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1

Washington Closure Hanford, LLC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Mr. Neil Brosee President Washington Closure Hanford, LLC 2620 Fermi Avenue Richland, Washington 99354 WEA-201 0-02 Dear Mr. Brosee: This...

2

Washington Closure Hanford, LLC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 19,2010 August 19,2010 CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Mr. Neil Brosee President Washington Closure Hanford, LLC 2620 Fermi Avenue Richland, Washington 99354 WEA-201 0-02 Dear Mr. Brosee: This letter refers to the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement investigation into the facts and circumstances surrounding the employee fall that occurred at the Hanford High Bay Testing Facility (336 Building) on July 1, 2009. The worker sustained serious injury to his back and broke bones in both legs. Based on an evaluation of the evidence in this matter, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has concluded that violations of 10 C.F.R. Part 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, by Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH) occurred. Accordingly, DOE is issuing the enclosed Preliminary Notice of

3

DOE Cites Washington Closure Hanford for Safety Violations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Department of Energy issues a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to contractor Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) for violations of DOE's worker safety and health program regulations in 2009 at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State.

4

Fiscal Year 2006 Washington Closure Hanford Science & Technology Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Washington Closure Hanford science and technology (S&T) plan documents the activities associated with providing S&T support to the River Corridor Closure Project for fiscal year 2006.

K.J. Kroegler, M. Truex, D.J. McBride

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

5

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington Closure Hanford, LLC - Washington Closure Hanford, LLC - WEA-2010-02 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC - WEA-2010-02 August 19, 2010 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Washington Closure Hanford, LLC related an Employee Fall at the High Bay Testing Facility (336 Building) at the Hanford Site This letter refers to the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement investigation into the facts and circumstances surrounding the employee fall that occurred at the Hanford High Bay Testing Facility (336 Building) on July 1, 2009. The worker sustained serious injury to his back and broke bones in both legs. Based on an evaluation of the evidence in this matter, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has concluded that violations of 10 C.F.R. Part 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, by

6

EIS-0391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, 391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington EIS-0391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts for the following three key areas: (1) retrieval, treatment, and disposal of waste from 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double-shell tanks and closure of the SST system, (2) decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility, a nuclear test reactor, and (3) disposal of Hanford's waste and other DOE sites' low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download December 13, 2013 EIS-0391: Record of Decision Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for

7

Bat Surveys of Retired Facilitiies Scheduled for Demolition by Washington Closure Hanford  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was conducted to evaluate buildings and facilities remaining in the Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition schedule for bat roost sites. The project began in spring of 2009 and was concluded in spring of 2011. A total of 196 buildings and facilities were evaluated for the presence of bat roosting sites. The schedule for the project was prioritized to accommodate the demolition schedule. As the surveys were completed, the results were provided to the project managers to facilitate planning and project completion. The surveys took place in the 300 Area, 400 Area, 100-H, 100-D, 100-N, and 100-B/C Area. This report is the culmination of all the bat surveys and summarizes the findings by area and includes recommended mitigation actions where bat roosts were found.

Gano, K. A.; Lucas, J. G.; Lindsey, C. T.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

8

Risk and Performance Analyses Supporting Closure of WMA C at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington  

SciTech Connect

The Office of River Protection under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area 0NMA) C as stipulated by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) under federalrequirements and work tasks will be done under the State-approved closure plans and permits. An initial step in meeting the regulatory requirements is to develop a baseline risk assessment representing current conditions based on available characterization data and information collected at the WMA C location. The baseline risk assessment will be supporting a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Field Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for WMA closure and RCRA corrective action. Complying with the HFFACO conditions also involves developing a long-term closure Performance Assessment (PA) that evaluates human health and environmental impacts resulting from radionuclide inventories in residual wastes remaining in WMA C tanks and ancillary equipment. This PAis being developed to meet the requirements necessary for closure authorization under DOE Order 435.1 and Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act. To meet the HFFACO conditions, the long-term closure risk analysis will include an evaluation of human health and environmental impacts from hazardous chemical inventories along with other performance Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Appropriate and Applicable Requirements (CERCLA ARARs) in residualwastes left in WMA C facilities after retrieval and removal. This closure risk analysis is needed to needed to comply with the requirements for permitted closure. Progress to date in developing a baseline risk assessment of WMA C has involved aspects of an evaluation of soil characterization and groundwater monitoring data collected as a part of the RFI/CMS and RCRA monitoring. Developing the long-term performance assessment aspects has involved the construction of detailed numericalmodels of WMA C using the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP(C)) computer code, the development of a technical approach for abstraction of a range of representative STOMP(C) simulations into a system-level modelbased on the GoldSim0 system-levelmodelsoftware. The STOMP(C)-based models will be used to evaluate local-scale impacts and closed facility performance over a sufficient range of simulations to allow for development of the system-level model of the WMA C. The GoldSim0-based system-level model will be used to evaluate overall sensitivity of modeled parameters and the estimate the uncertainty in potentialfuture impacts from a closed WMA C facility.

Eberlein, Susan J.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Kemp, Christopher J.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

9

EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of closing the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and the Solid Waste Landfill. The Washington State Department of Ecology is a cooperating agency in preparing this EA.

10

Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the Environmental for the Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington September 1992 U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington 99352 Contents 1 . 0 Summary . . 2.0 Purpose of and Need for the Proposed Action . . . . . . 3.0 Proposed Action and Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1 Proposed Action 3.2 Onsite Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . 3.3 Offsite Alternatives . . . . . . . . . 3.4 No Action Alternative ~ ~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 Affected Environment . . . . . . . . . . . 5.0 Environmental Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . 5.1 Construction Impacts 5.1.1 Atmospheric Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.1.2 Terrestrial Impacts . 5.1.3 Impacts on CERCLA Remedial Actions . 5.1.4 Construction Accidents .

11

Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington Closure, LLC Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington Closure, LLC March 23, 2005 - 10:56am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman today announced that Washington Closure, LLC has been awarded the contract to manage the clean up and remediation of the Columbia River Corridor at the Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. The five-member team includes the Washington Group International Inc., Bechtel National Inc., CH2M Hill Inc., Eberline Services Inc., and Integrated Logistics Services Inc. The Columbia River Corridor is composed of roughly 210 square miles along the outer edge of the Hanford Site. The contract calls for cleaning up and

12

Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford River Corridor Contract To Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington Closure, LLC Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington Closure, LLC March 23, 2005 - 10:56am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman today announced that Washington Closure, LLC has been awarded the contract to manage the clean up and remediation of the Columbia River Corridor at the Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. The five-member team includes the Washington Group International Inc., Bechtel National Inc., CH2M Hill Inc., Eberline Services Inc., and Integrated Logistics Services Inc. The Columbia River Corridor is composed of roughly 210 square miles along the outer edge of the Hanford Site. The contract calls for cleaning up and

13

Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States Department of Energy and the Washington State Department of Ecology for Development of the Hanford Site Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS ("TC&WM EIS")  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, AND THE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY, FOR DEVELOPMENT OF THE HANFORD SITE TANK CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT EIS ("TC&WM EIS") I. INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) have mutual responsibilities for accomplishing cleanup of the Hanford Site as well as continuing ongoing waste management activities consistent with applicable federal and state laws and regulations. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (otherwise called the "Tri-Party Agreement", or "TPA") contains various enforceable milestones that apply to tank waste management activities. DOE is also required to comply with applicable requirements of

14

EA-1111: K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1111: K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of...

15

Hanford Patrol Academy demolition sites closure plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site is owned by the U.S. Government and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Westinghouse Hanford Company is a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and serves as co-operator of the Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites, the unit addressed in this paper. This document consists of a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part A Permit Application, Form 3 (Revision 4), and a closure plan for the site. An explanation of the Part A Form 3 submitted with this closure plan is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. This Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites Closure Plan submittal contains information current as of December 15, 1994.

Not Available

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

Accelerated Closure of the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cleanup of the Hanford Site is currently planned to take until 2046 and another approximately $SOB. In the summer of 1999, Fluor Hanford initiated an ''Accelerated Closure Team'' to evaluate opportunities to reduce this long schedule and high cost for the parts of the Hanford Site which they manage. To-date, this breakthrough team has developed two approaches which will move > 50 million curies away from the Columbia River sooner than planned and at a significantly reduced cost. The approaches successfully applied so far are presently being applied to other opportunities at Hanford.

WILDE, R.T.

2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

EA-0915: Waste Tank Safety Program Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to resolve waste tank safety issues at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington, and to reduce the risks associated with...

18

Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plan - Plutonium Finishing Plant Treatment Unit Glovebox HA-20MB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This closure plan describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) glovebox HA-20MB that housed an interim status ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) of 1976 treatment unit. This closure plan is certified and submitted to Ecology for incorporation into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit (HF RCRA Permit) in accordance with Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement; TPA) Milestone M-83-30 requiring submittal of a certified closure plan for ''glovebox HA-20MB'' by July 31, 2003. Glovebox HA-20MB is located within the 231-5Z Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Currently glovebox HA-20MB is being used for non-RCRA analytical purposes. The schedule of closure activities under this plan supports completion of TPA Milestone M-83-44 to deactivate and prepare for dismantlement the above grade portions of the 234-5Z and ZA, 243-Z, and 291-Z and 291-Z-1 stack buildings by September 30, 2015. Under this closure plan, glovebox HA-20MB will undergo clean closure to the performance standards of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 with respect to all dangerous waste contamination from glovebox HA-20MB RCRA operations. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP treatment unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. Any information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. Clearance form only sent to RHA.

PRIGNANO, A.L.

2003-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

19

Red Lion Hotel Richland Hanford House Richland, Washington U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lion Hotel Richland Hanford House Lion Hotel Richland Hanford House Richland, Washington U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange April 13 - 14, 2010 Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange 1 Welcome Dear Participant, On behalf of the Department of Energy and the Savannah River National Laboratory, we welcome you to the Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange. Each of you bring a wealth of experience from a variety of different perspectives that will be essential for the effective and compliant imple- mentation of performance and risk assessments in support of tank closure, site operations, and area completion projects. The Performance Assess-

20

Environmental Assessment K Pool 'Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOERA-1 11 1 DOERA-1 11 1 Environmental Assessment K Pool 'Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Emrgy Richland, Washington December 1996 DOEEA-1111 ENVIRONMJ3'NTAL ASSESSMENT K POOL 'F'ISH REARING HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RICHLAND, WASHINGTON December 1996 This page intentionally left blank. DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. 1 ' U.S. Department of Energy summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a need to respond to a request to lease facilities at the Hanford Site 100-KE and 100-KW filter plant pools (K Pools) for fish rearing activities. These fish rearing activities would be: (1) business ventures with public h

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Record of Decision Issued for the Hanford Tank Closure and Waste...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Record of Decision Issued for the Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS Record of Decision Issued for the Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS December 13, 2013 -...

22

COMPREHENSIVE CLOSURE PLAN FOR THE HANFORD CENTRAL PLATEAU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a comprehensive and strategic plan that has been recently developed for the environmental closure of the Central Plateau area of the Hanford Site, a former weapons-production complex managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This approach was submitted to the DOE Richland Operations Office by Fluor Hanford to provide a framework and roadmap to integrate ongoing operations with closure of facilities that are no longer actively used--all with a view to closing the Central Plateau by 2035. The plan is currently under consideration by the DOE.

LACKEY, M.B.

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Cultural Resources Review for Closure of the nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill in the 600 Area, Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington, HCRC# 2010-600-018R  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office is proposing to close the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill (NRDWL) and Solid Waste Landfill (SWL) located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site. The closure of the NRDWL/SWL entails the construction of an evapotranspiration cover over the landfill. This cover would consist of a 3-foot (1-meter) engineered layer of fine-grained soil, modified with 15 percent by weight pea gravel to form an erosion-resistant topsoil that will sustain native vegetation. The area targeted for silt-loam borrow soil sits in Area C, located in the northern central portion of the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve Unit. The pea gravel used for the mixture will be obtained from both off-site commercial sources and an active gravel pit (Pit #6) located just west of the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. Materials for the cover will be transported along Army Loop Road, which runs from Beloit Avenue (near the Rattlesnake Barricade) east-northeast to the NRDWL/SWL, ending at State Route 4. Upgrades to Army Loop Road are necessary to facilitate safe bidirectional hauling traffic. This report documents a cultural resources review of the proposed activity, conducted according to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Gutzeit, Jennifer L.; Kennedy, Ellen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Sharpe, James J.; DeMaris, Ranae; Venno, M.; Christensen, James R.

2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

24

HANFORD SITE SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM RICHLAND WASHINGTON - 12464  

SciTech Connect

In support of implementation of Executive Order (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy and Economic Performance, the Hanford Site Sustainability Plan was developed to implement strategies and activities required to achieve the prescribed goals in the EO as well as demonstrate measurable progress in environmental stewardship at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site Sustainability Program was developed to demonstrate progress towards sustainability goals as defined and established in Executive Order (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy and Economic Performance; EO 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy and Transportation Management, and several applicable Energy Acts. Multiple initiatives were undertaken in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 to implement the Program and poise the Hanford Site as a leader in environmental stewardship. In order to implement the Hanford Site Sustainability Program, a Sustainability Plan was developed in conjunction with prime contractors, two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offices, and key stakeholders to serve as the framework for measuring progress towards sustainability goals. Based on the review of these metrics and future plans, several activities were initiated to proactively improve performance or provide alternatives for future consideration contingent on available funding. A review of the key metric associated with energy consumption for the Hanford Site in FY 2010 and 2011 indicated an increase over the target reduction of 3 percent annually from a baseline established in FY 2003 as illustrated in Figure 1. This slight increase was attributed primarily from the increased energy demand from the cleanup projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) in FY 2010 and 2011. Although it is forecasted that the energy demand will decrease commensurate with the completion of ARRA projects, several major initiatives were launched to improve energy efficiency.

FRITZ LL

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

25

Outcome-Based Planning-Hanford's Shift Towards Closure and Shrinking the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Over the past two years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) has formulated a focused, outcomes-based vision for accelerated cleanup of the Hanford Site. The primary elements, or outcomes, of this vision are to (1) accelerate restoration of the Columbia River Corridor, (2) transition the Central Plateau to long-term waste management, thereby shrinking the footprint of active site cleanup and operations, and (3) prepare for the future. The third outcome includes operation of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a key element of the foundation for Hanford's future; leveraging DOE's assets; and working with the community to understand their vision and reflect it as appropriate in the execution of the Hanford 2012 Vision. The purpose of these three outcomes is to provide a near term focus, aimed at achieving definitive end points over the next decade, while not precluding any long-term end-state associated with the completion of the Environmental Management (EM) mission at Hanford. The sheer expanse of the Hanford Site, the inherent hazards associated with the significant inventory of nuclear materials and wastes, the large number of aging contaminated facilities, the diverse nature and extent of environmental contamination, and the proximity to the Columbia River make the Hanford Site arguably the world's largest and most complex environmental cleanup project. Current projections are that it will cost over $80 billion and take over four decades to complete the cleanup at Hanford. Accelerated cleanup of the River Corridor portion of the Site will allow the remediation effort to focus on specific, near-term outcomes. Hanford's success in achieving these outcomes will reduce urgent risk, shrink the Site, remove contamination and wastes from the proximity of the river, and consolidate waste management activities on the Central Plateau. Hanford has begun implementation of this vision. Performance-based contracts are being realigned to reflect the outcome orientation, including issuing a new River Corridor closure contract. This paper summarizes the outcome-based planning approach for other sites and interested parties. A brief introduction to the Hanford Site, along with detailed descriptions of the three outcomes is provided. This paper also summarizes the analyses and resulting products that were prepared in shifting to an outcome-based approach for closing the Hanford Site.

Ballard, W. W.; Holten, R.; Johnson, W.; Reichmuth, B.; White, M.; Wood, T.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

26

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed- Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford’s 300 Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, WA – Hanford’s River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has met a significant cleanup challenge on the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082-ton nuclear test reactor from the 300 Area.

27

MANHATTAN PROJECT B REACTOR HANFORD WASHINGTON [HANFORD'S HISTORIC B REACTOR (12-PAGE BOOKLET)  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site began as part of the United States Manhattan Project to research, test and build atomic weapons during World War II. The original 670-square mile Hanford Site, then known as the Hanford Engineer Works, was the last of three top-secret sites constructed in order to produce enriched uranium and plutonium for the world's first nuclear weapons. B Reactor, located about 45 miles northwest of Richland, Washington, is the world's first full-scale nuclear reactor. Not only was B Reactor a first-of-a-kind engineering structure, it was built and fully functional in just 11 months. Eventually, the shoreline of the Columbia River in southeastern Washington State held nine nuclear reactors at the height of Hanford's nuclear defense production during the Cold War era. The B Reactor was shut down in 1968. During the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy began removing B Reactor's support facilities. The reactor building, the river pumphouse and the reactor stack are the only facilities that remain. Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office offers escorted public access to B Reactor along a designated tour route. The National Park Service (NPS) is studying preservation and interpretation options for sites associated with the Manhattan Project. A draft is expected in summer 2009. A final report will recommend whether the B Reactor, along with other Manhattan Project facilities, should be preserved, and if so, what roles the DOE, the NPS and community partners will play in preservation and public education. In August 2008, the DOE announced plans to open B Reactor for additional public tours. Potential hazards still exist within the building. However, the approved tour route is safe for visitors and workers. DOE may open additional areas once it can assure public safety by mitigating hazards.

GERBER MS

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

EA-1211: Relocation and Storage of Isotopic Heat Sources, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for relocation and storage of the isotopic heat sources at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in Richland, Washington.

30

Washington Closure Hanford System Engineer Program FY2010 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the assessments of the vital safety systems (VSS) that are administered under WCH’s system engineer program.

J.N. Winters

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

31

Safe interim storage of Hanford tank wastes, draft environmental impact statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Draft EIS is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). DOE and Ecology have identified the need to resolve near-term tank safety issues associated with Watchlist tanks as identified pursuant to Public Law (P.L.) 101-510, Section 3137, ``Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation,`` of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991, while continuing to provide safe storage for other Hanford wastes. This would be an interim action pending other actions that could be taken to convert waste to a more stable form based on decisions resulting from the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS. The purpose for this action is to resolve safety issues concerning the generation of unacceptable levels of hydrogen in two Watchlist tanks, 101-SY and 103-SY. Retrieving waste in dilute form from Tanks 101-SY and 103-SY, hydrogen-generating Watchlist double shell tanks (DSTs) in the 200 West Area, and storage in new tanks is the preferred alternative for resolution of the hydrogen safety issues.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Summary of Group Development and Testing for Single Shell Tank Closure at Hanford  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the bench-scale and large scale experimental studies performed by Savannah River National Laboratory for CH2M HILL to develop grout design mixes for possible use in producing fill materials as a part of Tank Closure of the Single-Shell Tanks at Hanford. The grout development data provided in this report demonstrates that these design mixes will produce fill materials that are ready for use in Hanford single shell tank closure. The purpose of this report is to assess the ability of the proposed grout specifications to meet the current requirements for successful single shell tank closure which will include the contracting of services for construction and operation of a grout batch plant. The research and field experience gained by SRNL in the closure of Tanks 17F and 20F at the Savannah River Site was leveraged into the grout development efforts for Hanford. It is concluded that the three Hanford grout design mixes provide fill materials that meet the current requirements for successful placement. This conclusion is based on the completion of recommended testing using Hanford area materials by the operators of the grout batch plant. This report summarizes the regulatory drivers and the requirements for grout mixes as tank fill material. It is these requirements for both fresh and cured grout properties that drove the development of the grout formulations for the stabilization, structural and capping layers.

Harbour, John, R.

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

33

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington file:///I|/Data%20Migration%20Task/EIS-0189-FEIS-Summary-1996.HTM[6/27/2011 11:21:59 AM] The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires Federal agencies to analyze the potential environmental impacts of their proposed actions to assist them in making informed decisions. A similar Washington State law, the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), requires State agencies, including the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), to analyze environmental impacts before making decisions that could impact the environment. A major emphasis of both laws is to promote public awareness of these actions and provide opportunities for public involvement. Because NEPA and SEPA requirements are similar, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Ecology

34

A WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY POSTDOCTORAL POSITION FOR WORK AT LIGO HANFORD, WA Applications are invited for a postdoctoral position in the Gravity Group at the Department of Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY POSTDOCTORAL POSITION FOR WORK AT LIGO HANFORD, WA Applications characterization for the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) at the Hanford site characterization at the LIGO Hanford observatory. Familiarity with data analysis pipelines for searching

Collins, Gary S.

35

EIS-0391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double-shell tanks and closure of the SST system, (2) decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility, a nuclear test reactor, and (3) disposal...

36

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, conducted August 18 through September 5, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Hanford Site. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Hanford Site, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the Hanford Site. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Hanford Site Survey. 44 refs., 88 figs., 74 tabs.

Not Available

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, conducted August 18 through September 5, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Hanford Site. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Hanford Site, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the Hanford Site. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Hanford Site Survey. 44 refs., 88 figs., 74 tabs.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT TO SUPPORT CLOSURE OF SINGLE-SHELL TANK WASTE MANAGEMENT AREA C AT THE HANFORD SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current proposed regulatory agreements (Consent Decree) at the Hanford Site call for closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) C in the year 2019. WMA C is part of the SST system in 200 East area ofthe Hanford Site and is one of the first tank farm areas built in mid-1940s. In order to close WMA C, both tank and facility closure activities and corrective actions associated with existing soil and groundwater contamination must be performed. Remedial activities for WMA C and corrective actions for soils and groundwater within that system will be supported by various types of risk assessments and interim performance assessments (PA). The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and the State ofWashington Department of Ecology (Ecology) are sponsoring a series of working sessions with regulators and stakeholders to solicit input and to obtain a common understanding concerning the scope, methods, and data to be used in the planned risk assessments and PAs to support closure of WMA C. In addition to DOE-ORP and Ecology staff and contractors, working session members include representatives from the U.S. Enviromnental Protection Agency, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), interested tribal nations, other stakeholders groups, and members of the interested public. NRC staff involvement in the working sessions is as a technical resource to assess whether required waste determinations by DOE for waste incidental to reprocessing are based on sound technical assumptions, analyses, and conclusions relative to applicable incidental waste criteria.

BERGERON MP

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hanford Federal Facility state of Washington leased land  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to provide information concerning past solid and hazardous waste management practices for all leased land at the US DOE Hanford Reservation. This report contains sections including land description; land usage; ground water, air and soil monitoring data; and land uses after 1963. Numerous appendices are included which provide documentation of lease agreements and amendments, environmental assessments, and site surveys.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

CLOSURE WELDING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS CONTAINERS AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) responsibility for the disposition of radioactive materials has given rise to several unique welding applications. Many of these materials require packaging into containers for either Interim or long-term storage. It is not uncommon that final container fabrication, i.e., closure welding, is performed with these materials already placed into the container. Closure welding is typically performed remote to the container, and routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE) are often times not feasible. Fluor Hanford has packaged many such materials in recent years as park of the Site's cleanup mission. In lieu of post-weld testing and NDE, the Fluor-Hanford approach has been to establish weld quality through ''upfront'' development and qualification of welding parameters, and then ensure parameter compliance during welding. This approach requires a rigor not usually afforded to typical welding development activities, and may involve statistical analysis and extensive testing, including burst, drop, sensitive leak testing, etc. This paper provides an instructive review of the development and qualification activities associated with the closure of radioactive materials containers, including a brief report on activities for closure welding research reactor, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site.

CANNELL, G.R.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This Final ''Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement'' (HCP EIS) is being used by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its nine cooperating and consulting agencies to develop a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site. The DOE will use the Final HCP EIS as a basis for a Record of Decision (ROD) on a CLUP for the Hanford Site. While development of the CLUP will be complete with release of the HCP EIS ROD, full implementation of the CLUP is expected to take at least 50 years. Implementation of the CLUP would begin a more detailed planning process for land-use and facility-use decisions at the Hanford Site. The DOE would use the CLUP to screen proposals. Eventually, management of Hanford Site areas would move toward the CLUP land-use goals. This CLUP process could take more than 50 years to fully achieve the land-use goals.

N /A

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

An Initial Evaluation Of Characterization And Closure Options For Underground Pipelines Within A Hanford Site Single-Shell Tank Farm  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site includes 149 single-shell tanks, organized in 12 'tank farms,' with contents managed as high-level mixed waste. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order requires that one tank farm, the Waste Management Area C, be closed by June 30, 2019. A challenge to this project is the disposition and closure of Waste Management Area C underground pipelines. Waste Management Area C contains nearly seven miles of pipelines and 200 separate pipe segments. The pipelines were taken out of service decades ago and contain unknown volumes and concentrations of tank waste residuals from past operations. To understand the scope of activities that may be required for these pipelines, an evaluation was performed. The purpose of the evaluation was to identify what, if any, characterization methods and/or closure actions may be implemented at Waste Management Area C for closure of Waste Management Area C by 2019. Physical and analytical data do not exist for Waste Management Area C pipeline waste residuals. To develop estimates of residual volumes and inventories of contamination, an extensive search of available information on pipelines was conducted. The search included evaluating historical operation and occurrence records, physical attributes, schematics and drawings, and contaminant inventories associated with the process history of plutonium separations facilities and waste separations and stabilization operations. Scoping analyses of impacts to human health and the environment using three separate methodologies were then developed based on the waste residual estimates. All analyses resulted in preliminary assessments, indicating that pipeline waste residuals presented a comparably low long-term impact to groundwater with respect to soil, tank and other ancillary equipment residuals, but exceeded Washington State cleanup requirement values. In addition to performing the impact analyses, the assessment evaluated available sampling technologies and pipeline removal or treatment technologies. The evaluation accounted for the potential high worker risk, high cost, and schedule impacts associated with characterization, removal, or treatment of pipelines within Waste Management Area C for closure. This assessment was compared to the unknown, but estimated low, long-term impacts to groundwater associated with remaining waste residuals should the pipelines be left "as is" and an engineered surface barrier or landfill cap be placed. This study also recommended that no characterization or closure actions be assumed or started for the pipelines within Waste Management Area C, likewise with the premise that a surface barrier or landfill cap be placed over the pipelines.

Badden, Janet W. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Connelly, Michael P. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Seeley, Paul N. [Cenibark International, Inc., Kennewick (United States); Hendrickson, Michelle L. [Washington State Univ., Richland (United States). Dept. of Ecology

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

43

Updated Site Response Analyses for the Waste Treatment Plant, DOE Hanford, Site, Washington.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the calculations performed to develop updated relative amplification functions for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facility at the DOE Hanford Site, Washington State. The original 2,000-year return period design spectra for the WTP were based on the results of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) performed for the DOE Hanford Site by Geomatrix (1996). Geomatrix (1996) performed the PSHA using empirical soil-site ground motion models based primarily on recordings from California. As part of that study, site response analyses were performed to evaluate ground motions at the Hanford sites and California deep soil sites. As described in Appendix A of Geomatrix (1996), characteristic site profiles and dynamic soil properties representative of conditions at various Hanford sites and California deep soil strong motion recording stations were defined. Relative site responses of the Hanford profiles and California profiles were then compared. Based on the results of those site response analyses, it was concluded that ground motions at the Hanford sites underlain by deep soil deposits are similar in character to those on California deep soil sites and it was judged appropriate to use empirical deep soil site attenuation relationships based primarily on California ground motion data to develop design spectra for the Hanford sites. In a subsequent analysis, Geomatrix (2003) updated the site response analyses of Geomatrix (1996, Appendix A) to incorporate randomization of the California and Hanford profiles. The results of that analysis also led to the conclusion that the response of the Hanford profiles was similar to the response of deep soil sites in California.

Youngs, Robert R.

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

44

DASHBOARDS & CONTROL CHARTS EXPERIENCES IN IMPROVING SAFETY AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of safety methodology, quality tools, leadership, and teamwork at Hanford and their significant positive impact on safe performance of work. Dashboards, Leading Indicators, Control charts, Pareto Charts, Dr. W. Edward Deming's Red Bead Experiment, and Dr. Deming's System of Profound Knowledge have been the principal tools and theory of an integrated management system. Coupled with involved leadership and teamwork, they have led to significant improvements in worker safety and protection, and environmental restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

PREVETTE, S.S.

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

45

Environmental assessment, K Pool fish rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has a need to respond to a request to lease facilities at the Hanford Site 100-KE and 100-KW filter plant pools (K Pools) for fish rearing activities. These fish rearing activities would be: (1) business ventures with public and private funds and (2) long-term enhancement and supplementation programs for game fish populations in the Columbia River Basin. The proposed action is to enter into a use permit or lease agreement with the YIN or other parties who would rear fish in the 100-K Area Pools. The proposed action would include necessary piping, pump, and electrical upgrades of the facility; cleaning and preparation of the pools; water withdrawal from the Columbia River, and any necessary water or wastewater treatment; and introduction, rearing and release of fish. Future commercial operations may be included.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Environmental Assessment Use of Existing Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) operates the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The DOE needs to identify and operate onsite locations for a continued supply of raw aggregate materials [approximately 7,600,000 cubic meters (10,000,000 cubic yards) over the next 10 years] for new facility construction, maintenance of existing facilities and transportation corridors, and fill and capping material for remediation and other sites.

N /A

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

47

Management of Hanford Site non-defense production reactor spent nuclear fuel, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs to provide radiologically, and industrially safe and cost-effective management of the non-defense production reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Hanford Site. The proposed action would place the Hanford Site`s non-defense production reactor SNF in a radiologically- and industrially-safe, and passive storage condition pending final disposition. The proposed action would also reduce operational costs associated with storage of the non-defense production reactor SNF through consolidation of the SNF and through use of passive rather than active storage systems. Environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with existing non-defense production reactor SNF storage facilities have been identified. DOE has determined that additional activities are required to consolidate non-defense production reactor SNF management activities at the Hanford Site, including cost-effective and safe interim storage, prior to final disposition, to enable deactivation of facilities where the SNF is now stored. Cost-effectiveness would be realized: through reduced operational costs associated with passive rather than active storage systems; removal of SNF from areas undergoing deactivation as part of the Hanford Site remediation effort; and eliminating the need to duplicate future transloading facilities at the 200 and 400 Areas. Radiologically- and industrially-safe storage would be enhanced through: (1) removal from aging facilities requiring substantial upgrades to continue safe storage; (2) utilization of passive rather than active storage systems for SNF; and (3) removal of SNF from some storage containers which have a limited remaining design life. No substantial increase in Hanford Site environmental impacts would be expected from the proposed action. Environmental impacts from postulated accident scenarios also were evaluated, and indicated that the risks associated with the proposed action would be small.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Regulatory Closure Options for the Residue in the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tanks  

SciTech Connect

Liquid, mixed, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has been stored in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTS) located in tank farms on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The DOE is developing technologies to retrieve as much remaining HLW as technically possible prior to physically closing the tank farms. In support of the Hanford Tanks Initiative, Sandia National Laboratories has addressed the requirements for the regulatory closure of the radioactive component of any SST residue that may remain after physical closure. There is significant uncertainty about the end state of each of the 149 SSTS; that is, the nature and amount of wastes remaining in the SSTS after retrieval is uncertain. As a means of proceeding in the face of these uncertainties, this report links possible end-states with associated closure options. Requirements for disposal of HLW and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) are reviewed in detail. Incidental waste, which is radioactive waste produced incidental to the further processing of HLW, is then discussed. If the low activity waste (LAW) fraction from the further processing of HLW is determined to be incidental waste, then DOE can dispose of that incidental waste onsite without a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC). The NRC has proposed three Incidental Waste Criteria for determining if a LAW fraction is incidental waste. One of the three Criteria is that the LAW fraction should not exceed the NRC's Class C limits.

Cochran, J.R. Shyr, L.J.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

49

Developing and Qualifying Parameters for Closure Welding Overpacks Containing Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Fluor engineers developed a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) technique and parameters, demonstrated requisite weld quality, and successfully closure-welded packaged spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site. This paper reviews weld development and qualification activities associated with the overpack closure-welding and provides a summary of the production campaign. The primary requirement of the closure weld is to provide leak-tight confinement of the packaged material against release to the environment during interim storage (40-year design term). Required weld quality, in this case, was established through up-front development and qualification, and then verification of parameter compliance during production welding. This approach was implemented to allow for a simpler overpack design and more efficient production operations than possible with approaches using routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE). A series of welding trials were conducted to establish the desired welding technique and parameters. Qualification of the process included statistical evaluation and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section IX testing. In addition, pull testing with a weighted mockup, and thermal calculation/physical testing to identify the maximum temperature the packaged contents would be subject to during welding, was performed. Thirteen overpacks were successfully packaged and placed into interim storage. The closure-welding development activities (including pull testing and thermal analysis) provided the needed confidence that the packaged SNF overpacks could be safely handled and placed into interim storage, and remain leak-tight for the duration of the storage term. (author)

Cannell, G.R.; Goldmann, L.H.; McCormack, R.L. [Hanford Site, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

DEVELOPING AND QUANTIFYING PARAMETERS FOR CLOSURE WELDING OVERPACKS CONTAINING RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

Fluor engineers developed a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) technique and parameters, demonstrated requisite weld quality and successfully closure-welded packaged spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site. This paper reviews weld development and qualification activities associated with the overpack closure-welding and provides a summary of the production campaign. The primary requirement of the closure weld is to provide leaktight confinement of the packaged material against release to the environment during interim storage (40-year design term). Required weld quality, in this case, was established through up-front development and qualification, and then verification of parameter compliance during production welding. This approach was implemented to allow for a simpler overpack design and more efficient production operations than possible with approaches using routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE). . A series of welding trials were conducted to establish the desired welding technique and parameters. Qualification of the process included statistical evaluation and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section IX testing. In addition, pull testing with a weighted mockup, and thermal calculation/physical testing to identify the maximum temperature the packaged contents would be subject to during welding, was performed. Thirteen overpacks were successfully packaged and placed into interim storage. The closure-welding development activities (including pull testing and thermal analysis) provided the needed confidence that the packaged SNF overpacks could be safely handled and placed into interim storage, and remain leaktight for the duration of the storage term.

CANNELL GR

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

Archaeological survey of the 200 East and 200 West Areas, Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Responding to a heavy demand for cultural resource reviews of excavation sites, the Westinghouse Hanford Company contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory to conduct a comprehensive archaeological resource review for the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site, Washington. This was accomplished through literature and records review and an intensive pedestrian survey of all undisturbed portions of the 200 East Area and a stratified random sample of the 200 West Area. The survey, followed the Secretary of the Interior's guidelines for the identification of historic properties. The result of the survey is a model of cultural resource distributions that has been used to create cultural resource zones with differing degrees of sensitivity. 11 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Chatters, J.C.; Cadoret, N.A.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Revised Draft Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Import Statement, Richland, Washington - Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Link to Main Report Link to Main Report RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: COVER SHEET 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office TITLE: Revised Draft Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, Benton County, Washington (DOE/EIS-0286D2) CONTACT: For further information on this document, write or call: Mr. Michael S. Collins HSW EIS Document Manager Richland Operations Office U.S. Department of Energy, A6-38 P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352-0550 Telephone: (800) 426-4914 Fax: (509) 372-1926 Email: hsweis@rl.gov For further information on the Department's National Environmental Policy Act process,

53

Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Import Statement, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COVER SHEET 1 COVER SHEET 1 U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office 2 3 TITLE: 4 Revised Draft Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact 5 Statement, Richland, Benton County, Washington (DOE/EIS-0286D2) 6 7 CONTACT: 8 For further information on this document, write or call: Mr. Michael S. Collins HSW EIS Document Manager Richland Operations Office U.S. Department of Energy, A6-38 P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352-0550 Telephone: (800) 426-4914 Fax: (509) 372-1926 Email: hsweis@rl.gov For further information on the Department's National Environmental Policy Act process, contact: Ms. Carol M. Borgstrom, Director Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, EH-42 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W.

54

Final Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COVER SHEET COVER SHEET U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office TITLE: Final Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, Benton County, Washington (DOE/EIS-0286F) CONTACT: For further information on this document, write or call: Mr. Michael S. Collins HSW EIS Document Manager Richland Operations Office U.S. Department of Energy, A6-38 P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352-0550 Telephone: (509) 376-6536 Fax: (509) 372-1926 Email: hsweis@rl.gov For further information on the Department's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact: Ms. Carol M. Borgstrom, Director Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, EH-42 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W.

55

DOEEA-1178 Assessment 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Assessment 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. March 1997 , DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liabili- ty or mponsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, appa- ratus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or s e m ' c e by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

56

Westinghouse P.O. Box 1970 Hanford COlTlpany Richland, Washington 99352  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Westinghouse P.O. Box 1970 Westinghouse P.O. Box 1970 Hanford COlTlpany Richland, Washington 99352 Hanford Operations and Engineering Contractor for the U S . Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-87RL10930 Approved for Public Release o-vrrorr 91: WHC-MR-0293 Revision 2 _-- Legend and Legacy: Fifty Years of Defense Production at the Hanford Site M. S. Gerber Date Published September 1992 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Manage men t 3 e f e r e n c e WHC-c: INFORMATION RELEASE REEUEST IN 0 Y 3s % - a - - Referencas Available to I n t e n d e d Audience T r a n s m i t to 00E-HQIOffice o f Scienofic and Tacnnical l n f o r m a a o n x u AurhorlRsquestor (PnnredlSignarure) $ & rnS*G&Gec #/L+ f2 lntenaed Audience u a Internal Sponsor s x t e r n

57

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 25, 2010 January 25, 2010 EIS-0391: Updated Notice of Public Hearings Tank Closure and Waste Management for the Hanford Site, Richland, WA January 13, 2010 CX-000471: Categorical Exclusion Determination Limited Prescribed Burning on the Hanford Site During October, November, and December of 2010 to Maintain Critical Fire Breaks CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 01/13/2010 Location(s): Benton County, Washington Office(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office January 8, 2010 EIS-0391: Notice of Public Hearings Tank Closure and Waste Management for the Hanford Site, Richland, WA January 1, 2010 EIS-0222: Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan December 18, 2009 EIS-0391: Notice of Modification of Preferred Alternatives

58

Quantitative 3-D Elemental Mapping by LA-ICP-MS of a Basaltic Clast from the Hanford 300 Area, Washington, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantitative 3-D Elemental Mapping by LA-ICP-MS of a Basaltic Clast from the Hanford 300 Area collected from the Hanford 300 Area in south-central Washington State, United States. A calibration method and riparian quality in many locations, most notably at the Hanford, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, and Nevada Test

Hu, Qinhong "Max"

59

Environmental assessment of SP-100 ground engineering system test site: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to modify an existing reactor containment building (decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) 309 Building) to provide ground test capability for the prototype SP-100 reactor. The 309 Building (Figure 1.1) is located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that Federal agencies assess the potential impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This Environmental Assessment describes the consideration given to environmental impacts during reactor concept and test site selection, examines the environmental effects of the DOE proposal to ground test the nuclear subsystem, describes alternatives to the proposed action, and examines radiological risks of potential SP-100 use in space. 73 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Engineering study of 50 miscellaneous inactive underground radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This engineering study addresses 50 inactive underground radioactive waste tanks. The tanks were formerly used for the following functions associated with plutonium and uranium separations and waste management activities in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site: settling solids prior to disposal of supernatant in cribs and a reverse well; neutralizing acidic process wastes prior to crib disposal; receipt and processing of single-shell tank (SST) waste for uranium recovery operations; catch tanks to collect water that intruded into diversion boxes and transfer pipeline encasements and any leakage that occurred during waste transfer operations; and waste handling and process experimentation. Most of these tanks have not been in use for many years. Several projects have, been planned and implemented since the 1970`s and through 1985 to remove waste and interim isolate or interim stabilize many of the tanks. Some tanks have been filled with grout within the past several years. Responsibility for final closure and/or remediation of these tanks is currently assigned to several programs including Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Environmental Restoration and Remedial Action (ERRA), and Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure (D&RCP). Some are under facility landlord responsibility for maintenance and surveillance (i.e. Plutonium Uranium Extraction [PUREX]). However, most of the tanks are not currently included in any active monitoring or surveillance program.

Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

1994-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect

In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

BAZZELL, K.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Coumbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCH’s Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

63

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCH’s Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

64

TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground measurements to refine interpretations of AEM data; and (3) Improve the calibration and correlation of AEM information. The potential benefits of this project are as follows: (1) Develop a tool to map subsurface units at the Hanford Site in a rapid and cost effective manner; (2) Map groundwater pathways within the River Corridor; and (3) Aid development of the conceptual site model. If anomalies observed in the AEM data can be correlated with subsurface geology, then the rapid scanning and non-intrusive capabilities provided by the airborne surveys can be used at the Hanford Site to screen for areas that warrant further investigation.

PETERSEN SW

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

65

Hanford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hanford Cleanup Site The Hanford Site mission focuses on environmental restoration, waste management, related scientific and environmental research and development of radioactive...

66

Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The seismic design basis for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, was established in 1999 based on an extensive probabilistic seismic hazard analysis completed in 1996 by Geomatrix Consultants, Inc. In subsequent years, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) staff questioned the some of the assumptions used in developing the seismic design basis, particularly the adequacy of the site geotechnical surveys. Existing site-specific shear wave velocity data were considered insufficient to reliably use California earthquake response data to directly predict ground motions at the Hanford Site. To address this concern, the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed and executed a plan for acquiring site-specific soil data down to approximately 500 feet, and for reanalyzing the effects of deeper layers of sediments interbedded with basalt. New geophysical data were acquired, analyzed, and interpreted with respect to existing geologic information gathered from other Hanford-related projects in the WTP area. Existing data from deep boreholes were assembled and interpreted to produce a model of the deeper rock layers consisting of inter-layered basalts and sedimentary interbeds. These data were analyzed statistically to determine the variability of seismic velocities. The earthquake ground motion response was simulated on a large number of models resulting from a weighted logic tree approach that addressed the geologic and geophysical uncertainties. Weights in the logic tree were chosen by a working group based on the strength or weakness of the available data for each combination of logic tree parameters. Finally, interim design ground motion spectra were developed to envelope the remaining uncertainties. The results of this study demonstrate that the site-specific soil structure (Hanford and Ringold formations) beneath the WTP is thinner than was assumed in the 1996 Hanford Site-wide model. This thinness produces peaks in the response spectra (relative to those in 1996) near 2 Hz and 5 Hz. The soil geophysical properties, shear wave velocity, and nonlinear response to the earthquake ground motions are known sufficiently, and alternative interpretations consistent with this data did not have a strong influence on the results. The structure of the upper four basalt flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt), which are inter-layered with sedimentary interbeds (Ellensburg Formation), produces strong reductions in the earthquake ground motions that propagate through them to reach the surface. Uncertainty in the strength of velocity contrasts between these basalts and interbeds resulted from an absence of measured shear wave velocities (Vs) in the interbeds. For this study, Vs in the interbeds was estimated from older, limited compressional wave (Vp) data using estimated ranges for the ratio of the two velocities (Vp/Vs) based on analogues in similar materials. The Vs for the basalts, where Vp/Vs is well defined, still is limited by the quality and quantity of the Vp data. A range of possible Vs for the interbeds and basalts was included in the logic trees that produced additional uncertainty in the resulting response spectra. The uncertainties in these response spectra were enveloped at approximately the 84. percentile (based on the logic tree) to produce conservative design spectra. This conservatism increased the seismic design basis by up to 40% compared to the 1999 values. Because of the sensitivity of the calculated response spectra to the velocity contrasts between the basalts and interbedded sediments, additional boreholes and direct Vs measurements through these layers are now being planned. The new measurements are expected to reduce the uncertainty in the site response that is caused by the lack of direct knowledge of the Vs contrasts within these layers. (authors)

Rohay, A.C.; Reidel, S.P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and 07: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of closing the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and the Solid Waste Landfill. The Washington State Department of Ecology is a cooperating agency in preparing this EA. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 26, 2011 EA-1707: Revised Draft Environmental Assessment Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington May 13, 2010 EA-1707: Draft Environmental Assessment

68

Expanded public notice: Washington State notice of intent for corrective action management unit, Hanford Environmental Restoration Disposal  

SciTech Connect

This document is to serve notice of the intent to operate an Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), adjacent to the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington, as a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU), in accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) 264.552. The ERDF CAMU will serve as a management unit for the majority of waste (primarily soil) excavated during remediation of waste management sites on the Hanford Facility. Only waste that originates from the Hanford Facility can be accepted in this ERDF CAMU. The waste is expected to consist of dangerous waste, radioactive waste, and mixed waste. Mixed waste contains radioactive and dangerous components. The primary features of the ERDF could include the following: one or more trenches, rail and tractor/trailer container handling capability, railroads, an inventory control system, a decontamination building, and operational offices.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

National Register of Historic Places multiple property documentation form -- Historic, archaeological, and traditional cultural properties of the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site encompasses an area of 560 square miles on the Columbia River in southeastern Washington. Since 1943, the Hanford Site has existed as a protected area for activities primarily related to the production of radioactive materials for national defense uses. For cultural resources on the Hanford Site, establishment of the nuclear reservation as a high security area, with public access restricted, has resulted in a well-protected status, although no deliberate resource protection measures were in effect to mitigate effects of facilities construction and associated activities. Thus, the Hanford Site contains an extensive record of aboriginal archaeological sites and Native American cultural properties, along with pre-Hanford Euro-American sites (primarily archaeological in nature with the removal of most pre-1943 structures), and a considerable number of Manhattan Project/Cold War era buildings and structures. The recent mission change from production to clean up and disposal of DOE lands created a critical need for development and implementation of new and different cultural resource management strategies. DOE-RL has undertaken a preservation planning effort for the Hanford Site. The intent of this Plan is to enable DOE-RL to organize data and develop goals, objectives, and priorities for the identification, evaluation, registration, protection, preservation, and enhancement of the Site`s historical and cultural properties. Decisions made about the identification, evaluation, registration and treatment of historic properties are most aptly made when relationships between individual properties and other similar properties are considered. The historic context and the multiple property documentation (NTD) process provides DOE-RL the organizational framework for these decisions. Once significant patterns are identified, contexts developed, and expected properties are defined, the NTD process provides the foundation for future decisions concerning the management of significant cultural resources on the Hanford Site.

Nickens, P.R.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

GROUDWATER REMEDIATION AT THE 100-HR-3 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA - 11507  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site underlies three former plutonium production reactors and the associated infrastructure at the 100-D and 100-H Areas. The primary contaminant of concern at the site is hexavalent chromium; the secondary contaminants are strontium-90, technetium-99, tritium, uranium, and nitrate. The hexavalent chromium plume is the largest plume of its type in the state of Washington, covering an area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} (2.7 mi{sup 2}) with concentrations greater than 20 {micro}g/L. Concentrations range from 60,000 {micro}g/L near the former dichromate transfer station in the 100-D Area to large areas of 20 to 100 {micro}g/L across much of the plume area. Pump-and-treat operations began in 1997 and continued into 2010 at a limited scale of approximately 200 gal/min. Remediation of groundwater has been fairly successful in reaching remedial action objectives (RAOs) of 20 {micro}g/L over a limited region at the 100-H, but less effective at 100-D. In 2000, an in situ, permeable reactive barrier was installed downgradient of the hotspot in 100-D as a second remedy. The RAOs are still being exceeded over a large portion of the area. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company was awarded the remediation contract for groundwater in 2008 and initiated a remedial process optimization study consisting of modeling and technical studies intended to enhance the remediation. As a result of the study, 1,400 gal/min of expanded treatment capacity are being implemented. These new systems are designed to meet 2012 and 2020 target milestones for protection of the Columbia River and cleanup of the groundwater plumes.

SMOOT JL; BIEBESHEIMER FH; ELUSKIE JA; SPILIOTOPOULOS A; TONKIN MJ; SIMPKIN T

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor Contractor Spent Two Years Preparing to Remediate 618-10 Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor Contractor Spent Two Years Preparing to Remediate 618-10 August 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov 509-376-5365 Todd Nelson, Washington Closure media@wch-rcc.com 509-372-9097 RICHLAND, WASH. - After careful preparation and characterization, the Department of Energy's (DOE) River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has begun remediation of one of the most hazardous burial grounds tackled to date on the Hanford Site's River Corridor. The $57 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project began with nearly two years of preparation and characterization before reaching their

72

Fiscal year 1991 report on archaeological surveys of the 100 Areas, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

In compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company, the Hanford Cultured Resources Laboratory (HCRL) conducted an archaeological survey during FY 1991 of the 100-Area reactor compounds on the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. This survey was conducted as part of a comprehensive resources review of 100-Area Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) operable units in support of CERCLA characterization activities. The work included a lite and records review and pedestrian survey of the project area following procedures set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan.

Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.; Minthorn, P.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fiscal year 1991 report on archaeological surveys of the 100 Areas, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

In compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company, the Hanford Cultured Resources Laboratory (HCRL) conducted an archaeological survey during FY 1991 of the 100-Area reactor compounds on the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. This survey was conducted as part of a comprehensive resources review of 100-Area Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) operable units in support of CERCLA characterization activities. The work included a lite and records review and pedestrian survey of the project area following procedures set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan.

Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.; Minthorn, P.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Preliminary Closure Plan for the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Disposal Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the preliminary plans for closure of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) disposal facility to be built by the Office of River Protection at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington. The facility will provide near-surface disposal of up to 204,000 cubic meters of ILAW in engineered trenches with modified RCRA Subtitle C closure barriers.

BURBANK, D.A.

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Data Summary Report for teh Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This data summary report summarizes the investigation results to evaluate the nature and distribution of Hanford Site-related contaminants present in the Columbia River. As detailed in DOE/RL-2008-11, more than 2,000 environmental samples were collected from the Columbia River between 2008 and 2010. These samples consisted of island soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater upwelling (pore water, surface water, and sediment), and fish tissue.

Hulstrom, L.

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 29, 2006 November 29, 2006 EIS-0183: Record of Decision Electrical Interconnection of the Windy Point Wind Energy Project June 26, 2006 EIS-0397: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement Lyle Falls Fishway Project May 1, 2006 EIS-0384: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Chief Joseph Hatchery Program March 31, 2006 EA-1547: Finding of No Significant Impact Fast Flux Test Facility Project, Hanford Site March 1, 2006 EA-1547: Final Environmental Assessment Sodium Residual Reaction/Removal and Other Deactivation Work Activities, Fast Flux Test Facility Project, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington February 17, 2006 EIS-0391: Notice to Extend Scoping Period Tank Closure and Waste Management for the Hanford Site, Richland, WA

77

Identifying the sources of subsurface contamination at the Hanford site in Washington using high-precision uranium isotopic measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Batches Processed Through Hanford Separations Plants, 1944Rev. 0, Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Richland, WA,11) Hartman, M.J. , ed. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring:

Christensen, John N.; Dresel, P. Evan; Conrad, Mark E.; Maher, Kate; DePaolo, Donald J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Transuranic Waste Retrieval from the 218-W-4B and 218-W-4C Low-Level Burial Grounds, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05 05 Environmental Assessment Transuranic Waste Retrieval from the 218-W-4B and 218-W-4C Low-Level Burial Grounds, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. March 2002 DOE/EA-1405 U.S. Department of Energy Contents Environmental Assessment C-1 March 2002 CONTENTS PREFACE ....................................................................................................................................P-1 GLOSSARY ................................................................................................................................ G-1 SCIENTIFIC NOTATION CONVERSION CHART .................................................................... G-2 METRIC CONVERSION CHART...............................................................................................

79

Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington Washington , DC 20585 September 20, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF CONTRACTING ACTIVITY AND PROCUREMENT DIRECTORS FROM : SUBJECT: PAULBOSCO~~ - SENIOR PROCUhM~ OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT JOSEPH F. WADDELL SENIOR PROCUREMENT NNSA OFFICE OF ACQ SITION MANAGEMENT Acquisition Savings Reporting Template Guidance The Department is continuing to make progress in its efforts to support the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Acquisition Savings Initiative, as well as the Department's Strategic Sourcing Program. After using our current reporting template for the past year, it was a good time to review the process and make adjustments where necessary. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) has also noted in an audit that

80

Revised Hydrogeology for the Suprabasalt Aquifer System, 200-West Area and Vicinity, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this study was to refine the conceptual groundwater flow model for the 200-West Area and vicinity. This is the second of two reports that combine to cover the 200 Area Plateau, an area that holds the largest inventory of radionuclide and chemical waste on the Hanford Site.

Williams, Bruce A.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schalla, Ronald; Webber, William D.

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT EXPANSION OF THE VOLPENTEST HAZARDOUS MATERIALS MANAGEMENT AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING AND EDUCATION CENTER HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY November 2002 1 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact This page intentionally left blank. 2 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1412, for expanding training and equipment testing facilities at the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center (HAMMER) on the

82

Evaluation and Screening of Remedial Technologies for Uranium at the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is presently conducting a re-evaluation of remedies addressing persistent dissolved uranium concentrations in the upper aquifer under the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This work is being conducted as a Phase III feasibility study for the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy. As part of the feasibility study process, a comprehensive inventory of candidate remedial technologies was conducted by PNNL. This report documents the identification and screening of candidate technologies. The screening evaluation was conducted in accordance with guidance and processes specified by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations associated with implementation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act process.

Nimmons, Michael J.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Occupational Exposure Evaluation of Complex Vapor Mixtures at the Hanford Nuclear Waste Site, Washington Work-site Vapor Characterization  

SciTech Connect

Extensive sampling and analysis has been done over the years to characterize the radioactive and chemical properties of hazardous waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford site in eastern Washington State. The purpose of these analyses was to evaluate safety and environmental concerns related to tank stability. More recently, characterization studies have broadened to evaluate potential health hazards of chemical vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. The extensive sampling done during this campaign evaluated vapor concentrations of more than 100 different chemical at 70 sites in and around one section of the tank farms. Sampling identified only four vapors (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitrosodimethylamine, and nitrosomethylethylamine) that were present above occupational exposure limits. These elevated concentrations were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors were measured above 10% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. This suggests that vapor controls can be focused on limited hazard zones around sources. (authors)

Anderson, T. J. [CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. / Environmental Health, P.O. Box 1000, S7-70, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

85

Archaeological survey of the McGee Ranch vicinity, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request for a cultural resources review from Westinghouse Hanford Company for the Action Plan for Characterization of McGee Ranch Soil, Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) conducted an archaeological survey of the McGee Ranch vicinity, located in the northwest portion of the Hanford Site. Staff members covered 8.4 km{sup 2} and recorded 42 cultural resources; 22 sites, and 20 isolated artifacts. Only 2 sites and 3 isolates were attributed to a prehistoric Native American occupation. The historic sites date from the turn of the century to the 1940s and are representative of the settlement patterns that occurred throughout the Columbia Basin. In addition to an archaeological pedestrian survey of the project area, we conducted literature and records searches and examined available aerial photographs. Records kept at HCRL were reviewed to determine if any archaeological survey had been conducted previously within the project area. Although no survey had been conducted, portions of the area adjacent to project boundaries were surveyed in 1988 and 1990. During those surveys, historic and prehistoric cultural resources were observed, increasing the possibility that similar land usage had taken place within the current project boundaries. Literature searches established a general historical sequence for this area. Aerial photographs alerted researchers to homesteads and linear features, such as roads and irrigation ditches, that might not be apparent from ground level.

Gard, H.A.; Poet, R.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Closure of the condensed-phase organic-nitrate reaction USQ at hanford  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discovery Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) was declared on the underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site in May 1996. The USQ was for condensed-phase organic-nitrate reactions (sometimes called organic complexant reactions) in the tanks. This paper outlines the steps taken to close the USQ, and resolve the related safety issue. Several processes were used at the Hanford Site to extract and/or process plutonium. These processes resulted in organic complexants (for chelating multivalent cations) and organic extraction solvents being sent to the underground waste storage tanks. This paper addresses the organic complexant hazard. The organic complexants are in waste matrices that include inert material, diluents, and potential oxidizers. In the presence of oxidizing material, the complexant salts can be made to react exothermically by heating to high temperatures or by applying an external ignition source of sufficient energy. The first organic complexant hazard assessments focused on determining whether a hulk runaway reaction could occur, similar to the 1957 accident at Kyshtm (a reprocessing plant in the former U.S.S.R.). Early analyses (1977 through 1994) examined organic-nitrate reaction onset temperatures and concluded that a bulk runaway reaction could not occur at the Hanford Site because tank temperatures were well below that necessary for bulk runaway. Therefore, it was believed that organic-nitrate reactions were adequately described in the then current Authorization Basis (AB). Subsequent studies examined a different accident scenario, propagation resulting from an external ignition source (e.g., lightning or welding slag) that initiates a combustion front that propagates through the organic waste. A USQ evaluation determined that localized high energy ignition sources were credible, and that point source ignition of organic complexant waste was not adequately addressed i n the then existing AB. Consequently, the USQ was declared on the underground storage tanks in May 1996 for condensed-phase organic-nitrate reactions. At the same time that the operating contractor recommended that the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) declare a USQ. preventative coiitrols were implemented to minimize potential ignition sources and prevent a possible accident.

COWLEY, W.L.

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

87

Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

88

N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor Cocooning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor Cocooning Project Now Complete N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor Cocooning Project Now Complete June 14, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov 509-376-5365 Mark McKenna mmckenna@wch-rcc.com 509-372-9032 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has completed placing N Reactor in interim safe storage, a process also known as "cocooning." N Reactor was the last of nine plutonium production reactors to be shut down at DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state. It was Hanford's longest-running reactor, operating from 1963 to 1987. "In the 1960's, N Reactor represented the future of energy in America.

89

A safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-SY-101: Hanford Site,Richland, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101,which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

Lentsch, J.W.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-101-SY: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101, which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

Lentsch, J.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

91

Independent Oversight Inspection of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program June 2010 Office of Independent Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS x Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program | i Abbreviations iii Executive Summary v 1 Introduction 1 2 Management and Oversight 3 3 Findings Requiring Corrective Action 14 4 Conclusions and Cross-Cutting Opportunities for Improvement 17 Appendix A - Supplemental Information 23 Appendix B - Background Information 26 Appendix C - AdvanceMed Hanford Beryllium Medical Support Program 32 Appendix D - CH2M-Hill Plateau Remediation Company 48 Appendix E - Mission Support Alliance 57 Appendix F - Washington Closure Hanford 71

92

Confirmatory radiological survey for the 190-C Main Pumphouse Facility decommissioning at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An independent assessment of remedial action activities at the 190-C Main Pumphouse Facility at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington has been accomplished by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Assessments Group. The purpose of the assessment was to confirm the site`s compliance with DOE applicable guidelines and provide independent measurements of the activity levels in the 190-C trenches and 105-C process water tunnels. The assessment included reviews of the Decontamination and Decommissioning Plan and data provided in the pre- and post-remedial action surveys. An on-site independent verification survey of the facility was conducted during the period of November 19--21, 1996. The independent verification survey included beta and gamma scans, smears for removable contamination, and direct measurements for beta-gamma activity in the trenches and tunnels. The same measurements and scans, with the addition of alpha measurements, were performed on the floor in the filter repair confinement area. The facility was also spot-checked for direct alpha and beta-gamma activity.

Coleman, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Forbes, G.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States). Environmental Technology Section

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Pore Water Extraction Test Near 241-SX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site, Washington, USA - 14168  

SciTech Connect

A proof-of-principle test is underway near the Hanford Site 241-SX Tank Farm. The test will evaluate a potential remediation technology that will use tank farm-deployable equipment to remove contaminated pore water from vadose zone soils. The test system was designed and built to address the constraints of working within a tank farm. Due to radioactive soil contamination and limitations in drilling near tanks, small-diameter direct push drilling techniques applicable to tank farms are being utilized for well placement. To address space and weight limitations in working around tanks and obstacles within tank farms, the aboveground portions of the test system have been constructed to allow deployment flexibility. The test system utilizes low vacuum over a sealed well screen to establish flow into an extraction well. Extracted pore water is collected in a well sump,and then pumped to the surface using a small-diameter bladder pump.If pore water extraction using this system can be successfully demonstrated, it may be possible to target local contamination in the vadose zone around underground storage tanks. It is anticipated that the results of this proof-of-principle test will support future decision making regarding interim and final actions for soil contamination within the tank farms.

Eberlein, Susan J.; Parker, Danny L.; Tabor, Cynthia L.; Holm, Melissa J.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

94

Final Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSW HSW EIS January 2004 1.6 Figure 1.2. States with Radioactive Waste Disposal Activities Final HSW EIS January 2004 1.12 Figure 1.3. Relationship of the HSW EIS to Other Hanford Cleanup Operations, Material Management Activities, and Key Environmental Reviews 2.17 Final HSW EIS January 2004 Figure 2.6. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Figure 2.7. X-Ray Image of Transuranic Waste Drum Contents M0212-0286.11 HSW EIS 12-10-02 M0212-0286.12 HSW EIS 12-10-02 2.17 Final HSW EIS January 2004 Figure 2.6. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Figure 2.7. X-Ray Image of Transuranic Waste Drum Contents M0212-0286.11 HSW EIS 12-10-02 M0212-0286.12 HSW EIS 12-10-02 Final HSW EIS January 2004 2.34 Figure 2.18. Typical Liner System Final HSW EIS January 2004 2.36

95

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington, Collection of Surface Water, River Sediments, and Island Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been prepared in support of the remedial investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River and describes the 2008/2009 data collection efforts. This report documents field activities associated with collection of sediment, river water, and soil in and adjacent to the Columbia River near the Hanford Site and in nearby tributaries.

L. C. Hulstrom

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

96

Environmental assessment for the relocation and storage of isotopic heat sources, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

As part of a bilateral agreement between the Federal Minister for Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the DOE, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed processes for the treatment and immobilization of high-level radioactive waste. One element of this bilateral agreement was the production of sealed isotopic heat sources. During the mid-1980s, 30 sealed isotopic heat sources were manufactured. The sources contain a total of approximately 8.3 million curies consisting predominantly of cesium-137 and strontium-90 with trace amounts of transuranic contamination. Currently, the sources are stored in A-Cell of the 324 Building. Intense radiation fields from the sources are causing the cell windows and equipment to deteriorate. Originally, it was not intended to store the isotopic heat sources for this length of time in A-cell. The 34 isotopic heat sources are classified as remote handled transuranic wastes. Thirty-one of the isotopic heat sources are sealed, and seals on the three remaining isotopic heat sources have not been verified. However, a decision has been made to place the remaining three isotopic heat sources in the CASTOR cask(s). The Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has concurred that isotopic heat sources with verified seals or those placed into CASTOR cask(s) can be considered sealed (no potential to emit radioactive air emissions) and are exempt from WAC Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Issuance of the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issuance of the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Issuance of the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Issuance of the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement December 5, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Carrie Meyer, DOE (509) 376-0810 Carrie_C_Meyer@orp.doe.gov Erika Holmes, Ecology (509) 372-7880 Erika.Holmes@ecy.wa.gov Richland, WA - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing its Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Site, Richland, Washington" (Final TC & WM EIS, DOE/EIS-0391), prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology are cooperating agencies on this Final EIS, which analyzes

98

Industrial Hygiene Surveillance of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Industrial Hygiene Program Strategy and Implementation of the Hanford Concerns Council Recommendations, October 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORP-2011-10-26 ORP-2011-10-26 Site: Hanford (Office of River Protection) Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Industrial Hygiene Surveillance of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Industrial Hygiene Program Strategy and Implementation of the Hanford Concerns Council Recommendations Dates of Activity : 08/16-25/2011 (Field) Final Report 10/26/2011 Report Preparer: Jim Lockridge, Certified Industrial Hygienist Activity Description/Purpose: Staff from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), in coordination with the Office of River Protection (ORP), reviewed the status and programmatic health

99

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 9, 1995 November 9, 1995 EA-1123: Final Environmental Assessment Transfer of Normal and Low-Enriched Uranium Billets to the United Kingdom, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington October 1, 1995 EIS-0212: Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage of Hanford Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington October 1, 1995 EIS-0173: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision Puget Power Northwest Washington Transmission Project October 1, 1995 EIS-0245: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington May 1, 1995 EA-0984: Finding of No Significant Impact Deactivation of the N Reactor Facilities, Richland, Washington May 1, 1995 EA-0984: Final Environmental Assessment Deactivation of the N Reactor Facilities, Richland, Washington

100

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 25, 1994 February 25, 1994 EA-0915: Final Environmental Assessment Waste Tank Safety Program Hanford Site, Richland, Washington January 1, 1994 EIS-0194: Final Environmental Impact Statement Tenaska Washington II Generation Project, Washington September 16, 1993 EIS-0119: Record of Decision Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington December 1, 1992 EIS-0119: Final Environmental Impact Statement Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington September 1, 1992 EA-0429: Final Environmental Assessment Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 10, 1992 EA-0881: Finding of No Significant Impact Tank 241-c-103 Organic Vapor and Liquid Characterization and Supporting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Isotopic Tracking of Hanford 300 Area Derived Uranium in the Columbia River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F. ; and Webber, W. D.. Hanford Site Groundwater MonitoringGeochemistry at the Hanford Site. PNNL-17031. 2007. (13)contamination at the Hanford Site in Washington using high-

Christensen, John N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Contaminant desorption during long-term leaching of hydroxide-weathered Hanford sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

137 in sediments at the Hanford Site, Washington. Environ.during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks. Appl.subsurface sediments from the Hanford site, USA. Geochim.

Thompson, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Notes from 24- 25 February 2009 Office of River Protection Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment Input Meeting Attendees: Representatives from Department of Energy-Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP), DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), met at the Ecology offices in Richland, Washington on 24 & 25 February 2009. EPA Region X staff participated on 25 February 2009 via teleconference. Discussion: DOE is pursuing closure of Waste Management Area C (WMA-C) located at the Hanford Site. At some point in the future, DOE and NRC will consult on waste determinations for these tank closures; additionally these tanks will be closed in coordination with EPA and

104

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Operations Office - July 2010 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Operations Office - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Operations Office - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Operations Office - July 2010 July 2010 Joint Assessment of the Effectiveness of Corrective Actions for the Building 336 Accident The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), and the Richland Operations Office (RL) performed a joint effectiveness assessment of the corrective actions taken by Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH) in response to the Building 336 Fall Event. The review was conducted from July 12-21, 2010, by a team consisting of four HSS and six RL personnel. The scope of the assessment included evaluation of work control, fall protection, quality assurance, and conduct of operations.

105

Major Recovery Act Project Completed at Hanford: Two New Super Cells Go  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Recovery Act Project Completed at Hanford: Two New Super Major Recovery Act Project Completed at Hanford: Two New Super Cells Go Into Service To Accept Contaminated Soil and Debris Months Ahead of Schedule and Millions Under Budget Major Recovery Act Project Completed at Hanford: Two New Super Cells Go Into Service To Accept Contaminated Soil and Debris Months Ahead of Schedule and Millions Under Budget February 23, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Todd Nelson, Washington Closure (509) 372-9097 media@wch-rcc.com RICHLAND, WASH. - Two new super cells are going into service to expand disposal capacity for contaminated soil and debris at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State.

106

Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Corridor Contract To Washington Closure, LLC March 23, 2005 - 10:56am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman today announced that Washington...

107

PILOT-SCALE TEST RESULTS OF A THIN FILM EVAPORATOR SYSTEM FOR MANAGEMENT OF LIQUID HIGH-LEVEL WASTES AT THE HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA -11364  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modular, transportable evaporator system, using thin film evaporative technology, is planned for deployment at the Hanford radioactive waste storage tank complex. This technology, herein referred to as a wiped film evaporator (WFE), will be located at grade level above an underground storage tank to receive pumped liquids, concentrate the liquid stream from 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.4 and then return the concentrated solution back into the tank. Water is removed by evaporation at an internal heated drum surface exposed to high vacuum. The condensed water stream will be shipped to the site effluent treatment facility for final disposal. This operation provides significant risk mitigation to failure of the aging 242-A Evaporator facility; the only operating evaporative system at Hanford maximizing waste storage. This technology is being implemented through a development and deployment project by the tank farm operating contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), for the Office of River Protection/Department of Energy (ORPIDOE), through Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc. (Columbia Energy). The project will finalize technology maturity and install a system at one of the double-shell tank farms. This paper summarizes results of a pilot-scale test program conducted during calendar year 2010 as part of the ongoing technology maturation development scope for the WFE.

CORBETT JE; TEDESCH AR; WILSON RA; BECK TH; LARKIN J

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

108

A Short History of Waste Management at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"The world’s first full-scale nuclear reactors and chemical reprocessing plants built at the Hanford Site in the desert of eastern Washington State produced two-thirds of the plutonium generated in the United States for nuclear weapons. Operating these facilities also created large volumes of radioactive and chemical waste, some of which was released into the environment exposing people who lived downwind and downstream. Hanford now contains the largest accumulation of nuclear waste in the Western Hemisphere. Hanford’s last reactor shut down in 1987 followed by closure of the last reprocessing plant in 1990. Today, Hanford’s only mission is cleanup. Most onsite radioactive waste and nuclear material lingers inside underground tanks or storage facilities. About half of the chemical waste remains in tanks while the rest persists in the soil, groundwater, and burial grounds. Six million dollars each day, or nearly two billion dollars each year, are spent on waste management and cleanup activities. There is significant uncertainty in how long cleanup will take, how much it will cost, and what risks will remain for future generations. This paper summarizes portions of the waste management history of the Hanford Site published in the book “Hanford: A Conversation about Nuclear Waste and Cleanup.”(1) "

Gephart, Roy E.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

GEOHYDROLOGICAL STUDIES FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION -- Vol. I: Executive Summary; Vol. II: Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION Volume I:of Washington state." Rockwell Hanford Operations Topicalmodel evaluation at the Hanford nuclear waste facility."

Apps, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Concentrations of dissolved methane (CH sub 4 ) and nitrogen (N sub 2 ) in groundwaters from the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This document reports all available dissolved gas concentration data for groundwaters from the Hanford Site as of June 1985. Details of the computational procedures required to reduce data obtained from the field measurements made by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project are provided in the appendix. Most measured values for methane concentration from reference repository boreholes are in the range of from 350 to 700 mg/L for the Cohassett flow top. Because of the uncertainties associated with these measurements, it is currently recommended that a conservative methane concentration of 1200 mg/L (methane saturated) in groundwater be considered the most reasonable upper-bounding value. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Early, T.O.

1986-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

111

DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at Hanford Site DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at...

112

Decommissioning of eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Addendum (Final Environmental Impact Statement)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first section of this volume summarizes the content of the draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) and this Addendum, which together constitute the final environmental impact statement (FEIS) prepared on the decommissioning of eight surplus plutonium production reactors at Hanford. The FEIS consists of two volumes. The first volume is the DEIS as written. The second volume (this Addendum) consists of a summary; Chapter 9, which contains comments on the DEIS and provides DOE`s responses to the comments; Appendix F, which provides additional health effects information; Appendix K, which contains costs of decommissioning in 1990 dollars; Appendix L, which contains additional graphite leaching data; Appendix M, which contains a discussion of accident scenarios; Appendix N, which contains errata; and Appendix 0, which contains reproductions of the letters, transcripts, and exhibits that constitute the record for the public comment period.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is one of two source operable units at the U Plant Aggregate Area at the Hanford Site. Source operable units include waste management units and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of radioactive and/or hazardous substance contamination. This work plan, while maintaining the title RFI/CMS, presents the background and direction for conducting a limited field investigation in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, which is the first part of the process leading to final remedy selection. This report discusses the background, prior recommendations, goals, organization, and quality assurance for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Work Plan. The discussion begins with a summary of the regulatory framework and the role of the work plan. The specific recommendations leading into the work plan are then addressed. Next, the goals and organization of the report are discussed. Finally, the quality assurance and supporting documentation are presented.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-BC-2 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This work plan and attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-BC-2 operable unit in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The 100 Area is one of four areas at the Hanford Site that are on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priorities List under CERCLA. The 100-BC-2 operable unit is one of two source operable units in the 100-B/C Area (Figure ES-1). Source operable units are those that contain facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of hazardous substance contamination. The 100-BC-2 source operable unit contains waste sites that were formerly in the 100-BC-2, 100-BC-3, and 100-BC-4 operable units. Because of their size and geographic location, the waste sites from these two operable units were added to 100-BC-2. This allows for a more efficient and effective investigation of the remaining 100-B/C Reactor area waste sites. The investigative approach to waste sites associated with the 100-BC-2 operable unit are listed in Table ES-1. The waste sites fall into three general categories: high priority liquid waste disposal sites, low priority liquid waste disposal sites, and solid waste burial grounds. Several sites have been identified as candidates for conducting an IRM. Two sites have been identified as warranting additional limited field sampling. The two sites are the 116-C-2A pluto crib, and the 116-C-2C sand filter.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Environmental assessment for the resiting, construction, and operation of the Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This environmental assessment (EA) presents estimated environmental impacts from the resiting, construction, and operation of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), which is proposed to be constructed and operated on land near the south boundary of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The EMSL, if constructed, would be a modern research facility in which experimental, theoretical, and computational techniques can be focused on environmental restoration problems, such as the chemical and transport behavior of complex mixtures of contaminants in the environment. The EMSL design includes approximately 18,500 square meters (200,000 square feet) of floor space on a 12-hectare (30-acre) site. The proposed new site is located within the city limits of Richland in north Richland, at the south end of DOE`s 300 Area, on land to be deeded to the US by the Battelle Memorial Institute. Approximately 200 persons are expected to be employed in the EMSL and approximately 60 visiting scientists may be working in the EMSL at any given time. State-of-the-art equipment is expected to be installed and used in the EMSL. Small amounts of hazardous substances (chemicals and radionuclides) are expected to be used in experimental work in the EMSL.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 27, 1998 August 27, 1998 EA-1260: Finding of No Significant Impact Transfer of 1100 Area, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 27, 1998 EA-1260: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Transfer of 1100 Area, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 13, 1998 EIS-0229: Notice of Availability of the Amended Record of Decision Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials August 1, 1998 EIS-0245-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington May 1, 1998 EIS-0189: Supplement Analysis Tank Waste Remediation System July 28, 1997 EA-1203: Final Environmental Assessment Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, Hanford Site,

117

Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes environmental information for the Hanford Site in Washington State for the calendar year 2001.

Poston, Ted M.; Hanf, Robert W.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Morasch, Launa F.

2002-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

118

HANFORD SITE WELDING PROGRAM SUCCESSFULLY PROVIDING A SINGLE SITE FUNCTION FOR USE BY MULTIPLE CONTRACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy, Richland Operations (DOE-RL) recently restructured its Hanford work scope, awarding two new contracts over the past several months for a total of three contracts to manage the sites cleanup efforts. DOE-RL met with key contractor personnel prior to and during contract transition to ensure site welding activities had appropriate oversight and maintained code compliance. The transition also provided an opportunity to establish a single site-wide function that would provide welding and materials engineering services to the Hanford site contractors: CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC); Mission Support Alliance (MSA); Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS); and Washington Closure Hanford (WCH). Over the years, multiple and separate welding programs (amongst the several contractors) existed at the Hanford site leading to inefficiencies resulting from duplication of administrative efforts, maintenance of welding procedures, welder performance certifications, etc. The new, single program eliminates these inefficiencies. The new program, co-managed by two of the sites' new contractors, the CHPRC ('owner' of the program and responsible for construction welding services) and the MSA (provides maintenance welding services), provides more than just the traditional construction and maintenance welding services. Also provided, are welding engineering, specialty welding development/qualification for the closure of radioactive materials containers and materials evaluation/failure analysis. The following describes the new Hanford site welding program.

CANNELL GR

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

119

Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work plan identifies the objectives, tasks, and schedule for conducting a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit in the southern portion of the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area of the Hanford Site. The 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit addresses contamination identified in the aquifer soils and groundwater within its boundary, as determined in the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area Management Study Report (AAMSR) (DOE/RL 1992b). The objectives of this work plan are to develop a program to investigate groundwater contaminants in the southern portion of the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area that were designated for Limited Field Investigations (LFIs) and to implement Interim Remedial Measures (IRMs) recommended in the 200 West Groundwater AAMSR. The purpose of an LFI is to evaluate high priority groundwater contaminants where existing data are insufficient to determine whether an IRM is warranted and collect sufficient data to justify and implement an IRM, if needed. A Qualitative Risk Assessment (QRA) will be performed as part of the LFI. The purpose of an IRM is to develop and implement activities, such as contaminant source removal and groundwater treatment, that will ameliorate some of the more severe potential risks of groundwater contaminants prior to the RI and baseline Risk Assessment (RA) to be conducted under the Final Remedy Selection (FRS) at a later date. This work plan addresses needs of a Treatability Study to support the design and implementation of an interim remedial action for the Uranium-{sup 99}{Tc}-Nitrate multi-contaminant IRM plume identified beneath U Plant.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

RESULTS FROM RECENT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY INVESTIGATIONS TARGETING CHROMIUM IN THE 100D AREA HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA  

SciTech Connect

Sodium dichromate was used in Hanford's 100D Area during the reactor operations period of 1950 to 1964 to retard corrosion in the reactor cooling systems. Some of the sodium dichromate was released to the environment by spills and/or leaks from pipelines used to deliver the chemical to water treatment plants in the area. As a result, hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] has migrated through the vadose zone to the groundwater and contaminated nearly 1 km{sup 2} of groundwater to above the drinking water standard of 48 {micro}g/L. Three technology tests have recently been completed in this area to characterize the source area of the plumes and evaluate alternative methods to remove Cr(VI) from groundwater. These are (1) refine the source area of the southern plume; (2) test electrocoagulation as an alternative groundwater treatment technology; and (3) test the ability to repair a permeable reactive barrier by injecting micron or nanometer-size zero-valent iron (ZVI). The projects were funded by the US Department of Energy as part of a program to interject new technologies and accelerate active cleanup. Groundwater monitoring over the past 10 years has shown that Cr(VI) concentrations in the southern plume have not significantly diminished, strongly indicating a continuing source. Eleven groundwater wells were installed in 2007 and 2008 near a suspected source area and monitored for Cr(VI) and groundwater levels. Interpretation of these data has led to refinement of the source area location to an area of less than 1 hectare (ha, 2.5 acres). Vadose zone soil samples collected during drilling did not discover significant concentrations of Cr(VI), indicating the source is localized, with a narrow wetted path from the surface to the water table. Electrocoagulation was evaluated through a pilot-scale treatability test. Over 8 million liters of groundwater were treated to Cr(VI) concentrations of {le}20 {micro}g/L. The test determined that this technology has the potential to treat Cr(VI) to these low levels, but system reliability and operational complexity rendered electrocoagulation less cost effective than the baseline technology of ion exchange. Laboratory and field tests were conducted to evaluate the practicality of injecting ZVI into the aquifer to increase the lifespan and effectiveness of an existing permeable reactive barrier. From a database of 30 ZVI materials, 6 were chosen and tested in the laboratory to determine their geochemical and physical performance under simulated 100D aquifer conditions. The best-performing ZVI was injected into the aquifer and met the primary goals of communicating the iron at least 7 meters from the injection point and reducing the aquifer to transform mobile Cr(VI) to trivalent chromium Cr(III), which is effectively immobile in the aquifer.

PETERSEN SW; THOMPSON KM; TONKIN MJ

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 26, 2011 July 26, 2011 Hanford Reaches Recovery Act Goal for Waste Cleanup Ahead of Schedule - Workers Shipped 1,800 Cubic Meters for Treatment and Disposal RICHLAND, Wash. - Today, the Department of Energy Hanford Site announced it reached a cleanup goal more than two months ahead of schedule at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. July 25, 2011 CX-006290: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cardwell-Cowlitz 2011 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/25/2011 Location(s): Cowlitz County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 21, 2011 CX-006304: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee-Bell #3/Grand Coulee-Westside #1 Insulator Replacement and Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/21/2011 Location(s): Grant County, Washington

122

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 10, 2003 March 10, 2003 EIS-0330: Record of Decision Wallula-McNary Transmission Line Project and Wallula Power Project March 7, 2003 EA-1454: Finding of No Significant Impact Reactivation and Use of Three Former Borrow Sites in the 100-F,100-H, and 100-N Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington March 6, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-128: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program March 3, 2003 EIS-0286: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program, Richland, Washington March 3, 2003 EIS-0286: Revised Draft Environmental Import Statement Richland Operations Office, Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program, Richland, Washington March 3, 2003 EA-1454: Final Environmental Assessment Reactivation and Use of Three Former Borrow Sites in the 100-F,100-H, and

123

State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Checklist for the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950's and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Clean closure is the proposed method of closure for the LSFF. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Microsoft Word - DOE-EA-1707D_Revised_Predecisional_EA Closure_NRDWL-SWL08232011.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7D 7D REVISED PREDECISIONAL DRAFT AUGUST 2011 Environmental Assessment Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill (NRDWL) and Solid Waste Landfill (SWL), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 DOE/EA-1707D REVISED PREDECISIONAL DRAFT AUGUST 2011 DOE/EA-1707D REVISED PREDECISIONAL DRAFT iii AUGUST 2011 Contents 1 1 Introduction and Purpose and Need ............................................................................................. 1-1 2 1.1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 1-1 3 1.2 Purpose and Need ................................................................................................................... 1-2 4

125

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 8, 2000 March 8, 2000 EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities, Yakima, Yakima County, Washington, Easton, Kittitas County, Washington September 15, 1999 EIS-0310: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility September 1, 1999 EIS-0222: Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 16, 1999 EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site

126

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES FOR TANK FARM CLOSURE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the performance objectives (metrics, times of analyses, and times of compliance) to be used in performance assessments of Hanford Site tank farm closure.

MANN, F.M.; CRUMPLER, J.D.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours June 3, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis John Britton, with Office of River Protection contractor Washington River Protection Solutions, explains the Hanford tank waste program to Western Washington University students in a recent tour of the Hanford site. John Britton, with Office of River Protection contractor Washington River Protection Solutions, explains the Hanford tank waste program to Western Washington University students in a recent tour of the Hanford site. RICHLAND, Wash. - It is harvest season for cherries, raspberries and rhubarb in Washington state. But employees at the Hanford site are helping grow the young minds of the nation's future science, technology,

128

Microsoft Word - TriCityWashingtonState20020620.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tri-City Tri-City Industrial Development Council in Washington State WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it will award $300,000 to the Tri-City Industrial Development Council (TRIDEC). TRIDEC's goal is to assist affected communities impacted by the ultimate closure of the Hanford facility that has served as the primary employment source for over 50 years. The grant will provide $200,000 for program administration and $100,000 for the Asset Reinvestment Program. "The Energy Department is a good neighbor to the communities surrounding our sites," Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham said. "Working with TRIDEC and other community reuse organizations around the country, the Department has retained, expanded or created over

129

EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington...

130

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions B A R R Y R . B minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington since the late 1950s (1). To predict the fate

Illinois at Chicago, University of

131

Field evidence for strong chemical separation of contaminants in the Hanford Vadose Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Transport in the Hanford vadose zone Conrad et al.Chemical Transport in the Hanford vadose zone Conrad et al.Vadose Zone Pore Fluids at Hanford, Washington: Vadose Zone

Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Maher, Katharine; Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 26, 1997 February 26, 1997 EIS-0189: Record of Decision Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, WA December 1, 1996 EA-1111: Final Environmental Assessment K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington October 21, 1996 EA-1177: Final Environmental Assessment Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants August 1, 1996 EIS-0189: Final Environmental Impact Statement Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington May 1, 1996 EIS-0244: Final Environmental Impact Statement Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization April 1, 1996 EIS-0259: Final Environmental Impact Statement Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class, Los Angeles and Class Naval Reactor Plants April 1, 1996 EIS-0259: Final Environmental Impact Statement

133

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2011 0, 2011 CX-006068: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/20/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 14, 2011 Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size swimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition. June 14, 2011 CX-006253: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Bonneville-Ross #1 230-Kilovolt, North Bonneville-Troutdale #2

134

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1878, Rev. 0 1878, Rev. 0 Summary Notes from 5 - 7 May 2009 Office of River Protection Waste Management Area C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Input Meeting MP Connelly Washington River Protection Solutions LLC Richland, WA 99352 U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC27-08RV14800 EDT/EON: DRF UC: Cost Center: Charge Code: B&R Code: Total Pages: 15 Key Words: Waste Management Area C, Performance Assessment, tank closure, waste inventory Abstract: Summary of meeting between DOE-ORP and Hanford Site regulators/stakeholders regarding Waste Management Area C performance assessment TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

135

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3622, Rev. 0 3622, Rev. 0 Summary Notes from 1 - 3 September 2009 Office of River Protection Waste Management Area C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Input Meeting MP Connelly Washington River Protection Solutions LLC Richland, WA 99352 U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC27-08RV1 4800 EDT/ECN: DRF UC: Cost Center: Charge Code: B&R Code: Total Pages: 13 Key Words: Waste Management Area C, Performance Assessment, tank closure, waste inventory Abstract: Summary of meeting between DOE-ORP and Hanford Site regulators/stakeholders regarding Waste Management Area C performance assessment TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

136

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2011 22, 2011 CX-006583: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement Along Portions of the Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph #1 and #2 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13 Date: 08/22/2011 Location(s): Douglas County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration August 22, 2011 CX-006580: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement Along the Grand Coulee-Okanogan #2 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13 Date: 08/22/2011 Location(s): Grant County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration August 18, 2011 EA-1728: Draft Environmental Assessment Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 15, 2011 EIS-0245-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site,

137

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26, 2010 26, 2010 CX-003272: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington-City-Everett CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): Everett, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 23, 2010 EIS-0119: Amended Record of Decision Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington July 22, 2010 CX-003234: Categorical Exclusion Determination Demolition of Vacant House at Bonneville Power Administration's Ross Complex CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 07/22/2010 Location(s): Clark County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 21, 2010 CX-003236: Categorical Exclusion Determination Augspurger Fiber Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B4.7 Date: 07/21/2010 Location(s): Skamania County, Washington

138

River Corridor Closure Project Partnering Performance Agreement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WCH and DOE have a mission to complete the clsoure of the Hanford River Corridor by 2015.  Early and efficient completion of this work scope law the River Corridor Closure Contract (DE-AC06...

139

HANFORD ENGINEER WORKS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

HANFORD ENGINEER WORKS HANFORD ENGINEER WORKS IJd *P-t - - ~~~ssiticatiC+n cwcetted rat G.E. NUCLEONICS PROJECT xi I ~@L.%&~--G-ENERAI,@ ELECTRIC z ,m ._.__.-. _ I--..-. By Authority of. COMPANY ._ Atmic Energy Commission Office of Hanford Dire&xl Operations Riohland, Washington Attention; Mr. Carleton Shugg, Manager ./ ALPKA-ROLLED EL'GIL%I jw -879 ' . *_ a. f' Richland, Washington February 6, 1948 , Thla Dclc.Jv-

140

Hanford Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Hanford Site Hanford Site Workers safely demolished a 175-foot-high exhaust stack at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, a project supported by $420,000 in Recovery Act funds Workers safely demolished a 175-foot-high exhaust stack at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, a project supported by $420,000 in Recovery Act funds Slurry pumps are used in the tank farms to pick up liquid and solid particle mixture, or slurry, and provide the force necessary to transport the waste from tank to tank during retrieval operations Slurry pumps are used in the tank farms to pick up liquid and solid particle mixture, or slurry, and provide the force necessary to transport the waste from tank to tank during retrieval operations The Pretreatment Facility control room building pad (foreground) and the Low-Activity Waste Facility (background)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 17, 2009 July 17, 2009 EIS-0424: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Klickitat Hatchery Program, Klickitat and Yakima Counties, WA July 1, 2009 EA-1660: Final Environmental Assessment Combined Community Communications Facility and Infrastructure Cleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington April 21, 2009 EIS-0419: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Whistling Ridge Energy Project in Skamania County, Washington. March 12, 2009 State Energy Program Assurances - Washington Governor Gregoire Letter from Washington Governor Gregoire providing Secretary Chu with the assurances needed so that Recovery Act funds can be made available. These assurances are required by Section 410 of the American Recovery and

142

DETECTION OF HISTORICAL PIPELINE LEAK PLUMES USING NON-INTRUSIVE SURFACE-BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE WASHINGTON USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical records from the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation (in eastern WA) indicate that ruptures in buried waste transfer pipelines were common between the 1940s and 1980s, which resulted in unplanned releases (UPRs) of tank: waste at numerous locations. A number of methods are commercially available for the detection of active or recent leaks, however, there are no methods available for the detection of leaks that occurred many years ago. Over the decades, leaks from the Hanford pipelines were detected by visual observation of fluid on the surface, mass balance calculations (where flow volumes were monitored), and incidental encounters with waste during excavation or drilling. Since these detection methods for historic leaks are so limited in resolution and effectiveness, it is likely that a significant number of pipeline leaks have not been detected. Therefore, a technology was needed to detect the specific location of unknown pipeline leaks so that characterization technologies can be used to identify any risks to groundwater caused by waste released into the vadose zone. A proof-of-concept electromagnetic geophysical survey was conducted at an UPR in order to image a historical leak from a waste transfer pipeline. The survey was designed to test an innovative electromagnetic geophysical technique that could be used to rapidly map the extent of historical leaks from pipelines within the Hanford Site complex. This proof-of-concept test included comprehensive testing and analysis of the transient electromagnetic method (TEM) and made use of supporting and confirmatory geophysical methods including ground penetrating radar, magnetics, and electrical resistivity characterization (ERC). The results for this initial proof-of-concept test were successful and greatly exceeded the expectations of the project team by providing excellent discrimination of soils contaminated with leaked waste despite the interference from an electrically conductive pipe.

SKORSKA MB; FINK JB; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

143

Hanford - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality, August 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

144

DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at Hanford Site DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at Hanford Site May 29, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), LLC has been selected as the tank operations contractor to store, retrieve and treat Hanford tank waste and close the tank farms at DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $7.1 billion over ten years (a five-year base period with options to extend it for up to five years). WRPS is a limited liability company comprised of Washington Group

145

DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at Hanford Site DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at Hanford Site May 29, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), LLC has been selected as the tank operations contractor to store, retrieve and treat Hanford tank waste and close the tank farms at DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $7.1 billion over ten years (a five-year base period with options to extend it for up to five years). WRPS is a limited liability company comprised of Washington Group

146

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 13, 2012 September 13, 2012 HAMMER Celebrates 15th Anniversary: Dedicates New U.S. State Department Field Exercise Building RICHLAND, Wash. - The Volpentest HAMMER Training Center, located at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, will mark its 15th anniversary of operations and dedicate a new Field Exercise Building for the U.S. State Department's counterterrorism efforts. September 6, 2012 Retrieval of Ninth Single-Shell Tank Complete Richland - Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has completed the retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from single-shell tank (SST) C-104, an underground storage tank that once held 259,000 gallons of waste left over from nuclear weapons production at Hanford. WRPS is the tank

147

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 12, 2011 January 12, 2011 The carbon steel doors come together to form an upside-down L-shape. The 102-ton door was set on top of the 85-ton door that was installed at the end of December. Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Sets Massive Protective Shield door in Pretreatment Facility Richland, Wash. -- Earlier this week, an enormous protective shield door was set in the Pretreatment Facility at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant, also known as the "Vit Plant." The 102-ton door was lowered through the roof and placed on top of an adjoining 85-ton door that was installed at the end of December. January 10, 2011 CX-007074: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington-City-Vancouver CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 01/10/2011 Location(s): Vancouver, Washington

148

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 19, 2013 June 19, 2013 A Hanford site volunteer helps a Boy Scout practice the Pull, Aim, Squeeze, Sweep, or PASS, fire extinguishing technique at the Volpentest HAMMER Training & Education Center in Richland. Local Scouts Train with Hanford Safety Experts - 52 Boy Scouts Earn Merit Badges at the HAMMER Training Facility RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford site services contractor Mission Support Alliance (MSA) hosted a unique opportunity for 52 local Boy Scouts at the Volpentest HAMMER Training & Education Center during two consecutive weekends recently. June 14, 2013 EA-1562-SA-1: Supplement Analysis Final Environmental Assessment of Construction and Operation of a Physical Sciences Facility at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington June 4, 2013

149

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 13, 2012 July 13, 2012 First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from River RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers have started moving highly radioactive material, called sludge, awayfrom the Columbia River, marking a significant milestone in the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s cleanup of the Hanford Site in Washington State. July 9, 2012 EA-1912: Draft Environmental Assessment Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project Benton County, WA July 3, 2012 EIS-0312: Record of Decision (2012) Bonneville Power Administration Administrator's Record of Decision: Columbia Basin Fish Accords Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with the Kalispel Tribe July 3, 2012 DOE Announces Additional Tour Seats Available: Tours of B Reactor at the Hanford Site Begin and End in Richland, Wash. RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has made additional

150

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

151

SYSTEM PLANNING WITH THE HANFORD WASTE OPERATIONS SIMULATOR  

SciTech Connect

At the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, 216 million liters (57 million gallons) of nuclear waste is currently stored in aging underground tanks, threatening the Columbia River. The River Protection Project (RPP), a fully integrated system of waste storage, retrieval, treatment, and disposal facilities, is in varying stages of design, construction, operation, and future planning. These facilities face many overlapping technical, regulatory, and financial hurdles to achieve site cleanup and closure. Program execution is ongoing, but completion is currently expected to take approximately 40 more years. Strategic planning for the treatment of Hanford tank waste is by nature a multi-faceted, complex and iterative process. To help manage the planning, a report referred to as the RPP System Plan is prepared to provide a basis for aligning the program scope with the cost and schedule, from upper-tier contracts to individual facility operating plans. The Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS), a dynamic flowsheet simulation and mass balance computer model, is used to simulate the current planned RPP mission, evaluate the impacts of changes to the mission, and assist in planning near-term facility operations. Development of additional modeling tools, including an operations research model and a cost model, will further improve long-term planning confidence. The most recent RPP System Plan, Revision 4, was published in September 2009.

CRAWFORD TW; CERTA PJ; WELLS MN

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

152

105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, and activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950`s and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the 105-DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF was initially used only for engineering-scale alkali metal reaction studies. In addition, the Fusion Safety Support Studies program sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium lead compounds. The facility has also been used to store and treat alkali metal waste, therefore the LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610. This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Notice of Intent To Prepare the Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, WA (DOE/EIS-0391) (2/2/06)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Federal Register 5 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 22 / Thursday, February 2, 2006 / Notices addressed as follows: Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability (Mail Code OE-20), U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20585-0350 (FAX 202-586-5860). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ellen Russell (Program Office) 202-586- 9624 or Michael Skinker (Program Attorney) 202-586-2793. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. 824a(e)). On December 14, 2005, the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from MAG E.S. to transmit electric energy from the United States to Canada. MAG E.S. is a Canadian

154

Application of a modified denitrifying bacteria method for analyzing groundwater and vadose zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA. Woods,and Conrad, Mark The Hanford Site in southern WashingtonL have been reported for Hanford groundwaters, where nitrate

Woods, Katharine N.; Singleton, Michael J.; Conrad, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Hanford Site August 2001 Washington, DC 20585 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE HANFORD SITE VOLUME III Table of Contents Acronyms .....................................................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ...........................................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results ...................................................................................................................................................................3 3.0 Conclusions............................................................................................................................................

156

Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks Youjun Deng a , James B. Harsh a at the US DOE Hanford Site, Washington, caus- ing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact mimicking tank leak conditions at the US DOE Hanford Site. In batch experiments, Si-rich solutions

Flury, Markus

157

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20, 2011 20, 2011 CX-006817: Categorical Exclusion Determination McNary-Ross No. 1 Upgrade Project, Surface Impairment Removal CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/20/2011 Location(s): Klickitat and Clark Counties, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration September 19, 2011 CX-006840: Categorical Exclusion Determination Security Barrier Relocation at the 618-11 Burial Grounds CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 09/19/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office, Golden Field Office September 19, 2011 CX-006839: Categorical Exclusion Determination Training Exercises and Simulations on the Hanford Site CX(s) Applied: B1.2 Date: 09/19/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office September 16, 2011

158

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2011 2, 2011 EA-1858: Mitigation Action Plan Nippon Paper Industries USA Company Biomass Cogeneration Project May 1, 2011 EA-1679: Preliminary Environmental Assessment Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington April 28, 2011 CX-005892: Categorical Exclusion Determination Columbia River Inter-Tidal Fish Commission Use of White Bluffs Boat Launch and Hanford Town Boat Ramp for Salmon Tagging CX(s) Applied: B3.8 Date: 04/28/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office April 26, 2011 CX-005891: Categorical Exclusion Determination 200 Area Tank Farm Interim Surface Barriers CX(s) Applied: B6.9 Date: 04/26/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington

159

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States » Washington United States » Washington Washington December 24, 2013 The concrete "core" is removed from Tank C-105 after workers cut a 55-inch hole in the tank dome. Cleanup Progresses at the Office of River Protection RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Office of River Protection's (ORP) mission continues: to retrieve, treat and dispose of the 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical waste stored in large, underground tanks. In 2013, ORP maintained steady progress toward the successful completion of its mission. December 24, 2013 Workers sample a well used to monitor groundwater at the Hanford site. EM's Richland Operations Office Celebrates Disposal Achievement in 2013 RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Richland Operations Office's 2013 accomplishments ranged from cleaning up buildings and waste sites to treating a record

160

Structural acceptance criteria for the evaulation of existing double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The structural acceptance criteria contained herein for the evaluation of existing underground double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site is part of the Life Management/Aging Management Program of the Tank Waste Remediation System. The purpose of the overall life management program is to ensure that confinement of the waste is maintained over the required service life of the tanks. Characterization of the present condition of the tanks, understanding and characterization of potential degradation mechanisms, and development of tank structural acceptance criteria based on previous service and projected use are prerequisites to assessing tank integrity, to projecting the length of tank service, and to developing and applying prudent fixes or repairs. The criteria provided herein summarize the requirements for the analysis and structural qualification of the existing double-shell tanks for continued operation. Code reconciliation issues and material degradation under aging conditions are addressed. Although the criteria were developed for double-shell tanks, many of the provisions are equally applicable to single-shell tanks. However, the criteria do not apply to the evaluation of tank appurtenances and buried piping.

Julyk, L.J.; Day, A.D.; Dyrness, A.D.; Moore, C.J.; Peterson, W.S.; Scott, M.A.; Shrivastava, H.P.; Sholman, J.S.; Watts, T.N.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Borehole Data Package for RCRA Well 299-W22-47 at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

One new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater assessment well was installed at single-shell tank Waste Management Area (WMA) S-SX in fiscal year (FY) 2005 to fulfill commitments for well installations proposed in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-24-57 (2004). The need for the new well, well 299-W22-47, was identified during a data quality objectives process for establishing a RCRA/ Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)/Atomic Energy Act (AEA) integrated 200 West and 200 East Area Groundwater Monitoring Network. This document provides a compilation of all available geologic data, spectral gamma ray logs, hydrogeologic data and well information obtained during drilling, well construction, well development, pump installation, aquifer testing, and sample collection/analysis activities. Appendix A contains the Well Summary Sheets, the Well Construction Summary Report, the geologist's Borehole Log, well development and pump installation records, and well survey results. Appendix B contains analytical results from groundwater samples collected during drilling. Appendix C contains complete spectral gamma ray logs and borehole deviation surveys.

Horton, Duane G.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

162

2010 Joint Effectiveness Review of Hanford Bldg 336 Corrective Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Assessment of the Effectiveness of Joint Assessment of the Effectiveness of Corrective Actions for the Building 336 Accident, July 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), and the Richland Operations Office (RL) performed a joint effectiveness assessment of the corrective actions taken by Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH) in response to the Building 336 Fall Event. The review was conducted from July 12-21, 2010, by a team consisting of four HSS and six RL personnel. The scope of the assessment included evaluation of work control, fall protection, quality assurance, and conduct of operations. Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) were generated for each functional area. The CRADs focused on the Judgments of Need (JONs) from the July 2009 Building 336 Fall

163

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 19, 2011 January 19, 2011 CX-005033: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oil Cleanup in 100-NR-2 CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 01/19/2011 Location(s): Hanford, Washington Office(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office January 19, 2011 CX-005032: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility Ventilation System Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 01/19/2011 Location(s): Hanford, Washington Office(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office January 13, 2011 CX-005034: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provide Power to Existing River Discharge and Monitoring System, 331 Facility, Hanford Site CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 01/13/2011 Location(s): Hanford, Washington Office(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland

164

MODIFICATIONS TO THE WIPP PANEL CLOSURE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methods Assessment for Run-of-Mine Salt Panel Closures, Interim Report For Scenario 1 Testing, Washington TRU Solutions, Carlsbad New Mexico. Appendix 1-A 1-A-54 of 100 Panel...

165

Informe Final Sobre el Estudio de las Enfermedades de la Tiroides en Hanford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resumen del Informe Final Sobre el Estudio de las Enfermedades de la Tiroides en Hanford WASHINGTON O R E G O N IDAHO HANFORD Acerca del Estudio Sobre las Enfermedades de la Tiroides en Hanford. (HTDS por su sigla en inglés) El estudio sobre las enfermedades de la tiroides en Hanford (HTDS por su sigla

166

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 25, 2012 April 25, 2012 Department of Energy Announces Intent to Extend Hanford Site Contract RICHLAND, Wash. - The Department of Energy (DOE) plans to extend CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company's contract for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site by another five years. April 25, 2012 Audit Report: IG-0863 The Department of Energy's $12.2 Billion Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Quality Assurance Issues - Black Cell Vessels April 24, 2012 Conceptual site model for evaluating soil vapor extraction system performance to determine if the system should be optimized, terminated, or transitioned to another approach. New Approach to Assess Volatile Contamination in Vadose Zone Provides Path Forward for Site Closure RICHLAND, Wash. and LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - Through the Deep Vadose

167

EA-1707: Revised Draft Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

168

EA-1707: Draft Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

169

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18, 2011 18, 2011 Hanford to Host ISMS Safety Workshop in Kennewick: Abstracts Due in June for September Event RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Hanford will hold its annual DOE Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Champions Workshop on September 12-15, 2011, at the Three Rivers Convention Center in Kennewick, Wash. May 17, 2011 EA-1731: Final Environmental Assessment Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Walla Walla and Columbia Counties, Washington May 17, 2011 EA-1731: Mitigation Acton Plan Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project May 17, 2011 EA-1731: Finding of No Significant Impact Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project May 13, 2011 CX-005809: Categorical Exclusion Determination

170

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 12, 2003 February 12, 2003 EIS-0286: Notice of Intent Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, WA February 12, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-121: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 10, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-120: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Benton County, Washington January 31, 2003 EIS-0325: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Schultz-Hanford Transmission Line Project January 29, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-119: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Snohomish-Murray No. 1 Transmission Line January 27, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-118: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Holcomb-Naselle 115kV,

171

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2011 1, 2011 CX-005337: Categorical Exclusion Determination Puget Sound Clean Cities Petroleum Reduction Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/01/2011 Location(s): Redmond, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory February 24, 2011 Online Registration Dates Set for 2011 Hanford Tours RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will open online registration on March 8 for tours of the Hanford Site and on March 15 for B Reactor-specific tours. February 24, 2011 Praveen Thallapally | photo courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Lab 10 Questions for a Materials Chemist: Praveen Thallapally Dr. Thallapally gave us an inside look at how he's working to advance carbon capture and geothermal technologies, developing a new class of

172

Letter: Transition of Closure Sites from the Office of Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Organizations From: Deputy Secretary of Energy, Kyle E. McSlarrow (DS-1) To: Todd Martin, Chair, Hanford Advisory Board This letter discusses the transition of closure sites...

173

300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This section provides a description of the Hanford Site, identifies the proposed method of 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS) closure, and briefly summarizes the contents of each chapter of this plan.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Tank Closure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Topics 3 Overview of SRS Tank Closure Program Two Tank Farms - F Area and H Area Permitted by SC as Industrial Wastewater Facilities under the Pollution Control...

175

First Chapter of Hanford Story Released | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter of Hanford Story Released Chapter of Hanford Story Released First Chapter of Hanford Story Released April 20, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoff_Tyree@rl.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - The Department of Energy is releasing the first chapter of "The Hanford Story" to the public. The Hanford Story is a multimedia presentation that provides an overview of the Hanford Site-its history, today's cleanup activities, and a glimpse into the possibilities of future uses of the 586-square-mile government site in southeast Washington State. The 17-minute video has been posted to the site's YouTube Channel on www.youtube.com/hanfordsite, as well as the Department of Energy's Hanford website on www.hanford.gov. The Hanford Story will be delivered in a series of video-based chapters

176

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 1, 2002 March 1, 2002 EIS-0333: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration, Benton County, Washington March 1, 2002 EA-1405: Final Environmental Assessment Transuranic Waste Retrieval from the 218-W-4B and 218-W-4C Low-Level Burial Grounds, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington February 27, 2002 EIS-0183: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision Mint Farm Generation Project February 27, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-46: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 27, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-45: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 15, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-42: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 1, 2002 EIS-0332: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

177

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2011 8, 2011 CX-006063: Categorical Exclusion Determination Limited Firebreak Maintenance on the Hanford Site During Calendar Year 2011 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/28/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 24, 2011 EIS-0425: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Project, Chelan and Okanogan Counties, WA June 24, 2011 EIS-0425: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Project, Chelan and Okanogan Counties, WA June 22, 2011 CX-006255: Categorical Exclusion Determination Indian Cabin Road Repair Date: 06/22/2011 Location(s): Skamania County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration

178

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11, 2011 11, 2011 EIS-0422: Record of Decision Bonneville Power Administration's Central Ferry-Lower Monumental 500-kilovolt Transmission Line Project March 11, 2011 CX-005421: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ohop Underbuild Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.12 Date: 03/11/2011 Location(s): Pierce County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration March 7, 2011 CX-005417: Categorical Exclusion Determination Beaver Creek Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 03/07/2011 Location(s): Okanogan County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration March 4, 2011 Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress: Recovery Act Funding Allows Demolition of Power Houses Ahead of Schedule RICHLAND, WASH. - Today's safe and successful explosive demolition at

179

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2011 6, 2011 CX-007504: Categorical Exclusion Determination 300 Area Nanoscale Research and Development Projects CX(s) Applied: B3.15, A9, B3.6 Date: 12/06/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office December 1, 2011 EA-1679: Revision Sheet for Final Environmental Assessment Grand Coulee's Third Power plant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington November 18, 2011 Demolition Begins on Hanford's Historic Plutonium Vaults - Plutonium Finishing Plant on track to meet regulatory milestone RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) began demolishing a vault complex that once held stores of plutonium for the U.S. nuclear weapons

180

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 2011 24, 2011 Chemical engineer Alan Zacher 10 Questions for a Chemical Engineer: Alan Zacher Chemical engineer Alan Zacher took some time to share advice for students interested in science and engineering and give us the download on his work developing propylene glycol from renewable sources. March 24, 2011 CX-005523: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington-City-Bellevue CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 03/24/2011 Location(s): Bellevue, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 22, 2011 EIS-0245-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Determination Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, WA March 22, 2011 EIS-0422: Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision Central Ferry to Lower Monumental 500-kilovolt Transmission Line Project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Tank Closure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Closure Closure Sherri Ross Waste Removal and Tank Closure Waste Disposition Project Programs Division Savannah River Operations Office Presentation to the DOE HLW Corporate Board 2  Overview and Status of SRS Tank Closure Program  Issues/Challenges  Communications  Schedule Performance  Ceasing Waste Removal  Compliance with SC Water Protection Standards  Questions? Topics 3 Overview of SRS Tank Closure Program  Two Tank Farms - F Area and H Area  Permitted by SC as Industrial Wastewater Facilities under the Pollution Control Act  Three agency Federal Facility Agreement (FFA)  DOE, SCDHEC, and EPA  51 Tanks  24 old style tanks (Types I, II and IV)  Do not have full secondary containment  FFA commitments to close by 2022  2 closed in 1997

182

The Integration of the 241-Z Building Decontamination and Decommissioning Under Cercla with RCRA Closure at the Plutonium Finishing Plant  

SciTech Connect

The 241-Z treatment and storage tanks, a hazardous waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal (TSD) unit permitted pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act, RCW 70.105, , have been deactivated and are being actively decommissioned under the provisions of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO), RCRA and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) 42 U.S.C. 9601 et seq. The 241-Z TSD unit managed non-listed radioactive contaminated waste water, containing trace RCRA characteristic constituents. The 241-Z TSD unit consists of below grade tanks (D-4, D-5, D-7, D-8, and an overflow tank) located in a concrete containment vault, sample glovebox GB-2-241-ZA, and associated ancillary piping and equipment. The tank system is located beneath the 241-Z building. The 241-Z building is not a portion of the TSD unit. The sample glovebox is housed in the above-grade building. Waste managed at the TSD unit was received via underground piping from Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sources. Tank D-6, located in the D-6 vault cell, is a past-practice tank that was taken out of service in 1972 and has never operated as a portion of the RCRA TSD unit. CERCLA actions will address Tank D-6, its containment vault cell, and soil beneath the cell that was potentially contaminated during past-practice operations and any other potential past-practice contamination identified during 241-Z closure, while outside the scope of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plan, 241-Z Treatment and Storage Tanks. Under the RCRA closure plan, the 241-Z TSD unit is anticipated to undergo clean closure to the performance standards of the State of Washington with respect to dangerous waste contamination from RCRA operations. The TSD unit will be clean closed if physical closure activities identified in the plan achieve clean closure standards for all 241-Z locations. Clean closed 241-Z treatment and storage tanks, equipment and/or structures will remain after RCRA clean closure for future disposition in conjunction with PFP decommissioning activities which are integrated with CERCLA. (authors)

Mattlin, E.; Charboneau, S. [U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Richland WA (United States); Johnston, G.; Hopkins, A.; Bloom, R.; Skeels, B.; Klos, D.B. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland WA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hanford tank residual waste – contaminant source terms and release models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual waste is expected to be left in 177 underground storage tanks after closure at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State (USA). In the long term, the residual wastes represent a potential source of contamination to the subsurface environment. Residual materials that cannot be completely removed during the tank closure process are being studied to identify and characterize the solid phases and estimate the release of contaminants from these solids to water that might enter the closed tanks in the future. As of the end of 2009, residual waste from five tanks has been evaluated. Residual wastes from adjacent tanks C-202 and C-203 have high U concentrations of 24 and 59 wt%, respectively, while residual wastes from nearby tanks C-103 and C-106 have low U concentrations of 0.4 and 0.03 wt%, respectively. Aluminum concentrations are high (8.2 to 29.1 wt%) in some tanks (C-103, C-106, and S-112) and relatively low (Technetium leachability is not as strongly dependent on the concentration of Tc in the waste, and it appears to be slightly more leachable by the Ca(OH)2-saturated solution than by the CaCO3-saturated solution. In general, Tc is much less leachable (<10 wt% of the available mass in the waste) than previously predicted. This may be due to the coprecipitation of trace concentrations of Tc in relatively insoluble phases such as Fe oxide/hydroxide solids.

Deutsch, William J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

184

Office of River Protection (Hanford) - Enforcement Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enforcement Documents Enforcement Documents Office of River Protection (Hanford) Enforcement Letter issued to Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, related to a positive Unreviewed Safety Question involving the Tank Farm Waste Transfer System at the Hanford Site, (NEL-2012-01) February 28, 2012 Consent Order issued to Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC related to deficiencies in the corrective action management program, radiation control program, and sealed radioactive source accountability and control program (NCO-2011-01) May 27, 2011 Consent Order issued to Bechtel National, Inc. for Deficiencies in Vendor Commercial Grade Dedication Processes at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project (NCO-2010-03) September 22, 2010 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Bechtel National, Inc., related to Deficiencies at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant at the Hanford Site, December 3, 2008 (NEA-2008-04)

185

EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of expansion or continued use of existing sand and gravel pits located on the Hanford Site (Pits F, H, N, 6, 9, 18, 21, 23, 24, 30, and 34) and establishing one new borrow area source in the 100 Area for ongoing construction activities and fill material following remediation activities. The scope of this EA does not include borrow sources for silt-loam material. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 15, 2013 EA-1934: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

186

EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, 4: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of expansion or continued use of existing sand and gravel pits located on the Hanford Site (Pits F, H, N, 6, 9, 18, 21, 23, 24, 30, and 34) and establishing one new borrow area source in the 100 Area for ongoing construction activities and fill material following remediation activities. The scope of this EA does not include borrow sources for silt-loam material. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 15, 2013 EA-1934: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

187

Energy Secretary Chu, EPA Administrator Jackson, Washington State Governor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Chu, EPA Administrator Jackson, Washington State Secretary Chu, EPA Administrator Jackson, Washington State Governor Gregoire and Oregon Governor Kulongoski Join Elected Officials in Announcing Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Cleanup Energy Secretary Chu, EPA Administrator Jackson, Washington State Governor Gregoire and Oregon Governor Kulongoski Join Elected Officials in Announcing Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Cleanup August 11, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - With the ongoing construction of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) in the background at the Hanford Site, Energy Secretary Steven Chu joined Washington Governor Chris Gregoire, Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski, Washington Attorney General Rob McKenna, U.S. Senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell, acting U.S. Assistant Attorney General John

188

Energy Secretary Chu, EPA Administrator Jackson, Washington State Governor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Secretary Chu, EPA Administrator Jackson, Washington State Energy Secretary Chu, EPA Administrator Jackson, Washington State Governor Gregoire and Oregon Governor Kulongoski Join Elected Officials in Announcing Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Cleanup Energy Secretary Chu, EPA Administrator Jackson, Washington State Governor Gregoire and Oregon Governor Kulongoski Join Elected Officials in Announcing Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Cleanup August 11, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - With the ongoing construction of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) in the background at the Hanford Site, Energy Secretary Steven Chu joined Washington Governor Chris Gregoire, Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski, Washington Attorney General Rob McKenna, U.S. Senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell, acting U.S. Assistant Attorney General John

189

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring for fiscal year 2004 (October 2003 through September 2004)on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Contaminant Release Data Package for Residual Waste in Single-Shell Hanford Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order requires that a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation report be submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology. The RCRA Facility Investigation report will provide a detailed description of the state of knowledge needed for tank farm performance assessments. This data package provides detailed technical information about contaminant release from closed single-shell tanks necessary to support the RCRA Facility Investigation report. It was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., which is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with tank closure. This data package is a compilation of contaminant release rate data for residual waste in the four Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs) that have been tested (C-103, C-106, C-202, and C-203). The report describes the geochemical properties of the primary contaminants of interest from the perspective of long-term risk to groundwater (uranium, technetium-99, iodine-129, chromium, transuranics, and nitrate), the occurrence of these contaminants in the residual waste, release mechanisms from the solid waste to water infiltrating the tanks in the future, and the laboratory tests conducted to measure release rates.

Deutsch, William J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

HANFORD TANK FARM RESOURCE CONVERVATION & RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) CORRECTIVE ACTION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

As a consequence of producing special nuclear material for the nation's defense, large amounts of extremely hazardous radioactive waste was created at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. A little over 50 million gallons of this waste is now stored in 177 large, underground tanks on Hanford's Central Plateau in tank farms regulated under the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA). Over 60 tanks and associated infrastructure have released or are presumed to have released waste in the vadose zone. In 1998, DOE's Office of River Protection established the Hanford Tank Farm RCRA Corrective Action Program (RCAP) to: (1) characterize the distribution and extent of the existing vadose zone contamination; (2) determine how the contamination will move in the future; (3) estimate the impacts of this contamination on groundwater and other media; (4) develop and implement mitigative measures; and (5) develop corrective measures to be implemented as part of the final closure of the tank farm facilities. Since its creation, RCAP has made major advances in each of these areas, which will be discussed in this paper.

KRISTOFZSKI, J.G.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

EIS-0325: Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0325 (January 2003)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

BPA proposes to construct a new 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in central Washington. This project would increase transmission system capacity north of Hanford.

193

COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI-ARID HANFORD SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI-ARID HANFORD SITE By ZIRU LIU Hanford project. Unfortunately, he just passed away this January and could not see the completion-ARID HANFORD SITE Abstract by Ziru Liu, Ph.D. Washington State University May 2013 Chair: Markus Flury

Flury, Markus

194

On the critical salt concentrations for particle detachment in homogeneous sand and heterogeneous Hanford sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hanford sediments Abstract One of the mechanisms for sudden particle release is a decrease in groundwater and (b) mineralogically heterogeneous sediment, taken from the Hanford formation in southeast Washington the amount of particles released and the CSC were an order of magnitude higher for the Hanford sediment than

Weisbrod, Noam

195

On the critical salt concentrations for particle detachment in homogeneous sand and heterogeneous Hanford sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hanford sediments Theresa Blumea,b , Noam Weisbrodc,*, John S. Selkera a Department of Bioengineering) mineralogically heterogeneous sediment, taken from the Hanford formation in southeast Washington. Stepwise the amount of particles released and the CSC were an order of magnitude higher for the Hanford sediment than

Selker, John

196

EIS-0245: Management of Spent Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

245: Management of Spent Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford 245: Management of Spent Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site - Supplement Analysis, Richland, Washington EIS-0245: Management of Spent Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site - Supplement Analysis, Richland, Washington Overview Overview to be provided. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 15, 2011 EIS-0245-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 1, 2001 EIS-0245-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 1, 1998 EIS-0245-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site,

197

Hanford Site sustainable development initiatives  

SciTech Connect

Since the days of the Manhattan Project of World War II, the economic well being of the Tri-Cities (Pasco, Kennewick, and Richland) of Washington State has been tied to the US Department of Energy missions at the nearby Hanford Site. As missions at the Site changed, so did the economic vitality of the region. The Hanford Site is now poised to complete its final mission, that of environmental restoration. When restoration is completed, the Site may be closed and the effect on the local economy will be devastating if action is not taken now. To that end, economic diversification and transition are being planned. To facilitate the process, the Hanford Site will become a sustainable development demonstration project.

Sullivan, C.T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Hanford ARI Overview | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford ARI Overview Hanford ARI Overview Hanford ARI Overview The Hanford Site provides the opportunity for long-term sustainable energy and industry development. The area boasts a specialized workforce that is highly educated and well-established; is rich in resources including land, infrastructure, low-cost energy, and available workforce; more scientists and engineers per capita than any other area in the Pacific Northwest; and is an optimum location for the development of sustainable energy solutions. Hanford_Asset_Revitalization_Initiative.pdf More Documents & Publications $300,000 Block Grant Awarded to Tri-City Industrial Development Council (TRIDEC) Department of Energy Awards $300,000 to Tri-City Industrial Development Council in Washington State Department of Energy Awards $600,000 to Tri-City Industrial Development

199

Senator Murray Visits Hanford | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Senator Murray Visits Hanford Senator Murray Visits Hanford Senator Murray Visits Hanford June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis In this photo, U.S. Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) receives an update on activities at C Farm from Office of River Protection (ORP) Manager Kevin Smith, left, and ORP Tank Farms Assistant Manager Tom Fletcher. In this photo, U.S. Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) receives an update on activities at C Farm from Office of River Protection (ORP) Manager Kevin Smith, left, and ORP Tank Farms Assistant Manager Tom Fletcher. U.S. Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) visited the Hanford site in Washington state recently, where she received an update on activities at C Farm, which is one of the groups of underground waste tanks at Hanford. Murray also toured the site's largest groundwater treatment facility. The 200 West

200

Hanford wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 17, 2001 August 17, 2001 EIS-0285-SA-23: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program August 17, 2001 EIS-0285-SA-22: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, King and Snohomish Counties, WA, in the Snohomish Region August 14, 2001 EIS-0265-SA-59: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program August 7, 2001 EIS-0265-SA-58: Supplement Anlalysis Watershed Program - Asotin Creek Channel, Floodplain and Riparian Restoration August 2, 2001 EIS-0285-SA-20: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program August 1, 2001 EIS-0245-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington July 24, 2001 EIS-0285-SA-17: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program

202

Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solutions, Solutions, LLC - October 2011 Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC - October 2011 October 2011 Industrial Hygiene Surveillance of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Industrial Hygiene Program Strategy and Implementation of the Hanford Concerns Council Recommendations [HIAR-ORP-2011-10-26] Staff from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), in coordination with the Office of River Protection (ORP), reviewed the status and programmatic health of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) industrial hygiene program relative to the Hanford Concerns Council (HCC) Independent Review Panel (IRP) report on Chemical Vapors Industrial

203

Tank Waste Feed Delivery System Readiness at the Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audit Report Audit Report Tank Waste Feed Delivery System Readiness at the Hanford Site OAS-L-12-09 August 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 23, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION FROM: David Sedillo, Director Western Audits Division Office of Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Tank Waste Feed Delivery System Readiness at the Hanford Site" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's largest cleanup task involves the treatment, immobilization and disposal of 56 million gallons of hazardous and highly radioactive waste at the Hanford Site, located in Southeastern Washington State. As part of this effort, the Department is constructing

204

Programmatic agreement among the USDOE/RL Operations Office, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the WA State Historic Preservation Office for the maintenance, deactivation, alteration and demolition of the built environment on the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This Programmatic Agreement (PA) addresses the built environment (i.e., buildings and structures) constructed during the Manhattan Project and Cold War Era periods of Hanford`s operational history. As such it encompasses the years 1943 through 1990. The identification, evaluation, and treatment of buildings and historic archeological remains on the Hanford Site predating 1943 will be accomplished through Sections 800.4 through 800.6 of the Council`s regulations. This PA will be in effect from the date of signature until September 30, 2000. Completion of the Sitewide Treatment Plan established under this PA satisfies all Section 106 requirements for identification, evaluation, and treatment necessary for all undertakings, up to and including demolition which may affect Manhattan Project and Cold War Era properties. This PA may be extended if the Sitewide Treatment Plan has not been completed by the end of FY 2000. Identification, evaluation, and treatment of properties constructed on the Hanford Site after 1990 will be handled pursuant to the regulations in effect at the time such properties are eligible for review.

Lloyd, D.W.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

DEVELOPMENT OF A GEOCHEMICAL MODEL FOR URANIUM TRANSPORT IN THE UNSATURATED AND SATURATED SEDIMENTS AT THE 200 WEST AREA OF THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON (SEPTEMBER 2004)  

SciTech Connect

Final Deliverable under GWP-HQ-LMT-02 contract for Hanford Sci. & Tech. Gp. to BHI. The scope of work covered laboratory analyses and gephysical logging for 299-W19-43 near the 200 West U Plant. Other isotopic analyses were conducted for holes around 216-U-1&2, including U-236.

ADAMS SC; PETERSEN SW

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2002  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2002 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. This report is written to meet the requirements in CERCLA, RCRA, the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, and Washington State Administrative Code.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

207

AN INTEGRATED BIOLOGICAL CONTROL SYSTEM AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

In 1999 an integrated biological control system was instituted at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Successes and changes to the program needed to be communicated to a large and diverse mix of organizations and individuals. Efforts at communication are directed toward the following: Hanford Contractors (Liquid or Tank Waste, Solid Waste, Environmental Restoration, Science and Technology, Site Infrastructure), General Hanford Employees, and Hanford Advisory Board (Native American Tribes, Environmental Groups, Local Citizens, Washington State and Oregon State regulatory agencies). Communication was done through direct interface meetings, individual communication, where appropriate, and broadly sharing program reports. The objectives of the communication efforts was to have the program well coordinated with Hanford contractors, and to have the program understood well enough that all stakeholders would have confidence in the work performed by the program to reduce or elimated spread of radioactive contamination by biotic vectors. Communication of successes and changes to an integrated biological control system instituted in 1999 at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site have required regular interfaces with not only a diverse group of Hanford contractors (i.e., those responsible for liquid or tank waste, solid wastes, environmental restoration, science and technology, and site infrastructure), and general Hanford employees, but also with a consortium of designated stake holders organized as the Hanford Advisory Board (i.e., Native American tribes, various environmental groups, local citizens, Washington state and Oregon regulatory agencies, etc.). Direct interface meetings, individual communication where appropriate, and transparency of the biological control program were the methods and outcome of this effort.

JOHNSON AR; CAUDILL JG; GIDDINGS RF; RODRIGUEZ JM; ROOS RC; WILDE JW

2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

208

Hanford wells  

SciTech Connect

The Site Characterization and Assessment Section of the Geosciences Department at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has compiled a list of wells located on or near the Hanford Site. Information has been updated on wells existing from the days before construction of the Hanford Works to the present. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The list of wells will be used by DOE contractors who need condensed, tabular information on well location, construction, and completion dates. This report does not include data on lithologic logs and ground-water contamination. Moreover, the completeness of this list is limited because of new well construction and existing well modifications, which are continually under way. Despite these limitations, this list represents the most complete description possible of data pertaining to wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

McGhan, V.L.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Agreement Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Agreement January 9, 2006 - 9:43am Addthis Richland, WA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Washington have entered into a settlement agreement that will lead to a final order and the dismissal of the challenge to Hanford's Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) in the lawsuit Washington v. Bodman. DOE, with Washington State as a cooperating agency, will prepare a new EIS that will include updated, site-wide groundwater analysis. "With this agreement, both parties will be able to shift their focus and resources away from litigation and toward partnership and our shared

210

Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Agreement Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Agreement January 9, 2006 - 9:43am Addthis Richland, WA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Washington have entered into a settlement agreement that will lead to a final order and the dismissal of the challenge to Hanford's Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) in the lawsuit Washington v. Bodman. DOE, with Washington State as a cooperating agency, will prepare a new EIS that will include updated, site-wide groundwater analysis. "With this agreement, both parties will be able to shift their focus and resources away from litigation and toward partnership and our shared

211

Demolishing Decay at the Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Check out this epic demolition video from the Hanford Site in Washington state. But its more than just great footage -- this represents important progress in the cleanup of the environmental legacy of one of America's most famous scientific undertakings -- the Manhattan Project.

212

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic, and Tank Wastes, Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic, and Tank Wastes, Hanford Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic, and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington; Record of Decision (ROO). This Record of Decision has been prepared pursuant to the Council on Environme~tal Quality ~egulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of the National Environmental Pol icy Act (NEPAl (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508) and the Department of Energy NEPA Guidelines (52 FR 47662, December 15, 1987). It is based on DOE's "Environmental Impact Statement for the Oi sposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic, and Tank Wastes'' (OOE/EIS-0113) and consideration of ~11 public and agency comments received on the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). fJECISION The decision is to implement the ''Preferred Alternative'' as discussed in

213

EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, 28: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts from vegetation management in the "project area" of the Hanford Site. The project area excludes most of the Hanford Reach National Monument that is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under permit from DOE. Vegetation managment under the EA would be consistent with and complement similar efforts currently being performed by the USFWS on the Monument. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA, and that preparation of

214

EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, 728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts from vegetation management in the "project area" of the Hanford Site. The project area excludes most of the Hanford Reach National Monument that is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under permit from DOE. Vegetation managment under the EA would be consistent with and complement similar efforts currently being performed by the USFWS on the Monument. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA, and that preparation of

215

Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit Interim Status Closure Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is located within the 234-52 Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based upon Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit manages transuranic mixed (TRUM) waste, there are many controls placed on management of the waste. Based on the many controls placed on management of TRUM waste, releases of TRUM waste are not anticipated to occur in the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit will be operated to immobilize and/or repackage plutonium-bearing waste in a glovebox process. The waste to be processed is in a solid physical state (chunks and coarse powder) and will be sealed into and out of the glovebox in closed containers. The containers of immobilized waste will be stored in the glovebox and in additional permitted storage locations at PFP. The waste will be managed to minimize the potential for spills outside the glovebox, and to preclude spills from reaching soil. Containment surfaces will be maintained to ensure integrity. In the unlikely event that a waste spill does occur outside the glovebox, operating methods and administrative controls will require that waste spills be cleaned up promptly and completely, and a notation will be made in the operating record. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

PRIGNANO, A.L.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

EA-0904: Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area 4: Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-0904: Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct an access road on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, from State Route 240 to Beloit Avenue in the 200 West Area. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 10, 1994 EA-0904: Finding of No Significant Impact Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area Hanford Site, Richland, Washington March 10, 1994 EA-0904: Final Environmental Assessment Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area Hanford Site,

217

2011 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains the vegetation monitoring data that was collected in the spring and summer of 2011 from the River Corridor Closure Contractor’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

West, W. J.; Lucas, J. G.; Gano, K. A.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

218

2010 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents eh status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with CERLA cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains vegetation monitoring data that were collected in the spring and summer of 2010 from the River Corridor Closure Contract’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

C. T. Lindsey, A. L. Johnson

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

303-K Storage Facility closure plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 303-K Storage Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 303-K Storage Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 303-K Storage Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 303-K Storage Facility. The 303-K Storage Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5.

Not Available

1993-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

ALTERATION OF KAOLINITE TO CANCRINITE AND SODALITE BY SIMULATED HANFORD TANK WASTE AND ITS IMPACT ON CESIUM RETENTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALTERATION OF KAOLINITE TO CANCRINITE AND SODALITE BY SIMULATED HANFORD TANK WASTE AND ITS IMPACT Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington State (USA) causing hundreds of thousands of gallons--Cancrinite, Cation Exchange, Cesium Sorption, Feldspathoid , Hanford Waste Tanks, Kaolinite, Mineral Stability

Flury, Markus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure  

SciTech Connect

This document was previously referred to as the Draft 2006 Plan. As part of the DOE`s national strategy, the Richland Operations Office`s Paths to Closure summarizes an integrated path forward for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site underwent a concerted effort between 1994 and 1996 to accelerate the cleanup of the Site. These efforts are reflected in the current Site Baseline. This document describes the current Site Baseline and suggests strategies for further improvements in scope, schedule and cost. The Environmental Management program decided to change the name of the draft strategy and the document describing it in response to a series of stakeholder concerns, including the practicality of achieving widespread cleanup by 2006. Also, EM was concerned that calling the document a plan could be misconstrued to be a proposal by DOE or a decision-making document. The change in name, however, does not diminish the 2006 vision. To that end, Paths to Closure retains a focus on 2006, which serves as a point in time around which objectives and goals are established.

Edwards, C.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

222

300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOERL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion includes closure plan documentation submitted for individual, treatment, storage, and/or disposal units undergoing closure, such as the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Whenever appropriate, 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. This 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System Closure Plan (Revision 2) includes a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Part A, Form 3. Information provided in this closure plan is current as of April 1999.

LUKE, S.N.

1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

223

HANFORD DECOMMISSIONING UPDATE 09/2007  

SciTech Connect

Fluor Hanford's K Basins Closure (KBC) Project tallied three major accomplishments at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington State this past summer. The Project finished emptying the aging K East Basin of both sludge and the last pieces of scrap spent nuclear fuel. It also Completed vacuuming the bulk of the sludge in the K West Basin into underwater containers. The 54-year-old concrete basins once held more than four million pounds of spent nuclear fuel and sit less than 400 yards from the Columbia River. Each basin holds more than a million gallons of radioactive water. In 2004, Fluor finished removing all the spent nuclear fuel from the K Basins. Nearly 50 cubic meters of sludge remained--a combination of dirt, sand, small pieces of corroded uranium fuel and fuel cladding, corrosion products from racks and canisters, ion-exchange resin beads, polychlorinated biphenyls, and fission products that had formed during the decades that the spent nuclear fuel was stored underwater. Capturing the sludge into underwater containers in the K East Basin took more than two years, and vacuuming the much smaller volume of sludge into containers in the K West Basin required seven months. Workers stood on grating above the basin water and vacuumed the sludge through long, heavy hoses. The work was complicated by murky water and contaminated solid waste (debris). Pumping was paused several times to safely remove and package debris that totaled more than 370 tons. In October 2006, Fluor Hanford workers began pumping the sludge captured in the K East Basin containers out through a specially designed pipeline to underwater containers in the K West Basin, about a half mile away. They used a heavy but flexible, double-walled ''hose-in-hose'' system. Pumping work progressed slowly at first, but ramped up in spring 2007 and was completed on May 31. Just a week before sludge transfers finished, the KBC Project removed the last few small pieces of irradiated fuel (about 19 pounds) found as the last remnants of sludge were vacuumed up. The fuel was loaded into a cask that sat underwater. The cask was hoisted out of the water, decontaminated, and transported to the K West Basin, where it is now being stored underwater until it can be dried and taken to storage in central Hanford. Removing the sludge and fuel from the K East Basin eliminated the final major radioactive sources there, and made the Columbia River and the adjacent environment safer for everyone who lives downstream. Fluor's priority at the K East Basin quickly turned to final preparations for demolishing the structure. Final activities to sort debris are progressing, along with plans to de-water the basin and turn it to rubble in the next two years. At the K West Basin, after the bulk sludge was removed July 3, workers began preparing to load out the last of the ''found'' nuclear fuel and to complete final pass sludge collection this coming year.

GERBER, M.S.

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hanford recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a study of the past and present recycling efforts on the Hanford site and options for future improvements in the recycling program. Until 1996, recycling goals were voluntarily set by the waste generators: this year, DOE has imposed goals for all its sites to accomplish by 1999. Hanford is presently meeting the voluntary site goals, but may not be able to meet all the new DOE goals without changes to the program. Most of these new DOE goals are recycling goals: * Reduce the generation of radioactive (low-level) waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of low-level mixed waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of hazardous waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Recycle 33 percent of the sanitary waste from all operations. * Increase affirmative procurement of EPA-designated recycled items to 100 percent. The Hanford recycling program has made great strides-there has been a 98 percent increase in the amount of paper recycled since its inception in 1990. Hanford recycles paper, chemicals cardboard, tires, oil, batteries, rags, lead weights, fluorescent tubes, aerosol products, concrete, office furniture, computer software, drums, toner cartridges, and scrap metal. Many other items are recycled or reused by individual groups on a one time basis without a formal contract. Several contracts are closed-loop contracts which involve all parts of the recycle loop. Considerable savings are generated from recycling, and much more is possible with increased attention and improvements to this program. General methods for improving the recycling program to ensure that the new goals can be met are: a Contract and financial changes 0 Tracking database and methods improvements 0 Expanded recycling efforts. Specifically, the Hanford recycling program would be improved by: 0 Establishing one overall DOE recycling contract at the Hanford site and a central group to control the contract. 0 Using a BOA or MTS contract as a way to get proceeds from recycling back to site facilities to provide incentives for recycling. . Upgrading tracking mechanisms to track and recycle construction waste which is presently buried in onsite pits. . Establishing contract performance measures which hold each project accountable for specific waste reduction goals. * Recycling and reusing any material or equipment possible as buildings are dismantled.

Leonard, I.M.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of Hanford Tank Wastes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1995/01eis0212_cl.html[6/27/2011 1:02:59 PM] 1995/01eis0212_cl.html[6/27/2011 1:02:59 PM] Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of Hanford Tank Wastes DOE/EIS-0212 VOLUME 1 OF 2 VOLUME 1 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SAFE INTERIM STORAGE OF HANFORD TANK WASTES Hanford Site Richland, Washington October, 1995 WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY NUCLEAR WASTE PROGRAM LACEY, WASHINGTON 98503 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RICHLAND OPERATIONS OFFICE

226

HANFORD FACILITY ANNUAL DANGEROUS WASTE REPORT CY2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report (ADWR) is prepared to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code Sections 173-303-220, Generator Reporting, and 173-303-390, Facility Reporting. In addition, the ADWR is required to meet Hanford Facility RCR4 Permit Condition I.E.22, Annual Reporting. The ADWR provides summary information on dangerous waste generation and management activities for the Calendar Year for the Hanford Facility EPA ID number assigned to the Department of Energy for RCRA regulated waste, as well as Washington State only designated waste and radioactive mixed waste. An electronic database is utilized to collect and compile the large array of data needed for preparation of this report. Information includes details of waste generated on the Hanford Facility, waste generated offsite and sent to Hanford for management, and other waste management activities conducted at Hanford, including treatment, storage, and disposal. Report details consist of waste descriptions and weights, waste codes and designations, and waste handling codes, In addition, for waste shipped to Hanford for treatment and/or disposal, information on manifest numbers, the waste transporter, the waste receiving facility, and the original waste generators are included. In addition to paper copies, the report is also transmitted electronically to a web site maintained by the Washington State Department of Ecology.

SKOLRUD, J.O.

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M. (comps.)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) environmental checklist forms for 304 Concretion Facility Closure Plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 304 Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 304 Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 304 Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 304 Facility. The 304 Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 1, 2012 February 1, 2012 CX-007984: Categorical Exclusion Determination Explosives Research Capability Expansion, 300 Area, Hanford Site CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/01/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office January 30, 2012 CX-007955: Categorical Exclusion Determination Exe-Guard (Formerly Whitelist) Antivirus Project CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.2, B1.7 Date: 01/30/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory January 27, 2012 CX-007880: Categorical Exclusion Determination Evergreen State Solar Partnership CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Golden Field Office January 13, 2012 CX-007980: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington River Protection Solutions LLC - Proposed Actions For Calendar

230

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 5, 2013 April 5, 2013 CX-010154: Categorical Exclusion Determination Digital Communication System Upgrade Project: 'D' Analog System Retirement and #WC SONET Ring CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 04/05/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration April 3, 2013 CX-010155: Categorical Exclusion Determination Augspurger Radio Tower Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 04/03/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration April 3, 2013 CX-010094: Categorical Exclusion Determination Activity-Specific Categorical Exclusion for Deep Borehole Drilling, Sampling, and Characterization for the Proposed Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco, Washington to the Hanford Site 200 East Area CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04/03/2013 Location(s): Washington

231

Washington Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington Recovery Act State Memo Washington Recovery Act State Memo Washington Recovery Act State Memo Washington State has substantial natural resources, including biomass, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA)is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Washington are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind, biomass, and geothermal, as well as cleaning up the legacy of Cold War nuclear facilities at Hanford. Through these investments, Washington's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Washington to play an important role in the new energy economy of the

232

300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 300 Area Process Trenches, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. For the purposes of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Westinghouse Hanford Company is identified as ``co-operator.`` The 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan (Revision 0) consists of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Form 3 and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Permit Application, Form 3 submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and six appendices. The 300 Area Process Trenches received dangerous waste discharges from research and development laboratories in the 300 Area and from fuels fabrication processes. This waste consisted of state-only toxic (WT02), corrosive (D002), chromium (D007), spent halogenated solvents (F001, F002, and F003), and spent nonhalogented solvent (F005). Accurate records are unavailable concerning the amount of dangerous waste discharged to the trenches. The estimated annual quantity of waste (item IV.B) reflects the total quantity of both regulated and nonregulated waste water that was discharged to the unit.

Luke, S.N.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fluor Hanford Project Focused Progress at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Fluor Hanford is making significant progress in accelerating cleanup at the Hanford site. This progress consistently aligns with a new strategic vision established by the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (RL).

HANSON, R.D.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report Calendar Year 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanford CY 2002 dangerous waste generation and management forms. The Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report (ADWR) is prepared to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code Sections 173-303-220, Generator Reporting, and 173-303-390, Facility Reporting. In addition, the ADWR is required to meet Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Condition I.E.22, Annual Reporting. The ADWR provides summary information on dangerous waste generation and management activities for the Calendar Year for the Hanford Facility EPA ID number assigned to the Department of Energy for RCRA regulated waste, as well as Washington State only designated waste and radioactive mixed waste. The Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) database is utilized to collect and compile the large array of data needed for preparation of this report. Information includes details of waste generated on the Hanford Facility, waste generated offsite and sent to Hanford for management, and other waste management activities conducted at Hanford, including treatment, storage, and disposal. Report details consist of waste descriptions and weights, waste codes and designations, and waste handling codes. In addition, for waste shipped to Hanford for treatment and/or disposal, information on manifest numbers, the waste transporter, the waste receiving facility, and the original waste generators are included. In addition to paper copies, electronic copies of the report are also transmitted to the regulatory agency.

FREEMAN, D.A.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of Iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation, 1945--1947: Draft. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project whose goal is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The report describes in detail the reconstructed conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation which was collected from the beginning of October 1945 through the end of December 1947.

Mart, E.I.; Denham, D.H.; Thiede, M.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Hanford Site Regional Population - 2010 Census  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy conducts radiological operations in south-central Washington State. Population dose estimates must be performed to provide a measure of the impact from site radiological releases. Results of the U.S. 2010 Census were used to determine counts and distributions for the residential population located within 50-miles of several operating areas of the Hanford Site. Year 2010 was the first census year that a 50-mile population of a Hanford Site operational area exceeded the half-million mark.

Hamilton, Erin L.; Snyder, Sandra F.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

237

TRACKING CLEAN UP AT HANFORD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA), is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), The Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for cleaning up the Hanford Site. Established in the 1940s to produce material for nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan Project, Hanford is often referred to as the world's large environmental cleanup project. The Site covers more than 580 square miles in a relatively remote region of southeastern Washington state in the US. The production of nuclear materials at Hanford has left a legacy of tremendous proportions in terms of hazardous and radioactive waste. From a waste-management point of view, the task is enormous: 1700 waste sites; 450 billion gallons of liquid waste; 70 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater; 53 million gallons of tank waste; 9 reactors; 5 million cubic yards of contaminated soil; 22 thousand drums of mixed waste; 2.3 tons of spent nuclear fuel; and 17.8 metric tons of plutonium-bearing material and this is just a partial listing. The agreement requires that DOE provide the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to the lead regulatory agency to help guide then in making decisions. The agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in it, or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The Action Plan that supports the TPA requires that Ecology and EPA have access to all data that is relevant to work performed, or to be performed, under the Agreement. Further, the Action Plan specifies two additional requirements: (1) that EPA, Ecology and their respective contractor staffs have access to all the information electronically, and (2) that the databases are accessible to, and used by, all personnel doing TPA-related work. The Hanford Environmental Databases document and track the progress of Site cleanup--Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS), Hanford Well Information Data System (HWIS), the Waste Information Data System (WIDS), and the Hanford Geographic Information System (HGIS). HEIS contains the date, time, location, and results from samples taken during activities such as field investigations and groundwater monitoring. HWIS contains the details of the wells and boreholes on the Site. WIDS tracks the waste sites--from discovery through cleanup. Each of the databases is supported by several applications for entering or retrieving information. HGIS keeps track of the locations for waste (WIDS) sites, wells and boreholes, and other sampling site locations. Of the applications used to extract data from the Environmental Databases, the Hanford Map Portal (QMAP) is the newest, and perhaps the most efficient. QMAP combines the HGIS spatial information with the information from the other databases so that users may browse to, or query, the waste site or well of interest. A query of a waste site or well engages QMAP to find the object and then the user may access the appropriate database. This paper describes the Environmental Databases and their maintenance, as well as the applications used to access them. Collectively, these databases are a critical element in formally documenting the work and associated decisions made during the cleanup of Hanford.

CONNELL, C.W.

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

238

Hanford Construction Workers Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONSTRUCTION CONSTRUCTION WORKES AT HANFORD: A NEEDS ASSESSMENT Submitted by Center to Protect Workers' Rights on behalf of The Building and Construction Trades Dept., AFL-CIO and The Central Washington Building and Construction Trades Council In cooperation with United Brotherhood of Carpenters University of Cincinnati Occupational Health Foundation George Washington University Zenith Administrators, Inc. Duke University July 1, 1997 Table bt Cóütn 1. Introduction and Background a. Specific Aims b. Rationale for Program 2. Need for Establishing Medical Evaluation and Notification a. Medical Surveillance b. History of Site c. Special Issues for Construction Workers 3. Size of Construction Workers' Population (Since 1943) a. Crude Estimate of Population Size b. Population Before 1950 c. Population After 1950

239

SPECIAL SECTION: HANFORD SITE Hanford Site Vadose Zone Studies: An Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a sparsely populated area in the rain shadow of the Cascade Mountains, adjacent to the Columbia River in southeastern Washington State (Fig. 1). The Hanford Site was set aside in the early 1940s by the U.S. Government to perform a top-secret mission, the Manhattan Project, for production of plutonium for atomic weapons used to end World War II and later to support the Cold War with the Soviet Union. Starting in 1943– 1945, Hanford employed thousands of workers on the largest construction project in the world at that time. The workers built a series of nuclear reactors along with large monolithic concrete buildings used to reprocess wastes. Plutonium production continued at Hanford for over 40 yr. During the late 1980s, in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident, plutonium production was suspended at Hanford (Gephart, 2003). Since then, efforts at

G. W. Gee; M. Oostrom; M. D. Freshley; M. L. Rockhold; J. M. Zachara

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Secretary Chu, Governor Gregoire Issue Statement on Hanford Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu, Governor Gregoire Issue Statement on Hanford Cleanup Chu, Governor Gregoire Issue Statement on Hanford Cleanup Secretary Chu, Governor Gregoire Issue Statement on Hanford Cleanup January 15, 2013 - 7:35pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Governor Chris Gregoire issued the following joint statement on the cleanup efforts underway at Hanford: "Over the past several months, the Department of Energy and the State of Washington have worked together closely to ensure the Waste Treatment Plant is on a stable path to resolving the technical issues, completing construction, and beginning to treat waste in the coming years. "Based on insight gathered from a number leading scientific experts, the Department is now confident construction activities at the High-Level Waste

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241

EA-1178: 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

78: 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, 78: 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1178: 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for a proposed energy conservation measure for a number of buildings in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The proposed action includes replacing the centralized heating system with heating units for individual buildings or groups of buildings, constructing new natural gas pipelines to provide a source for many of these units and constructing a central control building to operate and maintain the system. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 12, 1997 EA-1178: Finding of No Significant Impact

242

Second Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public - Agency Launches Web  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public - Agency Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public - Agency Launches Web Page Dedicated to The Hanford Story Second Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public - Agency Launches Web Page Dedicated to The Hanford Story August 25, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 RICHLAND, Wash. - The Department of Energy is releasing the second chapter of The Hanford Story today to the public. -Groundwater‖ explains how more than 100 square miles of groundwater under the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State became contaminated and what workers are doing to restore groundwater to its highest beneficial use. The Department has also launched a page on its website dedicated to the Hanford Story. Discussion questions and fact sheets are also being

243

Washington, DC'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

of. Energy of. Energy Washington, DC' 26585 , The Honorable Gene Eriquez .~ City Hall I55 Deer Hill Avenue + Danbury/Connecticut 06180 .. -r. - Dear Mayor Eriquez: Secretary of Energy Hazel O!Leary has .announced a knew approach -to openness in. the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with the public. In support of th,is initiative, we are,pleased to forward the enclosed information, related to the former Sperry Products,'.Inc. site in your jurisdiction ,that performed,work for DOE or its predecessor agencies. Th,is informatipn is provided,for your information, use, and retenti~oh. DOE's Formeily Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program is responsible for. identification of sites used by'DOE's predecessor agencies, determining their current radiological condition and,

244

Department Washington,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Washington, of Energy DC 20545 Mr. Roy J. Villella, Jr. Assistant Secretary Diebold, Incorporated 818 Mulberry Road, S.E. F. 0. Box 8230 Canton, Ohio 44711-8230 Dear Mr..Villella: Enclosed is your copy of the signed consent form for the survey of those portions of the Diebold property used by the former owner, Herring Hall and Marvin Safe Company, to machine uranium rod for the Manhattan Engineer District. I have directed our contractor, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to coordinate the specific time and details for the visit and survey. Mr. Woodrow Cottrell, ORNL, or his representative, will be contacting you in this regard. If you have any questions regarding the survey, please call me at (301) 353-5439. Sincerely, Andrew Wallo III, Designation

245

Washington Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Energy Management Federal Energy Management Program Federal/Utility Partnership Working Group David McAndrew April 14, 2010 Providence RI Washington Update Federal Energy Management Program femp.energy.gov 3 Presentation Overview * EO 13514 - Strategic Sustainability Plans * DOE's approach * EISA section 432 update * Outreach Opportunities - Federal Energy Management Awards - Energy Empowers Campaign - GovEnergy Federal Energy Management Program femp.energy.gov 4 EO13514 Sustainability Plans Update Federal Energy Management Program femp.energy.gov 5 EO 13514 Goals In addition to GHG goals, the EO requires agencies to meet sustainability targets, including: * 30% reduction in vehicle fleet petroleum use by 2020; * 26% reduction in potable, industrial, landscaping, and agricultural water consumption by 2020;

246

Washington Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) eere.energy.gov The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii Federal Energy Management Program Federal/Utility Partnership Working Group David McAndrew October 20, 2010 Rapid City, SD Washington Update 2 | Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) eere.energy.gov Presentation Overview * FEMP Updates * GHG Guidance Update * EISA Section 432 Update * Mark Your Calendar 3 | Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) eere.energy.gov * Richard Kidd is leaving FEMP - Will become Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Energy and Sustainability - Skye Schell will assume the role of interim Program Manager * Jesse Feinberg (Energetics) departed over the summer to attend grad school Columbia * Sarah Mabbitt (smabbitt@energetics.com)

247

Washington Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Energy Management Program Federal Energy Management Program Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update Dr. Timothy Unruh October 25-26, 2011 Philadelphia, PA 2 | Federal Energy Management Program eere.energy.gov Presentation Overview  Federal Government Goals and Status  FEMP Update  UESC Program Overview and Goals  Mark Your Calendar: Spring 2012 FUPWG 3 | Federal Energy Management Program eere.energy.gov FEMP's Mission FEMP provides the services, tools, and expertise to Federal agencies to help them achieve their legislated and executive ordered energy, greenhouse gas, and water goals. This is delivered through project financing services, technical assistance, and communications and training. 4 | Federal Energy Management Program eere.energy.gov

248

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater monitoring for FY 2006 on DOE's Hanford Site. Results of groundwater remediation, vadose zone monitoring, and characterization are summarized. DOE monitors groundwater at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and Washington Administrative Code (WAC).

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

EA-1203: Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, 3: Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1203: Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to widen and operate the unused Trench 33 in the 218-W-5 Low-Level Burial Ground at the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 28, 1997 EA-1203: Finding of No Significant Impact Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington July 28, 1997 EA-1203: Final Environmental Assessment Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

250

A Site-Wide Perspective on Uranium Geochemistry at the Hanford Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of River Protection (ORP) #12;#12;PNNL-17031 A Site-Wide Perspective on Uranium Geochemistry at the Hanford. and funded by DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington

251

State of Washington officials join department of energy to dedicate WIPP disposal room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State of Washington Officials Join Department of Energy State of Washington Officials Join Department of Energy To Dedicate WIPP Disposal Room CARLSBAD, N.M., June 2, 2000 - U.S. Congressman Doc Hastings of Washington state joined U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) officials today in dedicating the "Washington Room" at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Disposal Room 2 of Panel 1 in the WIPP underground will be filled with transuranic radioactive waste from the Hanford Site near Richland, Wash., as well as other DOE facilities. "The state of Washington is pleased that WIPP is open and will soon accept transuranic waste from Hanford," said Congressman Hastings. "This event recognizes the years of cooperation and dedication among all parties in making WIPP a reality. It also shows continuing progress on the cleanup of the Hanford Site."

252

An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress September 24, 2013 - 6:45pm Addthis An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy What are the key facts? For 40 years, the Hanford Site in Washington state was involved in the production of plutonium as part of our national defense efforts. Legacy cleanup progress at the Hanford site has been significant, including 100 percent of the site's spent fuel having been removed from areas around the Columbia River and placed in safe, secure dry storage. But there is more work to do. A new Framework will aid discussions with the state of Washington as the Energy Department works to resolve concerns about completion of the

253

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 2005: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 8 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination, and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2005, drillers completed 27 new monitoring wells, and decommissioned (filled with grout) 115 unneeded wells. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2005. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath former waste sites.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

254

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. This includes three recently acquired Transportable Array stations located at Cold Creek, Didier Farms, and Phinney Hill. For the Hanford Seismic Network, ten local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2009. All earthquakes were considered as “minor” with magnitudes (Mc) less than 1.0. Two earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), most likely in the Columbia River basalts; five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the sub-basalt sediments); and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, four earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 16 local earthquakes during the first quarter of FY 2011. Six earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), seven earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, thirteen earthquakes were located in known swarm areas and three earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (1.8 Mc) was recorded on October 19, 2010 at depth 17.5 km with epicenter located near the Yakima River between the Rattlesnake Mountain and Horse Heaven Hills swarm areas.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

HANFORD'S SIMULATED LOW ACTIVITY WASTE CAST STONE PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

Cast Stone is undergoing evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford’s (Washington) high activity waste (HAW) and low activity waste (LAW). This report will only cover the LAW Cast Stone. The programs used for this simulated Cast Stone were gradient density change, compressive strength, and salt waste form phase identification. Gradient density changes show a favorable outcome by showing uniformity even though it was hypothesized differently. Compressive strength exceeded the minimum strength required by Hanford and greater compressive strength increase seen between the uses of different salt solution The salt waste form phase is still an ongoing process as this time and could not be concluded.

Kim, Y.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

257

STRATEGIES FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINANTS AT THE HANFORD CENTRAL PLATEAU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep vadose zone contamination poses some of the most difficult remediation challenges for the protection of groundwater at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This paper describes processes and technologies being developed to use in the ongoing effort to remediate the contamination in the deep vadose zone at the Hanford Site.

CHRONISTER GB

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Hanford summit and sustainable development  

SciTech Connect

Since the days of the Manhattan Project of World War II, the economic well being of the Tri-Cities (Pasco, Kennewick, and Richland) of Washington State has been tied to the US Department of Energy missions at the nearby Hanford Site. As missions at the Site changed, so did the well being of the region. The Hanford Site is now poised to complete its final mission, that of environmental restoration. When restoration is compiled, the Site may be closed and the effect on the local economy will be devastating if action is not taken now. To that end, economic diversification and transition are being planned. To facilitate the process, the Hanford Site will become a sustainable development demonstration project -- a project with regional, national, and international application.

Sullivan, C.T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP December 1, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Richland, WA - In direct support of Hanford cleanup and the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) accelerated cleanup initiatives, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) is teaming with the Site services contractor, Mission Support Alliance, LLC (MSA), CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company and Washington River Protection Services Company to implement a WiMAX-based communications infrastructure at Hanford to augment the existing fiber optic and Wi-Fi-based systems. Wi-Fi and WiMAX are both considered last mile technologies that carry signals from telecommunications backbones (in this case hubs or access

260

Recovery Act Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor CH2M HILL drills record number of wells Recovery Act Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor CH2M HILL drills record number of wells May 26, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers at the Hanford Site have surpassed goals for drilling wells to detect and remove contamination from groundwater. The groundwater was contaminated by radioactive waste and chemicals generated during decades of producing plutonium for the Cold War at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The Department of Energy (DOE) had set a goal for its contractor, CH2M HILL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

262

DOE Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services - Agency Solicits Input from Industry, Stakeholders, and Workforce DOE Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services - Agency Solicits Input from Industry, Stakeholders, and Workforce July 19, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl..doe.gov 509-376-4171 The Department of Energy today issued a Draft Request for Proposals (RFP) for an Occupational Medical Services acquisition at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Draft RFP is one step in the process toward awarding a contract and provides an opportunity for companies, Hanford stakeholders, and the site's workforce to provide input on the Draft RFP. DOE will provide

263

Demolition Begins on Hanford's Historic Plutonium Vaults - Plutonium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demolition Begins on Hanford's Historic Plutonium Vaults - Demolition Begins on Hanford's Historic Plutonium Vaults - Plutonium Finishing Plant on track to meet regulatory milestone Demolition Begins on Hanford's Historic Plutonium Vaults - Plutonium Finishing Plant on track to meet regulatory milestone November 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree Department of Energy Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 Dee Millikin CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Dee_Millikin@rl.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) began demolishing a vault complex that once held stores of plutonium for the U.S. nuclear weapons program at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The vault complex is part of Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant, which

264

Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Data Report for Calendar Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

Environmental surveillance on and around the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The environmental surveillance data collected for this report provide a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford Site operations. Data were also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River water, sediment, and wildlife. These data are included in this appendix. This report is the first of two appendices that support "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008" (PNNL-18427), which describes the Hanford Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, Hanford Site cleanup and remediation efforts, and environmental monitoring activities and results.

Bisping, Lynn E.

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

265

Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Data Report for Calendar Year 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental surveillance on and around the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The environmental surveillance data collected for this report provide a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford Site operations. Data were also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River water, sediment, and wildlife. These data are included in this appendix. This report is the first of two appendices that support "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007" (PNNL-17603), which describes the Hanford Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, Hanford Site cleanup and remediation efforts, and environmental monitoring activities and results.

Bisping, Lynn E.

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

266

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

267

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP December 1, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Richland, WA - In direct support of Hanford cleanup and the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) accelerated cleanup initiatives, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) is teaming with the Site services contractor, Mission Support Alliance, LLC (MSA), CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company and Washington River Protection Services Company to implement a WiMAX-based communications infrastructure at Hanford to augment the existing fiber optic and Wi-Fi-based systems. Wi-Fi and WiMAX are both considered last mile technologies that carry signals from telecommunications backbones (in this case hubs or access

268

FLUOR HANFORD DECOMMISSIONING UPDATE  

SciTech Connect

Fluor Hanford is completing D&D of the K East Basin at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State this spring, with demolition expected to begin in June. Located about 400 yards from the Columbia River, the K East Basin is one of two indoor pools that formerly contained irradiated nuclear fuel, radioactive sludge and tons of contaminated debris. In unique and path-breaking work, workers finished removing the spent fuel from the K Basins in 2004. In May 2007, workers completed vacuuming the sludge into containers in the K East Basin, and transferring it into containers in the K West Basin. In December, they finished vacuuming the remainder of K West Basin sludge into these containers. The K East Basin was emptied of its radioactive inventory first because it was more contaminated than the K West Basin, and had leaked in the past. In October 2007, Fluor Hanford began physical D&D of the 8,400-square foot K East Basin by pouring approximately 14-inches of grout into the bottom of it. Grout is a type of special cement used for encasing waste. Two months later, Fluor Hanford workers completed sluicing contaminated sand from the large filter that had sieved contaminants from the basin water for more than 50 years. Next, they poured grout into the filter housing and the vault that surrounds the filter, as well as into ion exchange columns that also helped filter basin water. For a six-week period in February and March, personnel drained the approximately one million gallons of contaminated water from the K East Basin. The effort required more than 200 tanker truck loads that transported the water to an effluent treatment facility for treatment and then release. A thin fixative was also applied to the basin walls as the water was removed to hold residual contamination in place. As soon as the water was out of the basin, Fluor pumped in approximately 18 feet of 'controlled density fill' material (somewhat similar to sand) to shield workers to a safe level from the residual radioactivity. Workers then continued preparations for demolishing the structure. Currently, they are isolating utilities, removing asbestos, draining oils, and removing other items not allowed to be disposed in Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The basin's superstructure will be demolished using a heavy industrial excavator equipped with a shear. This portion of the work is expected to be completed in September, with removal of the basin substructure to follow in 2009. D&D of the K East Basin eliminated the final major radioactive sources there, and made the Columbia River and the adjacent environment safer for everyone who lives downstream.

GERBER MS

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

269

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 28, 2010 April 28, 2010 CX-002135: Categorical Exclusion Determination Barr-Tech - Green Waste To Renewable Energy CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Sprague, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 27, 2010 CX-002236: Categorical Exclusion Determination C-Farm Electrical, Lighting, and Walkway Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.13, B2.1, B1.3 Date: 04/27/2010 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office April 23, 2010 CX-002213: Categorical Exclusion Determination Spacer replacement along the Hanford-Wautoma #1 and #2 (substation to substation) transmission lines CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/23/2010 Location(s): Benton County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration

270

Borehole Data Package for Two RCRA Wells 299-W11-25B and 299-W11-46 at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area T, Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater monitoring and assessment well was installed at single-shell tank Waste Management Area (WMA) T in calendar year 2005 in partial fulfillment of commitments for well installations proposed in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-24-57 (2004). The need for increased monitoring capability at this WMA was identified during a data quality objectives process for establishing a RCRA/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)/Atomic Energy Act (AEA) integrated 200 West and 200 East Area Groundwater Monitoring Network. The initial borehole, 299-W11-25B, was located about 20 ft from existing downgradient well 299 W11-39. The specific objective for the borehole was to determine the vertical distribution of contaminants in the unconfined aquifer at the northeast corner of WMA T. The permanent casing in borehole 299-W11-25B was damaged beyond repair during well construction and replacement borehole, 299-W11-46, was drilled about 10 ft from borehole 299-W11-25B (Figure 1). Borehole 299-W11-46 was completed as a RCRA monitoring well. This document provides a compilation of all available geologic data, geophysical logs, hydrogeologic data and well information obtained during drilling, well construction, well development, pump installation, groundwater sampling and analysis activities, and preliminary results of slug tests associated with wells 299-W11-25B and 299-W11-46. Appendix A contains geologists logs, Well Construction Summary Reports, Well Summary Sheets (as-built diagrams), and Well Development and Testing Data sheets. Appendix B contains the results of chemical analysis of groundwater samples. Appendix C contains complete spectral gamma-ray logs and borehole deviation surveys and Appendix D contains initial results of slug tests. The non-conformance report for borehole 299-W11-46 is provided in Appendix E.

Horton, Duane G.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations...

272

Hanford System Overview  

CHG0612-16.0 CH2M-32399-VA Hanford System Overview Hanford System Overview January 23-24, 2007 Paul Certa Tom Crawford Aluminum and Chromium Leaching for

273

HANFORD REGULATORY EXPERIENCE REGULATION AT HANFORD A CASE STUDY  

SciTech Connect

Hanford has played a pivotal role in the United States' defense for more than 60 years, beginning with the Manhattan Project in the 1940s. During its history, the Hanford Site has had nine reactors producing plutonium for the United States' nuclear weapons program. All the reactors were located next to the Columbia River and all had associated low-level radioactive and hazardous waste releases. Site cleanup, which formally began in 1989 with the signing of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement, involves more than 1,600 waste sites and burial grounds, and the demolition of more than 1,500buildings and structures, Cleanup is scheduled to be complete by 2035. Regulatory oversight of the cleanup is being performed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington State Department of Ecology(Ecology) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Revised Code of Washington, 'Hazardous Waste Management.' Cleanup of the waste sites and demolition of the many buildings and structures generates large volumes of contaminated soil, equipment, demolition debris, and other wastes that must be disposed of in a secure manner to prevent further environmental degradation. From a risk perspective, it is essential the cleanup waste be moved to a disposal facility located well away from the Columbia River. The solution was to construct very large engineered landfill that meets all technical regulatory requirements, on the Hanford Site Central Plateau approximately 10kilometers from the river and 100metersabovegroundwater. This landfill, called the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility or ERDF is a series of cells, each 150x 300 meters wide at the bottom and 20 meters deep. This paper looks at the substantive environmental regulations applied to ERDF, and how the facility is designed to protect the environment and meet regulatory requirements. The paper describes how the U.S. Department of Energy(DOE),EPA, and Ecology interact in its regulation. In addition, the response to a recent $1 million regulatory fine is described to show actual interactions and options in this aspect of the regulatory process. The author acknowledges the significant contributions by Messrs. Clifford Clark and Owen Robertson. Ms. Nancy Williams provided graphics support and Ms. Laurie Kraemer edited the report.

HAWKINS AR

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

274

HANFORD REGULATORY EXPERIENCE REGULATION AT HANFORD A CASE STUDY  

SciTech Connect

Hanford has played a pivotal role in the United States' defense for more than 60 years, beginning with the Manhattan Project in the 1940s. During its history, the Hanford Site has had nine reactors producing plutonium for the United States' nuclear weapons program. All the reactors were located next to the Columbia River and all had associated low-level radioactive and hazardous waste releases. Site cleanup, which formally began in 1989 with the signing of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement, involves more than 1,600 waste sites and burial grounds, and the demolition of more than 1,500buildings and structures, Cleanup is scheduled to be complete by 2035. Regulatory oversight of the cleanup is being performed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington State Department of Ecology(Ecology) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Revised Code of Washington, 'Hazardous Waste Management.' Cleanup of the waste sites and demolition of the many buildings and structures generates large volumes of contaminated soil, equipment, demolition debris, and other wastes that must be disposed of in a secure manner to prevent further environmental degradation. From a risk perspective, it is essential the cleanup waste be moved to a disposal facility located well away from the Columbia River. The solution was to construct very large engineered landfill that meets all technical regulatory requirements, on the Hanford Site Central Plateau approximately 10kilometers from the river and 100metersabovegroundwater. This landfill, called the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility or ERDF is a series of cells, each 150x 300 meters wide at the bottom and 20 meters deep. This paper looks at the substantive environmental regulations applied to ERDF, and how the facility is designed to protect the environment and meet regulatory requirements. The paper describes how the U.S. Department of Energy(DOE),EPA, and Ecology interact in its regulation. In addition, the response to a recent $1 million regulatory fine is described to show actual interactions and options in this aspect of the regulatory process. The author acknowledges the significant contributions by Messrs. Clifford Clark and Owen Robertson. Ms. Nancy Williams provided graphics support and Ms. Laurie Kraemer edited the report.

HAWKINS AR

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

275

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During fiscal year 2008, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded 1431 triggers on the seismometer system, which included 112 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 422 regional and teleseismic events. There were 74 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. The highest-magnitude event (3.7 Mc) occurred on May 18, 2008, and was located approximately 17 km east of Prosser at a depth of 20.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, 13 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 45 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 16 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 54 earthquakes were located in swarm areas and 20 earthquakes were classified as random events. The May 18 earthquake was the highest magnitude event recorded since 1975 in the vicinity of the Hanford Site (between 46 degrees and 47 degrees north latitude and 119 degrees and 120 degrees west longitude). The event was not reported as being felt on the Hanford Site or causing any damage and was communicated to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Operations Center per HSAP communi¬cations procedures. The event is not considered to be significant with regard to site safety and not unprecedented given the site’s seismic history. The Hanford strong motion accelerometer (SMA) stations at the 200 East Area, 300 Area, and 400 Area were triggered by the May 18 event. The maximum acceleration recorded at the SMA stations (0.17% at the 300 Area) was 12 times smaller than the reportable action level (2% g) for Hanford Site facilities.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

276

Waste Removal & Tank Closure  

Hanford has developed the MARS – Explore a marriage between the SRS eductor and the MARS – Continue to refine to eductor technology to minimize water addition . 8

277

Iodine-129 in forage and deer on the Hanford site and other Pacific Northwest locations  

SciTech Connect

Samples of surface soil, litter, forage, and deer (rumen content, muscle, liver, and thyroid gland) were collected from Bend, Oregon; Centralia, Washington; Wenatchee, Washington; the Wooten Game Range near Dayton, Washington; and on or near the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The concentrations of /sup 129/I and /sup 127/I were determined using neturon activation techniques. The purpose of the study was to establish the current levels of /sup 129/I in the environs of the Hanford Site prior to the proposed restart of fuel reprocessing at the PUREX plant. The results of this study clearly demonstrated the longevity of /sup 129/I in the biosphere following gaseous release from a nuclear facility. Analyses of thyroid glands showed that deer living within 160 km (Wooten Game Range) of Hanford had elevated levels of /sup 129/I when compared to the more distant Pacific Northwest locations (Centralia, or Bend). Levels of /sup 129/I in deer thyroid from Bend, or Centralia, (15 fCi/g wet weight), were about five times higher than values reported for the central United States, while, Hanford samples were about 2,700 times higher. The average concentration of /sup 129/I in deer thyroids collected at Hanford in 1978 was similar to samples collected 14 years earlier. The concentrations of /sup 129/I in soil, litter, forage, and other deer samples generally decrease in the order: Hanford > Wooten > Wenatchee > Centralia approx. = Bend. This corresponds to an increase in distance from the Hanford Site.

Price, K.R.; Cadwell, L.L.; Schreckhise, R.G.; Brauer, F.P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

EIS-0467: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE announces its intent to prepare an EIS for the Acquisition of a Natural Gas Pipeline and Natural Gas Utility Service at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Natural Gas Pipeline or NGP EIS), and initiate a 30-day public scoping period.

279

Plutonium and Americium Geochemistry at Hanford: A Site Wide Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was produced to provide a systematic review of the state-of-knowledge of plutonium and americium geochemistry at the Hanford Site. The report integrates existing knowledge of the subsurface migration behavior of plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site with available information in the scientific literature regarding the geochemistry of plutonium and americium in systems that are environmentally relevant to the Hanford Site. As a part of the report, key research needs are identified and prioritized, with the ultimate goal of developing a science-based capability to quantitatively assess risk at sites contaminated with plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site and the impact of remediation technologies and closure strategies.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

280

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 30, 2009 September 30, 2009 CX-000477: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install a Photovoltaic Power Generation Array and Electric Car Charging Stations, Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 09/30/2009 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office September 23, 2009 CX-000476: Categorical Exclusion Determination 331 Building Irrigation Upgrades, 300 Area CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 09/23/2009 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office August 19, 2009 CX-000470: Categorical Exclusion Determination Purgewater Storage and Treatment Facility Unit #1 Closure CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 08/19/2009 Location(s): Benton County, Washington Office(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed 9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial treatment of contact-handled low-level mixed waste to meet existing Federal and State regulatory standards for eventual land disposal at the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Finding of No Significant Impact Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Final Environmental Assessment Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste

282

RECENT PROGRESS IN DOE WASTE TANK CLOSURE  

SciTech Connect

The USDOE complex currently has over 330 underground storage tanks that have been used to process and store radioactive waste generated from the production of weapons materials. These tanks contain over 380 million liters of high-level and low-level radioactive waste. The waste consists of radioactively contaminated sludge, supernate, salt cake or calcine. Most of the waste exists at four USDOE locations, the Hanford Site, the Savannah River Site, the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the West Valley Demonstration Project. A summary of the DOE tank closure activities was first issued in 2001. Since then, regulatory changes have taken place that affect some of the sites and considerable progress has been made in closing tanks. This paper presents an overview of the current regulatory changes and drivers and a summary of the progress in tank closures at the various sites over the intervening six years. A number of areas are addressed including closure strategies, characterization of bulk waste and residual heel material, waste removal technologies for bulk waste, heel residuals and annuli, tank fill materials, closure system modeling and performance assessment programs, lessons learned, and external reviews.

Langton, C

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hanford External Dosimetry Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the Hanford External Dosimetry Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include administrating the Hanford personnel dosimeter processing program and ensuring that the related dosimeter data accurately reflect occupational dose received by Hanford personnel or visitors. Specific chapters of this report deal with the following subjects: personnel dosimetry organizations at Hanford and the associated DOE and contractor exposure guidelines; types, characteristics, and procurement of personnel dosimeters used at Hanford; personnel dosimeter identification, acceptance testing, accountability, and exchange; dosimeter processing and data recording practices; standard sources, calibration factors, and calibration processes (including algorithms) used for calibrating Hanford personnel dosimeters; system operating parameters required for assurance of dosimeter processing quality control; special dose evaluation methods applied for individuals under abnormal circumstances (i.e., lost results, etc.); and methods for evaluating personnel doses from nuclear accidents. 1 ref., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Fix, J.J.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Hanford Production Workers Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Needs Assessment for Medical Surveillance of Needs Assessment for Medical Surveillance of Former Hanford Workers Phase I - October 1, 1997 Report Submitted by: University of Washington Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359739 Seattle, WA 98104 October 1, 1997 Authors Scott Barnhart, MD, MPH Principal Investigator Tim Takaro, MD, MPH, MS Co-Principal Investigator Bert Stover, BA Kate Durand, MHS, CIH Bill Trejo, BS Chris Mack, MS Kathy Ertell, MS, CIH Cooperative Agreement # DE-FCO3-96SF21-2581A000 TABLE OF CONTENTS List of Tables iv List of Figures v Executive Summary vi Introduction 1 II. Methods A. Human Subjects 3 B. Population Identification - Available Databases 3 C. Pending Databases 4 D. Assembly of Master Database 5 E. Estimation of Mortality 6 F. Estimation of Exposure* 6 C. Estimate of Need of Medical Surveillance

285

Hanford Production Workers Needs Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Surveillance of Medical Surveillance of Former Hanford Workers Phase I - October 1, 1997 Report Submitted by: University of Washington Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359739 Seattle, WA 98104 October 1, 1997 Authors Scott Barnhart, MD, MPH Principal Investigator Tim Takaro, MD, MPH, MS Co-Principal Investigator Bert Stover, BA Kate Durand, MHS, CIH Bill Trejo, BS Chris Mack, MS Kathy Ertell, MS, CIH Cooperative Agreement # DE-FCO3-96SF21-2581A000 TABLE OF CONTENTS List of Tables iv List of Figures v Executive Summary vi Introduction 1 II. Methods A. Human Subjects 3 B. Population Identification - Available Databases 3 C. Pending Databases 4 D. Assembly of Master Database 5 E. Estimation of Mortality 6 F. Estimation of Exposure* 6 C. Estimate of Need of Medical Surveillance

286

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

287

Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Funding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Funding Pays for Safe Disposal of 20,000 Truckloads of Soil Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Funding Pays for Safe Disposal of 20,000 Truckloads of Soil August 11, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov 509-376-6773 Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company removed nearly half a million tons of contaminated soil over the last two years using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. Workers shipped more than 20,000 truckloads of contaminated soil excavated

288

First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from River |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from River First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from River July 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Dee_Millikin@rl.doe.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers have started moving highly radioactive material, called sludge, away from the Columbia River, marking a significant milestone in the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s cleanup of the Hanford Site in Washington State. Today, DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) safely transferred the first large container of highly radioactive sludge from a basin next to a former plutonium production reactor to dry storage in the center of the site. Today's transfer is the first of six shipments

289

Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for fiscal year 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site occupies 560 sq. miles of land along the Columbia River in SE Washington. The Hanford Reach of the river is one of the most archaeologically rich areas in the western Columbia Plateau. To manage the Hanford Site`s archaeological, historical, and cultural resources, the Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) was established in 1987. HCRL ensures DOE complies with federal statutes, regulations, and guidelines. In FY 1994, HCRL conducted cultural resource reviews, conducted programs to identify and monitor historic and archaeological sites, etc. HCRL staff conducted 511 reviews, 29 of which required archaeological surveys and 10 of which required building documentation. Six prehistoric sites, 23 historic sites, one paleontological site, and two sites with historic and prehistoric components were discovered.

Nickens, P.R.; Wright, M.K.; Cadoret, N.A.; Dawson, M.V.; Harvey, D.W.; Simpson, E.M.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Tank Waste Retrieval Lessons Learned at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

One of the environmental remediation challenges facing the nation is the retrieval and permanent disposal of approximately 90 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Hanford Site is located in southeastern Washington State and stores roughly 60 percent of this waste. An estimated 53 million gallons of high-level, transuranic, and low-level radioactive waste is stored underground in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 newer double-shell tanks (DSTs) at the Hanford Site. These SSTs range in size from 55,000 gallons to 1,000,000 gallon capacity. Approximately 30 million gallons of this waste is stored in SSTs. The SSTs were constructed between 1943 and 1964 and all have exceeded the nominal 20-year design life. Sixty-seven SSTs are known or suspected to have leaked an estimated 1,000,000 gallons of waste to the surrounding soil. The risk of additional SST leakage has been greatly reduced by removing more than 3 million gallons of interstitial liquids and supernatant and transferring this waste to the DST system. Retrieval of SST salt-cake and sludge waste is underway to further reduce risks and stage feed materials for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant. Regulatory requirements for SST waste retrieval and tank farm closure are established in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO), better known as the Tri- Party Agreement, or TPA. The HFFACO was signed by the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and requires retrieval of as much waste as technically possible, with waste residues not to exceed 360 ft{sup 3} in 530,000 gallon or larger tanks; 30 ft{sup 3} in 55,000 gallon or smaller tanks; or the limit of waste retrieval technology, whichever is less. If residual waste volume requirements cannot be achieved, then HFFACO Appendix H provisions can be invoked to request Ecology and EPA approval of an exception to the waste retrieval criteria for a specific tank. Tank waste retrieval has been conducted at the Hanford Site over the last few decades using a method referred to as Past Practice Hydraulic Sluicing. Past Practice Hydraulic Sluicing employs large volumes of DST supernatant and water to dislodge, dissolve, mobilize, and retrieve tank waste. Concern over the leak integrity of SSTs resulted in the need for tank waste retrieval methods capable of using smaller volumes of liquid in a more controlled manner. Retrieval of SST waste in accordance with HFFACO requirements was initiated at the Hanford Site in April 2003. New and innovative tank waste retrieval methods that minimize and control the use of liquids are being implemented for the first time. These tank waste retrieval methods replace Past Practice Hydraulic Sluicing and employ modified sluicing, vacuum retrieval, and in-tank vehicle techniques. Waste retrieval has been completed in seven Hanford Site SSTs (C-106, C-103, C-201, C-202, C-203, C-204, and S-112) in accordance with HFFACO requirements. Three additional tanks are currently in the process of being retrieved (C-108, C-109 and S-102) Preparation for retrieval of two additional SSTs (C-104 and C-110) is ongoing with retrieval operations forecasted to start in calendar year 2008. Tank C-106 was retrieved to a residual waste volume of 470 ft{sup 3} using oxalic acid dissolution and modified sluicing. An Appendix H exception request for Tank C-106 is undergoing review. Tank C-103 was retrieved to a residual volume of 351 ft{sup 3} using a modified sluicing technology. This approach was successful at reaching the TPA limits for this tank of less than 360 ft{sup 3}and the limits of the technology. Tanks C-201, C-202, C-203, and C-204 are smaller (55,000 gallon) tanks and waste removal was completed in accordance with HFFACO requirements using a vacuum retrieval system. Residual waste volumes in each of these four tanks were less than 25 ft{sup 3}. Tank S-112 retrieval was completed February 28, 2007, meeting the TPA Limits of less than

Dodd, R.A. [CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., Richland, Washington (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Washington National Records Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington National Records Center Washington D.C. 20404 Annette Black, IM-23, 301-903-3842 Annette.Black@hq.doe.gov John E. Davenport, Director Records Management Div. IM23270CC...

292

HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU CLEANUP COMPLETION STRATEGY  

SciTech Connect

Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a comprehensive vision for completing Hanford's cleanup mission including transition to post-cleanup activities. This vision includes 3 principle components of cleanup: the {approx}200 square miles ofland adjacent to the Columbia River, known as the River Corridor; the 75 square miles of land in the center of the Hanford Site, where the majority of the reprocessing and waste management activities have occurred, known as the Central Plateau; and the stored reprocessing wastes in the Central Plateau, the Tank Wastes. Cleanup of the River Corridor is well underway and is progressing towards completion of most cleanup actions by 2015. Tank waste cleanup is progressing on a longer schedule due to the complexity of the mission, with construction of the largest nuclear construction project in the United States, the Waste Treatment Plant, over 50% complete. With the progress on the River Corridor and Tank Waste, it is time to place increased emphasis on moving forward with cleanup of the Central Plateau. Cleanup of the Hanford Site has been proceeding under a framework defmed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In early 2009, the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency signed an Agreement in Principle in which the parties recognized the need to develop a more comprehensive strategy for cleanup of the Central Plateau. DOE agreed to develop a Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy as a starting point for discussions. This DOE Strategy was the basis for negotiations between the Parties, discussions with the State of Oregon, the Hanford Advisory Board, and other Stakeholder groups (including open public meetings), and consultation with the Tribal Nations. The change packages to incorporate the Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy were signed by the Parties on October 26,2010, and are now in the process of being implemented.

BERGMAN TB

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

293

Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, seven local earthquakes were recorded during the second quarter of fiscal year 2008. The largest event recorded by the network during the second quarter (February 3, 2008 - magnitude 2.3 Mc) was located northeast of Richland in Franklin County at a depth of 22.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, two earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), three earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, five earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and two earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

294

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, forty-four local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2008. A total of thirty-one micro earthquakes were recorded within the Rattlesnake Mountain swarm area at depths in the 5-8 km range, most likely within the pre-basalt sediments. The largest event recorded by the network during the first quarter (November 25, 2007 - magnitude 1.5 Mc) was located within this swarm area at a depth of 4.3 km. With regard to the depth distribution, three earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), thirty-six earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and five earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, thirty-eight earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and six earth¬quakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

295

Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Federal and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Federal and state agencies determine cleanup plans for four areas near central Hanford Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Federal and state agencies determine cleanup plans for four areas near central Hanford October 7, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 Emerald Laija, EPA Laija.Emerald@epamail.epa.gov 509-376-4919 Dieter Bohrmann, Ecology Dieter.Bohrmann@ecy.wa.gov 509-372-7954 RICHLAND, Wash. -The Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in coordination with the Washington Department of Ecology, have made plans for remediating contaminated soil at four locations in the center of the Hanford Site. The agencies have chosen

296

EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Report for SRS / Hanford Tank Waste Review |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste Subcommittee Report for SRS / Hanford Tank Waste Tank Waste Subcommittee Report for SRS / Hanford Tank Waste Review EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Report for SRS / Hanford Tank Waste Review Environmental Management Advisory Board EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Report for SRS / Hanford Tank Waste Review Report Number TWS #003 EMAB EM-TWS SRS / Hanford Tank Waste June 23, 2011 This is the second report of the Environmental Management Tank Waste Subcommittee (EMTWS) of the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB). The first report was submitted and accepted by the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) in September 2010. The EM-TWS responded to three charges from EM-1 regarding the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant at Hanford (WTP) under construction in Richland, Washington. EM's responses were timely, and efforts have been

297

Office of Environmental Management's Hanford Site Awards $99M Contract to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management's Hanford Site Awards $99M Environmental Management's Hanford Site Awards $99M Contract to Small Business Office of Environmental Management's Hanford Site Awards $99M Contract to Small Business Small businesses are the backbone of our economy, employing half of all workers in America and creating two out of every three new jobs in the U.S. The Office of Environmental Management's Hanford Site awarded a $99 million contract (approximate value) to a minority-owned, women-owned, certified small business. The HPM Corporation of Kennewick, Washington, will provide Occupational Medical Services for the nearly 8,000 employees who work for Hanford Site contractors, Energy Department Offices, and others working at the Hanford Site. HPM Corporation, founded in 2001, will be responsible for operating and

298

Meeting Summaries for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting Summaries for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summaries for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Meeting Summaries for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment The Meeting Summaries for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment cover informal discussions between representatives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and involvement with Tribal Nations, State of Oregon, and the Hanford Advisory Board to support DOE's preparation of a new performance assessment (PA) for the Hanford Site C Tank Farm (CTF). These discussions will include the underlying assumptions, input parameters, and modeling approaches to be taken in

299

Fifth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Dedicated to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fifth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Fifth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Dedicated to Potential Future Uses of the Hanford Site Fifth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Dedicated to Potential Future Uses of the Hanford Site March 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Geoff Tyree, DOE , (509) 376-4171, Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - The Department of Energy is releasing the fifth chapter of The Hanford Story video series to the public today. "Future" offers perspectives and ideas for potential uses of the government's former plutonium production site in southeast Washington State as environmental cleanup is completed. From land use plans and preservation to economic development and tourism opportunities, the Future chapter touches on a variety of local economic,

300

Removing Phosphate from Hanford High-Phosphate Tank Wastes: FY 2010 Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for environmental remediation at the Hanford Site in Washington State, a former nuclear weapons production site. Retrieving, processing, immobilizing, and disposing of the 2.2 × 105 m3 of radioactive wastes stored in the Hanford underground storage tanks dominates the overall environmental remediation effort at Hanford. The cornerstone of the tank waste remediation effort is the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). As currently designed, the capability of the WTP to treat and immobilize the Hanford tank wastes in the expected lifetime of the plant is questionable. For this reason, DOE has been pursuing supplemental treatment options for selected wastes. If implemented, these supplemental treatments will route certain waste components to processing and disposition pathways outside of WTP and thus will accelerate the overall Hanford tank waste remediation mission.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Qafoku, Odeta; Felmy, Andrew R.; Carter, Jennifer C.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Hanford | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant | December 2009 Aerial View Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant | December 2009 Aerial View The Hanford Site mission focuses on environmental restoration, waste management, related scientific and environmental research and development of radioactive waste management technologies. Under the Tri-Party Agreement, lower-level hazardous wastes are buried in huge lined pits that will be sealed and monitored with sophisticated instruments for many years. Enforcement September 13, 2012 Enforcement Letter,CH2M HILL Plateau - NEL-2012-02 Issued to CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company related to Radiological Work Control Deficiencies at the Plutonium Finishing Plant and 105 K-East

302

Single-shell tank closure work plan. Revision A  

SciTech Connect

In January 1994, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Conset Order (Tri-Party Agreement) was amended to reflect a revised strategy for remediation of radioactive waste in underground storage tanks. These amendments include milestones for closure of the single-shell tank (SST) operable units, to be initiated by March 2012 and completed by September 2024. This SST-CWP has been prepared to address the principal topical areas identified in Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-06 (i.e., regulatory pathway, operable unit characterization, waste retrieval, technology development, and a strategy for achieving closure). Chapter 2.0 of this SST-CWP provides a brief description of the environmental setting, SST System, the origin and characteristics of SST waste, and ancillary equipment that will be remediated as part of SST operable unit closure. Appendix 2A provides a description of the hydrogeology of the Hanford Site, including information on the unsaturated sediments (vadose zone) beneath the 200 Areas Plateau. Chapter 3.0 provides a discussion of the laws and regulations applicable to closure of the SST farm operable units. Chapter 4.0 provides a summary description of the ongoing characterization activities that best align with the proposed regulatory pathway for closure. Chapter 5.0 describes aspects of the SST waste retrieval program, including retrieval strategy, technology, and sequence, potential tank leakage during retrieval, and considerations of deployment of subsurface barriers. Chapter 6.0 outlines a proposed strategy for closure. Chapter 7.0 provides a summary of the programs underway or planned to develop technologies to support closure. Ca. 325 refs.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

HANFORD FACILITY ANNUAL DANGEROUS WASTE REPORT CY2003 [SEC 1 & 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report (ADWR) is prepared to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code Sections 173-303-220, Generator Reporting, and 173-303-390, Facility Reporting. In addition, the ADWR is required to meet Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Condition I.E.22, Annual Reporting. The ADWR provides summary information on dangerous waste generation and management activities for the Calendar Year for the Hanford Facility EPA ID number assigned to the Department of Energy for RCRA regulated waste, as well as Washington State only designated waste and radioactive mixed waste. The Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) database is utilized to collect and compile the large array of data needed for preparation of this report. Information includes details of waste generated on the Hanford Facility, waste generated offsite and sent to Hanford for management, and other waste management activities conducted at Hanford, including treatment, storage, and disposal. Report details consist of waste descriptions and weights, waste codes and designations, and waste handling codes. In addition, for waste shipped to Hanford for treatment and or disposal, information on manifest numbers, the waste transporter, the waste receiving facility, and the original waste generators are included. In addition to paper copies, the report is also transmitted electronically to a web site maintained by the Washington State Department of Ecology.

FREEMAN, D.A.

2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

304

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction MDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in envirorunental pathways. epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering. radiation dosimetry. and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture; and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

McMakin, A.H., Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M. [comps.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M. [comps.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information contained in, and/or referenced in, this Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report addresses Permit Condition II.W (Other Permits and/or Approvals) of the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA7890008967). Condition II.W specifies that the Permittees are responsible for obtaining all other applicable federal, state, and local permits authorizing the development and operation of the Hanford Facility. Condition II.W further specifies that the Permittees are to use their best efforts to obtain such permits. For the purposes of this Permit Condition, ''best efforts'' mean submittal of documentation and/or approval(s) in accordance with schedules specified in applicable regulations, or as determined through negotiations with the applicable regulatory agencies.

SONNICHSEN, J.C.

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

307

May 19, 2000 Memo, Actions to Support Employees of Accelerated Closure Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

," I'@ ." A:r " The Deputy Secretary of Energy Washington, DC 20585 May 19,2000 MEMOIVINDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: 9P T. J. GLAUTHIER SUBJECT: Actions to Support Employees of Accelerated Closure Sites At present, there are approximately 400 employees assigned to accelerated closure sites. These sites are among our former nuclear production sites that are now being managed for clean up and closure on or before fiscal year 2006. As you may know, these sites have been identified in the Department's appropriations language for accelerated closure for the purpose of transitioning the real property to private commercial activities or environmentally friendly set-asides. Accelerated closure of these sites requires that employees with critical skills be retained, to the extent possible, to complete closure activities. Upon completion of closure

308

AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

309

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 8, 2012 March 8, 2012 Fifth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Dedicated to Potential Future Uses of the Hanford Site RICHLAND, Wash. - The Department of Energy is releasing the fifth chapter of The Hanford Story video series to the public today. March 1, 2012 The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment RICHLAND, Wash. - A new resin EM, the Richland Operations Office, and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are using in contaminated groundwater treatment is expected to increase efficiency and reduce costs in the operation of pump-and-treat facilities along the Columbia River at

310

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 1, 2012 June 1, 2012 The Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS), the largest robotic arm ever inserted into a Department of Energy waste storage tank, is back at work in one of Hanford's underground storage tanks where it has removed nearly 133,000 gallons of waste Robotic Arm Back to Work at Hanford RICHLAND, Wash. - A remotely operated robotic arm is back at work retrieving waste from one of Hanford's underground waste storage tanks. June 1, 2012 Dean Neshem, a pump-and-treat operations and maintenance engineer, observes operations at one of the Hanford site's five groundwater treatment facilities. Based on technical recommendations from DOE, CH2M HILL engineers tested and compared multiple resins to determine the products capable of removing contaminants from the groundwater.

311

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2011 7, 2011 Hanford Projects Receive Sustainability Awards RICHLAND, WASH. - Hanford's Department of Energy offices and their contractors received special recognition Tuesday for their part in promoting sustainability. June 2, 2011 Nathan Baker | Photo Courtesy of PNNL 10 Questions for a Signature Scientist: Nathan Baker Find out how he's working to advance the innovative application of data analytics and algorithms to real-world challenges, ranging from smart grids and bioforensics to nuclear non-proliferation and medical treatments. June 2, 2011 Hanford Surpasses Transuranic Waste Milestone: 1,000 Cubic Meters Shipped Four Months Ahead of Schedule RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Hanford surpassed a Tri-Party Agreement Milestone by four months in shipping 1,000

312

Hanford Site Guidelines for Preparation and Presentation of Geologic Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complex geology lies beneath the Hanford Site of southeastern Washington State. Within this geology is a challenging large-scale environmental cleanup project. Geologic and contaminant transport information generated by several U.S. Department of Energy contractors must be documented in geologic graphics clearly, consistently, and accurately. These graphics must then be disseminated in formats readily acceptable by general graphics and document producing software applications. The guidelines presented in this document are intended to facilitate consistent, defensible, geologic graphics and digital data/graphics sharing among the various Hanford Site agencies and contractors.

Lanigan, David C.; Last, George V.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Webber, William D.

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

THE HANFORD WASTE FEED DELIVERY OPERATIONS RESEARCH MODEL  

SciTech Connect

Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), the Hanford tank farm contractor, is tasked with the long term planning of the cleanup mission. Cleanup plans do not explicitly reflect the mission effects associated with tank farm operating equipment failures. EnergySolutions, a subcontractor to WRPS has developed, in conjunction with WRPS tank farms staff, an Operations Research (OR) model to assess and identify areas to improve the performance of the Waste Feed Delivery Systems. This paper provides an example of how OR modeling can be used to help identify and mitigate operational risks at the Hanford tank farms.

BERRY J; GALLAHER BN

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

314

Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External Flowsheet Review Team (Technical) Report Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External Flowsheet Review Team (Technical) Report Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External Flowsheet Review Team (Technical) Report Summary - Flowsheet for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant More Documents & Publications Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility

315

DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic Landmark DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic Landmark August 25, 2008 - 3:20pm Addthis DOE to offer regular public tours in 2009 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Deputy Secretary Lynn Scarlett and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Acting Deputy Secretary Jeffrey F. Kupfer today announced the designation of DOE's B Reactor as a National Historic Landmark and unveiled DOE's plan for a new public access program to enable American citizens to visit B Reactor during the 2009 tourist season. The B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State was the world's first industrial-scale nuclear reactor and produced plutonium for the atomic weapon that was dropped on Nagasaki,

316

DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic Landmark DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic Landmark August 25, 2008 - 3:20pm Addthis DOE to offer regular public tours in 2009 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Deputy Secretary Lynn Scarlett and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Acting Deputy Secretary Jeffrey F. Kupfer today announced the designation of DOE's B Reactor as a National Historic Landmark and unveiled DOE's plan for a new public access program to enable American citizens to visit B Reactor during the 2009 tourist season. The B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State was the world's first industrial-scale nuclear reactor and produced plutonium for the atomic weapon that was dropped on Nagasaki,

317

Washington County- Wind Ordinance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This ordinance establishes regulations to facilitate the installation and construction of Small Wind Energy Systems in Washington County for private landowners, subject to reasonable restrictions...

318

,"Washington Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

319

A hydrochemical data base for the Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This data package contains a revision of the Site Hydrochemical Data Base for water samples associated with the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). In addition to the detailed chemical analyses, a summary description of the data base format, detailed descriptions of verification procedures used to check data entries, and detailed descriptions of validation procedures used to evaluate data quality are included. 32 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

Early, T.O.; Mitchell, M.D.; Spice, G.D.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Summary of the HANFORD SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be welded. Some Tri-Party Agreement milestones completed in 2002 were related to work on Hanford tanks. #12 paragraphs. Solid waste may originate from work on the Hanford Site or from sources offsite, with contributions from CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.; S.M. Stoller Corporation; Fluor Hanford, Inc. and its

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), 6: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 30, 1996 EA-1096: Finding of No Significant Impact Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic) July 30, 1996 EA-1096: Final Environmental Assessment Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic)

322

FIA-13-0059 - In the Matter of Hanford Atomic Metals Trades Council |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 - In the Matter of Hanford Atomic Metals Trades Council 9 - In the Matter of Hanford Atomic Metals Trades Council FIA-13-0059 - In the Matter of Hanford Atomic Metals Trades Council On November 25, 2013, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision denying an appeal (Appeal) from a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) determination issued by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office (ROO). The Hanford Atomic Metals Trades Council (Appellant), sought categories of records concerning communications between DOE employees and DOE-contractor employees at the DOE's Hanford facility regarding collective bargaining, desired changes in wages, terms and conditions of employment, potential strikes, or closures. In its response, ROO withheld portions of a number of documents pursuant to Exemption 4 and

323

FIA-13-0061 - In the Matter of Hanford Atomic Metals Trades Council |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 - In the Matter of Hanford Atomic Metals Trades Council 1 - In the Matter of Hanford Atomic Metals Trades Council FIA-13-0061 - In the Matter of Hanford Atomic Metals Trades Council On November 14, 2013, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision denying an appeal (Appeal) from a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) determination issued by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office (ROO) . The Hanford Atomic Metals Trades Council (Appellant), sought categories of records concerning communications between DOE employees and DOE-contractor employees at the DOE's Hanford facility regarding collective bargaining, desired changes in wages, terms and conditions of employment, potential strikes, or closures. In its response, ROO withheld portions of a number of documents pursuant to Exemption 4 and

324

FIA-13-0058 - In the Matter of Hanford Atomic Metals Trades Council |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 - In the Matter of Hanford Atomic Metals Trades Council 8 - In the Matter of Hanford Atomic Metals Trades Council FIA-13-0058 - In the Matter of Hanford Atomic Metals Trades Council On October 29, 2013, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision denying an appeal (Appeal) from a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) determination issued by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Information Resources (OIR). The Hanford Atomic Metals Trades Council (Appellant), sought categories of records concerning communications between DOE employees and DOE-contractor employees at the DOE's Hanford facility regarding collective bargaining, desired changes in wages, terms and conditions of employment, potential strikes, or closures. In its July 31, 2013, response (Response), OIR identified 33 documents of which it withheld

325

Hanford Needs Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Needs Assessment Hanford Needs Assessment July 1997 This Needs Assessment for former Hanford construction workers was developed for the purpose of collecting existing...

326

RETRIEVAL & TREATMENT OF HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Farms contain 53 million gal of radioactive waste accumulated during over 50 years of operations. The waste is stored in 177 single-shell and double-shell tanks in the Hanford 200 Areas. The single-shell tanks were put into operation from the early 1940s through the 1960s with wastes received from several generations of processing facilities for the recovery of plutonium and uranium, and from laboratories and other ancillary facilities. The overall hanford Tank Farm system represents one of the largest nuclear legacies in the world driving towards completion of retrieval and treatment in 2028 and the associated closure activity completion by 2035. Remote operations, significant radiation/contamination levels, limited access, and old facilities are just some of the challenges faced by retrieval and treatment systems. These systems also need to be able to successfully remove 99% or more of the waste, and support waste treatment, and tank closure. The Tank Farm retrieval program has ramped up dramatically in the past three years with design, fabrication, installation, testing, and operations ongoing on over 20 of the 149 single-shell tanks. A variety of technologies are currently being pursued to retrieve different waste types, applications, and to help establish a baseline for recovery/operational efficiencies. The paper/presentation describes the current status of retrieval system design, fabrication, installation, testing, readiness, and operations, including: (1) Saltcake removal progress in Tanks S-102, S-109, and S-112 using saltcake dissolution, modified sluicing, and high pressure water lancing techniques; (2) Sludge vacuum retrieval experience from Tanks C-201, C-202, C-203, and C-204; (3) Modified sluicing experience in Tank C-103; (4) Progress on design and installation of the mobile retrieval system for sludge in potentially leaking single-shell tanks, particularly Tank C-101; and (5) Ongoing installation of various systems in the next generation of tanks to be retrieved.

EACKER, J.A.; SPEARS, J.A.; STURGES, M.H.; MAUSS, B.M.

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

327

Power Plant Closure Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizations that are planning to decommission an aged power plant face a host of issues that must be addressed and many tasks that must be properly executed in order to ensure a successful closure of the facility.

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

328

Hanford Site Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 15, 2010 March 15, 2010 CX-001180: Categorical Exclusion Determination Monroe-Custer Number 1 and 2 500-Kilovolt Transmission Line Structure 16/2 Access Road Improvement and Bridge Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/15/2010 Location(s): Snohomish County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration March 12, 2010 CX-006365: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington-City-Spokane CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/12/2010 Location(s): Spokane, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 12, 2010 CX-006364: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington-City-Pasco CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 03/12/2010 Location(s): Pasco, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 12, 2010 CX-001182: Categorical Exclusion Determination

330

State Energy Program Assurances - Washington Governor Gregoire...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Energy Program Assurances - Washington Governor Gregoire State Energy Program Assurances - Washington Governor Gregoire Letter from Washington Governor Gregoire providing...

331

Dose assessment for potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site: NESHAP compliance  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to present the assessment results for the registered stacks on the Hanford Site for potential emissions, i.e. emissions with no control devices in place. Further, the document will identify those stacks requiring continuous monitoring, i.e. the effective dose equivalent from potential emissions >0.1 mrem/yr. The stack assessment of potential emissions was performed on 84 registered stacks on the Hanford Site. These emission sources represent individual point sources presently registered under Washington Administrative code 246-247 with the Washington Department of Health. The methods used in assessing the potential emissions from the stacks are described.

Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Kenoyer, J.L. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Decontamination and inspection plan for Phase 3 closure of the 300 area waste acid treatment system  

SciTech Connect

This decontamination and inspection plan (DIP) describes decontamination and verification activities in support of Phase 3 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS). Phase 3 is the third phase of three WATS closure phases. Phase 3 attains clean closure conditions for WATS portions of the 334 and 311 Tank Farms (TF) and the 333 and 303-F Buildings. This DIP also describes designation and management of waste and debris generated during Phase 3 closure activities. Information regarding Phase 1 and Phase 2 for decontamination and verification activities closure can be found in WHC-SD-ENV-AP-001 and HNF-1784, respectively. This DIP is provided as a supplement to the closure plan (DOE/RL-90-11). This DIP provides the documentation for Ecology concurrence with Phase 3 closure methods and activities. This DIP is intended to provide greater detail than is contained in the closure plan to satisfy Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 requirement that closure documents describe the methods for removing, transporting, storing, and disposing of all dangerous waste at the unit. The decontamination and verification activities described in this DIP are based on the closure plan and on agreements reached between Ecology and the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) during Phase 3 closure activity workshops and/or project manager meetings (PMMs).

LUKE, S.N.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, general information portion  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needed by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in this report).

Hays, C.B.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

334

Fiscal Year 2005 Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Performance Assessment Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Groundwater is monitored in hundreds of wells at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of requirements. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various purposes, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users. DOE manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Performance Assessment Project, which is the responsibility of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The groundwater project integrates monitoring for various objectives into a single sampling schedule to avoid redundancy of effort and to improve efficiency of sample collection.This report documents the purposes and objectives of groundwater monitoring at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State.

Rieger, JoAnne T.; Hartman, Mary J.

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

335

Microsoft Word - HanfordWorkersComp082409.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

memorandum DATE: August 27, 2009 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-40 SUBJECT: Letter Report on "Allegations of Improper Hanford Workers' Compensation Payments," (INS-L-09-07, S09IS017) TO: Manager, Office of River Protection Manager, Richland Operations Office This is to advise you of the results of an Office of Inspector General inspection concerning workers' compensation related allegations at the Hanford site. Specifically, it was alleged that the Hanford site's tank farm contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), was paying employees on workers' compensation over 100 percent of their net salaries and beyond the 180 day limit allowed under the site's labor agreement. It was also alleged that the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP), WRPS, and the

336

Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report, CY 1992  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1992 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State in 1992. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sediments, soil, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and to control the impacts of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the workers and the local environment. Additionally, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although impacts from nuclear facilities are still seen on the Hanford Site and are slightly elevated when compared to offsite, these impacts are less than in previous years.

Schmidt, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; McKinney, S.M.; Perkins, C.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Hanford Projects Receive Sustainability Awards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Receive Sustainability Awards Projects Receive Sustainability Awards Hanford Projects Receive Sustainability Awards June 7, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - Hanford's Department of Energy offices and their contractors received special recognition Tuesday for their part in promoting sustainability. The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management in Washington D.C. selected 10 Hanford Site projects to be awarded for excellence in encouraging sustainability, conserving resources, and exemplifying the ideals set forth by Executive Order 13514. The Order was signed by President Barack Obama on October 5, 2009, and challenged federal agencies to make plans and lead by example in "environmental, energy, and economic

338

Retrieval of the Tenth Single-Shell Tank Complete at Hanford: Third  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Retrieval of the Tenth Single-Shell Tank Complete at Hanford: Third Retrieval of the Tenth Single-Shell Tank Complete at Hanford: Third Single-Shell Tank Emptied at Hanford's C Farm This Year Retrieval of the Tenth Single-Shell Tank Complete at Hanford: Third Single-Shell Tank Emptied at Hanford's C Farm This Year September 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Lori Gamache, ORP 509-372-9130 Rob Roxburgh, WRPS 509-376-5188 RICHLAND - Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has advised the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that they have completed retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from the third single-shell tank (SST) this year. WRPS is the tank operations contractor for the DOE Office of River Protection (ORP). An engineering evaluation in the field shows the waste volume in C-109 is below the regulatory requirement of 360 cubic feet of waste remaining in

339

Retrieval of the Tenth Single-Shell Tank Complete at Hanford: Third  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Tenth Single-Shell Tank Complete at Hanford: Third the Tenth Single-Shell Tank Complete at Hanford: Third Single-Shell Tank Emptied at Hanford's C Farm This Year Retrieval of the Tenth Single-Shell Tank Complete at Hanford: Third Single-Shell Tank Emptied at Hanford's C Farm This Year September 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Lori Gamache, ORP 509-372-9130 Rob Roxburgh, WRPS 509-376-5188 RICHLAND - Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has advised the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that they have completed retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from the third single-shell tank (SST) this year. WRPS is the tank operations contractor for the DOE Office of River Protection (ORP). An engineering evaluation in the field shows the waste volume in C-109 is below the regulatory requirement of 360 cubic feet of waste remaining in

340

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Fluor Hanford Inc. - EA-2004-06 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Inc. - EA-2004-06 Hanford Inc. - EA-2004-06 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Fluor Hanford Inc. - EA-2004-06 July 14, 2004 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Fluor Hanford, Incorporated, related to Deficiencies with the Design and Safety Basis of the Sludge and Water System (SWS) at the K Reactor, 100 Area, Hanford Site. Proposed Imposition of Civil Penalty $935,000. Department of Energy's Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) initiated its investigation of the SWS quality assurance and safety basis deficiencies with a review of relevant documentation. In addition, discussions that involved DOE-RL and FHI personnel took place in each organization's headquarters office at Richland, Washington, on January 27 and 28, 2004. OE's findings were provided to you in its May 6, 2004,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Federal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Federal Judge Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Federal Judge October 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) jointly filed a motion today in U.S. District Court asking the court to approve and enter a judicial consent decree that imposes a new, enforceable, and achievable schedule for cleaning up waste from Hanford's underground tanks. The settlement also includes new milestones in the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), an administrative order between DOE, Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which governs cleanup at DOE's Hanford Site. "Today's agreement represents an important milestone in the ongoing cleanup

342

Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project (DOE-eis-0325)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Record of Decision March 2003 Bonneville Power Administration Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Record of Decision Decision The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to construct the proposed Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project in Benton, Douglas, Grant, Kittitas, and Yakima Counties, Washington. BPA has decided to implement the Agency Preferred Alternative identified in the Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0325, January 2003), with the exception of Option 1 of the Sickler-Schultz Reroute. Due to landowner concerns, BPA will now implement Option 2 of the Sickler-Schultz Reroute. The Agency Preferred Alternative consists of constructing a new 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission

343

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 30, 2013 July 30, 2013 Matt McCormick, manager of the Richland Operations Office, commends a large group of Hanford workers for the 15-million-ton milestone at a public event at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) - a massive landfill for low-level radioactive and hazardous waste at the Hanford site - has achieved a major cleanup milestone. July 30, 2013 Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz tours the 200 West Pump and Treat System, which treats chemical and radionuclide contamination in Hanford's groundwater. Pictured, left to right, are Special Assistant to the Secretary Mark Appleton, Bob Popielarczyk of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Special Assistant to the Secretary T.J. Augustine, Secretary Ernest Moniz, EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and DOE Richland Operations Office Deputy Manager Doug Shoop.

344

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 15, 2013 January 15, 2013 EA-1949: FERC Draft Environmental Assessment Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA December 27, 2012 EM's Office of River Protection has successfully removed waste from a tenth storage tank at the Hanford site. Located in C Farm, C-109 is one of 16 underground tanks ranging in capacity from 55,000 to 530,000 gallons. Retrieval of Tenth Single-shell Tank Complete at Hanford's Office of River Protection RICHLAND, Wash. - The Office of River Protection (ORP) has completed retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from the tenth underground waste storage tank at the Hanford site. December 17, 2012 CX-009746: Categorical Exclusion Determination Upstream Ultrasonic Processing for Small Producers: Preventative Maintenance for Paraffin Management

345

NR Hanford OCMED Awd4 June 8 2012.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Consolidated Business Center Management Consolidated Business Center 250 E. 5 th Street, Suite 500, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 Media Contact: June 8, 2012 Cameron Hardy/ 509-308-4947 Cameron.hardy@rl.gov DOE Awards Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services Contract Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that HPM Corporation, of Kennewick, Washington has been awarded an estimated $99 million contract to provide Occupational

346

Hanford atmospheric dispersion data: 1960 through June 1967  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume presents dispersion and supporting meteorological data from experiments conducted over relatively flat terrain at Hanford, Washington from January 1960 through June 1967. The nature of the experiments, the sampling grids, and the tracer techniques used are described in the narrative portion of the document. Appendices contain the time-integrated concentrations for samplers within the plumes, summaries of the concentration distributions across the plumes, and wind and temperature profile data for each release period. 18 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

Nickola, P.W.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Glantz, C.S.; Kerns, R.E.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hanford ETR - Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - - Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - Estimate at Completion (Cost) Report Hanford ETR - Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - Estimate at Completion (Cost) Report This is a comprehensive review ofthe Hanford WTP estimate at completion - assessing the project scope, contract requirements, management execution plant, schedule, cost estimates, and risks. Hanford ETR - Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - Estimate at Completion (Cost) Report More Documents & Publications TBH-0042 - In the Matter of Curtis Hall

348

Hanford Emergency Response Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures.

Wagoner, J.D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Historical Photographs: Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Image 1. A facility at Hanford for treating persons injured by embedded radioactive particles (circa 1967). In this shielded operating cell, a mock patient is flanked by a...

350

DOELEA-1211 Environmental Assessment Relocation and Storage of Isotopic Heat Sources, Hanford Site,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOELEA-1211 DOELEA-1211 - Environmental Assessment Relocation and Storage of Isotopic Heat Sources, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington June 1997 DOE/EA-1211 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE RELOCATION AND STORAGE OF ISOTOPIC HEAT SOURCES HANFORD SITE RICHLAND, WASHINGTON JUNE 1997 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NCHLAND, WASHINGTON Portions of this document may be iiIegiile in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original dornmeut DOWEA- 1 2 1 1 U.S. Department of Energy Preface PREFACE This environmental assessment (EA) has been prep- to assess potentia environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy proposed action: Relocation and storage of the isotopic heat sources.

351

PROTECTING GROUNDWATER & THE COLUMBIA RIVER AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

Along the remote shores of the Columbia River in southeast Washington state, a race is on. Fluor Hanford, a prime cleanup contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Hanford Site, is managing a massive, multi-faceted project to remove contaminants from the groundwater before they can reach the Columbia. Despite the daunting nature and size of the problem--about 80 square miles of aquifer under the site contains long-lived radionuclides and hazardous chemicals--significant progress is being made. Many groups are watching, speaking out, and helping. A large. passionate, diverse, and geographically dispersed community is united in its desire to protect the Columbia River--the eighth largest in the world--and have a voice in Hanford's future. Fluor Hanford and the DOE, along with the US. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) interact with all the stakeholders to make the best decisions. Together, they have made some remarkable strides in the battle against groundwater contamination under the site.

GERBER, M.S.

2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

352

Washington Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Washington Quick Facts. The Grand Coulee Dam on Washington's Columbia River is the largest hydroelectric power producer in the United States, with a total generating ...

353

Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office...

354

SAFETY AT FLUOR HANFORD (A) CASE STUDY - PREPARED BY THUNDERBIRD SCHOOL OF GLOBAL MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

By November of 1997, Fluor Hanford (Fluor) had been the site manager of the Hanford nuclear reservation for a year. The Hanford site had been established as part of the Manhattan Project in the 1940s that gave birth to the atomic bomb. Hanford produced two thirds of U.S. plutonium during the Cold War period. The Hanford site was half the size of Rhode Island and occupied 586 square miles in southeastern Washington State. The production of plutonium for more than 40 years left a huge legacy of chemical and radiological contamination: 80 square miles of contaminated groundwater; 2,300 tons of spent nuclear fuel stored in underwater basins; 20 tons of plutonium-laced contaminated materials; and 500 contaminated facilities. The cleanup involved a challenging combination of radioactive material handling within an infrastructure constructed in the 1940s and 1950s. The cleanup that began in 1988 was expected to take 30 years or more. Improving safety at Hanford had already proven to be a significant challenge. As the new site manager at Hanford, Fluor Hanford inherited lower- and mid-level managers and thousands of unionized employees, many of whom were second or third generation Hanford employees. These employees had seen many contractors come and go over the years. Some of the managers who had worked with the previous contractor saw Fluor's emphasis on safety as getting in the way of operations. Union-management relations were fractious. Hanford's culture was described as 'production driven-management told everyone what to do, and, if you didn't do it, there were consequences'. Worker involvement in designing and implementing safety programs was negligible. Fluor Hanford also was having trouble satisfying its client, the Department of Energy (DOE). The DOE did not see a clear path forward for performance improvements at Hanford. Clearly, major change was necessary, but how and where should it be implemented?

ARNOLD LD

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

355

Hanford Site air operating permit application  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which amended the Federal Clean Air Act of 1977, required that the US Environmental Protection Agency develop a national Air Operating Permit Program, which in turn would require each state to develop an Air Operating Permit Program to identify all sources of ``regulated`` pollutants. Regulated pollutants include ``criteria`` pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur oxides, total suspended particulates, carbon monoxide, particulate matter greater than 10 micron, lead) plus 189 other ``Hazardous`` Air Pollutants. The Hanford Site, owned by the US Government and operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, is located in southcentral Washington State and covers 560 square miles of semi-arid shrub and grasslands located just north of the confluence of the Snake and Yakima Rivers with the Columbia River. This land, with restricted public access, provides a buffer for the smaller areas historically used for the production of nuclear materials, waste storage, and waste disposal. About 6 percent of the land area has been disturbed and is actively used. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application consists of more than 1,100 sources and in excess of 300 emission points. Before January 1995, the maintenance and operations contractor and the environmental restoration contractor for the US Department of Energy completed an air emission inventory on the Hanford Site. The inventory has been entered into a database so that the sources and emission points can be tracked and updated information readily can be retrieved. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application contains information current as of April 19, 1995.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 23, 2010 November 23, 2010 CX-004464: Categorical Exclusion Determination Central Ferry Area Radio Communications Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 11/01/2010 Location(s): Franklin County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration November 19, 2010 CX-004524: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington State University Building Upgrades and Resource Conservation Manager CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 11/19/2010 Location(s): Clark County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 19, 2010 CX-004525: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Services Corps CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 11/19/2010 Location(s): Kitsap County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

357

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21, 2011 21, 2011 CX-007750: Categorical Exclusion Determination Highlands Trail in the Longview-Cowlitz Number 1 Transmission Line Right-of-Way CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 12/21/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration December 16, 2011 Cows like these in Skagit County, Washington, supply the biodigester developed by Kevin Maas of Farm Power up to 70,000 gallons of manure per day. The newest Farm Power facility in Washington generates enough electricity to power 500 homes. Photo courtesy of sea_turtle. Farming Out Heat and Electricity through Biopower The newest biodigester at the Farm Power facility in Washington generates electricity from biogas created from bacteria's anaerobic digestion of cow

358

Washington Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Washington Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional...

359

Geothermal Technologies Program: Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheets provides a summary of geothermal potential, issues, and current development in Washington State. This fact sheet was developed as part of DOE's GeoPowering the West initiative, part of the Geothermal Technologies Program.

Not Available

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Achieving closure at Fernald  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Evaluation of injury/illness recordkeeping pilot course taught in Richland, Washington, June 18, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Injury/Illness Recordkeeping which was conducted June 18, at Hanford, in richland, Washington. This class was the second pilot course taught. This class was designed to aquaint attendees with DOE orders 5484.1, 5484.1A, draft 3 and OSHA regulations found in 29 CFR 1904.

Wright, T.S.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

THE INTEGRATION OF THE 241-Z BUILDING DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING (D&D) UNDER COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE COMPENSATION & LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) WITH RESOURCE CONSERVATION & RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) CLOSURE AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)  

SciTech Connect

The 241-Z treatment and storage tanks, a hazardous waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal (TSD) unit permitted pursuant to the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) and Washington State ''Hazardous Waste Management Act, RCW 70.105'', have been deactivated and are being actively decommissioned. The 241-Z TSD unit managed non-listed radioactive contaminated waste water, containing trace RCRA characteristic constituents. The 241-Z TSD unit consists of below grade tanks (D-4, D-5, D-7, D-8, and an overflow tank) located in a concrete containment vault, sample glovebox GB-2-241-ZA, and associated ancillary piping and equipment. The tank system is located beneath the 241-Z building. The 241-Z building is not a portion of the TSD unit. The sample glovebox is housed in the above-grade building. Waste managed at the TSD unit was received via underground mining from Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sources. Tank D-6, located in the D-6 vault cell, is a past-practice tank that was taken out of service in 1972 and has never operated as a portion of the RCRA TSD unit. CERCLA actions address Tank D-6, its containment vault cell, and soil beneath the cell that was potentially contaminated during past-practice operations and any other potential past-practice contamination identified during 241-Z closure, while outside the scope of the ''Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plant, 241-Z Treatment and Storage Tanks''.

HOPKINS, A.M.

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

363

FINAL FRONTIER AT HANFORD TACKLING THE CENTRAL PLATEAU  

SciTech Connect

The large land area in the center of the vast Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State is known as 'the plateau'--aptly named because its surface elevations are 250-300 feet above the groundwater table. By contrast, areas on the 585-square mile Site that border the Columbia River sit just 30-80 feet above the water table. The Central Plateau, which covers an ellipse of approximately 70 square miles, contains Hanford's radiochemical reprocessing areas--the 200 East and 200 West Areas--and includes the most highly radioactive waste and contaminated facilities on the Site. Five 'canyons' where chemical processes were used to separate out plutonium (Pu), 884 identified soil waste sites (including approximately 50 miles of solid waste burial trenches), more than 900 structures, and all of Hanford's liquid waste storage tanks reside in the Central Plateau. (Notes: Canyons is a nickname given by Hanford workers to the chemical reprocessing facilities. The 177, underground waste tanks at Hanford comprise a separate work scope and are not under Fluor's management). Fluor Hanford, a DOE prime cleanup contractor at the Site for the past 12 years, has moved aggressively to investigate Central Plateau waste sites in the last few years, digging more than 500 boreholes, test pits, direct soil 'pushes' or drive points; logging geophysical data sets; and performing electrical-resistivity scans (a non-intrusive technique that maps patterns of sub-surface soil conductivity). The goal is to identify areas of contamination areas in soil and solid waste sites, so that cost-effective and appropriate decisions on remediation can be made. In 2007, Fluor developed a new work plan for DOE that added 238 soil waste-site characterization activities in the Central Plateau during fiscal years (FYs) 2007-2010. This number represents a 50 percent increase over similar work previously done in central Hanford. Work Plans are among the required steps in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup process. The CERCLA process is used to oversee the investigation, decision-making and remediation of 'past practices' (historical) sites, as opposed to sites in active use. For the first several years of Hanford's cleanup work, everyone concerned--the Department, contractors, regulatory agencies, stakeholders and Indian nations and tribes--focused efforts on the rivershore. The magnificent Columbia River--eighth largest in the world--flows through and by the Hanford Site for 52 miles. Two million people live downstream from Hanford along the Columbia before it empties into the Pacific Ocean. Further, the part of the river known as the 'Hanford Reach' is a prime habitat for salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and other species of fish. In fact, it provides a spawning ground to more salmon than any other stretch of river in the United States outside of Alaska. For these reasons, protecting the Columbia by cleaning up waste directly along its shoreline was an early priority in Hanford's Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (or Tri-Party Agreement) signed in 1989 among the DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State to govern cleanup. However, Tri-Party Agreement signatories and others concerned with Hanford and the Columbia River, knew that the waste located in, and beneath, the Central Plateau could also pose dangers to the waterway. While the waste in central Hanford might move more slowly, and pose fewer immediate threats, it would have to be dealt with as cleanup progressed.

GERBER MS

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

364

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During FY 2009, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded nearly 3000 triggers on the seismometer system, which included over 1700 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 370 regional and teleseismic events. There were 1648 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. Nearly all of these earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. Recording of the Wooded Island events began in January with over 250 events per month through June 2009. The frequency of events decreased starting in July 2009 to approximately 10-15 events per month through September 2009. Most of the events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with 47 events in the 2.0-3.0 range. The estimated depths of the Wooded Island events are shallow (averaging less than 1.0 km deep) with a maximum depth estimated at 2.3 km. This places the Wooded Island events within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The highest-magnitude event (3.0Mc) occurred on May 13, 2009 within the Wooded Island swarm at depth 1.8 km. With regard to the depth distribution, 1613 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 18 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 17 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 1630 earthquakes were located in swarm areas and 18 earthquakes were classified as random events. The low magnitude of the Wooded Island events has made them undetectable to all but local area residents. However, some Hanford employees working within a few miles of the area of highest activity and individuals living in homes directly across the Columbia River from the swarm center have reported feeling many of the larger magnitude events. The Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer (SMA) network was triggered numerous times by the Wooded Island swarm events. The maximum acceleration value recorded by the SMA network was approximately 3 times lower than the reportable action level for Hanford facilities (2% g) and no action was required. The swarming is likely due to pressure that has built up, cracking the brittle basalt layers within the Columbia River Basalt Formation (CRBG). Similar earthquake “swarms” have been recorded near this same location in 1970, 1975 and 1988. Prior to the 1970s, swarming may have occurred, but equipment was not in place to record those events. Quakes of this limited magnitude do not pose a risk to Hanford cleanup efforts or waste storage facilities. Since swarms of the past did not intensify in magnitude, seismologists do not expect that these events will increase in intensity. However, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor the activity.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

Plans and Progress on Hanford MLLW Treatment and Disposal  

SciTech Connect

Mixed low-level waste (MLLW) contains both low-level radioactive materials and low-level hazardous chemicals. The hazardous component of mixed waste has characteristics identified by any or all of the following statutes: the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), as amended; the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976; and Washington State dangerous waste regulations. The Fluor Hanford Waste Management Project (WMP) is responsible for storing, treating, and disposing of solid MLLW, which includes organic and inorganic solids, organics and inorganic lab packs, debris, lead, mercury, long-length equipment, spent melters, and remote-handled (RH) and oversized MLLW. Hanford has 7,000 cubic meters, or about 25%, of the MLLW in storage at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Hanford plans to receive 57,000 cubic meters from on-site generators, or about 50% of DOE's newly generated MLLW. In addition, the Hanford Environment Restoration Program and off-site generators having approved Federal Facility Consent Agreement site treatment plans will most likely send 200 cubic meters of waste to be treated and returned to the generators. Volumes of off-site waste receipts will be affected when the MLLW Record of Decision is issued as part of the process for the Hanford Site Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The WMP objective relative to MLLW is to treat and dispose of {approx}8000 cubic meters of existing inventory and newly-generated waste by September 30, 2006.

McDonald, K. M.; Blackford, L. T.; Nester, D. E.; Connolly, R. R.; McKenney, D. E.; Moy, S. K.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

366

Hanford Waste Physical and Rheological Properties: Data and Gaps  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site in Washington State manages 177 underground storage tanks containing approximately 250,000 m3 of waste generated during past defense reprocessing and waste management operations. These tanks contain a mixture of sludge, saltcake and supernatant liquids. The insoluble sludge fraction of the waste consists of metal oxides and hydroxides and contains the bulk of many radionuclides such as the transuranic components and 90Sr. The saltcake, generated by extensive evaporation of aqueous solutions, consists primarily of dried sodium salts. The supernates consist of concentrated (5-15 M) aqueous solutions of sodium and potassium salts. The 177 storage tanks include 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double -hell tanks (DSTs). Ultimately the wastes need to be retrieved from the tanks for treatment and disposal. The SSTs contain minimal amounts of liquid wastes, and the Tank Operations Contractor is continuing a program of moving solid wastes from SSTs to interim storage in the DSTs. The Hanford DST system provides the staging location for waste feed delivery to the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s (ORP) Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP is being designed and constructed to pretreat and then vitrify a large portion of the wastes in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks.

Wells, Beric E.; Kurath, Dean E.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Onishi, Yasuo; Huckaby, James L.; Cooley, Scott K.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Tingey, Joel M.; Daniel, Richard C.; Anderson, K. K.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Washington Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Power Plants : ... Clean Cities Coalitions Western Washington (Seattle) ... Governor Chris Gregoire - Initiatives - Energy;

368

Energy Matters in Washington State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Matters in Washington State Energy Matters in Washington State www.energy.wsu.edu/library/ November 2009 #12;905 Plum Street SE, Building 3 P.O. Box 43169 Olympia, Washington 98504-3169 Energy University Extension Energy Program. 905 Plum Street SE, Building 3, P.O. Box 43169, Olympia, Washington

Collins, Gary S.

369

Performance Assessment Scoping - Hanford Example  

Performance Assessment Scoping - Hanford Example Linda Suttora Office of Environmental Compliance DOE-HQ Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010

370

Closure operators for order structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We argue that closure operators are fundamental tools for the study of relationships between order structures and their sequence representations. We also propose and analyse a closure operator for interval order structures.

Ryszard Janicki; Dai Tri Man Lê; Nadezhda Zubkova

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Hanford Waste Tank Plant PIA, Richland Operations Office | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Waste Tank Plant PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Waste Tank Plant PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Waste Tank Plant PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford...

372

Summary of the HANFORD SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

milestones completed in 2003 were related to work on Hanford waste storage tanks. During 2003, there were 36Summary of the HANFORD SITE Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2003 EDITORS R.W. HANF L Northwest National Laboratory under contract DE-AC06-76RL01830, with contributions from Bechtel Hanford, Inc

373

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to immobilize pretreated Hanford high-level waste and transuranic waste in borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters. Testing is being conducted in the HWVP Technology Development Project to ensure that adapted technologies are applicable to the candidate Hanford wastes and to generate information for waste form qualification. Empirical modeling is being conducted to define a glass composition range consistent with process and waste form qualification requirements. Laboratory studies are conducted to determine process stream properties, characterize the redox chemistry of the melter feed as a basis for controlling melt foaming and evaluate zeolite sorption materials for process waste treatment. Pilot-scale tests have been performed with simulated melter feed to access filtration for solids removal from process wastes, evaluate vitrification process performance and assess offgas equipment performance. Process equipment construction materials are being selected based on literature review, corrosion testing, and performance in pilot-scale testing. 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Larson, D.E.; Allen, C.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Kruger, O.L.; Weber, E.T. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

OVERVIEW OF HANFORD SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY - 12123  

SciTech Connect

To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration. Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford SSTs. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford SSTs is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS{reg_sign} The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford SSTs has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analyses of the remaining Hanford SSTs are scheduled for FY2013. Hanford SSTs are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of the concrete tank domes, looking for cracks and other surface conditions that may indicate signs of structural distress. The condition of the concrete and rebar of the Hanford SSTs is currently being tested and planned for additional activities in the near future. Concrete and rebar removed from the dome of a 65-year-old tank is being tested for mechanics properties and condition. Results indicated stronger than designed concrete with additional Petrographic examination and rebar testing ongoing. Material properties determined from previous efforts combined with current testing and construction document review will help to generate a database that will provide continuing indication of Hanford SST structural integrity.

RAST RS; RINKER MW; WASHENFELDER DJ; JOHNSON JB

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

375

Overview of Hanford Single Shell Tank (SST) Structural Integrity - 14023  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project (SSTIP) in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration, Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford Single-Shell Tanks. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS. The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford Single-Shell Tanks has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analysis of the remaining Hanford Single-Shell Tanks is scheduled for FY2014. Hanford Single-Shell Tanks are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than ? inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of the concrete tanks, looking for cracks and other surface conditions that may indicate signs of structural distress. The condition of the concrete and rebar of the Hanford Single-Shell Tanks is currently being tested and planned for additional activities in the near future. Concrete and rebar removed from the dome of a 65 year old tank was tested for mechanics properties and condition. Results indicated stronger than designed concrete with additional Petrographic examination and rebar completed. Material properties determined from previous efforts combined with current testing and construction document review will help to generate a database that will provide indication of Hanford Single-Shell Tank structural integrity.

Rast, Richard S.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

376

Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for fiscal year 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1996 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that affected groundwater quality on the site. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone during FY 1996 comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-gas monitoring, and electrical resistivity tomography. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1995 and June 1996. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Smaller plumes of strontium-90, technetium-99, and plutonium also were present at levels above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington interim drinking water standards. Uranium concentrations greater than the proposed drinking water standard were also observed. Nitrate, fluoride, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichlomethylene were present in groundwater samples at levels above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington maximum contaminant levels. The nitrate plume is the most extensive. Three-dimensional, numerical, groundwater models were applied to the Hanford Site to predict contaminant-flow paths and the impact of operational changes on site groundwater conditions. Other models were applied to assess the performance of three separate pump-and-treat systems.

Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; Borghese, J.V. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 6, 2008 November 6, 2008 EIS-0183: Record of Decision Columbia Basin Fish Accord MOA with the Shoshone-Banock Tribes November 1, 2008 EIS-0397: Final Environmental Impact Statement Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project September 26, 2008 EIS-0222: Amended Record of Decision Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan June 10, 2008 EIS-0378: Record of Decision Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmssion Proj June 2, 2008 EIS-0222-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement March 28, 2008 EIS-0397: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project March 1, 2008 EIS-0397: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project February 5, 2008 EIS-0378-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmssion Project

378

DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. for Price-Anderson Violations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group, Inc. for Price-Anderson Group, Inc. for Price-Anderson Violations DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. for Price-Anderson Violations June 5, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) for nuclear safety violations. CHG is the tank operations contractor for the tank farms located at DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The PNOV cites a series of violations that occurred on July 27, 2007, when waste being pumped out of tank S-102 spilled in the vicinity of the tank's retrieval pump. During waste transfer operations, a supply line became over-pressurized with tank waste, causing a rupture in the dilution water supply line and resulted in a spill of approximately 85 gallons of

379

Hanford Tanks 241-C-202 and 241-C-203 Residual Waste Contaminant Release Models and Supporting Data  

SciTech Connect

As directed by Congress, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of River Protection in 1998 to manage DOE's largest, most complex environmental cleanup project – retrieval of radioactive waste from Hanford tanks for treatment and eventual disposal. Sixty percent by volume of the nation's high-level radioactive waste is stored at Hanford in aging deteriorating tanks. If not cleaned up, this waste is a threat to the Columbia River and the Pacific Northwest. CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., is the Office of River Protection's prime contractor responsible for the storage, retrieval, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. As part of this effort, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop release models for key contaminants that are present in residual sludge remaining after closure of Hanford Tanks 241-C-203 (C-203) and 241-C-204 (C-204). The release models were developed from data generated by laboratory characterization and testing of samples from these two tanks. These release models are being developed to support the tank closure risk assessments performed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., for DOE.

Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Arey, Bruce W.

2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

380

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 30, 2010 September 30, 2010 CX-004092: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Energy Efficient Building Technologies for High Performance Hospitals CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/30/2010 Location(s): Seattle, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 30, 2010 CX-004074: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cascade Community Wind Mid Scale Wind Turbines CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 09/30/2010 Location(s): Kittitas County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 29, 2010 CX-004145: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Low Energy Enzyme Catalyzed Solvent for Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/29/2010 Location(s): Richland, Washington

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 7, 2011 October 7, 2011 CX-006814: Categorical Exclusion Determination Columbia Rural Electric Association (Columbia REA) Dayton Substation Tap Line Project CX(s) Applied: B4.12 Date: 10/07/2011 Location(s): Dayton, Columbia County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration September 28, 2011 CX-006957: Categorical Exclusion Determination Puget Sound Clean Cities Petroleum Reduction Project - Seattle Public Utilities CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/28/2011 Location(s): Seattle, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Sandia Site Office September 26, 2011 EIS-0421: Record of Decision Big Eddy-Knight Transmission Project Wasco County, Oregon and Klickitat County, Washington September 26, 2011 CX-006843: Categorical Exclusion Determination ER52 Fire Station Warning Signals

382

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13, 2010 13, 2010 CX-003035: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.7, B4.4, B5.1 Date: 07/13/2010 Location(s): Fox Island, Washington Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 12, 2010 CX-003628: Categorical Exclusion Determination Kittitas County Conservation Easement Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 07/12/2010 Location(s): Kittitas County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 12, 2010 CX-003447: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bridge and Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/12/2010 Location(s): Snohomish County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 12, 2010 CX-003240: Categorical Exclusion Determination

383

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15, 2010 15, 2010 CX-001639: Categorical Exclusion Determination Transportation Demand Management on 164th S/128th SW/20th SE CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 04/15/2010 Location(s): Snohomish County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 15, 2010 CX-001821: Categorical Exclusion Determination SGL Automotive Carbon Limited Liability Company (LLC) CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/15/2010 Location(s): Moses Lake, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office March 31, 2010 CX-001386: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dragoon Creek Access to Bonneville Power Administration's Bell-Boundary #3 Transmission Line to Replace Existing Bridge CX(s) Applied: B1.13, B1.3 Date: 03/31/2010 Location(s): Spokane County, Washington

384

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25, 2010 25, 2010 CX-003611: Categorical Exclusion Determination Schultz - Raver Number 3 and 4 500-kilovolt (kV) Transmission Lines Spacer Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/25/2010 Location(s): King County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration August 25, 2010 CX-003610: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ross-Lexington Number 1 Access Road Repair Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/25/2010 Location(s): Cowlitz County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration August 25, 2010 CX-003609: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cushman North Fork Skokomish Powerhouse CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/25/2010 Location(s): Tacoma, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 25, 2010 CX-003614: Categorical Exclusion Determination

385

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2011 1, 2011 CX-006066: Categorical Exclusion Determination Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 21, 2011 CX-006065: Categorical Exclusion Determination Siting, Construction, Operation and Decommissioning of Microbiological and Biomedical Facilities CX(s) Applied: B3.12 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 21, 2011 CX-006064: Categorical Exclusion Determination Actions to Conserve Energy CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 20, 2011 CX-006089: Categorical Exclusion Determination

386

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 9, 2010 September 9, 2010 CX-003832: Categorical Exclusion Determination Issaquah Highlands Zero Energy Affordable Housing CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2, B2.5, B5.1, B6.3 Date: 09/09/2010 Location(s): Seattle, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 8, 2010 CX-003908: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fiscal Year 2010 Columbia Basin Fish Accords with Colville Confederated Tribes CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 09/08/2010 Location(s): Okanogan County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration September 8, 2010 CX-003789: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grandview-Red Mountain Number 1 Proposed Transmission Line Interconnection CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 09/08/2010 Location(s): Benton County, Washington

387

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 15, 2011 February 15, 2011 CX-005262: Categorical Exclusion Determination Woodland and 148th Clearwire Wireless Communication Project CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B1.19 Date: 02/15/2011 Location(s): Pierce County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration February 11, 2011 CX-005224: Categorical Exclusion Determination Puget Sound Clean Cities Petroleum Reduction Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02/11/2011 Location(s): Bellevue, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory February 10, 2011 CX-005218: Categorical Exclusion Determination Puget Sound Clean Cities Petroleum Reduction Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02/10/2011 Location(s): Renton, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

388

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 30, 2009 September 30, 2009 CX-000477: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install a Photovoltaic Power Generation Array and Electric Car Charging Stations, Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 09/30/2009 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office September 23, 2009 CX-000476: Categorical Exclusion Determination 331 Building Irrigation Upgrades, 300 Area CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 09/23/2009 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office September 16, 2009 EIS-0183: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision Electrical Interconnection of the Kittitas Valley Wind Project September 15, 2009 EIS-0312: Record of Decision Washington-Action Agency Estuary Habitat Memorandum of Agreement

389

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2010 16, 2010 CX-003457: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sidewall Coring of Single-Shell Tank 241-A-106 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.11 Date: 08/16/2010 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office August 13, 2010 CX-004960: Categorical Exclusion Determination Boeing Research and Technology -Low-Cost, High-Energy Density Flywheel Storage Grid CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/13/2010 Location(s): Kent, Washington Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy August 12, 2010 CX-003624: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replacement of Twenty 22-L Structures on the Satsop-Aberdeen Number 2 230-kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/12/2010 Location(s): Gray's Harbor County, Washington

390

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 3, 2010 May 3, 2010 CX-002190: Categorical Exclusion Determination Nisqually Indian Tribe of the Nisqually Reservation Energy Efficiency Retrofits of Tribal Center CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 05/03/2010 Location(s): Nisqually Reservation, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy May 3, 2010 CX-002438: Categorical Exclusion Determination Rocky Reach-Maple Valley Number-1 Transmission Line Bridge Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/03/2010 Location(s): Kittitas County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration April 30, 2010 CX-002137: Categorical Exclusion Determination Farm Power Lynden CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/30/2010 Location(s): Lynden, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

391

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 13, 2010 October 13, 2010 CX-004253: Categorical Exclusion Determination Northwest Natural Devine Road Land Use Review Request CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 10/13/2010 Location(s): Clark County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration October 13, 2010 CX-004252: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Two Broken Transformers Near the Roza Dam Adult Trap Facility CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 10/13/2010 Location(s): Kittitas County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration October 8, 2010 EIS-0456: Final Environmental Impact Statement Cushman Hydroelectric Project (FERC Project No. 460) October 8, 2010 EIS-0456: Final Environmental Impact Statement (Appendices) Cushman Hydroelectric Project (FERC Project No. 460), Washington Comments and responses to DEIS-0456: Cushman Hydroelectric Project.

392

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 17, 2010 December 17, 2010 CX-004835: Categorical Exclusion Determination Electric Vehicle Charging Stations City of Mill Creek CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12/17/2010 Location(s): Mill Creek, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office December 16, 2010 CX-004691: Categorical Exclusion Determination Puget Sound Clean Cities Petroleum Reduction Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12/16/2010 Location(s): Kirkland, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 16, 2010 CX-004836: Categorical Exclusion Determination Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Advancement Initiative CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/16/2010 Location(s): Lynnwood, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

393

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 30, 2010 June 30, 2010 CX-003023: Categorical Exclusion Determination Output Power Purchase Agreement with Northwest Energy Supply Cooperative - Barr-Tech, LLC Resource CX(s) Applied: B4.1 Date: 06/30/2010 Location(s): Fishtrap, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration June 30, 2010 CX-002874: Categorical Exclusion Determination Game Farm Park Energy Efficient Replacement Lighting Project CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 06/30/2010 Location(s): Auburn, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy June 30, 2010 CX-002873: Categorical Exclusion Determination Green House Gas Inventory CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 06/30/2010 Location(s): Auburn, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy June 24, 2010 CX-002876: Categorical Exclusion Determination

394

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 26, 2010 May 26, 2010 CX-002564: Categorical Exclusion Determination FPE Renewables, LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/26/2010 Location(s): Lynden, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office May 26, 2010 CX-002557: Categorical Exclusion Determination G.R. Silicate CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/26/2010 Location(s): Hoquiam, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office May 21, 2010 CX-002567: Categorical Exclusion Determination Harold LeMay Enterprises, Inc. CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/21/2010 Location(s): Pierce County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office May 21, 2010 CX-002563: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clark Public Utilities CX(s) Applied: B5.1

395

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 18, 2009 November 18, 2009 CX-000195: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington County Pierce CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 11/18/2009 Location(s): Pierce County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 12, 2009 CX-000376: Categorical Exclusion Determination Boise White Paper Mill Carbon Capture and Sequestration CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 11/12/2009 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 4, 2009 Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Than 4 cents per kWh - Without New Dams $30.6 million Recovery Act investment by the Department of Energy highlights the additional potential of hydro power November 2, 2009

396

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2010 22, 2010 CX-002030: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar Array and Charging Stations - Administration Building/Cathcart CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/22/2010 Location(s): Snohomish County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 22, 2010 CX-002029: Categorical Exclusion Determination Engine Generator for Enumclaw Dairy Manure Digester CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/22/2010 Location(s): King County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 22, 2010 CX-001830: Categorical Exclusion Determination YWCA Family Village at Issaquah CX(s) Applied: B2.1, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/22/2010 Location(s): King county, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

397

Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the status of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) cleanup program and a direction forward to complete achievement of the 2006 vision. Achieving the 2006 vision results in significant benefits related to accomplishing EM program objectives. As DOE sites accelerate cleanup activities, risks to public health, the environment, and worker safety and health are all reduced. Finding more efficient ways to conduct work can result in making compliance with applicable environmental requirements easier to achieve. Finally, as cleanup activities at sites are completed, the EM program can focus attention and resources on the small number of sites with more complex cleanup challenges. Chapter 1 describes the process by which this report has been developed and what it hopes to accomplish, its relationship to the EM decision-making process, and a general background of the EM mission and program. Chapter 2 describes how the site-by-site projections were constructed, and summarizes, for each of DOE`s 11 Operations/Field Offices, the projected costs and schedules for completing the cleanup mission. Chapter 3 presents summaries of the detailed cleanup projections from three of the 11 Operations/Field Offices: Rocky Flats (Colorado), Richland (Washington), and Savannah River (South Carolina). The remaining eight Operations/Field Office summaries are in Appendix E. Chapter 4 reviews the cost drivers, budgetary constraints, and performance enhancements underlying the detailed analysis of the 353 projects that comprise EM`s accelerated cleanup and closure effort. Chapter 5 describes a management system to support the EM program. Chapter 6 provides responses to the general comments received on the February draft of this document.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Washington.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Washington Washington www.effi cientwindows.org March 2013 1. Meet the Energy Code and Look for the ENERGY STAR ® Windows must comply with your local energy code. Windows that are ENERGY STAR qualifi ed typically meet or exceed energy code requirements. To verify if specific window energy properties comply with the local code requirements, go to Step 2. 2. Look for Effi cient Properties on the NFRC Label The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) label is needed for verifi cation of energy code compliance (www.nfrc. org). The NFRC label displays whole- window energy properties and appears on all fenestration products which are part of the ENERGY STAR program.

399

Post-Closure Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 1324-N Surface Impoundment and 1324-NA Percolation Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1324-N Surface Impoundment and the 1324-NA Percolation Pond, located in the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site, are regulated under the Resource Consevation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Surface and underground features of the facilities have been removed and laboratory analyses showed that soil met the closure performance standards. These sites have been backfilled and revegetated.

Hartman, Mary J.

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

400

Hanford Site Video Library  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Video Library currently makes 30 videos related to the siteÆs history and the clean-up available for online viewing. The Video Library (also referred to as the Broadcast Archive) can be searched by keywords in the title or description. They can also be browsed in a complete list.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During FY 2010, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded 873 triggers on the seismometer system, which included 259 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 324 regional and teleseismic events. There were 210 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. One hundred and fifty-five earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this fiscal year were a continuation of the swarm events observed during fiscal year 2009 and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al. 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, 2010a, 2010b, and 2010c). Most events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with the largest event recorded on February 4, 2010 (3.0Mc). The estimated depths of the Wooded Island events are shallow (averaging approximately 1.5 km deep) placing the swarm within the Columbia River Basalt Group. Based upon the last two quarters (Q3 and Q4) data, activity at the Wooded Island area swarm has largely subsided. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will continue to monitor for activity at this location. The highest-magnitude events (3.0Mc) were recorded on February 4, 2010 within the Wooded Island swarm (depth 2.4 km) and May 8, 2010 on or near the Saddle Mountain anticline (depth 3.0 km). This latter event is not considered unusual in that earthquakes have been previously recorded at this location, for example, in October 2006 (Rohay et al. 2007). With regard to the depth distribution, 173 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 18 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 19 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 178 earthquakes were located in known swarm areas, 4 earthquakes occurred on or near a geologic structure (Saddle Mountain anticline), and 28 earthquakes were classified as random events. The Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer (SMA) network was triggered several times by the Wooded Island swarm events and the events located on or near the Saddle Mountain anticline. The maximum acceleration value recorded by the SMA network during fiscal year 2010 occurred February 4, 2010 (Wooded Island swarm event), approximately 2 times lower than the reportable action level for Hanford facilities (2% g) with no action required.

Rohay, Alan C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Devary, Joseph L.; Hartshorn, Donald C.

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

402

Evaluation of the Potential for Agricultural Development at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

By 2050, when cleanup of the Hanford Site is expected to be completed, large worldwide demands to increase the global production of animal and fish protein, food, and fiber are anticipated, despite advancements in crop breeding, genetic engineering, and other technologies. The most likely large areas for expanded irrigation in the Pacific Northwest are the undeveloped East High areas of the Columbia Basin Project and non-restricted areas within the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The area known as the Hanford Site has all the components that favor successful irrigated farming. Constraints to agricultural development of the Hanford Site are political and social, not economic or technical. Obtaining adequate water rights for any irrigated development will be a major issue. Numerous anticipated future advances in irrigation and resource conservation techniques such as precision agriculture techniques, improved irrigation systems, and irrigation system controls will greatly minimize the negative environmental impacts of agricultural activities.

Evans, Robert G.; Hattendorf, Mary J.; Kincaid, Charles T.

2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

403

EIS-0467: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA 7: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA EIS-0467: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA Summary This EIS will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to enter into a contract with a licensed natural gas supplier in Washington State to construct, operate, and maintain a natural gas pipeline. The pipeline would deliver natural gas to support the Waste Treatment Plant and the 242-A Evaporator operations in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Douglas Chapin, NEPA Document Manager U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office P.O. Box 550, MSIN A5-11 Richland, WA 99352 Documents Available for Download January 23, 2012 EIS-0467: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and

404

Third Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public - Chapter Dedicated to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public - Chapter Third Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public - Chapter Dedicated to Those Who Helped Complete Projects Funded by Recovery Act Third Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public - Chapter Dedicated to Those Who Helped Complete Projects Funded by Recovery Act September 15, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 RICHLAND, Wash. - The Department of Energy is releasing the third chapter of The Hanford Story today to the public. -Recovery Act‖ is a tribute to the thousands of workers and representatives of regulatory agencies, neighboring states, Tribes, stakeholders, and surrounding communities who came together to put stimulus funding to work at the government site in southeast Washington State. The video describes how the Department of Energy and its contractors turned

405

Department of Justice: CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. Admits Criminal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Justice: CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. Admits Criminal Department of Justice: CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. Admits Criminal Conduct, Parent Company Agrees to Cooperate in Ongoing Investigation and Pay $18.5 Million to Resolve Civil and Criminal Allegations Department of Justice: CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. Admits Criminal Conduct, Parent Company Agrees to Cooperate in Ongoing Investigation and Pay $18.5 Million to Resolve Civil and Criminal Allegations March 7, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Justice Department, in conjunction with the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Washington, announced today that Colorado-based CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. (CHG) and its parent company, CH2M Hill Companies Ltd. (CH2M Hill) have agreed that CHG committed federal criminal violations, defrauding the public by engaging in years of widespread time

406

DOE Announces Preference for Disposal of Hanford Transuranic Tank Waste at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces Preference for Disposal of Hanford Transuranic Tank Announces Preference for Disposal of Hanford Transuranic Tank Waste at WIPP DOE Announces Preference for Disposal of Hanford Transuranic Tank Waste at WIPP March 6, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced its preferred alternative to retrieve, treat, package, characterize and certify certain Hanford tank waste for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico, if such waste is properly classified in the future as defense-related mixed transuranic tank waste (mixed TRU waste). This preferred alternative, which may cover up to approximately 3.1 million gallons of tank waste contained in up to 20 tanks, will provide DOE with an option to deal with recent information about possible tank leaks and to

407

Hanford Site near-facility environmental monitoring data report for calendar year 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of the U.S. Department of Energy's Near-Facility Environmental Monitoring program conducted by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. for Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. for 1998 in the 100,200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in southcentral Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with federal, state, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

DIEDIKER, L.P.

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

408

DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules March 10, 2005 - 10:44am Addthis Hanford Tank Farm Contractor Faces Fine of more than $300,000 WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today notified the CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M Hill) - that it will fine the company $316,250 for violations of the department's nuclear safety requirements. CH2M Hill is the department's contractor responsible for storage of highly radioactive and hazardous liquid waste at the Hanford Tank Farms near Richland, Wash. The Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) issued today, cites four events that took place in 2003 and 2004. These events include the contamination of several workers while removing equipment from a valve pit

409

Washington: Washington's Clean Energy Resources and Economy (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of Washington.

Not Available

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ERDF is operated by Stoller Corporation (Stoller) under subcontract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH). Currently, six disposal cells comprise the ERDF, with four more...

411

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

department-energy-awards-hanford-river-corridor-contract-washington-closure-llc Page MANHATTAN PROJECT NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK The Department, as the direct descendent of the...

412

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 23 local earthquakes during the third quarter of FY 2010. Sixteen earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, twelve earthquakes were located in known swarm areas, 3 earthquakes occurred near a geologic structure (Saddle Mountain anticline), and eight earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (3.0 Mc) was recorded on May 8, 2010 at depth 3.0 km with epicenter located near the Saddle Mountain anticline. Later in the quarter (May 24 and June 28) two additional earthquakes were also recorded nearly at the same location. These events are not considered unusual in that earthquakes have been previously recorded at this location, for example, in October 2006 (Rohay et al; 2007). Six earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this quarter were a continuation of the swarm events observed during the 2009 and 2010 fiscal years and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al; 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, 2010a, and 2010b). All events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with a maximum depth estimated at 1.7 km. Based upon this quarters activity it is likely that the Wooded Island swarm has subsided. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor for activity at this location.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

413

Washington/Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington/Incentives Washington/Incentives < Washington Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Financial Incentive Programs for Washington 2 Rules, Regulations and Policies for Washington Download All Financial Incentives and Policies for Washington CSV (rows 1 - 184) Financial Incentive Programs for Washington Download Financial Incentives for Washington CSV (rows 1 - 163) Incentive Incentive Type Active Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency Program (Washington) Utility Rebate Program No Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives Program (Washington) Utility Rebate Program Yes Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Washington) Utility Rebate Program Yes Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Food Equipment Rebates (Washington) Utility Rebate Program No

414

Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

216-B-3 expansion ponds closure plan  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the activities for clean closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) of the 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds. The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds are operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds consists of a series of three earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. The 3A, 3B, and 3C ponds are referred to as Expansion Ponds because they expanded the capability of the B Pond System. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the Bypass pipe (Project X-009). Water discharged to the Bypass pipe flows directly into the 216-B-3C Pond. The ponds were operated in a cascade mode, where the Main Pond overflowed into the 3A Pond and the 3A Pond overflowed into the 3C Pond. The 3B Pond has not received waste water since May 1985; however, when in operation, the 3B Pond received overflow from the 3A Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to the Expansion Ponds had the potential to have contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the dangerous waste portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(the percentage of actual operating time). 1 Comprehensive Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Flowsheet and Throughput Specifically, the following questions were...

417

Hanford Tanks 241-AY-102 and 241-BX-101: Sludge Composition and Contaminant Release Data  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of testing sludge samples from Hanford tanks 241-AY-102 (AY-102) and 241-BX-101 (BX-101). These tests were conducted to characterize the sludge and assess the water leachability of contaminants from the solids. This work is being conducted to support the tank closure risk assessments being performed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. for the U.S. Department of Energy. This is the first report of testing of BX-101 sludge and the second report of testing of AY-102. Lindberg and Deutsch (2003) described the first phase of testing on AY-102 material.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Deutsch, William J.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Hess, Nancy J.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Arey, Bruce W.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Southeast Washington Subbasin Planning Ecoregion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Historic (potential) central arid steppe vegetation zone in the Southeast Washington Subbasin Planning miles of central Washington and occurs in the northwest corner of the Ecoregion is the regularly spacedSoutheast Washington Subbasin Planning Ecoregion Wildlife Assessment Paul R. Ashley and Stacey H

419

Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site, in Richland, Washington. The assessment, which was conducted from May 11 through May 22, 1992, included a selective-review of the ES&H management systems and programs of the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Offices the DOE Richland Field Office, and the site contractors. The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Secretary of Energy`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the Hanford Site ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Secretary with an independent assessment of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to address ES&H problems and requirements. They are not intended to be comprehensive compliance assessments of ES&H activities. The point of reference for assessing programs at the Hanford Site was, for the most part, the Tiger Team Assessment of the Hanford Site, which was conducted from May 21 through July 18, 1990. A summary of issues and progress in the areas of environment, safety and health, and management is included.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Hanford land disposal restrictions plan for mixed wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the early 1940s, the Hanford Site has been involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials. These production activities have resulted in the generation of large quantities of liquid and solid radioactive mixed waste. This waste is subject to regulation under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Atomic Energy Act. The State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) have entered into an agreement, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) to bring Hanford Site Operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement was amended to require development of the Hanford Land Disposal Restrictions Plan for Mixed Wastes (this plan) to comply with land disposal restrictions requirements for radioactive mixed waste. The Tri-Party Agreement requires, and the this plan provides, the following sections: Waste Characterization Plan, Storage Report, Treatment Report, Treatment Plan, Waste Minimization Plan, a schedule, depicting the events necessary to achieve full compliance with land disposal restriction requirements, and a process for establishing interim milestones. 34 refs., 28 figs., 35 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "washington closure hanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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421

ORNL measurements at Hanford Waste Tank TX-118  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A program of measurements and calculations to develop a method of measuring the fissionable material content of the large waste storage tanks at the Hanford, Washington, site is described in this report. These tanks contain radioactive waste from the processing of irradiated fuel elements from the plutonium-producing nuclear reactors at the Hanford site. Time correlation and noise analysis techniques, similar to those developed for and used in the Nuclear Weapons Identification System at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, will be used at the Hanford site. Both ``passive`` techniques to detect the neutrons emitted spontaneously from the waste in the tank and ``active`` techniques using AmBe and {sup 252}Cf neutron sources to induce fissions will be used. This work is divided into three major tasks: (1) development of high-sensitivity neutron detectors that can selectively count only neutrons in the high {gamma} radiation fields in the tanks, (2) Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations using both the KENO and MCNP codes to plan and analyze the measurements, and (3) the measurement of time-correlated neutrons by time and frequency analysis to distinguish spontaneous fission from sources inside the tanks. This report describes the development of the detector and its testing in radiation fields at the Radiation Calibration Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and in tank TX-118 at the 200 W area at Westinghouse Hanford Company.

Koehler, P.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project independent direction and oversight  

SciTech Connect

Hanford was selected in 1942 as one of the sites for the Manhattan Project. It produced plutonium for one of the world's first nuclear weapons. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors continued to make plutonium for nuclear weapons at Hanford for more than four decades. In the early days of Hanford operations, radioactive materials routinely were released to the environment by many processes. The DOE disclosed documents about these releases in 1986. In 1987, Washington, Oregon, and regional Indian tribes gathered an independent panel of experts. This group recommended dose reconstruction and health effects feasibility studies. Later that year, DOE hired Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to reconstruct potential public radiation doses from Hanford's past releases of radioactive material. The DOE agreed with the states and tribes that project direction would come from an independent technical steering panel (TSP). This approach was critical to gain public credibility for the project and the science. The TSP directs the project and makes policy. That is now clear - but, it was hard-earned. Conducting science in an open public process is new, challenging, and clearly worthwhile. The panel's product is good science that is believed and accepted by the public - our client.

Blazek, M.L.; Power, M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

New strategy for accelerating cleanup of Hanford reactor areas  

SciTech Connect

The initial work plans for cleanup of the 100 areas at Hanford followed the traditional Superfund path with a somewhat linear and phased process of investigation and decision making. Due to the complexity of the waste sites, the need to characterize existing mixed waste and hazardous-waste contamination and the need to obtain high-quality data for decision making, the proposed investigation schedules were typically 7 to 9 yr long. In addition, a large amount of resources and funding was committed to this investigative phase without achieving any remediation or reduction in risk. To correct these deficiencies, a new strategy was developed for use at the Hanford site, the Hanford Past Practice Investigation Strategy (HPPIS). In late 1991, work plans were revised to reflect this strategy, and field work is under way. These changes will result in savings in excess of $100,000,000 in remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) costs. The plutonium production reactor areas at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site, near Richland, Washington, were included on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) in 1989.

Krug, A.D.; Day, R.E.; Lauterbach, M.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Nevada Test Site closure program  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the history, design and development, procurement, fabrication, installation and operation of the closures used as containment devices on underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. It also addresses the closure program mothball and start-up procedures. The Closure Program Document Index and equipment inventories, included as appendices, serve as location directories for future document reference and equipment use.

Shenk, D.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2011 9, 2011 Department of Energy Announces $39 Million to Strengthen University-Led Nuclear Energy Research and Development 51 Projects Aim to Cut Carbon Pollution, Create Clean Energy Jobs and Strengthen America's Nuclear Energy Industry August 9, 2011 CX-006474: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Crusher and Dryer Facility Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08/09/2011 Location(s): Snohomish County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 8, 2011 CX-006463: Categorical Exclusion Determination Puget Sound Clean Cities Petroleum Reduction Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08/08/2011 Location(s): Seattle, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 8, 2011

426

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 10, 2009 December 10, 2009 CX-000347: Categorical Exclusion Determination Puget Sound Clean Cities Petroleum Reduction Project CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 12/10/2009 Location(s): Snohomish County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 10, 2009 CX-000346: Categorical Exclusion Determination Puget Sound Clean Cities Petroleum Reduction Project CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 12/10/2009 Location(s): Seattle, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 7, 2009 CX-000457: Categorical Exclusion Determination Focused Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage Along a Mount Simon Sandstone Fairway in the Michigan Basin CX(s) Applied: A1, A9

427

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 16, 2005 March 16, 2005 EIS-0312-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan December 23, 2004 EIS-0183: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision Hopkins Ridge Wind Interconnection Project September 3, 2004 EIS-0346: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Salmon Creek Project, Water Flow Restoration and Streambed Rehabilitation, Providing Passage for Summer Steelhead and Spring Chinook, Funding, Okanogan County, Washington September 3, 2004 EIS-0346: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Salmon Creek Project August 27, 2004 EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project August 27, 2004 EIS-0349: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Whatcom County, Washington