, and safety issues associated with nickel metal-hydride (Ni-MH) batteries and assesses the need for further testing and analysis. Among the issues discussed are cell and battery safety, workplace health and safety, shipping requirements, and in-vehicle safety. The manufacture and recycling of Ni-MH batteries are also examined. This report also overviews the ``FH&S`` issues associated with other nickel-based electric vehicle batteries; it examines venting characteristics, toxicity of battery materials, and the status of spent batteries as a hazardous waste.

Corbus, D.; Hammel, C.J.; Mark, J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Characterization of electrochemical systems and batteries: Materials and systems  

SciTech Connect

Materials are a pacing problem in battery development. The battery environment, particularly in rechargeable batteries, places great demands on materials. Characterization of battery materials is difficult because of their complex nature. In many cases meaningful characterization requires iii situ methods. Fortunately, several new electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques for in situ characterization studies have recently become available, and reports of new techniques have become more frequent. The opportunity now exists to utilize advanced instrumentation to define detailed features, participating chemical species and interfacial structure of battery materials with a precision heretofore not possible. This overview gives key references to these techniques and discusses the application of x-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of battery materials.

McBreen, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Characterization of electrochemical systems and batteries: Materials and systems  

SciTech Connect

Materials are a pacing problem in battery development. The battery environment, particularly in rechargeable batteries, places great demands on materials. Characterization of battery materials is difficult because of their complex nature. In many cases meaningful characterization requires iii situ methods. Fortunately, several new electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques for in situ characterization studies have recently become available, and reports of new techniques have become more frequent. The opportunity now exists to utilize advanced instrumentation to define detailed features, participating chemical species and interfacial structure of battery materials with a precision heretofore not possible. This overview gives key references to these techniques and discusses the application of x-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of battery materials.

McBreen, J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Industrial battery stack  

SciTech Connect

A novel industrial battery stack is disclosed, wherein positive plates which have been longitudinally wrapped with a perforate or semi-perforate material are accurately aligned with respect to the negative plates and separators in the stack during the stacking operation. The novel spacing members of the present invention have a generally U-shaped cross section for engaging through the wrapping a portion of the positive plate adjacent to the longitudinal edges of that plate. Projections protruding substantially from the base of the ''U'' provide the proper distance between the edge of the wrapped plate and an adjacent longitudinal surface. During the stacking and burning operation, this longitudinal surface comprises the back wall of a novel industrial battery plate holder. Following the burning of the battery stack and its subsequent assembly into an appropriate industrial battery case, the spacing member or members act to protect the positive battery plates and retain them in their proper alignment during the operation of the battery. Applicants have also provided a novel apparatus and method for stacking, aligning and burning industrial battery stacks which comprises a battery stack holder having several upstanding walls which define a stacking column having a coplanar terminus. An adjustably locatable partition within said stacking column may be disposed at any of a plurality of positions parallel with respect to the coplanar terminus so that the battery stack holder may be adjusted for any of a variety of given sizes of plates and separators. The battery plates and separators may then be stacked into the battery stack holder so that only the plate lugs extrude beyond the coplanar terminus. A dam is insertable along the top of the battery plates and across the top of the upstanding side walls of the battery stack holder to facilitate the rapid efficient burning of the industrial battery stack.

Digiacomo, H.L.; Sacco, J.A.

1980-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

240

Alan MacDiarmid, Conductive Polymers, and Plastic Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alan MacDiarmid, Conductive Polymers, and Plastic Batteries Alan MacDiarmid, Conductive Polymers, and Plastic Batteries Resources with Additional Information · Patents Alan MacDiarmid ©Alan MacDiarmid/ University of Pennsylvania Photo by Felice Macera Until 1987, the billions of batteries that had been marketed in myriad sizes and shapes all had one thing in common. To make electricity, they depended exclusively upon chemical reactions involving metal components of the battery. But today a revolutionary new type of battery is available commercially. It stores electricity in plastic. Plastic batteries are the most radical innovation in commercial batteries since the dry cell was introduced in 1890. Plastic batteries offer higher capacity, higher voltage, and longer shelf-life than many competitive designs. Companies are testing new shapes and configurations, including flat batteries, that can be bent like cardboard. Researchers expect that the new technology will free electronic designers from many of the constraints imposed by metal batteries such as limited recharging cycles, high weight, and high cost.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Collecting battery data with Open Battery Gareth L. Jones1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collecting battery data with Open Battery Gareth L. Jones1 and Peter G. Harrison2 1,2 Imperial present Open Battery, a tool for collecting data on mobile phone battery usage, describe the data we have a useful tool in future work to describe mobile phone battery traces. 1998 ACM Subject Classification D.4

Imperial College, London

242

A biological/chemical process for reduced waste and energy consumption, Caprolactam production: Phase 1, Select microorganisms and demonstrate feasibility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel biological/chemical process for converting cyclohexane into caprolactam was investigated. Microorganisms in a bioreactor would be used to convert cyclohexane into caprolactone followed by chemical synthesis of caprolactam using ammonia. The proposed bioprocess would be more energy efficient and reduce byproducts and wastes that are generated by the current chemical process. We have been successful in isolating from natural soil and water samples two microorganisms that can utilize cyclohexane as a sole source of carbon and energy for growth. These microorganisms were shown to have the correct metabolic intermediates and enzymes to convert cyclohexane into cyclohexanol, cyclohexanone and caprolactone. Genetic techniques to create and select for caprolactone hydrolase negative-mutants are being developed. These blocked-mutants will be used to convert cyclohexane into caprolactone but, because of the block, be unable to metabolize the caprolactone further and excrete it as a final end product.

St.Martin, E.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Chemical Engineering Annual Report 1999-2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Capacity of Re- chargeable Lithium Batteries Using LiCoO2 , LiMn2 O4 , or LiNiO2 Cathodes," Electrochemical Oligomer, and Li Salts for Application in Rechargeable Lithium Batteries," Electrochemical Society Annual for Lithium-Based Batteries," invited lecture, Chemical Engineering Depart- ment, U. Washington, May, 1997

Velev, Orlin D.

244

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials and electrified interfaces. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1997 are presented.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

1998 Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1998 are presented.

Ackerman, J.P.; Einziger, R.E.; Gay, E.C.; Green, D.W.; Miller, J.F.

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

246

1998 Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1998 are presented.

Ackerman, J.P.; Einziger, R.E.; Gay, E.C.; Green, D.W.; Miller, J.F.

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

247

Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste inspectors. See a hazardous waste inspection. ons, rrosive. n hemicals? ical waste. Waste-like chemicals have als Are you. Are your waste containers properly labeled? us Waste label as soon t Do you accumulate waste in a safe

Wilcock, William

248

Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Coatings on LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 for Li-Ion Battery Composite Cathodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, we report results of a novel synthesis method of thin film conductive carbon coatings on LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} cathode active material powders for lithium-ion batteries. Thin layers of graphitic carbon were produced from a solid organic precursor, anthracene, by a one-step microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) method. The structure and morphology of the carbon coatings were examined using SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. The composite LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrodes were electrochemically tested in lithium half coin cells. The composite cathodes made of the carbon-coated LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} powder showed superior electrochemical performance and increased capacity compared to standard composite LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrodes.

Doeff, M.M.; Kostecki, R.; Marcinek, M.; Wilcoc, J.D.

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

249

Batteries | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Batteries Batteries Batteries A small New York City startup is hoping it has the next big solution in energy storage. A video documents what the company's breakthrough means for the future of grid-scale energy storage. Learn more. First invented by Thomas Edison, batteries have changed a lot in the past century, but there is still work to do. Improving this type of energy storage technology will have dramatic impacts on the way Americans travel and the ability to incorporate renewable energy into the nation's electric grid. On the transportation side, the Energy Department is working to reduce the costs and weight of electric vehicle batteries while increasing their energy storage and lifespan. The Department is also supports research, development and deployment of battery technologies that would allow the

250

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Recycling and disposal of spent sodium-sulfur (Na/S) batteries are important issues that must be addressed as part of the commercialization process of Na/S battery-powered electric vehicles. The use of Na/S batteries in electric vehicles will result in significant environmental benefits, and the disposal of spent batteries should not detract from those benefits. In the United States, waste disposal is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Understanding these regulations will help in selecting recycling and disposal processes for Na/S batteries that are environmentally acceptable and cost effective. Treatment processes for spent Na/S battery wastes are in the beginning stages of development, so a final evaluation of the impact of RCRA regulations on these treatment processes is not possible. The objectives of tills report on battery recycling and disposal are as follows: Provide an overview of RCRA regulations and requirements as they apply to Na/S battery recycling and disposal so that battery developers can understand what is required of them to comply with these regulations; Analyze existing RCRA regulations for recycling and disposal and anticipated trends in these regulations and perform a preliminary regulatory analysis for potential battery disposal and recycling processes. This report assumes that long-term Na/S battery disposal processes will be capable of handling large quantities of spent batteries. The term disposal includes treatment processes that may incorporate recycling of battery constituents. The environmental regulations analyzed in this report are limited to US regulations. This report gives an overview of RCRA and discusses RCRA regulations governing Na/S battery disposal and a preliminary regulatory analysis for Na/S battery disposal.

Corbus, D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Medical and Biohazardous Waste Generator's Guide (Revision 2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as radioactive, mixed, or hazardous waste, depending on theas radioactive, mixed, or chemical waste, depending on the

Waste Management Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Two component absorption/phase separation chemical heat pump to provide temperature amplification to waste heat streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical heat pump that utilizes liquid/liquid phase separation rather than evaporation to separate two components in a heat of mixing chemical heat pump process. 3 figs.

Scott, T.C.; Kaplan, S.I.

1987-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

253

Battery utilizing ceramic membranes  

SciTech Connect

A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range.

Yahnke, Mark S. (Berkeley, CA); Shlomo, Golan (Haifa, IL); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Lithium battery management system  

SciTech Connect

Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

Dougherty, Thomas J. (Waukesha, WI)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

255

Applying the Battery Ownership Model in Pursuit of Optimal Battery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vehicle types, configurations, and use strategies - Accounting for the added utility, battery wear, and infrastructure costs of range-extension techniques (battery swap, fast...

256

Mesoporous Block Copolymer Battery Separators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is ~1-2 $ kg -1 , the cost of battery separators is ~120-240greatly reduce the cost of battery separators. Our approach1-2 $ kg -1 , the cost of a typical battery separator is in

Wong, David Tunmin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Feature - Lithium-air Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Develop Lithium-Air Battery Li-air Li-air batteries hold the promise of increasing the energy density of Li-ion batteries by as much as five to 10 times. But that potential will...

258

EVOLUTION OF CHEMICAL CONDITIONS AND ESTIMATED PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN THE RESIDUAL WASTE LAYER DURING POST-CLOSURE AGING OF TANK 18  

SciTech Connect

This document updates the Eh-pH transitions from grout aging simulations and the plutonium waste release model of Denham (2007, Rev. 1) based on new data. New thermodynamic data for cementitious minerals are used for the grout simulations. Newer thermodynamic data, recommended by plutonium experts (Plutonium Solubility Peer Review Report, LA-UR-12-00079), are used to estimate solubilities of plutonium at various pore water compositions expected during grout aging. In addition, a new grout formula is used in the grout aging simulations and apparent solubilities of coprecipitated plutonium are estimated using data from analysis of Tank 18 residual waste. The conceptual model of waste release and the grout aging simulations are done in a manner similar to that of Denham (2007, Rev. 1). It is assumed that the pore fluid composition passing from the tank grout into the residual waste layer controls the solubility, and hence the waste release concentration of plutonium. Pore volumes of infiltrating fluid of an assumed composition are reacted with a hypothetical grout block using The Geochemist's Workbench{reg_sign} and changes in pore fluid chemistry correspond to the number of pore fluid volumes reacted. As in the earlier document, this results in three states of grout pore fluid composition throughout the simulation period that are termed Reduced Region II, Oxidized Region II, and Oxidized Region III. The one major difference from the earlier document is that pyrite is used to account for reducing capacity of the tank grout rather than pyrrhotite. This poises Eh at -0.47 volts during Reduced Region II. The major transitions in pore fluid composition are shown. Plutonium solubilities are estimated for discrete PuO2(am,hyd) particles and for plutonium coprecipitated with iron phases in the residual waste. Thermodynamic data for plutonium from the Nuclear Energy Agency are used to estimate the solubilities of the discrete particles for the three stages of pore fluid evolution. In Denham (2007, Rev. 1), the solubilities in the oxidized regions were estimated at Eh values in equilibrium with dissolved oxygen. Here, these are considered to be maximum possible solubilities because Eh values are unlikely to be in equilibrium with dissolved oxygen. More realistic Eh values are estimated here and plutonium solubilities calculated at these are considered more realistic. Apparent solubilities of plutonium that coprecipitated with iron phases are estimated from Pu:Fe ratios in Tank 18 residual waste and the solubilities of the host iron phases. The estimated plutonium solubilities are shown. Uncertainties in the grout simulations and plutonium solubility estimates are discussed. The primary uncertainty in the grout simulations is that little is known about the physical state of the grout as it ages. The simulations done here are pertinent to a porous medium, which may or may not be applicable to fractured grout, depending on the degree and nature of the fractures. Other uncertainties that are considered are the assumptions about the reducing capacity imparted by blast furnace slag, the effects of varying dissolved carbon dioxide and oxygen concentrations, and the treatment of silica in the simulations. The primary uncertainty in the estimates of plutonium solubility is that little is known about the exact form of plutonium in the residual waste. Other uncertainties include those inherent in the thermodynamic data, pH variations from those estimated in the grout simulations, the effects of the treatment of silica in the grout simulations, and the effect of varying total dissolved carbonate concentrations. The objective of this document is to update the model for solubility controls on release of plutonium from residual waste in closed F-Area waste tanks. The update is based on new information including a new proposed grout formulation, chemical analysis of Tank 18 samples and more current thermodynamic data for plutonium and grout minerals. In addition, minor changes to the modeling of the grout chemical evolution have been made. It shoul

Denham, M.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

259

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Energy Materials: Battery Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... batteries of miniature electronic devices to large power source of electric vehicles. ... process developments on electrodes and separators and safety design.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Electronically configured battery pack  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Battery packs for portable equipment must sometimes accommodate conflicting requirements to meet application needs. An electronically configurable battery pack was developed to support two highly different operating modes, one requiring very low power consumption at a low voltage and the other requiring high power consumption at a higher voltage. The configurable battery pack optimizes the lifetime and performance of the system by making the best use of all available energy thus enabling the system to meet its goals of operation, volume, and lifetime. This paper describes the cell chemistry chosen, the battery pack electronics, and tradeoffs made during the evolution of its design.

Kemper, D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Zinc-Nickel Battery  

The short lifetime of the conventional zinc-nickel oxide battery has been the primary factor limiting its commercial use, ... Higher voltage, lower co ...

263

Battery Photo Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Battery Photo Archive The following images may be used freely as long as they are accompanied...

264

Prieto Battery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado-based startup company that is developing lithium ion batteries based on nano-structured materials. References Prieto Battery1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

265

Redox Flow Batteries: a Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1137-1164 Date Published 102011 ISSN 1572-8838 Keywords Flow battery, Flow cell, Redox, Regenerative fuel cell, Vanadium Abstract Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are enjoying a...

266

Phylion Battery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Phylion Battery Jump to: navigation, search Name Phylion Battery Place Suzhou, Jiangsu Province,...

267

Nanowire Lithium-Ion Battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... workings of Li-ion batteries, they either lack the nanoscale spatial resolution commensurate with the morphology of the active battery materials and ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

268

How Green Is Battery Recycling?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gaines Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory How Green Is Battery Recycling? 28 th International Battery Seminar and Exhibit Ft. Lauderdale, FL March...

269

Argonne to Advise Battery Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Argonne to advise battery alliance Lithium ion batteries are anticipated to replace gasoline as a major source...

270

Advanced Flow-Battery Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Advanced Flow-Battery Systems ... Abstract Scope, Flow- battery systems (FBS) were originally developed over 30 years ago and have since...

271

Lithium-Ion Battery Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium-Ion Battery Issues IEA Workshop on Battery Recycling Hoboken, Belgium September 26-27, 2011 Linda Gaines Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory...

272

Advanced Flow Battery Electrodes: Low-cost, High-Performance 50-Year Electrode  

SciTech Connect

GRIDS Project: Primus Power is developing zinc-based, rechargeable liquid flow batteries that could produce substantially more energy at lower cost than conventional batteries. A flow battery is similar to a conventional battery, except instead of storing its energy inside the cell it stores that energy for future use in chemicals that are kept in tanks that sit outside the cell. One of the most costly components in a flow battery is the electrode, where the electrochemical reactions actually occur. Primus Power is investigating and developing mixed-metal materials for their electrodes that could ultimately reduce the lifetime cost of flow batteries because they are more durable and long-lasting than electrodes found in traditional batteries. Using these electrodes, Primus Powers flow batteries can be grouped together into robust, containerized storage pods for use by utilities, renewable energy developers, businesses, and campuses.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The contact-temperature ignition (CTI) criteria for propagating chemical reactions including the effect of moisture and application to Hanford waste  

SciTech Connect

To assure the continued absence of uncontrolled condensed-phase chemical reactions in connection with the Hanford waste materials, efforts have been underway including both theoretical and experimental investigations to clarify the requirements for such reactions. This document defines the differences and requirements for homogeneous runaway and propagating chemical reactions incuding a discussion of general contact-temperature ignition (CTI) condition for propagating reactions that include the effect of moisture. The CTI condition implies that the contact temperature or interface temperature between reacted and unreacted materials must exceed the ignition temperature and is compared to experimental data including both synthetic ferrocyanide and surrogate organic materials. In all cases, the occurrences of ignition accompanied by self-propagating reactions are consistent with the theoretical anticipations of the CTI condition.

Cash, R.J.

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

274

ORNL team uses lignin to power green battery | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fred Strohl Communications 865.574.4165 ORNL team uses lignin to power green battery Listen to the audio OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Aug. 16, 2013 -- Lignin is a waste material that is...

275

Condition responsive battery charging circuit  

SciTech Connect

A battery charging circuit includes a ferroresonant transformer having a rectified output for providing a constant output voltage to be supplied to a battery to be charged. Battery temperature is sensed providing an input to a control circuit which operates a shunt regulator associated with the ferroresonant transformer to provide battery charge voltage as a function of battery temperature. In response to a high battery temperature the controller functions to lower the output voltage to the battery, and in response to a low battery temperature, operates to provide a higher output voltage, with suitable control for any battery temperature between minus 10* and plus 150* fahrenheit. As the battery approaches full charge and battery acceptance current falls below a predetermined level, a charge cycle termination control allows charging to continue for a period preset by the operator, at the end of which period, line voltage is removed from the charger thereby terminating the charge cycle.

Reidenbach, S.G.

1980-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

276

Battery paste expander material  

SciTech Connect

Battery paste expander material for the negative plate of a lead--acid storage battery had the following composition: finely divided carbon; barium sulfate; lignosulfonic acid; sulfur; carbohydrates; and Ca/sup 2 +/, Na/sup +/, and NH/sub 4//sup +/ ions. (RWR)

Limbert, J.L.; Procter, H.G.; Poe, D.T.

1971-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

277

Battery capacity measurement and analysis using lithium coin cell battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: DC/DC converter, battery, coin cell, data acquisition, embedded system, energy estimation, power estimation

Sung Park; Andreas Savvides; Mani Srivastava

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Chemical and physical property of rice straw waste and hospital sewage sludge in turned windrow aeration system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most sewage sludge from hospital wastewater treatment plants in Northern Thailand are also being to incinerator and agricultural fields. Land application of hospital sewage sludge has serious effects on environmental. The main goal of this investigation ... Keywords: co-composting, hospital sewage sludge, rice straw waste, turned windrow aeration

Khajornsak Sopajaree; Apisit Sancom

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

High Level Waste Tank Farm Replacement Project for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0831, for the construction and operation of the High-Level Waste Tank Farm Replacement (HLWTFR) Project for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The HLWTFR Project as originally proposed by the DOE and as analyzed in this EA included: (1) replacement of five high-level liquid waste storage tanks with four new tanks and (2) the upgrading of existing tank relief piping and high-level liquid waste transfer systems. As a result of the April 1992 decision to discontinue the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel at INEL, DOE believes that it is unlikely that the tank replacement aspect of the project will be needed in the near term. Therefore, DOE is not proposing to proceed with the replacement of the tanks as described in this-EA. The DOE`s instant decision involves only the proposed upgrades aspect of the project described in this EA. The upgrades are needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act requirements, and the Department`s obligations pursuant to the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement and Consent Order among the Environmental Protection Agency, DOE, and the State of Idaho. The environmental impacts of the proposed upgrades are adequately covered and are bounded by the analysis in this EA. If DOE later proposes to proceed with the tank replacement aspect of the project as described in the EA or as modified, it will undertake appropriate further review pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Impact of increased electric vehicle use on battery recycling infrastructure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

State and Federal regulations have been implemented that are intended to encourage more widespread use of low-emission vehicles. These regulations include requirements of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and regulations pursuant to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and the Energy Policy Act. If the market share of electric vehicles increases in response to these initiatives, corresponding growth will occur in quantities of spent electric vehicle batteries for disposal. Electric vehicle battery recycling infrastructure must be adequate to support collection, transportation, recovery, and disposal stages of waste battery handling. For some battery types, such as lead-acid, a recycling infrastructure is well established; for others, little exists. This paper examines implications of increasing electric vehicle use for lead recovery infrastructure. Secondary lead recovery facilities can be expected to have adequate capacity to accommodate lead-acid electric vehicle battery recycling. However, they face stringent environmental constraints that may curtail capacity use or new capacity installation. Advanced technologies help address these environmental constraints. For example, this paper describes using backup power to avoid air emissions that could occur if electric utility power outages disable emissions control equipment. This approach has been implemented by GNB Technologies, a major manufacturer and recycler of lead-acid batteries. Secondary lead recovery facilities appear to have adequate capacity to accommodate lead waste from electric vehicles, but growth in that capacity could be constrained by environmental regulations. Advances in lead recovery technologies may alleviate possible environmental constraints on capacity growth.

Vimmerstedt, L.; Hammel, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Jungst, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Food Battery Competition Sponsored by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food Battery Competition Sponsored by: The University of Tennessee, Materials Research Society (MRS growing populations and energy needs forever. Batteries have evolved a great deal and when you compare the bulky, heavy, toxic car lead batteries to the novel and outstanding lithium-ion batteries, you can

Tennessee, University of

282

Substation battery-maintenance procedures  

SciTech Connect

The frequency of substation battery failures is gratifyingly low. One trouble spot appears to be extraneous short circuits that drain an otherwise healthy battery. Use of the lead--calcium battery promises to reduce substantially the amount of maintenance that substation batteries need.

Timmerman, M.H.

1976-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Assessment of battery technologies for electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This document, Part 2 of Volume 2, provides appendices to this report and includes the following technologies, zinc/air battery; lithium/molybdenum disulfide battery; sodium/sulfur battery; nickel/cadmium battery; nickel/iron battery; iron/oxygen battery and iron/air battery. (FI)

Ratner, E.Z. (Sheladia Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (USA)); Henriksen, G.L. (ed.) (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Chemical technology division: Annual technical report 1987  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1987 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries--mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet and for the purification of ferrous scrap; (6) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (7) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of various minerals; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 54 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO/sub 2/ recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO/sub 2/ recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Date: ____________ MATERIAL FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 2003 Date: ____________ MATERIAL FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL 1) Source: Bldg: ________________________________________ Disinfection? cc YES, Autoclaved (each container tagged with `Treated Biomedical Waste') cc YES, Chemical

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

290

Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

291

CCE CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Chemicals--Safety measures. 3. Hazardous wastes. I. National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Prudent) produced two major reports on laboratory safety and laboratory waste disposal: Prudent Practices Nanomaterials, 77 4.G Biohazards, 79 4.H Hazards from Radioactivity, 79 5 Management of Chemicals 83 5.A

Tai, Yu-Chong

292

PNGV battery test manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual defines a series of tests to characterize aspects of the performance or life cycle behavior of batteries for hybrid electric vehicle applications. Tests are defined based on the Partnership for New Generation Vehicles (PNGV) program goals, although it is anticipated these tests may be generally useful for testing energy storage devices for hybrid electric vehicles. Separate test regimes are defined for laboratory cells, battery modules or full size cells, and complete battery systems. Some tests are common to all three test regimes, while others are not normally applicable to some regimes. The test regimes are treated separately because their corresponding development goals are somewhat different.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Polymeric battery separators  

SciTech Connect

Configurations of cross-linked or vulcanized amphophilic or quaternized block copolymer of haloalkyl epoxides and hydroxyl terminated alkadiene polymers are useful as battery separators in both primary and secondary batteries, particularly nickel-zinc batteries. The quaternized block copolymers are prepared by polymerizing a haloalkyl epoxide in the presence of a hydroxyl terminated 1,3-alkadiene to form a block copolymer that is then reacted with an amine to form the quaternized or amphophilic block copolymer that is then cured or cross-linked with sulfur, polyamines, metal oxides, organic peroxides and the like.

Minchak, R. J.; Schenk, W. N.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

294

BEEST: Electric Vehicle Batteries  

SciTech Connect

BEEST Project: The U.S. spends nearly a $1 billion per day to import petroleum, but we need dramatically better batteries for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles (EV/PHEV) to truly compete with gasoline-powered cars. The 10 projects in ARPA-Es BEEST Project, short for Batteries for Electrical Energy Storage in Transportation, could make that happen by developing a variety of rechargeable battery technologies that would enable EV/PHEVs to meet or beat the price and performance of gasoline-powered cars, and enable mass production of electric vehicles that people will be excited to drive.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Battery utilizing ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range. 2 figs.

Yahnke, M.S.; Shlomo, G.; Anderson, M.A.

1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

SOLAR BATTERY CHARGERS FOR NIMH BATTERIES1 Abstract -This paper proposes new solar battery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOLAR BATTERY CHARGERS FOR NIMH BATTERIES1 Abstract - This paper proposes new solar battery chargers for NiMH batteries. Used with portable solar panels, existing charge control methods are shown of consumer portable solar arrays. These new arrays are lightweight, durable, and flexible and have been

Lehman, Brad

297

Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite-Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined Sodium Bearing Waste (HLW and/or LLW)  

SciTech Connect

Zeolites are extremely versatile. They can adsorb liquids and gases and serve as cation exchange media. They occur in nature as well cemented deposits. The ancient Romans used blocks of zeolitized tuff as a building material. Using zeolites for the management of radioactive waste is not a new idea, but a process by which the zeolites can be made to act as a cementing agent is. Zeolitic materials are relatively easy to synthesize from a wide range of both natural and man-made substances. The process under study is derived from a well known method in which metakaolin (an impure thermally dehydroxylated kaolinite heated to {approx}700 C containing traces of quartz and mica) is mixed with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and reacted in slurry form (for a day or two) at mildly elevated temperatures. The zeolites form as finely divided powders containing micrometer ({micro}m) sized crystals. However, if the process is changed slightly and only just enough concentrated sodium hydroxide solution is added to the metakaolinite to make a thick crumbly paste and then the paste is compacted and cured under mild hydrothermal conditions (60-200 C), the mixture will form a hard ceramic-like material containing distinct crystalline tectosilicate minerals (zeolites and feldspathoids) imbedded in an X-ray amorphous hydrated sodium aluminosilicate matrix. Due to its lack of porosity and vitreous appearance we have chosen to call this composite a ''hydroceramic''.

Grutzeck, Michael W.

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Block copolymer electrolytes for lithium batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ethylene Carbonate for Lithium Ion Battery Use. Journal oflithium atoms in lithium-ion battery electrolyte. Chemicalcapacity fading of a lithium-ion battery cycled at elevated

Hudson, William Rodgers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Battery SEAB Presentation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Battery SEAB Presentation Battery SEAB Presentation Battery SEAB Presentation More Documents & Publications Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Day 1, Session 1...

300

Vehicle Technologies Office: Applied Battery Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Battery Research to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Applied Battery Research on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Applied Battery...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Aerospatiale Batteries ASB | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aerospatiale Batteries ASB Jump to: navigation, search Name Aerospatiale Batteries (ASB) Place France Product Research, design and manufacture of Thermal Batteries. References...

302

Battery SEAB Presentation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Battery SEAB Presentation Battery SEAB Presentation Battery SEAB Presentation More Documents...

303

Automating Personalized Battery Management on Smartphones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

get the new available battery capacity that can be assignedof expected lifetime of 1% battery capacity in minutes. Forof energy supply (battery capacity) and demand on cell

Falaki, Mohamamd Hossein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

What's Next for Batteries? - Energy Innovation Portal  

What's Next for Batteries? July 30, 2013. What will batteries look like in the future? How will they work? Argonne National Laboratory battery research experts ...

305

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support.

Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Method and apparatus for measuring the state of charge in a battery based on volume of battery components  

SciTech Connect

The state of charge of electrochemical batteries of different kinds is determined by measuring the incremental change in the total volume of the reactive masses in the battery. The invention is based on the principle that all electrochemical batteries, either primary or secondary (rechargeable), produce electricity through a chemical reaction with at least one electrode, and the chemical reactions produce certain changes in the composition and density of the electrode. The reactive masses of the electrodes, the electrolyte, and any separator or spacers are usually contained inside a battery casing of a certain volume. As the battery is used, or recharged, the specific volume of at least one of the electrode masses will change and, since the masses of the materials do not change considerably, the total volume occupied by at least one of the electrodes will change. These volume changes may be measured in many different ways and related to the state of charge in the battery. In one embodiment, the volume change can be measured by monitoring the small changes in one of the principal dimensions of the battery casing as it expands or shrinks to accommodate the combined volumes of its components.

Rouhani, S. Zia (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

307

Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the claimed invention to combine chemical treatment with microfiltration process to treat groundwater, leachate from contaminated soil washing, surface and run-off waters contaminated with toxic metals, radionuclides and trace amounts of organics from variety of sources. The process can also be used to treat effluents from industrial processes such as discharges associated with smelting, mining and refining operations. Influent contaminants amenable to treatment are from a few mg/L to hundreds of mg/L. By selecting appropriate precipitation, ion exchange and adsorption agents and conditions, efficiencies greater than 99.9 percent can be achieved for removal of contaminants. The filtered water for discharge can be targeted with either an order of magnitude greater or lower than contaminant levels for drinking water.

Vijayan, S.; Wong, Chi Fun; Buckley, L.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Batteries Breakout Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

models (trailers with engine or battery for long drives) "Out-of-the-Box" Ideas * High voltage packs> 600V Packs (getting rid of high current components) * Cars driven on...

309

Sodium sulfur battery seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure is directed to an improvement in a sodium sulfur battery construction in which a seal between various battery compartments is made by a structure in which a soft metal seal member is held in a sealing position by holding structure. A pressure applying structure is used to apply pressure on the soft metal seal member when it is being held in sealing relationship to a surface of a container member of the sodium sulfur battery by the holding structure. The improvement comprises including a thin, well-adhered, soft metal layer on the surface of the container member of the sodium sulfur battery to which the soft metal seal member is to be bonded.

Mikkor, Mati (Ann Arbor, MI)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Parallel flow diffusion battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

Yeh, Hsu-Chi (Albuquerque, NM); Cheng, Yung-Sung (Albuquerque, NM)

1984-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

Parallel flow diffusion battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Flywheel Battery Commercialization Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High energy-density flywheel batteries, already in development as load leveling devices for electric and hybrid vehicles, have the potential to form part of an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) for utilities and their customers. This comprehensive assessment of the potential of flywheels in a power conditioning role shows that a sizeable market for flywheel battery-UPS systems may emerge if units can be manufactured in sufficient volume.

1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

313

Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vanadium redox flow battery, sometimes abbreviated as VRB, is an energy storage technology with significant potential for application in a wide range of contexts. Vanadium redox batteries have already been used in a number of demonstrations in small-scale utility-scale applications, and it is believed that the technology is close to being viable for more widespread use. This report examines the vanadium redox technology, including technical performance and cost issues that drive its application today...

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Argonne TTRDC - TransForum v10n1 - New Molecule for Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Molecule Could Help Make Batteries Safer, Less Expensive New Molecule Could Help Make Batteries Safer, Less Expensive Charge transfer mechanism for Li-ion battery overcharge protection Charge Transfer Mechanism for Li-ion Battery Overcharge Protection. When the battery is overcharged, the redox shuttle (bottom molecule) will be oxidized by losing an electron to the positive electrode. The radical cation formed (top molecule) will then diffuse back to the negative electrode, causing the cation to obtain an electron and be reduced. The net reaction is to shuttle electrons from the positive electrode to the negative electrode without causing chemical damage to the battery. Safety, life and cost are three of the major barriers to making commercially-viable lithium-ion batteries for plug-in hybrid electric

315

Method and apparatus for indicating electric charge remaining in batteries based on electrode weight and center of gravity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In most electrochemical batteries which generate electricity through the reaction of a battery electrode with an electrolyte solution, the chemical composition, and thus the weight and density, of the electrode changes as the battery discharges. The invention measures a parameter of the battery which changes as the weight of the electrode changes as the battery discharges and relates that parameter to the value of the parameter when the battery is fully charged and when the battery is functionally discharged to determine the state-of-charge of the battery at the time the parameter is measured. In one embodiment, the weight of a battery electrode or electrode unit is measured to determine the state-of-charge. In other embodiments, where a battery electrode is located away from the geometrical center of the battery, the position of the center of gravity of the battery or shift in the position of the center of gravity of the battery is measured (the position of the center of gravity changes with the change in weight of the electrode) and indicates the state-of-charge of the battery. 35 figs.

Rouhani, S.Z.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

316

Method and apparatus for indicating electric charge remaining in batteries based on electrode weight and center of gravity  

SciTech Connect

In most electrochemical batteries which generate electricity through the reaction of a battery electrode with an electrolyte solution, the chemical composition, and thus the weight and density, of the electrode changes as the battery discharges. The invention measures a parameter of the battery which changes as the weight of the electrode changes as the battery discharges and relates that parameter to the value of the parameter when the battery is fully charged and when the battery is functionally discharged to determine the state-of-charge of the battery at the time the parameter is measured. In one embodiment, the weight of a battery electrode or electrode unit is measured to determine the state-of-charge. In other embodiments, where a battery electrode is located away from the geometrical center of the battery, the position of the center of gravity of the battery or shift in the position of the center of gravity of the battery is measured (the position of the center of gravity changes with the change in weight of the electrode) and indicates the state-of-charge of the battery.

Rouhani, S. Zia (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Battery Capacity Measurement And Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we look at different battery capacity models that have been introduced in the literatures. These models describe the battery capacity utilization based on how the battery is discharged by the circuits that consume power. In an attempt to validate these models, we characterize a commercially available lithium coin cell battery through careful measurements of the current and the voltage output of the battery under different load profile applied by a micro sensor node. In the result, we show how the capacity of the battery is affected by the different load profile and provide analysis on whether the conventional battery models are applicable in the real world. One of the most significant finding of our work will show that DC/DC converter plays a significant role in determining the battery capacity, and that the true capacity of the battery may only be found by careful measurements.

Using Lithium Coin; Sung Park; Andreas Savvides; Mani B. Srivastava

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Bridging the Gap in the Chemical Thermodynamic Database for Nuclear Waste Repository: Studies of the Effect of Temperature on Actinide Complexation  

SciTech Connect

Recent results of thermodynamic studies on the complexation of actinides (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and Pu{sup 4+}) with F{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -}/HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} at elevated temperatures are reviewed. The data indicate that, for all systems except the 1:1 complexation of Np(V) with HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, the complexation of actinides is enhanced by the increase in temperature. The enhancement is primarily due to the increase in the entropy term (T{Delta}S) that exceeds the increase in the enthalpy ({Delta}H) as the temperature is increased. These data bridge the gaps in the chemical thermodynamic database for nuclear waste repository where the temperature could remain significantly higher than 25 C for a long time after the closure of the repository.

Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin; Xia, Yuanxian; Friese, Judah I.; Zanonato, PierLuigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

319

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of phenolic resin containing waste streams to sequentially recover monomers and chemicals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a waste phenolic resin containing feedstreams in a manner such that pyrolysis of said resins and a given high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolyses of the resins in other monomeric components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said resin and a given high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other monomeric components; selecting, if desired, a catalyst and a support and treating said feedstreams with said catalyst to effect acid or basic catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said first temperature program range to utilize reactive gases such as oxygen and steam in the pyrolysis process to drive the production of specific products; differentially heating said feedstreams at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantity of said high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other monomeric components therein; separating said high value monomeric constituent; selecting a second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said phenolic resins waste and differentially heating said feedstreams at said higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said different high value monomeric constituent; and separating said different high value monomeric constituent. 11 figs.

Chum, H.L.; Evans, R.J.

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

320

Battery disconnect sensing circuit for battery charging systems  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a battery disconnect sensing circuit for battery charging systems which have a pair of cables adapted to be connected to a battery to charge it. The sensing circuit contains a first R-C circuit adapted to connect across the cables and a second R-C circuit adapted to connect across the cables. The time constant of the first R-C circuit is substantially greater than that of the second R-C circuit. Also means connected to the RC circuits produced a momentary control signal in response to disconnection of the cables from a battery being charged. Included in a battery charging system is a source of charging current whose voltage output is controlled at a predetermined value when connected to a battery. It increases to a higher value when disconnected from the battery. Controller means connected with the source activate the battery charging system automatically in response to electrical connection of the battery. The improvement consists of: means for momentarily effecting reversal of the higher voltage value, and battery disconnect sensing means connected the charging source and to the controller means for sensing the reversed higher voltage upon disconnection of the battery charger system from the battery and for responding by automatically deactivating the battery charging system.

Dattilo, D.P.

1986-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 1, Cell and battery safety  

SciTech Connect

This report is the first of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues involved in using sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles that may affect the commercialization of Na/S batteries. This and the other reports on recycling, shipping, and vehicle safety are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD&D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers cell design and engineering as the basis of safety for Na/S batteries and describes and assesses the potential chemical, electrical, and thermal hazards and risks of Na/S cells and batteries as well as the RD&D performed, under way, or to address these hazards and risks. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, universities, and private industry. Subsequent volumes will address environmental, health, and safety issues involved in shipping cells and batteries, using batteries to propel electric vehicles, and recycling and disposing of spent batteries. The remainder of this volume is divided into two major sections on safety at the cell and battery levels. The section on Na/S cells describes major component and potential failure modes, design, life testing and failure testing, thermal cycling, and the safety status of Na/S cells. The section on batteries describes battery design, testing, and safety status. Additional EH&S information on Na/S batteries is provided in the appendices.

Ohi, J.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Side Reactions in Lithium-Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model for Aging of Lithium-Ion Battery Cells. Journal of TheSalts Formed on the Lithium-Ion Battery Negative Electrodeion batteries In a lithium ion battery, positively charged

Tang, Maureen Han-Mei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Advances in lithium-ion batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current reviews of the lithium ion battery literature byof view of the lithium ion battery scientist and engineer,lithium ion batteries. The chapter on aging summarizes the effects of the chemistry on the battery

Kerr, John B.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Means for controlling battery chargers  

SciTech Connect

A battery charger control device is described that senses the placement of a battery across control terminals and utilizes the voltage thereof to place into conduction a transistor which actuates a relay which turns on a battery charger, which thereafter, monitors the the charge condition of the battery as determined by the voltage supplied to a voltage following circuit from the control terminals, and which actuates an electronic switch after the elapse of a predetermined period of time after the battery has attained a fully charged condition as determined by the voltage of the battery as presented to the voltage following circuit.

Ballman, G.C.

1980-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

325

Maintenance-free automotive battery  

SciTech Connect

Two types of maintenance-free automotive batteries were developed by Japan Storage Battery Co. to obtain a maintenance-free battery for practical use and to prevent deterioration of the battery during long storage and/or shipment. Design considerations included a special grid alloy, the separator, plate surface area, vent structure, and electrolyte. Charge characteristics, overcharge characteristics, life characteristics under various conditions, and self-discharge characteristics are presented. The characteristics of the maintenance-free battery with a Pb-Ca alloy grid are superior to those of a conventional battery. 10 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

Kano, S.; Ando, K.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Systems approach to rechargeable batteries  

SciTech Connect

When selecting a rechargeable battery for an application, consideration must be given to the total system. Electrical load requirements, mechanical restrictions, environmental conditions, battery life, and charging must be considered to assure satisfactory battery performance. Meeting the electrical requirements involves selecting a battery that will deliver adequate voltage, run time and power. The mechanical aspects are largely a matter of resolving volume and weight. The charger must be capable of returning the battery to full charge in an allotted time. But of greater importance, the charge control method should be chosen carefully to maximize the operational life of the battery. 4 refs.

Mullersman, F.H.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst: Final Report, 24 February 2004 -- 23 February 2006  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst Final Report February 24, 2004 - February 23, 2006 T. Reppert Mack Trucks, Inc. Allentown, Pennsylvania J. Chiu Southwest Research Institute San Antonio, Texas Subcontract Report NREL/SR-540-38222 September 2005 Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst Final Report February 24, 2004 - February 23, 2006 T. Reppert Mack Trucks, Inc. Allentown, Pennsylvania J. Chiu Southwest Research Institute San Antonio, Texas NREL Technical Monitor: R. Parish Prepared under Subcontract No. ZCI-4-32049-01 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-540-38222 September 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory

328

Battery venting system and method  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

Casale, Thomas J. (Aurora, CO); Ching, Larry K. W. (Littleton, CO); Baer, Jose T. (Gaviota, CA); Swan, David H. (Monrovia, CA)

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

329

Battery Vent Mechanism And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

Ching, Larry K. W. (Littleton, CO)

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Battery venting system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve. 8 figs.

Casale, T.J.; Ching, L.K.W.; Baer, J.T.; Swan, D.H.

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

331

Waste Minimization Plan Colorado School of Mines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Minimization Plan Colorado School of Mines Prepared by: Environmental Health and Safety Department Revised February 2008 #12;Waste Minimization Plan Table of Contents Policy Statement Based Chemical Inventory and Database................................................4 Centralized Waste

332

Energizing the batteries for electric cars  

SciTech Connect

This article reports of the nickel-metal-hydride battery and its ability to compete with the lead-acid battery in electric-powered vehicles. The topics of the article include development of the battery, the impetus for development in California environmental law, battery performance, packaging for the battery's hazardous materials, and the solid electrolyte battery.

O' Connor, L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems. According to one aspect, a battery charging control method includes accessing information regarding a presence of at least one of a surplus and a deficiency of electrical energy upon an electrical power distribution system at a plurality of different moments in time, and using the information, controlling an adjustment of an amount of the electrical energy provided from the electrical power distribution system to a rechargeable battery to charge the rechargeable battery.

Tuffner, Francis K. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W. (Richland, WA); Hammerstrom, Donald J. (West Richland, WA); Pratt, Richard M. (Richland, WA)

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

334

Battery charging and testing circuit  

SciTech Connect

A constant current battery charging circuit is provided by which the battery receives a full charge until the battery voltage reaches a threshold. When the battery voltage is above the threshold, the battery receives a trickle charge. The actual battery voltage is compared with a reference voltage to determine whether the full charge circuit should be in operation. Hysteresis is provided for preventing a rapid on/off operation around the threshold. The reference voltage is compensated for temperature variations. The hysteresis system and temperature compensation system are independent of each other. A separate test circuit is provided for testing the battery voltage. During testing of the battery, the full charge circuit is inoperative.

Wicnienski, M. F.; Charles, D. E.

1984-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

Feasibility study for the recycling of nickel metal hydride electric vehicle batteries. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This feasibility study examined three possible recycling processes for two compositions (AB{sub 2} and AB{sub 5}) of nickel metal hydride electric vehicle batteries to determine possible rotes for recovering battery materials. Analysts examined the processes, estimated the costs for capital equipment and operation, and estimated the value of the reclaimed material. They examined the following three processes: (1) a chemical process that leached battery powders using hydrochloric acid, (2) a pyrometallurical process, and (3) a physical separation/chemical process. The economic analysis revealed that the physical separation/chemical process generated the most revenue.

Sabatini, J.C.; Field, E.L.; Wu, I.C.; Cox, M.R.; Barnett, B.M.; Coleman, J.T. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Battery conditioning system having communication with battery parameter memory means in conjunction with battery conditioning  

SciTech Connect

In an exemplary embodiment, a battery conditioning system monitors battery conditioning and includes a memory for storing data based thereon; for example, data may be stored representative of available battery capacity as measured during a deep discharge cycle. With a microprocessor monitoring battery operation of a portable unit, a measure of remaining battery capacity can be calculated and displayed. Where the microprocessor and battery conditioning system memory are permanently secured to the battery so as to receive operating power therefrom during storage and handling, the performance of a given battery in actual use can be accurately judged since the battery system can itself maintain a count of accumulated hours of use and other relevant parameters. In the case of a non-portable conditioning system, two-way communication may be established with a memory associated with the portable unit so that the portable unit can transmit to the conditioning system information concerning battery parameters (e.g. rated battery capacity) and/or battery usage (e.g. numbers of shallow discharge and recharge cycles), and after a conditioning operation, the conditioning system can transmit to the portable unit a measured value of battery capacity, for example. 27 figs.

Koenck, S.E.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

337

Battery Recycling - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The symposium will cover all aspects of battery recycling from legislation, collection, safety issues & transportation regulations and current recycling...

338

Battery Cahrging at the EVRS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ETA-NTP008 Revision 4 Effective December 1, 2004 Battery Charging Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: Date:...

339

The wild wild waste: e-waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E-Waste is a popular, informal name for discarded electronic products such as computers, VCRs, cameras, which have reached the end of their "useful life". Discarded electronic products contain a stew of toxic metals and chemicals such as lead, mercury, ... Keywords: donate, e-waste, ecology, efficiency, environment, green computing, hazardous material, re-use, recycle, reduce, thin-client, upgrade, virtualization

Scott E. Hanselman; Mahmoud Pegah

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

Lorenzo, Donald K. (Knoxville, TN); Van Cleve, Jr., John E. (Kingston, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

Lorenzo, D.K.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

1980-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

342

batteries | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

batteries batteries Dataset Summary Description The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) publishes a wide selection of data and statistics on renewable energy power technologies from a variety of sources (e.g. EIA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, EPRI and AWEA). In 2006, NREL published the 4th edition, presenting market and performance data for over a dozen technologies from publications from 1997 - 2004. Source NREL Date Released March 01st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords advanced energy storage batteries biomass csp fuel cells geothermal Hydro market data NREL performance data PV wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Technology Profiles (market and performance data) (xls, 207.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

343

Safe battery solvents  

SciTech Connect

An ion transporting solvent maintains very low vapor pressure, contains flame retarding elements, and is nontoxic. The solvent in combination with common battery electrolyte salts can be used to replace the current carbonate electrolyte solution, creating a safer battery. It can also be used in combination with polymer gels or solid polymer electrolytes to produce polymer batteries with enhanced conductivity characteristics. The solvents may comprise a class of cyclic and acyclic low molecular weight phosphazenes compounds, comprising repeating phosphorus and nitrogen units forming a core backbone and ion-carrying pendent groups bound to the phosphorus. In preferred embodiments, the cyclic phosphazene comprises at least 3 phosphorus and nitrogen units, and the pendent groups are polyethers, polythioethers, polyether/polythioethers or any combination thereof, and/or other groups preferably comprising other atoms from Group 6B of the periodic table of elements.

Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Delmastro, Joseph R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stewart, Frederick F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

344

Support for the delisting of decontaminated liquid chemical surety materials as listed hazardous waste from specific sources (state) MD02 in COMAR 10. 51. 02. 16-1. Technical report, December 1987-February 1988  

SciTech Connect

Maryland recently enacted regulations that listed decontaminated residues of certain chemical warfare agents as hazardous wastes. The State would consider delisting if the Army document the effects of its decontamination procedures. Army specialists at U.S. Army Chemical Research, Development and Engineering Center (CRDEC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, have had exhaustive experience in this area since 1918 when chemical agents were first used in combat in World War I. Competence accrued during this 70-year legacy includes destruction of laboratory and training wastes, combat decontamination, and largescale demilitarization of unserviceable and obsolete agent-filled munitions. The facts and circumstances enumerated in this document indicate that current decontamination practices are safe, scientifically valid, and result in the total destruction of agents in questions.

Durst, H.D.; Sarver, E.W.; Yurow, H.W.; Beaudry, W.T.; D'Eramo, P.A.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Paintable Battery Neelam Singh1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paintable Battery Neelam Singh1 , Charudatta Galande1 , Andrea Miranda1 , Akshay Mathkar1 , Wei Gao Belgium. If the components of a battery, including electrodes, separator, electrolyte and the current collectors can be designed as paints and applied sequentially to build a complete battery, on any arbitrary

Ajayan, Pulickel M.

346

Seal for sodium sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which the sealing is accomplished by a radial compression seal made on a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

Topouzian, Armenag (Birmingham, MI); Minck, Robert W. (Lathrup Village, MI); Williams, William J. (Northville, MI)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Battery switch for downhole tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electrical circuit for a downhole tool may include a battery, a load electrically connected to the battery, and at least one switch electrically connected in series with the battery and to the load. The at least one switch may be configured to close when a tool temperature exceeds a selected temperature.

Boling, Brian E. (Sugar Land, TX)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

348

New Developments in Battery Chargers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Electronic equipment is increasingly becoming smaller, lighter, and more functional, thanks to the push of technological advancements and the pull from customer demand. The result of these demands has been rapid advances in battery technology and in the associated circuitry for battery charging and protection. For many years, nickel-cadmium (NiCd) batteries have been the standard for small electronic systems. A few larger systems, such as laptop computers and high-power radios, operated on "gel-cell " lead-acid batteries. Eventually, the combined effects of environmental problems and increased demand on the batteries led to the development of new battery technologies: nickel-metal hydride (NiMH), rechargeable alkaline, lithium ion (Li+), and lithium polymer. These new battery technologies require more sophisticated charging and protection circuitry to maximize performance and ensure safety. NiCd and NiMH Batteries NiCd has long been the preferred technology for rechargeable batteries in portable electronic equipment, and in some ways, NiCd batteries still outperform the newer technologies. NiCd batteries have less capacity than Li+ or NiMH types, but their low impedance is attractive in applications that require high current for short periods. Power tools, for example, will continue to use NiCd battery packs indefinitely.

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

UV and EB Curable Binder Technology for Lithium Ion Batteries and UltraCapacitors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

the basic feasibility of using UV curing technology to produce Lithium ion battery electrodes at speeds over 200 feet per minute has been shown. A unique set of UV curable chemicals were discovered that were proven to be compatible with a Lithium ion battery environment with the adhesion qualities of PVDF.

Voelker, Gary

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

EPA streamlines requirements for universal wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Universal Waste rule issued Feb. 11, 1993, fosters the recycling of certain universal wastes typically discarded by consumers. Because these wastes are disposed of from households, they are excluded from hazardous waste regulation under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). However, any commercial entity that accepts these wastes is subject to full RCRA regulation. Hence, there has been little incentive to recycle these wastes. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has concluded certain universal wastes are hazardous and are predominantly generated in municipal settings both household and commercial. These wastes could benefit from and safely be managed under a regulatory scheme less burdensome than the full RCRA Subtitle C program now applicable to these waters. The Universal Waste rule proposes requirements for used nickel-cadmium and small, sealed lead-acid batteries and canceled pesticides. The Agency is considering expanding the scope of the rule to other forms of universal wastes, including antifreeze and light bulbs.

Bryant, C. (Technical Group Inc., Washington, DC (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The changing battery industry  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an economic and technological assessment of the electrical battery industry, highlighting major trends. Among those systems considered are lithium-based, sodium-sulfur nickel-zinc, nickel-iron, nickel-hydrogen, zinc-chloride, conductive polymer, and redox cells. Lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, and manganese dioxide-based batteries and direct solar power and fuel cells are discussed in relation to these new techniques. New applications, including electric vehicles, solar power storage, utility load leveling, portable appliances, computer power and memory backup, and medical implants are discussed. Predictions and development scenarios for the next twenty years are provided for the U.S. market.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

TSA waste stream and final waste form composition  

SciTech Connect

A final vitrified waste form composition, based upon the chemical compositions of the input waste streams, is recommended for the transuranic-contaminated waste stored at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The quantities of waste are large with a considerable uncertainty in the distribution of various waste materials. It is therefore impractical to mix the input waste streams into an ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste. As a result, waste stream input to a melter could vary widely in composition, with the potential of affecting the composition and properties of the final waste form. This work examines the extent of the variation in the input waste streams, as well as the final waste form under conditions of adding different amounts of soil. Five prominent Rocky Flats Plant 740 waste streams are considered, as well as nonspecial metals and the ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste streams. The metals waste stream is the most extreme variation and results indicate that if an average of approximately 60 wt% of the mixture is soil, the final waste form will be predominantly silica, alumina, alkaline earth oxides, and iron oxide. This composition will have consistent properties in the final waste form, including high leach resistance, irrespective of the variation in waste stream. For other waste streams, much less or no soil could be required to yield a leach resistant waste form but with varying properties.

Grandy, J.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Batteries - EnerDel Lithium-Ion Battery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EnerDel/Argonne Advanced High-Power Battery for Hybrid Electric Vehicles EnerDel/Argonne Advanced High-Power Battery for Hybrid Electric Vehicles EnerDel lithium-ion battery The EnerDel Lithium-Ion Battery The EnerDel/Argonne lithium-ion battery is a highly reliable and extremely safe device that is lighter in weight, more compact, more powerful and longer-lasting than the nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries in today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The battery is expected to meet the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium's $500 manufacturing price criterion for a 25-kilowatt battery, which is almost a sixth of the cost to make comparable Ni-MH batteries intended for use in HEVs. It is also less expensive to make than comparable Li-ion batteries. That cost reduction is expected to help make HEVs more competitive in the marketplace and enable consumers to receive an immediate payback in

354

Mixed waste solidification testing on polymer and cement-based waste forms in support of Hanford`s WRAP 2A facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A testing program has been conducted by the Westinghouse Hanford Company to confirm the baseline waste form selection for use in Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 2A. WRAP Module 2A will provide treatment required to properly dispose of containerized contact-handled, mixed low-level waste at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Solidification/stabilization has been chosen as the appropriate treatment for this waste. This work is intended to test cement-based, thermosetting polymer, and thermoplastic polymer solidification media to substantiate the technology approach for WRAP Module 2A. Screening tests were performed using the major chemical constituent of each waste type to measure the gross compatibility with the immobilization media and to determine formulations for more detailed testing. Surrogate materials representing each of the eight waste types were prepared in the laboratory. These surrogates were then solidified with the selected immobilization media and subjected to a battery of standard performance tests. Detailed discussion of the laboratory work and results are contained in this report.

Burbank, D.A. Jr.; Weingardt, K.M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This report is the first of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues involved in using sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles that may affect the commercialization of Na/S batteries. This and the other reports on recycling, shipping, and vehicle safety are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers cell design and engineering as the basis of safety for Na/S batteries and describes and assesses the potential chemical, electrical, and thermal hazards and risks of Na/S cells and batteries as well as the RD D performed, under way, or to address these hazards and risks. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, universities, and private industry. Subsequent volumes will address environmental, health, and safety issues involved in shipping cells and batteries, using batteries to propel electric vehicles, and recycling and disposing of spent batteries. The remainder of this volume is divided into two major sections on safety at the cell and battery levels. The section on Na/S cells describes major component and potential failure modes, design, life testing and failure testing, thermal cycling, and the safety status of Na/S cells. The section on batteries describes battery design, testing, and safety status. Additional EH S information on Na/S batteries is provided in the appendices.

Ohi, J.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Current balancing for battery strings  

SciTech Connect

A battery plant is described which features magnetic circuit means for balancing the electrical current flow through a pluraliircuitbattery strings which are connected electrically in parallel. The magnetic circuit means is associated with the battery strings such that the conductors carrying the electrical current flow through each of the battery strings pass through the magnetic circuit means in directions which cause the electromagnetic fields of at least one predetermined pair of the conductors to oppose each other. In an alternative embodiment, a low voltage converter is associated with each of the battery strings for balancing the electrical current flow through the battery strings.

Galloway, James H. (New Baltimore, MI)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Battery testing for photovoltaic applications  

SciTech Connect

Battery testing for photovoltaic (PV) applications is funded at Sandia under the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Photovoltaic Balance of Systems (BOS) Program. The goal of the PV BOS program is to improve PV system component design, operation, reliability, and to reduce overall life-cycle costs. The Sandia battery testing program consists of: (1) PV battery and charge controller market survey, (2) battery performance and life-cycle testing, (3) PV charge controller development, and (4) system field testing. Test results from this work have identified market size and trends, PV battery test procedures, application guidelines, and needed hardware improvements.

Hund, T.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of automotive battery separators. Environmental research brief  

SciTech Connect

The WMAC team at the University of Louisville performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures automotive battery separators. Two types of separators-polyethylene/silica sheet and vinyl rib-are produced. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that waste spill absorbents are generated in large quantities and at a significant waste management cost, and that waste reduction could result from using wringable, reusable aborbents.

Fleischman, M.; Schmidt, P.; Roberts, D.; Looby, G.P.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Zinc alkaline secondary battery  

SciTech Connect

A zinc alkaline secondary battery with improved service life in which a multi-layer separator is interposed between the negative and positive electrodes and the quantity of the alkaline electrolyte in the layer of the separator adjacent to the negative electrode is less than that of the electrolyte in the layer of the separator adjacent to the positive electrode.

Furukawa, N.; Nishizawa, N.

1983-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

362

Battery electrode growth accommodation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrode for a lead acid flow through battery, the grids including a plastic frame, a plate suspended from the top of the frame to hang freely in the plastic frame and a paste applied to the plate, the paste being free to allow for expansion in the planar direction of the grid.

Bowen, Gerald K. (Cedarburg, WI); Andrew, Michael G. (Wauwatosa, WI); Eskra, Michael D. (Fredonia, WI)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Thin-film Lithium Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thin-Film Battery with Lithium Anode Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division Thin-Film Lithium Batteries Resources with Additional Information The Department of Energy's 'Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed high-performance thin-film lithium batteries for a variety of technological applications. These batteries have high energy densities, can be recharged thousands of times, and are only 10 microns thick. They can be made in essentially any size and shape. Recently, Teledyne licensed this technology from ORNL to make batteries for medical devices including electrocardiographs. In addition, new "textured" cathodes have been developed which have greatly increased the peak current capability of the batteries. This greatly expands the potential medical uses of the batteries, including transdermal applications for heart regulation.'

364

Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, 616 Nonradioactive dangerous waste storage facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter provides information on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the waste stored at the 616 NRDWSF. A waste analysis plan is included that describes the methodology used for determining waste types.

Price, S.M.

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

Results of Water and Sediment Toxicity Tests and Chemical Analyses Conducted at the Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Waste Unit, January 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Operable Unit consists of two inactive rubble pits (631-1G and 631-3G) that have been capped, and one active burning rubble pit (631-2G), where wooden pallets and other non-hazardous debris are periodically burned. The inactive rubble pits may have received hazardous materials, such as asbestos, batteries, and paint cans, as well as non-hazardous materials, such as ash, paper, and glass. In an effort to determine if long term surface water flows of potentially contaminated water from the 631-1G, 631-3G, and 631-2G areas have resulted in an accumulation of chemical constituents at toxic levels in the vicinity of the settling basin and wetlands area, chemical analyses for significant ecological preliminary constituents of concern (pCOCs) were performed on aqueous and sediment samples. In addition, aquatic and sediment toxicity tests were performed in accordance with U.S. EPA methods (U.S. EPA 1989, 1994). Based on the results of the chemical analyses, unfiltered water samples collected from a wetland and settling basins located adjacent to the CSBRP Operable Unit exceed Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) for aluminum, barium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and vanadium at one or more of the four locations that were sampled. The water contained very high concentrations of clay particles that were present as suspended solids. A substantial portion of the metals were present as filterable particulates, bound to the clay particles, and were therefore not biologically available. Based on dissolved metal concentrations, the wetland and settling basin exceeded TRVs for aluminum and barium. However, the background reference location also exceeded the TRV for barium, which suggests that this value may be too low, based on local geochemistry. The detection limits for both total and dissolved mercury were higher than the TRV, so it was not possible to determine if the TRV for mercury was exceeded. Dissolved metal levels of chromium, copper, iron, lead and vanadium were below the TRVs. Metal concentrations in the sediment exceeded the TRVs for arsenic, chromium, copper, and mercury but not for antimony and lead. The results of the water toxicity tests indicated no evidence of acute toxicity in any of the samples. The results of the chronic toxicity tests indicated possible reproductive impairment at two locations. However, the results appear to be anomalous, since the toxicity was unrelated to concentration, and because the concentrations of pCOCs were similar in the toxic and the non-toxic samples. The results of the sediment toxicity tests indicated significant mortality in all but one sample, including the background reference sediment. When the results of the CSBRP sediment toxicity tests were statistically compared to the result from the background reference sediment, there was no significant mortality. These results suggest that the surface water and sediment at the CSBRP Operable Unit are not toxic to the biota that inhabit the wetland and the settling basin.

Specht, W.L.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

366

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1990 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for coal- fired magnetohydrodynamics and fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for a high-level waste repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, concentrating plutonium solids in pyrochemical residues by aqueous biphase extraction, and treating natural and process waters contaminated by volatile organic compounds; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 66 refs., 69 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EnergyOffice of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage J.S. Wainright, R. F. Savinell, P.I.s Dept. of Chemical...

368

A literature review of coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical processes pertinent to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

A literature review has been conducted to determine the state of knowledge available in the modeling of coupled thermal (T), hydrologic (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes relevant to the design and/or performance of the proposed high-level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The review focuses on identifying coupling mechanisms between individual processes and assessing their importance (i.e., if the coupling is either important, potentially important, or negligible). The significance of considering THMC-coupled processes lies in whether or not the processes impact the design and/or performance objectives of the repository. A review, such as reported here, is useful in identifying which coupled effects will be important, hence which coupled effects will need to be investigated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in order to assess the assumptions, data, analyses, and conclusions in the design and performance assessment of a geologic reposit``. Although this work stems from regulatory interest in the design of the geologic repository, it should be emphasized that the repository design implicitly considers all of the repository performance objectives, including those associated with the time after permanent closure. The scope of this review is considered beyond previous assessments in that it attempts with the current state-of-knowledge) to determine which couplings are important, and identify which computer codes are currently available to model coupled processes.

Manteufel, R.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Turner, D.R.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - 2005 Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Awards 5 Awards 2005 Outstanding Engineering Achievement, Illinois Engineering Council, awarded to Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Engineering Division IBA Research Award, International Battery Materials Association, Christopher Johnson R&D 100 Award, Self-Contained Battery-Powered bion® Microstimulator with Rechargeable Miniature Battery, Khalil Amine, Ilias Belharouak, Bookeun Oh, Donald Vissers, Qingzheng Wang Electrochemical Society Battery Division Research Award, Electrochemical Society, Michael Thackeray Illinois Engineering Council Outstanding Engineering Achievement Award, UREX+ Process for Separating Key Radionuclides from Commercial Spent Fuel Innovation Hub Tribute to Innovative Minds, Michael Thackeray The University of Chicago Distinguished Performance Award, U of C, Julius Jellinek

370

Advanced Battery Manufacturing (VA)  

SciTech Connect

LiFeBATT has concentrated its recent testing and evaluation on the safety of its batteries. There appears to be a good margin of safety with respect to overheating of the cells and the cases being utilized for the batteries are specifically designed to dissipate any heat built up during charging. This aspect of LiFeBATTs products will be even more fully investigated, and assuming ongoing positive results, it will become a major component of marketing efforts for the batteries. LiFeBATT has continued to receive prismatic 20 Amp hour cells from Taiwan. Further testing continues to indicate significant advantages over the previously available 15 Ah cells. Battery packs are being assembled with battery management systems in the Danville facility. Comprehensive tests are underway at Sandia National Laboratory to provide further documentation of the advantages of these 20 Ah cells. The company is pursuing its work with Hybrid Vehicles of Danville to critically evaluate the 20 Ah cells in a hybrid, armored vehicle being developed for military and security applications. Results have been even more encouraging than they were initially. LiFeBATT is expanding its work with several OEM customers to build a worldwide distribution network. These customers include a major automotive consulting group in the U.K., an Australian maker of luxury off-road campers, and a number of makers of E-bikes and scooters. LiFeBATT continues to explore the possibility of working with nations that are woefully short of infrastructure. Negotiations are underway with Siemens to jointly develop a system for using photovoltaic generation and battery storage to supply electricity to communities that are not currently served adequately. The IDA has continued to monitor the progress of LiFeBATTs work to ensure that all funds are being expended wisely and that matching funds will be generated as promised. The company has also remained current on all obligations for repayment of an IDA loan and lease payments for space to the IDA. A commercial venture is being formed to utilize the LiFeBATT product for consumer use in enabling photovoltaic powered boat lifts. Field tests of the system have proven to be very effective and commercially promising. This venture is expected to result in significant sales within the next six months.

Stratton, Jeremy

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

An Interleaved Dual-Battery Power Supply for Battery-Operated Electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Interleaved Dual-Battery Power Supply for Battery-Operated Electronics QingQing Wu,Wu, Qinru VoltageAnalysis of Optimal Supply Voltage Design of Interleaved DualDesign of Interleaved Dual--Battery PowerBattery Power SupplySupply ConclusionsConclusions #12;Batteries in Mobile/Portable ElectronicsBatteries

Pedram, Massoud

372

US advanced battery consortium in-vehicle battery testing procedure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article describes test procedures to be used as part of a program to monitor the performance of batteries used in electric vehicle applications. The data will be collected as part of an electric vehicle testing program, which will include battery packs from a number of different suppliers. Most data will be collected by on-board systems or from driver logs. The paper describes the test procedure to be implemented for batteries being used in this testing.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Screening tests for hazard classification of complex waste materials - Selection of methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study we describe the development of an alternative methodology for hazard characterization of waste materials. Such an alternative methodology for hazard assessment of complex waste materials is urgently needed, because the lack of a validated instrument leads to arbitrary hazard classification of such complex waste materials. False classification can lead to human and environmental health risks and also has important financial consequences for the waste owner. The Hazardous Waste Directive (HWD) describes the methodology for hazard classification of waste materials. For mirror entries the HWD classification is based upon the hazardous properties (H1-15) of the waste which can be assessed from the hazardous properties of individual identified waste compounds or - if not all compounds are identified - from test results of hazard assessment tests performed on the waste material itself. For the latter the HWD recommends toxicity tests that were initially designed for risk assessment of chemicals in consumer products (pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, biocides, food, etc.). These tests (often using mammals) are not designed nor suitable for the hazard characterization of waste materials. With the present study we want to contribute to the development of an alternative and transparent test strategy for hazard assessment of complex wastes that is in line with the HWD principles for waste classification. It is necessary to cope with this important shortcoming in hazardous waste classification and to demonstrate that alternative methods are available that can be used for hazard assessment of waste materials. Next, by describing the pros and cons of the available methods, and by identifying the needs for additional or further development of test methods, we hope to stimulate research efforts and development in this direction. In this paper we describe promising techniques and argument on the test selection for the pilot study that we have performed on different types of waste materials. Test results are presented in a second paper. As the application of many of the proposed test methods is new in the field of waste management, the principles of the tests are described. The selected tests tackle important hazardous properties but refinement of the test battery is needed to fulfil the a priori conditions.

Weltens, R., E-mail: reinhilde.weltens@vito.be [VITO Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Boeretang 200, B 2400 Mol (Belgium); Vanermen, G.; Tirez, K. [VITO Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Boeretang 200, B 2400 Mol (Belgium); Robbens, J. [University of Antwerp - Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Deprez, K.; Michiels, L. [University of Hasselt - Biomedical Research Institute, University Hasselt, Campus Diepenbeek, Agoralaan A, B3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Next Generation Processes for Carbonate Electrolytes for Battery Applications - Kris Rangan, Materials Modification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Processes for Carbonate Electrolytes for Battery Applications Next Generation Processes for Carbonate Electrolytes for Battery Applications Dr. Kausik Mukhopadhyay & Dr. Krishnaswamy K. Rangan Materials Modification, Inc. 2809-K Merrilee Drive, Fairfax. VA 22031 ABSTRACT  Dimethyl Carbonate (DMC) is a promising electrolyte solvent for lithium battery applications due to its inherent safety and robustness. Despite the enormous promise of its industrial use, this chemical is currently entirely imported from China. The global battery market is about US$ 50 billion, of which approximately $ 5.5 billion is captured by the rechargeable batteries for use in electric vehicles, laptops, consumer electronics, rechargeable batteries etc.  Indigenous manufacture of DMC will enormously benefit not only the American lithium battery industry

375

Advanced Batteries for PHEVs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes testing conducted on two different types of batteriesVARTA nickel-metal hydride and SAFT lithium ionused in the Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) Sprinter program. EPRI and DaimlerChrysler developed a PHEV concept for the Sprinter Van to reduce the vehicle's emissions, fuel consumption, and operating costs while maintaining equivalent or superior functionality and performance. The PHEV Sprinter was designed to operate in both a pure electric mode and a charge-sustaining hybrid ...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

376

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals on the University of Northern

Bolch, Tobias

377

Design and Simulation of Lithium Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LiNiOiCarbon Lithium-Ion Battery," S. S. lonics, 69,238-the mid-1980's, the lithium-ion battery based on a carboncommercialization of the lithium-ion battery, several other

Doyle, C.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

AGM Batteries Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ltd Place United Kingdom Product Manufactures lithium-ion cells and batteries for AEA Battery Systems Ltd. References AGM Batteries Ltd1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile...

379

Design and Simulation of Lithium Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to increase the battery's capacity (j n u J per unit volume.to estimate the battery capacity by relating the dischargealso the specific capacity of current battery systems. It is

Doyle, C.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

BATTERY INDUSTRIAL, LEAD ACID TYPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... between the cell cover and the cell container, and all openings on the top of the battery other than the filling vents shall be gas tight and effectively ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

VEHICLE DETAILS AND BATTERY SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

voltage limits (see Note 2) at 50% depth of discharge (DOD). 2013 Chevrolet Malibu ECO Hybrid - VIN 3800 Advanced Vehicle Testing - Beginning-of-Test Battery Testing Results...

382

VEHICLE DETAILS AND BATTERY SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

voltage limits (see Note 2) at 50% depth of discharge (DOD). 2013 Chevrolet Malibu ECO Hybrid - VIN 7249 Advanced Vehicle Testing - Beginning-of-Test Battery Testing Results...

383

Nanofilm Coatings Improve Battery Performance  

Recent advances in battery technology are expected to more than double consumer demand for electric vehicles within the next five years. The ...

384

Argonne TTRDC - Experts - Battery Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Battery Technologies Experts Click on a highlighted name to see a full rsum. Jeff...

385

Battery Testing in the US  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S.-China EV and Battery Workshop Joint Vehicle Demonstrations and Standards Development August 24, 2012 Session Chairmen: Keith Hardy, Argonne National Laboratory Li Jianqiu,...

386

New Life for EV Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 15, 2013 ... Five used Chevrolet Volt batteries are at the heart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) effort to determine the feasibility of a...

387

Rechargeable Batteries, Photochromics, Electrochemical Lithography...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

employed to explore in detail fundamental interfacial processes. Using current-sensing atomic forcemicroscopy (CSAFM), small variations in the electronic conductance of battery...

388

Flow Batteries: A Historical Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marvin Warshay *1976 Shunt Current Model, Paul Prokopius *1976 Interfaced an RFB with solar cells *1977 Electrode-Membrane-Flow Battery Testing *Largest polarization @ negative...

389

Attempting clairvoyance with battery performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The light-weight, long-lasting, high-performance attributes of cellular phones and laptop computers, among other equally impressive portable devices currently in the marketplace, are responsible for igniting the overwhelming growth of the battery-powered electronics industry. The demand for smaller and longer lasting solutions, in fact, is only increasing, and key to this success is the battery, which can range from single-use alkaline and zinc-air to rechargeable nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, lithium-ion, and lithium-polymer technologies. Unfortunately, however, advancements in circuit and system integration have outpaced energy and power density improvements in the battery. Consequently, as batteries conform to the size constraints of portable applications, capacity and output power are necessarily compromised. Degradation in battery performance over time not only affects functionality but also operational life, proving inadequate the traditional assumption that the battery is an ideal voltage source. Including the effects of the battery on state-of-theart systems during the design phase is therefore of increasing importance for optimal life and performance. The problem is securing a suitable Cadence-compatible model. Battery Models State-of-the-art electrical models for batteries are either Thevenin-, impedance-, or runtime-based. Thevenin- and impedance-based models, shown in Figures 1(a)-(b), assume both open-circuit voltage and capacity or state-of-charge (SOC) are constant and approximate loading and ac/transient effects with an impedance network of passive devices for

A. Rincn-mora; Min Chen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Platform Li-Ion Battery Risk Assessment Tool: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-01-406  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pressure within a lithium-ion cell changes due to various chemical reactions. When a battery undergoes an unintended short circuit, the pressure changes are drastic - and often lead to uncontrolled failure of the cells. As part of work for others with Oceanit Laboratories Inc. for the NAVY STTR, NREL built Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations that can identify potential weak spots in the battery during such events, as well as propose designs to control violent failure of batteries.

Santhanagopalan, S.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in soil, vegetation, workshop-floor dust, and electronic shredder residue from an electronic waste recycling facility and in soils from a chemical industrial complex in eastern China  

SciTech Connect

In this study, 11 2,3,7,8-substituted PBDD/Fs and 10 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners were determined in electronic shredder waste, workshop-floor dust, soil, and leaves (of plants on the grounds of the facility) from a large-scale electronic wastes (e-waste) recycling facility and in surface soil from a chemical-industrial complex (comprising a coke-oven plant, a coal-fired power plant, and a chlor-alkali plant) as well as agricultural areas in eastern China. Total PBDD/F concentrations in environmental samples were in the range of 113-818 pg/g dry wt (dw) for leaves, 392-18,500 pg/g dw for electronic shredder residues, 716-80,0000 pg/g dw for soil samples, and 89,600-14,3000 pg/g dw for workshop-floor dust from the e-waste recycling facility and in a range from nondetect (ND) to 427 pg/g dw in soil from the chemical-industrial complex. The highest mean concentrations of total PBDD/Fs were found in soil samples and workshop-floor dust from the e-waste recycling facility. The dioxin-like toxic equivalent (measured as TEQ) concentrations of PBDD/Fs were greater than the TEQs of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) reported in our previous study for the same set of samples. The concentrations of PBDFs were several orders of magnitude higher than the concentrations of PBDDs in samples from the e-waste facility or from soil from the chemical-industrial complex. A significant correlation was found between the concentrations of {Sigma}PBDD/Fs and {Sigma}PBDEs (r = 0.769, p < 0.01) and between SPBDD/Fs and the previously reported SPCDD/F concentrations (r = 0.805, p < 0.01). The estimated daily human intakes of TEQs contributed by PBDD/Fs via soil/dust ingestion and dermal exposures in e-waste recycling facilities were higher than the intakes of TEQs contributed by PCDD/Fs, calculated in our previous study. 45 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Jing Ma; Rudolf Addink; Sehun Yun; Jinping Cheng; Wenhua Wang; Kurunthachalam Kannan [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China). School of Environmental Science and Engineering

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Method for charging a storage battery  

SciTech Connect

A method is disclosed for charging a lead-acid storage battery, the method comprising the steps of charging the battery at an initially high rate during an initial stage of the charging cycle, monitoring the internal battery voltage, charging the battery at a lower, finishing rate after a preselected battery voltage has been monitored, and periodically interrupting the finishing charge until the battery is recharged.

Fallon, W.H.; Kirby, D.W.; Neukirch, E.O.; Schober, W.R.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

393

Hazardous Waste Management Keith Williams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Waste Management Keith Williams DES ­ Environmental Affairs Extension 53163 #12,100 Locally · 1998 Univ of Va $33,990 · 1998 Univ. of MD $0 !!!!! #12;Hazardous Waste Disposal Procedures Hazardous (Chemical) Waste Management in University of Maryland Laboratories o All laboratories and work

Appelbaum, Ian

394

In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of Interfaces in Li-ion Batteries: Challenges and Opportunities  

SciTech Connect

The critical challenge facing the lithium ion battery development is the basic understanding of the structural evolution during the cyclic operation of the battery and the consequence of the structural evolution on the properties of the battery. Although transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and spectroscopy have been evolved to a stage such that it can be routinely used to probe into both the structural and chemical composition of the materials with a spatial resolution of a single atomic column, a direct in-situ TEM observation of structural evolution of the materials in lithium ion battery during the dynamic operation of the battery has never been reported. This is related to three factors: high vacuum operation of a TEM; electron transparency requirement of the region to be observed, and the difficulties dealing with the liquid electrolyte of lithium ion battery. In this paper, we report the results of exploring the in-situ TEM techniques for observation of the interface in lithium ion battery during the operation of the battery. A miniature battery was fabricated using a nanowire and an ionic liquid electrolyte. The structure and chemical composition of the interface across the anode and the electrolyte was studied using TEM imaging, electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. In addition, we also explored the possibilities of carrying out in-situ TEM studies of lithium ion batteries with a solid state electrolyte.

Wang, Chong M.; Xu, Wu; Liu, Jun; Choi, Daiwon; Arey, Bruce W.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Zhang, Jiguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Salmon, Norman

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Bridging the Gap in the Chemical Thermodynamic Database for Nuclear Waste Repository: Studies of the Effect of Temperature on Actinide Complexation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Gap in the Chemical Thermodynamic Database for NuclearRecent results of thermodynamic studies on the complexationthe gaps in the chemical thermodynamic database for nuclear

Rao, Linfeng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Self-Regulating, Nonflamable Rechargeable Lithium Batteries ...  

Rechargeable lithium batteries are superior to other rechargeable batteries due to their ability to store more energy per unit size and weight and to operate at ...

397

Battery Life Predictor Model - Energy Innovation Portal  

Energy Analysis Battery Life Predictor Model ... Technology Marketing Summary Batteries are one of the leading cost drivers of any electric vehicle ...

398

Better Batteries with a Conducting Polymer Binder  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batteries with a Conducting Polymer Binder Conductive polymer binder for Lithium ion battery June 2013 Berkeley Lab scientists have invented a new material for use in...

399

Ford Electric Battery Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ford Electric Battery Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Ford Electric Battery Group Place Dearborn, MI Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes...

400

Energy - Green battery | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy - Green battery By substituting lignin for highly engineered, expensive graphite to make battery electrodes, researchers have developed a process that requires fewer steps...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Advanced battery modeling using neural networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Batteries have gained importance as power sources for electric vehicles. The main problem with the battery technology available today is that the design of the (more)

Arikara, Muralidharan Pushpakam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Battery-Size Regenerative Fuel Cells  

ORNL 2010-G01073/jcn UT-B ID 201002378 Battery-Size Regenerative Fuel Cells Technology Summary A battery-size regenerative fuel cell with energy ...

403

Vehicle Technologies Office: Applied Battery Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Battery Research Applied battery research addresses the barriers facing the lithium-ion systems that are closest to meeting the technical energy and power requirements for...

404

Kayo Battery Industries Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Kayo Battery Industries Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Kayo Battery Industries Group Place...

405

Battery Recycling by Hydrometallurgy: Evaluation of Simultaneous ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Battery Recycling by Hydrometallurgy: Evaluation of ... of spent batteries using the same process, in order to overcome the high costs and...

406

American Battery Charging Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon American Battery Charging Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name American Battery Charging Inc Place...

407

Battery Wireless Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Battery Wireless Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Battery & Wireless Solutions...

408

Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AdvancedLightSource Home Science Highlights Industry @ ALS Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS Print Wednesday, 23...

409

China BAK Battery Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon China BAK Battery Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name China BAK Battery Inc Place Shenzhen, Guangdong...

410

Advanced Battery Factory | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Advanced Battery Factory Jump to: navigation, search Name Advanced Battery Factory Place Shen Zhen...

411

Lithium-Ion Batteries: Possible Materials Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne, IL Abstract The transition to plug-in hybrid vehicles and possibly pure battery electric vehicles will depend on the successful development of lithium-ion batteries....

412

Ovonic Battery Company Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Ovonic Battery Company Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Ovonic Battery Company Inc Place...

413

Carbon Micro Battery LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Carbon Micro Battery LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Micro Battery, LLC Place California...

414

Beijing Tianruichi Battery TRC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Beijing Tianruichi Battery TRC Jump to: navigation, search Name Beijing Tianruichi Battery (TRC) Place China...

415

Block copolymer electrolytes for lithium batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the energy equation, battery capacity, is defined as theperformance and capacity fading of a lithium-ion batteryof large-capacity lithium- ion battery systems. With new

Hudson, William Rodgers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Nanofilm Coatings Improve Battery Performance - Energy Innovation ...  

Recent advances in battery technology are expected to more than double consumer demand for electric vehicles within the next five years. The lithium-ion battery is an ...

417

Five rules for longer battery life  

SciTech Connect

The fundamentals of proper lead-acid battery care are given, including five basic maintenance rules, and the reasoning behind them, for longer battery life.

1971-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Battery resource assessment. Subtask II. 5. Battery manufacturing capability recycling of battery materials. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect

Studies were conducted on the recycling of advanced battery system components for six different battery systems. These include: Nickel/Zinc, Nickel/Iron, Zinc/Chlorine, Zinc/Bromine, Sodium/Sulfur, and Lithium-Aluminum/Iron Sulfide. For each battery system, one or more processes has been developed which would permit recycling of the major or active materials. Each recycle process has been designed to produce a product material which can be used directly as a raw material by the battery manufacturer. Metal recoverabilities are in the range of 93 to 95% for all processes. In each case, capital and operating costs have been developed for a recycling plant which processes 100,000 electric vehicle batteries per year. These costs have been developed based on material and energy balances, equipment lists, factored installation costs, and manpower estimates. In general, there are no technological barriers for recycling in the Nickel/Zinc, Nickel/Iron, Zinc/Chlorine and Zinc/Bromine battery systems. The recycling processes are based on essentially conventional, demonstrate technology. The lead times required to build battery recycling plants based on these processes is comparable to that of any other new plant. The total elapsed time required from inception to plant operation is approximately 3 to 5 y. The recycling process for the sodium/sulfur and lithium-aluminum/sulfide battery systems are not based on conventional technology. In particular, mechanical systems for dismantling these batteries must be developed.

Pemsler, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Battery resource assessment. Interim report No. 1. Battery materials demand scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Projections of demand for batteries and battery materials between 1980 and 2000 are presented. The estimates are based on existing predictions for the future of the electric vehicle, photovoltaic, utility load-leveling, and existing battery industry. Battery demand was first computed as kilowatt-hours of storage for various types of batteries. Using estimates for the materials required for each battery, the maximum demand that could be expected for each battery material was determined.

Sullivan, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Nanofilm Coatings Improve Battery Performance  

demand for electric vehicles within the next five years. The lithium-ion battery is an attractive candidate for use in such vehicles because of its light weight and high energy density. At present, however, lithium-ion batteries are not ...

423

The INEL battery data base  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has established a Battery Data Base for electric vehicle applications at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objectives of the Data Base are to collect, store, and make available to the electric vehicle community battery data from the INEL. Argonne National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, and DOE battery contractors in forms appropriate for evaluating the batteries in electric vehicles. The Data Base currently includes data from over 500 test on 15 batteries of 5 different types. The data (over 120 MB) is stored on a 760 MB harddisk attached to a MicroVax 2. PC-based software to access the data has been developed on the IBM PS/2 using dBASE 4. The initial version of the Data Base to be distributed on a single floppy disk is nearly complete. The first release will include the physical characteristics of the batteries, summary tables showing the test results for each cycle of the battery test programs, and some constant power discharge data for the batteries. Later versions of the Data Base will include second-by-second peak power and SFUDS data, which will require several floppy of Bernoulli disks to store the data. 2 refs., 4 figs.

Burke, A.F.; Hardin, J.E.; Kiser, D.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Lithium batteries for pulse power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New designs of lithium batteries having bipolar construction and thin cell components possess the very low impedance that is necessary to deliver high-intensity current pulses. The R D and understanding of the fundamental properties of these pulse batteries have reached an advanced level. Ranges of 50--300 kW/kg specific power and 80--130 Wh/kg specific energy have been demonstrated with experimental high-temperature lithium alloy/transition-metal disulfide rechargeable bipolar batteries in repeated 1- to 100-ms long pulses. Other versions are designed for repetitive power bursts that may last up to 20 or 30 s and yet may attain high specific power (1--10 kW/kg). Primary high-temperature Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} pulse batteries (thermal batteries) are already commercially available. Other high-temperature lithium systems may use chlorine or metal-oxide positive electrodes. Also under development are low-temperature pulse batteries: a 50-kW Li/SOCl{sub 2} primary batter and an all solid-state, polymer-electrolyte secondary battery. Such pulse batteries could find use in commercial and military applications in the near future. 21 refs., 8 figs.

Redey, L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A Desalination Battery Mauro Pasta,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Desalination Battery Mauro Pasta, Colin D. Wessells, Yi Cui,,§ and Fabio La Mantia, although its high energy consumption, and thus high cost, call for new, efficient technology. Here, we demonstrate the novel concept of a "desalination battery", which operates by performing cycles in reverse

Cui, Yi

426

Battery system with temperature sensors  

SciTech Connect

A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

427

EXAFS studies of battery materials  

SciTech Connect

X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used at extensively at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to study materials and electrodes of several battery systems. The power and the general applicability of the technique is illustrated by studies of several battery materials such as PEO-salt complexes, PbO{sub 2}, and in situ studies of mossy zinc deposition in alkaline electrolyte.

McBreen, J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

ATOMIC BATTERY AND TEST INSTRUMENT  

SciTech Connect

A portable nuclear battery is designed which can be adjusted to vary the output. The battery comprises a Sr/sup 90/ peactivated phosphor light source and photocells housed in a shielding structure. The output may be varied by rotating elements between the light source and the photocells. (D.L.C.)

Viszlocky, N.

1962-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

429

EXAFS studies of battery materials  

SciTech Connect

X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used at extensively at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to study materials and electrodes of several battery systems. The power and the general applicability of the technique is illustrated by studies of several battery materials such as PEO-salt complexes, PbO{sub 2}, and in situ studies of mossy zinc deposition in alkaline electrolyte.

McBreen, J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Definition: Battery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Battery Battery Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Battery An energy storage device comprised of two or more electrochemical cells enclosed in a container and electrically interconnected in an appropriate series/parallel arrangement to provide the required operating voltage and current levels. Under common usage, the term battery also applies to a single cell if it constitutes the entire electrochemical storage system.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Electrochemical cell Related Terms Fuel cell, energy, operating voltage, smart grid References ↑ http://www1.eere.energy.gov/solar/solar_glossary.html#B Retrie LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Battery&oldid=502543

431

Rechargeable Heat Battery's Secret Revealed: Solar Energy Capture in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rechargeable Heat Rechargeable Heat Battery Rechargeable Heat Battery's Secret Revealed Solar energy capture in chemical form makes it storable and transportable January 11, 2011 | Tags: Chemistry, Energy Technologies, Franklin Contact: John Hules, JAHules@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 6008 2011-01-11-Heat-Battery.jpg A molecule of fulvalene diruthenium, seen in diagram, changes its configuration when it absorbs heat, and later releases heat when it snaps back to its original shape. Image: Jeffrey Grossman Broadly speaking, there have been two approaches to capturing the sun's energy: photovoltaics, which turn the sunlight into electricity, or solar-thermal systems, which concentrate the sun's heat and use it to boil water to turn a turbine, or use the heat directly for hot water or home

432

Test Report : GS battery, EPC power HES RESCU.  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprising of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. GS Battery and EPC Power have developed an energy storage system that utilizes zinc-bromide flow batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the GS Battery, EPC Power HES RESCU.

Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Performance Characteristics of Lithium-ion Batteries of Various Chemistries for Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as cycle life and battery cost and battery managementnot dominate the total battery cost. Note that in generalsuch as cycle life and battery cost and battery management

Burke, Andrew; Miller, Marshall

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Waste disposal options report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the potential options for the processing and disposal of mixed waste generated by reprocessing spent nuclear fuel at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. It compares the proposed waste-immobilization processes, quantifies and characterizes the resulting waste forms, identifies potential disposal sites and their primary acceptance criteria, and addresses disposal issues for hazardous waste.

Russell, N.E.; McDonald, T.G.; Banaee, J.; Barnes, C.M.; Fish, L.W.; Losinski, S.J.; Peterson, H.K.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Wenzel, D.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Argonne CNM News: Batteries Get a Quick Charge with New Anode Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batteries Get a Quick Charge with New Anode Technology Batteries Get a Quick Charge with New Anode Technology Tijana Rajh Argonne nanoscientist Tijana Rajh holds a strip of material created from titanium dioxide nanotubes. A team of researchers led by Tijana Rajh (Group Leader, Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials NanoBio Interfaces Group), and Christopher Johnson (Argonne's Chemical Sciences & Engineering Division), working under a CNM user science project, discovered that nanotubes composed of titanium dioxide can switch their phase as a battery is cycled, gradually boosting their operational capacity. New batteries produced with this material can be recharged up to half of their original capacity in less than 30 seconds. By switching out conventional graphite anodes with titanium nanotube anodes, a surprising phenomenon occurs. As the battery cycles through

436

Pushing the Boundaries in Energy Technbology: Materials Design for Battery Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pushing the Boundaries in Energy Technology: Materials Design for Battery Applications" Pushing the Boundaries in Energy Technology: Materials Design for Battery Applications" Co-Organizers: Elena Shevchenko (CNM), Mitra Taheri (Drexel University), and Mali Balasubramanian (APS) Batteries are a key element for storing and supplying energy. Transformational battery technologies require tailoring novel materials and/or incorporating new chemical processes. Energy storage devices are intrinsically complex with the relevant materials processes covering time-scales from picoseconds to years and length-scales from angstroms to millimeters. Advanced x-ray and electron microscopy methods have opened a new window by which vital structural and electronic properties of battery materials can be obtained at the appropriate spatio- temporal scales using spectroscopic, scattering and imaging techniques under real world

437

Battery conditioning system having communication with battery parameter memory means in conJunction with battery conditioning  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a battery conditioning system. It comprises: rechargeable battery means for supplying operating current during a number of hours of portable operation so as to become progressively discharged as a result, memory and communications means for operative association with the rechargeable battery means and receiving power from the rechargeable battery means during portable operation, and battery conditioning system means for coupling with the rechargeable batter means and with the memory and communications means, for conditioning of the battery means after a period of portable operation and for the transmission of data concerning the rechargeable battery means.

Koenck, S.E.

1989-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

438

Recombinant electric storage battery  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a recombinant storage battery. It comprises: a plurality of positive plates containing about 2 to 4 percent of antimony based upon the total weight of the alloy and positive active material, and essentially antimony free negative plates in a closed case; a fibrous sheet plate separator between adjacent ones of the plates, and a body of an electrolyte to which the sheet separators are inert absorbed by each of the separators and maintained in contact with each of the adjacent ones of the plates. Each of the separator sheets comprising first fibers which impart to the sheet a given absorbency greater than 90 percent relative to the electrolyte and second fibers which impart to the sheet a different absorbency less than 80 percent relative to the electrolyte. The first and second fibers being present in such proportions that each of the sheet separators has an absorbency with respect to the electrolyte of from 75 to 95 percent and the second fibers being present in such proportions that the battery has a recombination rate adequate to compensate for gassing.

Flicker, R.P.; Fenstermacher, S.

1989-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

439

Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cobaltate batteries have been in commercial use since 1991. A new lithium-ion battery with different cathodeMn2O4 cathode in lithium ion batteries by using surface modification. Since one of the main reasons cathode material for rechargeable lithium ion batteries because of its high voltage, low cost, and safety

Knowles, David William

440

Battery-Powered Digital CMOS Massoud Pedram  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Page 1 USC Low Power CAD Massoud Pedram Battery-Powered Digital CMOS Design Massoud Pedram Power CAD Massoud Pedram Motivation Extending the battery service life of battery-powered micro in the VLSI circuit Y The battery system is assumed to be an ideal source that delivers a fixed amount

Pedram, Massoud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Charging system for nickel-zing batteries  

SciTech Connect

A source of constant current or constant power supplies charging current to a nickel-zinc battery to produce a generally S-shaped battery voltage waveform. To improve battery life, charging is terminated at the inflection point where the slope of the battery voltage changes from increasing to decreasing.

Jones, R. A.; Reoch, W. D.

1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

442

Battery Thermal Management System Design Modeling (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents the objectives and motivations for a battery thermal management vehicle system design study.

Kim, G-H.; Pesaran, A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Method and apparatus for rapid battery charging  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for charging electrical storage batteries having a known nominal amperage are described. The method consists in discharging the battery to a predetermined value and then charging the battery with a charging current initially several times greater than the nominal battery amperage. The charging current decreases exponentially from the initial charging current to a charging current much less than the nominal battery amperage when the battery is fully charged. The apparatus uses the discharge rate of an RC circuit to control the charging current applied to the battery. 3 figures, 1 table.

Samsioe, P.E.

1979-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

444

Method and apparatus for battery charging  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of charging a battery and terminating the charging thereof upon determination of the existence of a prescribed condition comprising the steps of: applying charging current to the battery; measuring the battery voltage soon after the charging current is applied; determining, on the basis of the battery voltage measurement, the knee voltage of the charging characteristic of the particular battery being charged; calculating a battery voltage limit beyond which no further charging current is to be applied, the voltage limit being the point at which the instantaneous battery voltage is a pre-determined value greater than the knee voltage of the battery's charging characteristic; continued measuring of the battery voltage as the charging current is applied; and terminating the application of charging current when the battery voltage limit is reached.

Westhaver, L.A.; Ruksznis, R.E.

1987-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

445

Extended shelf-life battery  

SciTech Connect

A lead-acid battery having extended shelf-life is described comprising: a battery housing containing positive and negative lead-acid electrode elements and separators; sulfuric acid electrolyte contained within the housing in a quantity sufficient to maintain the electrode elements in a damp, but not flooded, condition; a desiccant within the housing located out of contact with the elements and in a position to absorb water vapor present in the housing the desiccant being located in container at least a portion of water is permeable to water vapor; the electrode positive and negative materials being formed - that a charge exists on the battery and so that self-discharge reactions will occur within the housing producing water vapor; the electrolyte having a specific gravity ranging from about 1.015 to about 1.320 and the quantity of the desiccant being sufficient to absorb the water vapor created during the self-discharge reactions to maintain the specific gravity of the electrolyte within the range. A method for extending the storage life of a lead-acid battery comprising the steps of: preparing a formed, lead-acid battery including electrode elements and a flooding quantity of sulfuric acid electrolyte; removing from the battery a substantial quantity of the electrolyte to leave damp elements; placing in the battery a quantity of desiccant in a container, at least a portion of which is permeable to water vapor, the container being in a position to absorb water vapor generated in the battery during self-discharge and at a location out of contact with the electrode elements; and controlling the specific gravity of the electrolyte remaining in the battery after the removal step within a range of about 1.015 and 1.320 during discharge reactions by absorbing water vapor produced thereby in the desiccant.

Bullock, N.K.; Symumski, J.S.

1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Method and apparatus for providing sterile charged batteries  

SciTech Connect

A method is described of providing sterile, charged batteries for use in a sterile field comprising the steps of: sterilizing at least one battery and a battery charger, the battery and battery charger being adapted to withstand exposure to the environment present during such sterilizating step; transferring the battery and the battery charger in a sterile state to the sterile field; and charging the battery to a desired voltage with the battery charger in the sterile field.

Pascaloff, J.H.

1987-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

447

Battery monitoring and charger control system  

SciTech Connect

A battery cell controlled charging system, consisting of a display unit, battery cell probes, a battery charger and circuitry for controlling the charger, monitors the specific gravity, electrolyte level and temperature control of each cell in a multi-cell lead-acid battery and uses the information to automatically charge the battery when a cell or cells become out of specification while restricting overcharging which is damaging to cells.

Barry, G.H.; Dahl, E.A.

1983-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

448

Cell for making secondary batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides all solid-state lithium and sodium batteries operating in the approximate temperature range of ambient to 145 C (limited by melting points of electrodes/electrolyte), with demonstrated energy and power densities far in excess of state-of-the-art high-temperature battery systems. The preferred battery comprises a solid lithium or sodium electrode, a polymeric electrolyte such as polyethylene oxide doped with lithium trifluorate (PEO[sub 8]LiCF[sub 3]SO[sub 3]), and a solid-state composite positive electrode containing a polymeric organosulfur electrode, (SRS)[sub n], and carbon black, dispersed in a polymeric electrolyte. 2 figs.

Visco, S.J.; Liu, M.; DeJonghe, L.C.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

449

Anti-stratification battery separator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a separator for an electric storage battery comprising a thin microporous sheet for suppressing dendrite growth between adjacent plates of the battery. The sheet has top, bottom and lateral edges defining the principal face of the separator and ribs formed on the surface of the face. The improvement described here comprises: the ribs each (1) having a concave shape, (2) being superposed one over another and (3) extending laterally across the face substantially from one the lateral edge to the other the lateral edge for reducing the accumulation of highly concentrated electrolyte at the bottom of the battery during recharge.

Stahura, D.W.; Smith, V.V. Jr.

1986-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

450

Cell for making secondary batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides all solid-state lithium and sodium batteries operating in the approximate temperature range of ambient to 145.degree. C. (limited by melting points of electrodes/electrolyte), with demonstrated energy and power densities far in excess of state-of-the-art high-temperature battery systems. The preferred battery comprises a solid lithium or sodium electrode, a polymeric electrolyte such as polyethylene oxide doped with lithium triflate (PEO.sub.8 LiCF.sub.3 SO.sub.3), and a solid-state composite positive electrode containing a polymeric organosulfur electrode, (SRS).sub.n, and carbon black, dispersed in a polymeric electrolyte.

Visco, Steven J. (2336 California St., Berkeley, CA 94703); Liu, Meilin (1121C Ninth St., #29, Albany, CA 94710); DeJonghe, Lutgard C. (910 Acalanes Rd., Lafayette, CA 94549)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Solid polymer battery electrolyte and reactive metal-water battery  

SciTech Connect

In one implementation, a reactive metal-water battery includes an anode comprising a metal in atomic or alloy form selected from the group consisting of periodic table Group 1A metals, periodic table Group 2A metals and mixtures thereof. The battery includes a cathode comprising water. Such also includes a solid polymer electrolyte comprising a polyphosphazene comprising ligands bonded with a phosphazene polymer backbone. The ligands comprise an aromatic ring containing hydrophobic portion and a metal ion carrier portion. The metal ion carrier portion is bonded at one location with the polymer backbone and at another location with the aromatic ring containing hydrophobic portion. The invention also contemplates such solid polymer electrolytes use in reactive metal/water batteries, and in any other battery.

Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stewart, Frederick F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Environmental impact analysis of electric and hybrid vehicle batteries. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This environmental impact analysis of electric and hybrid vehicle batteries is intended to identify principal environmental impacts resulting directly or indirectly from the development of electric vehicle batteries. Thus, the result of this study could be used to determine the appropriate following step in the U.S. DOE's EIA process. The environmental impacts considered in this document are the incremental impacts generated during the various phases in the battery life cycle. The processes investigated include mining, milling, smelting, and refining of metallic materials for electrode components; manufacturing processes of inorganic chemicals and other materials for electrolytes and other hardware components; battery assembly processes; operation and maintenance of batteries; and recycling and disposal of used batteries. The severity of the incremental impacts is quantified to the extent consistent with the state-of-knowledge. Many of the industrial processes involve proprietary or patent information; thus, in many cases, the associated environmental impacts could not be determined. In addition, most candidate battery systems are still in the development phase. Thus, the manufacturing and recycling processes for most battery systems either have not been developed by industry, or the information is not available. For these cases, the associated environmental impact evaluations could only be qualitative, and the need for further investigations is indicated. 26 figures, 27 tables. (RWR)

Not Available

1977-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

453

Three-dimensional batteries using a liquid cathode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 2.1.2 Lithium ion Battery2.2 Schematic of lithium ion battery operating principles (be rechargeable. The lithium ion battery is often referred

Malati, Peter Moneir

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE LITHIUM-ALUMINUM, IRON SULFIDE BATTERY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. Newman, Proc. Syrup. Battery Design and Optimization,123, 1364 (1976). Symp, Battery Design and Optimization, S.~ALUMINUM, IRON SULFIDE BATTERY Contents ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Pollard, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

The UC Davis Emerging Lithium Battery Test Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cell (Altairnano data) Battery cost considerations It is ofnot dominate the total battery cost. Note that in generala detailed lithium battery cost model that is applicable to

Burke, Andy; Miller, Marshall

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ALUMINUM BATTERY - Energy Innovation Portal  

Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery ...

457

Improved Positive Electrode Materials for Li-ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

could double Chevy Volt battery capacity. http://could-double-chevy-volt-battery-capacity/chevy-volt3-4/; Volts Battery Capacity Could Double. http://

Conry, Thomas Edward

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Battery Aging, Diagnosis, and Prognosis of Lead-Acid Batteries for Automotive Application.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??New battery technologies have been emerging into todays market and frequenting headlines; however, the lead-acid battery overwhelmingly remains the most common automotive battery. Because of (more)

Picciano, Nicholas I.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Battery SEAB Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii US Department of Energy Vehicle Battery R&D: Current Scope and Future Directions January 31, 2012 * David Howell (EERE/VTP) * Pat Davis (EERE/VTP) * Dane Boysen (ARPA-E) * Dave Danielson (ARPA-E) * Linda Horton (BES) * John Vetrano (BES) 2 | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov U.S. Oil-dependence is Driven by Transportation Source: DOE/EIA Annual Energy Review, April 2010 Transportation Residential and Commercial 94% Oil-dependent Industry 41% Oil-dependent 17% Oil-dependent 72% 22% 1% 5% U.S. Oil Consumption by End-use Sector 19.1 Million Barrels per Day (2010) Electric Power 1% Oil-dependent * On-road vehicles are responsible for ~80% of transportation oil usage 3 | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov

460

NUCLEAR BATTERY POWERED TIMERS  

SciTech Connect

During the period from May 1957 to July 1958, four nuclear batiery powered timers were fabricated and tested from two basic designs in the time ranges of onesecond, three-second, annd half-hour intervals. The timers were temperature-tested over a range of -65 to +165 F with accuracics over this temperature range from plus or minus 10 perceat to plus or minus 15 percent. Each unit has a volume of 10 cubic inches, and the timer can be initiated either by an explosive squib or a pull-out wire. At the end of the timing interval, the timer has ann output of 30,000 ergs. The cost of the program was ,000. From the results of this development program, it appears quite feasible to build operable nuclear battery powered timers on a production basis. (auth)

DesJardin, R.L.

1958-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Optimization of blended battery packs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reviews the traditional battery pack design process for hybrid and electric vehicles, and presents a dynamic programming (DP) based algorithm that eases the process of cell selection and pack design, especially ...

Erb, Dylan C. (Dylan Charles)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

The search for better batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To handle small, power-hungry electronic systems, manufacturers of rechargeable batteries are exploring at least five technologies: nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, lithium-ion, lithium-solid polymer electrolyte, and zinc-air. The author describes ...

M. J. Riezenman

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z