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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

WEEE and portable batteries in residual household waste: Quantification and characterisation of misplaced waste  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: We analyse 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 Danish households. We quantify and characterise misplaced WEEE and portable batteries. We compare misplaced WEEE and batteries to collection through dedicated schemes. Characterisation showed that primarily small WEEE and light sources are misplaced. Significant amounts of misplaced batteries were discarded as built-in WEEE. - Abstract: A total of 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 households in 12 Danish municipalities was analysed and revealed that 89.6 kg of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), 11 kg of batteries, 2.2 kg of toners and 16 kg of cables had been wrongfully discarded. This corresponds to a Danish household discarding 29 g of WEEE (7 items per year), 4 g of batteries (9 batteries per year), 1 g of toners and 7 g of unidentifiable cables on average per week, constituting 0.34% (w/w), 0.04% (w/w), 0.01% (w/w) and 0.09% (w/w), respectively, of residual waste. The study also found that misplaced WEEE and batteries in the residual waste constituted 16% and 39%, respectively, of what is being collected properly through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. This shows that a large amount of batteries are being discarded with the residual waste, whereas WEEE seems to be collected relatively successfully through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. Characterisation of the misplaced batteries showed that 20% (w/w) of the discarded batteries were discarded as part of WEEE (built-in). Primarily alkaline batteries, carbon zinc batteries and alkaline button cell batteries were found to be discarded with the residual household waste. Characterisation of WEEE showed that primarily small WEEE (WEEE directive categories 2, 5a, 6, 7 and 9) and light sources (WEEE directive category 5b) were misplaced. Electric tooth brushes, watches, clocks, headphones, flashlights, bicycle lights, and cables were items most frequently found. It is recommended that these findings are taken into account when designing new or improving existing special waste collection schemes. Improving the collection of WEEE is also recommended as one way to also improve the collection of batteries due to the large fraction of batteries found as built-in. The findings in this study were comparable to other western European studies, suggesting that the recommendations made in this study could apply to other western European countries as well.

Bigum, Marianne, E-mail: mkkb@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Petersen, Claus, E-mail: claus_petersen@econet.dk [Econet A/S, Strandboulevarden 122, 5, 2100 Kbenhavn (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H., E-mail: thho@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, Charlotte, E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Science Highlight July 2011 Better Batteries through Nanoscale 3D Chemical Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to hierarchical structures found in energy materials such as battery electrodes, fuel cells, and catalytic systems Science Highlight ­ July 2011 Better Batteries through Nanoscale 3D Chemical Imaging Concerns battery technology. Although Li-ion batteries, crucial in the boom of portable electronics, stand

Wechsler, Risa H.

3

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

4

Chemical Shuttle Additives in Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this program were to discover and implement a redox shuttle that is compatible with large format lithium ion cells utilizing LiNi{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} (NMC) cathode material and to understand the mechanism of redox shuttle action. Many redox shuttles, both commercially available and experimental, were tested and much fundamental information regarding the mechanism of redox shuttle action was discovered. In particular, studies surrounding the mechanism of the reduction of the oxidized redox shuttle at the carbon anode surface were particularly revealing. The initial redox shuttle candidate, namely 2-(pentafluorophenyl)-tetrafluoro-1,3,2-benzodioxaborole (BDB) supplied by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL, Lemont, Illinois), did not effectively protect cells containing NMC cathodes from overcharge. The ANL-RS2 redox shuttle molecule, namely 1,4-bis(2-methoxyethoxy)-2,5-di-tert-butyl-benzene, which is a derivative of the commercially successful redox shuttle 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-dimethoxybenzene (DDB, 3M, St. Paul, Minnesota), is an effective redox shuttle for cells employing LiFePO{sub 4} (LFP) cathode material. The main advantage of ANL-RS2 over DDB is its larger solubility in electrolyte; however, ANL-RS2 is not as stable as DDB. This shuttle also may be effectively used to rebalance cells in strings that utilize LFP cathodes. The shuttle is compatible with both LTO and graphite anode materials although the cell with graphite degrades faster than the cell with LTO, possibly because of a reaction with the SEI layer. The degradation products of redox shuttle ANL-RS2 were positively identified. Commercially available redox shuttles Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}F{sub 12} (Air Products, Allentown, Pennsylvania and Showa Denko, Japan) and DDB were evaluated and were found to be stable and effective redox shuttles at low C-rates. The Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}F{sub 12} is suitable for lithium ion cells utilizing a high voltage cathode (potential that is higher than NMC) and the DDB is useful for lithium ion cells with LFP cathodes (potential that is lower than NMC). A 4.5 V class redox shuttle provided by Argonne National Laboratory was evaluated which provides a few cycles of overcharge protection for lithium ion cells containing NMC cathodes but it is not stable enough for consideration. Thus, a redox shuttle with an appropriate redox potential and sufficient chemical and electrochemical stability for commercial use in larger format lithium ion cells with NMC cathodes was not found. Molecular imprinting of the redox shuttle molecule during solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer formation likely contributes to the successful reduction of oxidized redox shuttle species at carbon anodes. This helps to understand how a carbon anode covered with an SEI layer, that is supposed to be electrically insulating, can reduce the oxidized form of a redox shuttle.

Patterson, Mary

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Multi-layered, chemically bonded lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed are multilayer, porous, thin-layered lithium-ion batteries that include an inorganic separator as a thin layer that is chemically bonded to surfaces of positive and negative electrode layers. Thus, in such disclosed lithium-ion batteries, the electrodes and separator are made to form non-discrete (i.e., integral) thin layers. Also disclosed are methods of fabricating integrally connected, thin, multilayer lithium batteries including lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries.

Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Nanda, Jagjit; Bischoff, Brian L; Bhave, Ramesh R

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

6

Chemical Stabilization of Hanford Tank Residual Waste  

SciTech Connect

Three different chemical treatment methods were tested for their ability to stabilize residual waste from Hanford tank C-202 for reducing contaminant release (Tc, Cr, and U in particular). The three treatment methods tested were lime addition [Ca(OH)2], an in-situ Ceramicrete waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous iron/goethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants of concern (lime addition and ceramicrete) and chemical reduction followed by co-precipitation (ferrous iron/goethite incorporation treatment). The results have demonstrated that release of the three most significant mobile contaminants of concern from tank residual wastes can be dramatically reduced after treatment compared to contact with simulated grout porewater without treatment. For uranium, all three treatments methods reduced the leachable uranium concentrations by well over three orders of magnitude. In the case of uranium and technetium, released concentrations were well below their respective MCLs for the wastes tested. For tank C-202 residual waste, chromium release concentrations were above the MCL but were considerably reduced relative to untreated tank waste. This innovative approach has the potential to revolutionize Hanfords tank retrieval process, by allowing larger volumes of residual waste to be left in tanks while providing an acceptably low level of risk with respect to contaminant release that is protective of the environment and human health. Such an approach could enable DOE to realize significant cost savings through streamlined retrieval and closure operations.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Um, Wooyong; Williams, Benjamin D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Gartman, Brandy N.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Results of Hazardous and Mixed Waste Excavation from the Chemical Waste Landfill  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of the excavation of a 1.9-acre hazardous and mixed waste landfill operated for 23 years at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Excavation of the landfill was completed in 2 1/2 years without a single serious accident or injury. Approximately 50,000 cubic yards of soil contaminated with volatile and semi-volatile organics, metals, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and radioactive constituents was removed. In addition, over 400 cubic yards of buried debris was removed, including bulk debris, unknown chemicals, compressed gas cylinders, thermal and chemical batteries, explosive and ordnance debris, pyrophoric materials and biohazardous waste. Removal of these wastes included negotiation of multiple regulations and guidances encompassed in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and risk assessment methodology. RCRA concepts that were addressed include the area of contamination, permit modification, emergency treatment provision, and listed waste designation. These regulatory decisions enabled the project to overcome logistical and programmatic needs such as increased operational area, the ability to implement process improvements while maintaining a record of decisions and approvals.

Young, S. G.; Schofield, D. P.; Kwiecinski, D.; Edgmon, C. L.; Methvin, R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

Low Temperature Waste Energy Recovery at Chemical Plants and Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies to economically recover low-temperature waste energy in chemical plants and refineries are the holy grail of industrial energy efficiency. Low temperature waste energy streams were defined by the Texas Industries of the Future Chemical...

Ferland, K.; papar, R.; Quinn, J.; Kumar, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

A Chemical Potential "Battery" for Superfluid 4He Weak E. Hoskinson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Chemical Potential "Battery" for Superfluid 4He Weak Links E. Hoskinson , Y. Sato , K. Penanen, similar to a simple battery or voltage source for analogous superconducting devices. We describe here power is balanced by thermal conduction through the walls of the inner volume, heat carried out

Packard, Richard E.

10

A Chemical Potential "Battery" for Superfluid 4He Weak E. Hoskinson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Chemical Potential "Battery" for Superfluid 4He Weak Links E. Hoskinson , Y. Sato , K. Penanen, similar to a simple battery or voltage source for analogous superconducting devices. We describe here in the opposite direction: Is = -In. The steady-state T is reached when the heater power is balanced by thermal

Sato, Yuki

11

Chemical wastes and the law of conservation of matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This note discusses the conservation of matter as a starting point for understanding the problems of chemical waste.

John W. Hill

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Chemical Sciences and Engineering - US China Electric Vehicle and Battery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations Presentations View program in brief » View the Conference Booklet with program (pdf) » Plenary Sessions 4th US - China Electric Vehicle and Battery Technology Workshop, Dave Howell, US Department of Energy (pdf) U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Program Overview, Henry Kelly, US DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (pdf) EcoPartnerships: A model for US-China Energy Collaboration, David Fleshler, Case Western Reserve University and QIN Xingcai, Tianjin Lishen Battery Joint-Stock Co., Ltd. (pdf) Lishen Advanced Battery Development for EV and ESS, Qin Xingcai, Tianjin Lishen Battery Joint-Stock Co., Ltd. (pdf) EV R&D in CAERI, Xiaochang Ren, China Automotive Engineering Research Institute (pdf) Roundtable 1: Joint Battery Technology Roadmapping

13

Tailored Recovery of Carbons from Waste Tires for Enhanced Performance as Anodes in Lithium-ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

Morphologically tailored pyrolysis-recovered carbon black is utilized in lithium-ion batteries as a potential solution for adding value to waste tire-rubber-derived materials. Micronized tire rubber was digested in a hot oleum bath to yield a sulfonated rubber slurry that was then filtered, washed, and compressed into a solid cake. Carbon was recovered from the modified rubber cake by pyrolysis in a nitrogen atmosphere. The chemical pretreatment of rubber produced a carbon monolith with higher yield than that from the control (a fluffy tire-rubber-derived carbon black). The carbon monolith showed a very small volume fraction of pores of widths 3 4 nm, reduced specific surface area, and an ordered assembly of graphitic domains. Electrochemical studies on the recovered-carbon-based anode revealed an improved Li-ion battery performance with higher reversible capacity than that of commercial carbon materials. Anodes made with a sulfonated tire-rubber-derived carbon and a control tire-rubber-derived carbon, respectively, exhibited an initial coulombic efficiency of 80% and 45%, respectively. The reversible capacity of the cell with the sulfonated carbon as anode was 400 mAh/g after 100 cycles, with nearly 100% coulombic efficiency. Our success in producing higher performance carbon material from waste tire rubber for potential use in energy storage applications adds a new avenue to tire rubber recycling.

Naskar, Amit K [ORNL; Bi, [ORNL; Saha, Dipendu [ORNL; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Bridges, Craig A [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Chemical Stabilization of Hanford Tank Residual Waste. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous irongoethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants...

15

Depollution benchmarks for capacitors, batteries and printed wiring boards from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE)  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Weve analysed data on the dismantling of electronic and electrical appliances. Ten years of mass balance data of more than recycling companies have been considered. Percentages of dismantled batteries, capacitors and PWB have been studied. Threshold values and benchmarks for batteries and capacitors have been identified. No benchmark for the dismantling of printed wiring boards should be set. - Abstract: The article compiles and analyses sample data for toxic components removed from waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE) from more than 30 recycling companies in Switzerland over the past ten years. According to European and Swiss legislation, toxic components like batteries, capacitors and printed wiring boards have to be removed from WEEE. The control bodies of the Swiss take back schemes have been monitoring the activities of WEEE recyclers in Switzerland for about 15 years. All recyclers have to provide annual mass balance data for every year of operation. From this data, percentage shares of removed batteries and capacitors are calculated in relation to the amount of each respective WEEE category treated. A rationale is developed, why such an indicator should not be calculated for printed wiring boards. The distributions of these de-pollution indicators are analysed and their suitability for defining lower threshold values and benchmarks for the depollution of WEEE is discussed. Recommendations for benchmarks and threshold values for the removal of capacitors and batteries are given.

Savi, Daniel, E-mail: d.savi@umweltchemie.ch [Dipl. Environmental Sci. ETH, bro fr umweltchemie, Zurich (Switzerland); Kasser, Ueli [Lic. Phil. Nat. (Chemist), bro fr umweltchemie, Zurich (Switzerland); Ott, Thomas [Dipl. Phys. ETH, Institute of Applied Simulation, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Wdenswil (Switzerland)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Chemical Sciences and Engineering - US China Electric Vehicle and Battery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program View the Conference Booklet with program (pdf) » THURSDAY, AUGUST 4 Time Title, Speaker Plenary Session 9:00 AM Welcome and Orientation Welcome to Argonne by Eric Isaacs, Laboratory Director Orientation, Logistics and Workshop Format by Larry Johnson, Transportation Center Director 9:20 - 10:40 Technology Policy: US-China Collaboration on the Electric Vehicle Initiative Henry Kelly, USDOE Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ZHANG Zhihong, MOST, Deputy Director General, Department of New and High Technology WU Feng, Beijing Institute of Technology, Chief Scientist of National (973) Advance Secondary Battery Project Dave Howell, USDOE Vehicle Technologies Program, Team Lead, Hybrid Electric Systems 10:40 - 11:00 Tea/Coffee Break

17

Chemical Applications of Electrohydraulic Cavitation for Hazardous Waste Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the destruction or transformation of hazardous chemical substances such as high-temperature incineration, amended activated sludge digestion, anaerobic digestion and conventional physicochemical treatment. Pulsed-power plasma discharge technology may have.... Current approaches to the treatment of hazardous chemical wastes include high temperature incineration, chemical oxidation with and UV light, membrane separation, activated carbon adsorption, substrate-specific biodegration, electron beam bombardment...

Hoffmann, M. R.

18

System for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and system for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material having a high through-put. The solid waste material is added to an annular vessel (10) substantially filled with concentrated sulfuric acid. Concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide is added to the sulfuric acid within the annular vessel while the sulfuric acid is reacting with the solid waste. The solid waste is mixed within the sulfuric acid so that the solid waste is substantilly fully immersed during the reaction. The off gas from the reaction and the products slurry residue is removed from the vessel during the reaction.

Cowan, Richard G. (Kennewick, WA); Blasewitz, Albert G. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Accelerated chemical aging of crystalline nuclear waste forms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste disposal is a significant technological issue, and the solution of this problem (or lack thereof) will ultimately determine whether nuclear energy is deemed environmentally friendly, despite significantly lower carbon emissions than fossil fuel energy sources. A critical component of any waste disposal strategy is the selection of the waste form that is tasked with preventing radionuclides from entering the environment. The design of robust nuclear waste forms requires consideration of several criteria, including: radiation tolerance, geological interaction and chemical durability; all of these criteria ensure that the radionuclides do not escape from the waste form. Over the past 30years, there have been numerous and thorough studies of these criteria on candidate waste forms, including radiation damage and leaching. However, most of these efforts have focused on the performance of the candidate waste form at t=0, with far less attention paid to the phase stability, and subsequent durability, of candidate waste forms during the course of daughter product formation; that is, the chemical aging of the material. Systematic understanding of phase evolution as a function of chemistry is important for predictions of waste form performance as well as informing waste form design. In this paper, we highlight the research challenges associated with understanding waste form stability when attempting to systematically study the effects of dynamic composition variation due to in situ radionuclide daughter production formation.

C.R. Stanek; B.P. Uberuaga; B.L. Scott; R.K. Feller; N.A. Marks

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Burning Chemical Waste Disposal Site: Investigation, Assessment and Rehabilitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of underground fires on a site previously used for disposal of chemical wastes from the nylon industry was causing a nuisance and restricting the commercial development of the site and adjacent areas....

D. L. Barry; J. M. Campbell; E. H. Jones

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Surface reconstruction and chemical evolution of stoichiometric layered cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Li-Rich Layered Oxides for Lithium Batteries. Nano Lett. 13,O 2 Cathode Material in Lithium Ion Batteries. Adv. Energysolvent decomposition in lithium ion batteries: first-

Lin, Feng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Chemical treatment of mixed waste at the FEMP  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Treatment Project is one in a series of projects implemented by the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) to treat mixed waste. The projects were initiated to address concerns regarding treatment capacity for mixed waste and to comply with requirements established by the Federal Facility Compliance Act. The Chemical Treatment Project is designed to utilize commercially available mobile technologies to perform treatment at the FEMP site. The waste in the Project consists of a variety of waste types with a wide range of hazards and physical characteristics. The treatment processes to be established for the waste types will be developed by a systematic approach including waste streams evaluation, projectization of the waste streams, and categorization of the stream. This information is utilized to determine the proper train of treatment which will be required to lead the waste to its final destination (i.e., disposal). This approach allows flexibility to manage a wide variety of waste in a cheaper, faster manner than designing a single treatment technology diverse enough to manage all the waste streams.

Honigford, L.; Sattler, J.; Dilday, D.; Cook, D.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Chemical treatment of mixed waste can be done.....Today!  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Treatment Project is one in a series of projects implemented by the FEMP to treat mixed waste. The projects were initiated to address concerns regarding treatment capacity for mixed waste and to comply with requirements established by the Federal Facility Compliance Act. The Chemical Treatment Project is designed to utilize commercially available mobile technologies to perform treatment at the FEMP site. The waste in the Project consists of a variety of waste types with a wide range of hazards and physical characteristics. The treatment processes to be established for the waste types will be developed by a systematic approach including waste streams evaluation, projectization of the waste streams, and categorization of the stream. This information is utilized to determine the proper train of treatment which will be required to lead the waste to its final destination (i.e., disposal). This approach allows flexibility to manage a wide variety of waste in a cheaper, faster manner than designing a single treatment technology diverse enough to manage all the waste streams.

Honigford, L.; Dilday, D.; Cook, D. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sattler, J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Alternative Waste Forms for Electro-Chemical Salt Waste  

SciTech Connect

This study was undertaken to examine alternate crystalline (ceramic/mineral) and glass waste forms for immobilizing spent salt from the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) electrochemical separations process. The AFCI is a program sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and demonstrate a process for recycling spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The electrochemical process is a molten salt process for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel in an electrorefiner and generates spent salt that is contaminated with alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanide fission products (FP) that must either be cleaned of fission products or eventually replaced with new salt to maintain separations efficiency. Currently, these spent salts are mixed with zeolite to form sodalite in a glass-bonded waste form. The focus of this study was to investigate alternate waste forms to immobilize spent salt. On a mole basis, the spent salt is dominated by alkali and Cl with minor amounts of alkaline earth and lanthanides. In the study reported here, we made an effort to explore glass systems that are more compatible with Cl and have not been previously considered for use as waste forms. In addition, alternate methods were explored with the hope of finding a way to produce a sodalite that is more accepting of as many FP present in the spent salt as possible. This study was done to investigate two different options: (1) alternate glass families that incorporate increased concentrations of Cl; and (2) alternate methods to produce a mineral waste form.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Brian J.; Matyas, Josef; Arreguin, Shelly A.; Vienna, John D.

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

25

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500 C with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO{sub 2} gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO{sub 2} gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO{sub 2} absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described. 8 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

26

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500.degree. C. with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO.sub.2 gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO.sub.2 gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO.sub.2 absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

CHEMICAL REMOVAL OF BIOMASS FROM WASTE AIR BIOTRICKLING FILTERS: SCREENING OF CHEMICALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL REMOVAL OF BIOMASS FROM WASTE AIR BIOTRICKLING FILTERS: SCREENING OF CHEMICALS for the removal of excess biomass from biotrickling ®lters for waste air treatment. Although the experiment/v) NaOH, 0.26 and 1.31% (w/v) NaClO and 11.3% (w/v) H2O2 resulted in a biomass removal signi

28

RSP WASTE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII RADIOACTIVE WASTE PICKUP REQUEST FORM Revision 06/07 (WASTE WHICH CONTAINS RADIOISOTOPES BUT NO HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RSP WASTE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII RADIOACTIVE WASTE PICKUP REQUEST FORM Revision 06/07 (WASTE WHICH CONTAINS RADIOISOTOPES BUT NO HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS) INSTRUCTIONS : 1. *NO ISOTOPES MAY BE MIXED IN THE WASTE BOX! One type of isotope per waste box - Except C-14 AND H-3 WHICH MAY BE DISPOSED OF TOGETHER. 2

Browder, Tom

29

Plasma chemical process for treatment of hazardous wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conventional methods of combustion are not always effective. One of the new methods for waste treatment is the destruction in plasma jet of chemical reactive gases. An unit with plasmotron power up to 50 kW is constructed for the investigations. Sulphur, chlorine and nitrogen containing organic toxic wastes are subjected to destruction. Water steam, air and their mixture are used as plasma generating gas and chemical reagent. The studies are carried out at a different ratio of plasma generating gasltoxic wastes at temperatures to 2000C. The products are analysed by gas mass spectroscopy. The released gas is composed of Co, H2 and CO2. There were found no hydrocarbons, dioxine and furan. Gas heat value is good for its burning without environment pollution.

Iv. Georgiev; Zh. Bulgaranova; B. Kumanova

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Systematic Waste Minimization in Chemical Processes. 1. Methodology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

22 In MFM, the functional structure of a system is described using a set of interrelated structures for mass, energy, and information flows. ... (1)?Dantus, M. M.; High, K. A. Economic Evaluation for the Retrofit of Chemical Processes through Waste Minimization and Process Integration. ... Price-Targeting Through Iterative Flowsheet Syntheses in Developing Novel Processing Equipment:? Pervaporation ...

Iskandar Halim; Rajagopalan Srinivasan

2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

31

Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL  

SciTech Connect

In part one of this document the Governing Documents and Definitions sections provide general guidelines and regulations applying to the handling of hazardous chemical wastes. The remaining sections provide details on how you can prepare your waste properly for transport and disposal. They are correlated with the steps you must take to properly prepare your waste for pickup. The purpose of the second part of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of radioactive and mixed waste to LBL's Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of radioactive or mixed waste, can meet LBL's acceptance criteria for radioactive and mixed waste.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

State waste discharge permit application, 200-E chemical drain field  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect ground would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). The Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. This document presents the State Waste Discharge Permit (SWDP) application for the 200-E Chemical Drain Field. Waste water from the 272-E Building enters the process sewer line directly through a floor drain, while waste water from the 2703-E Building is collected in two floor drains, (north and south) that act as sumps and are discharged periodically. The 272-E and 2703-E Buildings constitute the only discharges to the process sewer line and the 200-E Chemical Drain Field.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of transuranic wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document provides radiological, physical and chemical characterization data for transuranic radioactive wastes and transuranic radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program (PSPI). Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 139 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 39,380{sup 3} corresponding to a total mass of approximately 19,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats Plant generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: A NEW PROCESS FOR CHEMICALLY CLEANING SAVANNAH RIVER WASTE TANKS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has 49 high level waste (HLW) tanks that must be emptied, cleaned, and closed as required by the Federal Facilities Agreement. The current method of chemical cleaning uses several hundred thousand gallons per tank of 8 weight percent (wt%) oxalic acid to partially dissolve and suspend residual waste and corrosion products such that the waste can be pumped out of the tank. This adds a significant quantity of sodium oxalate to the tanks and, if multiple tanks are cleaned, renders the waste incompatible with the downstream processing. Tank space is also insufficient to store this stream given the large number of tanks to be cleaned. Therefore, a search for a new cleaning process was initiated utilizing the TRIZ literature search approach, and Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination--Ultraviolet (CORD-UV), a mature technology currently used for decontamination and cleaning of commercial nuclear reactor primary cooling water loops, was identified. CORD-UV utilizes oxalic acid for sludge dissolution, but then decomposes the oxalic acid to carbon dioxide and water by UV treatment outside the system being treated. This allows reprecipitation and subsequent deposition of the sludge into a selected container without adding significant volume to that container, and without adding any new chemicals that would impact downstream treatment processes. Bench top and demonstration loop measurements on SRS tank sludge stimulant demonstrated the feasibility of applying CORD-UV for enhanced chemical cleaning of SRS HLW tanks.

Ketusky, E; Neil Davis, N; Renee Spires, R

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

35

Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Recovery of valuable metals from scrap batteries of mobile phone. - Highlights: Recovery of Co and Li from spent LIBs was performed by hydrometallurgical route. Under the optimum condition, 99.1% of lithium and 70.0% of cobalt were leached. The mechanism of the dissolution of lithium and cobalt was studied. Activation energy for lithium and cobalt were found to be 32.4 kJ/mol and 59.81 kJ/mol, respectively. After metal recovery, residue was washed before disposal to the environment. - Abstract: In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2 M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75 C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1 ? (1 ? X){sup 1/3} = k{sub c}t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles i.e. 1 ? 3(1 ? X){sup 2/3} + 2(1 ? X) = k{sub c}t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution.

Jha, Manis Kumar, E-mail: mkjha@nmlindia.org; Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

The application of a chemical equilibrium model, SOLTEQ, to predict the chemical speciations in stabilized/solidified waste forms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE APPLICATION OI' A CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM MODEL, SOLTEQ, TO PREDICT THK CHEMICAL SPKCIATIONS IN STABILIZED/SOLIDIFIED WASTE FORMS A Thesis by JOO-YANG PARK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1994 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE APPLICATION OF A CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM MODEL, SOLTEQ, TO PREDICT THE CHEMICAL SPECIATIONS IN STABILIZED/SOLIDIFIED WASTE FORMS A Thesis...

Park, Joo-Yang

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Battery cell feedthrough apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact, hermetic feedthrough apparatus is described comprising interfitting sleeve portions constructed of chemically-stable materials to permit unique battery designs and increase battery life and performance. 8 figs.

Kaun, T.D.

1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

38

Batteries and Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A battery is a device which can store chemical energy and, on demand, convert it into electrical energy to drive an external circuit. The importance of batteries to modern life surely requires no emphasis. Eve...

Derek Pletcher

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Batteries and fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A battery is a device which can store chemical energy and, on demand, convert it into electrical energy to drive an external circuit. The importance of batteries to modern life surely requires no emphasis. Eve...

Derek Pletcher; Frank C. Walsh

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

X-ray Absorption Measurements on Nickel Cathode of Sodium-beta Alumina batteries: Fe-Ni-CI Chemical Associations  

SciTech Connect

Sections of Na-Al-NiCl2 cathodes from sodium-beta alumina ZEBRA batteries have been characterized with X-ray fluorescence mapping, and XANES measurements to probe the microstructure, elemental correlation, and chemical speciation after voltage cycling. Cycling was performed under identical load conditions at either 240 or 280 C operating temperature and subsequently quenched in either the charged or discharged state. X-ray fluorescence mapping and XANES measurements were made adjacent to the current collector and ?"-Al2O3 solid electrolyte interfaces to detect possible gradients in chemical properties across the cathode. An FeS additive, introduced during battery synthesis, was found to be present as either Fe metal or an Fe(II) chloride in all cathode samples. X-ray fluorescence mapping reveals an operating temperature and charge-state dependent spatial correlation between Fe, Ni, and Cl concentration. XANES measurements indicate that both Ni and Fe are chemically reactive and shift between metallic and chloride phases in the charged and discharged states, respectively. However the percentage of chemically active Ni and Fe is significantly less in the cell operated at lower temperature. Additionally, the cathode appeared chemically homogeneous at the scale of our X-ray measurements.

Bowden, Mark E.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Fulton, John L.; Lemmon, John P.; Lu, Xiaochuan; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Heald, Steve M.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Mortensen, Devon R.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Hess, Nancy J.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Chemical and Electrochemical Differences in Nonaqueous LiO2 and NaO2 Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most intriguing difference between the two batteries is their respective galvanostatic charging overpotentials: a NaO2 battery exhibits a low overpotential throughout most of its charge, whereas a LiO2 battery has a low initial overpotential that continuously increases to very high voltages by the end of charge. ... Li metal was purchased from FMC, Na metal was purchased from GalliumSource, P50 Avcarb carbon paper was purchased from the Fuel Cell Store, and Whatman glass fiber filters (QM-A grade) were used as the separator. ...

Bryan D. McCloskey; Jeannette M. Garcia; Alan C. Luntz

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

42

Technology Evaluation Workshop Report for Tank Waste Chemical Characterization  

SciTech Connect

A Tank Waste Chemical Characterization Technology Evaluation Workshop was held August 24--26, 1993. The workshop was intended to identify and evaluate technologies appropriate for the in situ and hot cell characterization of the chemical composition of Hanford waste tank materials. The participants were asked to identify technologies that show applicability to the needs and good prospects for deployment in the hot cell or tanks. They were also asked to identify the tasks required to pursue the development of specific technologies to deployment readiness. This report describes the findings of the workshop. Three focus areas were identified for detailed discussion: (1) elemental analysis, (2) molecular analysis, and (3) gas analysis. The technologies were restricted to those which do not require sample preparation. Attachment 1 contains the final workshop agenda and a complete list of attendees. An information package (Attachment 2) was provided to all participants in advance to provide information about the Hanford tank environment, needs, current characterization practices, potential deployment approaches, and the evaluation procedure. The participants also received a summary of potential technologies (Attachment 3). The workshop opened with a plenary session, describing the background and issues in more detail. Copies of these presentations are contained in Attachments 4, 5 and 6. This session was followed by breakout sessions in each of the three focus areas. The workshop closed with a plenary session where each focus group presented its findings. This report summarizes the findings of each of the focus groups. The evaluation criteria and information about specific technologies are tabulated at the end of each section in the report. The detailed notes from each focus group are contained in Attachments 7, 8 and 9.

Eberlein, S.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

This final hazard categorization (FHC) document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the commitments for the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks Remediation Project. The remediation activities analyzed in this FHC are based on recommended treatment and disposal alternatives described in the Engineering Evaluation for the Remediation to the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks (BHI 2005e).

T. M. Blakley; W. D. Schofield

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

44

SURFACE RECONSTRUCTION AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF STOICHIOMETRIC LAYERED CATHODE MATERIALS FOR LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CATHODE MATERIALS FOR LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES Feng Lin, 1*As shown in Figure 2, in lithium-metal half-cells, capacitypredominantly occurs along the lithium diffusion channels,

Lin, Feng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Combustible radioactive waste treatment by incineration and chemical digestion  

SciTech Connect

A review is given of present and planned combustible radioactive waste treatment systems in the US. Advantages and disadvantages of various systems are considered. Design waste streams are discussed in relation to waste composition, radioactive contaminants by amount and type, and special operating problems caused by the waste.

Stretz, L.A.; Crippen, M.D.; Allen, C.R.

1980-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

46

Study of chemical toxicity of low-level wastes. Volume 1. Main report  

SciTech Connect

The chemical composition of fuel-cycle wastes is reasonably well known. By comparison, there is little information on the chemical composition of non-fuel cycle wastes. Such non-fuel cycle wastes come from a variety of sources - industrial, chemical, and medical. Because of the paucity of information, it is difficult to define the chemical characteristics and to evaluate potential hazards of non-fuel cycle wastes as a result of chemical toxicity. This report provides an assessment of the chemical toxicity of low-level radioactive wastes based on literature reviews, preparation of bibliographies and monographs, and application of a variety of methodologies either being currently applied or being proposed for relative hazard assessments. The report relies primarily on data from the Maxey Flats, Kentucky waste disposal site. While there are differences between humid and dry sites, the findings are believed to be generally applicable to evaluating the chemical toxicity of wastes at all low-level radioactive waste burial sites.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Study of chemical toxicity of low-level wastes. Volume 2. Monographs  

SciTech Connect

The chemical composition of fuel-cycle wastes is reasonably well known. By comparison, there is little information on the chemical composition of non-fuel cycle wastes. Such non-fuel cycle wastes come from a variety of sources - industrial, chemical, and medical. Because of the paucity of information, it is difficult to define the chemical characteristics and to evaluate potential hazards of non-fuel cycle wastes as a result of chemical toxicity. This report provides an assessment of the chemical toxicity of low-level radioactive wastes based on literature reviews, preparation of bibliographies and monographs, and application of a variety of methodologies either being currently applied or being proposed for relative hazard assessments. The report relies primarily on data from the Maxey Flats, Kentucky waste disposal site. While there are differences between humid and dry sites, the findings are believed to be generally applicable to evaluating the chemical toxicity of wastes at all low-level radioactive waste burial sites.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

University of Delaware Laboratory Chemical Waste Disposal Guide ALL CHEMICAL WASTE MUST BE DISPOSED OF THROUGH THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiments and procedures Non-Returnable gas cylinders Batteries Spent solvents, Stains, Strippers, Thinners, Fertilizers Formaldehyde and Formalin Solutions Mercury containing items (other heavy metals) Liquid OR SMALL CONTAINERS IMPORTANT: DO NOT DISPOSE OF REACTIVE, AIR SENSITIVE, OR OXIDIZER SAMPLES

Firestone, Jeremy

49

Ecotoxicological assessment of organic wastes spread on land: Towards a proposal of a suitable test battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The land spreading of organic wastes in agriculture is a common practice in Europe, under the regulation of the Directive 86/278/EEC. One of the objectives of this Directive is to prevent harmful effects of organic wastes on soil, plants and animals. Despite this regulatory framework, there is still a lack of harmonized ecotoxicological test strategy to assess the environmental hazard of such wastes. The aim of this study was to provide a first step towards the a priori ecotoxicological assessment of organic wastes before their land use. For that purpose, nine different organic wastes were assessed using direct (i.e. terrestrial tests) and indirect (i.e. tests on water eluates) approaches, for a total of thirteen endpoints. Then, multivariate analyzes were used to discriminate the most relevant test strategy, among the application rates and bioassays used. From our results, a draft of test strategy was proposed, using terrestrial bioassays (i.e. earthworms and plants) and a concentration range between one and ten times the recommended application rates of organic wastes.

Pierre Huguier; Nicolas Manier; Laure Chabot; Pascale Bauda; Pascal Pandard

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Conversion of waste polyvinyl chloride (PVC) to useful chemicals  

SciTech Connect

Developments of recycling technologies are expected one of the most important keys for saving energy and resources, and minimization impact for environment. For instance, combustion of waste for power generation and conversion of plastics into liquid fuels have been studying for thermal energy recycling. However, PVC has been excepted from the most of these experiments. Because, heat of combustion of PVC is almost a half of other plastics, hydrogen chloride, which is produced at low temperature, corrodes the combustion chamber, and PVC causes coking reaction during pyrolysis of plastics. Numerous investigations have been conducted on degradation of PVC. However, most of these experiments were done to improve heat resistance of PVC or to study reaction mechanism of PVC degradation. Pyrolysis of PVC into liquid products have been studying since 1960`s from a view of environmental protection. Recently, Y. Maezawa et al. reported PVC was converted into oil at 600 T with sodium hydroxide. However, more than 50 % of hydrocarbon fraction of PVC was converted to residue and gas in their experiment. We are going to develop a new technology to convert of PVC into useful chemicals or liquid fuels at high efficiency by using hydrogen donor solvent.

Kamo, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Miki, K.; Sato, Y. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki (Japan)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Conversion of Waste CO2 and Shale Gas to High-Value Chemicals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The project aims to develop, build, operate, and validate a laboratory-scale continuous process that converts waste CO2 from industrial sources from shale gas into commodity chemical intermediates.

52

Thermo-chemical conversion of dairy waste based biomass through direct firing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i THERMO-CHEMICAL CONVERSION OF DAIRY WASTE BASED BIOMASS THROUGH DIRECT FIRING A Thesis by NICHOLAS THOMAS CARLIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2005 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering ii THERMO-CHEMICAL CONVERSION OF DAIRY WASTE BASED BIOMASS THROUGH DIRECT FIRING A Thesis by NICHOLAS THOMAS CARLIN...

Carlin, Nicholas Thomas

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

53

Nuclear batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear batteries ... Describes the structure, operation, and application of nuclear batteries. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Alfred B. Garrett

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Chemical Fabrication and Electrochemical Characterization of Graphene Nanosheets Using a Lithium Battery Platform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For instance, graphene-based nanocomposites have found extensive applications in Li-ion batteries (LIBs) as scientists and engineers seek to achieve superior electrochemical performances. ... Second-Year Undergraduate; Graduate Education/Research; Interdisciplinary/Multidisciplinary; Hands-On Learning/Manipulatives; Electrochemistry; Materials Science; Nanotechnology; Upper-Division Undergraduate; Laboratory Instruction ... International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Drug Research (2010), 2 (2), 127-133 CODEN: IJPSPP; ISSN:0975-248X. ...

Aaron J. Blake; Hong Huang

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

55

Chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for low-level mixed waste stabilization  

SciTech Connect

Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs) are being developed and fabricated for low-temperature stabilization and solidification of mixed waste streams which are amenable to conventional high-temperature stabilization processes due to presence of volatiles such as heavy metal chloride and fluorides and/or pyrophorics in the wastes. Phosphates of Mg, Mg-Na and Zr are being developed as candidate matrix materials. In this paper, we present the fabrication procedures of phosphate waste forms using surrogates compositions of three typical mixed wastes streams -- ash, cement sludges, and salts. The performance of the final waste forms such as compression strength, leachability of the contaminants, durability in aqueous environment were conducted. In addition, parameteric studies have been conducted to establish the optimal waste loading in a particular binder system. Based on the results, we present potential applications in the treatment of various mixed waste streams.

Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Cunnane, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Mayberry, J.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Enhanced Chemical Cleaning: A New Process for Chemically Cleaning Savannah River Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) there are 49 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks that eventually must be emptied, cleaned, and closed. The current method of chemically cleaning SRS HLW tanks, commonly referred to as Bulk Oxalic Acid Cleaning (BOAC), requires about a half million liters (130,000 gallons) of 8 weight percent (wt%) oxalic acid to clean a single tank. During the cleaning, the oxalic acid acts as the solvent to digest sludge solids and insoluble salt solids, such that they can be suspended and pumped out of the tank. Because of the volume and concentration of acid used, a significant quantity of oxalate is added to the HLW process. This added oxalate significantly impacts downstream processing. In addition to the oxalate, the volume of liquid added competes for the limited available tank space. A search, therefore, was initiated for a new cleaning process. Using TRIZ (Teoriya Resheniya Izobretatelskikh Zadatch or roughly translated as the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving), Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination with Ultraviolet Light (CORD-UV{reg_sign}), a mature technology used in the commercial nuclear power industry was identified as an alternate technology. Similar to BOAC, CORD-UV{reg_sign} also uses oxalic acid as the solvent to dissolve the metal (hydr)oxide solids. CORD-UV{reg_sign} is different, however, since it uses photo-oxidation (via peroxide/UV or ozone/UV to form hydroxyl radicals) to decompose the spent oxalate into carbon dioxide and water. Since the oxalate is decomposed and off-gassed, CORD-UV{reg_sign} would not have the negative downstream oxalate process impacts of BOAC. With the oxalate destruction occurring physically outside the HLW tank, re-precipitation and transfer of the solids, as well as regeneration of the cleaning solution can be performed without adding additional solids, or a significant volume of liquid to the process. With a draft of the pre-conceptual Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) flowsheet, taking full advantage of the many CORD-UV{reg_sign} benefits, performance demonstration testing was initiated using available SRS sludge simulant. The demonstration testing confirmed that ECC is a viable technology, as it can dissolve greater than 90% of the sludge simulant and destroy greater than 90% of the oxalates. Additional simulant and real waste testing are planned.

Ketusky, Edward; Spires, Renee; Davis, Neil

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

57

Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of batteries masks their chemical complexity. A typical lithium-ion battery in a cell phone consists of trillions of particles. When a lithium-ion battery is charged or...

58

Chemical Environment at Waste Package Surfaces in a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect

We have conducted a series of deliquescence, boiling point, chemical transformation, and evaporation experiments to determine the composition of waters likely to contact waste package surfaces over the thermal history of the repository as it heats up and cools back down to ambient conditions. In the above-boiling period, brines will be characterized by high nitrate to chloride ratios that are stable to higher temperatures than previously predicted. This is clearly shown for the NaCl-KNO{sub 3} salt system in the deliquescence and boiling point experiments in this report. Our results show that additional thermodynamic data are needed in nitrate systems to accurately predict brine stability and composition due to salt deliquescence in dust deposited on waste package surfaces. Current YMP models capture dry-out conditions but not composition for NaCl-KNO{sub 3} brines, and they fail to predict dry-out conditions for NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} brines. Boiling point and deliquescence experiments are needed in NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} systems to directly determine dry-out conditions and composition, because these salt mixtures are also predicted to control brine composition in the above-boiling period. Corrosion experiments are needed in high temperature and high NO{sub 3}:Cl brines to determine if nitrate inhibits corrosion in these concentrated brines at temperatures above 160 C. Chemical transformations appear to be important for pure calcium- and magnesium-chloride brines at temperatures greater than 120 C. This stems from a lack of acid gas volatility in NaCl/KNO{sub 3} based brines and by slow CO{sub 2}(g) diffusion in alkaline brines. This suggests that YMP corrosion models based on bulk solution experiments over the appropriate composition, temperature, and relative humidity range can be used to predict corrosion in thin brine films formed by salt deliquescence. In contrast to the above-boiling period, the below-boiling period is characterized predominately by NaCl based brines with minor amounts of K, NO{sub 3}, Ca, Mg, F, and Br at less than 70% relative humidity. These brines are identified as sulfate and bicarbonate brines by the chemical divide theory. Nitrate to chloride ratios are strongly tied to relative humidity and halite solubility. Once the relative humidity is low enough to produce brines saturated with respect to halite, then NO{sub 3}:Cl increases to levels and may inhibit corrosion. In addition to the more abundant NaCl-based brines some measured pore waters will evaporate towards acid NaCl-CaCl{sub 2} brines. Acid volatility also occurs with this brine type indicating that chemical transformations may be important in thin films. In contrast to the above-boiling period, comparison of our experimental data with calculated data suggest that current YMP geochemical models adequately predict in-drift chemistry in the below-boiling period.

Carroll, S; Alai, M; Craig, L; Gdowski, G; Hailey, P; Nguyen, Q A; Rard, J; Staggs, K; Sutton, M; Wolery, T

2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

59

FISHERY WASTE EFFLUENTS: A METHOD TO DETERMINE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND AND RESIDUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FISHERY WASTE EFFLUENTS: A METHOD TO DETERMINE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND effluents, especially for total suspended and settleable solids, and oil and grease. The relationship between chemical oxygen demand and residue was determined on a limited number of samples from four types

60

Radiological and chemical source terms for Solid Waste Operations Complex. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to describe the radiological and chemical source terms for the major projects of the Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC), including Project W-112, Project W-133 and Project W-100 (WRAP 2A). For purposes of this document, the term ``source term`` means the design basis inventory. All of the SWOC source terms involve the estimation of the radiological and chemical contents of various waste packages from different waste streams, and the inventories of these packages within facilities or within a scope of operations. The composition of some of the waste is not known precisely; consequently, conservative assumptions were made to ensure that the source term represents a bounding case (i.e., it is expected that the source term would not be exceeded). As better information is obtained on the radiological and chemical contents of waste packages and more accurate facility specific models are developed, this document should be revised as appropriate. Radiological source terms are needed to perform shielding and external dose calculations, to estimate routine airborne releases, to perform release calculations and dose estimates for safety documentation, to calculate the maximum possible fire loss and specific source terms for individual fire areas, etc. Chemical source terms (i.e., inventories of combustible, flammable, explosive or hazardous chemicals) are used to determine combustible loading, fire protection requirements, personnel exposures to hazardous chemicals from routine and accident conditions, and a wide variety of other safety and environmental requirements.

Boothe, G.F.

1994-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Method of waste stabilization via chemically bonded phosphate ceramics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for regulating the reaction temperature of a ceramic formulation process is provided comprising supplying a solution containing a monovalent alkali metal; mixing said solution with an oxide powder to create a binder; contacting said binder with bulk material to form a slurry; and allowing the slurry to cure. A highly crystalline waste form is also provided consisting of a binder containing potassium and waste substrate encapsulated by the binder. 3 figs.

Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Jeong, S.Y.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

62

Nuclear Batteries for Implantable Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nuclear battery is so named because its source of ... the nucleus of the atoms of the fuel, rather than in the electrons that surround ... the fundamental source of energy for the chemical batteries describ...

David L. Purdy

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Chemical compatibility screening results of plastic packaging to mixed waste simulants  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a chemical compatibility program for evaluating transportation packaging components for transporting mixed waste forms. We have performed the first phase of this experimental program to determine the effects of simulant mixed wastes on packaging materials. This effort involved the screening of 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to {approximately}3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14 day exposures to the waste simulants of 60 C. The seal materials or rubbers were tested using VTR (vapor transport rate) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criteria of {approximately}1 g/m{sup 2}/hr for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. It was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only VITON passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. It is anticipated that those materials with the lowest VTRs will be evaluated in the comprehensive phase of the program. For specific gravity testing of liner materials the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE were found to offer the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Chemical Fixation of Carbon Dioxide Using a Green and Efficient Catalytic System Based on Sugarcane BagasseAn Agricultural Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical Fixation of Carbon Dioxide Using a Green and Efficient Catalytic System Based on Sugarcane BagasseAn Agricultural Waste ... Wisconsin

Wei Chen; Lin-xin Zhong; Xin-wen Peng; Run-cang Sun; Fa-chuang Lu

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

65

Tabulation of thermodynamic data for chemical reactions involving 58 elements common to radioactive waste package systems  

SciTech Connect

The rate of release and migration of radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository to the biosphere is dependent on chemical interactions between groundwater, the geologic host rock, and the radioactive waste package. For the purpose of this report, the waste package includes the wasteform, canister, overpack, and repository backfill. Chemical processes of interest include sorption (ion exchange), dissolution, complexation, and precipitation. Thermochemical data for complexation and precipitation calculations for 58 elements common to the radioactive waste package are presented. Standard free energies of formation of free ions, complexes, and solids are listed. Common logarithms of equilibrium constants (log K's) for speciation and precipitation reactions are listed. Unless noted otherwise, all data are for 298.15/sup 0/K and one atmosphere.

Benson, L.V.; Teague, L.S.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Recovery and utilization of waste liquids in ultra-clean coal preparation by chemical leaching  

SciTech Connect

Coal with ash lower than 1%, being called an ultra-clean coal, has many potential applications, such as a substitute for diesel fuel, production of carbon electrodes, superior activated carbon and other chemical materials. It is difficult to reduce coal ash to such a level by conventional coal preparation technology. By means of chemical leaching with the proper concentration of alkali and acid solutions, any coal can be deeply deashed to 1% ash level. However, the cost of chemical methods is higher than that of physical ones, additionally, the waste liquids would give rise to environmental pollution if used on a large scale. If the waste liquids from chemical preparation of ultra-clean coal can be recovered and utilized, so as to produce salable by-products, the cost of chemical leaching will be reduced. This processing will also solve the pollution problem of these waste liquids. This paper describes recovery and utilization methods for these liquids used in chemical leaching, including the recoveries of alkali, silica, sodium-salt and aluminium-salt. A preliminary estimate was made regarding its economic benefits. It shows that this research solves the two problems in the chemical preparation of ultra-clean coal. One is the high-cost and the other is environmental pollution. This research demonstrates good potential for the production of ultra-clean coal on an industrial scale.

Xu Zesheng; Shi Zhimin; Yang Qiaowen; Wang Xinguo [China Univ. of Mining and Technology, Beijing (China). Beijing Graduate School

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Assessing the Power Generation Solution by Thermal-chemical Conversion of Meat Processing Industry Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents a waste to energy conversion solution using a pyro-air-gasification process applied to biodegradable residues from meat processing industry integrated with small scale thermodynamic cycle for power generation. The solution of air- gasification at atmospheric pressure is based on experimental research and engineering computation developed during the study. The input data, such as: waste chemical composition, low/high heating value and proximate analysis, correspond to real waste products, sampled directly from the industrial processing line. Separate drying as first stage pre-treatment and integrated partial drying inside the reactor was used. The syngas low heating value of about 4.3MJ/Nm3 is insured by its combustible fraction (H2 12.2%, CO 19.2%, CH4 1.6%). According to syngas composition the thermodynamic cycle was chosen Otto gas engine. For a given waste feed-in flow considered in our computation of about 110kg/h the power output obtained is about 50 kWel. The global energy efficiency of the unit is about 15%. The results offer answers to energy recovery waste disposal for residues with characteristics that are not suitable for classic incineration or limit the energy efficiency of the process making it non-economical (the average humidity of the raw waste is about 42% in mass). The research focused on waste to energy conversion process energy efficiency, waste neutralization and power generation.

Cosmin Marculescu; Florin Alexe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SIMULATED HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASSES TO SUPPORT SULFATE SOLUBILITY MODELING  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms both within the DOE complex and to some extent at U.K. sites. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerated cleanup missions. Much of the previous work on improving sulfate retention in waste glasses has been done on an empirical basis, making it difficult to apply the findings to future waste compositions despite the large number of glass systems studied. A more fundamental, rather than empirical, model of sulfate solubility in glass, under development at Sheffield Hallam University (SHU), could provide a solution to the issues of sulfate solubility. The model uses the normalized cation field strength index as a function of glass composition to predict sulfate capacity, and has shown early success for some glass systems. The objective of the current scope is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DOE waste vitrification efforts, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the current model. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for simulated waste glasses fabricated SHU in support of sulfate solubility model development. A review of the measured compositions revealed that there are issues with the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations missing their targeted values by a significant amount for several of the study glasses. SHU is reviewing the fabrication of these glasses and the chemicals used in batching them to identify the source of these issues. The measured sulfate concentrations were all below their targeted values. This is expected, as the targeted concentrations likely exceeded the solubility limit for sulfate in these glass compositions. Some volatilization of sulfate may also have occurred during fabrication of the glasses. Measurements of the other oxides in the study glasses were reasonably close to their targeted values

Fox, K.; Marra, J.

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

69

Rechargeable Heat Battery's Secret Revealed: Solar Energy Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rechargeable Heat Battery Rechargeable Heat Battery's Secret Revealed Solar energy capture in chemical form makes it storable and transportable January 11, 2011 | Tags: Chemistry,...

70

Sandia National Laboratories: Batteries & Energy Storage Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Waste Prioritized Safeguards and Security Issues for extended Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel Research to Improve Transportation Energy Storage Fact Sheet Sandia's Battery...

71

Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

In part one of this document the Governing Documents and Definitions sections provide general guidelines and regulations applying to the handling of hazardous chemical wastes. The remaining sections provide details on how you can prepare your waste properly for transport and disposal. They are correlated with the steps you must take to properly prepare your waste for pickup. The purpose of the second part of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of radioactive and mixed waste to LBL`s Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of radioactive or mixed waste, can meet LBL`s acceptance criteria for radioactive and mixed waste.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include universal waste, batteries, computers, and hazardousaerosol cans, lead-acid batteries, and electronic media,metal, aluminum cans, and batteries to a recycling center or

Borglin, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals  

SciTech Connect

A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

74

EXPEDITING THE PATH TO CLOSURE THE CHEMICAL WASTE LANDFILL, SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES, NEW MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is undergoing closure subject to the requirements of Subtitle C of RCRA. This paper identifies regulatory mechanisms that have and continue to expedite and simplify the closure of the CWL. These include (1) the Environmental Restoration (ER) Programmatic effort to achieve progress quickly with respect to the standard regulatory processes, which resulted in the performance of voluntary corrective measures at the CWL years in advance of the standard process schedule, (2) the management and disposal of CWL remediation wastes and materials according to the risks posed, and (3) the combination of multiple regulatory requirements into a single submittal.

Young, S.G.; Schofield, D.P.; Davis, M.J.; Methvin, R.; Mitchell, M.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

75

Preparation and Characterization of Chemical Plugs Based on Selected Hanford Waste Simulants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of preparation and characterization of chemical plugs based on selected Hanford Site waste simulants. Included are the results of chemical plug bench testing conducted in support of the M1/M6 Flow Loop Chemical Plugging/Unplugging Test (TP-RPP-WTP-495 Rev A). These results support the proposed plug simulants for the chemical plugging/ unplugging tests. Based on the available simulant data, a set of simulants was identified that would likely result in chemical plugs. The three types of chemical plugs that were generated and tested in this task consisted of: 1. Aluminum hydroxide (NAH), 2. Sodium aluminosilicate (NAS), and 3. Sodium aluminum phosphate (NAP). While both solvents, namely 2 molar (2 M) nitric acid (HNO3) and 2 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at 60C, used in these tests were effective in dissolving the chemical plugs, the 2 M nitric acid was significantly more effective in dissolving the NAH and NAS plugs. The caustic was only slightly more effecting at dissolving the NAP plug. In the bench-scale dissolution tests, hot (60C) 2 M nitric acid was the most effective solvent in that it completely dissolved both NAH and NAS chemical plugs much faster (1.5 2 x) than 2 M sodium hydroxide. So unless there are operational benefits for the use of caustic verses nitric acid, 2 M nitric acid heated to 60C C should be the solvent of choice for dissolving these chemical plugs. Flow-loop testing was planned to identify a combination of parameters such as pressure, flush solution, composition, and temperature that would effectively dissolve and flush each type of chemical plug from preformed chemical plugs in 3-inch-diameter and 4-feet-long pipe sections. However, based on a review of the results of the bench-top tests and technical discussions, the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Research and Technology (R&T), Engineering and Mechanical Systems (EMS), and Operations concluded that flow-loop testing of the chemically plugged pipe sections would not provide any additional information or useful data. The decision was communicated through a Sub Contract Change Notice (SCN-070) that included a revised scope as follows: Photographing the chemical plugs in the pipes before extrusion to compare the morphology of aged gels with that of fresh gels. Setting up an extrusion apparatus and extruding the chemical plugs. Documenting the qualitative observations on the efforts to remove the chemical plug materials from the pipe sections. Performing X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of extruded gel samples to detect any crystallization of gel during storage. Disposing of the extruded gel as a waste. Documenting the analytical results in a test report. There were no significant morphological differences between the fresh and aged plugs except for an overgrowth of small transparent crystals on the surface of the aged NAS gel plug. An initial pressure of <150 psi was required to start extruding the aged NAS and NAP plugs, whereas the NAH plug began to extrude with the application of minimal pressure. The shear strength of extruded samples ranged from ~9 to >15 KPa for the NAS plug and from ~2 to 6 KPa for the NAH plug. Following extrusion, the NAP plug sections were thixotropic. The bulk of all the aged gel plugs consisted of amorphous material with nitratine constituting the crystalline phase. A separate question about the whether the current in-tank waste conditions will bound the future multi-tank blended feed conditions for the Waste Treatment Plant is outside the scope of this study.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Gunderson, Katie M.; Baum, Steven R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Poloski, Adam P.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batteries Batteries battery/cell diagram Battery/Cell Diagram Batteries are important to our everyday lives and show up in various consumer electronics and appliances, from MP3 players to laptops to our vehicles. Batteries play an important role in our vehicles and are gradually becoming more and more important as they assume energy storage responsibilities from fuel in vehicle propulsion systems. A battery is a device that stores chemical energy in its active materials and converts it, on demand, into electrical energy by means of an electrochemical reaction. An electrochemical reaction is a chemical reaction involving the transfer of electrons, and it is that reaction which creates electricity. There are three main parts of a battery: the anode, cathode, and electrolyte. The anode is the "fuel" electrode which gives up electrons to the external circuit to create the flow of electrons or electricity. The cathode is the oxidizing electrode which accepts electrons in the external circuit. Finally, the electrolyte carries the electric current, as ions, inside the cell, between the anode and cathode.

77

EA-437; Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and Process Waste Liquid Collection Systems Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

437; Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and 437; Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and Process Waste Liquid Collection Systems Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Idaho National Engineering Laboratory TABLE OF CONTENTS Environmental Assessment Process Equipment Waste and Process Waste Liquid Collection Systems Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Idaho National Engineering Laboratory 1. INTRODUCTION 2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 2.1 Purpose and Need of the Proposed Action 2.2 Description of the Affected Facilities 2.3 Description of Proposed Action 2.4 Alternatives to the Proposed Action 2.5 Separate But Related Actions 3. AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Physical Environment 3.3 Biological Resources 3.4 Cultural Resources 3.5 Environmental Quality and Monitoring Programs

78

In-situ, Real-Time Monitoring of Mechanical and Chemical Structure Changes in a V2O5 Battery Electrode Using a MEMS Optical Sensor  

SciTech Connect

This work presents the first demonstration of a MEMS optical sensor for in-situ, real-time monitoring of both mechanical and chemical structure evolutions in a V2O5 lithium-ion battery (LIB) cathode during battery operation. A reflective membrane forms one side of a Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer, while the other side is coated with V2O5 and exposed to electrolyte in a half-cell LIB. Using one microscope and two laser sources, both the induced membrane deflection and the corresponding Raman intensity changes are observed during lithium cycling. Results are in good agreement with the expected mechanical behavior and disorder change of the V2O5 layers, highlighting the significant potential of MEMS as enabling tools for advanced scientific investigations.

Jung, H. [University of Maryland; Gerasopoulos, K. [University of Maryland; Gnerlich, Markus [University of Maryland; Talin, A. Alec [Sandia National Laboratories; Ghodssi, Reza [University of Maryland

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Unique battery with an active membrane separator having uniform physico-chemically functionalized ion channels and a method making the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a unique battery having an active, porous membrane and method of making the same. More specifically the invention relates to a sealed battery system having a porous, metal oxide membrane with uniform, physicochemically functionalized ion channels capable of adjustable ionic interaction. The physicochemically-active porous membrane purports dual functions: an electronic insulator (separator) and a unidirectional ion-transporter (electrolyte). The electrochemical cell membrane is activated for the transport of ions by contiguous ion coordination sites on the interior two-dimensional surfaces of the trans-membrane unidirectional pores. The membrane material is designed to have physicochemical interaction with ions. Control of the extent of the interactions between the ions and the interior pore walls of the membrane and other materials, chemicals, or structures contained within the pores provides adjustability of the ionic conductivity of the membrane.

Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Ruscic, Katarina J. (Chicago, IL); Sears, Devin N. (Spruce Grove, CA); Smith, Luis J. (Natick, MA); Klingler, Robert J. (Glenview, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

80

Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

insertion reactions. For Li-ion battery materials, it refersis widespread throughout the Li-ion battery literature, thisthe chemistry of the Li-ion battery is not fixed, unlike the

Doeff, Marca M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Chemical compatibility study of Cooley L18KU, Herculite, and Elephant Mat with Hanford tank waste  

SciTech Connect

An independent chemical compatibility review of various wrapping and absorbent/padding materials was conducted to evaluate resistance to chemicals and constituents present in liquid waste from the Hanford underground tanks. These materials will be used to wrap long-length contaminated equipment when such equipment is removed from the tanks and prepared for transportation and subsequent disposal or storage. The materials studied were Cooley L18KU, Herculite, and Elephant Mat. The study concludes that these materials are appropriate for use in this application.

Mercado, J.E.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

82

EXPLORING ENGINEERING CONTROL THROUGH PROCESS MANIPULATION OF RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TANK CHEMICAL CLEANING  

SciTech Connect

One method of remediating legacy liquid radioactive waste produced during the cold war, is aggressive in-tank chemical cleaning. Chemical cleaning has successfully reduced the curie content of residual waste heels in large underground storage tanks; however this process generates significant chemical hazards. Mercury is often the bounding hazard due to its extensive use in the separations process that produced the waste. This paper explores how variations in controllable process factors, tank level and temperature, may be manipulated to reduce the hazard potential related to mercury vapor generation. When compared using a multivariate regression analysis, findings indicated that there was a significant relationship between both tank level (p value of 1.65x10{sup -23}) and temperature (p value of 6.39x10{sup -6}) to the mercury vapor concentration in the tank ventilation system. Tank temperature showed the most promise as a controllable parameter for future tank cleaning endeavors. Despite statistically significant relationships, there may not be confidence in the ability to control accident scenarios to below mercurys IDLH or PAC-III levels for future cleaning initiatives.

Brown, A.

2014-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

83

Performance optimization of biological waste treatment by flotation clarification at a chemical manufacturing facility  

SciTech Connect

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., utilizes a deep-tank activated sludge wastewater treatment system with a dissolved air flotation clarifier (DAF) to effectively treat amine wastes containing residual organics, ammonia-nitrogen and organic nitrogen. The bio-system, a deep tank aeration system, produces a high quality final effluent low in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), ammonia and organic nitrogen, turbidity and total suspended solids. Prior to installing the DAF, treatment performance was at risk with a gravity clarifier. Waste treatment performance was jeopardized by poor settling bio-flocs and uncontrollable solids-liquid separation problems within the gravity clarifier. The solids settleability problems resulted primarily from mixed liquor nitrogen supersaturation degassing in the clarifier. As a result of the degassing, biomass floated on the gravity clarifier or overflowed the effluent weir. As a result of biomass loss periodically organic carbon and total Kjeldahl nitrogen loadings had to be reduced in order to maintain optimal food-to-mass ratios. As biomass levels dropped within the aeration basin, waste treatment performance was at risk and waste loads had to be decreased causing waste inventories to increase in storage tanks.

Kerecz, B.J. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States); Miller, D.R. [Komline-Sanderson, Peapack, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Technology development program for Idaho Chemical Processing Plant spent fuel and waste management  

SciTech Connect

Acidic high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage at the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, and describes the Spent Fuel and HLW Technology program in more detail.

Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.; Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

REVIEW OF ALTERNATIVE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OPTIONS FOR SRS WASTE TANKS  

SciTech Connect

A literature review was conducted to support the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for Alternative Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (AECC) for sludge heel removal funded as part of the EM-21 Engineering and Technology program. The goal was to identify potential technologies or enhancements to the baseline oxalic acid cleaning process for chemically dissolving or mobilizing Savannah River Site (SRS) sludge heels. The issues with the potentially large volume of oxalate solids generated from the baseline process have driven an effort to find an improved or enhanced chemical cleaning technology for the tank heels. This literature review builds on a previous review conducted in 2003. A team was charged with evaluating the information in these reviews and developing recommendations of alternative technologies to pursue. The new information in this report supports the conclusion of the previous review that oxalic acid remains the chemical cleaning agent of choice for dissolving the metal oxides and hydroxides found in sludge heels in carbon steel tanks. The potential negative impact of large volumes of sodium oxalate on downstream processes indicates that the amount of oxalic acid used for chemical cleaning needs to be minimized as much as possible or the oxalic acid must be destroyed prior to pH adjustment in the receipt tank. The most straightforward way of minimizing the volume of oxalic acid needed for chemical cleaning is through more effective mechanical cleaning. Using a mineral acid to adjust the pH of the sludge prior to adding oxalic acid may also help to minimize the volume of oxalic acid used in chemical cleaning. If minimization of oxalic acid proves insufficient in reducing the volume of oxalate salts, several methods were found that could be used for oxalic acid destruction. For some waste tank heels, another acid or even caustic treatment (or pretreatment) might be more appropriate than the baseline oxalic acid cleaning process. Caustic treatment of high aluminum sludge heels may be appropriate as a means of reducing oxalic acid usage. Reagents other than oxalic acid may also be needed for removing actinide elements from the tank heels. A systems engineering evaluation (SEE) was performed on the various alternative chemical cleaning reagents and organic oxidation technologies discussed in the literature review. The objective of the evaluation was to develop a short list of chemical cleaning reagents and oxalic acid destruction methods that should be the focus of further research and development. The results of the SEE found that eight of the thirteen organic oxidation technologies scored relatively close together. Six of the chemical cleaning reagents were also recommended for further investigation. Based on the results of the SEE and plan set out in the TTQAP the following broad areas are recommended for future study as part of the AECC task: (1) Basic Chemistry of Sludge Dissolution in Oxalic Acid: A better understanding of the variables effecting dissolution of sludge species is needed to efficiently remove sludge heels while minimizing the use of oxalic acid or other chemical reagents. Tests should investigate the effects of pH, acid concentration, phase ratios, temperature, and kinetics of the dissolution reactions of sludge components with oxalic acid, mineral acids, and combinations of oxalic/mineral acids. Real waste sludge samples should be characterized to obtain additional data on the mineral phases present in sludge heels. (2) Simulant Development Program: Current sludge simulants developed by other programs for use in waste processing tests, while compositionally similar to real sludge waste, generally have more hydrated forms of the major metal phases and dissolve more easily in acids. Better simulants containing the mineral phases identified by real waste characterization should be developed to test chemical cleaning methods. (3) Oxalic Acid Oxidation Technologies: The two Mn based oxidation methods that scored highly in the SEE should be studied to evaluate long term potential. One of the AOP's

Hay, M.; Koopman, D.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Excavation and Remediation of the Sandia National Laboratories Chemical Waste Landfill  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a 1.9-acre disposal site that was used for the disposal of chemical wastes generated by many of SNL/NM research laboratories from 1962 until 1985. These laboratories were primarily involved in the design, research and development of non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons and the waste generated by these labs included small quantities of a wide assortment of chemical products. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan for the Chemical Waste Landfill was approved by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in 1992. Subsequent site characterization activities identified the presence of significant amounts of chromium in the soil as far as 80 feet below ground surface (fbgs) and the delineation of a solvent plume in the vadose zone that extends to groundwater approximately 500 fbgs. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was detected in some groundwater samples at concentrations slightly above the drinking water limit of 5 parts per billion. In 1997 an active vapor extraction system reduced the size of the TCE vapor plume and for the last six quarterly sampling events groundwater samples have not detected TCE above the drinking water standard. A source term removal, being conducted as a Voluntary Corrective Measure (VCM), began in September 1998 and is expected to take up to two years. Four distinct disposal areas were identified from historical data and the contents of disposal pits and trenches in these areas, in addition to much of the highly contaminated soil surrounding the disposal cells, are currently being excavated. Buried waste and debris are expected to extend to a depth of 12 to 15 fbgs. Excavation will focus on the removal of buried debris and contaminated soil in a sequential, area by area manner and will proceed to whatever depth is required in order to remove all pit contents. Up to 50,000 cubic yards of soil and debris will be removed and managed during the excavation of the CWL. As part of the excavation process, soil is being separated from the buried debris using a 2-inch mechanical screen. After separation from the soil, debris items are further-segregated by matrix into the following categories: wood, scrap metal, concrete/aggregates, resins, compatible debris, intact chemical containers, radioactive and mixed waste, and high hazard items. One of the greatest sources of hazards throughout the excavation process is the removal of numerous intact chemical containers with unknown contents. A large portion of the excavated soil is contaminated with metals and/or solvents, Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are also known to be present. Most of the contaminated soils being excavated will be taken to the nearby Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) for treatment and management while a majority of the containers will be taken to the Hazardous Waste Management Facility or the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility for proper treatment and/or disposal at permitted offsite facilities.

KWIECINSKI,DANIEL ALBERT; METHVIN,RHONDA KAY; SCHOFIELD,DONALD P.; YOUNG,SHARISSA G.

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

87

Characterization of plutonium-bearing wastes by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of characterization studies of plutonium-bearing wastes produced at the US Department of Energy weapons production facilities. Several different solid wastes were characterized, including incinerator ash and ash heels from Rocky Flats Plant and Los Alamos National Laboratory; sand, stag, and crucible waste from Hanford; and LECO crucibles from the Savannah River Site. These materials were characterized by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy. The results showed the presence of discrete PuO{sub 2}PuO{sub 2{minus}x}, and Pu{sub 4}O{sub 7} phases, of about 1{mu}m or less in size, in all of the samples examined. In addition, a number of amorphous phases were present that contained plutonium. In all the ash and ash heel samples examined, plutonium phases were found that were completely surrounded by silicate matrices. Consequently, to achieve optimum plutonium recovery in any chemical extraction process, extraction would have to be coupled with ultrafine grinding to average particle sizes of less than 1 {mu}m to liberate the plutonium from the surrounding inert matrix.

Behrens, R.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Van Deventer, E.; Chaiko, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-B-1 Surface Chemical and Solid Waste Dumping Area, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-003  

SciTech Connect

The 100-B-1 waste site was a dumping site that was divided into two areas. One area was used as a laydown area for construction materials, and the other area was used as a chemical dumping area. The 100-B-1 Surface Chemical and Solid Waste Dumping Area site meets the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations support future unrestricted land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

R. A. Carlson

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

89

Standard practices for dissolving glass containing radioactive and mixed waste for chemical and radiochemical analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These practices cover techniques suitable for dissolving glass samples that may contain nuclear wastes. These techniques used together or independently will produce solutions that can be analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), radiochemical methods and wet chemical techniques for major components, minor components and radionuclides. 1.2 One of the fusion practices and the microwave practice can be used in hot cells and shielded hoods after modification to meet local operational requirements. 1.3 The user of these practices must follow radiation protection guidelines in place for their specific laboratories. 1.4 Additional information relating to safety is included in the text. 1.5 The dissolution techniques described in these practices can be used for quality control of the feed materials and the product of plants vitrifying nuclear waste materials in glass. 1.6 These pr...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Chemical species of migrating radionuclides at a shallow land low-level radioactive-waste burial site  

SciTech Connect

A research program at the Maxey Flats, Kentucky (U.S.A.) waste disposal site has been undertaken to define the chemical species contributing to the migration or retention of radionuclides contained in waste buried at that site. An experimental trench and inert atmosphere sampling wells were installed to sample water for determination of the chemical species of migrating radionuclides. The organic ligands are studied by gas chromatography, steric exclusion chromatography and mass spectrometry; and the data correlated with specific radionuclide counting data to determine precise chemical species. Preliminary data are reported in the text.

Kirby, L.J.; Toste, A.P.; Wilkerson, C.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

DOE underground storage tank waste remediation chemical processing hazards. Part I: Technology dictionary  

SciTech Connect

This document has been prepared to aid in the development of Regulating guidelines for the Privatization of Hanford underground storage tank waste remediation. The document has been prepared it two parts to facilitate their preparation. Part II is the primary focus of this effort in that it describes the technical basis for established and potential chemical processing hazards associated with Underground Storage Tank (UST) nuclear waste remediation across the DOE complex. The established hazards involve those at Sites for which Safety Analysis Reviews (SARs) have already been prepared. Potential hazards are those involving technologies currently being developed for future applications. Part I of this document outlines the scope of Part II by briefly describing the established and potential technologies. In addition to providing the scope, Part I can be used as a technical introduction and bibliography for Regulatory personnel new to the UST waste remediation, and in particular Privatization effort. Part II of this document is not intended to provide examples of a SAR Hazards Analysis, but rather provide an intelligence gathering source for Regulatory personnel who must eventually evaluate the Privatization SAR Hazards Analysis.

DeMuth, S.F.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved. 1 fig.

Vijayan, S.; Wong, C.F.; Buckley, L.P.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

93

Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved.

Vijayan, Sivaraman (Deep River, CA); Wong, Chi F. (Pembroke, CA); Buckley, Leo P. (Deep River, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Integrated Modeling for Intelligent Battery Thermal Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effective thermal management is crucial to the optimal operation of lithium ion batteries and its health management. However, the thermal behaviors of batteries are governed by complex chemical process whose parameters will degrade over time and different ... Keywords: integrated modeling, distributed parameter system, battery thermal management, intelligent learning

Zhen Liu; Han-Xiong Li

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Boosting batteries | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boosting batteries Boosting batteries Broad use possible for lithium-silicon batteries Findings could pave the way for widespread adoption of lithium ion batteries for applications...

96

Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes Print Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes Print The deceivingly simple appearance of batteries masks their chemical complexity. A typical lithium-ion battery in a cell phone consists of trillions of particles. When a lithium-ion battery is charged or discharged lithium ions move from one electrode to another, filling and unfilling individual, variably-sized battery particles. The rates of these processes determine how much power a battery can deliver. Despite the technological innovations and widespread use of batteries, the mechanism behind charging and discharging particles remains largely a mystery, partly because it is difficult to visualize the motion of lithium ions for a significant number of battery particles at nanoscale resolution.

97

Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes Print Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes Print The deceivingly simple appearance of batteries masks their chemical complexity. A typical lithium-ion battery in a cell phone consists of trillions of particles. When a lithium-ion battery is charged or discharged lithium ions move from one electrode to another, filling and unfilling individual, variably-sized battery particles. The rates of these processes determine how much power a battery can deliver. Despite the technological innovations and widespread use of batteries, the mechanism behind charging and discharging particles remains largely a mystery, partly because it is difficult to visualize the motion of lithium ions for a significant number of battery particles at nanoscale resolution.

98

Battery Components, Active Materials for  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A battery consists of one or more electrochemical cells that convert into electrically energy the chemical energy stored in two separated electrodes, the anode and the cathode. Inside a cell, the two electrodes ....

J. B. Goodenough

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - News & Highlights - Press  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Press Coverage 9 Press Coverage November 6, 2009 -- Clean Skies News An inside look at Argonne's battery research November 5, 2009 -- AllCarsElectric U.S. Army to test Argonne/EnerDel-developed battery chemistry for Hybrid Humvee October 20, 2009 -- Science Channel Argonne's Mark Peters and Monica Regalbuto talk recycling nuclear waste. September 22, 2009 -- GreenCarsReport.com Your Tax $$$ At Work: Argonne Lab's Better Batteries, Greener Fuels August 25, 2009 -- AllCarsElectric.com Scientists at Argonne Discover New Battery Chemical That Could Increase Durability and Decrease Cost of Li-Ion Technology Two researchers at the Argonne National Laboratory have discovered that adding less than a gram of a molecule they created can effectively control a lithium ion's battery voltage from increasing outside of the safe operating range.

100

CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND PCT DATA FOR THE INITIAL SET OF HANFORD ENHANCED WASTE LOADING GLASSES  

SciTech Connect

In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test results for 20 simulated high level waste glasses fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation ranges of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. Two components of the study glasses, fluorine and silver, were not measured since each of these species would have required the use of an additional preparation method and their measured values were likely to be near or below analytical detection limits. Some of the glasses were difficult to prepare for chemical analysis. A sodium peroxide fusion dissolution method was successful in completely dissolving the glasses. Components present in the glasses in minor concentrations can be difficult to measure using this dissolution method due to dilution requirements. The use of a lithium metaborate preparation method for the minor components (planned for use since it is typically successful in digesting Defense Waste Processing Facility HLW glasses) resulted in an unacceptable amount of undissolved solids remaining in the sample solutions. An acid dissolution method was used instead, which provided more thorough dissolution of the glasses, although a small amount of undissolved material remained for some of the study glasses. The undissolved material was analyzed to determine those components of the glasses that did not fully dissolve. These components (e.g., calcium and chromium) were present in sufficient quantities to be reported from the measurements resulting from the sodium peroxide fusion preparation method, which did not leave undissolved material. Overall, the analyses resulted in sums of oxides that ranged from about 98 to 101.5 wt % for the study glasses, indicating excellent recovery of all the components in the chemical composition analyses. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions indicated that, in general, the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations. Exceptions were Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and P{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The measured values for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} were somewhat low when compared to the targeted values for all of the study glasses targeting Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations above 0.5 wt %. Many of the measured MgO and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} values were below the targeted values for those glasses that contained these components. Two of the study glasses exhibited differences from the targeted compositions that may indicate a batching error. Glasses EWG-HAI-Centroid-2 and EWG-OL-1672 had measured values for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} that were lower than the targeted values, and measured values for B{sub 2}O{sub 3} that were higher than the targeted values. Glass EWG-HAI-Centroid-2 also had a measured value for Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} that was lower than the targeted value. A review of the PCT data, including standards and blanks, revealed no issues with the performance of the tests. The PCT results were normalized to both the targeted and measured compositions of the study glasses. Comparisons of the normalized PCT results for both the quenched and Canister Centerline Cooled versions of the study glasses are made with the Environmental Assessment benchmark glass for reference.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Solid electrolytes for battery applications a theoretical perspective a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solid state batteries at the present time. · Several companies are involved in all solids state batterySolid electrolytes for battery applications ­ a theoretical perspective a Natalie Holzwarth ion batteries Solid electrolytes Advantages 1. Excellent chemical and physical stability. 2. Perform

Holzwarth, Natalie

102

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

103

Use of Chemical Oxygen Demand Values of Bacterial Cells in Waste-Water Purification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bacterial Cells in Waste-Water Purification A. F. Gaudy Jr. M. N...Bacterial Cells in Waste-Water Purification A. F. GAUDY, JR., M...bacterial cells in waste-water purification. Appl. Microbiol. 12:254-260...

A. F. Gaudy Jr.; M. N. Bhatla; E. T. Gaudy

1964-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Batteries, from Cradle to Grave  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As battery producers and vendors, legislators, and the consumer population become aware of the consequences of inappropriate disposal of batteries to landfill sites instead of responsible chemical neutralization and reuse, the topic of battery recycling has begun to appear on the environmental agenda. ... Significant advances are also being made in fuel-cell technology with several companies involved in the design and manufacture of high-performance fuel cells adapted to the portable electronics, back-up energy, and traction markets (37-41). ... These hydrogen or methanol-fuelled cells draw their chemical energy from a quick-fill reservoir outside the cell (or stack) structure. ...

Michael J. Smith; Fiona M. Gray

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

105

Batteries - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Battery Research, Development, and Testing Advanced Battery Research, Development, and Testing Argonne's Research Argonne plays a major role in the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) energy storage program within its Office of Vehicle Technologies. Activities include: Developing advanced anode and cathode materials under DOE's longer term exploratory R&D program Leading DOE's applied R&D program focused on improving lithium-ion (Li-Ion) battery technology for use in transportation applications Developing higher capacity electrode materials and electrolyte systems that will increase the energy density of lithium batteries for extended electric range PHEV applications Conducting independent performance and life tests on other advanced (Li-Ion, Ni-MH, Pb-Acid) batteries. Argonne's R&D focus is on advanced lithium battery technologies to meet the energy storage needs of the light-duty vehicle market.

106

EMSL - batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

batteries en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-structural-defects-...

107

STATUS OF CHEMICAL CLEANING OF WASTE TANKS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT - 9114  

SciTech Connect

Chemical Cleaning is currently in progress for Tanks 5 and 6 at the Savannah River Site. The Chemical Cleaning process is being utilized to remove the residual waste heel remaining after completion of Mechanical Sludge Removal. This work is required to prepare the tanks for closure. Tanks 5 and 6 are 1950s vintage carbon steel waste tanks that do not meet current containment standards. These tanks are 22.9 meters (75 feet) in diameter, 7.5 meters (24.5 feet) in height, and have a capacity of 2.84E+6 liters (750,000 gallons). Chemical Cleaning adds 8 wt % oxalic acid to the carbon steel tank to dissolve the remaining sludge heel. The resulting acidic waste solution is transferred to Tank 7 where it is pH adjusted to minimize corrosion of the carbon steel tank. The Chemical Cleaning flowsheet includes multiple strikes of acid in each tank. Acid is delivered by tanker truck and is added to the tanks through a hose assembly connected to a pipe penetration through the tank top. The flowsheet also includes spray washing with acid and water. This paper includes an overview of the configuration required for Chemical Cleaning, the planned flowsheet, and an overview of technical concerns associated with the process. In addition, the current status of the Chemical Cleaning process in Tanks 5 and 6, lessons learned from the execution of the process, and the path forward for completion of cleaning in Tanks 5 and 6 will also be discussed.

Thaxton, D; Geoff Clendenen, G; Willie Gordon, W; Samuel Fink, S; Michael Poirier, M

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Screening values for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals that Lack Established Occupational Exposure Limits  

SciTech Connect

Over 1,500 different volatile chemicals have been reported in the headspaces of tanks used to store high-level radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Concern about potential exposure of tank farm workers to these chemicals has prompted efforts to evaluate their toxicity, identify chemicals that pose the greatest risk, and incorporate that information into the tank farms industrial hygiene worker protection program. Established occupation exposure limits for individual chemicals and petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures have been used elsewhere to evaluate about 900 of the chemicals. In this report headspace concentration screening values were established for the remaining 600 chemicals using available industrial hygiene and toxicological data. Screening values were intended to be more than an order of magnitude below concentrations that may cause adverse health effects in workers, assuming a 40-hour/week occupational exposure. Screening values were compared to the maximum reported headspace concentrations.

Poet, Torka S.; Mast, Terryl J.; Huckaby, James L.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

109

Use of resin-bearing wastes from coke and coal chemicals production at the Novokuznetsk Metallurgical Combine  

SciTech Connect

The coke and coal chemicals plant at the Novokuznetsk Metallurgical Combine is making trial use of a technology that recycles waste products in 'tar ponds.' Specialists from the Ekomash company have installed a recycling unit in one area of the plant's dump, the unit including an inclined conveyor with a steam heater and a receiving hopper The coal preparation shop receives the wastes in a heated bin, where a screw mixes the wastes with pail of the charge for the coking ovens. The mixture subsequently travels along a moving conveyor belt together with the rest of the charge materials. The addition of up to 2% resin-bearing waste materials to the coal charge has not had any significant effect on the strength properties of the coke.

Kul'kova, T.N.; Yablochkin, N.V.; Gal'chenko, A.I.; Karyakina, E.A.; Litvinova, V.A.; Gorbach, D.A.

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

materials, although electro-active compounds containing these metals exist. Todays technologically important cathodesactive field. Characteristics of battery cathode materials

Doeff, Marca M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Vehicle Battery Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Battery Basics Vehicle Battery Basics Vehicle Battery Basics November 22, 2013 - 1:58pm Addthis Batteries are essential for electric drive technologies such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and all-electric vehicles (AEVs). What is a Battery? A battery is a device that stores chemical energy and converts it on demand into electrical energy. It carries out this process through an electrochemical reaction, which is a chemical reaction involving the transfer of electrons. Batteries have three main parts, each of which plays a different role in the electrochemical reaction: the anode, cathode, and electrolyte. The anode is the "fuel" electrode (or "negative" part), which gives up electrons to the external circuit to create a flow of electrons, otherwise

112

KAir Battery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

KAir Battery, from Ohio State University, is commercializing highly energy efficient cost-effective potassium air batteries for use in the electrical stationary storage systems market (ESSS). Beyond, the ESSS market potential applications range from temporary power stations and electric vehicle.

113

The removal of mercury from solid mixed waste using chemical leaching processes  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this research was to evaluate chemical leaching as a technique to treat soils, sediments, and glass contaminated with either elemental mercury or a combination of several mercury species. Potassium iodide/iodine solutions were investigated as chemical leaching agents for contaminated soils and sediments. Clean, synthetic soil material and surrogate storm sewer sediments contaminated with mercury were treated with KI/I{sub 2} solutions. It was observed that these leaching solutions could reduce the mercury concentration in soil and sediments by 99.8%. Evaluation of selected posttreatment sediment samples revealed that leachable mercury levels in the treated solids exceeded RCRA requirements. The results of these studies suggest that KI/I{sub 2} leaching is a treatment process that can be used to remove large quantities of mercury from contaminated soils and sediments and may be the only treatment required if treatment goals are established on Hg residual concentrations in solid matrices. Fluorescent bulbs were used to simulate mercury contaminated glass mixed waste. To achieve mercury contamination levels similar to those found in larger bulbs such as those used in DOE facilities a small amount of Hg was added to the crushed bulbs. The most effective agents for leaching mercury from the crushed fluorescent bulbs were KI/I{sub 2}, NaOCl, and NaBr + acid. Radionuclide surrogates were added to both the EPA synthetic soil material and the crushed fluorescent bulbs to determine the fate of radionuclides following chemical leaching with the leaching agents determined to be the most promising. These experiments revealed that although over 98% of the dosed mercury solubilized and was found in the leaching solution, no Cerium was measured in the posttreatment leaching solution. This finding suggest that Uranium, for which Ce was used as a surrogate, would not solubilize during leaching of mercury contaminated soil or glass.

Gates, D.D.; Chao, K.K.; Cameron, P.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Models for Battery Reliability and Lifetime  

SciTech Connect

Models describing battery degradation physics are needed to more accurately understand how battery usage and next-generation battery designs can be optimized for performance and lifetime. Such lifetime models may also reduce the cost of battery aging experiments and shorten the time required to validate battery lifetime. Models for chemical degradation and mechanical stress are reviewed. Experimental analysis of aging data from a commercial iron-phosphate lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell elucidates the relative importance of several mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms.

Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G. H.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Dispersion by chemical reaction of Rocky Mountain Arsenal Basin F waste soils  

SciTech Connect

Many military installations have soil contamination problems that range from heavy metals to petroleum products. Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) Basin F contains high concentrations of salts, heavy metals, ammonia, urea, and organics. The Dispersion by Chemical Reaction (DCR) process leads to a reduction in the mobility of the organic and inorganic constituents by first removing volatile constituents via steam stripping and volatilization, then trapping the nonvolatile contaminants in a nonmobile phase (microencapsulation), and finally compacting the treated material into large soil bodies (macroencapsulation). This report summarizes the results of the DCR testing of soil-amended Basin F sludge from RMA. The primary focus of this study is on pesticide leachability. The DCR process used to treat the Basin F waste soil produced a dry, homogeneous, soil-like material with desirable physical properties that on compaction achieved the following remediation goals: reduction of all leachable volatiles to nondetectable levels, confinement of all metals to below RCRA TCLP levels, and a decrease in pesticide leachability to levels approaching RCRA standards. For example, endrin TCLP concentration was reduced from 74 microgram/L to 20-28 microgram/L (regulatory limit = 20 ug/L). In several cases, reductions in pesticide leachability could be attributed to simple dilution with the calcium oxide (CaO) reagent. However in other cases, microencapsulation and/or macroencapsulation also played a role in reducing pesticide leachability. Additional work is necessary to optimize the amounts of lime-milk, hydrophobic CaO, and benign oil used in the processing of RMA Basin F waste soils. Ideally, the optimum design should achieve the regulatory and client goals, while minimizing materials handling, energy, and reagent inputs.

Payne, J.R.; Marion, G.M.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Chemical pre-treatment of waste water from the Morcinek Mine in Poland  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a treatment strategy for brine that is recovered from the Morcinek mine near the city of Kartowice in Upper Silesia, Poland. The purpose of the study is to provide sufficient chemical composition and solubility data to permit selection of equipment for a pilot scale waste water processing plant. The report delineates: (1) the pre-treatment steps necessary before the brine is delivered to a reverse osmosis unit; (2) the composition of the brine solution at various stages in the pretreatment process and during the reverse osmosis step; (3) the types and amounts of chemicals that need to be added to the brine during pre-treatment. Analysis of the composition of the brine slurry from the submerged combustion evaporator that follows the reverse osmosis unit and the composition of brine elements that might be carried into the exhaust stack of the evaporator will be dealt with later. The pretreatment process will consist of four steps: (1) aeration and addition of sodium carbonate, (2) multimedia filtration, (3) addition of hydrochloric acid, and (4) ultrafiltration. On the basis of one m{sup 3} of the brine that has a density of 1.03 g/cm{sup 3}, approximately 800 grams (1.7 lbs.) of sodium carbonate monohydrate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O) and 60 grams (0.12 lbs.) of concentrated hydrochloric acid (HCI) will need to be added to the brine during pre-treatment. The goal of the pre-treatment is to produce a fluid that is always undersaturated with respect to all mineral phases. However, only the minimum amount of pre-treatment chemicals should be added in order to minimize costs. Therefore the overall goal is to generate a fluid that approaches but does not exceed saturation at the end of the reverse osmosis process. The suggested amounts of chemicals reported here are therefore the minimum amounts that need to be added during pre-treatment to keep all salts in solution during the reverse osmosis process.

Bourcier, W.; Jackson, K.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

118

The BATINTREC process for reclaiming used batteries  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Battery Recycling (BATINTREC) process is an innovative technology for the recycling of used batteries and electronic waste, which combines vacuum metallurgical reprocessing and a ferrite synthesis process. Vacuum metallurgical reprocessing can be used to reclaim the mercury (Hg) in the dry batteries and the cadmium (Cd) in the Ni-Cd batteries. The ferrite synthesis process reclaims the other heavy metals by synthesizing ferrite in a liquid phase. Mixtures of manganese oxide and carbon black are also produced in the ferrite synthesis process. The effluent from the process is recycled, thus significantly minimizing its discharge. The heavy metal contents of the effluent could meet the Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard of China if the ratio of the crushed battery scrap and powder to FeSO{sub 4}{center_dot}7H{sub 2}O is set at 1:6. This process could not only stabilize the heavy metals, but also recover useful resource from the waste.

Xia Yueqing; Li Guojian

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Integrated chemical/biological treatment of paint stripper mixed waste: Metals toxicity and separation  

SciTech Connect

The DOE complex has generated vast quantities of complex heterogeneous mixed wastes. Paint stripper waste (PSW) is a complex waste that arose from decontamination and decommissioning activities. It contains paint stripper, cheesecloth, cellulose-based paints with Pb and Cr, and suspect Pu. Los Alamos National Laboratory has 150--200 barrels of PSW and other national laboratories such as Rocky Flats Plant have many more barrels of heterogeneous waste. Few technologies exist that can treat this complex waste. Our approach to solving this problem is the integration of two established technologies: biodegradation and metals chelation.

Vanderberg-Twary, L.; Grumbine, R.K.; Foreman, T.; Hanners, J.L.; Brainard, J.R.; Sauer, N.N.; Unkefer, P.J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES TO OPERATING AN ON-SITE LABORATORY AT THE SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES CHEMICAL WASTE LANDFILL  

SciTech Connect

During the excavation of the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), operations were realized by the presence of URS' (formerly known as United Research Services) On-site Mobile Laboratory (OSML) and the close proximity of the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration Chemical Laboratory (ERCL). The laboratory was located adjacent to the landfill in order to provide soil characterization, health and safety support, and waste management data. Although the cost of maintaining and operating an analytical laboratory can be higher than off-site analysis, there are many benefits to providing on site analytical services. This paper describes the synergies between the laboratory, as well as the advantages and disadvantages to having a laboratory on-site during the excavation of SNL/NM CWL.

Young, S.G.; Creech, M.N.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Recycling of sodium waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling of sodium waste ... Methods for handling and recycling a dangerous and costly chemical. ...

Bettina Hubler-Blank; Michael Witt; Herbert W. Roesky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Titanates as High-Energy Cathode Materials for Li-IonI, Amine K (2009) High Energy Cathode Material for Long-LifeA New Cathode Material for Batteries of High Energy Density.

Doeff, Marca M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a discussion of proposed experimental work, additional data analysis, and future modeling programs. These proposals have led to recent investigations into the mercury issue and the effect of co-precipitating noble metals which will be documented in two separate reports. SRS hydrogen generation work since 2002 will also be collected and summarized in a future report on the effect of noble metal-sludge matrix interactions on hydrogen generation. Other potential factors for experimental investigation include sludge composition variations related to both the washing process and to the insoluble species with particular attention given to the role of silver and to improving the understanding of the interaction of nitrite ion with the noble metals.

Koopman, D. C.

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Method and compositions for the degradation of tributyl phosphate in chemical waste mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and process are disclosed for the degradation of tributyl phosphate in an organic waste mixture and a biologically pure, novel bacteria culture for accomplishing the same. A newly-discovered bacteria (a strain of Acinetobacter sp. ATCC 55587) is provided which is combined in a reactor vessel with a liquid waste mixture containing tributyl phosphate and one or more organic waste compounds capable of functioning as growth substrates for the bacteria. The bacteria is thereafter allowed to incubate within the waste mixture. As a result, the tributyl phosphate and organic compounds within the waste mixture are metabolized (degraded) by the bacteria, thereby eliminating such materials which are environmentally hazardous. In addition, the bacteria is capable of degrading waste mixtures containing high quantities of tributyl phosphate (e.g. up to about 1.0% by weight tributyl phosphate). 6 figs.

Stoner, D.L.; Tien, A.J.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

125

Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batteries to someone by Batteries to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Batteries Battery Systems Applied Battery Research Long-Term Exploratory Research Ultracapacitors Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Batteries battery/cell diagram Battery/Cell Diagram Batteries are important to our everyday lives and show up in various

126

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Radionuclide Incorporation in Secondary Crystalline Minerals Resulting from Chemical Weathering of Selected Waste Glasses: Progress Report for Subtask 3d  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were conducted in fiscal year 1998 by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate potential incorporation of radionuclides in secondary mineral phases that form from weathering vitrified nuclear waste glasses. These experiments were conducted as part of the Immobilized Low- Activity Waste-Petiormance Assessment (ILAW-PA) to generate data on radionuclide mobilization and transport in a near-field enviromnent of disposed vitrified wastes. An initial experiment was conducted to identify the types of secondary minerals that form from two glass samples of differing compositions, LD6 and SRL202. Chemical weathering of LD6 glass at 90oC in contact with an aliquot of uncontaminated Hanford Site groundwater resulted in the formation of a Crystalline zeolitic mineral, phillipsite. In contrast similar chemical weathering of SRL202 glass at 90"C resulted in the formation of a microcrystalline smectitic mineral, nontronite. A second experiment was conducted at 90"C to assess the degree to which key radionuclides would be sequestered in the structure of secondary crystalline minerals; namely, phillipsite and nontronite. Chemical weathering of LD6 in contact with radionuclide-spiked Hanford Site groundwater indicated that substantial ilactions of the total activities were retained in the phillipsite structure. Similar chemical weathering of SRL202 at 90"C, also in contact with radionuclide-spiked Hanford Site groundwater, showed that significant fractions of the total activities were retained in the nontronite structure. These results have important implications regarding the radionuclide mobilization aspects of the ILAW-PA. Additional studies are required to confkm the results and to develop an improved under- standing of mechanisms of sequestration and attenuated release of radionuclides to help refine certain aspects of their mobilization.

SV Mattigod; DI Kaplan; VL LeGore; RD Orr; HT Schaef; JS Young

1998-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

128

Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes  

SciTech Connect

The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and electric vehicles (EVs); a market predicted to be potentially ten times greater than that of consumer electronics. In fact, only Liion batteries can meet the requirements for PHEVs as set by the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), although they still fall slightly short of EV goals. In the case of Li-ion batteries, the trade-off between power and energy shown in Figure 1 is a function both of device design and the electrode materials that are used. Thus, a high power battery (e.g., one intended for an HEV) will not necessarily contain the same electrode materials as one designed for high energy (i.e., for an EV). As is shown in Figure 1, power translates into acceleration, and energy into range, or miles traveled, for vehicular uses. Furthermore, performance, cost, and abuse-tolerance requirements for traction batteries differ considerably from those for consumer electronics batteries. Vehicular applications are particularly sensitive to cost; currently, Li-ion batteries are priced at about $1000/kWh, whereas the USABC goal is $150/kWh. The three most expensive components of a Li-ion battery, no matter what the configuration, are the cathode, the separator, and the electrolyte. Reduction of cost has been one of the primary driving forces for the investigation of new cathode materials to replace expensive LiCoO{sub 2}, particularly for vehicular applications. Another extremely important factor is safety under abuse conditions such as overcharge. This is particularly relevant for the large battery packs intended for vehicular uses, which are designed with multiple cells wired in series arrays. Premature failure of one cell in a string may cause others to go into overcharge during passage of current. These considerations have led to the development of several different types of cathode materials, as will be covered in the next section. Because there is not yet one ideal material that can meet requirements for all applications, research into cathodes for Li-ion batteries is, as of this writ

Doeff, Marca M

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

129

Chemical and Charge Imbalance Induced by Radionuclide Decay: Effects on Waste Form Structure  

SciTech Connect

This is a milestone document covering the activities to validate theoretical calculations with experimental data for the effect of the decay of 90Sr to 90Zr on materials properties. This was done for a surragate waste form strontium titanate.

Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Jaffe, John E.; Jiang, Weilin; Strachan, Denis M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Establishing and Implementing a Waste Minimization Program in the Chemical and Oil Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The incentives for establishing and the expertise for implementing successful waste minimization programs can be found in every company. The in-house expertise that discovers, designs, builds and manages manufacturing processes understand...

Hollod, G. J.; Marton, R. J.

131

RSP-MW UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII RADIOACTIVE MIXED WASTE PICKUP REQUEST FORM Revision, 4/04 (WASTE CONTAINING BOTH RADIOISOTOPES AND HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RSP-MW UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII RADIOACTIVE MIXED WASTE PICKUP REQUEST FORM Revision, 4/04 (WASTE AND UNDERSTAND ALL CONDITIONS ON THIS FORM. GENERATOR CERTIFICATION: I certify the above waste contains

Browder, Tom

132

Determination of naphthenic acids in California crudes and refinery waste waters by fluoride ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

A method based on negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry using fluoride (F/sup -/) ions produced from NF/sub 3/ reagent gas has been applied to the analysis of naphthenic acids in California crude oils and refinery waste waters. Since complex mixtures of naphthenic acids cannot be separated into individual components, only the determination of relative distribution of acids classified by the hydrogen deficiency was possible. The identities and relative distribution of paraffinic and mono-, di-, tri, and higher polycyclic acids were obtained from the intensities of the carboxylate (RCOO/sup -/) ions.

Dzidic, I.; Somerville, A.C.; Raia, J.C.; Hart, H.V.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Metal-Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect

Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Battery business boost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... year, A123 formed deals with the US car manufacturer Chrysler to make batteries for its electric cars. Other applications for A123 products include batteries for portable power tools and huge batteries ... batteries are not yet developed enough to be considered for use in its Prius hybrid electric car, preferring instead to keep using nickel metal hydride batteries. ...

Katharine Sanderson

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

135

Vehicle Technologies Office: Waste Heat Recovery | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Batteries Fuel Efficiency & Emissions Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Combustion Idle Reduction Emissions Waste Heat Recovery Lightweighting Parasitic Loss Reduction Lubricants...

136

Methods of chemical analysis for organic waste constituents in radioactive materials: A literature review  

SciTech Connect

Most of the waste generated during the production of defense materials at Hanford is presently stored in 177 underground tanks. Because of the many waste treatment processes used at Hanford, the operations conducted to move and consolidate the waste, and the long-term storage conditions at elevated temperatures and radiolytic conditions, little is known about most of the organic constituents in the tanks. Organics are a factor in the production of hydrogen from storage tank 101-SY and represent an unresolved safety question in the case of tanks containing high organic carbon content. In preparation for activities that will lead to the characterization of organic components in Hanford waste storage tanks, a thorough search of the literature has been conducted to identify those procedures that have been found useful for identifying and quantifying organic components in radioactive matrices. The information is to be used in the planning of method development activities needed to characterize the organics in tank wastes and will prevent duplication of effort in the development of needed methods.

Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The effect of high pH chemical hydrolysis on biological waste treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mg/1. The reduci. ion in organic nitrogen was from approximately 8. 5 mg/1 to about 2. 5 mg/1 as nitrogen. Malhotea et al. (16) concluded that on a chemical cost basis lime would be the most economical chemical precipitant for the activated... helpful suggestions throughout the study. Dr. William D. Langley, and Dr. Chia Shun Shih, for serving on my my committee. Vi TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION REVIEW OF LITFRATURE Chemical Treatment . Lime Sludge Characteristics Non...

Smullen, Richard Frederick

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Conversion of Waste CO2 and Shale Gas to High-Value Chemicals  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

acid using known technologies or combined with Schematic illustrating the NovomerPraxair semi-integrated process to produce high- value chemical intermediates. Graphic image...

139

DOE/LX/07-0096 Secondary Document DMSA C-337-45 Solid Waste Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

aerosol can, a tube of gasket adhesive, container of roof cement, drum of gloves and boots, batteries, and waste oil. The Toxic Substances Control Act waste formerly stored...

140

Battery Safety Testing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

mechanical modeling battery crash worthiness for USCAR Abuse tolerance evaluation of cells, batteries, and systems Milestones Demonstrate improved abuse tolerant cells and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell phones, laptops, medical devices, and cars. As conventional lithium-ion batteries approach their theoretical energy-storage limits, new technologies are emerging to address the long-term energy-storage improvements needed for mobile systems, electric vehicles in particular. Battery performance depends on the dynamics of evolving electronic and chemical states that, despite advances in material synthesis and structural probes, remain elusive and largely unexplored. At Beamlines 8.0.1 and 9.3.2, researchers studied lithium-ion and lithium-air batteries, respectively, using soft x-ray spectroscopy techniques. The detailed information they obtained about the evolution of electronic and chemical states will be indispensable for understanding and optimizing better battery materials.

142

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell phones, laptops, medical devices, and cars. As conventional lithium-ion batteries approach their theoretical energy-storage limits, new technologies are emerging to address the long-term energy-storage improvements needed for mobile systems, electric vehicles in particular. Battery performance depends on the dynamics of evolving electronic and chemical states that, despite advances in material synthesis and structural probes, remain elusive and largely unexplored. At Beamlines 8.0.1 and 9.3.2, researchers studied lithium-ion and lithium-air batteries, respectively, using soft x-ray spectroscopy techniques. The detailed information they obtained about the evolution of electronic and chemical states will be indispensable for understanding and optimizing better battery materials.

143

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

Recovery of valuable chemical feedstocks from waste automotive plastics via pyrolysis processes  

SciTech Connect

Each year in North America over 9 million scrap vehicles are shredded to recover approximately 10 million tons of ferrous metal. The process also produces 3 million tons of waste known as automobile shredder residue (ASR) which consists of plastics, rubber, foams, textiles, glass, dirt, rust, etc. This waste is currently landfilled. In this study the authors present the results obtained in three different pyrolysis processes when ASR was used as the pyrolysis feedstock. The pyrolysis processes examined included: (1) a fast pyrolysis process, featuring rapid heat transfer and short residence times. This process produced primarily a gas stream that was rich in C{sub 1} to C{sub 3} hydrocarbons; (2) a screw kiln unit, characterized by slow heating and long residence times. This process produced a liquid stream that was high in aromatics; (3) a bench-scale autoclave reactor which, in the presence of water, produced a pyrolysis liquid containing large quantities of oxygenated hydrocarbons.

Shen, Z.; Day, M.; Cooney, D. [National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Inst. for Environmental Research and Technology

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Analysis of Impedance Response in Lithium-ion Battery Electrodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major amount of degradation in battery life is in the form of chemical degradation due to the formation of Solid Electrolyte Interface (SEI) which is a passive film resulting from chemical reaction. Mechanical degradation in the form of fracture...

Cho, Seongkoo

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

146

Summary of raman cone penetrometer probe waste tank radiation and chemical environment test  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of testing Raman sapphire windows that were braze mounted into a mockup Raman probe head and stainless steel coupons in a simulated tank waste environment. The simulated environment was created by exposing sapphire window components, immersed in a tank simulant, in a gamma pit. This work was completed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM-50) for Technical Task Proposal RL4-6-WT-21.

Reich, F.R.

1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

147

Li-Ion and Other Advanced Battery Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scientist viewing computer screen scientist viewing computer screen Li-Ion and Other Advanced Battery Technologies The research aims to overcome the fundamental chemical and mechanical instabilities that have impeded the development of batteries for vehicles with acceptable range, acceleration, costs, lifetime, and safety. Its aim is to identify and better understand cell performance and lifetime limitations. These batteries have many other applications, in mobile electronic devices, for example. The work addresses synthesis of components into battery cells with determination of failure modes, materials synthesis and evaluation, advanced diagnostics, and improved electrochemical model development. This research involves: Battery development and analysis; Mathematical modeling; Sophisticated diagnostics;

148

ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS WASTE TANKS TO IMPROVE ACTINIDE SOLUBILITY  

SciTech Connect

Processes for the removal of residual sludge from SRS waste tanks have historically used solutions containing up to 0.9 M oxalic acid to dissolve the remaining material following sludge removal. The selection of this process was based on a comparison of a number of studies performed to evaluate the dissolution of residual sludge. In contrast, the dissolution of the actinide mass, which represents a very small fraction of the waste, has not been extensively studied. The Pu, Np, and Am in the sludge is reported to be present as hydrated and crystalline oxides. To identify aqueous solutions which have the potential to increase the solubility of the actinides, the alkaline and mildly acidic test solutions shown below were selected as candidates for use in a series of solubility experiments. The efficiency of the solutions in solubilizing the actinides was evaluated using a simulated sludge prepared by neutralizing a HNO{sub 3} solution containing Pu, Np, and Am. The hydroxide concentration was adjusted to a 1.2 M excess and the solids were allowed to age for several weeks prior to starting the experiments. The sludge was washed with 0.01 M NaOH to prepare the solids for use. Following the addition of an equal portion of the solids to each test solution, the concentrations of Pu, Np, and Am were measured as a function of time over a 792 h (33 day) period to provide a direct comparison of the efficiency of each solution in solubilizing the actinide elements. Although the composition of the sludge was limited to the hydrated actinide oxides (and did not contain other components of demonstrated importance), the results of the study provides guidance for the selection of solutions which should be evaluated in subsequent tests with a more realistic surrogate sludge and actual tank waste.

Rudisill, T.; Thompson, M.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

149

Safety Hazards of Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Hazards of Batteries Safety Hazards of Batteries Battery technology is at the heart of much of our technological revolution. One of the most prevalent rechargeable batteries in use today is the Lithium-ion battery. Cell phones, laptop computers, GPS systems, iPods, and even cars are now using lithium- ion rechargeable battery technology. In fact, you probably have a lithium-ion battery in your pocket or purse right now! Although lithium-ion batteries are very common there are some inherent dangers when using ANY battery. Lithium cells are like any other technology - if they are abused and not used for their intended purpose catastrophic results may occur, such as: first-, second-, and third-degree burns, respiratory problems, fires, explosions, and even death. Please handle the lithium-ion batteries with care and respect.

150

Conversion of Wastes into Bioelectricity and Chemicals by Using Microbial Electrochemical Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...production energy. As shown...Emerging Renewable Energy Technologies...electrical grid energy (62...opportunities and challenges for successful...The main challenge of using...discharge. The integration of METs into...applications such as energy and chemical...electricity from renewable resources . Environ...Oak Ridge National Laboratory...

Bruce E. Logan; Korneel Rabaey

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

151

EIS-0074: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Idaho National Engineering Lab, Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this statement to analyze the environmental implications of the proposed selection of a strategy for long- term management of the high- level radioactive wastes generated as part of the national defense effort at the Department's Idaho Chemical Processing Plant a t the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory.

152

EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation Of N Reactor (U-Metal) Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages  

SciTech Connect

The Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management & Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the N Reactor, a graphite moderated reactor at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site (ref. 1). The N Reactor core was fueled with slightly enriched (0.947 wt% and 0.947 to 1.25 wt% {sup 235}U in Mark IV and Mark IA fuels, respectively) U-metal clad in Zircaloy-2 (Ref. 1, Sec. 3). Both types of N Reactor SNF have been considered for disposal at the proposed Yucca Mountain site. For some WPs, the outer shell and inner shell may breach (Ref. 3) allowing the influx of water. Water in the WP will moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the WP; and the water may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components from the WP, further affecting the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of WPs containing two multi-canister overpacks (MCO) with either six baskets of Mark IA or five baskets of Mark IV intact N Reactor SNF rods (Ref. 1, Sec. 4) and two high-level waste (HLW) glass pour canisters (GPCs) arranged according to the codisposal concept (Ref. 4). The specific study objectives were to determine: (1) The extent to which fissile uranium will remain in the WP after corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration (2) The extent to which fissile uranium will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water (such that internal criticality is no longer possible, but the possibility of external criticality may be enhanced); and (3) The nominal chemical composition for the criticality evaluations of the WP design, and to suggest the range of parametric variations for additional evaluations. The scope of this calculation, the chemical compositions (and subsequent criticality evaluations) of the simulations, is limited to time periods up to 6.35 x 10{sup 5} years. This longer time frame is closer to the one million year time horizon recently recommended by the National Academy of Sciences to the Environmental Protection Agency for performance assessment related to a nuclear repository (Ref. 5). However, it is important to note that after 100,000 years, most of the materials of interest (fissile materials) will have either been removed from the WP, reached a steady state, or been transmuted.

P. Bernot

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

153

Optima Batteries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Optima Batteries Jump to: navigation, search Name: Optima Batteries Place: Milwaukee, WI Website: http:www.optimabatteries.com References: Optima Batteries1 Information About...

154

Implementation of chemical controls through a backfill system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect

A backfill system has been designed for the WIPP which will control the chemical environment of the post-closure repository to a domain where the actinide solubility is within its lowest region. The actinide solubility is highly dependent on the chemical species which constitute the fluid, the resulting pH of the fluid, and oxidation state of the actinide which is stable under the specific conditions. The implementation of magnesium oxide (MgO) as the backfill material not only controls the pH of the expected fluids but also effectively removes the carbonate from the system, which has a significant impact for actinide solubility. The selection process, emplacement system, design, and confirmatory experimental results are presented.

Bynum, R.V. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stockman, C.; Wang, Yifeng; Peterson, A.; Krumhansl, J.; Nowak, J.; Chu, M.S.Y. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cotton, J.; Patchet, S.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite - Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined HLW  

SciTech Connect

During the seventh year of the current grant (DE-FG02-05ER63966) we completed an exhaustive study of cold calcination and began work on the development of tank fill materials to fill empty tanks and control residuals. Cold calcination of low and high NOx low activity waste (LAW) SRS Tank 44 and Hanford AN-107 simulants, respectively with metallic Al + Si powders was evaluated. It was found that a combination of Al and Si powders could be used as reducing agents to reduce the nitrate and nitrite content of both low and high NOx LAW to low enough levels to allow the LAW to be solidified directly by mixing it with metakaolin and allowing it to cure at 90 C. During room temperature reactions, NOx was reduced and nitrogen was emitted as N2 or NH3. This was an important finding because now one can pretreat LAW at ambient temperatures which provides a low-temperature alternative to thermal calcination. The significant advantage of using Al and Si metals for denitration/denitrition of the LAW is the fact that the supernate could potentially be treated in situ in the waste tanks themselves. Tank fill materials based upon a hydroceramic binder have been formulated from mixtures of metakaolinite, Class F fly ash and Class C flue gas desulphurization (FGD) ash mixed with various concentrations of NaOH solution. These harden over a period of hours or days depending on composition. A systematic study of properties of the tank fill materials (leachability) and ability to adsorb and hold residuals is under way.

Grutzeck, Michael

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

EQ6 Calculation for Chemical Degradation of Shippingport LWBR (TH/U Oxide) Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages  

SciTech Connect

The Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management & Operating contractor (CRWMS M&O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) (Ref. 1). The Shippingport LWBR SNF has been considered for disposal at the potential Yucca Mountain site. Because of the high content of fissile material in the SNF, the waste package (WP) design requires special consideration of the amount and placement of neutron absorbers and the possible loss of absorbers and SNF materials over geologic time. For some WPs, the outer shell corrosion-resistant material (CRM) and the corrosion-allowance inner shell may breach (Refs. 2 and 3), allowing the influx of water. Water in the WP will moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the WP; and the water may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers from the WP, further affecting the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of WPs containing a Shippingport LWBR SNF seed assembly, and high-level waste (HLW) glass canisters arranged according to the codisposal concept (Ref. 4). The specific study objectives were to determine: (1) The extent to which criticality control material, suggested for this WP design, will remain in the WP after corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration (such that it can be effective in preventing criticality); (2) The extent to which fissile uranium and fertile thorium will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water (such that internal criticality is no longer possible, but the possibility of external criticality may be enhanced); and (3) The nominal chemical composition for the criticality evaluations of the WP design, and to suggest the range of parametric variations for additional evaluations. The scope of this calculation, the chemical compositions (and subsequent criticality evaluations), of the simulations are limited to time periods up to 3.17 x 10{sup 5} years. This longer time frame is closer to the one million year time horizon recently recommended by the National Academy of Sciences to the Environmental Protection Agency for performance assessment related to a nuclear repository (Ref. 5). However, it is important to note that after 100,000 years, most of the materials of interest (fissile and absorber materials) will have either been removed from the WP, reached a steady state, or been transmuted. The calculation included elements with high neutron-absorption cross sections, notably gadolinium (Gd), as well as the fissile materials. The results of this analysis will be used to ensure that the type and amount of criticality control material used in the WP design will prevent criticality.

S. Arthur

2000-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

157

Vanadium Flow Battery for Energy Storage: Prospects and Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vanadium Flow Battery for Energy Storage: Prospects and Challenges ... Her work involves investigating the strategy to improve the stability of electrolytes for the vanadium flow battery. ... Dr. Huamin Zhang currently is a tenured Professor at Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science; he serves as the head of the energy storage division and chief scientist of the 973 National Project on Flow Battery. ...

Cong Ding; Huamin Zhang; Xianfeng Li; Tao Liu; Feng Xing

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

Survey of mercury, cadmium and lead content of household batteries  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: A well selected sample of 146 batteries was analysed for its heavy metals content. A comparison was made between heavy metals contents in batteries in 2006 and 2011. No significant change after implementation of the new EU Batteries Directive. Severe differences in heavy metal contents were found in different battery-types. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to provide updated information on the development of the potential impact of heavy metal containing batteries on municipal waste and battery recycling processes following transposition of the new EU Batteries Directive 2006/66/EC. A representative sample of 146 different types of commercially available dry and button cells as well as lithium-ion accumulators for mobile phones were analysed for their mercury (Hg)-, cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-contents. The methods used for preparing the cells and analysing the heavy metals Hg, Cd, and Pb were either developed during a former study or newly developed. Several batteries contained higher mass fractions of mercury or cadmium than the EU limits. Only half of the batteries with mercury and/or lead fractions above the marking thresholds were labelled. Alkalinemanganese mono-cells and Li-ion accumulators, on average, contained the lowest heavy metal concentrations, while zinccarbon batteries, on average, contained the highest levels.

Recknagel, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.recknagel@bam.de [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Reference Materials, Richard-Willsttter-Strae 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Radant, Hendrik [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Reference Materials, Richard-Willsttter-Strae 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Kohlmeyer, Regina [German Federal Environment Agency (UBA), Section III 1.6 Extended Producer Responsibility, Wrlitzer Platz 1, D-06844 Dessau-Rolau (Germany)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Modeling & Simulation - Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of Batteries for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Production of Batteries for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles battery assessment graph Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are currently being implemented in hybrid electric (HEV), plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV), and electric (EV) vehicles. While nickel metal-hydride will continue to be the battery chemistry of choice for some HEV models, Li-ion will be the dominate battery chemistry of the remaining market share for the near-future. Large government incentives are currently necessary for customer acceptance of the vehicles such as the Chevrolet Volt and Nissan Leaf. Understanding the parameters that control the cost of Li-ion will help researchers and policy makers understand the potential of Li-ion batteries to meet battery energy density and cost goals, thus enabling widespread adoption without incentives.

160

Batteries and Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collage of electric cars, plug, battery research lab Collage of electric cars, plug, battery research lab Batteries and Fuel Cells EETD researchers study the basic science and development of advanced batteries and fuel cells for transportation, electric grid storage, and other stationary applications. This research is aimed at developing more environmentally friendly technologies for generating and storing energy, including better batteries and fuel cells. Li-Ion and Other Advanced Battery Technologies Research conducted here on battery technology is aimed at developing low-cost rechargeable advanced electrochemical batteries for both automotive and stationary applications. The goal of fuel cell research is to provide the technologies for the successful commercialization of polymer-electrolyte and solid oxide fuel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Biochar production from waste rubber-wood-sawdust and its potential use in C sequestration: Chemical and physical characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biochars have received increasing attention because of their potential environmental applications such as soil amending and atmospheric C sequestration. In this study, biochar was produced from waste rubber-wood-sawdust. The produced biochars were characterized by BrunauerEmmettTeller (BET) gas porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Pyrolysis temperature was shown to have a strong influence on both thermal and chemical characteristic of biochar samples. The experimental data shows that the biochar samples can absorb around 5% water by mass (hydrophilic) at lower temperatures (650C), biochar samples were thermally stable and became hydrophobic due to the presence of aromatic compounds. Carbon content (over 85%) increased with increasing temperature, and showed an inverse effect to the elemental ratios of H/C and O/C. The very low H/C and O/C ratios obtained for the biochar indicated that carbon in this material is predominantly unsaturated. BET results showed that the sawdust derived biochars have surface areas between 10 and 200m2g?1 and FTIR indicated an aromatic functional group about 866cm?1 in most of the samples. The rate of CO2 adsorption on sawdust derived biochar generally increased with increasing temperature from 450 to 650C but then decreased with increase in the production temperature. Derived biochar represents a potential alternative adsorbent for C sequestration.

Wan Azlina Wan Abdul Karim Ghani; Ayaz Mohd; Gabriel da Silva; Robert T. Bachmann; Yun H. Taufiq-Yap; Umer Rashid; Alaa H. Al-Muhtaseb

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Chemical pollution and toxicity of water samples from stream receiving leachate from controlled municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study was aimed to determine the impact of municipal waste landfill on the pollution level of surface waters, and to investigate whether the choice and number of physical and chemical parameters monitored are sufficient for determining the actual risk related to bioavailability and mobility of contaminants. In 20072012, water samples were collected from the stream flowing through the site at two sampling locations, i.e. before the stream?s entry to the landfill, and at the stream outlet from the landfill. The impact of leachate on the quality of stream water was observed in all samples. In 20072010, high values of TOC and conductivity in samples collected down the stream from the landfill were observed; the toxicity of these samples was much greater than that of samples collected up the stream from the landfill. In 20102012, a significant decrease of conductivity and TOC was observed, which may be related to the modernization of the landfill. Three tests were used to evaluate the toxicity of sampled water. As a novelty the application of Phytotoxkit F for determining water toxicity should be considered. Microtox showed the lowest sensitivity of evaluating the toxicity of water samples, while Phytotoxkit F showed the highest. High mortality rates of Thamnocephalus platyurus in Thamnotoxkit F test can be caused by high conductivity, high concentration of TOC or the presence of compounds which are not accounted for in the water quality monitoring program.

A. Melnyk; K. Kukli?ska; L. Wolska; J. Namie?nik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Lithium sulfide compositions for battery electrolyte and battery electrode coatings  

SciTech Connect

Method of forming lithium-containing electrolytes are provided using wet chemical synthesis. In some examples, the lithium containing electrolytes are composed of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7. The solid electrolyte may be a core shell material. In one embodiment, the core shell material includes a core of lithium sulfide (Li.sub.2S), a first shell of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7, and a second shell including one of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7 and carbon. The lithium containing electrolytes may be incorporated into wet cell batteries or solid state batteries.

Liang, Chengdu; Liu, Zengcai; Fu, Wujun; Lin, Zhan; Dudney, Nancy J; Howe, Jane Y; Rondinone, Adam J

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

164

Process Waste Assessment, Mechanics Shop  

SciTech Connect

This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate hazardous wastes generated in the Mechanics Shop. The Mechanics Shop maintains and repairs motorized vehicles and equipment on the SNL/California site, to include motorized carts, backhoes, street sweepers, trash truck, portable emergency generators, trencher, portable crane, and man lifts. The major hazardous waste streams routinely generated by the Mechanics Shop are used oil, spent off filters, oily rags, and spent batteries. The used off and spent off filters make up a significant portion of the overall hazardous waste stream. Waste oil and spent batteries are sent off-site for recycling. The rags and spent on filters are not recycled. They are disposed of as hazardous waste. Mechanics Shop personnel continuously look for opportunities to minimize hazardous wastes.

Phillips, N.M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Thermochemical treatments based on NH3/O2 for improved graphite-based fiber electrodes in vanadium redox flow batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Electrochemical behavior of the polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based graphite as a low cost electrode material for vanadium based redox batteries (VFB) in sulfuric acid medium has been improved by means of the successful introduction of nitrogen and oxygen-containing groups at the graphite surface by thermal activation under NH3/O2 (1:1) atmosphere. Influence of the temperature and treatment duration times have been studied towards the positive reaction of VFB. The structure, composition, and electrochemical properties of the treated samples have been characterized with field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The estimation of electrochemical surface area has also been evaluated. The treatment of PAN graphite material at 773K for 24-h leads to electrode materials with the best electrochemical activity towards the VO 2 + /VO2+ redox couple. This method produces an increase of the nitrogen and oxygen content at the surface up to 8% and 32%, respectively, and is proved to be a straightforward and cost-effective methodology. This improvement of the electrochemical properties is attributed to the incorporation of the nitrogen and oxygen-containing groups that facilitate the electron transfer through the electrode/electrolyte interface for both oxidation and reduction processes.

Cristina Flox; Javier Rubio-Garca; Marcel Skoumal; Teresa Andreu; Juan Ramn Morante

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Alan MacDiarmid, Conductive Polymers, and Plastic Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alan MacDiarmid, Conductive Polymers, and Plastic Batteries Alan MacDiarmid, Conductive Polymers, and Plastic Batteries Resources with Additional Information · Patents Alan MacDiarmid ©Alan MacDiarmid/ University of Pennsylvania Photo by Felice Macera Until 1987, the billions of batteries that had been marketed in myriad sizes and shapes all had one thing in common. To make electricity, they depended exclusively upon chemical reactions involving metal components of the battery. But today a revolutionary new type of battery is available commercially. It stores electricity in plastic. Plastic batteries are the most radical innovation in commercial batteries since the dry cell was introduced in 1890. Plastic batteries offer higher capacity, higher voltage, and longer shelf-life than many competitive designs. Companies are testing new shapes and configurations, including flat batteries, that can be bent like cardboard. Researchers expect that the new technology will free electronic designers from many of the constraints imposed by metal batteries such as limited recharging cycles, high weight, and high cost.

167

Designing a wastewater and storm water management system for a new sealed lead acid battery facility  

SciTech Connect

Design of a new lead acid battery manufacturing facility requires careful planning to ensure compliance with wastewater, storm water, air quality and hazardous waste regulations. A case history is presented describing the planning approach to development of a wastewater and storm water management system for an SLA (sealed lead acid) battery plant in Columbus, Georgia. Several pollution prevention concepts were utilized in the design of the wastewater management system, which resulted in an 80% reduction in wastewater volume, and at the same time ensured compliance with the mass-based federal categorical effluent limits. Storm water management features were focused on eliminating any outdoor areas of industrial activity by avoiding outdoor storage areas to the extent possible, containment of remaining areas, and stringent air emission control concepts. Federal effluent guidelines for the battery manufacturing point source category as well as federal regulations governing the industrial storm water discharge permitting program were the key factors in motivating the design concepts utilized. Areas affected by the design concepts included facility layout, HVAC system design, process recovery systems, chemical storage and containment, and wastewater treatment technology. The facility has been in compliance with all applicable environmental regulations since startup in August, 1992 and has been awarded the 1995 Matsushita Electric Corporation`s President`s Award for Environmental Excellence.

Nichols, C.P.; Langan, M.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Waste package degradation from thermal and chemical processes in performance assessments for the Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarizes modeling of waste container degradation in performance assessments conducted between 1984 and 2008 to evaluate feasibility, viability, and assess compliance of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As understanding of the Yucca Mountain disposal system increased, modeling of container degradation evolved from a component of the source term in 1984 to a separate module describing both container and drip shield degradation in 2008. A thermal module for evaluating the influence of higher heat loads from more closely packed, large waste packages was also introduced. In addition, a module for evaluating drift chemistry was added in later \\{PAs\\} to evaluate the potential for localized corrosion of the outer barrier of the waste container composed of Alloy 22, a highly corrosion-resistant nickelchromiumtungstenmolybdenum alloy. The uncertainty of parameters related to container degradation contributed significantly to the estimated uncertainty of performance measures (cumulative release in assessments prior to 1995 and individual dose, thereafter).

Rob P. Rechard; Joon H. Lee; Ernest L. Hardin; Charles R. Bryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Batteries | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Batteries Batteries Batteries A small New York City startup is hoping it has the next big solution in energy storage. A video documents what the company's breakthrough means for the future of grid-scale energy storage. Learn more. First invented by Thomas Edison, batteries have changed a lot in the past century, but there is still work to do. Improving this type of energy storage technology will have dramatic impacts on the way Americans travel and the ability to incorporate renewable energy into the nation's electric grid. On the transportation side, the Energy Department is working to reduce the costs and weight of electric vehicle batteries while increasing their energy storage and lifespan. The Department is also supports research, development and deployment of battery technologies that would allow the

170

Batteries Breakout Session  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

capture external conditions (consumer and infrastructure) * Capture Secondary use of batteries * EV100 Primary Vehicle, felt not practical? Barriers Interfering with Reaching the...

171

Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Improving the batteries for electric drive vehicles, including hybrid electric (HEV) and plug-in electric (PEV) vehicles, is key to improving vehicles' economic, social, and environmental...

172

battery2.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Power Battery Systems Company 5 Silkin Street, Apt. 40 Sarov, Nizhny Novgorod Russia, 607190 Alexander A. Potanin 7-(83130)-43701 (phonefax), potanin@hpbs.ru General...

173

EMSL - battery materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

battery-materials en Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

174

GBP Battery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GBP Battery Place: China Product: Shenzhen-China-based maker of Li-Poly and Li-ion batteries suitable for EVs and other applications. References: GBP Battery1 This article is...

175

Non-Aqueous Battery Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0 V. Practical non-aqueous batteries have energies extending from 100...electric watches to 20 kWh secondary batteries being developed for vehicle traction...10 years, to a military lithium thermal battery delivering all of its energy in...

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Coatings on LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 for Li-Ion Battery Composite Cathodes  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we report results of a novel synthesis method of thin film conductive carbon coatings on LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} cathode active material powders for lithium-ion batteries. Thin layers of graphitic carbon were produced from a solid organic precursor, anthracene, by a one-step microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) method. The structure and morphology of the carbon coatings were examined using SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. The composite LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrodes were electrochemically tested in lithium half coin cells. The composite cathodes made of the carbon-coated LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} powder showed superior electrochemical performance and increased capacity compared to standard composite LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrodes.

Doeff, M.M.; Kostecki, R.; Marcinek, M.; Wilcoc, J.D.

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

177

Experimental determination of the speciation, partitioning, and release of perrhenate as a chemical surrogate for pertechnetate from a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form  

SciTech Connect

A key component to closing the nuclear fuel cycle is the storage and disposition of nuclear waste in geologic systems. Multiphase ceramic waste forms have been studied extensively as a potential host matrix for nuclear waste. Understanding the speciation, partitioning, and release behavior of radionuclides immobilized in multiphase ceramic waste forms is a critical aspect of developing the scientific and technical basis for nuclear waste management. In this study, we evaluated a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form (i.e., fluidized-bed steam reform sodium aluminosilicate [FBSR NAS] product) as a potential host matrix for long-lived radionuclides, such as technetium (99Tc). The FBSR NAS material consists primarily of nepheline (ideally NaAlSiO4), anion-bearing sodalites (ideally M8[Al6Si6O24]X2, where M refers to alkali and alkaline earth cations and X refers to monovalent anions), and nosean (ideally Na8[AlSiO4]6SO4). Bulk X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of the multiphase ceramic waste form, suggest rhenium (Re) is in the Re(VII) oxidation state and has partitioned to a Re-bearing sodalite phase (most likely a perrhenate sodalite Na8[Al6Si6O24](ReO4)2). Rhenium was added as a chemical surrogate for 99Tc during the FBSR NAS synthesis process. The weathering behavior of the FBSR NAS material was evaluated under hydraulically unsaturated conditions with deionized water at 90 ?C. The steady-state Al, Na, and Si concentrations suggests the weathering mechanisms are consistent with what has been observed for other aluminosilicate minerals and include a combination of ion exchange, network hydrolysis, and the formation of an enriched-silica surface layer or phase. The steady-state S and Re concentrations are within an order of magnitude of the nosean and perrhenate sodalite solubility, respectively. The order of magnitude difference between the observed and predicted concentration for Re and S may be associated with the fact that the anion-bearing sodalites contained in the multiphase ceramic matrix are present as mixed-anion sodalite phases. These results suggest the multiphase FBSR NAS material may be a viable host matrix for long-lived, highly mobilie radionuclides which is a critical aspect in the management of nuclear waste.

Pierce, Eric M.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Fitts, Jeff. P.; Jantzen, Carol. M.; Tang, G.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Prieto Battery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado-based startup company that is developing lithium ion batteries based on nano-structured materials. References: Prieto Battery1 This article is a stub. You can...

179

Cellulosic materials recovered from steam classified municipal solid wastes as feedstocks for conversion to fuels and chemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A process has been developed for the treatment of municipal solid waste to separate and recover the cellulosic biomass from the nonbiomass components. ... highly suitable as a feedstock for conversion to fuel, fe...

Michael H. Eley; Gerald R. Guinn; Joyita Bagchi

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Two component absorption/phase separation chemical heat pump to provide temperature amplification to waste heat streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical heat pump that utilizes liquid/liquid phase separation rather than evaporation to separate two components in a heat of mixing chemical heat pump process. 3 figs.

Scott, T.C.; Kaplan, S.I.

1987-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Technology for Treatment of Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated during Uranium and Plutonium Chemical and Metallurgical Manufacturing in FSUE PO Mayak - 13616  

SciTech Connect

Created technological scheme for treatment of liquid radioactive waste generated while uranium and plutonium chemical and metallurgical manufacturing consists of: - Liquid radioactive waste (LRW) purification from radionuclides and its transfer into category of manufacturing waste; - Concentration of suspensions containing alpha-nuclides and their further conversion to safe dry state (calcinate) and moving to long controlled storage. The following technologies are implemented in LRW treatment complex: - Settling and filtering technology for treatment of liquid intermediate-level waste (ILW) with volume about 1500m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8} Bq/dm{sup 3} - Membrane and sorption technology for processing of low-level waste (LLW) of radioactive drain waters with volume about 150 000 m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} Bq/dm{sup 3}. Settling and filtering technology includes two stages of ILW immobilization accompanied with primary settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following flushing and drying of the pulp generated; secondary deep after settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following solid phase concentration by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration. Besides, the installation capacity on permeate is not less than 3 m{sup 3}/h. Concentrates generated are sent to calcination on microwave drying (MW drying) unit. Membrane and sorption technology includes processing of averaged sewage flux by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration with total capacity of installations on permeate not less than 18 m{sup 3}/h and sorption extraction of uranium from permeate on anionite. According to radionuclide contamination level purified solution refers to general industrial waste. Concentrates generated during suspension filtering are evaporated in rotary film evaporator (RFE) in order to remove excess water, thereafter they are dried on infrared heating facility. Solid concentrate produced is sent for long controlled storage. Complex of the procedures carried out makes it possible to solve problems on treatment of LRW generated while uranium and plutonium chemical and metallurgical manufacturing in Federal State Unitary Enterprise (FSUE) Mayak and cease its discharge into open water reservoirs. (authors)

Adamovich, D. [SUE MosSIA Radon, 2/14 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation)] [SUE MosSIA Radon, 2/14 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation); Batorshin, G.; Logunov, M.; Musalnikov, A. [FSUE 'PO Mayak', 31 av. Lenin, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456780 (Russian Federation)] [FSUE 'PO Mayak', 31 av. Lenin, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456780 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Tanks for the Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...kg), in the most common flow batteries that number ranges from 20 to 50 Wh/kg. Most modular units now under development range in size from refrigerators to railcars. A flow battery in Osaka, Japan, that's capable of storing a megawatt...

Robert F. Service

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hydration Aging of Nuclear Waste Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of Nuclear Waste Glass 10...STEINDLER Chemical Engineering...60439 The aging of simulated nuclear waste glass by...nuclear waste forms can meet...simulated aging reac-tions...whether a waste formn can...pro-jected Nuclear Regulatory...STEINDLEt Chemical Engineering...Basisfor Waste Form Integrity...

J. K. BATES; L. J. JARDINE; M. J. STEINDLER

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Chemical properties of urban waste ash produced by open burning on the Jos Plateau: implications for agriculture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Urban centres produce most of the world's waste and between a third and a half goes uncollected. The answer to the problem of waste disposal lies partly in agriculture, as waste can be extremely nutrient-rich. In the last decade there has been a tremendous increase in the developing world in total city area under informal food production and there are many examples of waste recycling onto the urban or peri-urban plots. Farmers on the Jos Plateau, Nigeria, have developed a successful soil fertility management strategy based on the combination of inorganic fertilisers, manure and urban waste ash. This study sought to provide some preliminary data on urban waste ash produced by open burning and used in farming in a developing country. Ash samples were collected from different locations around Jos and tested for C, N, pH, P, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd and Pb. It was found that ash is an effective liming material (because of the high pH, and high Ca, Mg and K contents), and has the potential to contribute significant quantities of micro-nutrients such as Mn, Zn and Cu. Ash, however, is far from being a homogenous material and its variability means that its fertilising potential will vary between batches and that, even if mean and median levels are low, there is the risk of the formation of localised areas of soil with excessive heavy metal contents (this is particularly the case with Pb). Further research is required to determine the plant-availability of these elements in the ash and to assess the wider environmental and health implications of uncontrolled, open burning of waste as a means of producing ash for agricultural purposes.

M.W. Pasquini; M.J. Alexander

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Aluminoborosilicate Waste Glass Dissolution under Alkaline Conditions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aluminoborosilicate Waste Glass Dissolution under Alkaline Conditions at 40C: Implications for a Chemical Affinity-Based Aluminoborosilicate Waste Glass Dissolution under...

186

Development of the Conceptual Models for Chemical Conditions and Hydrology Used in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations specify that the DOE must demonstrate on a sound basis that the WIPP disposal system will effectively contain long-lived alpha-emitting radionuclides within its boundaries for 10,000 years following closure. In 1996, the DOE submitted the ''40 CFR Part 191 Compliance Certification Application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant'' (CCA) to the EPA. The CCA proposed that the WIPP site complies with EPA's regulatory requirements. Contained within the CCA are descriptions of the scientific research conducted to characterize the properties of the WIPP site and the probabilistic performance assessment (PA) conducted to predict the containment properties of the WIPP disposal system. In May 1998, the EPA certified that the TRU waste disposal at the WIPP complies with its regulations. Waste disposal operations at WIPP commenced on March 28, 1999. The 1996 WIPP PA model of the disposal system included conceptual and mathematical representations of key hydrologic and geochemical processes. These key processes were identified over a 22-year period involving data collection, data interpretation, computer models, and sensitivity studies to evaluate the importance of uncertainty and of processes that were difficult to evaluate by other means. Key developments in the area of geochemistry were the evaluation of gas generation mechanisms in the repository; development of a model of chemical conditions in the repository and actinide concentrations in brine; selecting MgO backfill and demonstrating its effects experimentally; and determining the chemical retardation capability of the Culebra. Key developments in the area of hydrology were evacuating the potential for groundwater to dissolve the Salado Formation (the repository host formation), development of a regional model for hydrologic conditions, development of a stochastic, probabilistic representation of hydraulic properties in the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation; characterization of physical transport in the Culebra, and the evaluation of brine and gas flow in the Salado. Additional confidence in the conceptual models used in the 1996 WIPP PA was gained through independent peer review in many stages of their development.

LARSON, KURT W.

2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

187

SOLAR BATTERY CHARGERS FOR NIMH BATTERIES1 Abstract -This paper proposes new solar battery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOLAR BATTERY CHARGERS FOR NIMH BATTERIES1 Abstract - This paper proposes new solar battery chargers for NiMH batteries. Used with portable solar panels, existing charge control methods are shown of consumer portable solar arrays. These new arrays are lightweight, durable, and flexible and have been

Lehman, Brad

188

Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer, Longer-lasting Batteries Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer,...

189

Lithium Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries. Lithium Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries. Abstract: Rechargeable lithium metal batteries have much higher energy density than those...

190

Blue Sky Batteries Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Batteries Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Blue Sky Batteries Inc Place: Laramie, Wyoming Zip: 82072-3 Product: Nanoengineers materials for rechargeable lithium batteries....

191

Design and Simulation of Lithium Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gabano, Ed. , Lithium Batteries, Academic Press, New York,K. V. Kordesch, "Primary Batteries 1951-1976," J. Elec- n ~.Rechargeable Lithium Batteries," J. Electrochem. Soc. , [20

Doyle, C.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Aerospatiale Batteries ASB | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aerospatiale Batteries ASB Jump to: navigation, search Name: Aerospatiale Batteries (ASB) Place: France Product: Research, design and manufacture of Thermal Batteries. References:...

193

American Battery Charging Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Battery Charging Inc Place: Smithfield, Rhode Island Zip: 2917 Product: Manufacturer of industrial and railroad battery chargers. References: American Battery Charging...

194

Method and apparatus for measuring the state of charge in a battery based on volume of battery components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The state of charge of electrochemical batteries of different kinds is determined by measuring the incremental change in the total volume of the reactive masses in the battery. The invention is based on the principle that all electrochemical batteries, either primary or secondary (rechargeable), produce electricity through a chemical reaction with at least one electrode, and the chemical reactions produce certain changes in the composition and density of the electrode. The reactive masses of the electrodes, the electrolyte, and any separator or spacers are usually contained inside a battery casing of a certain volume. As the battery is used, or recharged, the specific volume of at least one of the electrode masses will change and, since the masses of the materials do not change considerably, the total volume occupied by at least one of the electrodes will change. These volume changes may be measured in many different ways and related to the state of charge in the battery. In one embodiment, the volume change can be measured by monitoring the small changes in one of the principal dimensions of the battery casing as it expands or shrinks to accommodate the combined volumes of its components.

Rouhani, S. Zia (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

195

Temperature maintained battery system  

SciTech Connect

A chassis contains a battery charger connected to a multi-cell battery. The charger receives direct current from an external direct current power source and has means to automatically selectively charge the battery in accordance with a preselected charging program relating to temperature adjusted state of discharge of the battery. A heater device is positioned within the chassis which includes heater elements and a thermal switch which activates the heater elements to maintain the battery above a certain predetermined temperature in accordance with preselected temperature conditions occurring within the chassis. A cooling device within the chassis includes a cooler regulator, a temperature sensor, and peltier effect cooler elements. The cooler regulator activates and deactivates the peltier cooler elements in accordance with preselected temperature conditions within the chassis sensed by the temperature sensor. Various vehicle function circuitry may also be positioned within the chassis. The contents of the chassis are positioned to form a passage proximate the battery in communication with an inlet and outlet in the chassis to receive air for cooling purposes from an external source.

Newman, W.A.

1980-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

196

Chemical technology division: Annual technical report 1987  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1987 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries--mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet and for the purification of ferrous scrap; (6) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (7) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of various minerals; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 54 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO/sub 2/ recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock  

SciTech Connect

Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

QUANTITATIVE HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT RESULTING FROM GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION OF AN ABANDONED OPEN FIELD CHEMICAL WASTE BURNING SITE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantitative human health risk assessment was performed for the evaluation of health threat resulting from the chemical contamination of the soil and groundwater in the area of the former open field pharmaceutica...

GYULA DURA; SANDOR SZOBOSZLAI; BALAZS KRISZT

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Argonne TTRDC - TransForum v10n1 - New Molecule for Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Molecule Could Help Make Batteries Safer, Less Expensive New Molecule Could Help Make Batteries Safer, Less Expensive Charge transfer mechanism for Li-ion battery overcharge protection Charge Transfer Mechanism for Li-ion Battery Overcharge Protection. When the battery is overcharged, the redox shuttle (bottom molecule) will be oxidized by losing an electron to the positive electrode. The radical cation formed (top molecule) will then diffuse back to the negative electrode, causing the cation to obtain an electron and be reduced. The net reaction is to shuttle electrons from the positive electrode to the negative electrode without causing chemical damage to the battery. Safety, life and cost are three of the major barriers to making commercially-viable lithium-ion batteries for plug-in hybrid electric

202

Method and apparatus for indicating electric charge remaining in batteries based on electrode weight and center of gravity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In most electrochemical batteries which generate electricity through the reaction of a battery electrode with an electrolyte solution, the chemical composition, and thus the weight and density, of the electrode changes as the battery discharges. The invention measures a parameter of the battery which changes as the weight of the electrode changes as the battery discharges and relates that parameter to the value of the parameter when the battery is fully charged and when the battery is functionally discharged to determine the state-of-charge of the battery at the time the parameter is measured. In one embodiment, the weight of a battery electrode or electrode unit is measured to determine the state-of-charge. In other embodiments, where a battery electrode is located away from the geometrical center of the battery, the position of the center of gravity of the battery or shift in the position of the center of gravity of the battery is measured (the position of the center of gravity changes with the change in weight of the electrode) and indicates the state-of-charge of the battery. 35 figs.

Rouhani, S.Z.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

203

Method and apparatus for indicating electric charge remaining in batteries based on electrode weight and center of gravity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In most electrochemical batteries which generate electricity through the reaction of a battery electrode with an electrolyte solution, the chemical composition, and thus the weight and density, of the electrode changes as the battery discharges. The invention measures a parameter of the battery which changes as the weight of the electrode changes as the battery discharges and relates that parameter to the value of the parameter when the battery is fully charged and when the battery is functionally discharged to determine the state-of-charge of the battery at the time the parameter is measured. In one embodiment, the weight of a battery electrode or electrode unit is measured to determine the state-of-charge. In other embodiments, where a battery electrode is located away from the geometrical center of the battery, the position of the center of gravity of the battery or shift in the position of the center of gravity of the battery is measured (the position of the center of gravity changes with the change in weight of the electrode) and indicates the state-of-charge of the battery.

Rouhani, S. Zia (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support.

Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Nickel coated aluminum battery cell tabs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery cell tab is described. The battery cell tab is anodized on one end and has a metal coating on the other end. Battery cells and methods of making battery cell tabs are also described.

Bucchi, Robert S.; Casoli, Daniel J.; Campbell, Kathleen M.; Nicotina, Joseph

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

206

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 1, Cell and battery safety  

SciTech Connect

This report is the first of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues involved in using sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles that may affect the commercialization of Na/S batteries. This and the other reports on recycling, shipping, and vehicle safety are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD&D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers cell design and engineering as the basis of safety for Na/S batteries and describes and assesses the potential chemical, electrical, and thermal hazards and risks of Na/S cells and batteries as well as the RD&D performed, under way, or to address these hazards and risks. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, universities, and private industry. Subsequent volumes will address environmental, health, and safety issues involved in shipping cells and batteries, using batteries to propel electric vehicles, and recycling and disposing of spent batteries. The remainder of this volume is divided into two major sections on safety at the cell and battery levels. The section on Na/S cells describes major component and potential failure modes, design, life testing and failure testing, thermal cycling, and the safety status of Na/S cells. The section on batteries describes battery design, testing, and safety status. Additional EH&S information on Na/S batteries is provided in the appendices.

Ohi, J.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Electrocatalysts for Nonaqueous LithiumAir Batteries:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrocatalysts for Nonaqueous LithiumAir Batteries: Status, Challenges, and Perspective. Electrocatalysts for Nonaqueous LithiumAir Batteries: Status, Challenges,...

208

Bridging the Gap in the Chemical Thermodynamic Database for Nuclear Waste Repository: Studies of the Effect of Temperature on Actinide Complexation  

SciTech Connect

Recent results of thermodynamic studies on the complexation of actinides (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and Pu{sup 4+}) with F{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -}/HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} at elevated temperatures are reviewed. The data indicate that, for all systems except the 1:1 complexation of Np(V) with HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, the complexation of actinides is enhanced by the increase in temperature. The enhancement is primarily due to the increase in the entropy term (T{Delta}S) that exceeds the increase in the enthalpy ({Delta}H) as the temperature is increased. These data bridge the gaps in the chemical thermodynamic database for nuclear waste repository where the temperature could remain significantly higher than 25 C for a long time after the closure of the repository.

Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin; Xia, Yuanxian; Friese, Judah I.; Zanonato, PierLuigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

209

Battery Vent Mechanism And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

Ching, Larry K. W. (Littleton, CO)

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Battery venting system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

Casale, Thomas J. (Aurora, CO); Ching, Larry K. W. (Littleton, CO); Baer, Jose T. (Gaviota, CA); Swan, David H. (Monrovia, CA)

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

211

In Situ Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Electrochemical Cells: Batteries, Supercapacitors, and Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Situ Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Electrochemical Cells: Batteries, Supercapacitors, and Fuel Cells ... In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. ... In situ NMR studies on fuel cells (FCs) have focused on probing the chemical reactions at the electrodes and the fate of fuels such as methanol during FC operation. ...

Frdric Blanc; Michal Leskes; Clare P. Grey

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

212

Analysis of the validity of analytical models used for assessment of forty-five waste site areas: Subsurface flow and chemical transport  

SciTech Connect

Closure actions at 45 waste sites were analyzed using an analytical model. A quality assurance program, which consisted of (1) comparison to analytical solutions with different boundary conditions, (2) comparison of model results to measured concentrations, (3) comparison with layered numerical solutions, and (4) evaluation and sensitivity analysis of input data, suggests that this type of analysis is a reasonable screening tool. Boundary conditions and controlling processes, such as chemical speciation, must be properly identified when defining input parameters; also, transient models that account for unsaturated zone processes predict higher peak concentrations than steady-state models such as the EPA VHS model. Assessment of complex systems that have multiple flow paths, or studies of remedial actions (such as ground water withdrawal and treatment) may require numerical modeling to meet the required objectives. However, the quality assurance analysis for the subject waste sites indicates that analytical approximations are sufficiently accurate to make relative environmental assessments (e.g., prioritizing sites or assessing various closure actions).

Looney, B.B.; Fjeld, R.A.; Merrell, G.B.; Duffield, G.M.; Andrews, C.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

214

Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

Lorenzo, Donald K. (Knoxville, TN); Van Cleve, Jr., John E. (Kingston, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst: Final Report, 24 February 2004 -- 23 February 2006  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst Final Report February 24, 2004 - February 23, 2006 T. Reppert Mack Trucks, Inc. Allentown, Pennsylvania J. Chiu Southwest Research Institute San Antonio, Texas Subcontract Report NREL/SR-540-38222 September 2005 Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst Final Report February 24, 2004 - February 23, 2006 T. Reppert Mack Trucks, Inc. Allentown, Pennsylvania J. Chiu Southwest Research Institute San Antonio, Texas NREL Technical Monitor: R. Parish Prepared under Subcontract No. ZCI-4-32049-01 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-540-38222 September 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory

216

batteries | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

batteries batteries Dataset Summary Description The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) publishes a wide selection of data and statistics on renewable energy power technologies from a variety of sources (e.g. EIA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, EPRI and AWEA). In 2006, NREL published the 4th edition, presenting market and performance data for over a dozen technologies from publications from 1997 - 2004. Source NREL Date Released March 01st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords advanced energy storage batteries biomass csp fuel cells geothermal Hydro market data NREL performance data PV wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Technology Profiles (market and performance data) (xls, 207.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

217

Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1979. [Pyrochemical/dry processing; waste encapsulation in metal; transport in geologic media  

SciTech Connect

For pyrochemical and dry processing materials development included exposure to molten metal and salt of Mo-0.5% Ti-0.07% Ti-0.01% C, Mo-30% W, SiC, Si/sub 2/ON/sub 2/, ZrB/sub 2/-SiC, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, AlN, HfB/sub 2/, Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, nickel nitrate-infiltrated W, W-coated Mo, and W-metallized alumina-yttria. Work on Th-U salt transport processing included solubility of Th in liquid Cd, defining the Cd-Th and Cd-Mg-Th phase diagrams, ThO/sub 2/ reduction experiments, and electrolysis of CaO in molten salt. Work on pyrochemical processes and associated hardware for coprocessing U and Pu in spent FBR fuels included a second-generation computer model of the transport process, turntable transport process design, work on the U-Cu-Mg system, and U and Pu distribution coefficients between molten salt and metal. Refractory metal vessels are being service-life tested. The chloride volatility processing of Th-based fuel was evaluated for its proliferation resistance, and a preliminary ternary phase diagram for the Zn-U-Pu system was computed. Material characterization and process analysis were conducted on the Exportable Pyrochemical process (Pyro-Civex process). Literature data on oxidation of fissile metals to oxides were reviewed. Work was done on chemical bases for the reprocessing of actinide oxides in molten salts. Flowsheets are being developed for the processing of fuel in molten tin. Work on encapsulation of solidified radioactive waste in metal matrix included studies of leach rate of crystalline waste materials and of the impact resistance of metal-matrix waste forms. In work on the transport properties of nuclear waste in geologic media, adsorption of Sr on oolitic limestone was studied, as well as the migration of Cs in basalt. Fitting of data on the adsorption of iodate by hematite to a mathematical model was attempted.

Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Effects of heat treatment and formulation on the phase composition and chemical durability of the EBR-ll ceramic waste form.  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive waste salts generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II will be immobilized in a ceramic waste form (CWF). Tests are being conducted to evaluate the suitability of the CWF for disposal in the planned federal high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. In this report, the results of laboratory tests and analyses conducted to address product consistency and thermal stability issues called out in waste acceptance requirements are presented. The tests measure the impacts of (1) variations in the amounts of salt and binder glass used to make the CWF and (2) heat treatments on the phase composition and chemical durability of the waste form. A series of CWF materials was made to span the ranges of salt and glass contents that could be used during processing: between 5.0 and 15 mass% salt loaded into the zeolite (the nominal salt loading is 10.7%, and the process control range is 10.6 to 11.2 mass%), and between 20 and 30 mass% binder glass mixed with the salt-loaded zeolite (the nominal glass content is 25% and the process control range is 20 to 30 mass%). In another series of tests, samples of two CWF products made with the nominal salt and glass contents were reheated to measure the impact on the phase composition and durability: long-term heat treatments were conducted at 400 and 500 C for durations of 1 week, 4 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year; short-term heat treatments were conducted at 600, 700, 800, and 850 C for durations of 4, 28, 52, and 100 hours. All of the CWF products that were made with different amounts of salt, zeolite, and glass and all of the heat-treated CWF samples were analyzed with powder X-ray diffraction to measure changes in phase compositions and subjected to 7-day product consistency tests to measure changes in the chemical durability. The salt loading had the greatest impact on phase composition and durability. A relatively large amount of nepheline, Na{sub 4}(AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 4}, was formed in the material made with 5.0 mass% salt loading, which was also the least durable of the materials that were tested. Nepheline was not detected in materials made with salt-loaded zeolites containing 15 or 20 mass% salt. Conversely, halite was not detected with XRD in materials made with 5.0 or 7.5 mass% salt loading, but similar amounts of halite were measured in the other CWF materials. The sodalite contents of all materials were similar. The halite content in the CWF source material used in the short-term heat-treatment study, which had the nominal salt and binder glass loadings, was determined to be about 1.3 mass% by standard addition analysis. Heat treatment had only a small effect on the phase composition: the amount of halite increased to as much as 3.7 mass%, and trace amounts of nepheline were detected in samples treated at 800 and 850 C. The CWF samples treated at high temperatures had lower amounts of halite detected in the rapid water-soluble test. The releases of B, Na, and Si in the product consistency tests (PCTs) were not sensitive to the heat-treatment conditions. The PCT responses of all salt-loaded and heat-treated CWF materials were well below that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass.

Ebert, W. E.; Dietz, N. L.; Janney, D. E.

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

Transparent lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...computers). Typically, a battery is composed of electrode...nanotubes (5, 7), graphene (11), and organic...is not suitable for batteries, because, to our knowledge...production of 30-inch graphene films for transparent electrodes...rechargeable lithium batteries . Nature 414 : 359 367...

Yuan Yang; Sangmoo Jeong; Liangbing Hu; Hui Wu; Seok Woo Lee; Yi Cui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Coatings on LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 for Li-Ion Battery Composite Cathodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O 2 for Li-ion Battery Composite Cathodes Marek L. MarcinekRaman spectroscopy. The composite LiNi 1/3 Co 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2electronic contact within the composite cathode and does not

Doeff, M.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Batteries - EnerDel Lithium-Ion Battery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EnerDel/Argonne Advanced High-Power Battery for Hybrid Electric Vehicles EnerDel/Argonne Advanced High-Power Battery for Hybrid Electric Vehicles EnerDel lithium-ion battery The EnerDel Lithium-Ion Battery The EnerDel/Argonne lithium-ion battery is a highly reliable and extremely safe device that is lighter in weight, more compact, more powerful and longer-lasting than the nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries in today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The battery is expected to meet the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium's $500 manufacturing price criterion for a 25-kilowatt battery, which is almost a sixth of the cost to make comparable Ni-MH batteries intended for use in HEVs. It is also less expensive to make than comparable Li-ion batteries. That cost reduction is expected to help make HEVs more competitive in the marketplace and enable consumers to receive an immediate payback in

222

Current balancing for battery strings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery plant is described which features magnetic circuit means for balancing the electrical current flow through a pluraliircuitbattery strings which are connected electrically in parallel. The magnetic circuit means is associated with the battery strings such that the conductors carrying the electrical current flow through each of the battery strings pass through the magnetic circuit means in directions which cause the electromagnetic fields of at least one predetermined pair of the conductors to oppose each other. In an alternative embodiment, a low voltage converter is associated with each of the battery strings for balancing the electrical current flow through the battery strings.

Galloway, James H. (New Baltimore, MI)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Battery electrode growth accommodation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrode for a lead acid flow through battery, the grids including a plastic frame, a plate suspended from the top of the frame to hang freely in the plastic frame and a paste applied to the plate, the paste being free to allow for expansion in the planar direction of the grid.

Bowen, Gerald K. (Cedarburg, WI); Andrew, Michael G. (Wauwatosa, WI); Eskra, Michael D. (Fredonia, WI)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Johnson Controls Develops an Improved Vehicle Battery, Works...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Johnson Controls Develops an Improved Vehicle Battery, Works to Cut Battery Costs in Half Johnson Controls Develops an Improved Vehicle Battery, Works to Cut Battery Costs in Half...

225

Thin-film Lithium Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thin-Film Battery with Lithium Anode Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division Thin-Film Lithium Batteries Resources with Additional Information The Department of Energy's 'Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed high-performance thin-film lithium batteries for a variety of technological applications. These batteries have high energy densities, can be recharged thousands of times, and are only 10 microns thick. They can be made in essentially any size and shape. Recently, Teledyne licensed this technology from ORNL to make batteries for medical devices including electrocardiographs. In addition, new "textured" cathodes have been developed which have greatly increased the peak current capability of the batteries. This greatly expands the potential medical uses of the batteries, including transdermal applications for heart regulation.'

226

Application of a NAPL partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) to support DNAPL remediation at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico chemical waste landfill  

SciTech Connect

Chlorinated solvents as dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) are present at a large number of hazardous waste sites across the U.S. and world. DNAPL is difficult to detect in the subsurface, much less characterize to any degree of accuracy. Without proper site characterization, remedial decisions are often difficult to make and technically effective, cost-efficient remediations are even more difficult to obtain. A new non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) characterization technology that is superior to conventional technologies has been developed and applied at full-scale. This technology, referred to as the Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT), has been adopted from oil-field practices and tailored to environmental application in the vadose and saturated zones. A PITT has been applied for the first time at full-scale to characterize DNAPL in the vadose zone. The PITT was applied in December 1995 beneath two side-by-side organic disposal pits at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) RCRA Interim Status Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. DNAPL, consisting of a mixture of chlorinated solvents, aromatic hydrocarbons, and PCE oils, is known to exist in at least one of the two buried pits. The vadose zone PITT was conducted by injecting a slug of non-partitioning and NAPL-partitioning tracers into and through a zone of interest under a controlled forced gradient. The forced gradient was created by a balanced extraction of soil gas at a location 55 feet from the injector. The extracted gas stream was sampled over time to define tracer break-through curves. Soil gas sampling ports from multilevel monitoring installations were sampled to define break-through curves at specific locations and depths. Analytical instrumentation such as gas chromatographs and a photoacoustical analyzers operated autonomously, were used for tracer detection.

Studer, J.E. [INTERA Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mariner, P.; Jin, M. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be damaged when corrosive chemicals are put down the drain. Burning hazardous wastes simply distributes themHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any

de Lijser, Peter

228

Electrolyte Model Helps Researchers Develop Better Batteries, Wins R&D 100 Award  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Dow Chemical, Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, Argonne National Lab (ANL) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), have developed the Advanced Electrolyte Model (AEM), a powerful tool that analyzes and identifies potential electrolytes for use in battery systems.

229

Advanced Battery Manufacturing (VA)  

SciTech Connect

LiFeBATT has concentrated its recent testing and evaluation on the safety of its batteries. There appears to be a good margin of safety with respect to overheating of the cells and the cases being utilized for the batteries are specifically designed to dissipate any heat built up during charging. This aspect of LiFeBATTs products will be even more fully investigated, and assuming ongoing positive results, it will become a major component of marketing efforts for the batteries. LiFeBATT has continued to receive prismatic 20 Amp hour cells from Taiwan. Further testing continues to indicate significant advantages over the previously available 15 Ah cells. Battery packs are being assembled with battery management systems in the Danville facility. Comprehensive tests are underway at Sandia National Laboratory to provide further documentation of the advantages of these 20 Ah cells. The company is pursuing its work with Hybrid Vehicles of Danville to critically evaluate the 20 Ah cells in a hybrid, armored vehicle being developed for military and security applications. Results have been even more encouraging than they were initially. LiFeBATT is expanding its work with several OEM customers to build a worldwide distribution network. These customers include a major automotive consulting group in the U.K., an Australian maker of luxury off-road campers, and a number of makers of E-bikes and scooters. LiFeBATT continues to explore the possibility of working with nations that are woefully short of infrastructure. Negotiations are underway with Siemens to jointly develop a system for using photovoltaic generation and battery storage to supply electricity to communities that are not currently served adequately. The IDA has continued to monitor the progress of LiFeBATTs work to ensure that all funds are being expended wisely and that matching funds will be generated as promised. The company has also remained current on all obligations for repayment of an IDA loan and lease payments for space to the IDA. A commercial venture is being formed to utilize the LiFeBATT product for consumer use in enabling photovoltaic powered boat lifts. Field tests of the system have proven to be very effective and commercially promising. This venture is expected to result in significant sales within the next six months.

Stratton, Jeremy

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Batteries, mobile phones & small electrical devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the ANU (eg. lead acid car batteries) send an email to recycle@anu.edu.au A bit of information about by batteries. Rechargeable batteries have been found to save resources, money and energy and therefore are a more environmentally friendly alternative to single use batteries. However rechargeable batteries

231

Results of Water and Sediment Toxicity Tests and Chemical Analyses Conducted at the Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Waste Unit, January 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Operable Unit consists of two inactive rubble pits (631-1G and 631-3G) that have been capped, and one active burning rubble pit (631-2G), where wooden pallets and other non-hazardous debris are periodically burned. The inactive rubble pits may have received hazardous materials, such as asbestos, batteries, and paint cans, as well as non-hazardous materials, such as ash, paper, and glass. In an effort to determine if long term surface water flows of potentially contaminated water from the 631-1G, 631-3G, and 631-2G areas have resulted in an accumulation of chemical constituents at toxic levels in the vicinity of the settling basin and wetlands area, chemical analyses for significant ecological preliminary constituents of concern (pCOCs) were performed on aqueous and sediment samples. In addition, aquatic and sediment toxicity tests were performed in accordance with U.S. EPA methods (U.S. EPA 1989, 1994). Based on the results of the chemical analyses, unfiltered water samples collected from a wetland and settling basins located adjacent to the CSBRP Operable Unit exceed Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) for aluminum, barium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and vanadium at one or more of the four locations that were sampled. The water contained very high concentrations of clay particles that were present as suspended solids. A substantial portion of the metals were present as filterable particulates, bound to the clay particles, and were therefore not biologically available. Based on dissolved metal concentrations, the wetland and settling basin exceeded TRVs for aluminum and barium. However, the background reference location also exceeded the TRV for barium, which suggests that this value may be too low, based on local geochemistry. The detection limits for both total and dissolved mercury were higher than the TRV, so it was not possible to determine if the TRV for mercury was exceeded. Dissolved metal levels of chromium, copper, iron, lead and vanadium were below the TRVs. Metal concentrations in the sediment exceeded the TRVs for arsenic, chromium, copper, and mercury but not for antimony and lead. The results of the water toxicity tests indicated no evidence of acute toxicity in any of the samples. The results of the chronic toxicity tests indicated possible reproductive impairment at two locations. However, the results appear to be anomalous, since the toxicity was unrelated to concentration, and because the concentrations of pCOCs were similar in the toxic and the non-toxic samples. The results of the sediment toxicity tests indicated significant mortality in all but one sample, including the background reference sediment. When the results of the CSBRP sediment toxicity tests were statistically compared to the result from the background reference sediment, there was no significant mortality. These results suggest that the surface water and sediment at the CSBRP Operable Unit are not toxic to the biota that inhabit the wetland and the settling basin.

Specht, W.L.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

232

Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

due to releases of radionuclides and chemicals from the high-level radioactive waste tanks, Fast Flux Test Facility decommissioning, and waste management activities over long...

233

US advanced battery consortium in-vehicle battery testing procedure  

SciTech Connect

This article describes test procedures to be used as part of a program to monitor the performance of batteries used in electric vehicle applications. The data will be collected as part of an electric vehicle testing program, which will include battery packs from a number of different suppliers. Most data will be collected by on-board systems or from driver logs. The paper describes the test procedure to be implemented for batteries being used in this testing.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Applying the Battery Ownership Model in Pursuit of Optimal Battery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ownership Model in Pursuit of Optimal Battery Use Strategies 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

235

Vent construction for batteries  

SciTech Connect

A battery casing to be hermetically sealed is described the casing having main side walls with end walls bridging the end portions of the side walls, at least one of the end walls facing and being exposed to the battery interior, the improvement in vent means for the casing which ruptures when internal casing pressure exceeds a given value. The vent means include at least one vent-forming rib of a given length and width projecting outward from a portion of the end wall normally facing the battery interior, the rib being in a central band or segment of the one end wall and oriented so that the length of the rib is parallel to the band or segment; and the rib having formed therein a vent-forming groove which extends transversely of the length of the rib only part way substantially symmetrically along the transverse contour thereof, so that both ends of the groove are spaced from the base of the rib and the groove extends comparable distances on both sides of the top or center point of the rib contour.

Romero, A.

1986-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

236

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Next Generation Processes for Carbonate Electrolytes for Battery Applications - Kris Rangan, Materials Modification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Processes for Carbonate Electrolytes for Battery Applications Next Generation Processes for Carbonate Electrolytes for Battery Applications Dr. Kausik Mukhopadhyay & Dr. Krishnaswamy K. Rangan Materials Modification, Inc. 2809-K Merrilee Drive, Fairfax. VA 22031 ABSTRACT  Dimethyl Carbonate (DMC) is a promising electrolyte solvent for lithium battery applications due to its inherent safety and robustness. Despite the enormous promise of its industrial use, this chemical is currently entirely imported from China. The global battery market is about US$ 50 billion, of which approximately $ 5.5 billion is captured by the rechargeable batteries for use in electric vehicles, laptops, consumer electronics, rechargeable batteries etc.  Indigenous manufacture of DMC will enormously benefit not only the American lithium battery industry

237

Chemical Engineering Division research highlights, 1979  

SciTech Connect

In 1979, CEN conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-temperature, rechargeable lithium/iron sulfide batteries for electric vehicles and electric utility load leveling; (2) ambient-temperature batteries - improved lead-acid, nickel/zinc, and nickel/iron - for electric vehicles; (3) molten carbonate fuel cells for use by electric utilities; (4) coal technology - mainly fluidized-bed combustion of coal in the presence of SO/sub 2/ sorbent of limestone; (5) heat- and seed- recovery technology for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic systems; (6) solar energy collectors and thermal energy storage; (7) fast breeder reactor chemistry research - chemical support of reactor safety studies, chemistry of irradiated fuels, and sodium technology; (8) fuel cycle technology - reprocessing of nuclear fuels, management of nuclear wastes, geologic migration studies, and proof-of-breeding studies for the Light Water Breeder Reactor; (9) magnetic fusion research - lithium processing technology and materials research; and (10) basic energy sciences - homogeneous catalysis, thermodynamics of inorganic and organic materials, environmental chemistry, electrochemistry, and physical properties of salt vapors. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of these areas.

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Nickel recovery aids battery development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GM is developing the zinc/nickel-oxide battery for the small commuter-type electric car that the company expects to produce in a few years. ...

1981-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

239

United States Advanced Battery Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of internal short circuit as a potential failure mechanism * Public Perception: - Media and other promotion of unrealistic expectations for battery capabilities present a...

240

Advanced battery modeling using neural networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

battery models are available today that can accurately predict the performance of the battery system. This thesis presents a modeling technique for batteries employing neural networks. The advantage of using neural networks is that the effect of any...

Arikara, Muralidharan Pushpakam

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS Print Wednesday, 23 January 2013 16:59 toyota battery a) Cross-section of the in situ...

242

Block copolymer electrolytes for lithium batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interface in the Li-ion battery. Electrochimica Acta 50,K. The role of Li-ion battery electrolyte reactivity inK. The role of Li-ion battery electrolyte reactivity in

Hudson, William Rodgers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Sandia National Laboratories: Evaluating Powerful Batteries for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ClimateECEnergyEvaluating Powerful Batteries for Modular Electric Grid Energy Storage Evaluating Powerful Batteries for Modular Electric Grid Energy Storage Sandian Spoke at the...

244

Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Lithium Batteries Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

245

Batteries lose in game of thorns | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batteries lose in game of thorns Batteries lose in game of thorns Scientists see how and where disruptive structures form and cause voltage fading Images from EMSL's scanning...

246

Disordered Materials Hold Promise for Better Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disordered materials hold promise for better batteries Disordered Materials Hold Promise for Better Batteries February 21, 2014 | Tags: Chemistry, Hopper, Materials Science,...

247

Hierarchically Structured Materials for Lithium Batteries. |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

battery (LIB) is one of the most promising power sources to be deployed in electric vehicles (EV), including solely battery powered vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles,...

248

Ford Electric Battery Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ford Electric Battery Group Place: Dearborn, MI References: Ford Battery1 Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with...

249

Design and Simulation of Lithium Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Newman, "Thermal Modeling of the LithiumIPolymer Battery I.J. Newman, "Thermal Modeling of the LithiumIPolymer Battery

Doyle, C.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Advanced Battery Factory | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Factory Jump to: navigation, search Name: Advanced Battery Factory Place: Shen Zhen City, Guangdong Province, China Product: Producers of lithium polymer batteries, established in...

251

Ovonic Battery Company Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ovonic Battery Company Inc Place: Michigan Zip: 48309 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Focused on commercializing its patented and proprietary NiMH battery technology through...

252

Washington: Graphene Nanostructures for Lithium Batteries Recieves...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Washington: Graphene Nanostructures for Lithium Batteries Recieves 2012 R&D 100 Award Washington: Graphene Nanostructures for Lithium Batteries Recieves 2012 R&D 100 Award February...

253

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment PHEV Battery Cost Assessment 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

254

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment PHEV Battery Cost Assessment 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

255

Coordination Chemistry in magnesium battery electrolytes: how...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry in magnesium battery electrolytes: how ligands affect their performance. Coordination Chemistry in magnesium battery electrolytes: how ligands affect their performance....

256

Upgrading the Vanadium Redox Battery | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upgrading the Vanadium Redox Battery Upgrading the Vanadium Redox Battery New electrolyte mix increases energy storage by 70 percent After developing a more effective...

257

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

258

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A review of nuclear batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper reviews recent efforts in the literature to miniaturize nuclear battery systems. The potential of a nuclear battery for longer shelf-life and higher energy density when compared with other modes of energy storage make them an attractive alternative to investigate. The performance of nuclear batteries is a function of the radioisotope(s), radiation transport properties and energy conversion transducers. The energy conversion mechanisms vary significantly between different nuclear battery types, where the radioisotope thermoelectric generator, or RTG, is typically considered a performance standard for all nuclear battery types. The energy conversion efficiency of non-thermal-type nuclear batteries requires that the two governing scale lengths of the system, the range of ionizing radiation and the size of the transducer, be well-matched. Natural mismatches between these two properties have been the limiting factor in the energy conversion efficiency of small-scale nuclear batteries. Power density is also a critical performance factor and is determined by the interface of the radioisotope to the transducer. Solid radioisotopes are typically coated on the transducer, forcing the cell power density to scale with the surface area (limiting power density). Methods which embed isotopes within the transducer allow the power density to scale with cell volume (maximizing power density). Other issues that are examined include the limitations of shelf-life due to radiation damage in the transducers and the supply of radioisotopes to sustain a commercial enterprise. This review of recent theoretical and experimental literature indicates that the physics of nuclear batteries do not currently support the objectives of miniaturization, high efficiency and high power density. Instead, the physics imply that nuclear batteries will be of moderate size and limited power density. The supply of radioisotopes is limited and cannot support large scale commercialization. Niche applications for nuclear batteries exist, and advances in materials science may enable the development of high-efficiency solid-state nuclear batteries in the near term.

Mark A. Prelas; Charles L. Weaver; Matthew L. Watermann; Eric D. Lukosi; Robert J. Schott; Denis A. Wisniewski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - 2005 Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Awards 5 Awards 2005 Outstanding Engineering Achievement, Illinois Engineering Council, awarded to Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Engineering Division IBA Research Award, International Battery Materials Association, Christopher Johnson R&D 100 Award, Self-Contained Battery-Powered bion® Microstimulator with Rechargeable Miniature Battery, Khalil Amine, Ilias Belharouak, Bookeun Oh, Donald Vissers, Qingzheng Wang Electrochemical Society Battery Division Research Award, Electrochemical Society, Michael Thackeray Illinois Engineering Council Outstanding Engineering Achievement Award, UREX+ Process for Separating Key Radionuclides from Commercial Spent Fuel Innovation Hub Tribute to Innovative Minds, Michael Thackeray The University of Chicago Distinguished Performance Award, U of C, Julius Jellinek

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Redox Flow Batteries, a Review  

SciTech Connect

Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

U. Tennessee Knoxville; U. Texas Austin; McGill U; Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M.; Meyers, Jeremy P.; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Lithium batteries for pulse power  

SciTech Connect

New designs of lithium batteries having bipolar construction and thin cell components possess the very low impedance that is necessary to deliver high-intensity current pulses. The R D and understanding of the fundamental properties of these pulse batteries have reached an advanced level. Ranges of 50--300 kW/kg specific power and 80--130 Wh/kg specific energy have been demonstrated with experimental high-temperature lithium alloy/transition-metal disulfide rechargeable bipolar batteries in repeated 1- to 100-ms long pulses. Other versions are designed for repetitive power bursts that may last up to 20 or 30 s and yet may attain high specific power (1--10 kW/kg). Primary high-temperature Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} pulse batteries (thermal batteries) are already commercially available. Other high-temperature lithium systems may use chlorine or metal-oxide positive electrodes. Also under development are low-temperature pulse batteries: a 50-kW Li/SOCl{sub 2} primary batter and an all solid-state, polymer-electrolyte secondary battery. Such pulse batteries could find use in commercial and military applications in the near future. 21 refs., 8 figs.

Redey, L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Battery system with temperature sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

264

Definition: Battery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Battery Battery Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Battery An energy storage device comprised of two or more electrochemical cells enclosed in a container and electrically interconnected in an appropriate series/parallel arrangement to provide the required operating voltage and current levels. Under common usage, the term battery also applies to a single cell if it constitutes the entire electrochemical storage system.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Electrochemical cell Related Terms Fuel cell, energy, operating voltage, smart grid References ↑ http://www1.eere.energy.gov/solar/solar_glossary.html#B Retrie LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Battery&oldid=502543

265

Workshop on electrodes for flowing solution batteries. Summary report  

SciTech Connect

The electrochemical technology of aqueous secondary cells with flowing electrolyte solutions was the subject of a workshop sponsored by EPRI with the cooperation of DOE. The workshop was held in Tampa, Florida, 5-7 November 1979, and was attended by a select group drawn from advanced battery developers, government agencies, universities, and research organizations. The workshop general objectives were to look at the significant parameters believed to govern the performance of the two basic types of electrodes now in use; namely, a porous flow-through electrode (PFTE), and an impervious flow-by electrode. Progress, problems, and prospects were informally discussed. Brief critical reviews were given by session chairmen as a means of introducing each of the key topics (Current Distribution in FTPE, Conversion Efficiency, Segmented FTPE Studies, General Discussion on FTPF Parameters, Surface Activation, Application of FTPE to Waste Recovery, Exxon Zinc-Bromine Flow-By System, FTPE In NASA Redox Energy Storage, and Application of FTPE In Lockheed Zinc/Ferricyanide Redox System). The interaction of this diverse group of engineers and scientists was said by all to be of great benefit in widening understanding of the problems and possible future approaches to new work. The main needs for future work that were identified in the final discussion session among the participants were: (1) engineering analysis, (2) porous structures, (3) materials characteristics, and (4) chemical characteristics. In generally comparing flow-through to flow-by electrodes, there were some surprising differences arising from experimental results that did not fit conventional thinking.

Nanis, L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Rechargeable Heat Battery's Secret Revealed: Solar Energy Capture in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rechargeable Heat Rechargeable Heat Battery Rechargeable Heat Battery's Secret Revealed Solar energy capture in chemical form makes it storable and transportable January 11, 2011 | Tags: Chemistry, Energy Technologies, Franklin Contact: John Hules, JAHules@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 6008 2011-01-11-Heat-Battery.jpg A molecule of fulvalene diruthenium, seen in diagram, changes its configuration when it absorbs heat, and later releases heat when it snaps back to its original shape. Image: Jeffrey Grossman Broadly speaking, there have been two approaches to capturing the sun's energy: photovoltaics, which turn the sunlight into electricity, or solar-thermal systems, which concentrate the sun's heat and use it to boil water to turn a turbine, or use the heat directly for hot water or home

267

Stability of polymer binders in Li-O2 batteries  

SciTech Connect

A number of polymers with various chemical structures were studied as binders for air electrodes in Li-O2 batteries. The nature of the polymer significantly affects the binding properties in the carbon electrodes thus altering the discharge performance of Li-O2 batteries. Stability of polymers to the aggressive reduced oxygen species generated during discharge was tested by ball milling them with KO2 and Li2O2, respectively. Most of the polymers decomposed under these conditions and mechanisms of the decompositions are proposed for some of the polymers. Polyethylene was found to have excellent stability and is suggested as robust binder for air electrodes in Li-O2 batteries.

Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Xu, Wu; Engelhard, Mark H.; Nie, Zimin; Li, Xiaohong S.; Zhang, Jiguang

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

268

High level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Division of Waste Products through a lead office at Savannah River is developing a program to immobilize all US high-level nuclear waste for terminal disposal. DOE high-level wastes include those at the Hanford Plant, the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, and the Savannah River Plant. Commercial high-level wastes, for which DOE is also developing immobilization technology, include those at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant and any future commercial fuels reprocessing plants. The first immobilization plant is to be the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River, scheduled for 1983 project submission to Congress and 1989 operation. Waste forms are still being selected for this plant. Borosilicate glass is currently the reference form, but alternate candidates include concretes, calcines, other glasses, ceramics, and matrix forms.

Crandall, J L

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overview and Progress of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Activity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by the Department of Energy's Energy Storage area at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the research area that is examining new battery materials and addressing fundamental chemical and mechanical instability issues in batteries.

270

Argonne CNM News: Batteries Get a Quick Charge with New Anode Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batteries Get a Quick Charge with New Anode Technology Batteries Get a Quick Charge with New Anode Technology Tijana Rajh Argonne nanoscientist Tijana Rajh holds a strip of material created from titanium dioxide nanotubes. A team of researchers led by Tijana Rajh (Group Leader, Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials NanoBio Interfaces Group), and Christopher Johnson (Argonne's Chemical Sciences & Engineering Division), working under a CNM user science project, discovered that nanotubes composed of titanium dioxide can switch their phase as a battery is cycled, gradually boosting their operational capacity. New batteries produced with this material can be recharged up to half of their original capacity in less than 30 seconds. By switching out conventional graphite anodes with titanium nanotube anodes, a surprising phenomenon occurs. As the battery cycles through

271

Pushing the Boundaries in Energy Technbology: Materials Design for Battery Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pushing the Boundaries in Energy Technology: Materials Design for Battery Applications" Pushing the Boundaries in Energy Technology: Materials Design for Battery Applications" Co-Organizers: Elena Shevchenko (CNM), Mitra Taheri (Drexel University), and Mali Balasubramanian (APS) Batteries are a key element for storing and supplying energy. Transformational battery technologies require tailoring novel materials and/or incorporating new chemical processes. Energy storage devices are intrinsically complex with the relevant materials processes covering time-scales from picoseconds to years and length-scales from angstroms to millimeters. Advanced x-ray and electron microscopy methods have opened a new window by which vital structural and electronic properties of battery materials can be obtained at the appropriate spatio- temporal scales using spectroscopic, scattering and imaging techniques under real world

272

Performance analysis results of a battery fuel gauge algorithm at multiple temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Evaluating a battery fuel gauge (BFG) algorithm is a challenging problem due to the fact that there are no reliable mathematical models to represent the complex features of a Li-ion battery, such as hysteresis and relaxation effects, temperature effects on parameters, aging, power fade (PF), and capacity fade (CF) with respect to the chemical composition of the battery. The existing literature is largely focused on developing different BFG strategies and BFG validation has received little attention. In this paper, using hardware in the loop (HIL) data collected form three Li-ion batteries at nine different temperatures ranging from?20C to 40C, we demonstrate detailed validation results of a battery fuel gauge (BFG) algorithm. The BFG validation is based on three different BFG validation metrics; we provide implementation details of these three BFG evaluation metrics by proposing three different BFG validation load profiles that satisfy varying levels of user requirements.

B. Balasingam; G.V. Avvari; K.R. Pattipati; Y. Bar-Shalom

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Industrial Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, some common and emerging techniques to better utilize energy in the chemical process industries are discussed. Temperature levels of waste heat available are pointed out. Emerging practices for further economical utilization of waste...

Altin, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability  

SciTech Connect

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Nanocarbon Networks for Advanced Rechargeable Lithium Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

His research focuses on energy storage and conversion with batteries, fuel cells, and solar cells. ... As an important type of secondary battery, lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) have quickly dominated the market for consumer electronics and become one of key technologies in the battery industry after their first release by Sony Company in the early 1990s. ...

Sen Xin; Yu-Guo Guo; Li-Jun Wan

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

276

Battery Thermal Management System Design Modeling (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presents the objectives and motivations for a battery thermal management vehicle system design study.

Kim, G-H.; Pesaran, A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

NREL: Sustainable NREL - Waste Reduction and Pollution Prevention  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pollution prevention programs support the goal of near-zero waste through NREL's 4R philosophy, composting, the chemical management system and excess chemical inventory, and our...

278

Cell for making secondary batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides all solid-state lithium and sodium batteries operating in the approximate temperature range of ambient to 145.degree. C. (limited by melting points of electrodes/electrolyte), with demonstrated energy and power densities far in excess of state-of-the-art high-temperature battery systems. The preferred battery comprises a solid lithium or sodium electrode, a polymeric electrolyte such as polyethylene oxide doped with lithium triflate (PEO.sub.8 LiCF.sub.3 SO.sub.3), and a solid-state composite positive electrode containing a polymeric organosulfur electrode, (SRS).sub.n, and carbon black, dispersed in a polymeric electrolyte.

Visco, Steven J. (2336 California St., Berkeley, CA 94703); Liu, Meilin (1121C Ninth St., #29, Albany, CA 94710); DeJonghe, Lutgard C. (910 Acalanes Rd., Lafayette, CA 94549)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Cell for making secondary batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides all solid-state lithium and sodium batteries operating in the approximate temperature range of ambient to 145 C (limited by melting points of electrodes/electrolyte), with demonstrated energy and power densities far in excess of state-of-the-art high-temperature battery systems. The preferred battery comprises a solid lithium or sodium electrode, a polymeric electrolyte such as polyethylene oxide doped with lithium trifluorate (PEO[sub 8]LiCF[sub 3]SO[sub 3]), and a solid-state composite positive electrode containing a polymeric organosulfur electrode, (SRS)[sub n], and carbon black, dispersed in a polymeric electrolyte. 2 figs.

Visco, S.J.; Liu, M.; DeJonghe, L.C.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

280

Battery SEAB Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii US Department of Energy Vehicle Battery R&D: Current Scope and Future Directions January 31, 2012 * David Howell (EERE/VTP) * Pat Davis (EERE/VTP) * Dane Boysen (ARPA-E) * Dave Danielson (ARPA-E) * Linda Horton (BES) * John Vetrano (BES) 2 | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov U.S. Oil-dependence is Driven by Transportation Source: DOE/EIA Annual Energy Review, April 2010 Transportation Residential and Commercial 94% Oil-dependent Industry 41% Oil-dependent 17% Oil-dependent 72% 22% 1% 5% U.S. Oil Consumption by End-use Sector 19.1 Million Barrels per Day (2010) Electric Power 1% Oil-dependent * On-road vehicles are responsible for ~80% of transportation oil usage 3 | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Resynthesis of LiCo1?xMnxO2 as a cathode material for lithium secondary batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A recycling process involving chemical, mechanical, and electrochemical steps has been applied to recover cobalt from spent lithium ion batteries and resynthesize cathode active materials. LiCo1?xMnxO2...powders ...

Soo-Kyung Kim; Dong-Hyo Yang; Jeong-Soo Sohn

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Hunan Copower EV Battery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EV Battery Co Ltd Place: Hunan Province, China Sector: Vehicles Product: Producer of batteries and battery-related products for electric vehicles. References: Hunan Copower EV...

283

In situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High Energy Density Li-Air Batteries In situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High Energy...

284

Visualization of Charge Distribution in a Lithium Battery Electrode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution in Thin-Film Batteries. J. Electrochem. Soc.of Lithium Polymer Batteries. J. Power Sources 2002, 110,for Rechargeable Li Batteries. Chem. Mater. 2010, 15. Padhi,

Liu, Jun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Developing Next-Gen Batteries With Help From NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Helps Develop Next-Gen Batteries NERSC Helps Develop Next-Gen Batteries A genomics approach to materials research could speed up advancements in battery performance December...

286

Making Li-air batteries rechargeable: material challenges. |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Li-air batteries rechargeable: material challenges. Making Li-air batteries rechargeable: material challenges. Abstract: A Li-air battery could potentially provide three to five...

287

In Situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High Energy Density Li-Air Batteries In Situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High Energy...

288

Autonomic Shutdown of Lithium-Ion Batteries Using Thermoresponsive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

shutdown of Li-ion batteries is demonstrated by incorporating thermoresponsive polyethylene (PE) microspheres (ca. 4 m) onto battery anodes. When the internal battery...

289

Sandia National Laboratories: Due Diligence on Lead Acid Battery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Due Diligence on Lead Acid Battery Recycling March 23, 2011 Lead Acid Batteries on secondary containment pallet Lead Acid Batteries on secondary containment pallet In 2004, the US...

290

EV Everywhere Battery Workshop Introduction | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Workshop Introduction EV Everywhere Battery Workshop Introduction Presentation given at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Battery Workshop on July 26, 2012 held at the...

291

Phylion Battery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicles Product: Jiangsu-province-based producer of high-power high-energy Li-ion batteries for such uses as electric bicycles, hybrid vehicles, lighting, medical equipment,...

292

Polymer Electrolyte and Polymer Battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generally the polymer electrolyte of the polymer battery is classified into two kinds of the electrolyte: One is a dry-type electrolyte composed of a polymer matrix and...21.1. Fig....

Toshiyuki Osawa; Michiyuki Kono

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Reinventing Batteries for Grid Storage  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The City University of New York's Energy Institute, with the help of ARPA-E funding, is creating safe, low cost, rechargeable, long lifecycle batteries that could be used as modular distributed storage for the electrical grid. The batteries could be used at the building level or the utility level to offer benefits such as capture of renewable energy, peak shaving and microgridding, for a safer, cheaper, and more secure electrical grid.

Banerjee, Sanjoy

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

294

Batteries using molten salt electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolyte system suitable for a molten salt electrolyte battery is described where the electrolyte system is a molten nitrate compound, an organic compound containing dissolved lithium salts, or a 1-ethyl-3-methlyimidazolium salt with a melting temperature between approximately room temperature and approximately 250.degree. C. With a compatible anode and cathode, the electrolyte system is utilized in a battery as a power source suitable for oil/gas borehole applications and in heat sensors.

Guidotti, Ronald A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

295

Thermal Batteries for Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: UT Austin will demonstrate a high-energy density and low-cost thermal storage system that will provide efficient cabin heating and cooling for EVs. Compared to existing HVAC systems powered by electric batteries in EVs, the innovative hot-and-cold thermal batteries-based technology is expected to decrease the manufacturing cost and increase the driving range of next-generation EVs. These thermal batteries can be charged with off-peak electric power together with the electric batteries. Based on innovations in composite materials offering twice the energy density of ice and 10 times the thermal conductivity of water, these thermal batteries are expected to achieve a comparable energy density at 25% of the cost of electric batteries. Moreover, because UT Austins thermal energy storage systems are modular, they may be incorporated into the heating and cooling systems in buildings, providing further energy efficiencies and positively impacting the emissions of current building heating/cooling systems.

None

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

296

Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer, Longer-lasting Batteries  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Partnered with NETZSCH, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed an Isothermal Battery Calorimeter (IBC) used to quantify heat flow in battery cells and modules.

297

Johnson Controls Develops an Improved Vehicle Battery, Works to Cut Battery Costs in Half  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Johnson Controls is working to increase energy density of vehicle batteries while reducing manufacturing costs for lithium-ion battery cells.

298

Iron Edison Battery Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iron Edison Battery Company Iron Edison Battery Company Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Iron Edison Battery Company Name Iron Edison Battery Company Place Lakewood, Colorado Sector Bioenergy, Carbon, Efficiency, Hydro, Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Nickel Iron (Ni-Fe) battery systems Year founded 2011 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 202-681-4766 Website http://ironedison.com Region Rockies Area References Iron Edison Battery Company[1] Nickel Iron Battery Specifications[2] About the company and the owners[3] Nickel Iron Battery Association[4] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Iron Edison Battery Company is a company based in Lakewood, Colorado. Iron Edison is redefining off-grid energy storage using advanced

299

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | June 2007 Salt Disposal Investigations Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | June 2007 Salt Disposal Investigations The mission of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site is to provide permanent, underground disposal of TRU and TRU-mixed wastes (wastes that also have hazardous chemical components). TRU waste consists of clothing, tools, and debris left from the research and production of nuclear weapons. TRU waste is contaminated with small amounts of plutonium and other TRU radioactive elements. Over the next 35 years, WIPP is expected to receive approximately 175,000 cubic meters of waste from various DOE sites. Enforcement September 8, 2006 Enforcement Letter, Washington TRU Solutions - September 8, 2006

300

Waste generator services implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

Recurring waste management noncompliance problems have spurred a fundamental site-wide process revision to characterize and disposition wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The reengineered method, termed Waste Generator Services, will streamline the waste acceptance process and provide waste generators comprehensive waste management services through a single, accountable organization to manage and disposition wastes in a timely, cost-effective, and compliant manner. This report outlines the strategy for implementing Waste Generator Services across the INEEL. It documents the culmination of efforts worked by the LMITCO Environmental Management Compliance Reengineering project team since October 1997. These efforts have included defining problems associated with the INEEL waste management process; identifying commercial best management practices; completing a review of DOE Complex-wide waste management training requirements; and involving others through an Integrated Process Team approach to provide recommendations on process flow, funding/charging mechanisms, and WGS organization. The report defines the work that will be performed by Waste Generator Services, the organization and resources, the waste acceptance process flow, the funding approach, methods for measuring performance, and the implementation schedule and approach. Field deployment will occur first at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant in June 1998. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1999, Waste Generator Services will be deployed at the other major INEEL facilities in a phased approach, with implementation completed by March 1999.

Mousseau, J.; Magleby, M.; Litus, M.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4). Although disposal of HLW remains...for long-term disposal is through deep...successful waste-disposal program has eluded...geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Authorized...Administration withdrew funding for Yucca Mountain...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

302

Nanocomposite protective coatings for battery anodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Modified surfaces on metal anodes for batteries can help resist formation of malfunction-inducing surface defects. The modification can include application of a protective nanocomposite coating that can inhibit formation of surface defects. such as dendrites, on the anode during charge/discharge cycles. For example, for anodes having a metal (M'), the protective coating can be characterized by products of chemical or electrochemical dissociation of a nanocomposite containing a polymer and an exfoliated compound (M.sub.a'M.sub.b''X.sub.c). The metal, M', comprises Li, Na, or Zn. The exfoliated compound comprises M' among lamella of M.sub.b''X.sub.c, wherein M'' is Fe, Mo, Ta, W, or V, and X is S, O, or Se.

Lemmon, John P; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual mixed waste Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

annually to the Kentucky Division of Waste Management... the Chemical Waste Management Procedures ... Source: Corbitt, Cynthia - Department of Biology, University of Louisville...

304

Advanced Redox Flow Batteries for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the status of the advanced redox flow battery research being performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energys Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 1 of FY2012 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails completion of evaluation and optimization of single cell components for the two advanced redox flow battery electrolyte chemistries recently developed at the lab, the all vanadium (V) mixed acid and V-Fe mixed acid solutions. All the single cell components to be used in future kW-scale stacks have been identified and optimized in this quarter, which include solution electrolyte, membrane or separator; carbon felt electrode and bi-polar plate. Varied electrochemical, chemical and physical evaluations were carried out to assist the component screening and optimization. The mechanisms of the battery capacity fading behavior for the all vanadium redox flow and the Fe/V battery were discovered, which allowed us to optimize the related cell operation parameters and continuously operate the system for more than three months without any capacity decay.

Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Xia, Guanguang; Wang, Wei; Yang, Zhenguo

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

305

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 2, Chapter C, Appendix C1--Chapter C, Appendix C3 (beginning), Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains appendices for the following: Rocky Flats Plant and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste process information; TRUPACT-II content codes (TRUCON); TRUPACT-II chemical list; chemical compatibility analysis for Rocky Flats Plant waste forms; chemical compatibility analysis for waste forms across all sites; TRU mixed waste characterization database; hazardous constituents of Rocky Flats Transuranic waste; summary of waste components in TRU waste sampling program at INEL; TRU waste sampling program; and waste analysis data.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Horizon Batteries formerly Electrosource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Batteries formerly Electrosource Batteries formerly Electrosource Jump to: navigation, search Name Horizon Batteries (formerly Electrosource) Place Texas Sector Vehicles Product Manufacturer of high-power, light-weight batteries for use in electric and hybrid-electric vehicles, engine-starting and telecommunication stand-by power applications. References Horizon Batteries (formerly Electrosource)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Horizon Batteries (formerly Electrosource) is a company located in Texas . References ↑ "Horizon Batteries (formerly Electrosource)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Horizon_Batteries_formerly_Electrosource&oldid=346600

307

Electrolyte Model Helps Researchers Develop Better Batteries...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Electrolyte Model Helps Researchers Develop Better Batteries, Wins R&D 100 Award Electrolyte Model Helps Researchers Develop Better Batteries, Wins R&D 100 Award October 15, 2014 -...

308

'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov PCCPxantheascover Imagine a cell phone battery that lasted a whole week on a single charge. A car battery that worked...

309

Vehicle Technologies Office: Exploratory Battery Materials Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lowering the cost and improving the performance of batteries for plug-in electric vehicles requires improving every part of the battery, from underlying chemistry to packaging. To reach the EV...

310

A User Programmable Battery Charging System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, high energy density and longer lasting batteries with efficient charging systems are being developed by companies and original equipment manufacturers. Whatever the application may be, rechargeable batteries, which deliver power to a load or system...

Amanor-Boadu, Judy M

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Battery Development, System...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

learn how batteries are used in plug-in electric vehicles, visit the Alternative Fuels Data Center's page on batteries. Through the USABC, VTO supports a variety of research,...

312

Molten Salt Batteries and Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter describes recent work on batteries and fuel cells using molten salt electrolytes. This entails a comparison with other batteries and fuel cells utilizing aqueous and organic electrolytes; for...(1,2)

D. A. J. Swinkels

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Khalil Amine on Lithium-air Batteries  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Khalil Amine, materials scientist at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

Khalil Amine

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

314

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. es001barnett2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications PHEV Battery Cost Assessment PHEV and LEESS Battery Cost Assessment PHEV...

315

Design and Simulation of Lithium Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A New Rechargeable Plastic Li-Ion Battery," Lithium Batteryion battery developed at Bellcore in Red Bank, NJ.1-6 The experimental prototYpe cell has the configuration: Li

Doyle, C.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Chemical pore closure of zeolite A using tetraethyl orthosilicate: A potential method for enhancing the use of zeolites as part of a long-term waste immobilization strategy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of zeolites as an integral part of long-term toxic waste storage strategies are hindered by the very ion-exchange properties which make them so useful in cleaning waste water of toxic contaminants. Previous literature shows that a range of surface modifications have been proposed for changing the catalytic properties of zeolites, this study examines one of these techniques, the control of pore opening size by coating the zeolite surface with silica using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), as a means of reducing ion-exchange. After initial removal of waste material from solution, pores are sealed using liquid TEOS at 80 C, and the ion exchange is remeasured in comparison to a sample of untreated zeolite. Sealing the surface with a silica deposit has yielded up to 95% reduction in waste leached from the zeolite without significant reduction in the overall crystallinity of the material. The stability of the coating against physical abrasion has also been studied and been shown to be resistant to simple attrition forces.

Christopher D. Johnson; Fred Worrall

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Final Report - Development of New Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) Technology to Recover High Valued Products from Chemical Plant and Refinery Waste Systems  

SciTech Connect

Project Objective was to extend pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology into previously under-exploited applications such as polyolefin production vent gas recovery and H2 recovery from refinery waste gases containing significant amounts of heavy hydrocarbons, aromatics, or H2S.

Keith Ludwig

2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

318

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cleanup » Waste Management Cleanup » Waste Management Waste Management November 12, 2013 U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal On Tuesday, November 12, 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will host a press call to discuss Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project (CEUSP) shipment and disposal plans in Nevada. September 24, 2013 Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment and Disposition Framework Completing the Office of River Protection (ORP) mission of stabilizing 56 million gallons of chemical and radioactive waste stored in Hanford's 177 tanks is one of the Energy Department's highest priorities. This Framework document outlines a phased approach for beginning tank waste treatment while continuing to resolve technical issues with the Pretreatment and

319

Waste Management Magazine Highlights Nevada National Security Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Magazine Highlights Nevada National Security Site Management Magazine Highlights Nevada National Security Site Waste Management Magazine Highlights Nevada National Security Site March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A worker at NNSS handles large, high-powered batteries called radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), which are discussed in the recent article on the NNSS in RadWaste Solutions magazine. Like most low-level waste, RTGs disposed of at the NNSS were handled without any special equipment or clothing because of the relatively low dose rate levels. A worker at NNSS handles large, high-powered batteries called radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), which are discussed in the recent article on the NNSS in RadWaste Solutions magazine. Like most low-level waste, RTGs disposed of at the NNSS were handled without any special equipment or

320

Ionic Liquid-Enhanced Solid State Electrolyte Interface (SEI) for Lithium Sulfur Batteries  

SciTech Connect

Li-S battery is a complicated system with many challenges existing before its final market penetration. While most of the reported work for Li-S batteries is focused on the cathode design, we demonstrate in this work that the anode consumption accelerated by corrosive polysulfide solution also critically determines the Li-S cell performance. To validate this hypothesis, ionic liquid (IL) N-methyl-N-butylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Py14TFSI) has been employed to modify the properties of SEI layer formed on Li metal surface in Li-S batteries. It is found that the IL-enhanced passivation film on the lithium anode surface exhibits much different morphology and chemical compositions, effectively protecting lithium metal from continuous attack by soluble polysulfides. Therefore, both cell impedance and the irreversible consumption of polysulfides on lithium metal are reduced. As a result, the Coulombic efficiency and the cycling stability of Li-S batteries have been greatly improved. After 120 cycles, Li-S battery cycled in the electrolyte containing IL demonstrates a high capacity retention of 94.3% at 0.1 C rate. These results unveil another important failure mechanism for Li-S batteries and shin the light on the new approaches to improve Li-S battery performances.

Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Chen, Honghao; Meduri, Praveen; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Novel Electrolytes for Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

We have been investigating three primary areas related to lithium ion battery electrolytes. First, we have been investigating the thermal stability of novel electrolytes for lithium ion batteries, in particular borate based salts. Second, we have been investigating novel additives to improve the calendar life of lithium ion batteries. Third, we have been investigating the thermal decomposition reactions of electrolytes for lithium-oxygen batteries.

Lucht, Brett L

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

322

Battery Thermal Management System Design Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Looks at the impact of cooling strategies with air and both direct and indirect liquid cooling for battery thermal management.

Pesaran, A.; Kim, G. H.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Process removes Sr from nuclear wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process removes Sr from nuclear wastes ... Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have devised a chemical process for extracting and recovering strontium-90 from liquid nuclear wastes. ... Argonne chemist E. Philip Horwitz, head of the team, says it could be a significant aid in managing such radioactive wastes. ...

WARD WORTHY

1990-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

324

Method for processing aqueous wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating waste water such as that from an industrial processing facility comprising the separation of the waste water into a dilute waste stream and a concentrated waste stream. The concentrated waste stream is treated chemically to enhance precipitation and then allowed to separate into a sludge and a supernate. The supernate is skimmed or filtered from the sludge and blended with the dilute waste stream to form a second dilute waste stream. The sludge remaining is mixed with cementitious material, rinsed to dissolve soluble components, then pressed to remove excess water and dissolved solids before being allowed to cure. The dilute waste stream is also chemically treated to decompose carbonate complexes and metal ions and then mixed with cationic polymer to cause the precipitated solids to flocculate. Filtration of the flocculant removes sufficient solids to allow the waste water to be discharged to the surface of a stream. The filtered material is added to the sludge of the concentrated waste stream. The method is also applicable to the treatment and removal of soluble uranium from aqueous streams, such that the treated stream may be used as a potable water supply.

Pickett, John B. (3922 Wood Valley Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Martin, Hollis L. (Rt. 1, Box 188KB, McCormick, SC 29835); Langton, Christine A. (455 Sumter St. SE., Aiken, SC 29801); Harley, Willie W. (110 Fairchild St., Batesburg, SC 29006)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Jeff Chamberlain on Lithium-air batteries  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Jeff Chamberlain, technology transfer expert at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries. More information at http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2009/batteries090915.html

Chamberlain, Jeff

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

326

Jeff Chamberlain on Lithium-air batteries  

SciTech Connect

Jeff Chamberlain, technology transfer expert at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries. More information at http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2009/batteries090915.html

Chamberlain, Jeff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Wearable Textile Battery Rechargeable by Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wearable Textile Battery Rechargeable by Solar Energy ... Furthermore, the wearable textile battery was integrated with flexible and lightweight solar cells on the battery pouch to enable convenient solar-charging capabilities. ... Other groups(17-20) have also developed flexible conductive substrates by engaging carbon nanomaterials, such as graphene paper, for demonstration of similar wearable energy storage devices. ...

Yong-Hee Lee; Joo-Seong Kim; Jonghyeon Noh; Inhwa Lee; Hyeong Jun Kim; Sunghun Choi; Jeongmin Seo; Seokwoo Jeon; Taek-Soo Kim; Jung-Yong Lee; Jang Wook Choi

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

328

Microbial battery for efficient energy recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...used for decades in batteries (19). This couple...condition in Ag 2 O/Ag batteries, the overpotential...or carbon nanotube/graphene-coated macroporous substrate, such...silver oxide-zinc batteries . Ind Eng Chem Prod Res Dev...23 Xie X ( 2012 ) Graphene-sponge as high-performance...

Xing Xie; Meng Ye; Po-Chun Hsu; Nian Liu; Craig S. Criddle; Yi Cui

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Electrothermal Analysis of Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the electrothermal analysis and testing of lithium ion battery performance. The objectives of this report are to: (1) develop an electrothermal process/model for predicting thermal performance of real battery cells and modules; and (2) use the electrothermal model to evaluate various designs to improve battery thermal performance.

Pesaran, A.; Vlahinos, A.; Bharathan, D.; Duong, T.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Solid-state lithium battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

Geek-Up[4.8.2011]: Batteries (With & Without) and Tools for Team Science |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4.8.2011]: Batteries (With & Without) and Tools for Team 4.8.2011]: Batteries (With & Without) and Tools for Team Science Geek-Up[4.8.2011]: Batteries (With & Without) and Tools for Team Science April 8, 2011 - 5:20pm Addthis The sensor part of the device is about 2 millimeters in size | Courtesy of LLNL The sensor part of the device is about 2 millimeters in size | Courtesy of LLNL Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of Shanghai for Science and Technology have collaborated to develop first-generation battery-less chemical detectors. Traditionally, these detectors rely on an external power source. Through this alternative, the detector utilizes a nanosensor that relies on semiconductor nanowires.

332

Experiences with treatment of mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

During its many years of research activities involving toxic chemicals and radioactive materials, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has generated considerable amounts of waste. Much of this waste includes chemically hazardous components and radioisotopes. Los Alamos chose to use an electrochemical process for the treatment of many mixed waste components. The electro-chemical process, which the authors are developing, can treat a great variety of waste using one type of equipment built at a moderate expense. Such a process can extract heavy metals, destroy cyanides, dissolve contamination from surfaces, oxidize toxic organic compounds, separate salts into acids and bases, and reduce the nitrates. All this can be accomplished using the equipment and one crew of trained operating personnel. Results of a treatability study of chosen mixed wastes from Los Alamos Mixed Waste Inventory are presented. Using electrochemical methods cyanide and heavy metals bearing wastes were treated to below disposal limits.

Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.; Smith, W.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nuttall, E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Dept.

1996-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

333

David Robertson Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Robertson Robertson Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division 9700 South Cass Avenue, Building 205 Argonne, IL 60439-4837 Phone: 630/252-7906; fax: 630/972-4468 e-mail: robertsond@anl.gov Professional Experience * May 2010-present: Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL: Engineering Specialist, Electrochemical Analysis and Diagnostics Laboratory, Testing of advanced battery technologies, DOE contract deliverables, benchmarking of foreign battery technologies * July 2007-May 2010: LGCPI, Troy, MI: Electrical Engineering Manager, Lead the development, validation and integration of Battery Management and Control systems, electrical interfaces, wiring systems and sensing interfaces of large format lithium ion batteries for automotive and other applications.

334

Wastes and by-products - alternatives for agricultural use  

SciTech Connect

Top address a growing national problem with generation of wastes and by-products, TVA has been involved for several years with developing and commercializing environmentally responsible practices for eliminating, minimizing, or utilizing various wastes/by-products. In many cases, reducing waste generation is impractical, but the wastes/by-products can be converted into other environmentally sound products. In some instances, conversion of safe, value-added agricultural products in the best or only practical alternative. TVA is currently involved with a diversity of projects converting wastes/by-products into safe, economical, and agriculturally beneficial products. Environmental improvement projects have involved poultry litter, cellulosic wastes, used battery acid, ammonium sulfate fines, lead smelting effluents, deep-welled sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate solutions, wood ash, waste magnesium ammonium sulfate slurry from recording tape production, and ammunition plant waste sodium nitrate/ammonium nitrate streams.

Boles, J.L.; Craft, D.J.; Parker, B.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Laboratory study on the behaviour of spent AA household alkaline batteries in incineration  

SciTech Connect

The quantitative evaluation of emissions from incineration is essential when Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies consider this process as an end-of-life solution for some wastes. Thus, the objective of this work is to quantify the main gaseous emissions produced when spent AA alkaline batteries are incinerated. With this aim, batteries were kept for 1 h at 1273 K in a refractory steel tube hold in a horizontal electric furnace with temperature control. At one end of the refractory steel tube, a constant air flow input assures the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere and guides the gaseous emissions to a filter system followed by a set of two bubbler flasks having an aqueous solution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. After each set of experiments, sulphur, chlorides and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn) were analyzed in both the solutions obtained from the steel tube washing and from the bubblers. Sulphur, chlorides and metals were quantified, respectively, using barium sulfate gravimetry, the Volhard method and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The emissions of zinc, the most emitted metal, represent about 6.5% of the zinc content in the batteries. Emissions of manganese (whose oxide is the main component of the cathode) and iron (from the cathode collector) are negligible when compared with their amount in AA alkaline batteries. Mercury is the metal with higher volatility in the composition of the batteries and was collected even in the second bubbler flask. The amount of chlorides collected corresponds to about 36% of the chlorine in the battery sleeve that is made from PVC. A considerable part of the HCl formed in PVC plastic sleeve incineration is neutralized with KOH, zinc and manganese oxides and, thus, it is not totally released in the gas. Some of the emissions are predictable through a thermodynamic data analysis at temperatures in the range of 1200-1300 K taking into account the composition of the batteries. This analysis was done for most of potential reactions between components in the batteries as well as between them and the surrounding atmosphere and it reasonably agrees the experimental results. The results obtained show the role of alkaline batteries at the acid gases cleaning process, through the neutralization reactions of some of their components. Therefore, LCA of spent AA alkaline batteries at the municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration process must consider this contribution.

Almeida, Manuel F. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: mfa@fe.up.pt; Xara, Susana M.; Delgado, Julanda; Costa, Carlos A. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was the largest of three defense production sites in the U.S. Over the span of 40 years, it was used to produce 64 metric tons of plutonium, helping end World War II and playing a major role in military defense efforts during the Cold War. As a result, 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes are now stored in 177 underground tanks on the Hanford Site. To address this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the "Vit Plant," will use vitrification to immobilize most of Hanford's dangerous tank waste.

337

Waste Minimization: A Hidden Energy Savings?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE MINIMIZATION: A HIDDEN ENERGY SAVINGS? R. 1. GOOD Principal Engineer, Environmental Protection and Energy Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Company, Inc. Seadrift, Texas ABSTRACT Several changes in the last few years have forced a re...-examination of waste generation within the petro chemical industry. In today's political/regulatory arena, industrial waste, both hazardous and non hazardous, has become an extreme potential liability in handling, storing, and disposal. Traditional methods...

Good, R. L.; Hunt, K. E.

338

Advanced batteries for electric vehicle applications  

SciTech Connect

A technology assessment is given for electric batteries with potential for use in electric powered vehicles. Parameters considered include: specific energy, specific power, energy density, power density, cycle life, service life, recharge time, and selling price. Near term batteries include: nickel/cadmium and lead-acid batteries. Mid term batteries include: sodium/sulfur, sodium/nickel chloride, nickel/metal hydride, zinc/air, zinc/bromine, and nickel/iron systems. Long term batteries include: lithium/iron disulfide and lithium- polymer systems. Performance and life testing data for these systems are discussed. (GHH)

Henriksen, G.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Control technology assessment of hazardous-waste-disposal operations in chemicals manufacturing: in-depth survey report of San Juan Cement Company, Dorado, Puerto Rico, November 1981  

SciTech Connect

A visit was made to the San Juan Cement Company, Dorado, Puerto Rico to evaluate control methods for a storage and delivery system for hazardous wastes used in a demonstration project as a supplemental fuel for cofiring a cement kiln. Analysis of the material during the visit revealed the presence of methylene chloride, carbon-tetrachloride, chloroform, acetone, hexane, ethanol, and ethyl acetate. Steel storage tanks were placed on an impermeable concrete slab surrounded by a sealed retaining wall. Steel piping with all welded joints carried the waste fuels from storage tanks to the kiln, where fuels were injected through a specially fabricated burner. Vapor emissions were suppressed by venting the displaced vapor through a recycle line. Exhaust gases from the kiln passed through a bag house type dust collector, and were vented to the atmosphere through a single stack. Half-mask air-purifying respirators were used when in the hazardous-waste storage/delivery area. Neoprene gloves were used when performing tasks with potential skin contact. Hard hats, safety glasses, and safety boots were all worn. The author concludes that the control methods used seemed effective in suppressing vapor emissions.

Crandall, M.S.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...06520, USA. Nuclear power is re-emerging...proclaiming a nuclear renaissance...example, plant safety...liabilities, terrorism at plants and in transport...high-level nuclear wastes (HLW...factor in risk perceptions...supporting nuclear power in the abstract...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

342

Cathode material for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

343

EPA aide wary about burning waste at sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

EPA aide wary about burning waste at sea ... An Environmental Protection Agency official has cautioned that a proposal by Chemical Waste Management (CWM) to perform a research burn of chemical wastes at sea should be permitted only if stringent conditions are met. ... During 19 days of burns, EPA would conduct research to determine the incinerator emissions' composition, transport, and effect on marine life. ...

1986-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

344

The Science of Battery Degradation.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents work that was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development project, Science of Battery Degradation. The focus of this work was on the creation of new experimental and theoretical approaches to understand atomistic mechanisms of degradation in battery electrodes that result in loss of electrical energy storage capacity. Several unique approaches were developed during the course of the project, including the invention of a technique based on ultramicrotoming to cross-section commercial scale battery electrodes, the demonstration of scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to probe lithium transport mechanisms within Li-ion battery electrodes, the creation of in-situ liquid cells to observe electrochemical reactions in real-time using both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and STXM, the creation of an in-situ optical cell utilizing Raman spectroscopy and the application of the cell for analyzing redox flow batteries, the invention of an approach for performing ab initio simulation of electrochemical reactions under potential control and its application for the study of electrolyte degradation, and the development of an electrochemical entropy technique combined with x-ray based structural measurements for understanding origins of battery degradation. These approaches led to a number of scientific discoveries. Using STXM we learned that lithium iron phosphate battery cathodes display unexpected behavior during lithiation wherein lithium transport is controlled by nucleation of a lithiated phase, leading to high heterogeneity in lithium content at each particle and a surprising invariance of local current density with the overall electrode charging current. We discovered using in-situ transmission electron microscopy that there is a size limit to lithiation of silicon anode particles above which particle fracture controls electrode degradation. From electrochemical entropy measurements, we discovered that entropy changes little with degradation but the origin of degradation in cathodes is kinetic in nature, i.e. lower rate cycling recovers lost capacity. Finally, our modeling of electrode-electrolyte interfaces revealed that electrolyte degradation may occur by either a single or double electron transfer process depending on thickness of the solid-electrolyte- interphase layer, and this cross-over can be modeled and predicted.

Sullivan, John P; Fenton, Kyle R [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; El Gabaly Marquez, Farid; Harris, Charles Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Hayden, Carl C.; Hudak, Nicholas [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Kliewer, Christopher Jesse; Leung, Kevin [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Sugar, Joshua Daniel; Talin, Albert Alec; Tenney, Craig M [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Zavadil, Kevin R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Promising Magnesium Battery Research Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS Print Wednesday, 23 January 2013 16:59 toyota battery a) Cross-section of the in situ electrochemical/XAS cell with annotations. b) Drawing and c) photograph of the assembled cell. Alternatives to the current lithium-ion-based car batteries are at the forefront of the automotive industry's research agenda-manufacturers want to build cars with longer battery life, and to do that they're going to have to find new solutions. One promising battery material is magnesium (Mg)-it is more dense than lithium, it is safer, and the magnesium ion carries a two-electron charge, giving it potential as a more efficient energy source. Magnesium has a high volumetric capacity, which could mean

346

SECONDARY BATTERIES LITHIUM RECHARGEABLE SYSTEMS | Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rechargeable lithium batteries have conquered the markets for portable consumer electronics and, recently, for electric vehicles. Lithium, the lightest and one of the most reactive of metals, having the greatest electrochemical potential (E=3.045V), provides very high energy and power densities in batteries. As lithium metal reacts violently with water and can ignite into flame, modern lithium-ion batteries use carbon negative electrode and lithium metal oxide positive electrode. The electrolyte is usually based on a lithium salt in organic solution. Thin-film batteries use solid oxide or polymer electrolytes. Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (containing an intercalation negative electrode) should not be confused with nonrechargeable lithium primary batteries (containing metallic lithium). This article outlines energy storage in lithium batteries, basic cell chemistry, positive electrode materials, negative electrode materials, electrolytes, and state-of-charge (SoC) monitoring.

P. Kurzweil; K. Brandt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Molten Air -- A new, highest energy class of rechargeable batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study introduces the principles of a new class of batteries, rechargeable molten air batteries, and several battery chemistry examples are demonstrated. The new battery class uses a molten electrolyte, are quasi reversible, and have amongst the highest intrinsic battery electric energy storage capacities. Three examples of the new batteries are demonstrated. These are the iron, carbon and VB2 molten air batteries with respective intrinsic volumetric energy capacities of 10,000, 19,000 and 27,000 Wh per liter.

Licht, Stuart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Lithium-Air Battery: High Performance Cathodes for Lithium-Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect

BEEST Project: Researchers at Missouri S&T are developing an affordable lithium-air (Li-Air) battery that could enable an EV to travel up to 350 miles on a single charge. Todays EVs run on Li-Ion batteries, which are expensive and suffer from low energy density compared with gasoline. This new Li-Air battery could perform as well as gasoline and store 3 times more energy than current Li-Ion batteries. A Li-Air battery uses an air cathode to breathe oxygen into the battery from the surrounding air, like a human lung. The oxygen and lithium react in the battery to produce electricity. Current Li-Air batteries are limited by the rate at which they can draw oxygen from the air. The team is designing a battery using hierarchical electrode structures to enhance air breathing and effective catalysts to accelerate electricity production.

None

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe.sup.3+ provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided.

Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of chemical use), waste reduction, and energy savings by theA Changing Climate for Energy from Waste? Final Report forHowever, new waste-to-energy plants and composting have

Borglin, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Evaluation of Wet Chemical ICP-AES Elemental Analysis Methods usingSimulated Hanford Waste Samples-Phase I Interim Report  

SciTech Connect

The wet chemistry digestion method development for providing process control elemental analyses of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Melter Feed Preparation Vessel (MFPV) samples is divided into two phases: Phase I consists of: (1) optimizing digestion methods as a precursor to elemental analyses by ICP-AES techniques; (2) selecting methods with the desired analytical reliability and speed to support the nine-hour or less turnaround time requirement of the WTP; and (3) providing baseline comparison to the laser ablation (LA) sample introduction technique for ICP-AES elemental analyses that is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Phase II consists of: (1) Time-and-Motion study of the selected methods from Phase I with actual Hanford waste or waste simulants in shielded cell facilities to ensure that the methods can be performed remotely and maintain the desired characteristics; and (2) digestion of glass samples prepared from actual Hanford Waste tank sludge for providing comparative results to the LA Phase II study. Based on the Phase I testing discussed in this report, a tandem digestion approach consisting of sodium peroxide fusion digestions carried out in nickel crucibles and warm mixed-acid digestions carried out in plastic bottles has been selected for Time-and-Motion study in Phase II. SRNL experience with performing this analytical approach in laboratory hoods indicates that well-trained cell operator teams will be able to perform the tandem digestions in five hours or less. The selected approach will produce two sets of solutions for analysis by ICP-AES techniques. Four hours would then be allocated for performing the ICP-AES analyses and reporting results to meet the nine-hour or less turnaround time requirement. The tandem digestion approach will need to be performed in two separate shielded analytical cells by two separate cell operator teams in order to achieve the nine-hour or less turnaround time. Because of the simplicity of the warm mixed-acid method, a well-trained cell operator team may in time be able to perform both sets of digestions. However, having separate shielded cells for each of the methods is prudent to avoid overcrowding problems that would impede a minimal turnaround time.

Coleman, Charles J.; Edwards, Thomas B.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

352

Chemical Cleaning Program Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chemical Cleaning Chemical Cleaning Program Review Neil Davis Deputy Program Manager Waste Removal & Tank Closure July 29, 2009 SRR-STI-2009-00464 2 Contents Regulatory drivers Process overview Preliminary results Lessons learned Path forward 3 Regulatory Drivers The Federal Facilities Agreement establishes milestones for the removal of bulk waste and closure of each non-compliant tank Per the Dispute Resolution: - "DOE shall complete operational closure of Tanks 19 and 18 by 12/31/2012" - "DOE shall complete operational closure of 4 tanks by 9/30/2015" SRR intention to close 4 tanks by 9/30/2010, or as soon as possible Tanks 5 & 6 will be 2 of the 4 tanks 4 Tank Closure Process Bulk Waste Removal Mechanical Heel Removal Chemical Cleaning Annulus

353

Army urged to resume burning chemical arms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Army urged to resume burning chemical arms ... Under baseline, the weapon is disassembled into four componentsthe chemical agent, energetic materials, metal parts, and dunnage (waste)with each incinerated separately. ...

1994-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

354

Batteries - Next-generation Li-ion batteries Breakout session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-generation Li-ion batteries Next-generation Li-ion batteries EV Everywhere Workshop July 26, 2012 Breakout Session #1 - Discussion of Performance Targets and Barriers Comments on the Achievability of the Targets * Overall, everything is achievable, but, clearly, the cost targets are dramatic, particularly for AEV 300. (I have discussed this with Yet-Ming Chiang, who has a good feel for cost reductions, both their importance and interesting approaches.) * AEV 100 achievable with a good silicon/graphite composite anode and LMRNMC (unsure timeline) * AEV 300 would require cycleable Li-metal anode and UHVHC cathode (can't get there with Li-ion intercalation on both electrodes) (unsure timeline) Barriers Interfering with Reaching the Targets * Pack - too high a fraction of inactive materials/inefficient engineering designs.

355

Waste reduction assistance program (WRAP) on-site consultation audit report: Seafood processing plant  

SciTech Connect

The waste audit study was conducted at a seafood processing plant in Alaska. The report discusses process descriptions, waste types and quantities, current waste and materials management practices, and waste reduction alternatives. The company's current practices include use of fish waste, burning of used oil and solvents, and water conservation. Additional opportunities include microfiltration of solvents and oils, recycling of used batteries, inventory control and formation of a waste reduction team. Appendices include a summary of state regulations, a fact sheet on used oil, and a list of vendors and services.

Not Available

1989-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

356

Accident analysis of railway transportation of low-level radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes: Application of the /open quotes/Maximum Credible Accident/close quotes/ concept  

SciTech Connect

The maximum credible accident (MCA) approach to accident analysis places an upper bound on the potential adverse effects of a proposed action by using conservative but simplifying assumptions. It is often used when data are lacking to support a more realistic scenario or when MCA calculations result in acceptable consequences. The MCA approach can also be combined with realistic scenarios to assess potential adverse effects. This report presents a guide for the preparation of transportation accident analyses based on the use of the MCA concept. Rail transportation of contaminated wastes is used as an example. The example is the analysis of the environmental impact of the potential derailment of a train transporting a large shipment of wastes. The shipment is assumed to be contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls and low-level radioactivities of uranium and technetium. The train is assumed to plunge into a river used as a source of drinking water. The conclusions from the example accident analysis are based on the calculation of the number of foreseeable premature cancer deaths the might result as a consequence of this accident. These calculations are presented, and the reference material forming the basis for all assumptions and calculations is also provided.

Ricci, E.; McLean, R.B.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Use of Fe2O3-Containing Industrial Wastes As the Oxygen Carrier for Chemical-Looping Combustion of Coal: Effects of Pressure and Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research (2006), 45 (17), 6075-6080 CODEN: IECRED; ISSN:0888-5885. ... Chemical-Looping Combustion with NiO and Fe2O3 in a Thermobalance and Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor with Double Loops ... Shen, L. H.; Wu, J. H.; Gao, Z. P.; Xiao, J. Combust. ...

Shuai Zhang; Chiranjib Saha; Yichao Yang; Sankar Bhattacharya; Rui Xiao

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

358

State-of-the-Art of Recycling E-Wastes by Vacuum Metallurgy Separation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SepraDyne Corporation (Denton, TX) developed a high vacuum rotary retort for reclaiming Hg from batteries and the air pollution control scrubber waste. ... The surface soil at the e-waste recycling workshop was polluted with Cu, Zn, and Pb, which were distributed discretely in surface soil. ... This clean and non-polluting technol. ...

Lu Zhan; Zhenming Xu

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Multimedia Study of Hazardous Waste Landfill Gas Migration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hazardous waste landfills pose uniquely challenging environmental problems which arise as a result of the chemical complexity of waste sites, their involvement of many environmental media, and their very size ...

Robert D. Stephens; Nancy B. Ball; Danny M. Mar

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Handbook of industrial and hazardous wastes treatment. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect

This expanded Second Edition offers 32 chapters of industry- and waste-specific analyses and treatment methods for industrial and hazardous waste materials - from explosive wastes to landfill leachate to wastes produced by the pharmaceutical and food industries. Key additional chapters cover means of monitoring waste on site, pollution prevention, and site remediation. Including a timely evaluation of the role of biotechnology in contemporary industrial waste management, the Handbook reveals sound approaches and sophisticated technologies for treating: textile, rubber, and timber wastes; dairy, meat, and seafood industry wastes; bakery and soft drink wastes; palm and olive oil wastes; pesticide and livestock wastes; pulp and paper wastes; phosphate wastes; detergent wastes; photographic wastes; refinery and metal plating wastes; and power industry wastes. This final chapter, entitled 'Treatment of power industry wastes' by Lawrence K. Wang, analyses the stream electric power generation industry, where combustion of fossil fuels coal, oil, gas, supplies heat to produce stream, used then to generate mechanical energy in turbines, subsequently converted to electricity. Wastes include waste waters from cooling water systems, ash handling systems, wet-scrubber air pollution control systems, and boiler blowdown. Wastewaters are characterized and waste treatment by physical and chemical systems to remove pollutants is presented. Plant-specific examples are provided.

Lawrence Wang; Yung-Tse Hung; Howard Lo; Constantine Yapijakis (eds.)

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Waste gas combustion in a Hanford radioactive waste tank  

SciTech Connect

It has been observed that a high-level radioactive waste tank generates quantities of hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen that are potentially well within flammability limits. These gases are produced from chemical and nuclear decay reactions in a slurry of radioactive waste materials. Significant amounts of combustible and reactant gases accumulate in the waste over a 110- to 120-d period. The slurry becomes Taylor unstable owing to the buoyancy of the gases trapped in a matrix of sodium nitrate and nitrite salts. As the contents of the tank roll over, the generated waste gases rupture through the waste material surface, allowing the gases to be transported and mixed with air in the cover-gas space in the dome of the tank. An ignition source is postulated in the dome space where the waste gases combust in the presence of air resulting in pressure and temperature loadings on the double-walled waste tank. This analysis is conducted with hydrogen mixing studies HMS, a three-dimensional, time-dependent fluid dynamics code coupled with finite-rate chemical kinetics. The waste tank has a ventilation system designed to maintain a slight negative gage pressure during normal operation. We modeled the ventilation system with the transient reactor analysis code (TRAC), and we coupled these two best-estimate accident analysis computer codes to model the ventilation system response to pressures and temperatures generated by the hydrogen and ammonia combustion.

Travis, J.R.; Fujita, R.K.; Spore, J.W.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Battery Ventures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ventures (Boston) Ventures (Boston) Name Battery Ventures (Boston) Address 930 Winter Street, Suite 2500 Place Waltham, Massachusetts Zip 02451 Region Greater Boston Area Product Venture Capital Year founded 1983 Phone number (781) 478-6600 Website http://www.battery.com/ Coordinates 42.4024072°, -71.274181° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4024072,"lon":-71.274181,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

363

VEHICLE DETAILS AND BATTERY SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RR0DF106791 RR0DF106791 Hybrid Propulsion System: Mild Parallel Belt-Alternator Starter (BAS) Number of Electric Machines: 1 Motor: 15 kW (peak), AC induction Battery Specifications Manufacturer: Hitachi Type: Cylindrical Lithium-ion Number of Cells: 32 Nominal Cell Voltage: 3.6 V Nominal System Voltage: 115.2 V Rated Pack Capacity: 4.4 Ah Maximum Cell Charge Voltage 2 : 4.10 V Minimum Cell Discharge Voltage 2 : 3.00 V Thermal Management: Active - Forced air Pack Weight: 65 lb BEGINNING-OF-TEST: BATTERY LABORATORY TEST RESULTS SUMMARY Vehicle Mileage and Testing Date Vehicle Odometer: 5,715 mi Date of Test: January 8, 2013 Static Capacity Test Measured Average Capacity: 3.98 Ah Measured Average Energy Capacity: 460 Wh HPPC Test Pulse Discharge Power @ 50% DOD

364

VEHICLE DETAILS AND BATTERY SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RRXDF106605 RRXDF106605 Hybrid Propulsion System: Mild Parallel Belt-Alternator Starter (BAS) Number of Electric Machines: 1 Motor: 15 kW (peak), AC induction Battery Specifications Manufacturer: Hitachi Type: Cylindrical Lithium-ion Number of Cells: 32 Nominal Cell Voltage: 3.6 V Nominal System Voltage: 115.2 V Rated Pack Capacity: 4.4 Ah Maximum Cell Charge Voltage 2 : 4.10 V Minimum Cell Discharge Voltage 2 : 3.00 V Thermal Management: Active - Forced air Pack Weight: 65 lb BEGINNING-OF-TEST: BATTERY LABORATORY TEST RESULTS SUMMARY Vehicle Mileage and Testing Date Vehicle Odometer: 4,244 mi Date of Test: January 9, 2013 Static Capacity Test Measured Average Capacity: 3.88 Ah Measured Average Energy Capacity: 450 Wh HPPC Test Pulse Discharge Power @ 50% DOD

365

Cascade redox flow battery systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reduction/oxidation ("redox") flow battery system includes a series of electrochemical cells arranged in a cascade, whereby liquid electrolyte reacts in a first electrochemical cell (or group of cells) before being directed into a second cell (or group of cells) where it reacts before being directed to subsequent cells. The cascade includes 2 to n stages, each stage having one or more electrochemical cells. During a charge reaction, electrolyte entering a first stage will have a lower state-of-charge than electrolyte entering the nth stage. In some embodiments, cell components and/or characteristics may be configured based on a state-of-charge of electrolytes expected at each cascade stage. Such engineered cascades provide redox flow battery systems with higher energy efficiency over a broader range of current density than prior art arrangements.

Horne, Craig R.; Kinoshita, Kim; Hickey, Darren B.; Sha, Jay E.; Bose, Deepak

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

366

Electrolytes for lithium ion batteries  

SciTech Connect

A family of electrolytes for use in a lithium ion battery. The genus of electrolytes includes ketone-based solvents, such as, 2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanone; 3,3-dimethyl 2-butanone(pinacolone) and 2-butanone. These solvents can be used in combination with non-Lewis Acid salts, such as Li.sub.2[B.sub.12F.sub.12] and LiBOB.

Vaughey, John; Jansen, Andrew N.; Dees, Dennis W.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

367

Battery system with temperature sensors  

SciTech Connect

A battery system includes a platform having an aperture formed therethrough, a flexible member having a generally planar configuration and extending across the aperture, wherein a portion of the flexible member is coextensive with the aperture, a cell provided adjacent the platform, and a sensor coupled to the flexible member and positioned proximate the cell. The sensor is configured to detect a temperature of the cell.

Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

368

EERE Partner Testimonials- Phil Roberts, California Lithium Battery (CalBattery)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Phil Roberts, CEO and Founder of California Lithium Battery (CalBattery), describes the new growth and development that was possible through partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy.

369

Rechargeable Batteries, Photochromics, Electrochemical Lithography: From  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rechargeable Batteries, Photochromics, Electrochemical Lithography: From Rechargeable Batteries, Photochromics, Electrochemical Lithography: From Interfacial Studies to Practical Applications Speaker(s): Robert Kostecki Date: January 11, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Satkartar K. Kinney The constantly growing power requirements of portable electronic devices and the need for high-power batteries for electric vehicles have created a strong demand for new batteries or substantial improvements of existing ones. Fundamental problems associated with complex interfacial processes in batteries must be resolved to enhance battery performance and lifetime. An overview of the principles of electrode-electrolyte interfacial studies, experimental methods, recent results, and potential applications will be presented. Advanced instrumental techniques and

370

California Lithium Battery, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California California Lithium Battery, Inc. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 626 likes California Lithium Battery, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory California Lithium Battery ("CALBattery") is a start-up California company established in 2011 to develop and manufacture a breakthrough high energy density and long cycle life lithium battery for utility energy storage, transportation, and defense industries. The company is a joint venture between California-based Ionex Energy Storage Systems and CALiB Power. US production of this advanced Very Large Format (400Ah+) si-graphene LI-ion battery is scheduled to start in California in 2014. Plans are to produce the initial batteries for CALBattery JV partner Ionex Energy Storage Systems for use in 1-100MW grid scale energy storage

371

California Lithium Battery, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California California Lithium Battery, Inc. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 626 likes California Lithium Battery, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory California Lithium Battery ("CALBattery") is a start-up California company established in 2011 to develop and manufacture a breakthrough high energy density and long cycle life lithium battery for utility energy storage, transportation, and defense industries. The company is a joint venture between California-based Ionex Energy Storage Systems and CALiB Power. US production of this advanced Very Large Format (400Ah+) si-graphene LI-ion battery is scheduled to start in California in 2014. Plans are to produce the initial batteries for CALBattery JV partner Ionex Energy Storage Systems for use in 1-100MW grid scale energy storage

372

California Lithium Battery, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California California Lithium Battery, Inc. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 626 likes California Lithium Battery, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory California Lithium Battery ("CALBattery") is a start-up California company established in 2011 to develop and manufacture a breakthrough high energy density and long cycle life lithium battery for utility energy storage, transportation, and defense industries. The company is a joint venture between California-based Ionex Energy Storage Systems and CALiB Power. US production of this advanced Very Large Format (400Ah+) si-graphene LI-ion battery is scheduled to start in California in 2014. Plans are to produce the initial batteries for CALBattery JV partner Ionex Energy Storage Systems for use in 1-100MW grid scale energy storage

373

Primer on lead-acid storage batteries  

SciTech Connect

This handbook was developed to help DOE facility contractors prevent accidents caused during operation and maintenance of lead-acid storage batteries. Major types of lead-acid storage batteries are discussed as well as their operation, application, selection, maintenance, and disposal (storage, transportation, as well). Safety hazards and precautions are discussed in the section on battery maintenance. References to industry standards are included for selection, maintenance, and disposal.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

NO. REV. NO. LSPE THERMAL BATTERY TEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NO. REV. NO. ATM 1086 LSPE THERMAL BATTERY TEST PAGE 1 OF DATE 2/25/72 Prepared by @c!_.e,~.~ ~P. Weir Approved by ~~---:J L. Lewis 5 #12;KC::Y, NO. LSPE THERMAL BATTERY TEST ATM 1086 2 PAGE OF DATE 2-52-72 Introduction The purpose of this ATM is to document the results of a Thermal Battery test for the Lunar Seismic

Rathbun, Julie A.

375

A Full-scale Study on the Partitioning of Trace Elements in Municipal Solid Waste IncinerationEffects of Firing Different Waste Types  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The changes in waste composition were applied by adding (one-by-one): dedicated waste fractions, comprising road salt (NaCl), household batteries, automotive shredder waste, CCA (copper?chromate?arsenate)-impregnated wood, PVC, and, shoes, to a base-load waste. ... What is left after removing recyclables from vehicles is shredded. ... Automotive shredder waste (residues) is then the light shredder fraction from the airflow separator that separates it from the heavier metallic fraction, which is fully recyclable as a secondary raw material. ...

Anne J. Pedersen; Flemming J. Frandsen; Christian Riber; Thomas Astrup; Sren N. Thomsen; Kasper Lundtorp; Leif F. Mortensen

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

376

Epitaxial Single Crystal Nanostructures for Batteries & PVs ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrode Channel Flow DEMS Cell Sulfur@Carbon Cathodes for Lithium Sulfur Batteries Better Ham & Cheese: Enhanced Anodes and Cathodes for Fuel Cells Epitaxial Single...

377

Block copolymer electrolytes for lithium batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

connecting to the solid-state lithium battery. c. An opticalbattery (discounting packaging, tabs, etc. ) demonstrate the advantage of the solid-state

Hudson, William Rodgers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

systems performance studies - HIL components testing Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

379

NREL: Energy Storage - Battery Materials Synthesis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

power requirements and system integration demands of EDVs pose significant challenges to energy storage technologies. Making these materials durable enough that batteries last...

380

Autogenic Pressure Reactions for Battery Materials Manufacture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Materials Manufacture Technology available for licensing: A unique method for anode and cathode manufacture A one-step, solvent-free reaction for producing unique...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ambient Operation of Li/Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect

In this work, Li/air batteries based on nonaqueous electrolytes were investigated in ambient conditions (with an oxygen partial pressure of 0.21 atm and relative humidity of ~20%). A heat-sealable polymer membrane was used as both an oxygen-diffusion membrane and as a moisture barrier for Li/air batteries. The membrane also can minimize the evaporation of the electrolyte from the batteries. Li/air batteries with this membrane can operate in ambient conditions for more than one month with a specific energy of 362 Wh kg-1, based on the total weight of the battery including its packaging. Among various carbon sources used in this work, Li/air batteries using Ketjenblack (KB) carbon-based air electrodes exhibited the highest specific energy. However, KB-based air electrodes expanded significantly and absorbed much more electrolyte than electrodes made from other carbon sources. The weight distribution of a typical Li/air battery using the KB-based air electrode was dominated by the electrolyte (~70%). Lithium-metal anodes and KB-carbon anodes account for only 5.12% and 5.78% of the battery weight, respectively. We also found that only ~ 20% of the mesopore volume of the air electrode was occupied by reaction products after discharge. To further improve the specific energy of the Li/air batteries, the microstructure of the carbon electrode needs to be further improved to absorb much less electrolyte while still holding significant amounts of reaction products

Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Deyu; Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Williford, Ralph E.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Side Reactions in Lithium-Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efforts to develop new high-energy materials such as siliconNew Cathode Material for Batteries of High- Energy Density.

Tang, Maureen Han-Mei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

High Voltage Electrolyte for Lithium Batteries  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

battery using high voltage high energy cathode materials to enable large-scale, cost competitive production of the next generation of electric-drive vehicles. To...

384

Celgard and Entek - Battery Separator Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Celgard and Entek Battery Separator Development Harshad Tataria R. Pekala, Ron Smith USABC May 19, 2009 Project ID es08tataria This presentation does not contain any...

385

USABC Battery Separator Development | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation es007smith2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications USABC Battery Separator Development Overview...

386

Kayo Battery Industries Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicles Product: Shenzhen-based company, started by Hong Kong Highpower Technology and Japan Kayo Group, active in producing Lithium and NiMH batteries for various applications...

387

Benefits of battery-uItracapacitor hybrid energy storage systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the benefits of battery and battery-ultracapacitor hybrid energy storage systems (ESSs) in pulsed-load applications. It investigates and quantifies the benefits of the hybrid ESS over its battery-only ...

Smith, Ian C., S.M. (Ian Charles). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Are Batteries Ready for Plug-in Hybrid Buyers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

237253. Burke, A. , 2007. Batteries and ultracapacitors forresults with lithium-ion batteries. In: Proceedings (CD)locate/tranpol Are batteries ready for plug-in hybrid

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Batteries as they are meant to be seen | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batteries as they are meant to be seen Batteries as they are meant to be seen The search for long-lasting, inexpensive rechargeable batteries Researchers have developed a way to...

390

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Battery Development, System Analysis, and Testing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

To develop better lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries for plug-in electric vehicles, researchers must integrate the advances made in exploratory battery materials and applied battery research into full...

391

Challenges and Prospects of LithiumSulfur Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

His research interests are in the area of materials for rechargeable batteries, fuel cells, and solar cells, including novel synthesis approaches for nanomaterials. ... Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries have the highest energy density among the rechargeable battery chemistries. ...

Arumugam Manthiram; Yongzhu Fu; Yu-Sheng Su

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE LITHIUM-ALUMINUM, IRON SULFIDE BATTERY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operation and thermal management of battery modules may alsoneed for careful thermal ment of battery modules. manage~ Atfor precise thermal management of LiAl/FeS battery modules.

Pollard, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Thermal behavior simulation of Ni/MH battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal behavior of overcharged Ni/MH battery is studied with microcalorimeter. The battery is installed in a special device in ... Quantity of heat and heat capacity of the battery charged at different state of ...

DaHe Li; Kai Yang; Shi Chen; Feng Wu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Improved Positive Electrode Materials for Li-ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the assembled Li-ion battery, such as the operating1-4: Schematic of a Li-ion battery. Li + ions are shuttledprocessing of active Li-ion battery materials. Various

Conry, Thomas Edward

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Investigation of chemical looping combustion by solid fuels. 2. redox reaction kinetics and product characterization with coal, biomass, and solid waste as solid fuels and CuO as an oxygen carrier  

SciTech Connect

This paper is the second in a series of two on the investigation of the chemical looping combustion (CLC) of solid fuels. The first paper put forward the concept of the CLC of solid fuels using a circulating fluidized bed as a reactor and Cu-CuO as the oxygen carrier, which was based on an analysis of oxygen transfer capability, reaction enthalpy, and chemical equilibrium. In this second paper, we report the results of the evaluation of the reduction of CuO reduced by solid fuels such as coal and some other 'opportunity' solid fuels. Tests on the reduction of CuO by the selected solid fuels were conducted using simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, which simulates a microreactor. An attached mass spectrometer (MS) was used for the characterization of evolved gaseous products. The X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used for the characterization of the solid residues. Results strongly supported the feasibility of CuO reduction by selected solid fuels. CuO can be fully converted into Cu in a reduction process, either in a direct path by solid fuels, which was verified by MS analysis under a N{sub 2} atmosphere, or in an indirect path by pyrolysis and gasification products of solid fuels in the reducer. No Cu{sub 2}O exists in reducing atmospheres, which was characterized by an XRD analysis and mass balance calculations. No carbon deposit was found on the surface of the reduced Cu, which was characterized by SEM analysis. CuO reduction by solid fuels can start at temperatures as low as approximately 500 C. Tests indicated that the solid fuels with higher reactivity (higher volatile matter) would be desirable for the development of the chemical looping combustion process of solid fuels, such as sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coal and solid waste and biomass. 4 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Yan Cao; Bianca Casenas; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hanford Waste Transfer Planning and Control - 13465  

SciTech Connect

Hanford tank waste cleanup requires efficient use of double-shell tank space to support single-shell tank retrievals and future waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Every waste transfer, including single-shell tank retrievals and evaporator campaign, is evaluated via the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program for compliance with safety basis, environmental compliance, operational limits and controls to enhance future waste treatment. Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes are stored at the Hanford Site on an interim basis until they can be treated, as necessary, for final disposal. Implementation of the Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program helps to ensure continued safe and prudent storage and handling of these wastes within the Tank Farms Facility. The Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program is a Safety Management Program that is a formal process for evaluating waste transfers and chemical additions through the preparation of documented Waste Compatibility Assessments (WCA). The primary purpose of the program is to ensure that sufficient controls are in place to prevent the formation of incompatible mixtures as the result of waste transfer operations. The program defines a consistent means of evaluating compliance with certain administrative controls, safety, operational, regulatory, and programmatic criteria and specifies considerations necessary to assess waste transfers and chemical additions. Current operations are most limited by staying within compliance with the safety basis controls to prevent flammable gas build up in the tank headspace. The depth of solids, the depth of supernatant, the total waste depth and the waste temperature are monitored and controlled to stay within the Compatibility Program rules. Also, transfer planning includes a preliminary evaluation against the Compatibility Program to assure that operating plans will comply with the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program. (authors)

Kirch, N.W.; Uytioco, E.M.; Jo, J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Waste Minimization- The Challenge of the 90's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W~STE MINIMIZATION - THE CHALLENGE OF THE 90'S RICHARD DURHAM Senior Environmental Specialist Dow Chemical U.S.A. Plaquemine, Louisiana ABSTRACT Waste minimization is an environmental good news story that Dow enjoys going out... informally for years. The chemical industry has been practicing waste reduction by increasing yields, improving their processes and reducing energy requirements. If Dow or any other chemical company does not practice waste reduction, competition...

Durham, R.

398

Flexographically Printed Rechargeable Zinc-based Battery for Grid Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the rechargeable battery industry. Li-ion batteries rapidlyLi-ion chemistry. For grid storage applications, several other rechargeable batteryLi-ion batteries, because cadmium is highly toxic. In 1991, lithium-ion battery

Wang, Zuoqian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Definition: Chemical energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy energy Energy stored in chemical bonds between atoms within molecules. When a chemical reaction occurs, the chemical energy within a molecule can increase or that energy can be released into its surroundings as another form of energy (e.g., heat or light). Fuel combustion is example of the conversion of chemical energy to another form of energy.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In chemistry, Chemical energy is the potential of a chemical substance to undergo a transformation through a chemical reaction or, to transform other chemical substances. Examples include batteries and light bulbs and cells etc. Breaking or making of chemical bonds involves energy, which may be either absorbed or evolved from a chemical system Energy that can be released (or absorbed) because of a reaction between a set of

400

Building Technologies Office: Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Chargers and Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies Framework Document Public Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies Framework Document Public Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies Framework Document Public Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies Framework Document Public Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies Framework Document Public Meeting on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies Framework Document Public Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Battery

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Department of Energy Will Hold a Batteries and Energy Storage...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Will Hold a Batteries and Energy Storage Information Meeting on October 21, 2011 Department of Energy Will Hold a Batteries and Energy Storage Information...

402

USABC Development of Advanced High-Performance Batteries for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

USABC Development of Advanced High-Performance Batteries for EV Applications USABC Development of Advanced High-Performance Batteries for EV Applications 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

403

Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

404

High-Voltage Solid Polymer Batteries for Electric Drive Vehicles...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High-Voltage Solid Polymer Batteries for Electric Drive Vehicles High-Voltage Solid Polymer Batteries for Electric Drive Vehicles 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

405

Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

406

Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program Presentation from the...

407

High-Voltage Solid Polymer Batteries for Electric Drive Vehicles...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High-Voltage Solid Polymer Batteries for Electric Drive Vehicles High-Voltage Solid Polymer Batteries for Electric Drive Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

408

Computer-Aided Engineering for Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Computer-Aided Engineering for Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries (CAEBAT) Computer-Aided Engineering for Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries (CAEBAT) 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

409

Development of Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries Development of Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

410

Overview and Progress of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Progress of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Activity Overview and Progress of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT)...

411

NREL: Transportation Research - Innovative Way to Test Batteries...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Way to Test Batteries Fills a Market Niche A square piece of machinery with a lid that opens upwards NETZSCH's Isothermal Battery Calorimeter (IBC 284), developed by...

412

Electrolytes - R&D for Advanced Lithium Batteries. Interfacial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R&D for Advanced Lithium Batteries. Interfacial Behavior of Electrolytes Electrolytes - R&D for Advanced Lithium Batteries. Interfacial Behavior of Electrolytes 2012 DOE Hydrogen...

413

Development of Computer-Aided Design Tools for Automotive Batteries...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Progress of Computer-Aided Engineering of Batteries (CAEBAT) Computer-Aided Engineering for Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries (CAEBAT)...

414

Overcharge Protection for PHEV Batteries | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Overcharge Protection for PHEV Batteries Overcharge Protection for PHEV Batteries 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

415

Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program 2010 DOE Vehicle...

416

Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program 2009 DOE...

417

Manipulating the Surface Reactions in Lithium Sulfur Batteries...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manipulating the Surface Reactions in Lithium Sulfur Batteries Using Hybrid Anode Structures. Manipulating the Surface Reactions in Lithium Sulfur Batteries Using Hybrid Anode...

418

By losing their shape, material fails batteries | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

By losing their shape, material fails batteries By losing their shape, material fails batteries Too many electrons at the lithiation front in silicon are a problem Molecular...

419

Characterization of Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction and Infrared Imaging Techniques Characterization of Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction and Infrared Imaging Techniques 2011 DOE...

420

EV Everywhere: Innovative Battery Research Powering Up Plug-In...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EV Everywhere: Innovative Battery Research Powering Up Plug-In Electric Vehicles EV Everywhere: Innovative Battery Research Powering Up Plug-In Electric Vehicles January 24, 2014 -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium-Air Battery Electrode...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium-Air Battery Electrode. Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium-Air Battery Electrode. Abstract: Functionalized graphene sheets (FGS)...

422

Reality Check: Cheaper Batteries are GOOD for America's Electric...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Reality Check: Cheaper Batteries are GOOD for America's Electric Vehicle Manufacturers Reality Check: Cheaper Batteries are GOOD for America's Electric Vehicle Manufacturers...

423

Automotive Li-ion Battery Cooling Requirements | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Automotive Li-ion Battery Cooling Requirements Presents thermal management of lithium-ion battery packs for electric vehicles cunningham.pdf More Documents & Publications...

424

New INL High Energy Battery Test Facility | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

INL High Energy Battery Test Facility New INL High Energy Battery Test Facility 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

425

NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit...

426

Abuse Testing of High Power Batteries | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Testing of High Power Batteries Abuse Testing of High Power Batteries 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting,...

427

Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design Activity Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design Activity 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

428

Energy Management Strategies for Fast Battery Temperature Rise...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Management Strategies for Fast Battery Temperature Rise and Engine Efficiency Improvement at Very Cold Conditions Energy Management Strategies for Fast Battery Temperature...

429

Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

430

PHEV and LEESS Battery Cost Assessment | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

PHEV and LEESS Battery Cost Assessment PHEV and LEESS Battery Cost Assessment 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

431

Saft America Advanced Batteries Plant Celebrates Grand Opening...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saft America Advanced Batteries Plant Celebrates Grand Opening in Jacksonville Saft America Advanced Batteries Plant Celebrates Grand Opening in Jacksonville September 16, 2011 -...

432

Electrochemistry, Batteries and Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrochemistry is concerned with the effect of electrical voltages and currents on chemical reactions (ionics) and chemical changes which produce the voltages and currents (electrodics). This is illustrated in ...

H. D. Gesser

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

A description of the vapor phase in the lithium thionyl chloride battery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A DESCRIPTION OF TIIE YAPOP, PHASE IN THF. LITHIUM THIONYI. CHLORIDE BATTERY A Thesis by RODOLFO MORALES, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AEzM University in partial fulfrHment of the requirement for the degree oi' MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering A DESCRIPTION OF THE VAPOR PHASE IN THE LITHIUM THIONYL CHLORIDE BATTERY A Thesis bv RODOLFO 'vIORALES, JR. Approved as to style and content by: Ralph E. White (Chairman of Committee) James...

Morales, Rodolfo

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

provides information on the basis for the chemical and radionuclide composition in the tanks, as well as equipment, soils, and waste forms. These data, along with information...

435

Rechargeable thin-film lithium batteries  

SciTech Connect

Rechargeable thin-film batteries consisting of lithium metal anodes, an amorphous inorganic electrolyte, and cathodes of lithium intercalation compounds have been fabricated and characterized. These include Li-TiS{sub 2}, Li-V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Li-Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cells with open circuit voltages at full charge of about 2.5 V, 3.7 V, and 4.2 V, respectively. The realization of these robust cells, which can be cycled thousands of times, was possible because of the stability of the amorphous lithium electrolyte, lithium phosphorus oxynitride. This material has a typical composition of Li{sub 2.9}PO{sub 3.3}N{sub 0.46}and a conductivity at 25 C of 2 {mu}S/cm. The thin-film cells have been cycled at 100% depth of discharge using current densities of 5 to 100 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. Over most of the charge-discharge range, the internal resistance appears to be dominated by the cathode, and the major source of the resistance is the diffusion of Li{sup +} ions from the electrolyte into the cathode. Chemical diffusion coefficients were determined from ac impedance measurements.

Bates, J.B.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Dudney, N.J.; Luck, C.F.; Yu, X.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Thin-film Rechargeable Lithium Batteries  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Rechargeable thin films batteries with lithium metal anodes, an amorphous inorganic electrolyte, and cathodes of lithium intercalation compounds have been fabricated and characterized. The cathodes include TiS{sub 2}, the {omega} phase of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and the cubic spinel Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} with open circuit voltages at full charge of about 2.5 V, 3.7 V, and 4.2 V, respectively. The development of these robust cells, which can be cycled thousands of times, was possible because of the stability of the amorphous lithium electrolyte, lithium phosphorus oxynitride. This material has a typical composition of Li{sub 2.9}PO{sub 3.3}N{sub 0.46} and a conductivity at 25 C of 2 {mu}S/cm. Thin film cells have been cycled at 100% depth of discharge using current densities of 2 to 100 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. The polarization resistance of the cells is due to the slow insertion rate of Li{sup +} ions into the cathode. Chemical diffusion coefficients for Li{sup +} ions in the three types of cathodes have been estimated from the analysis of ac impedance measurements.

Bates, J. B.; Gruzalski, G. R.; Dudney, N. J.; Luck, C. F.; Yu, X.

1993-11-00T23:59:59.000Z

437

Waste minimization in semiconductor processing  

SciTech Connect

The US semiconductor industry uses 5--7 thousand pounds of arsine annually. Fifty to eighty percent of the arsine used becomes a waste product, which requires abatement. Traditional methods of abatement are reviewed with an emphasis on dry chemical scrubbing. A variety of dry chemical scrubbing materials were evaluated for arsine capacity, using activated carbon as the baseline for comparison. Of the available technologies, dry chemical scrubbing is the most effective means of minimizing arsenic containing waste generated from semiconductor effluents. A copper oxide based media has been identified which has high capacity, high efficiency and treats the spectrum of gases used in MOCVD processes. Reclaim and recovery of spent scrubber media has the potential to drastically reduce arsenic waste from semiconductor manufacturing.

Hardwick, S.J.; Mailloux, J.C. [Novapure Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

Thin film buried anode battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reverse configuration, lithium thin film battery (300) having a buried lithium anode layer (305) and process for making the same. The present invention is formed from a precursor composite structure (200) made by depositing electrolyte layer (204) onto substrate (201), followed by sequential depositions of cathode layer (203) and current collector (202) on the electrolyte layer. The precursor is subjected to an activation step, wherein a buried lithium anode layer (305) is formed via electroplating a lithium anode layer at the interface of substrate (201) and electrolyte film (204). The electroplating is accomplished by applying a current between anode current collector (201) and cathode current collector (202).

Lee, Se-Hee (Lakewood, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Liu, Ping (Denver, CO)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Graphene/Li-ion battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Density function theory calculations were carried out to clarify storage states of Lithium (Li) ions in graphene clusters. The adsorption energy spin polarization charge distribution electronic gap surface curvature and dipole momentum were calculated for each cluster. Li-ion adsorbed graphene doped by one Li atom is spin polarized so there would be different gaps for different spin polarization in electrons. Calculation results demonstrated that a smaller cluster between each two larger clusters is preferable because it could improve grapheneLi-ion batteries; consequently the most proper graphene anode structure has been proposed.

Narjes Kheirabadi; Azizollah Shafiekhani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Alloys of clathrate allotropes for rechargeable batteries  

SciTech Connect

The present disclosure is directed at an electrode for a battery wherein the electrode comprises clathrate alloys of silicon, germanium or tin. In method form, the present disclosure is directed at methods of forming clathrate alloys of silicon, germanium or tin which methods lead to the formation of empty cage structures suitable for use as electrodes in rechargeable type batteries.

Chan, Candace K; Miller, Michael A; Chan, Kwai S

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Pioneering battery maker files for bankruptcy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Ultimately, the fate of US battery makers will remain tied to that of the electric car itself. And for now, no battery technology can compete cost-wise with the internal ... cost-wise with the internal combustion engine. The outlook in the near future for electric cars does not look that promising, says Daniel Scherson, an electrochemist at Case Western ...

Devin Powell

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

442

Battery Stack-on Process Improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imagine yourself in a job in which you stack 10,000 batteries onto a conveyor for eight hours. Each battery weighs about 22 pounds. The work is completed in an acidic environment where temperatures can peak in the summer as high as 100 degrees...

Watkins, Robert E.

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

443

Transparent lithium-ion batteries , Sangmoo Jeongb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and solar cells; however, transparent batteries, a key component in fully integrated transparent devices by a microfluidics-assisted method. The feature dimension in the electrode is below the resolution limit of human (11), and solar cells (12­14). However, the battery, a key component in portable electronics, has

Cui, Yi

444

Biological treatment of chemically flocculated agro-industrial waste from the wool scouring industry by an aerobic process without sludge recycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new agro-industrial effluent known as Sirolan CF effluent is the aqueous phase remaining after the chemical flocculation of wool scouring effluent by the Sirolan CF process. This effluent has been characterized, and shown to be effectively treated by biological degradation. It has a high concentration of organic material (5750mg/L COD), with a low BOD5/COD ratio (0.29). Aerobic biological treatment was tested using laboratory and pilot scale reactors, and shown to remove essentially all BOD5, solvent extractable material and detergent activity. Maximum removal of the COD was 65% leaving a 2000mg/L residual component of nonbiodegradable organic material. The combined processes of Sirolan CF and biological treatment removed over 90% of the COD and all solvent extractable material from raw wool scouring effluent. This compares favourably to existing treatment systems, and represents a viable and attractive alternative to treat this extremely polluted wastewater.

Andrew J Poole; Ralf Cord-Ruwisch; F.William Jones

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Argonne Transportation - Lithium Battery Technology Patents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awarded Lithium Battery Technology Patents Awarded Lithium Battery Technology Patents "Composite-structure" material is a promising battery electrode for electric vehicles Argonne National Laboratory has been granted two U.S. patents (U.S. Pat. 6,677,082 and U.S. Pat. 6,680,143) on new "composite-structure" electrode materials for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Electrode compositions of this type are receiving worldwide attention. Such electrodes offer superior cost and safety features over state-of-the-art LiCoO2 electrodes that power conventional lithium-ion batteries. Moreover, they demonstrate outstanding cycling stability and can be charged and discharged at high rates, making them excellent candidates to replace LiCoO2 for consumer electronic applications and hybrid electric vehicles.

446

Paper Battery Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Paper Battery Co Paper Battery Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Paper Battery Co. Place Troy, New York Zip 12180 Product Paper Battery Co. is constructing a hybrid ultracapacitor/battery which yeilds high power and energy density. The material used is a nano-porous cellulous. Coordinates 39.066587°, -80.768578° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.066587,"lon":-80.768578,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

447

Towards Safer Lithium-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Safer Lithium-Ion Batteries Towards Safer Lithium-Ion Batteries Speaker(s): Guoying Chen Date: October 25, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Venkat Srinivasan Safety problems associated with rechargeable lithium batteries are now well recognized. Recent spectacular fires involving cell phones, laptops, and (here at LBNL) AA cells have made the news. These events are generally caused by overcharging and subsequent development of internal shorts. Before these batteries can be used in vehicle applications, improvement in cell safety is a must. We have been active in the area of lithium battery safety for many years. For example, a versatile, inexpensive overcharge protection approach developed in our laboratory, uses an electroactive polymer to act as a reversible, self-actuating, low resistance internal

448

Plasma Mass Filters For Nuclear Waste Reprocessing  

SciTech Connect

Practical disposal of nuclear waste requires high-throughput separation techniques. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which contains the most active and mobile radioisotopes and produces most of the heat. We suggest that the fission products could be separated as a group from nuclear waste using plasma mass filters. Plasmabased processes are well suited to separating nuclear waste, because mass rather than chemical properties are used for separation. A single plasma stage can replace several stages of chemical separation, producing separate streams of bulk elements, fission products, and actinoids. The plasma mass filters may have lower cost and produce less auxiliary waste than chemical processing plants. Three rotating plasma configurations are considered that act as mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, the Ohkawa filter, and the asymmetric centrifugal trap.

Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

449

Life Cycle Environmental Impact of High-Capacity Lithium Ion Battery with Silicon Nanowires Anode for Electric Vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The grid electricity used in this analysis is average U.S. electricity mix with 89.56% of nonrenewable energies. ... The results demonstrate that the major opportunity for reducing the life cycle impacts of the battery pack is to use clean energy supply for battery operation, such as solar and wind electricity, which could reduce these environmental impacts significantly. ... All the above analyses including the life cycle inventory analysis, impact analysis, uncertainty, and sensitivity analysis together confirm that the LIB pack using SiNW anode from metal-assisted chemical etching could have environmental impacts comparable with those of conventional battery pack, while significantly increasing the battery energy storage and extending the driving range of EVs in the future. ...

Bingbing Li; Xianfeng Gao; Jianyang Li; Chris Yuan

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Wet Chemical Synthesis of Graphene for Battery Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this thesis, an improved Hummers method is used to produce graphene oxide, while thermal treatment has been used as the reduction process to (more)

Johansen, Ida

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

1 INTRODUCTION Industry has become an essentialpart of modem society,and waste production is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and environmental threats, contaminated sites can contribute to the long-term contaminationof the ambient air, soils Contamination Problems Aerospace Organic Chemicals Automobile Paints and Coatings Batteries (storage and primary Electronic Components Manufacturing Pharmaceuticals Electroplating and Metal Finishing Explosives Printing

Ma, Lena

452

Multi-cell storage battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-cell storage battery, in particular to a lithium storage battery, which contains a temperature control device and in which groups of one or more individual cells arranged alongside one another are separated from one another by a thermally insulating solid layer whose coefficient of thermal conductivity lies between 0.01 and 0.2 W/(m*K), the thermal resistance of the solid layer being greater by at least a factor .lambda. than the thermal resistance of the individual cell. The individual cell is connected, at least in a region free of insulating material, to a heat exchanger, the thermal resistance of the heat exchanger in the direction toward the neighboring cell being selected to be greater by at least a factor .lambda. than the thermal resistance of the individual cell and, in addition, the thermal resistance of the heat exchanger toward the temperature control medium being selected to be smaller by at least a factor of about 10 than the thermal resistance of the individual cell, and .lambda. being the ratio of the energy content of the individual cell to the amount of energy that is needed to trigger a thermally induced cell failure at a defined upper operating temperature limit.

Brohm, Thomas (Hattersheim, DE); Bottcher, Friedhelm (Kelkheim, DE)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

The effect of concentration on the structure and crystallinity of a cementitious waste form for caustic wastes  

SciTech Connect

Cement-based waste forms have long been considered economical technologies for disposal of various types of waste. A solidified cementitious waste form, Cast Stone, was developed to immobilize the radioactive secondary waste from vitrification processes. In this work, Cast Stone was considered for a Na-based caustic liquid waste, and its physical properties were analyzed as a function of liquid waste loading up to 2 M Na. Differences in crystallinity (phase composition), microstructure, mesostructure (pore size distribution, surface area), and macrostructure (density, compressive strength) were investigated using various analytical techniques, in order to assess the suitability of Cast Stone as a chemically durable waste. It was found that the concentration of secondary waste simulant (caustic waste) had little effect on the relevant engineering properties of Cast Stone, showing that Cast Stone could be an effective and tolerant waste form for a wide range of concentrations of high sodium waste.

Chung, Chul-Woo; Turo, Laura A.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Johnson, Bradley R.; McCloy, John S.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Use of solid waste for chemical stabilization: Adsorption isotherms and {sup 13}C solid-state NMR study of hazardous organic compounds sorbed on coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect

Adsorption of hazardous organic compounds on the Dave Johnston plant fly ash is described. Fly ash from Dave Johnston and Laramie River power plants were characterized using elemental, x-ray, and {sup 29}Si NMR; the Dave Johnston (DJ) fly ash had higher quartz contents, while the Laramie River fly ash had more monomeric silicate anions. Adsorption data for hydroaromatics and chlorobenzenes indicate that the adsorption capacity of DJ coal fly ash is much less than that of activated carbon by a factor of >3000; but it is needed to confirm that solid-gas and solid-liquid equilibrium isotherms can indeed be compared. However, for pyridine, pentachlorophenol, naphthalene, and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, the DJ fly ash appears to adsorb these compounds nearly as well as activated carbon. {sup 13}C NMR was used to study the adsorption of hazardous org. cpds on coal fly ash; the nuclear spin relaxation times often were very long, resulting in long experimental times to obtain a spectrum. Using a jumbo probe, low concentrations of some hazardous org. cpds could be detected; for pentachlorophenol adsorbed onto fly ash, the chemical shift of the phenolic carbon was changed. Use of NMR to study the adsorption needs further study.

Netzel, D.A.; Lane, D.C.; Rovani, J.F.; Cox, J.D.; Clark, J.A.; Miknis, F.P.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

"Buried-Anode" Technology Leads to Advanced Lithium Batteries (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

It all began in 2001, when three NREL researchers took their thin-film It all began in 2001, when three NREL researchers took their thin-film expertise from window technology research and applied it to a solid-state, thin-film lithium battery. The researchers knew that lithium batteries tended to degrade quickly because the fragile lithium metal anode was on the top of the battery, where any cracks in the encapsulant could lead to rapid failure. The team developed the concept of building the battery in reverse order, depositing first the solid-state electrolyte, made of lithium phosphorous oxynitride (LiPON), then the cathode, a metal oxide. Lithium is typically intercalated (chemically trapped) within the cathode material. Placing an initial charge on the battery causes the lithium ions to migrate out of the cathode

456

Summaries of FY 1993 research in the chemical sciences  

SciTech Connect

The summaries in photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, chemical engineering sciences, and advanced battery technology are arranged according to national laboratories and offsite institutions. Small business innovation research projects are also listed. Special facilities supported wholly or partly by the Division of Chemical Sciences are described. Indexes are provided for selected topics of general interest, institutions, and investigators.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Philadelphians protest ocean burning of waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Philadelphians protest ocean burning of waste ... A raucous, hostile crowd of Philadelphia residents shouted down Environmental Protection Agency officials last week at a public hearing on the agency's tentative decision to issue a research permit for an ocean burn of chemical wastes. ...

1986-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

458

Court blocks testing of nuclear waste site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Court blocks testing of nuclear waste site ... WIPP was authorized by Congress in 1979 to provide an R&D facility to demonstrate safe handling, transport, and disposal of "mixed" transuranic wastes (contaminated with radioactive plutonium-239 and hazardous chemicals), which are now stored temporarily at DOE nuclear-weapons-making facilities. ...

RICHARD SELTZER

1992-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

459

Learning Policies For Battery Usage Optimization in Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithmic chal- lenge. 1 Introduction Electric vehicles, partially or fully powered by batteries, are oneLearning Policies For Battery Usage Optimization in Electric Vehicles Stefano Ermon, Yexiang Xue for the widespread adoption of electric vehicles. Multi-battery systems that combine a standard battery

Bejerano, Gill

460

Understanding human-battery interaction on mobile phones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mobile phone users have to deal with limited battery lifetime through a reciprocal process we call human-battery interaction (HBI). We conducted three user studies in order to understand HBI and discover the problems in existing mobile phone designs. ... Keywords: batteries, human-battery interaction, mobile phones, power management

Ahmad Rahmati; Angela Qian; Lin Zhong

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Aqueous Cathode for Next-Generation Alkali-Ion Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aqueous cathode in the flow-through mode can be individually stored in a fuel tank, which reduces the volume of the battery and increases the design flexibility of the battery structure, as shown in Figure 1. ... Unlike previous lithium?water batteries, the aqueous cathode is not plagued by H2 evolution from the solution, and the battery is efficiently rechargeable. ...

Yuhao Lu; John B. Goodenough; Youngsik Kim

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

462

BROADBAND IDENTIFICATION OF BATTERY ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE FOR HEV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ CEA LETI/LITEN; P. Granjon ­ GIPSA-Lab; Abstract -- In recent years, Li-ion batteries have been for the broadband monitoring of a battery. Keywords-- battery impedance, spectroscopy, broadband signals, Li-ion system of EV and HEV. Li-ion battery technology is believed to be the most attractive

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

463

Lithium Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries  

SciTech Connect

Rechargeable lithium metal batteries have much higher energy density than those of lithium ion batteries using graphite anode. Unfortunately, uncontrollable dendritic lithium growth inherent in these batteries (upon repeated charge/discharge cycling) and limited Coulombic efficiency during lithium deposition/striping has prevented their practical application over the past 40 years. With the emerging of post Li-ion batteries, safe and efficient operation of lithium metal anode has become an enabling technology which may determine the fate of several promising candidates for the next generation of energy storage systems, including rechargeable Li-air battery, Li-S battery, and Li metal battery which utilize lithium intercalation compounds as cathode. In this work, various factors which affect the morphology and Coulombic efficiency of lithium anode will be analyzed. Technologies used to characterize the morphology of lithium deposition and the results obtained by modeling of lithium dendrite growth will also be reviewed. At last, recent development in this filed and urgent need in this field will also be discussed.

Xu, Wu; Wang, Jiulin; Ding, Fei; Chen, Xilin; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Zhang, Yaohui; Zhang, Jiguang

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

464

Flow Battery System Design for Manufacturability.  

SciTech Connect

Flow battery energy storage systems can support renewable energy generation and increase energy efficiency. But, presently, the costs of flow battery energy storage systems can be a significant barrier for large-scale market penetration. For cost- effective systems to be produced, it is critical to optimize the selection of materials and components simultaneously with the adherence to requirements and manufacturing processes to allow these batteries and their manufacturers to succeed in the market by reducing costs to consumers. This report analyzes performance, safety, and testing requirements derived from applicable regulations as well as commercial and military standards that would apply to a flow battery energy storage system. System components of a zinc-bromine flow battery energy storage system, including the batteries, inverters, and control and monitoring system, are discussed relative to manufacturing. The issues addressed include costs and component availability and lead times. A service and support model including setup, maintenance and transportation is outlined, along with a description of the safety-related features of the example flow battery energy storage system to promote regulatory and environmental, safety, and health compliance in anticipation of scale manufacturing.

Montoya, Tracy Louise; Meacham, Paul Gregory; Perry, David; Broyles, Robin S.; Hickey, Steven; Hernandez, Jacquelynne

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Argonne TTRDC - Publications - Transforum 10.2 - Battery Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Battery Facilities Will Help Accelerate Commercialization of Technologies New Battery Facilities Will Help Accelerate Commercialization of Technologies Gang Cheng tests batteries At existing Argonne battery testing labs, researcher Gang Cheng conducts an experiment to detect moisture in battery electrolytes. Moisture is detrimental to the performance and longevity of battery cells. Argonne will soon have three new battery facilities to bolster its research and development of battery materials and batteries for hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and all other electric vehicles. The Lab was recently awarded $8.8 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding to build a Battery Prototype Cell Fabrication Facility, a Materials Production Scale-Up Facility and a Post-Test Analysis Facility.

466

Argonne TTRDC - APRF - Research Activities - Ultracapacitors with Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Active Combination of Ultracapacitors with Batteries for PHEVs Active Combination of Ultracapacitors with Batteries for PHEVs Ultracapacitors Ultracapacitors will dramatically boost the power of lithium-ion batteries, enabling plug-in vehicles to travel much further on a single charge. Lithium-ion battery The newest generation of lithium-ion battery (foreground) has an energy density three times that of the batteries in today's electric cars (background). Argonne researchers are investigating the benefits of combining ultracapacitors with lithium-ion batteries. This combination can dramatically boost the power of lithium-ion batteries, offering a potential solution to the battery-related challenges facing electric vehicles. This technology can: Exponentially increase the calendar and cycle lifetimes of lithium-ion batteries

467

Enhanced Chemical Cleaning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chemical Cleaning Chemical Cleaning Renee H. Spires Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Project Manager July 29, 2009 Tank Waste Corporate Board 2 Objective Provide an overview of the ECC process and plan 3 Chemical Cleaning * Oxalic Acid can get tanks clean - Tank 16 set a standard in 1982 - Tanks 5-6 Bulk OA cleaning results under evaluation * However, the downstream flowsheet and financial impacts of handling the spent acid were unacceptable Before After Tank 16 Tank 16 4 Oxalic Acid Flowsheet Impacts Evap Sludge Washing Evap Feed/Drop Tank 8 Wt% Oxalic Acid Neutralization Tank Solids Liquid High oxalate concentration Negligible oxalate concentration * Oxalates from chemical cleaning impact salt processing * A process change was needed Evaporator Saltstone Vaults DWPF Filled Canisters 5 Vision * Eliminate the impacts to the Tank Farm

468

Hanford site transuranic waste certification plan  

SciTech Connect

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A, ''Radioactive Waste Management, and the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant' (DOE 1996d) (WIPP WAC). The WIPP WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WIPP WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their management of TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter41 (TRUPACT-11). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-I1 requirements in the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (NRC 1997) (TRUPACT-I1 SARP).

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

469

Redox Flow Batteries: An Engineering Perspective  

SciTech Connect

Redox flow batteries are well suited to provide modular and scalable energy storage systems for a wide range of energy storage applications. In this paper, we review the development of redox flow battery technology including recent advances in new redox active materials and systems. We discuss cost, performance, and reliability metrics that are critical for deployment of large flow battery systems. The technology, while relatively young, has the potential for significant improvement through reduced materials costs, improved energy and power efficiency, and significant reduction in the overall system cost.

Chalamala, Babu R.; Soundappan, Thiagarajan; Fisher, Graham R.; Anstey, Mitchell A.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Perry, Mike L.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

APPLICATIONS PORTABLE | Military: Batteries and Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrical power supply is a critical issue for all parts of modern armies, including today's and future foot soldiers. Batteries are the fundamental source of energy supply. However, where today mainly primary batteries are used in battlefield operations, future scenarios will more likely use secondary batteries in combination with fuel cells for recharging. Thereby, two lines of development are currently being pursued: larger recharging units in the range of 250W carried by entire squads and smaller fuel cells in the range of 25W carried by individual soldiers most likely as part of a soldier energy network.

C. Cremers; J. Tbke; M. Krausa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Evolution of Strategies for Modern Rechargeable Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(3) Electrochemical Energy Storage and Conversion: Interrupted by the first energy crisis and a move to the University of Oxford, England, he has used his experience with oxides to develop electrodes and solid electrolytes for rechargeable batteries and for the solid oxide fuel cell. ... The sodiumsulfur battery has also opened the door to consideration of other high-temperature battery configurations, viz. a gaseous fuel-cell/electrolysis-cell cycle via an Fe/FeOx oxidation/reduction, based on the solid-oxide fuel-cell technology. ... composites constitute flowable semi-solid fuels that are here charged and discharged in prototype flow cells. ...

John B. Goodenough

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

472

Waste Inventory for Near Surface Repository (NSR) - 13482  

SciTech Connect

The main characteristics, physical, chemical as well as radiological of the waste intended to be disposed of in the planned NSR are described. This description is mainly based on the waste inventory investigations performed by the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP). The four different waste streams to be disposed of in the NSR are described and investigated. (authors)

Vaidotas, Algirdas [Lithuania Enterprise Company Radioactive Waste Management Agency, Luksio 5, Vilnius (Lithuania)] [Lithuania Enterprise Company Radioactive Waste Management Agency, Luksio 5, Vilnius (Lithuania)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Nuclear waste programs; Semiannual progress report, October 1991--March 1992  

SciTech Connect

This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Programs of the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1991-March 1992. In these programs, studies are underway on the performance of waste glass and spent fuel in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories

Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Ebert, W.L.; Emery, J.W.; Feng, X.; Finn, P.A.; Gerding, T.J.; Hoh, J.C. [and others

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Role of Recycling in the Life Cycle of Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ROLE OF RECYCLING IN THE LIFE CYCLE OF BATTERIES ROLE OF RECYCLING IN THE LIFE CYCLE OF BATTERIES J.L. Sullivan, L. Gaines, and A. Burnham Argonne National Laboratory, Energy Systems Division Keywords: battery, materials, recycling, energy Abstract Over the last few decades, rechargeable battery production has increased substantially. Applications including phones, computers, power tools, power storage, and electric-drive vehicles are either commonplace or will be in the next decade or so. Because advanced rechargeable batteries, like those

475

EV Everywhere Batteries Workshop- Next Generation Lithium Ion Batteries Breakout Session Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Breakout session presentation for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Battery Workshop on July 26, 2012 held at the Doubletree O'Hare, Chicago, IL.

476

Metalworkers clean up their waste  

SciTech Connect

This article describes how using methods such as chemical precipitation, filtration, and ion exchange, metal parts manufacturers are reducing the pollutants in their wastewater so it can be reused or safely discharged. Metalworking manufacturer are recovering useful materials, lowering their disposal costs, and reducing pollution by treating their wastewater with methods such as chemical precipitation and ion exchange so that it can be reused or safely discharged. They are also reducing wastes by recycling metalworking coolants. The major wastewater treatment technologies identified by the Environmental Protection Agency are chemical precipitation, or adding flocculants to bind waste particles together; membrane ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis, in which waste is trapped when the water passes through a membrane; and ion exchange, in which specially formulated resins capture dissolved metal salts. Other treatment techniques cited by Elwood Forsht, chief of the chemicals and metals branch at the EPA, include electrowinning, which uses electrolysis to concentrate metallic ions in wastewater, and coolant recycling, a method that removes metal particles by centrifugal force and kills bacteria by pasteurization. Many metalworking operations create wastewater, including drilling, welding, soldering, surface finishing, electroplating, acid treatment, anodizing, assembly, and machining. Companies use wastewater treatment technologies to recycle their wastewater or clean it so that it meets EPA standards and can be discharged into a municipal waste system, thus avoiding high disposal costs.

Valenti, M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Improved layered mixed transition metal oxides for Li-ion batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for rechargeable lithium batteries," Science 311(5763), 977-^ for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries," J. Electrochem. Soc.02 for lithium-ion batteries," Chem. Lett. , [3] Yabuuchi,

Doeff, Marca M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Structural Integration of Silicon Solar Cells and Lithium-ion Batteries Using Printed Electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solid state battery ..of the thin-film solid state battery is shown in Fig. 13.the thin-film solid state battery. CHAPTER FIVE Performance

Kang, Jin Sung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Firm sues to hasten burning of waste at sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In an effort to force a decision on its bid to perform a research burn of chemical wastes at sea, Chemical Waste Management is suing both the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration. The company wants the U.S. ...

1986-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

480

Annual Energy Review 2008 - Released June 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "waste batteries chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

AEA Battery Systems Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEA Battery Systems Ltd AEA Battery Systems Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name AEA Battery Systems Ltd Place Caithness, United Kingdom Zip KW14 7XW Product Designs, manufactures and supplies specialist lithium-ion high performance cells and batteries. Coordinates 36.482929°, -94.323563° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.482929,"lon":-94.323563,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

482

Coda Battery Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coda Battery Systems Coda Battery Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name Coda Battery Systems Place Enfield, Connecticut Sector Vehicles Product Connecticut-based joint venture producing lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles. Coordinates 36.181032°, -77.662805° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.181032,"lon":-77.662805,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

483

Recycling of Li-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Linda Gaines Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory Recycling of Li-Ion Batteries Illinois Sustainable Technology Center University of Illinois We don't want to trade one crisis for another!  Battery material shortages are unlikely - We demonstrated that lithium demand can be met - Recycling mitigates potential scarcity  Life-cycle analysis checks for unforeseen impacts  We need to find something to do with the used materials - Safe - Economical 2 We answer these questions to address material supply issues  How many electric-drive vehicles will be sold in the US and world-wide?  What kind of batteries might they use? - How much lithium would each battery use?  How much lithium would be needed each year?

484

Electric Fuel Battery Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Battery Corporation Fuel Battery Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Electric Fuel Battery Corporation Place Auburn, Alabama Zip 36832 Product Develops and manufactures BA-8180/U high power zinc-air battery for military applications. Coordinates 42.79301°, -110.997909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.79301,"lon":-110.997909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}