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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Wash  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wash ingt on, DC 20585 November 1,2010 Mr. Ron Murphree, Chair Oak Ridge Site-Specific Advisory Board P.O. Box 2001, MS-7604 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 Dear Mr. Murphree: Thank you...

2

WASH-  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

rcc.p,anc. 01 thts arf~cle. tha rcc.p,anc. 01 thts arf~cle. tha yubl~rhe, "r ~u~~iunl riknouu~adqnS the U.S. C;ov.rnmmnf' s rayhr (0 retam l nOn*aClulive.roy~ltV (r-0 ltconso In ma IO Dny Copvrlqhl WASH- covrrm~ the wtvdo. ISADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE SEAWAY INDUSTRIAL PARK W . D. Cottrell, R. W . Leggett and H. W . Dickson Health Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 December 1976 CONTENTS l&t of Tab1 es - . . . List of Illustrations . . Abstract . . . . . . Introduction . . . . ............ ............ ............ ............ Radiological Survey Techniques . . . . . . 1 . . Measurement of External Gamma and Beta-Gamma Radiation Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . Measurement of Radium in the Soil . . . . . . Measurement of Radioactivity in Surface Water

3

Enhanced Inactivation of Salmonella and Pseudomonas Biofilms on Stainless Steel by Use of T-128, a Fresh-Produce Washing Aid, in Chlorinated Wash Solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...surface, niches of washing machines, or tanks...the presence of soil with organic matter...T-128, as a washing aid, enhances the...to low pH and the surfactant action of polyethylene...shows that the surfactant component in T-128...stainless steel during washing. The purple-stained...

Cangliang Shen; Yaguang Luo; Xiangwu Nou; Gary Bauchan; Bin Zhou; Qin Wang; Patricia Millner

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

Student ID Advisor 1st Year Fall __________ (year) 1st Year Spr. __________ (year) 1st Year Sum. __________ (year)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Name Major Student ID Advisor 1st Year Fall __________ (year) 1st Year Spr. __________ (year) 1st) Projected Graduation Date SUBJECT SUBJECT CR. HRS. SUBJECT COURSE # CR. HRS. Advisor Signature Date Student

Barrash, Warren

5

Goldendale, Wash.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Big Eddy Substation near The Dalles, Ore., to a new substation about four miles northwest of Goldendale, Wash. BPA is currently proposing three alternative routes as well as the...

6

Connecticut's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Hydrogen Inc LiquidPiston Inc Nxegen SmartPower United Technologies Corp Registered Financial Organizations in Connecticut's 1st congressional district The Hartford Retrieved...

7

Program Update: 1st Quarter 2013 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1st Quarter 2013 1st Quarter 2013 Program Update: 1st Quarter 2013 Inside this Update: Abandoned Uranium Mines Report to Congress: LM Wants Your Input; LM Discusses Management of LTS&M Records; LM Launches New Website Under energy.gov; Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident; Completion of the CERCLA Natural Resource Damage Process at the Rocky Flats Site; Environmental Justice Activities; Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy; DOE Evaluates Environmental Impacts of Uranium Mining on Government Land in Western Colorado; Solar Photovoltaic System at Tuba City Site; and more. The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during

8

Proceedings of the 1st Nordic Feed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of the 1st Nordic Feed Science Conference, Uppsala, Sweden Institutionen för husdjurens Department of Animal Nutrition and Management ISSN 0347-9838 ISRN SLU-HUV-R-274-SE #12;#12;Proceedings of the 1st Nordic Feed Science Conference 22 ­ 23 of June 2010 Uppsala Sweden Institutionen för husdjurens

9

Arizona's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contents Contents 1 Registered Research Institutions in Arizona's 1st congressional district 2 Registered Networking Organizations in Arizona's 1st congressional district 3 Registered Energy Companies in Arizona's 1st congressional district 4 Energy Generation Facilities in Arizona's 1st congressional district Registered Research Institutions in Arizona's 1st congressional district Northern Arizona University Registered Networking Organizations in Arizona's 1st congressional district Distributed Wind Energy Association Registered Energy Companies in Arizona's 1st congressional district Coolidge Petrosun Optimum Biodiesel Plant EV Solar Products Pacific Blue Energy Southwest Wind Power Southwest Windpower Inc Sunshine Arizona Wind Energy LLC Energy Generation Facilities in Arizona's 1st congressional district

10

Nebraska's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska. Nebraska. Contents 1 US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Nebraska's 1st congressional district 2 Registered Research Institutions in Nebraska's 1st congressional district 3 Registered Energy Companies in Nebraska's 1st congressional district 4 Utility Companies in Nebraska's 1st congressional district US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Nebraska's 1st congressional district Cuming County Public Power District Smart Grid Project Stanton County Public Power District Smart Grid Project Registered Research Institutions in Nebraska's 1st congressional district University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida (Building Energy Efficient Homes for America) Registered Energy Companies in Nebraska's 1st congressional district Axis Technologies Group Inc

11

California's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California. California. Contents 1 Registered Research Institutions in California's 1st congressional district 2 Registered Policy Organizations in California's 1st congressional district 3 Registered Energy Companies in California's 1st congressional district 4 Energy Generation Facilities in California's 1st congressional district Registered Research Institutions in California's 1st congressional district California Lighting Technology Center (University of California, Davis) Western Cooling Efficiency Center Registered Policy Organizations in California's 1st congressional district California Fuel Cell Partnership Solar Living Institute Registered Energy Companies in California's 1st congressional district AMG Energy Advanced Energy Products Advanced Energy Products Corp AEP

12

POLICY NAME 1ST READING BY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLICY NAME 1ST READING BY FACULTY SENATE APPROVED BY FACULTY SENATE POSTED FOR PUBLIC COMMENT APPROVED BY PRES or PROVOST ADOPTED FINAL POLICY DESTINATION Student Pregnancy Leave Pending Regents Professor (Version 1) 01/26/2011 04/27/2011 Regents Professor (Version 2) 04/12/2012 Revised Policy

Maxwell, Bruce D.

13

October 1st Hamilton Convention Centre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

October 1st & 2nd , 2010 Hamilton Convention Centre 1 Summers Lane, Hamilton ON ANGELA SILLA, EventMaster University, Hamilton Brian Leber, MDCM, FRCPC Professor Division of Hematology & Thromboembolsim Department of Medicine McMaster University, Hamilton Peter Powers, MD, FRCPC Associate Professor Division of Hematology

Hitchcock, Adam P.

14

Oregon's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Oregon's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Oregon. Contents 1 US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Oregon's 1st congressional district 2 Registered Research Institutions in Oregon's 1st congressional district 3 Registered Policy Organizations in Oregon's 1st congressional district 4 Registered Energy Companies in Oregon's 1st congressional district 5 Registered Financial Organizations in Oregon's 1st congressional district 6 Utility Companies in Oregon's 1st congressional district US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Oregon's 1st congressional district Pacific Northwest Generating Cooperative Smart Grid Project

15

Idaho's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Idaho's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Idaho. Contents 1 US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Idaho's 1st congressional district 2 Registered Research Institutions in Idaho's 1st congressional district 3 Registered Energy Companies in Idaho's 1st congressional district 4 Energy Generation Facilities in Idaho's 1st congressional district 5 Utility Companies in Idaho's 1st congressional district US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Idaho's 1st congressional district Idaho Power Company Smart Grid Project M2M Communications Smart Grid Project Registered Research Institutions in Idaho's 1st congressional district

16

Washington's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1st congressional district: Energy Resources 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Washington. Contents 1 US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Washington's 1st congressional district 2 Registered Networking Organizations in Washington's 1st congressional district 3 Registered Energy Companies in Washington's 1st congressional district 4 Registered Financial Organizations in Washington's 1st congressional district 5 Utility Companies in Washington's 1st congressional district US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Washington's 1st congressional district Snohomish County Public Utilities District Smart Grid Project Registered Networking Organizations in Washington's 1st congressional

17

Colorado's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Colorado's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Colorado. Contents 1 Registered Research Institutions in Colorado's 1st congressional district 2 Registered Networking Organizations in Colorado's 1st congressional district 3 Registered Policy Organizations in Colorado's 1st congressional district 4 Registered Energy Companies in Colorado's 1st congressional district 5 Registered Financial Organizations in Colorado's 1st congressional district 6 Energy Incentives for Colorado's 1st congressional district Registered Research Institutions in Colorado's 1st congressional district Colorado Renewable Energy Collaboratory

18

Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania. Contents 1 US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district 2 Registered Energy Companies in Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district 3 Registered Financial Organizations in Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district 4 Utility Companies in Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district PECO Energy Company Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district Advanced Renewables LLC Aircuity Inc AlumiFuel Power Inc Biofuel Advanced Research and Development LLC BARD BlackGold Biofuels Blue Hill Investment Partners LLC CDI Corporation Chameleon Optics Inc Clean Markets Energy Cooperative Association of Pennsylvania

19

New Mexico's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Mexico's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in New Mexico. Contents 1 US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in New Mexico's 1st congressional district 2 Registered Research Institutions in New Mexico's 1st congressional district 3 Registered Energy Companies in New Mexico's 1st congressional district 4 Energy Generation Facilities in New Mexico's 1st congressional district US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in New Mexico's 1st congressional district Ktech Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project Public Service Company of New Mexico Smart Grid Demonstration Project Registered Research Institutions in New Mexico's 1st congressional district

20

Louisiana's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1st congressional district 1st congressional district 2 Registered Energy Companies in Louisiana's 1st congressional district 3 Energy Incentives for Louisiana's 1st congressional district 4 Utility Companies in Louisiana's 1st congressional district US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Louisiana's 1st congressional district Entergy New Orleans, Inc. Smart Grid Project Entergy Services, Inc. Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Louisiana's 1st congressional district GT Energy Green Coast Enterprises New Orleans Preservation Research Center Sun Energy Group LLC Wayne Troyer & Associates Energy Incentives for Louisiana's 1st congressional district Climate Action Plan (New Orleans) JOB1 Workforce Development and Business Support (New Orleans, Louisiana) Net Metering (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Maine's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maine's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Maine's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Maine. Contents 1 US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Maine's 1st congressional district 2 Registered Energy Companies in Maine's 1st congressional district 3 Registered Financial Organizations in Maine's 1st congressional district 4 Utility Companies in Maine's 1st congressional district US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Maine's 1st congressional district Central Maine Power Company Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Maine's 1st congressional district Ascendant Energy Company Inc Criterium Engineers International WoodFuels LLC

22

REPORT from 1st Annual World Congress of BIOENERGY ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT from 1st Annual World Congress of BIOENERGY , DALIAN, CHINA Dr. Efstratios Kalogirou Earth of SYNERGIA (WTERT Greece) participated in the successful 1st Annual World Congress of BIOENERGY, held between

23

1st Mile | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mile Mile Jump to: navigation, search Name 1st Mile Place Lyngby, Denmark Zip 2800 Product Denmark-based company that provides research and screening for venture capitalists. Website http://www.1stmile.dk/ Coordinates 56.866669°, 8.31667° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.866669,"lon":8.31667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

24

Kansas's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1st congressional district: Energy Resources 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Kansas. US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Kansas's 1st congressional district Midwest Energy Inc. Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Kansas's 1st congressional district Conestoga Energy Partners LLC ESE Alcohol Gateway Ethanol LLC formerly Wildcat Bio Energy LLC Kansas Ethanol LLC Nesika Energy LLC Orion Ethanol Reeve Agri Energy Inc Western Plains Energy LLC Utility Companies in Kansas's 1st congressional district Midwest Energy Inc Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Kansas%27s_1st_congressional_district&oldid=189120

25

Program Update: 1st Quarter 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 Program Update: 1st Quarter 2012 Inside this Update: Interagency Working Group Collaborates on Codisposal of Uranium Mine and Mill Tailings Waste in New Mexico; Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Benchmarking Visit to the LMBC; LM Creates Cooperative Agreement with the Northern Arapaho Tribe; LM Participates in 2012 WM Conference; M Partners with Diné Environmental Institute on Remediation of Uranium Processing Sites; LM Stakeholder Survey 2012 Update; LM: LEEDing the Way; Yucca Mountain Transition Progress - Congressional Interest; and more. The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time. Office of Legacy Management (LM) Program Update, January-March 2012

26

Ohio's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohio. Registered Energy Companies in Ohio's 1st congressional district AHL-TECH Ameridian Speciality Services CECO Environmental Corp CMC BMC Utility Products Cinergy Ventures II...

27

Missouri's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1st congressional district: Energy Resources 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Missouri. US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Missouri's 1st congressional district The Boeing Company Smart Grid Demonstration Project Registered Energy Companies in Missouri's 1st congressional district A2Wind Limited Affinity Wind LLC Akermin Inc Armstrong Teasdale Future Energy Group Clean Power Design CleanTech Biofuels Confluence Solar International Fuel Technology Inc Secure Energy Inc Solar Night Industries Inc Solutia Wind Capital Group Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Missouri%27s_1st_congressional_district&oldid=194597

28

Program Update: 1st Quarter 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time.

29

Solvent wash solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

Neace, J.C.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

30

Soil washing technology evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

Suer, A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

North Carolina's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

st congressional district: Energy Resources st congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in North Carolina. Registered Policy Organizations in North Carolina's 1st congressional district The Biofuels Center of North Carolina Registered Energy Companies in North Carolina's 1st congressional district Biofuels Center of North Carolina Field Controls Torpedo Speciality Wire Inc Energy Generation Facilities in North Carolina's 1st congressional district Craven County Biomass Facility Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=North_Carolina%27s_1st_congressional_district&oldid=196349" Categories: Places Stubs Congressional Districts

32

Nevada's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1st congressional district: Energy Resources 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Nevada. US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Nevada's 1st congressional district NV Energy, Inc. Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Nevada's 1st congressional district Algodyne Ethanol Energy Inc Bio Solutions Manufacturing Inc Innovative Energy Solutions Inc Li ion Motors Corp formerly EV Innovations Inc Merlin Contracting Power Efficiency Corporation PEFF Powered by Renewables formerly Nevada Wind Renewable Capital Renewable Energy Resources Inc Renewable Powertech Inc Sol-Up USA, LLC Summit Energy Ventures LLC UNLV Center for Energy Research CER

33

1st Women-VetsinTech Hackathon @ Facebook  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The 1st EVER Women-VetsinTech hackathon @ Facebook will be a shortened version of the VetsinTech popular weekend event but will be action packed with goal of getting to a MVP (minimum viable...

34

Hand Washing vs Sanitizers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hand Washing vs Sanitizers Hand Washing vs Sanitizers Name: allison Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Which works better, antibacterial hand sanitizers, or just plain soap and water? Replies: Soap and water removes more than just bacteria. Soap and water is your best bet. Steve Sample For that answer I would direct you to a few web sites: www.cnn.com:80/health/9808/05/antibacterial.warning/index.html www.cnn.com:80/health/9909/16/killer.ap/index.html and www.microbe.org and go to the "wash up" icon. They have a whole section devoted to handwashing. Good luck Van Hoeck It depends on the need. For a surgeon hand sanitizers are essential, and they have to be applied correctly. There is a famous story of a surgeon who refused to use them because he was allergic to the substance, and he just washed his hands with soap vigorously, and of course used surgical gloves. Nevertheless, he infected several patients with Staphilocccus aureus, a bacteria that lives on the skin harmless, but that can cause severe infections in patients when it is helped entering the body through wounds. The surgeon was caught. So for serious disinfection (also when handling contaminated material) soap is not enough. It is for normal hand-cleaning.

35

Soil washing treatability study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing was identified as a viable treatment process option for remediating soil at the FEMP Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Little information relative to the specific application and potential effectiveness of the soil washing process exists that applies to the types of soil at the FEMP. To properly evaluate this process option in conjunction with the ongoing FEMP Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS), a treatability testing program was necessary to provide a foundation for a detailed technical evaluation of the viability of the process. In August 1991, efforts were initiated to develop a work plan and experimental design for investigating the effectiveness of soil washing on FEMP soil. In August 1992, the final Treatability Study Work Plan for Operable Unit 5: Soil Washing (DOE 1992) was issued. This document shall be referenced throughout the remainder of this report as the Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP). The purpose of this treatability study was to generate data to support initial screening and the detailed analysis of alternatives for the Operable Unit 5 FS.

Krstich, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Ultrasound enhanced soil washing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of an ultrasonic enhanced soil-washing process requires a comprehensive, well-designed experimental program, with the results carefully analyzed on the basis of known ultrasonic cleaning mechanisms. There has been no systematic work carried out to develop information on the important variables that can affect the efficacy of ultrasonic enhancement of contaminant removal from soil. The goal of this study is to examine the potential of ultrasonic energy to enhance soil washing and to optimize conditions. Ultrasonic energy potentially can be used in enhancing contaminant removal from the entire soil mix, or it can be used as a polishing operation on the fines portion of the soil mixture after traditional soil washing operations. The research study was designed to demonstrate that ultrasonic energy can: improve process performance, e.g., remove contaminants to lower residual concentrations; and improve process economics, e.g., shorter treatment (residence) times, less surfactant use. This process was demonstrated using soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

Meegoda, J.; Ho, W.; Bhattacharajee, M.; Wei, C.F.; Cohen, D.M.; Magee, R.S. [New Jersey Inst. of Technology, Newark, NJ (United States); Frederick, R.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Michigan's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

st congressional district: Energy Resources st congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Michigan. Registered Energy Companies in Michigan's 1st congressional district AG Solutions Inc Dow Building Solutions Dow Chemical Co Dow Chemical Company Dow Kokam Energy Generation Facilities in Michigan's 1st congressional district Hillman Power Co. Biomass Facility Viking-Lincoln Biomass Facility Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Michigan%27s_1st_congressional_district&oldid=194174" Categories: Places Stubs Congressional Districts What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

38

Illinois' 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illinois. Illinois. Registered Networking Organizations in Illinois' 1st congressional district Chicago Clean Energy Alliance Registered Energy Companies in Illinois' 1st congressional district Acciona Wind Energy USA LLC Aerotecture International Inc American Bar Association Section on Environment American Science and Technology Corporation AST Atlas Material Testing Solutions Boeing Co CNT Energy Carbon Green BioEnergy LLC Carbon Opportunity Group Carbon Solutions Group Centre for Neighbourhood Technology Chicago Climate Exchange CCX Chromatin Inc Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County (CEDA) Digilog Global Environmental LLC E ON Climate Renewables North America formerly Airtricity USA Environmental Financial Group Environmental Law and Policy Center

39

Proceeding of the 1st International Forum on Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceeding of the 1st International Forum on Heat Transfer November 24-26, 2004, Kyoto, Japan Paper No. HEAT TRANSFER PROBLEMS RELATED WITH CARBON NANOTUBES BY MOLECULAR DYNAMICS-BASED SIMULATIONS Dynamics Simulation, Thermal Conductance ABSTRACT Several heat transfer problems related to single

Maruyama, Shigeo

40

Improving Conifer Timber Steering Group Wednesday 1st  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enterprise, Forest Industries Cluster Steve Lee - Forest Research, Conifer Breeding Programme Vaughan Hammond direction and integration of purpose to the Forest Research programmes in conifer breeding and timber1 Improving Conifer Timber Steering Group Wednesday 1st November, 2006 Attendees: Richard Ogilvy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Proceedings of the 1st Annual Gas Processing Symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pretreatment units, a gas-fired power plant, a CO2 separation unit and storage tanks. LNG and condensateProceedings of the 1st Annual Gas Processing Symposium H. Alfadala, G.V. Rex Reklaitis and M.M. El. An example of the latter arises if part of the gas output from the separation plant is fed back

Foss, Bjarne A.

42

June 24-26, 2008 1st International Conference on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

June 24-26, 2008 ETH Zurich 1st International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance #12;June 24-26, 2008 ETH Zurich · 1855 founded · 383 Professors · 21 Nobelprizes · 13000 Students · Bachelor/Master/Doctorate School Main Building of ETH ZurichHönggerberg Campus ETH Zurich #12;June 24-26, 2008 ETH Zurich Science

43

Microsoft Word - S06528_1st qtr 2010.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 10 July 2010 LMS/RFS/S06528 This page intentionally left blank LMS/RFS/S06528 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Rocky Flats Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities First Quarter Calendar Year 2010 July 2010 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities-1st Quarter CY 2010 July 2010 Doc. No. S06528 Page i Contents Abbreviations.................................................................................................................................. v 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Site Operations and Maintenance.........................................................................................

44

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report - 1st Quarter FY 1995  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

. . National Environmental Policy Act N E P . A LESSONS Office of NEPA LEARNED QUARTERLY REPORT 1ST QUARTER FY 1995 Policy and Assistance U.S. Department of Energy March 1,1995 ODU- To foster continuing improvement of the Department's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance program, the Secretarial Policy Statement on NEPA, issued June 13, 1994, requires the Office of Environment Safety and Health to solicit comments from the NEPA Document Manager, the NEPA Compliance Officer, and team members after completing each environmental impact statement and environmental assessment on lessons learned in the process, and to distribute a quarterly summary to all,NEPA Compliance Officers and NEPA Document Managers. This second quarterly report summarizes the lessons learned for documents completed between October 1 and December 31, 1994. It is based on responses to the revised

45

The 1st Joint International Conference on Multibody System Dynamics May 2527, 2010, Lappeenranta, Finland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 1st Joint International Conference on Multibody System Dynamics May 25­27, 2010, Lappeenrantast Joint International Conference on Multibody System Dynamics (IMSD'10)., Lappeenranta : Finland

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

46

Comparison of alternative washing systems for heliostats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two methods have been proposed for washing heliostat mirrors in a solar central receiver facility. One method involves truck-mounted washing mechanisms continuously traversing the heliostat field, washing mirrors sequentially on a fixed schedule. The other concept involves a washing unit affixed to each heliostat, permitting near-simultaneous washing of all heliostats on demand. The former, scheduled washing system has the advantage of lower capital costs, while the latter, responsive system has more operational flexibility. Cost-benefit evaluation of the two systems, taking into account the random nature of rainfall patterns and soiling processes, indicates that the scheduled system is preferable.

Kerstein, A.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Wash  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 9, 2013 September 9, 2013 DETERMINATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES UNDER THE BAYH-DOLE ACT FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLE ENERGY, AND ADVANCED ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Under the Bayh-Dole Act, 35 U.S.C. §§ 200-12 ("Bayh-Dole"), Federal agencies may determine that "exceptional circumstances" exist such that a modification in the patent rights disposition provided under the Act would better promote its objectives. The Department of Energy ("DOE") has determined that exceptional circumstances exist for disposition of patent rights arising under research, development, demonstration, and market transformation projects involving energy efficiency, renewable energy, and advanced energy technologies as described in Title IX, Subtitles A through D of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 16191

48

Wash  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SEP 1 5" 2009 SEP 1 5" 2009 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: RITA R. FRANKLIN ... 111 r:-J) A:)-- ACTING CHIEF Hu~ooiTAL OFFICER SUBJECT: REVISED PERSONNEL ACCOUNTABILITY FOR NON-COOP INCIDENTS This updates the attached previous memorandum on this subject in light of current pandemic planning and reporting needs. It changes the requirement from reporting only key employees who have a serious illness, which includes pandemic influenza, to all employees who have been diagnosed as suspected or confilmed with a contagious disease, including a pandemic influenza. Human Resources Offices and Headquarters Administrative Officers are to report these incidents directly to this office while contractors are to report them through their

49

1st International Workshop on High Performance Computing, Networking and Analytics for the Power Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1st International Workshop on High Performance Computing, Networking and Analytics for the Power Transient Stability" #12;1st International Workshop on High Performance Computing, Networking and Analytics (University of Vermont). "Developing a Dynamic Model of Cascading Failure for High Performance Computing using

50

M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) 1st Law of Thermodynamics: Control Volumes 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) 1st Law of Thermodynamics: Control Volumes 1 The First Law of Thermodynamics: Control Volumes Here we will extend the conservation°o Control volume #12; M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) 1st Law of Thermodynamics

Bahrami, Majid

51

M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) 1st Law of Thermodynamics: Closed Systems 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) 1st Law of Thermodynamics: Closed Systems 1 The First Law of Thermodynamics: Closed Systems The first law of thermodynamics can be simply is negative. #12; M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) 1st Law of Thermodynamics: Closed

Bahrami, Majid

52

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Seismic data - raw taken by Apex Hipoint for 1st test 2012  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Seismic data - raw taken by Apex Hipoint for 1st test 2012

Jaffe, Todd

53

Proceedings of the 1st international workshop on Interactive multimedia for consumer electronics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is our great pleasure to welcome you to the 1st ACM International Workshop on Interactive Multimedia for Consumer Electronics -- IMCE'09. This year's workshop brings together researchers from both academia and industry in domains including ...

Ling Shao; Caifeng Shan; Jiebo Luo; Minoru Etoh

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 1st Quarter 2013 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 807 158 282 - 1,247 Alabama Railroad 449 71 14 - 534 Alabama River 358 - - - 358 Alabama Truck - 87 267 - 354 Colorado Total 204 - - - 204 Colorado Railroad

55

Soil washing: A preliminary assessment of its applicability to Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing is being considered for treating soils at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. As a result of over 50 years of operations to produce plutonium for the US Department of Defense and research for DOE, soils in areas within the Site are contaminated with hazardous wastes and radionuclides. In the soil washing process, contaminated soil is mixed with a liquid and then physically and/or chemically treated to dissolve the contaminants into solution and/or concentrate them in a small fraction of the soil. The purpose of this procedure is to separate the contaminants from the bulk of the soil. The key to successful application is to match the types of contaminants and soil characteristics with physical-chemical methods that perform well under the existing conditions. The applicability of soil washing to Hanford Site contaminated soils must take into account both the characteristics of the oil and the type of contamination. Hanford soils typically contain up to 90% sand, gravel, and cobbles, which generally are favorable characteristics for soil washing. For example, in soil samples from the north pond in the 300 Area, 80% to 90% of the soil particles were larger than 250 {mu}m. The principal contaminants in the soil are radionuclides, heavy metals, and nitrate and sulfate salts. For most of the sites, organic contaminants are either not present or are found in very low concentration. 28 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Gerber, M A; Freeman, H D; Baker, E G; Riemath, W F

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Inhibition Of Washed Sludge With Sodium Nitrite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

Congdon, J. W.; Lozier, J. S.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

57

DOE Announces 1st Projects to Meet President's Clean Coal Commitment |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Announces 1st Projects to Meet President's Clean Coal DOE Announces 1st Projects to Meet President's Clean Coal Commitment DOE Announces 1st Projects to Meet President's Clean Coal Commitment January 15, 2003 - 8:58am Addthis Washington, DC - Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham today announced the first eight projects chosen by the Department of Energy in the initial phase of President Bush's Clean Coal Power Initiative. The projects, valued at more than $1.3 billion, are expected to help pioneer a new generation of innovative power plant technologies that could help meet the President's Clear Skies and Climate Change initiatives. "The level of interest expressed in the first competition was tremendous," Secretary Abraham said. "That is a clear indication of the potential to develop and apply technology to improve our energy security through the use

58

DOE Announces 1st Projects to Meet President's Clean Coal Commitment |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1st Projects to Meet President's Clean Coal 1st Projects to Meet President's Clean Coal Commitment DOE Announces 1st Projects to Meet President's Clean Coal Commitment January 15, 2003 - 8:58am Addthis Washington, DC - Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham today announced the first eight projects chosen by the Department of Energy in the initial phase of President Bush's Clean Coal Power Initiative. The projects, valued at more than $1.3 billion, are expected to help pioneer a new generation of innovative power plant technologies that could help meet the President's Clear Skies and Climate Change initiatives. "The level of interest expressed in the first competition was tremendous," Secretary Abraham said. "That is a clear indication of the potential to develop and apply technology to improve our energy security through the use

59

Washing studies for PCP and creosote-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a series of bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to evaluate the feasibility of washing pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote from the soil at an abandoned wood-treatment Superfund site in Pensacola, FL. The high sand content and low silt/fines content of the soil made soil washing a promising alternative to incineration. The bench-scale tests confirmed the feasibility of washing the PCP and the carcinogenic creosote compounds from the soil using a nonionic surfactant at the pH of nine to ten and a water temperature of approximately 120 F. The target concentrations for total creosote were not achieved, but the results were sufficiently close to warrant further testing. The pilot-scale tests using the EPA's mobile Volume Reduction Unit produced residual PCP, carcinogenic creosote, and total creosote levels below the target levels. The tests also produced comparison data on the effects of surfactant concentration, pH, temperature, and liquid:solid ratio. (Copyright (c) 1994 Elsevier Science B.V.)

Tobia, R.J.; Camacho, J.M.; Augustin, P.; Griffiths, R.A.; Frederick, R.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

HARRINGTON SJ

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 1st Quarter 2013 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 807 158 282 - 1,247 Alabama Railroad 449 71 14 - 534 Alabama River 358 - - - 358 Alabama Truck - 87 267 - 354 Indiana Total - 164 - - 164 Indiana Railroad - 164 - - 164

62

Hand Washing - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Awareness Cold and Flu Prevention Hand Washing Healthy Sleep Heat Stress Radon Signs of a Heart Attack Signs of a Stroke Distracted Driving Coping with Stress & Change Skin Cancer...

63

Adapted by Joshua Johnson November 12, 2013 Sand Tank (1st  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adapted by Joshua Johnson November 12, 2013 Sand Tank (1st Grade) Lesson Plan Science Standards: Sand Tank provided by the CSM Integrated Groundwater Modeling Center Food coloring Aquifer activity and/or the Sand Tank Curriculum Guide. Lecture: 1. So you live in a city, where do you get your clean

64

Conference scope and theme The 1st International Smart Design conference aims to provide a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conference scope and theme The 1st International Smart Design conference aims to provide a timely. Posters The conference includes a poster session which will provide students with the opportunity for the best poster. Conference sponsored by PepsiCo Europe Poster submission / areas of interest Topics

Evans, Paul

65

Proceedings of the 1st workshop on Constraints in Software Testing, Verification and Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of the 1st workshop on Constraints in Software Testing, Verification and Analysis in Software Testing, Verifi- cation and Analysis (CSTVA'06), a workshop of the twelfth International interest in the application of constraint solving techniques to the field of testing and analysis

66

03/0924 1 st INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON THE USE OF AQUATIC MACROPKYTES FOR WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filters (RBF). "Rustic" and rather simple wastewater treatment systems for such small communities in rural03/0924 1 st INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON THE USE OF AQUATIC MACROPKYTES FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS £-10 CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT : THE FRENCH EXPERIENCE Catherine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

67

Presented by Issel Anne L. Lim 1st Year PhD Candidate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Presented by Issel Anne L. Lim 1st Year PhD Candidate Biomedical Engineering Johns Hopkins in temperature production + binding of channel-activating ligands ­ Channel protein itself temp-dep structural = transmembrane voltage A, B = preexponential factors = opening rate = closing rate TRPM8 & TRPV1: Opening vs

Yue, David

68

1st MORE TEAM MEETING Roma, 26-27 February 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1st MORE TEAM MEETING Roma, 26-27 February 2007 THE BEPICOLOMBO ORBIT DETERMINATION PROBLEM processed high resolution camera images (repeated on the same area of the surface) and S/C attitude data of the spherical harmonics of the gravity field of Mercury, static part; of degrees from 2 to at least 25 (possibly

Milani, Andrea

69

1st  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

short tons) short tons) Production ............................................. 266.4 241.4 259.0 249.6 245.1 243.1 263.5 256.1 258.2 248.7 264.6 261.7 1016.4 1007.8 1033.2 Appalachia ......................................... 80.6 76.1 69.3 68.1 70.4 71.3 72.0 71.9 73.3 69.9 74.3 73.8 294.1 285.5 291.2 Interior ................................................ 44.3 44.1 46.4 44.8 45.5 45.0 45.6 47.1 46.7 44.9 47.8 47.3 179.6 183.3 186.6 Western ............................................. 141.5 121.1 143.4 136.7 129.2 126.8 146.0 137.1 138.2 133.9 142.5 140.7 542.7 539.0 555.3 Primary Inventory Withdrawals .............. 0.8 0.8 4.1 0.1 5.5 -1.1 1.6 -2.6 1.0 -0.1 0.6 -2.3 5.7 3.5 -0.8 Imports .................................................. 2.0 2.3 2.4 2.4 1.4 2.8 2.4 2.7 2.2 2.4 3.3 2.9 9.2 9.3 10.7 Exports ..................................................

70

1st  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(a) (a) OECD ................................................ 23.17 23.23 23.99 24.73 24.84 25.00 25.23 25.55 25.83 26.00 26.25 26.69 23.78 25.16 26.19 U.S. (50 States) ............................. 11.70 12.06 12.61 12.88 13.07 13.33 13.52 13.83 13.98 14.21 14.34 14.55 12.32 13.44 14.27 Canada .......................................... 4.12 3.87 4.21 4.48 4.32 4.27 4.34 4.51 4.58 4.55 4.66 4.86 4.17 4.36 4.66 Mexico ............................................ 2.93 2.89 2.88 2.91 2.82 2.79 2.76 2.74 2.68 2.68 2.72 2.70 2.90 2.78 2.69 North Sea (b) ................................. 2.94 2.89 2.74 2.89 3.07 3.04 3.01 2.91 3.03 2.99 2.94 3.02 2.86 3.01 2.99 Other OECD .................................. 1.48 1.53 1.54 1.57 1.56 1.56 1.59 1.56 1.56 1.57 1.59 1.57 1.53 1.57 1.57 Non-OECD ........................................

71

1st  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

North America ................................... 18.75 18.82 19.71 20.27 20.21 20.39 20.63 21.08 21.25 21.44 21.72 22.10 19.39 20.58 21.63 Canada ................................................ 4.12 3.87 4.21 4.48 4.32 4.27 4.34 4.51 4.58 4.55 4.66 4.86 4.17 4.36 4.66 Mexico ................................................. 2.93 2.89 2.88 2.91 2.82 2.79 2.76 2.74 2.68 2.68 2.72 2.70 2.90 2.78 2.69 United States ....................................... 11.70 12.06 12.61 12.88 13.07 13.33 13.52 13.83 13.98 14.21 14.34 14.55 12.32 13.44 14.27 Central and South America ............. 4.42 4.94 5.27 4.94 4.61 5.12 5.37 5.13 4.78 5.36 5.60 5.34 4.89 5.06 5.27 Argentina ............................................. 0.69 0.70 0.72 0.71 0.74 0.73 0.73 0.73 0.74 0.73 0.73 0.73 0.70 0.73 0.73 Brazil ....................................................

72

1st  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross State Product (Billion $2005) Real Gross State Product (Billion $2005) New England ............... 732 730 733 732 733 737 744 747 752 756 761 766 732 741 759 Middle Atlantic ............. 2,013 2,012 2,022 2,019 2,034 2,045 2,059 2,066 2,074 2,085 2,094 2,105 2,016 2,051 2,089 E. N. Central ................ 1,879 1,880 1,887 1,882 1,884 1,894 1,909 1,916 1,924 1,935 1,946 1,958 1,882 1,901 1,941 W. N. Central ............... 887 889 893 891 891 898 904 909 914 920 926 933 890 901 923 S. Atlantic .................... 2,475 2,479 2,494 2,500 2,507 2,524 2,541 2,552 2,571 2,590 2,608 2,629 2,487 2,531 2,599 E. S. Central ................ 636 638 640 640 642 646 649 652 656 660 664 669 639 647 662 W. S. Central ............... 1,637 1,655 1,673 1,675 1,681 1,691 1,704 1,711 1,724 1,736 1,750 1,767 1,660 1,697 1,744 Mountain ...................... 889 891 895 894 897

73

(STARC), (), (NEC), () 1st. Layer 2nd. Layer 3rd. Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, , , , , , (STARC), (), (NEC), () PG401 Program BPA RB SB BPA RB SB BPA RB SB BPA RB SB BPA RB SB BPA RB SB BPA RB SB 1st. Layer 2nd. Layer 3rd. Layer Total System BPA BPA 1 BPA 3 BPA2 BPA 4 BPA 5 BPA 6 RB 7 RB15 BPA 8 BPA 9 BPA 10 RB 11 BPA 12 BPA 13 RB 14 RB END RB RB BPA RB Data

Kasahara, Hironori

74

A spatially dependent model for washing wool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We analytically model the transport of dirt in the industrial washing of wool using the advectiondiffusion equation in two dimensions. Separation of variables leads to a SturmLiouville problem where the analytic solution reveals how contamination is distributed both along and down the wool and indicates the operating parameter regimes that optimise the cleaning efficiency.

J.F. Caunce; S.I. Barry; G.N. Mercer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Washing treatment of automotive shredder residue (ASR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Worldwide, the amount of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) reaches 50million units per year. Once the ELV has been processed, it may then be shredded and sorted to recover valuable metals that are recycled in iron and steelmaking processes. The residual fraction, called automotive shredder residue (ASR), represents 25% of the ELV and is usually landfilled. In order to deal with the leachable fraction of ASR that poses a potential threat to the environment, a washing treatment before landfilling was applied. To assess the potential for full-scale application of washing treatment, tests were carried out in different conditions (L/S=3 and 5L/kgTS; t=3 and 6h). Moreover, to understand whether the grain size of waste could affect the washing efficiency, the treatment was applied to ground (<4mm) and not-ground samples. The findings obtained revealed that, on average, washing treatment achieved removal rates of more than 60% for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN). With regard to metals and chlorides, sulphates and fluoride leachable fraction, a removal efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained, as confirmed also by EC values. The comparison between the results for ground and not-ground samples did not highlight significant differences.

Raffaello Cossu; Tiziana Lai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Soil Washing Potential of a Natural Surfactant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil Washing Potential of a Natural Surfactant ... The aqueous solubilities of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and naphthalene in the natural surfactant solutions were found to vary linearly with the concentration of the surfactant showing trends comparable to that of typical com mercial surfactants. ...

D. Roy; R. R. Kommalapati; S. S. Mandava; K. T. Valsaraj; W. D. Constant

1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

77

100 Area Hanford soil washing treatability tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing laboratory tests performed at Hanford in support of 100 Area Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) feasibility studies included characterization of soils, physical separation, chemical extraction, and water treatment. Results to date show that < 20 % of the soil is finer than 0.25 mm ({minus}40 mesh). The highest concentration of {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 137}Cs contaminants is generally associated with fine soil particles. However, measurable concentrations of contaminants were found in all sizes of soil particles. In initial testing, attrition scrubbing was generally sufficient to treat soils to meet selected performance levels for {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu. However, more intense attrition scrubbing, autogenous grinding, or chemical extraction was required to enhance removal of {sup 137}Cs. Additional tests and assessment of the feasibility of using soil washing techniques are in progress.

Field, J.G.; Belden, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R.J.; Mattigod, S.V.; Freeman, H.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Scheck, R.W. [Mactec/Dames and Moore (United States); Goller, E.D. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Comparison of a plant based natural surfactant with SDS for washing of As(V) from Fe rich soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study explores the possible application of a biodegradable plant based surfactant, obtained from Sapindus mukorossi, for washing low levels of arsenic (As) from an iron (Fe) rich soil. Natural association of As(V) with Fe(III) makes the process difficult. Soapnut solution was compared to anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in down-flow and a newly introduced suction mode for soil column washing. It was observed that soapnut attained up to 86% efficiency with respect to SDS in removing As. Full factorial design of experiment revealed a very good fit of data. The suction mode generated up to 83 kPa pressure inside column whilst down-flow mode generated a much higher pressure of 214 kPa, thus making the suction mode more efficient. Micellar solubilisation was found to be responsible for As desorption from the soil and it followed 1st order kinetics. Desorption rate coefficient of suction mode was found to be in the range of 0.005 to 0.01, much higher than down-flow mode values. Analysis of the FT-IR data suggested that the soapnut solution did not interact chemically with As, offering an option for reusing the surfactant. Soapnut can be considered as a soil washing agent for removing As even from soil with high Fe content.

Soumyadeep Mukhopadhyay; Mohd. Ali Hashim; Jaya Narayan Sahu; Ismail Yusoff; Bhaskar Sen Gupta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

1st Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy-Efficiency Rulemakings Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is the 1st Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy-Efficiency Rulemakings Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities, as issued by the Assistant Secretary on August 2006.

80

1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop: April 5-7, 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PROGRAM PROGRAM 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop April 5-7, 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Microsoft Word - S09187_1stQtr2012.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities First Quarter Calendar Year 2012 July 2012 LMS/RFS/S09187 This page intentionally left blank LMS/RFS/S09187 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities First Quarter Calendar Year 2012 July 2012 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities-1st Quarter CY 2012 July 2012 Doc. No. S09187 Page i Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. v

82

Town Hall Meeting October 1st, 2012 | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

49 49 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142234349 Varnish cache server Town Hall Meeting October 1st, 2012 Home > Blogs > Graham7781's blog Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 19 September, 2012 - 13:40 OpenEI Town Hall meeting What: OpenEI's town hall meeting is a half-hour open forum for discussions on energy topics with NREL's OpenEI team. Find out how your fellow researchers, students, teachers and energy professionals are using energy

83

Microsoft Word - S04474_1st qtr 08 rpt.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 July 2008 Office of Legacy Management LMS/RFS/S04474 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AM01-07LM00060 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank LMS/RFS/S04474 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Rocky Flats Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities First Quarter Calendar Year 2008 July 2008 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities-1st Quarter CY 2008 July 2008 Doc. No. S0447400 Page iii Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations

84

107th Congress 1st session S.1166, Next generation Lighting Initiative  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II II 107TH CONGRESS 1ST SESSION S. 1166 To establish the Next Generation Lighting Initiative at the Department of Energy, and for other purposes. IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES JULY 11, 2001 Mr. BINGAMAN (for himself and Mr. DEWINE) introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Nat- ural Resources A BILL To establish the Next Generation Lighting Initiative at the Department of Energy, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa- 1 tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, 2 SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. 3 This Act may be cited as ''Next Generation Lighting 4 Initiative Act''. 5 SEC. 2. FINDING. 6 Congress finds that it is in the economic and energy 7 security interests of the United States to encourage the

85

Biogenesis (trade name) soil washing technology: Innovative technology evaluation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing technologies are designed to transfer contaminants from soil to a liquid phase. The BioGenesis Soil Washing Technology uses soil washing with a proprietary surfactant solution to transfer organic contaminants from soils to wastewater. The BioGenesis soil washing process was evaluated under the SITE program at a refinery where soils were contaminated with crude oil. Results of chemical analyses show that levels of total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons (TRPH), an indicator of degraded crude oil, decreased by 65 to 73 percent in washed soils. The TRPH in residual soils were allowed to biodegrade for an additional 120 days. Results indicate that soil washing and biodegradation removed 85 to 88 percent of TRPH in treated soils. The Innovative Technology Evaluation Report provides information on the technology applicability, economic analysis, technology limitations, a technology description, process residuals, site requirements, latest performance data, the technology status, vendors claims, and the source of further information.

Bannerjee, P.

1993-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

86

Development of a mobile heliostat mirror washing system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development, design and fabrication of an experimental system for washing heliostats. The economics of heliostat cleaning, the design requirements and the design and testing of the wash system are discussed. The heliostat wash system was designed to wash the heliostats located at the 10 MWe Central Receiver Pilot Plant located near Barstow, California. The plant, called Solar One, is a cooperative activity between the Department of Energy and the Associates: Southern California Edison, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, and the California Energy Commission. 12 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

FREE Name Tags for 1st year Students FREE Selected Course Packs for 2nd year Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· FREE Name Tags for 1st year Students · FREE Selected Course Packs for 2nd year Students Process · Discounts & Free Registration to Events · Financial Support for Student Projects & Groups (up to $11,000 each year!) · Discounts on Insurance, Rental Cars, and more! · FREE Legal Advice · Expanded

Liu, Taosheng

88

1st Genomics-Bioinformatics Day on "Comparative Genomics" April 24th 2003 in the Medawar Building in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1st Genomics-Bioinformatics Day on "Comparative Genomics" April 24th 2003 in the Medawar Building. There is a need, however, for researchers interested in genomics and bioinformatics to meet, so Jotun Hein, Richard Mott and Chris Ponting have organised the first Genomics/Bioinformatics day. It is our intention

Goldschmidt, Christina

89

1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop: April 5-7, 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. marine energy industry is actively pursuing development of offshore wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems. Experience in the wind energy sector demonstrates that new technology development requires thorough measurement and characterization of the environmental conditions prevalent at installation sites and of technology operating in the field. Presently, there are no turn-key instrumentation system solutions that meet the measurement needs of the marine energy industry. The 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop brought together technical experts from government laboratories, academia, and industry representatives from marine energy, wind, offshore oil and gas, and instrumentation developers to present and discuss the instrumentation needs of the marine energy industry. The goals of the meeting were to: (1) Share the latest relevant knowledge among technical experts; (2) Review relevant state-of-the-art field measurement technologies and methods; (3) Review lessons learned from recent field deployments; (4) Identify synergies across different industries; (5) Identify gaps between existing and needed instrumentation capabilities; (6) Understand who are the leading experts; (7) Provide a forum where stakeholders from the marine energy industry could provide substantive input in the development of new marine energy field deployable instrumentation packages.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Simulation of soil washing with surfactants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mathematical model of soil washing that incorporates the surfactant enhanced mobilization and solubilization of organic compounds was implemented using a finite difference compositional reservoir simulator. The primary objective of the model was identification of the contributions of the various mechanismswater displacement, surfactant mobilization and dissolutionon the removal of organic contaminants from soil. Mobilization of the organic phase was described by a reduction in the residual oil saturation caused by decreased interfacial tension. Increased aqueous solubility of organic compounds due to solubilization by surfactant micelles was modeled assuming local equilibrium. Parameters for the model were obtained from experimental measurements and literature sources. The model was implemented in a two-dimensional, two-phase system. Experimental data from surfactant flushing of columns contaminated with automatic transmission fluid and a mixture of chlorinated organics were used to evaluate the performance of the model. In most cases, the predicted organic recoveries were found to agree well with experimental results. For the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate, mobilization of organic contaminants was the main recovery mechanism for both waste liquids modeled. The results suggest that complete dissolution of a contaminant nonaqueous phase, rather than mobilization and subsequent vertical migration, may be difficult to achieve at the surfactant concentrations studied.

Elaine P.S Cheah; Danny D Reible; Kalliat T Valsaraj; W.David Constant; Barry W Walsh; Louis J Thibodeaux

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Washing of soils spiked with various pollutants by surfactant solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the batch-type of washing with surfactant solutions was employed for the treatment of soils artificially contaminated with various volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metals. 15 industrial grade surfactants were tested. Washing was conducing by adding surfactant solution to the soils and mixing for one hour, then centrifuging it and analyzing the supernatant. Deionized water was used for soil washing for comparison. Results indicated that deionized water performed as well as Surfactant No. 1 in washing VOC-contaminated soils. Therefore, it is concluded that the VOCs tested can be easily washed from soils by rain water. In washing PAH-contaminated soils, nonionic surfactants performed better than anionic surfactants in terms of removal efficiency. The amphoteric surfactant performed worst in washing PAH-contaminated soils. Generally, surfactants are useful in removing cadmium from soils, but are not useful for the removal of lead and copper. Amphoteric, anionic, and low pH cationic surfactants were the most effective of those tested. For PAH/heavy metals-contaminated soils, removal efficiencies were lower than that of soils containing a single contaminant.

Yang, G.C.C.; Chang, J.H. [National Sun Yat-Sen Univ., Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Caustic washing for refining of direct coal liquefaction products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive research and development sponsored by the U.S. DOE/PETC over the past two decades has resulted in dramatic improvements in the quality of direct coal liquefaction products. High-quality coal-derived distillates are obtainable from catalytic two-stage liquefaction (TSL) processes, such as those developed at the Wilsonville, AL pilot plant and the Hydrocarbon Technologies Inc. (HTI) pilot plant and bench units. The products of the Wilsonville and HTI TSL operations are suitable as high quality feedstocks for producing transportation fuels in a refinery. These products have important quality advantages over crude petroleum: they are distillates boiling below about 700{degrees}F and are thus virtually free of resid and metals, and they have very low sulfur contents and low nitrogen contents. The coal liquids have carbon and hydrogen contents and Watson characterization factors within the range of crude petroleums. However, relative to crude petroleum, the crude coal products have elevated oxygen contents. This report describes the removal of phenols from coal liquids by caustic washing, and the the recovery of the cresylic acid by-product.

Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.; Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D. [CONSOL, Inc., Library, PA (United States); Zhou, P. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Washing off intensification of cotton and wool fabrics by ultrasounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wet textile washing processes were set up for wool and cotton fabrics to evaluate the potential of ultrasound transducers (US) in improving dirt removal. The samples were contaminated with an emulsion of carbon soot in vegetable oil and aged for three hours in fan oven. Before washing, the fabrics were soaked for 3min in a standard detergent solution and subsequently washed in a water bath. The dirt removal was evaluated through colorimetric measurements. The total color differences ?E of the samples were measured with respect to an uncontaminated fabric, before and after each washing cycle. The percentage of ?E variation obtained was calculated and correlated to the dirt removal. The results showed that the US transducers enhanced the dirt removal and temperature was the parameter most influencing the US efficiency on the cleaning process. Better results were obtained at a lower process temperature.

R. Peila; G. Actis Grande; M. Giansetti; S. Rehman; S. Sicardi; G. Rovero

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Design for dissemination of a low cost washing machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Throughout much the developing world, laundry is done the same way today as it was thousands of years ago. The strenuous and time consuming task of clothes washing often falls on the women, who spend many hours every week ...

Raduta, Radu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Kinetics ofin situ surfactant soil flushing at moderate washing conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economicin situ soil flushing using common surfactants may be a good substitute for exhaustive, pressurized soil washing or bioremediation requiring high energy consumption or laborious technique. Two model surfactants

Daechul Cho; Hyun-Su Kim

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

LHC-2008 C.Vallee HERA Structure Functions 1 Physics at LHC-2008 Split, October 1st 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LHC-2008 C.Vallee HERA Structure Functions 1 LHC Physics at LHC-2008 Split, October 1st 2008 Claude Vallée CPPM/DESY, on behalf of ZEUS and H1 FUNCTIONS STRUCTURE H E R A #12;LHC-2008 C.Vallee HERA/ antiquarks High x quarks/gluon x DGLAP W,Z top DY Jets Higgs Kinematics: HERA LHC , Zo e e q qx Q2 e W q q

97

Optimizing a Washing Procedure To Mobilize Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a Field-Contaminated Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil washing was combined with surfactant regeneration and detoxification steps to generate innocuous products. ... Yet guidance in selecting surfactants for ex situ soil washing remains somewhat fragmentary. ...

Tao Yuan; William D. Marshall

2007-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

98

Use of antimicrobial agents in a novel cattle washing system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USE OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS IN A NOVEL CATTLE WASHING SYSTEM A Thesis by BRIAN REED COVINGTON Submitted to thc Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 2001 Major Subject: Animal Science USE OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS IN A NOVEL CATTLE WASHING SYSTEM A Thesis by BRIAN REED COVINGTON Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requtrements for the degree of MASTER...

Covington, Brian Reed

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

99

The 1st August 2010 Solar Storm Effects on the Ionosphere in the Yangtze River Delta Region Based on Ground and Space GPS Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On 1st August 2010, the entire side of the sun facing earth erupted in a frenzy of solar activity. This solar storm just like a solar tsunami, the massive multiple filaments of magnetism were released from the...

Hu Wang; Qian-xin Wang; Ying-yan Cheng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! February 20, 2012 - 5:00am Addthis Kristin Swineford Communication Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs For many of us, particularly those living east of the Mississippi river, President's Day weekend is not just a time to honor the birthday of our country's founding father, it's also the final escape from dreadfully cold and snowy days. However, those of us with pestering consumerist habits to feed always ensure our return to the metropolis by Monday, as the day is quickly taking on a new reputation: Second best shopping day of the year, after Black Friday. By now you're asking, "What does any of this have to do with energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! February 20, 2012 - 5:00am Addthis Kristin Swineford Communication Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs For many of us, particularly those living east of the Mississippi river, President's Day weekend is not just a time to honor the birthday of our country's founding father, it's also the final escape from dreadfully cold and snowy days. However, those of us with pestering consumerist habits to feed always ensure our return to the metropolis by Monday, as the day is quickly taking on a new reputation: Second best shopping day of the year, after Black Friday. By now you're asking, "What does any of this have to do with energy

102

Soil washing results for mixed waste pond soils at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing technology was assessed as a means for remediating soil contaminated with mixed wastes primarily composed of heavy metals and radionuclides. The soils at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site are considered suitable for soil washing because of their relatively low quantities of silt and clay. However, in a limited number of soil washing experiments using soils from different locations in the north pond of the 300 Area, the degree of decontamination achieved for the coarse fraction of the soil varied considerably. Part of this variation appears to be due to the presence of a discrete layer of contaminated sediment found in some of the samples. 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Gerber, M.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Midea Washing Appliance: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903) Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903) Midea Washing Appliance: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903) April 22, 2011 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Midea Washing Appliances Mfg. Co., Ltd. failed to certify a variety of dishwashers as compliant with the applicable water and energy conservation standards. DOE regulations require a manufacturer (which includes importers) to submit reports certifying that its products have been tested and meet the applicable water and energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. Midea: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903) More Documents & Publications Midea Washing Appliance: Order (2011-CE-1903)

104

100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Nuclear car wash status report, August 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large majority of US imports arrive at seaports in maritime cargo containers. The number of containers arriving is nearly 10 million per year, each with a cargo of up to 30 tons of various materials. This provides a vulnerable entry point for the importation of a nuclear weapon or its components by a terrorist group. Passive radiation sensors are being deployed at portals to detect radioactive material and portable instruments are carried by port personnel to augment detection. Those instruments can detect the neutrons and g-rays produced by {sup 240}Pu that is normally present in weapons grade plutonium in cases where cargo overburden is not too great. However, {sup 235}U produces almost no neutron output in its normal radioactive decay and its principal {gamma}-radiation is at 186 keV and is readily attenuated by small amounts of wood or packing materials. Impurities such as {sup 232}U, often present in reactor irradiated material at the 100-200 ppt level, can provide a detectable signal through significant cargo overburden but the wide variations among samples of HEU make this an unreliable means of detecting SNM. High quality radiography may be useful in determining that the majority of containers are clearly free of SNM. However, some containers will lead to ambiguous results from radiography and passive radiation sensing. For these reasons active neutron interrogation is proposed as a means to produce fission and thus greatly amplify the radiation output of fissionable material to facilitate its reliable detection even when well shielded by large cargo overburden. Historically, the fission signature utilized as the unique identifying feature of fissionable materials is the detection of delayed neutrons. However, these neutrons have very low yield {approx} 0.017 per fission in {sup 235}U, and their low energy results in very poor penetration of hydrogenous materials such as fuels, water, wood, or agricultural products. That signature alone does not provide reliable detection in thick cargos. A new signature has been identified and has been developed within the current project for the detection of well shielded SNM. This SNM signature is based on high-energy {beta}-delayed {gamma}-radiation produced by fission products following neutron or photon induced fission. These {gamma}-rays are high enough in energy (E{sub {gamma}} > 3 MeV) to be readily distinguished from any natural background radioactivity since the latter does not extend above 2.6 MeV. Their abundance is nearly a decade greater than delayed neutrons and their short half-lives deliver nearly all of the signature radiation on time scales of one minute or less and thus facilitate rapid scanning. Finally, for this {gamma}-radiation in the 3-6 MeV range attenuation occurs only by Compton scattering and is in the range where minimum attenuation occurs in all materials. Even the thickest cargos of any material attenuate these {gamma}-rays by only a factor of 10-30X so that the signature is readily detected even with the most challenging shield materials. The goals of the current program are to detect significant quantities (much less than IAEA ''significant'' amounts) of well-shielded SNM, and to do so with detection probability P{sub d} {ge} 95% and with false alarm rates P{sub fp} {le} 0.001. It is the goal to meet these requirements in a scan that requires less than one minute to complete and does so without damage to the cargo or to people who may be hidden inside. We intend to meet these requirements even when the cargo overburden is up to {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2} of any material ranging from fuels and agricultural products to steel and lead.

Prussin, S; Slaughter, D; Pruet, J; Descalle, M; Bernstein, A; Hall, J; Accatino, M; Alford, O; Asztalos, S; Church, J; Loshak, A; Madden, N; Manatt, D; Moore, T; Norman, E; Petersen, D

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

106

Am/Cm Oxalate Precipitation and Washing Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to discuss the findings of the Am/Cm Oxalate Precipitation and Washing Demonstration carried out at TNX during December 1995. This demonstration consisted of two steps: oxalate precipitation and precipitate washing. The first step reacted Am/Cm stimulant solution with oxalic acid resulting in the formation of insoluble lanthanide oxalates and soluble metal oxalates. The second step consisted of washing the precipitate with equal volumes of a nitric acid/oxalic acid solution to remove unwanted cations (miscellaneous metals) from the slurry. Quantitative results consist of: the solubility of the metallic impurities and lanthanide oxalates under process conditions, the settling rate of the oxalates, the specific volume of the oxalate precipitate, and the minimum distance the solution transfer jet can be place from the oxalate solids to prevent entrainment. Finally, discussion of how to decrease lanthanide losses is presented in terms of transfer jet location, initial nitric acid concentration, and wash nitric acid concentration. Solubilizing the precipitate and adjusting the nitric acid concentration prior to vitrification were not performed in this demonstration.

Beck, S.B.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

107

Modeling the two stages of surfactant-aided soil washing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides new insights into modelling the distribution of hydrophobic compounds between soil and water phases in the presence of nonionic surfactant micelles. Experimental measurements were made of various systems comprising a non-ionic surfactant, five soils of different fractional organic carbon contents, and a hydrophobic (disperse) dye. Soil-washing performance was quantified using reciprocal surfactant-soil solubilization coefficients (1/Kd). Two stages of partitioning were identified. In stage 1, the dye concentration increased slightly with increasing surfactant dose until surfactant monomers saturated the bulk solution at the critical micelle concentration (cmc). The washing performance was 1:1 proportional to the surfactant monomer concentration. Most of the surfactant in this stage is sorbed. In stage 2, above the cmc, soil-washing performance increased linearly with increasing available surfactant micelles in the bulk solution. Reciprocal surfactant-soil solubilization coefficients (1/Kd), octanolwater partition coefficients (Kow), fractional organic carbon content of the soil (foc), and surfactant concentration were correlated for each stage in the soil-washing process using two simple equations.

W Chu; W.S So

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Removal of alkylphenols from polluted sites using surfactant-assisted soil washing and photocatalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surfactant-assisted soil washing and photocatalysis are well-known remediation processes ... concern. The application of photocatalysis to treat soil washing extracts containing 4-methylphenol, 4-ethylphenol and....

Manuela Davezza; Debora Fabbri

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Effect of Ultrasound on Surfactant-Aided Soil Washing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of ultrasound as an enhancement mechanism in the surfactant-aided soil-washing process was examined by conducting desoption tests of soils contaminated with naphthalene or diesel-oil. The experiments were conducted to elucidate the effect of ultrasound on the mass transfer from soil to the aqueous phase using naphthalene-contaminated soil. In addition, the use of ultrasound for the diesel-oil-contaminated soil was investigated under a range of conditions of surfactant concentration, sonication power, duration, soil/liquid ratio, particle size and initial diesel-oil concentration. The ultrasound used in the soil-washing process significantly enhanced the mass transfer rate from the solid phase to the aqueous phase. The removal efficiency of diesel-oil from the soil phase generally increased with longer sonication time, higher power intensity, and large particle size.

Seungmin Na; Yongwoon Park; Anna Hwang; Jeongsook Ha; Younguk Kim; Jeehyeong Khim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Field studies of in-situ soil washing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EPA and US Air Force conducted a research test program to demonstrate the removal of hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons from a sandy soil by in situ soil washing using surfactants. Contaminated soil from the fire-training area of Volk Air National Guard Base, WI, was first taken to a laboratory for characterization. At the laboratory, the soil was recompacted into glass columns creating a simulated in-situ environment. Under gravity flow, 12 pore volumes of aqueous surfactant solutions were passed through each of the columns. Gas chromatograph (GC) analyses were used on the washing effluent and soil to determine removal efficiency (RE). The results of these tests were highly encouraging. Treated effluent was discharged directly to the on-base aerobic-treatment lagoons.

Nash, J.H.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

An efficient process for recovery of fine coal from tailings of coal washing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gravity concentration of hard lignites using conventional jigs and heavy media separation equipment is prone to produce coal-rich fine tailings. This study aims to establish a fine coal recovery process of very high efficiency at reasonable capital investment and operational costs. The technical feasibility to upgrade the properties of the predeslimed fine refuse of a lignite washing plant with 35.9% ash content was investigated by employing gravity separation methods. The laboratory tests carried out with the combination of shaking table and Mozley multi-gravity separator (MGS) revealed that the clean coal with 18% ash content on dry basis could be obtained with 58.9% clean coal recovery by the shaking table stage and 4.1% clean coal recovery by MGS stage, totaling to the sum of 63.0% clean coal recovery from a predeslimed feed. The combustible recovery and the organic efficiency of the shaking table + MGS combination were 79.5% and 95.5%, respectively. Based on the results of the study, a flow sheet of a high-efficiency fine coal recovery process was proposed, which is also applicable to the coal refuse pond slurry of a lignite washing plant.

Cicek, T.; Cocen, I.; Engin, V.T.; Cengizler, H. [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. for Mining Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

1st Workshop on Dependability Issues in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks and Sensor Networks (DIWANS'04), Florence, Italy, Fault Tolerant Communication Topologies for Wireless Ad Hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1st Workshop on Dependability Issues in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks and Sensor Networks (DIWANS'04), Florence, Italy, June 2004 Fault Tolerant Communication Topologies for Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Bernd, distributed algorithms, failure locality 1 Introduction Wireless sensor networks, mobile ad hoc networks

113

Soil remediation using soil washing followed by Fenton oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil washing was applied to a contaminated soil with p-Cresol by using a nonionic surfactant (Tween 80). A mathematical model has also been proposed to describe both the pollutant desorption and the surfactant adsorption, taking place simultaneously. The effect of temperature (2040C) and surfactant concentration (0.110gL?1) have been analyzed on both kinetic rates. The kinetic desorption rate of p-Cresol increases as the initial solubilizer concentration. Desorption of p-Cresol was slightly greater with increasing temperature. The obtained kinetic model represents quite well the experimental results. Soil washing wastewater (20mgL?1 of p-Cresol and 0.86gL?1 of Tween 80) has been treated with Fenton Reagent to remove the pollutant extracted (p-Cresol) and to recover the surfactant solution. The pH of the soil washing wastewater was about 6.5 and did not change significantly during the Fenton Reagent treatment. Total conversions of p-Cresol were observed, at very short times, at the conditions tested for the Fenton reaction (100mgL?1 of H2O2 and 10mgL?1 of Fe2+). The hydrogen peroxide was not totally exhausted, showing conversions near 60% at 120min. Besides, the removal of Tween 80 during the Fentons reaction was lower than 10%, which suggests that the reaction is mainly selective to p-Cresol degradation. The toxicity of the liquids, measured by Microtox bioassay, was significantly reduced after the oxidation reaction, suggesting the negligible formation of degradation intermediates with higher toxicity than p-Cresol.

J.M. Rosas; F. Vicente; A. Santos; A. Romero

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

readme.1st  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

But there are aspects to public domain distribution which we overlooked back in 1986: 1) CORRUPTION: There are many copies of Z80MU 3.10 floating around...

115

Poster/Oral Subject Area Classification Competitor First Name Competitor Last Name Award Place Amount Oral/Poster 1. History, Literature, Fine Arts, Communication, Languages, Philosophy Graduate Vahid Vahdat Zad Subject Area 1st 300  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Business, Education, Political Science, Public Policy Graduate Lauren Lewis Subject Area 1st-Tie 300 Poster-Tie 300 Poster 2. Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Business, Education, Political Science, Public 1st 300 Oral 2. Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Business, Education, Political Science, Public

116

Laboratory studies of surfactant-enhanced washing of polychlorinated biphenyl from sandy material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil washing was combined with surfactant regeneration and ... ... Adsorption of Non-ionic Surfactants onto Sand and Its Importance in Naphthalene Removal ...

Abdul S. Abdul; Thomas L. Gibson

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wash-Rite Co - IN 08  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Wash-Rite Co - IN 08 Wash-Rite Co - IN 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WASH-RITE CO. (IN.08 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1410 Cornell Avenue , Indianapolis , Indiana IN.08-2 Evaluation Year: 1991 IN.08-3 IN.08-4 Site Operations: Conducted washing test to decontaminate gloves and recover uranium. IN.08-1 IN.08-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited scope of activities at this site IN.08-3 IN.08-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium IN.08-2 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to WASH-RITE CO.

118

Washing of Rocky Flats Combustible Residues (Conducted March - May 1995)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this project is to determine the feasibility of washing plutonium-containing combustible residues using ultrasonic disruption as a method for dislodging particulate. Removal of plutonium particulate and, to a lesser extent, solubilized plutonium from the organic substrate should substantially reduce potential fire, explosion or radioactive release hazards due to radiolytic hydrogen generation or high flammability. Tests were conducted on polypropylene filters which were used as pre-filters in the rich-residue ion-exchange process at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. These filters are similar to the Ful-Flo{reg_sign} cartridges used at Rocky Flats that make up a substantial fraction of the combustible residues with the highest hazard rating. Batch experiments were run on crushed filter material in order to determine the amount of Pu removed by stirring, stirring and sonication, and stirring and sonication with the introduction of Pu-chelating water-soluble polymers or surfactants. Significantly more Pu is removed using sonication and sonication with chelators than is removed with mechanical stirring alone.

Mary E. Barr; Ann R. Schake; David A. Romero; Gordon D. Jarvinen

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Manufacturing of a Crab Analogue to Determine the Quality of U.S. Shore-based Produced Surimi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage stability and chemical composition of surimi produced using an in-line washing system were of the 13th by the FlY Arctu rus and held using a flooded refrigerated seawater (RSW) system (Gwinn, 1987

120

EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The workshop was conducted by a trained facilitator using Value Engineering techniques to elicit the most technically sound solutions from the workshop participants. The path forward includes developing the OBA into a well engineered solution for achieving RCRA clean closure of the EBR-II Primary Reactor Tank system. Several high level tasks are also part of the path forward such as reassigning responsibility of the cleanup project to a dedicated project team that is funded by the DOE Office of Environmental Management, and making it a priority so that adequate funding is available to complete the project. Based on the experience of the sodium cleanup specialists, negotiations with the DEQ will be necessary to determine a risk-based de minimus quantity for acceptable amount of sodium that can be left in the reactor systems after cleanup has been completed.

Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DEGRADED TBP SOLVENT REGENERATION TECHNOLOGY USING BUTYLAMINE AS A SOLVENT WASHING TO REDUCE SOLID SALT WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Normal butylamine compounds are studied as salt-free wash reagents for degraded solvent used in PUREX process in spent fuel reprocessing. The solvent wash tests were carried out with two types of butylamine compounds, n-butylamine oxalate and n-butylamine bicarbonate, by counter-current mode using a small size mixer-settler composed of two 4-stage wash steps. Di-n-butyl phosphoric acid (HDBP), the main degradation product from TBP, was removed from real degraded solvent with decontamination factor of 2.5 {approx} 7.9. The study on electrolytic decomposition of butylamine compounds was also conducted for waste treatment.

Asakura, T.; Itoh, Y.; Hotoku, S.; Morita, Y.; Uchiyama, G.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

122

Be in a state of purification (e.g. ritual washing, clean clothes) Stand upright facing the direction of Mecca  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Be in a state of purification (e.g. ritual washing, clean clothes) Stand upright facing the day and night. Purification: In most cases, this is achieved through washing of the face & hands, and wiping of head & feet with water. However, at times, the body must be washed. Clothes must be clean. Call

Khambatt, Mujtaba

123

Synthesis of super plasticizer NF-30 from coal coking by product washing oil and performance analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Super plasticizer was synthesized by using coal coking by product washing oil and industrial naphthalene....2 in exhaust (20%). Compared with NF, NF-30 have some advantages in lower cost, high water reducing rate...

Zifang Xu ???; Mingxu Zhang; Wenpei Hu

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Sandia National Laboratories: one-pot wash-free process for switchgras...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

one-pot wash-free process for switchgrass ionic liquid pretreatment and saccharification One-Pot-to-Prep Biomass for Biofuels On September 10, 2013, in Biofuels, Biomass, Energy,...

125

Effect of washing with tap and treated seawater on the quality of whole scad (Trachurus trachurus)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of washing whole scad (Trachurus trachurus) with fresh water and seawater were evaluated. Fish evaluations for 12 days of storage in ice included sensory (EU and the... Pseudomonas...]. The main concl...

Patrcia Incio; Fernando Bernardo

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Removal of \\{PAHs\\} with surfactant-enhanced soil washing: Influencing factors and removal effectiveness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

PAH removal with surfactant enhanced washing was investigated through a series of laboratory tests to examine the effect of stirring speed, washing time, surfactant concentration, liquid/solid ratio, temperature, and on-and-off mode. The first four factors show significant influence on the PAH removal while the latter two do not. Total removal ratio and a new proposed parameter, solubilization percentage, are used to evaluate the effectiveness quantitatively.

Sheng Peng; Wei Wu; Jiajun Chen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The integration of innovative technologies into a physical-separation-based soil washing system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An innovative system`s approach to the treatment of soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has been proposed to effectively and cost competitively treat a significant mass of soil. The use of an integrated soil treatment system to decontaminate FEMP soils is a unique application of the soil washing technology. Due to the unfavorable soil particle size distribution and the ubiquitous distribution of uranium among these particle size fractions, conventional soil washing processes commonly used on predominantly sandy soils alone may not achieve the desirable waste minimization level without the inclusion of innovative technologies. This objective of this paper is to briefly describe the physical separation and chemical extraction process commonly used in soil washing operation and to present the baseline soil washing approach used on FEMP soils. Noting the successful and not-so-successful processes within the soil washing operation at the FEMP, a proposed innovative system`s approach to treating FEMP soils will be described. This system`s approach will integrate a conventional soil washing operation with proposed innovative technologies.

Krstich, M.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The partitioning and modelling of pesticide parathion in a surfactant-assisted soil-washing system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil sorption of organic pollutants has long been a problematic in the soil washing process because of its durability and low water solubility. This paper discussed the soil washing phenomena over a wide range of parathion concentrations and several soil samples at various fractions of organic content (foc) levels. When parathion dosage is set below the water solubility, washing performance is stable for surfactant concentrations above critical micelle concentration (cmc) and it is observed that more than 90% of parathion can be washed out when dosage is five times lower than the solubility limit. However, such trends change when non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) is present in the system. Parathion extraction depends very much on the surfactant dosage but is not affected by the levels of foc in the system. In between the extreme parathion dosage, a two-stage pattern is observed in these boundary regions. Washing performance is first increased with additional surfactant, but the increase slows down gradually since the sorption sites are believed to be saturated by the huge amount of surfactant in the system. A mathematical model has included foc to demonstrate such behavior and this can be used as a prediction for extraction.

W. Chu; K.H. Chan; W.K. Choy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Washing and alkaline leaching of Hanford tank sludges: A status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of the assumed high cost of high-level waste (HLW) immobilization and disposal, pretreatment methods are being developed to minimize the volume of HLW requiring vitrification. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating several options for pretreating the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The pretreatment methods under study for the tank sludges include: (1) simply washing the sludges with dilute NaOH, (2) performing caustic leaching (as well as washing) to remove certain wash components, and (3) dissolving the sludges in acid and extracting key radionuclides from the dissolved sludge solutions. The data collected in this effort will be used to support the March 1998 decision on the extent of pretreatment to be performed on the Hanford tank sludges. This document describes sludge washing and caustic leaching tests conducted in FY 1994. These tests were performed using sludges from single-shell tanks (SST) B-201 and U-110. A summary is given of all the sludge washing and caustic leaching studies conducted at PNL in the last few years.

Lumetta, G.J.; Rapko, B.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pre-Developmental Pre-Developmental INL EBR-II Wash Water Treatment Technologies (PBS # ADSHQTD0100 (0003199)) EBR-II Wash Water Workshop - The majority of the sodium has been removed, remaining material is mostly passivated. Similar closure projects have been successfully completed. Engineering needs to be developed to apply the OBA path. Page 1 of 2 Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop Challenge In 1994 Congress ordered the shutdown of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and a closure project was initiated. The facility was placed in cold shutdown, engineering began on sodium removal, the sodium was drained in 2001 and the residual sodium chemically passivated to render it less reactive in 2005. Since that time, approximately 700 kg of metallic sodium and 3500 kg of sodium bicarbonate remain in the facility. The

131

Washing and Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank Sludge: Results of FY 1998 Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sludge washing and parametric caustic leaching tests were performed on sludge samples tiom five Hanford tanks: B-101, BX-1 10, BX-112, C-102, and S-101. These studies examined the effects of both dilute hydroxide washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the residual sludge solids. ` Dilute hydroxide washing removed from <1 to 25% of the Al, -20 to 45% of the Cr, -25 to 97% of the P, and 63 to 99% of the Na from the Hdord tank sludge samples examined. The partial removal of these elements was likely due to the presence of water-soluble sodium salts of aluminate, chromate, hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, and phosphate, either in the interstitial liquid or as dried salts.

GJ Lumetta; BM Rapko; J Liu; DJ Temer; RD Hunt

1998-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

132

DOE Announces Additional Tour Seats Available: Tours of B Reactor at the Hanford Site Begin and End in Richland, Wash.  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

RICHLAND, Wash. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has made additional seats available for tours of the B Reactor National Historic Landmark this July and August.

133

The potential use of surfactant and cosolvent soil washing as adjuvant for in-situ aquifer restoration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The use of surfactant and aqueous cosolvent soil washing for the restoration of contaminated aquifers was investigated by laboratory experimentation and literature review. The effect (more)

Ziegenfuss, Philip Scott

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

C-104 high-level waste solids: Washing/leaching and solubility versus temperature studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the C-104 HLW solids. The objective of this work was to determine the composition of the C-104 solids remaining after washing with 0.01 M NaOH or leaching with 3 M NaOH. Another objective of this test was to determine the solubility of the C-104 solids as a function of temperature. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-8, Rev. 0, ``Determination of the Solubility of HLW Sludge Solids.

GJ Lumetta; DJ Bates; JP Bramson; LP Darnell; OT Farmer III; SK Fiskum; LR Greenwood; FV Hoopes; CZ Soderquist; MJ Steele; RT Steele; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

135

Soil clean-up by surfactant washing. I. Laboratory results and mathematical modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The removal of weathered-in PCBs from clayey soil by surfactant washing is demonstrated at bench scale. Spent surfactant solution was treated for recycle at bench scale by countercurrent liquid-liquid extraction for the removal of nonvolatile contaminants, and by thin film aeration in packed columns for removal of volatile organics. A correlation of micelle/water partition coefficients with octanol/water partition coefficients reported earlier by Valsaraj et al. is extended to several additional compounds. Mathematical models for batch-batch, batch-continuous flow, and countercurrent flow surfactant soil washing are described, and the effects of the model parameters are discussed.

Clarke, A.N.; Plumb, P.D.; Subramanyan (Eckenfelder, Inc., Nashville, TN (USA)); Wilson D.J. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Washing out of the 0-transition in Josephson junctions R. Avriller1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Washing out of the 0- transition in Josephson junctions R. Avriller1 and F. Pistolesi1 1 Univ: July 21, 2014) We consider a Josephson junction formed by a quantum dot connected to two bulk numbers: 73.23.-b, 74.25.F-, 74.50.+r, 74.45.+c Introduction.-- The Josephson junction is a fun- damental

Boyer, Edmond

137

Preliminary gravity and magnetic models across Midway Valley and Yucca Wash, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed gravity and ground magnetic data collected along ten traverses across Midway Valley and Yucca Wash on the eastern flank of Yucca Mountain in southwest Nevada are interpreted. These data were collected as part of an effort to evaluate faulting in the vicinity of proposed surface facilities for a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Geophysical data show that Midway Valley is bounded by large gravity and magnetic anomalies associated with the Bow Ridge and Paintbrush Canyon faults, on the west side of Exile Hill and on the west flank of Fran Ridge, respectively. In addition, Midway Valley itself is characterized by a number of small-amplitude anomalies that probably reflect small-scale faulting beneath Midway Valley. Gravity and magnetic data across the northwest trending Yucca Wash and the inferred Yucca Wash fault indicate no major vertical offsets greater than 100 m using a density contrast of 0.2 to 0.3 g/cm{sup 3} along the proposed Yucca Wash fault. In addition, a broad magnetic high coincides with the approximate location of the hydrologic gradient and probably reflects moderately magnetic Topopah Spring Tuff or lavas in the Calico Hills Formation.

Ponce, D.A.; Langenheim, V.E.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Advanced Sediment Washing for Decontamination of New York/New Jersey Harbor Dredged Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Advanced Sediment Washing for Decontamination of New York/New Jersey Harbor Dredged Materials Sediment Issue One of the greatest drivers for maintaining access to America's intermodal ports and related of contaminated sediments dredged from our nations waterways. More than 400 million cubic yards (CY) of sediments

Brookhaven National Laboratory

139

Soil remediation using a coupled process: soil washing with surfactant followed by photo-Fenton oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present work the use of a coupled process, soil washing and photo-Fenton oxidation, was investigated for remediation of a soil contaminated with p,p?-DDT (DDT) and p,p?-DDE (DDE), and a soil artificially contaminated with diesel. In the soil washing experiments, Triton X-100 (TX-100) aqueous solutions were used at different concentrations to obtain wastewaters with different compositions. Removal efficiencies of 66% (DDT), 80% (DDE) and 100% (diesel) were achieved for three sequential washings using a TX-100 solution strength equivalent to 12 times the effective critical micelle concentration of the surfactant (12 CMCeff). The wastewater obtained was then treated using a solar photo-Fenton process. After 6h irradiation, 99, 95 and 100% degradation efficiencies were achieved for DDT, DDE and diesel, respectively. In all experiments, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon decreased by at least 95%, indicating that residual concentration of contaminants and/or TX-100 in the wastewater was very low. The co-extraction of metals was also evaluated. Among the metals analyzed (Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, Cd, Mn and Co), only Cr and Mn were detected in the wastewater at concentrations above the maximum value permitted by current Brazilian legislation. The effective removal of contaminants from soil by the TX-100 washing process, together with the high degradation efficiency of the solar photo-Fenton process, suggests that this procedure could be a useful option for soil remediation.

Ricardo D. Villa; Alam G. Trov; Raquel F. Pupo Nogueira

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Comparison of soil washing using conventional surfactant solutions and colloidal gas aphron suspensions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surfactants have proven to be an effective way of augmenting the removal and mobilization of organics from contaminated soil. A more recent and innovative technology to aid the removal of contaminants from soil is the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) suspensions. The performance of CGAs and surfactant solutions in washing soils contaminated with 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) was investigated and compared with the process of washing soils with aqueous solutions of surfactants as in conventional surfactant flushing. In general it was observed that there was no significant difference in the performance of the two processes of soil washing for a highly soluble compound like 2,4-D. However, the surfactant consumption per gram of 2,4-D recovered from the soil was higher for conventional washing than for CGA solutions. CGAs also had a significant advantage over surfactant solutions in that at low flow rates, the pumping of CGAs showed lower pressure drops across the soil column.

Roy, D.; Valsaraj, K.T.; Tamayo, A. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Washing of field weathered crude oil contaminated soil with an environmentally compatible surfactant, alkyl polyglucoside  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weathered crude oil contaminated soils (COCSs), which are much more difficult to remediate than those freshly contaminated, are widespread especially at the sites of oil fields and industries. Surfactant enhanced ex situ soil washing could be used to remediate COCSs, but surfactant toxicity becomes one of the major concerns. In this study, a class of green surfactants, alkyl polyglucosides (APGs), were tested in washing the field weathered COCS with relatively high oil concentration (123mgg?1 dry soil) from Jilin Oilfield, Northeastern China. APG1214, characterized with longer alkyl chain, was more effective than APG0810 in crude oil removal. Adding inorganic sodium salts into APG1214 solution further improved the crude oil removal efficiency (CORE). Washing parameters (temperature, washing time, agitation speed and solution/soil ratio) were investigated and further optimized integratedly with an orthogonal design. At the optimum conditions, the CORE reached 97%. GC/MS analysis showed that the proportion of small n-alkanes (C16C23) in residual crude oil gradually increased, which was helpful to interpret the oil removal mechanism. Moreover, eminent effect on removal of large n-alkanes was achieved from the synergy between APG1214 and inorganic salts, which was opposite to the effect when they were added separately. This study demonstrated a promising way to remediate COCS with ecologically compatible surfactant and provided guidelines for its practical application.

Mei Han; Guodong Ji; Jinren Ni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

FRIED SCALLOPS Prepare an egg wash by beating 1 egg in 1/2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

preference with salt and pepper. Dip scallop meats in egg wash, then coat with any prepared seafood breading and season with freshly ground pepper. *Recipe courtesy of Fresh from Florida Seafood. For more seafood recipes, visit http://www.fl-seafood.com. COLLECTING Scallops may be spotted on or near the bottom

Watson, Craig A.

143

Improvement of the Coal Ash Slagging Tendency by Coal Washing and Additive Blending with Mullite Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four typical coals and two pretreatment methods were investigated to prevent slagging by facilitating mullite formation in coal ash at a high temperature. ... Both security and economy in power plant can be improved substantially as long as ash deposition and slagging tendency alleviated. ... Pilot-projects about coal washing and coal blending economic benefit are looking forward to put into practice. ...

Zhenyu Huang; Yan Li; Dan Lu; Zhijun Zhou; Zhihua Wang; Junhu Zhou; Kefa Cen

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

144

Method for producing catalysts from coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere. 1 fig.

Farcasiu, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kaufman, P.B.; Jagtoyen, M.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

145

Method for producing catalysis from coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere.

Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Library, PA); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

SLUDGE BATCH 7 (SB7) WASHING DEMONSTRATION TO DETERMINE SULFATE/OXALATE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY AND SETTLING BEHAVIOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) washing, a demonstration of the proposed Tank Farm washing operation was performed utilizing a real-waste test slurry generated from Tank 4, 7, and 12 samples. The purpose of the demonstration was twofold: (1) to determine the settling time requirements and washing strategy needed to bring the SB7 slurry to the desired endpoint; and (2) to determine the impact of washing on the chemical and physical characteristics of the sludge, particularly those of sulfur content, oxalate content, and rheology. Seven wash cycles were conducted over a four month period to reduce the supernatant sodium concentration to approximately one molar. The long washing duration was due to the slow settling of the sludge and the limited compaction. Approximately 90% of the sulfur was removed through washing, and the vast majority of the sulfur was determined to be soluble from the start. In contrast, only about half of the oxalate was removed through washing, as most of the oxalate was initially insoluble and did not partition to the liquid phase until the latter washes. The final sulfur concentration was 0.45 wt% of the total solids, and the final oxalate concentration was 9,900 mg/kg slurry. More oxalate could have been removed through additional washing, although the washing would have reduced the supernatant sodium concentration.The yield stress of the final washed sludge (35 Pa) was an order of magnitude higher than that of the unwashed sludge ({approx}4 Pa) and was deemed potentially problematic. The high yield stress was related to the significant increase in insoluble solids that occurred ({approx}8 wt% to {approx}18 wt%) as soluble solids and water were removed from the slurry. Reduction of the insoluble solids concentration to {approx}14 wt% was needed to reduce the yield stress to an acceptable level. However, depending on the manner that the insoluble solids adjustment was performed, the final sodium concentration and extent of oxalate removal would be prone to change. As such, the strategy for completing the final wash cycle is integral to maintaining the proper balance of chemical and physical requirements.

Reboul, S.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

147

Investigation of Rheological Impacts on Sludge Batch 3 as Insoluble Solids and Wash Endpoints are Adjusted  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing and immobilizing radioactive sludge slurry into a durable borosilicate glass. The DWPF has already processed three sludge batches (Sludge Batch 1A, Sludge Batch 1B, and Sludge Batch 2) and is currently processing the fourth sludge batch (Sludge Batch 3). A sludge batch is defined as a single tank of sludge slurry or a combination of sludge slurries from different tanks that has been or will be qualified before being transferred to DWPF. As a part of the Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) qualification task, rheology measurements of the sludge slurry were requested at different insoluble solids loadings. These measurements were requested in order to gain insight into potential processing problems that may occur as the insoluble solids are adjusted up or down (by concentration or dilution) during the process. As a part of this study, a portion of the ''as received'' SB3 sample was washed with inhibited water (0.015 M NaOH and 0.015 M NaNO2) to target 0.5M Na versus a measured 1M Na in the supernate. The purpose of the ''washing'' step was to allow a comparison of the SB3 rheological data to the rheological data collected for Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) and to determine if there was a dependence of the yield stress and consistency as a function of washing. The ''as received'' SB3 rheology data was also compared to SB3 simulants prepared by the Simulant Development Program in order to provide guidance for selecting a simulant that is more representative of the rheological properties of the radioactive sludge slurry. A summary of the observations, conclusions are: (1) The yield stress and plastic viscosity increased as the weight percent insoluble solids were increased for the ''as received'' and ''washed'' SB3 samples, at a fixed pH. (2) For the same insoluble solids loading, the yield stress for the SB2 sample is approximately a factor of three higher than the ''as received'' SB3 sample. There also appears to be small difference in the plastic viscosity. This difference is probably due to the different Na concentrations of the slurries. (3) The yield stress for the SB2 sample at 17.5 wt. % insoluble solids loading is four times higher than the ''washed'' SB3 sample at 16.5 wt. % insoluble solids. There also appears to be small difference in the plastic viscosity. The differences for the yield stress and consistency can be explained by the differences in the Fe and Na concentrations of the sludge slurry and the anion concentrations of the resulting supernates. (4) The rheological properties (i.e. yield stress and plastic viscosity), as the insoluble solids are adjusted, for the ''as received'' and ''washed'' SB3 samples are different. The plastic viscosity curve for the ''as received'' SB3 sample was higher than the plastic viscosity curve for SB3 ''washed'' sample. The yield stress curve for the ''washed'' SB3 sample is slightly lower than the ''as received'' SB3 sample up until {approx}19 wt. % insoluble solids. The ''washed'' SB3 sample then exceeds the yield stress curve for the ''as received'' SB3 sample. This rheological behavior is probably due to the difference in the Na concentration of the supernate for the samples. (5) No unusual behavior, such as air entrainment, was noted for the ''as received'' SB3 sample. (6) The observed physical properties of the SB3 sample changed after washing. The ''washed'' SB3 sample entrained air readily at higher insoluble solids loadings (i.e. 14.1, 16.5, 19.5 wt. %) as it did for SB2. The air entrainment appeared to dissipate for the SB3 sample at the lower insoluble solids loadings (i.e. 9.7 and 11.7 wt. %). (7) The physical behavior of SB3 can be influenced by controlling the Na concentration in the supernate and the wt. % insoluble solids. The cause for the air entrainment in the ''washed'' SB3 sample could be due to a change in the particle size during the washing step. (8) The SB3 simulants prepared for the Simulant Development Program were approximately a factor of 1.6 to 4 times higher for yield stress and 2.6 to 4 times higher

Fellinger, T. L.

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

148

WashWise cleans up the Northwest: Lessons learned from the Northwest high-efficiency clothes washer initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

WashWise is a regional market transformation program designed to promote the sale and acceptance or resource-efficient clothes washers (RECWs) in the Northwest through financial incentives, education, and marketing. The Program is sponsored by the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (the Alliance), a non-profit regional consortium of utilities, government, public interest groups, and private sector organizations. WashWise started in May 1997 and will continue through the end of 1999. WashWise works to transform the clothes washer market primarily at the retail level through an in-store instant rebate and a retailer bonus. In addition to financial incentives, WashWise has undertaken a collaborative marketing and promotional campaign to educate consumers about the financial savings and other benefits of RECWs. The program promotes only RECWs that meet strict energy and water savings criteria. WashWise has far exceeded initial expectations; annual program sales goals were met in the first three months. As of June 1998, 30,000 RECWs have been sold through the program (representing approximately 13 percent of the Northwest residential clothes washer market). In addition, over 540 retailers, including national and regional chains, are participating in the program. Preliminary survey results also have also provided evidence of broad customer satisfaction. This paper reviews the key elements that have contributed to the success of the WashWise program. In addition, the paper provides program results and indicates future directions for WashWise and the RECW market.

Gordon, L.M.; Banks, D.L.; Brenneke, M.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

C-106 High-Level Waste Solids: Washing/Leaching and Solubility Versus Temperature Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the Hanford tank C-106 high-level waste (HLW) solids. The objective of this work was to determine the composition of the C-106 solids remaining after washing with 0.01M NaOH or leaching with 3M NaOH. Another objective of this test was to determine the solubility of various C-106 components as a function of temperature. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-8,Rev. 0, Determination of the Solubility of HLW Sludge Solids. The test went according to plan, with only minor deviations from the test plan. The deviations from the test plan are discussed in the experimental section.

GJ Lumetta; DJ Bates; PK Berry; JP Bramson; LP Darnell; OT Farmer III; LR Greenwood; FV Hoopes; RC Lettau; GF Piepel; CZ Soderquist; MJ Steele; RT Steele; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

150

Extraction agents for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from soil in soil washing technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil have been recognised as a serious health and environmental issue due to their carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic properties. One of the commonly employed soil remediation techniques to clean up such contamination is soil washing or solvent extraction. The main factor which governs the efficiency of this process is the solubility of \\{PAHs\\} in the extraction agent. Past field-scale soil washing treatments for PAH-contaminated soil have mainly employed organic solvents or water which is either toxic and costly or inefficient in removing higher molecular weight PAHs. Thus, the present article aims to provide a review and discussion of the alternative extraction agents that have been studied, including surfactants, biosurfactants, microemulsions, natural surfactants, cyclodextrins, vegetable oil and solution with solid phase particles. These extraction agents have been found to remove \\{PAHs\\} from soil at percentages ranging from 47 to 100% for various PAHs.

Ee Von Lau; Suyin Gan; Hoon Kiat Ng; Phaik Eong Poh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Safety evaluation of the ESP sludge washing baselines runs. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose is to provide the technical basis for evaluation of unreviewed safety question for the Extended Sludge Processing (ESP) Sludge Washing Baseline Runs, which are necessary to resolve technical questions associated with process control (sludge suspension, sludge settling, heat transfer, temperature control). The sludge is currently stored in below-ground tanks and will be prepared for processing at the Defense Waste Processing Facility as part of the Integrated Waste Removal Program for Savannah River Site.

Gupta, M.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Extensive separations (CLEAN) processing strategy compared to TRUEX strategy and sludge wash ion exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous pretreatment flowsheets have been proposed for processing the radioactive wastes in Hanford`s 177 underground storage tanks. The CLEAN Option is examined along with two other flowsheet alternatives to quantify the trade-off of greater capital equipment and operating costs for aggressive separations with the reduced waste disposal costs and decreased environmental/health risks. The effect on the volume of HLW glass product and radiotoxicity of the LLW glass or grout product is predicted with current assumptions about waste characteristics and separations processes using a mass balance model. The prediction is made on three principal processing options: washing of tank wastes with removal of cesium and technetium from the supernatant, with washed solids routed directly to the glass (referred to as the Sludge Wash C processing strategy); the previous steps plus dissolution of the solids and removal of transuranic (TRU) elements, uranium, and strontium using solvent extraction processes (referred to as the Transuranic Extraction Option C (TRUEX-C) processing strategy); and an aggressive yet feasible processing strategy for separating the waste components to meet several main goals or objectives (referred to as the CLEAN Option processing strategy), such as the LLW is required to meet the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Class A limits; concentrations of technetium, iodine, and uranium are reduced as low as reasonably achievable; and HLW will be contained within 1,000 borosilicate glass canisters that meet current Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant glass specifications.

Knutson, B.J.; Jansen, G.; Zimmerman, B.D.; Seeman, S.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Lauerhass, L.; Hoza, M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Crude oil contaminated soil washing in air sparging assisted stirred tank reactor using biosurfactants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigated the removal of crude oil from soil using air sparging assisted stirred tank reactors. Two surfactants (rhamnolipid and sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) were tested and the effects of different parameters (i.e. temperature, surfactant concentrations, washing time, volume/mass ratio) were investigated under varying washing modes namely, stirring only, air sparging only and the combination of stirring and air sparging. The results showed that SDS removed more than 80% crude oil from non-weathered soil samples, whist rhamnolipid showed similar oil removal at the third and fourth levels of the parameters tested. The oil removal ability of the seawater prepared solutions were better than those of the distilled water solutions at the first and second levels of temperature and concentration of surfactant solutions. This approach of soil washing was noted to be effective in reducing the amount of oil in soil. Therefore we suggested that a field scale test be conducted to assess the efficiency of these surfactants.

Kingsley Urum; Turgay Pekdemir; David Ross; Steve Grigson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Soil washing as a potential remediation technology for contaminated DOE sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Frequently detected contaminants at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites include radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Remediation of these sites requires application of several technologies used in concert with each other, because no single technology is universally applicable. Special situations, such as mixed waste, generally require innovative technology development. This paper, however, focuses on contaminated soils, for which soil washing and vitrification technologies appear to have wide ranging application potential. Because the volumes of contaminated soils around the DOE complex are so large, soil washing can offer a potentially inexpensive way to effect remediation or to attain waste volume reduction. As costs for disposal of low-level and mixed wastes continue to rise, it is likely that volume-reduction techniques and in-situ containment techniques will become increasingly important. This paper reviews the status of the soil washing technology, examines the systems that are currently available, and discusses the potential application of this technology to some DOE sites, with a focus on radionuclide contamination and, primarily, uranium-contaminated soils

Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Natsis, M.E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Walker, J.S. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Soil washing as a potential remediation technology for contaminated DOE sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Frequently detected contaminants at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites include radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Remediation of these sites requires application of several technologies used in concert with each other, because no single technology is universally applicable. Special situations, such as mixed waste, generally require innovative technology development. This paper, however, focuses on contaminated soils, for which soil washing and vitrification technologies appear to have wide ranging application potential. Because the volumes of contaminated soils around the DOE complex are so large, soil washing can offer a potentially inexpensive way to effect remediation or to attain waste volume reduction. As costs for disposal of low-level and mixed wastes continue to rise, it is likely that volume-reduction techniques and in-situ containment techniques will become increasingly important. This paper reviews the status of the soil washing technology, examines the systems that are currently available, and discusses the potential application of this technology to some DOE sites, with a focus on radionuclide contamination and, primarily, uranium-contaminated soils

Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Natsis, M.E. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)); Walker, J.S. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Petroglyph Wash DetritalWash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TheStrip 4mi 6km 7mi 11km 2mi 3km 7mi 11km 12mi 19km 8mi 13km 10mi 16km 33mi 53km 2mi 3km 2mi 3km 3mi 5km 8mi 13km 3mi 5km 5mi 8km 10mi 16km 14mi 22km 13mi 21km 3mi 5km1mi 2km 25mi 40km 14mi 22km 8mi 13km 4mi 6km 15mi 24km 4mi 6km 4mi 6km 36mi 58km 14mi 22km 5mi 8km 20mi 32km 26mi 42km 19mi 31km 4mi

Lachniet, Matthew S.

157

Effects of adding wash tower effluent to Ano Liossia landfill to enhance bioreaction c by Olympia Galenianou.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A theoretical study was performed on the effects of adding sulfate-rich wash tower effluent from the Athens hospital waste incinerator to the Ano Liossia landfill of Athens. The method of mass balance was used to examine ...

Galenianou, Olympia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Volume84, number 2 FEBS LETTERS December 1977 EFFECTS OF WASHING AND OSMOTIC SHOCK ON CATALASE ACTIVITY OF INTACT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] and described in detail [17]. Each washing of a chloroplast suspension consisted of resuspension of the pellet centrifuge. Final resuspension of each pellet in a small volume of the same medium gave a suspension

Allen, John F.

159

Opportunities for Energy Conservation and Improved Comfort From Wind Washing Retrofits in Two-Story Homes - Part I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of wind washing found in this study. Repairs and energy monitoring were completed in six of these homes to evaluate retrofit methods and cost effectiveness of retrofit solutions. These results are discussed in Part II of this paper....

Withers, C. R. Jr.; Cummings, J. B.

160

Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludge: Results of FY 1997 studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current plan for remediating the Hanford tank farms consists of waste retrieval, pretreatment, treatment (immobilization), and disposal. The tank wastes will be partitioned into high-level and low-level fractions. The HLW will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass matrix; the resulting glass canisters will then be disposed of in a geologic repository. Because of the expected high cost of HLW vitrification and geologic disposal, pretreatment processes will be implemented to reduce the volume of immobilized high-level waste (IHLW). Caustic leaching (sometimes referred to as enhanced sludge washing or ESW) represents the baseline method for pretreating Hanford tank sludges. Caustic leaching is expected to remove a large fraction of the Al, which is present in large quantities in Hanford tank sludges. A significant portion of the P is also expected to be removed from the sludge by metathesis of water-insoluble metal phosphates to insoluble hydroxides and soluble Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Similar metathesis reactions can occur for insoluble sulfate salts, allowing the removal of sulfate from the HLW stream. This report describes the sludge washing and caustic leaching tests performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in FY 1996. The sludges used in this study were taken from Hanford tanks AN-104, BY-108, S-101, and S-111.

Lumetta, G.J.; Burgeson, I.E.; Wagner, M.J.; Liu, J.; Chen, Y.L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SWITCH: Case Studies in the Demand Side Management of Washing Appliances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The emergence of viable smart home technologies together with ambitious government initiatives for smart meter rollouts will provide a rich platform on which to develop demand side management strategies that aim to modify consumer's use of energy. In this work we develop such a platform that aims to SWITCH behaviour patterns and SWITCH on/off energy consuming appliances when they are not needed or when they could be utilised to benefit from on-site power generation or off-peak electricity. This platform was installed in 3 occupied domestic properties that form part of the Creative Energy Homes project at the University of Nottingham, UK. A total of 6 case studies are presented that investigate the impact of shifting the time of use of washing machines and dishwashers with varying levels of user engagement. A range of issues and user perceptions of the technology are presented and discussed.

R. Shipman; M. Gillott; E. Naghiyev

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Selective sorption of PCBs by low-cost polymers and application to soil washing processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surfactant-assisted soil washing and soil flushing processes have shown to be a promising soil decontamination method. In these and other remediation technologies that employ surfactants to mobilize organic contaminants, large volumes of contaminated aqueous solutions are generated. An efficient process to selectively concentrate the organic contaminant from the aqueous surfactant solution, thereby allowing the recycle of the surfactant, is considered essential for cost-effective application of these remediation methods. To this end, a process was developed wherein commercial, low-cost polymers are used to selectively sorb PCBs and petroleum oils from aqueous surfactant solutions. Sorption isotherms and sorption rates were determined for a large number of polymer sorbents and several significant structure-property relationships were observed. Two classes of polymers, polyester elastomers and carbon-filled elastomer rubbers (e.g., recycled rubber tire), were found to perform superiorly in this application and a successful pilot-scale demonstration of the process was conducted.

Sivavec, T.M.; Webb, J.L.; Gascoyne, D.G. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Removal and degradation of aromatic compounds from a highly polluted site by coupling soil washing with photocatalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possible application of two environmental remediation technologies soil washing and photocatalysis to remove and decompose various aromatic pollutants present in excavated soils of a contaminated industrial site has been investigated. Aqueous solutions containing the non-ionic surfactant Brij 35 were used to extract the contaminants from the soil samples. The photocatalytic treatment of the obtained washing wastes, performed in the presence of TiO2 suspensions irradiated with simulated sunlight, showed a slow abatement of the toxic compounds due to the relevant concentrations of organics in the waste. A neat improvement of the process performances, obtained by operating in the presence of added potassium peroxydisulfate, suggests a feasible treatment route.

D. Fabbri; A. Bianco Prevot; V. Zelano; M. Ginepro; E. Pramauro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The effects of chlorine, washing and evisceration on microbial population and storage-life of fresh fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF CHLORINE, WASHING AND EVISCERATION ON THE MICROBIAL POPULATION AND STORAGE-LIFE OF FRESH FISH A Thesis by CHARLES MADE NEAL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM Univ rsity in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Augu t 1977 Major Subject: Food Technology THE EFFECTS OF CHLORINE& WASHING lQ', D EVISCEPATION ON THE MICROBIAL POPULATION AND STORAGE-LIFE OF FRESH FISH A Thesis by CHARLES WADE NEAL Approved as to style and content...

Neal, Charles Wade

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

165

Decontamination of soil washing wastewater using solar driven advanced oxidation processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Decontamination of soil washing wastewater was performed using two different solar driven advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): the photo-Fenton reaction and the cobalt/peroxymonosulfate/ultraviolet (Co/PMS/UV) process. Complete sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), the surfactant agent used to enhance soil washing process, degradation was achieved when the Co/PMS/UV process was used. In the case of photo-Fenton reaction, almost complete SDS degradation was achieved after the use of almost four times the actual energy amount required by the Co/PMS/UV process. Initial reaction rate in the first 15min (IR15) was determined for each process in order to compare them. Highest IR15 value was determined for the Co/PMS/UV process (0.011mmol/min) followed by the photo-Fenton reaction (0.0072mmol/min) and the dark Co/PMS and Fenton processes (IR15=0.002mmol/min in both cases). Organic matter depletion in the wastewater, as the sum of surfactant and total petroleum hydrocarbons present (measured as chemical oxygen demand, COD), was also determined for both solar driven processes. It was found that, for the case of COD, the highest removal (69%) was achieved when photo-Fenton reaction was used whereas Co/PMS/UV process yielded a slightly lower removal (51%). In both cases, organic matter removal achieved was over 50%, which can be consider proper for the coupling of the tested \\{AOPs\\} with conventional wastewater treatment processes such as biodegradation.

Erick R. Bandala; Yuridia Velasco; Luis G. Torres

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The use of a combined process of surfactant-aided soil washing and coagulation for PAH-contaminated soils treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) persist in soils due to their low volatility, low water solubility and low biodegradability, all of which make it difficult to remove this type of compound from soils. The work described here involved the study of a combined surfactant-aided soil washing (SASW) process and coagulation treatment, using iron and aluminium salts, to remediate a low-permeability PAH-polluted soil. Phenanthrene was selected as the model PAH and three different types of surfactants (anionic, cationic, and non-ionic) were used as washing agents. The results show that the anionic surfactant is the most effective washing fluid because efficiencies higher than 90% can be achieved. Non-ionic and cationic surfactant efficiencies were 70% and 30%, respectively. In addition, only the anionic wastewater can be satisfactorily treated with this technology, with COD removals greater than 90% achieved. Variation of pH, zeta-potential and the dose of aluminium required seem to indicate that a charge-neutralization mechanism is the main process involved in the emulsion break-up obtained in the treatment of aqueous surfactant wastes. In addition, the effects of surfactant concentration and that of the pH of the soil-washing wastewater seem to have a greater influence on the performance of the coagulation process.

R. Lpez-Vizcano; C. Sez; P. Caizares; M.A. Rodrigo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING POST ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION TANK 51 SLUDGE SLURRY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The remaining contents of Tank 51 from Sludge Batch 4 will be blended with Purex sludge from Tank 7 to constitute Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) has completed caustic addition to Tank 51 to perform low temperature Al dissolution on the H-Modified (HM) sludge material to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and Al being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) has also completed aluminum dissolution tests using a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry through funding by DOE EM-21. This report documents assessment of downstream impacts of the aluminum dissolved sludge, which were investigated so technical issues could be identified before the start of SB5 processing. This assessment included washing the aluminum dissolved sludge to a Tank Farm projected sodium concentration and weight percent insoluble solids content and DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing using the washed sludge. Based on the limited testing, the impact of aluminum dissolution on sludge settling is not clear. Settling was not predictable for the 3-L sample. Compared to the post aluminum dissolution sample, settling after the first wash was slower, but settling after the second wash was faster. For example, post aluminum dissolution sludge took six days to settle to 60% of the original sludge slurry height, while Wash 1 took nearly eight days, and Wash 2 only took two days. Aluminum dissolution did impact sludge rheology. A comparison between the as-received, post aluminum dissolution and washed samples indicate that the downstream materials were more viscous and the concentration of insoluble solids less than that of the starting material. This increase in viscosity may impact Tank 51 transfers to Tank 40. The impact of aluminum dissolution on DWPF CPC processing cannot be determined because acid addition for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle was under-calculated and thus under-added. Although the sludge was rheologically thick throughout the SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles, this may have been due to the under addition of acid. Aluminum dissolution did, however, impact analyses of the SRAT receipt material. Two methods for determining total base yielded significantly different results. The high hydroxide content and the relatively high soluble aluminum content of the washed post aluminum dissolution sludge likely contributed to this difference and the ultimate under addition of acid. It should be noted that the simulant used to provide input for the SRAT cycle was an inadequate representation of the waste in terms of acid demand, likely due to the differences in the form of aluminum and hydroxide in the simulant and actual waste. Based on the results of this task, it is recommended that: (1) Sludge settling and rheology during washing of the forthcoming Sludge Batch 5 qualification sample be monitored closely and communicated to the Tank Farm. (2) SRNL receive a sample of Tank 51 after all chemical additions have been made and prior to the final Sludge Batch 5 decant for rheological assessment. Rheology versus wt% insoluble solids will be performed to determine the maximum amount of decant prior to the Tank 51 to Tank 40 transfer. (3) As a result of the problem with measuring total base and subsequently under-calculating acid for the DWPF CPC processing of the post aluminum dissolution sludge; (4) Studies to develop understanding of how the sludge titrates (i.e., why different titration methods yield different results) should be performed. (5) Simulants that better match the properties of post aluminum dissolution sludge should be developed. (6) Work on developing an acid calculation less dependant on the total base measurement should be continued.

Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

168

Degradation of pyrene in cetylpyridinium chloride-aided soil washing wastewater by pyrite Fenton reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Degradation of pyrene by pyrite Fenton reaction in synthetic cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC)-aided soil washing wastewater (SWW) was investigated in a closed batch reactor. Pyrene in the presence of CPC was gradually degraded in the pyrite Fenton system by 96% in 180min at initial pH 7 showing pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics (0.0194min?1), while the concentration of pyrene in the absence of CPC decreased abruptly by 91% in 5min and then did not significantly decrease by the end of sampling time (180min). In a classic Fenton system, pyrene in the presence of CPC was degraded by 35% in 180min at initial pH 3. The sustainable reactivity of pyrite Fenton was attributed to slow but continuous dissolution of Fe(II) from the pyrite surface leading to continuous production of reactive radicals during the reaction. Pyrene in the presence of CPC was mainly degraded by OH radicals. Its product study showed that the pyrite Fenton system can successfully degrade pyrene in the CPC-aided SWW without accumulating toxic oxy-pyrenes such as 1,6-pyrenequinone and 1,8-pyrenequinone. CPC was also successfully degraded (95%) in the pyrite Fenton system, forming carbon dioxide and ammonium as main degradation products.

Kyunghoon Choi; Sungjun Bae; Woojin Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Report on Produced Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 2009 Produced Water Volumes and Management Practices Page 3 Table of Contents Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................ 7 Chapter 1 - Introduction ............................................................................................................. 11 1.1 Purpose .......................................................................................................................... 11 1.2 Background ................................................................................................................... 11 1.3 Overview ....................................................................................................................... 11

170

Report on Produced Water  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of the pond, as well as the quality of the produced water. In semiarid regions, hot, dry air moving from a land surface will result in high evaporation rates for smaller ponds. As...

171

New mud system produces solids-free, reusable water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Corpus Christi, Texas, based Cameron Equipment Co., Inc., has developed a closed-loop mud treating system that removes solids from water-based systems and leaves the separated fluid clean and chemical free enough to be re-used directly on the rig. The system has been successfully applied by a Gulf of Mexico operator in areas where zero discharge is required. The alternative mud conditions program offered by the developers is called the Cameron Fluid Recycling System. Designed for closed-loop water-based fluids, the system is a new method of removing solids from normally discharged fluids such as drilling mud, waste and wash water, or any other water-based fluid that contains undesirable solids. The patented method efficiently produces end products that are (1) dry solids; and (2) essentially 100% solids-free fluid that can be re-used in the same mud system. All excess drilling mud, and all wash water that would normally go to the reserve pit or a cuttings barge are collected in a tank. Recycled fluid is compatible with the mud system fluid, no harmful chemicals are used, and pH is not altered.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Enhanced photodegradation of pentachlorophenol in a soil washing system under solar irradiation with TiO2 nanorods combined with municipal sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel remediation method for soil contaminated with hydrophobic chlorinated aromatic pollutants (HCAPs) was developed using TiO2 nanorods combined with municipal sewage sludge in surfactant solution. The target contaminant washed into surfactant solution from polluted soil can be rapidly removed under natural sunlight irradiation. The photocatalyst synthesized by TiO2 combined with municipal sewage sludge by a hydrothermal process shows excellent ability in this situation. The TiO2 nanorods appear on the surface of municipal sewage sludge, which offers a new way of solving waste municipal sewage sludge disposal problem and of producing high-activity photocatalyst. The nanocomposite was characterized by SEM, X-ray diffraction, and UVVis DRS. Results showed that the new nanocomposite was better than the original TiO2 catalyst. Using the proposed method in this study, the target contaminant can be removed by up to 97% after 30min of irradiation in natural sunlight, whereas the surfactant loss was only 27%.

Zeyu Zhou; Yaxin Zhang; Hongtao Wang; Tan Chen; Wenjing Lu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Abstract of a Journal of the Weather in Quebec, between the 1st of April 1765, and 30th of April 1766. By Cap. Alex. Rose, of the 52d Regiment; Communicated by the Rev. P. Murdoch, D. D. F. R. S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 January 1766 research-article Abstract of a Journal of the Weather in Quebec, between the 1st of April 1765, and 30th of April 1766. By Cap. Alex. Rose, of the 52d Regiment; Communicated by the Rev...

1766-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Depositional environment of the Middle Pennsylvanian granite wash: Lambert 1, Hryhor, and Sundance fields, northern Palo Duro basin, Oldham County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, electric logs, drill stem tests, dip logs, and seismic records. Five granite wash fields have been discovered adjacent to the Bravo Dome in Oldham County, Texas; the Lambert 'I, Hryhor, Sundance, Pond, and Brandi. The section at Lambert 1, Hryhor..., electric logs, drill stem tests, dip logs, and seismic records. Five granite wash fields have been discovered adjacent to the Bravo Dome in Oldham County, Texas; the Lambert 'I, Hryhor, Sundance, Pond, and Brandi. The section at Lambert 1, Hryhor...

Wharton, Amy Laura

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Diagenesis of sandstones from the Douglas Creek member of the Green River Formation (Eocene) at Red Wash field, Uintay County, Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, sandstone and some limestone and dolomite beds. The Garden Creek Member at Red Wash Field is about 550 ft (168 m) thick. The Parachute Creek Member, overlying the Garden Creek, is largely oil shale, gray shale, and limestone and dolomite beds..., sandstone and some limestone and dolomite beds. The Garden Creek Member at Red Wash Field is about 550 ft (168 m) thick. The Parachute Creek Member, overlying the Garden Creek, is largely oil shale, gray shale, and limestone and dolomite beds...

Ray, Earl Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Selected chemistry of primary producers, primary consumers and suspended matter from Corpus Christi Bay and the northwest Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, suspended matter (suspended sediment) samples were vacuum filtered using 0. 4 p, 47 mi. llimeter diameter Nucleopore membrane filters. All samples were subsequently washed with deionized water (to remove dissolved solids) and dried at 60 C. Once dry...SELECTED CHEMISTRY OF PRIMARY PRODUCERS, PRIMARY CONSUMERS AND SUSPENDED MATTER FROM CORPUS CHRISTI BAY AND THE NORTHWEST GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis ROBERT RUSSELL SIMS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial...

Sims, Robert Russell

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

MonthlyReport1stQrtr  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

35 35 0 0 0 35 Number of charging events² 800 0 0 0 800 Electricity consumed (AC MWh) 5.25 0.00 0.00 0.00 5.25 Percent of time with a vehicle connected to charging unit 36% 0% 0% 0% 36% Percent of time with a vehicle drawing power from charging unit 7% 0% 0% 0% 7% Max electricity demand across all days Min electricity demand across all days Electricity demand on single calendar day with highest peak Max percentage of charging units connected across all days Min percentage of charging units connected across all days Percentage of charging units connected on single calendar day with peak electricity demand Region: All Report period: January 2011 through March 2011 Number of EV Project vehicles in region: 35 5/19/2011 5:37:48 PM INL/LTD-11-22097 1 of 2 © 2011 ECOtality

178

113TH CONGRESS 1ST SESSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Hydropower at Corps of Engineers facilities. Sec. 2010. Clarification of work-in-kind credit authority. Sec authorizations. TITLE II--WATER RESOURCES POLICY REFORMS Sec. 2001. Purposes. Sec. 2002. Safety assurance review. 2011. Transfer of excess work-in-kind credit. Sec. 2012. Credit for in-kind contributions. Sec. 2013

US Army Corps of Engineers

179

1st Year Orientation Farid N. Najm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mobile, internet, sensors, HCI, energy, biology, medicine ... § Engineering can change the world § You and Program Advising ? Counselling and Referrals § Contact: ? Jennifer Fabro, First Year Counsellor ? Curtis

Prodiæ, Aleksandar

180

1st Circular Time-Resolved Vibrational  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Germany) Giulio Cerullo (Politec. Milano, Italy) Majed Chergui (EPFL, Switzerland) Dana Dlott (University of Illinois, USA) Thomas Elssser (Max Born Institute, Germany) Nikolaus Ernsting (Humbolt Univ. Germany Gerwert (Ruhr University, Germany) Peter Hamm (Univ. Zurich, Switzerland) Joachim Heberle (Free Univ

Gerwert, Klaus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Dewarless Logging Tool - 1st Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report focuses on Sandia National Laboratories' effort to create high-temperature logging tools for geothermal applications without the need for heat shielding. One of the mechanisms for failure in conventional downhole tools is temperature. They can only survive a limited number of hours in high temperature environments. For the first time since the evolution of integrated circuits, components are now commercially available that are qualified to 225 C with many continuing to work up to 300 C. These components are primarily based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology. Sandia has developed and tested a simple data logger based on this technology that operates up to 300 C with a few limiting components operating to only 250 C without thermal protection. An actual well log to 240 C without shielding is discussed. The first prototype high-temperature tool measures pressure and temperature using a wire-line for power and communication. The tool is based around the HT83C51 microcontroller. A brief discussion of the background and status of the High Temperature Instrumentation program at Sandia, objectives, data logger development, and future project plans are given.

HENFLING,JOSEPH A.; NORMANN,RANDY A.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

107TH CONGRESS 1ST SESSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projects for the uranium mining industry. Sec. 307. Maintenance of a viable domestic uranium conversion ind. Cost recovery from Government agencies. Sec. 304. Depleted uranium hexafluoride. Sec. 305. Nuclear

183

Design for Emotion, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Design for Emotion introduces you to the why, what, when, where and how of designing for emotion. Improve user connection, satisfaction and loyalty by incorporating emotion and personality into your design process. The conscious and unconscious ...

Trevor van Gorp; Edie Adams

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

111TH CONGRESS 1ST SESSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with energy and weapons use;18 (B) explore methods for eliminating or19 minimizing adverse effects of energy develop-20 ment and nuclear materials on the environment;21 (C) train people in ecological and environ-22; read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources AN ACT To authorize

Georgia, University of

185

Mississippi's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMississippi%27s1stcongressionaldistrict&oldid194589...

186

Program Update: 1st Quarter 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Inside this Update: DOE Celebrates 20-Year Anniversary of Executive Order 12898; LM Updates the Public on Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress; LM Issues ULP PEIS; Tracking Uranium...

187

API Design for C++, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The design of application programming interfaces can affect the behavior, capabilities, stability, and ease of use of end-user applications. With this book, you will learn how to design a good API for large-scale long-term projects. With extensive C++ ...

Martin Reddy

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Enterprise Mac Managed Preferences, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many systems administrators on the Mac need a way to manage machine configuration after initial setup and deployment. Apples Managed Preferences system (also known as MCX) is under-documented, often misunderstood, and sometimes outright unknown by sys ...

Edward Marczak; Greg Neagle

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Semester Project 1st November 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during the Second World War'; Dr Fearghal McGarry, History (QUB), Prof. Keith Jeffery, History (QUB. Christopher Marsh, History (QUB); Prof. Mary O'Dowd, History (QUB) `Collectors and Collections of Ephemeral Print, c. 1600-1750'; Prof. Christopher Marsh, History (QUB); Prof. Crawford Gribben, History (QUB

Daraio, Chiara

190

108TH CONGRESS 1ST SESSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-DEEPWATER ARCHITECTURE.--The4 term ``ultra-deepwater architecture'' means the inte-5 gration of technologies energy sciences, advanced scientific5 and computing research, biological and environmental re-6 search

191

Method for producing superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for producing a V3Al superconductor is disclosed which comprises making a composite composed of a sheath portion of a copper alloy containing 1 to 15 atomic percent of germanium, 1 to 15 atomic percent of silicon or 2 to 25 atomic percent of gallium and surrounded by the sheath portion, at least one core portion of a vanadium-aluminum alloy containing 0.5 to 20 atomic percent of aluminum; elongating the composite; and then heat-treating the elongated composite thereby to form a V3(Al, Ge), V3(Al, Si) or V3(Al, Ga) layer between the sheath portion and the core portion.

Inoue, K.; Tachikawa, K.; Togano, K.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Process for producing ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for producing ethanol from raw materials containing a high dry solid mash level having fermentable sugars or constituents which can be converted into sugars, comprising the steps of: (a) liquefaction of the raw materials in the presence of an alpha amylase to obtain liquefied mash; (b) saccharification of the liquefied mash in the presence of a glucoamylase to obtain hydrolysed starch and sugars; (c) fermentation of the hydrolysed starch and sugars by yeast to obtain ethanol; and (d) recovering the obtained ethanol, wherein an acid fungal protease is introduced to the liquefied mash during the saccharification and/or to the hydrolysed starch and sugars during the fermentation, thereby increasing the rate of production of ethanol as compared to a substantially similar process conducted without the introduction of the protease.

Lantero, O.J.; Fish, J.J.

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

193

Removal of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn from a highly contaminated industrial soil using surfactant enhanced soil washing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surfactant enhanced soil washing (SESW) was applied to an industrial contaminated soil. A preliminary characterization of the soil regarding the alkaline-earth metals, Na, K, Ca and Mg took values of 2866, 2036, 2783 and 4149mg/kg. The heavy metals As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn, had values of 4019, 14, 35582, 70, 2603, and 261mg/kg, respectively. When using different surfactants, high removal of Cu, Ni and Zn were found, and medium removals for Pb, As and Cd. In the case of these three metals, tap water removed more than the surfactant solutions, except for the case of As. There were surfactants with average removals (this is, the removal for all the metals studied) of 67.1% (Tween 80), 64.9% (Surfacpol 14104) and 61.2% (Emulgin W600). There were exceptional removals using Texapon N-40 (83.2%, 82.8% and 86.6% for Cu, Ni and Zn), Tween 80 (85.9, 85.4 and 81.5 for Cd, Zn and Cu), Polafix CAPB (79%, 83.2% and 49.7% for Ni, Zn and As). The worst results were obtained with POLAFIX LO with a global removal of 45%, well below of the average removal with tap water (50.2%).All removal efficiencies are reported for a one step washing using 0.5% surfactant solutions, except for the case of mezquite gum, where a 0.1% solution was employed.

Luis G. Torres; Rosario B. Lopez; Margarita Beltran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Major Energy Producers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

206(92) 206(92) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1992 January 1994 Elk. I nergy Information dministration This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. All telephone orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents McPherson Square Bookstore U.S. Government Printing Office 1510 H Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20402 Washington, DC 20005 (202)783-3238 (202)653-2050 FAX (202)512-2233 FAX (202)376-5055 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., eastern time, M-F 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., eastern time, M-F All mail orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office P.O. Box 371954 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of subscribers, such as

195

Method for producing superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a method for producing v/sub 3/Ga superconductors which comprises forming a composite of a core portion and a sheath portion surrounding said core portion, said sheath portion being composed of a gallium-containing alloy selected from the group consisting of copper-gallium and copper-silver-gallium alloys, and said core portion being composed of a vanadium metal, elongating said composite, and heat-treating the resulting elongated composite to form a v/sub 3/Ga layer between said sheath and core portions; the improvement wherein the gallium-containing alloy has a gallium content of 0.1 to 30 atomic percent and additionally contains at least one metal selected from the group consisting of 0.05 to 5 atomic percent of magnesium, 0.5 to 10 atomic percent of aluminum , 0.1 to 10 atomic percent of cerium and 0.05 to 10 atomic percent of sodium, and the vanadium metal is a vanadium alloy containing 0.1 to 15 atomic percent of gallium.

Asano, T.; Tachikawa, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Yoshida, Y.

1981-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

196

Exploration strategies based on a coalbed methane producibility model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing geologic and hydrologic characteristics of a basin does not necessarily lead to a determination of its coalbed methane producibility because it is the synergy among key hydrogeologic controls that governs producibility. Detailed studies performed in the San Juan, Piceance, and Sand Wash Basins determined that the key hydrogeologic factors affecting producibility include depositional setting and coal distribution, tectonic and structural setting, coal rank and gas generation, hydrodynamics, permeability, and gas content. The conceptual model based on these factors provides a rationale for exploration and development strategies for unexplored areas or in basins having established or limited production. Exceptionally high productivity requires good permeability; thick, laterally continuous high-rank and high-gas-content coals; dynamic flow of ground water through those coals; generation of secondary biogenic gases; and migration and conventional trapping of thermogenic and biogenic gases. Higher coalbed methane producibility commonly occurs in areas of upward flow associated with permeability barriers (no-flow boundaries). Fluid migration across a large gathering area orthogonal to permeability barriers and/or in situ generation of secondary biogenic gases concentrate the coal gas, resulting in higher gas contents. Low coalbed methane production is typically associated with very low permeability systems; the absence of conventional or hydrodynamic traps; and thin, low-rank coals below the threshold of thermogenic gas generation. Production from relatively low-gas-content coals in highly permeable recharge areas may result in excessive water and limited coalbed methane production. Thus, high permeability can be as detrimental to coalbed methane producibility as is low permeability.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Hamilton, D.S.; Tyler, R.; Finley, R.J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Exploration strategies based on a coalbed methane producibility model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing geologic and hydrologic characteristics of a basin does not necessarily lead to a determination of its coalbed methane producibility because it is the synergy among key hydrogeologic controls that governs producibility. Detailed studies performed in the San Juan, Piceance, and Sand Wash Basins determined that the key hydrogeologic factors affecting producibility include depositional setting and coal distribution, tectonic and structural setting, coal rank and gas generation, hydrodynamics, permeability, and gas content. The conceptual model based on these factors provides a rationale for exploration and development strategies for unexplored areas or in basins having established or limited production. Exceptionally high productivity requires good permeability; thick, laterally continuous high-rank and high-gas-content coals; dynamic flow of ground water through those coals; generation of secondary biogenic gases; and migration and conventional trapping of thermogenic and biogenic gases. Higher coalbed methane producibility commonly occurs in areas of upward flow associated with permeability barriers (no-flow boundaries). Fluid migration across a large gathering area orthogonal to permeability barriers and/or in situ generation of secondary biogenic gases concentrate the coal gas, resulting in higher gas contents. Low coalbed methane production is typically associated with very low permeability systems; the absence of conventional or hydrodynamic traps; and thin, low-rank coals below the threshold of thermogenic gas generation. Production from relatively low-gas-content coals in highly permeable recharge areas may result in excessive water and limited coalbed methane production. Thus, high permeability can be as detrimental to coalbed methane producibility as is low permeability.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Hamilton, D.S.; Tyler, R.; Finley, R.J. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Testa Produce | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Testa Produce Testa Produce Jump to: navigation, search Name Testa Produce Facility Testa Produce Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Testa Produce Developer Testa Produce Energy Purchaser Testa Produce Location Chicago IL Coordinates 41.81065982°, -87.65433311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.81065982,"lon":-87.65433311,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

199

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to initiating a new sludge batch in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is required to simulate this processing, including Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation, waste glass fabrication, and chemical durability testing. This report documents this simulation for the next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 6 (SB6). SB6 consists of Tank 12 material that has been transferred to Tank 51 and subjected to Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD), Tank 4 sludge, and H-Canyon Pu solutions. Following LTAD and the Tank 4 addition, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided SRNL a 3 L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB6 qualification. Pu solution from H Canyon was also received. SB6 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of Pu from H Canyon), DWPF CPC simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass characterization and chemical durability evaluation. The following are significant observations from this demonstration. Sludge settling improved slightly as the sludge was washed. SRNL recommended (and the Tank Farm implemented) one less wash based on evaluations of Tank 40 heel projections and projections of the glass composition following transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40. Thorium was detected in significant quantities (>0.1 wt % of total solids) in the sludge. In past sludge batches, thorium has been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), seen in small quantities, and reported with the radionuclides. As a result of the high thorium, SRNL-AD has added thorium to their suite of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) elements. The acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing of 115%, or 1.3 mol acid per liter of SRAT receipt slurry, was adequate to accomplish some of the goals of SRAT processing: nitrite was destroyed to below 1,000 mg/kg and mercury was removed to below the DWPF target with 750 g of steam per g of mercury. However, rheological properties did not improve and were above the design basis. Hydrogen generation rates did not exceed DWPF limits during the SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. However, hydrogen generation during the SRAT cycle approached the DWPF limit. The glass fabricated with the Tank 51 SB6 SME product and Frit 418 was acceptable with respect to chemical durability as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The PCT response was also predictable by the current durability models of the DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). It should be noted, however, that in the first attempt to make glass from the SME product, the contents of the fabrication crucible foamed over. This may be a result of the SME product's REDOX (Reduction/Oxidation - Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe) of 0.08 (calculated from SME product analytical results). The following are recommendations drawn from this demonstration. In this demonstration, at the request of DWPF, SRNL caustic boiled the SRAT contents prior to acid addition to remove water (to increase solids concentration). During the nearly five hours of caustic boiling, 700 ppm of antifoam was required to control foaming. SRNL recommends that DWPF not caustic boil/concentrate SRAT receipt prior to acid addition until further studies can be performed to provide a better foaming control strategy or a new antifoam is developed for caustic boiling. Based on this set of runs and a recently completed demonstration with the SB6 Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) sample, it is recommended that DWPF not add formic acid at the design addition rate of two gallons per minute for this sludge batch. A longer acid addition time appears to be helpful in allowing slower reaction of formic acid with the sludge and possibly decreases the chance of a foam over during acid addition.

Pareizs, J.; Pickenheim, B.; Bannochie, C.; Billings, A.; Bibler, N.; Click, D.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Method of producing submicron size particles and product produced thereby  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Submicron size particles are produced by using a sputtering process to deposit particles into a liquid. The liquid is processed to recover the particles therefrom, and the particles have sizes in the range of twenty to two hundred Angstroms. Either metallic or non-metallic particles can be produced, and the metallic particles can be used in ''metallic inks.'' 4 figs.

Bourne, R.S.; Eichman, C.C.; Welbon, W.W.

1988-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Discharge produces hydrocarbons from coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Discharge produces hydrocarbons from coal ... Studies of the reactions of coal in electric discharges by two chemists at the U.S. Bureau of Mines' Pittsburgh Coal Research Center may lead to improved ways of producing acetylene and other useful chemicals from coal. ... Other workers have produced high yields of acetylene from coal by extremely rapid pyrolysis using energy sources such as plasma jets, laser beams, arc-image reactors, and flash heaters. ...

1968-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

202

Process for selection of Oxygen-tolerant algal mutants that produce H.sub.2  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for selection of oxygen-tolerant, H.sub.2 -producing algal mutant cells comprising: (a) growing algal cells photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase; (b) inducing algal cells grown photoautrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase in step (a) anaerobically by (1) resuspending the cells in a buffer solution and making said suspension anaerobic with an inert gas; (2) incubating the suspension in the absence of light at ambient temperature; (c) treating the cells from step (b) with metronidazole, sodium azide, and added oxygen to controlled concentrations in the presence of white light. (d) washing off metronidazole and sodium azide to obtain final cell suspension; (e) plating said final cell suspension on a minimal medium and incubating in light at a temperature sufficient to enable colonies to appear; (f) counting the number of colonies to determine the percent of mutant survivors; and (g) testing survivors to identify oxygen-tolerant H.sub.2 -producing mutants.

Ghirardi, Maria L. (Lakewood, CO); Seibert, Michael (Lakewood, CO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Correlation of mineralogy and trace element leaching behavior in modified in situ spent shales from Logan Wash, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale retorting induces mineral and chemical reactions to occur on the macroscopic and microscopic levels in the kerogen-bearing marlstone. The nature and extent of the reactions is dependent upon process variables such as maximum temperature, time at temperature, atmosphere, and raw shale composition. This report describes the investigation of the mineral, chemical, and trace element release properties of spent shales retrieved from an experimental in situ retort at Occidental Oil Shale, Inc.'s Logan Wash site in Garfield County, Colorado. Correlation between mineralogy of the spent materials and the mobility of major, minor, and trace elements are indicated, and relationships with important process parameters are discussed. The progress of carbonate decomposition reactions and silication reactions is indicative of the processing conditions experienced by the shale materials and influences the mobility of major, minor, and trace elements when the solids are contacted by water. Shale minerals that are exposed to the extreme conditions reached in underground retorting form high temperature product phases including akermanite-gehlenite and diopside-augite solid solutions, kalsilite, monticellite, and forsterie. The persistence of relatively thermally stable phases, such as quartz, orthoclase, and albite provide insight into the extremes of processing conditions experienced by the spent shales. Leachate compositions suggest that several trace elements, including vanadium, boron, fluoride, and arsenic are not rendered immobile by the formation of the high-temperature silicate product phase akermanite-gehlenite.

Peterson, E.J.; O'Rourke, J.A.; Wagner, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Method for producing a borohydride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing a borohydride is described and which includes the steps of providing a source of borate; providing a material which chemically reduces the source of the borate to produce a borohydride; and reacting the source of borate and the material by supplying heat at a temperature which substantially effects the production of the borohydride.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

205

Cellulase producing microorganism ATCC 55702  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase--containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualifies for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

Dees, H. Craig (Lenoir City, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Microorganisms for producing organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

Cellulase producing microorganism ATCC 55702  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase--containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualifies for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

Dees, H.C.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Producing hydrogen using nuclear energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The earliest means of separating hydrogen from water was by electrolysis using electrical energy that usually had been produced by low-efficiency thermodynamic processes. Substitution of thermal energy for electrical energy in high-temperature electrolysis gives a somewhat higher overall efficiency, but significantly complicates the process. Today, the vast majority of hydrogen is produced by steam methane reforming (SMR) followed by a water-shift reaction. A well-designed SMR plant will yield hydrogen having 75??80% of the energy of the methane used. Recent work in Japan has demonstrated the feasibility of substituting high-temperature heat from a gas-cooled nuclear reactor to replace the heat supplied in SMR by the combustion of methane. Using high-temperature heat from nuclear plants to drive thermochemical processes for producing hydrogen has been studied extensively. Bench-scale tests have been carried out in Japan demonstrating the sulphur-iodine (SI) process to produce hydrogen.

Robert E. Uhrig

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Methods of producing transportation fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing transportation fuel is described herein. The method for producing transportation fuel may include providing formation fluid having a boiling range distribution between -5.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process to a subsurface treatment facility. A liquid stream may be separated from the formation fluid. The separated liquid stream may be hydrotreated and then distilled to produce a distilled stream having a boiling range distribution between 150.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. The distilled liquid stream may be combined with one or more additives to produce transportation fuel.

Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Cherrillo, Ralph Anthony (Houston, TX); Bauldreay, Joanna M. (Chester, GB)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

210

Stratigraphy, coal occurrence, and depositional history of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Sand Wash basin, northwestern Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fort Union Formation in the Sand Wash basin is divided into the massive Cretaceous and Tertiary (K/T) sandstone unit, lower coal-bearing unit, gray-green mudstone unit, basin sandy unit, and upper shaly unit. Lithofacies and coal-occurrence maps of the stratigraphic units indicate that sandstone bodies and coal beds occur along south-north oriented, intermontane fluvial systems. Net-sandstone-thickness trends of the massive K/T sandstone unit reveal laterally extensive channel-fill sandstones formed in north-flowing fluvial systems. The massive K/T sandstone unit's dominant source was in the Sawatch Range. Sandstones within the lower coal-bearing unit consist of similar north-flowing fluvial systems, but they are laterally discontinuous and have several tectonically active source areas, including the Uinta and Sierra Madre-Park uplifts, and Sawatch Range. Coal-occurrence maps of the lower coal-bearing unit indicate that maximum coal-bed thicknesses are greatest along the south-north-oriented fluvial axes. Coal beds thin and split to the east and west, confirming a direct relation between the position of thick, fluvial-sandstone bodies, which form a stable platform for peat accumulation, and the location of the thick coal beds. Above the lower coal-bearing unit, the gray-green mudstone unit forms north-trending belts centered R91W and R100W. The gray-green mudstone thins to the north and into the basin center and probably is lacustrine in origin, reflecting tectonic quiescence and cessation of coarse clastic sedimentation. The basin sandy unit is best developed in the central parts of the basin, where its fluvial depositional axis is oriented south-north. The upper shaly unit directly overlies the basin sandy unit and includes a thin Cherokee coal zone. The upper shaly unit has variable thicknesses due to erosion at the base of the Wasatch Formation and lateral facies changes.

Tyler, R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

WASH plus infrascaping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For many decades, various non-governmental agencies, and political entities have been working to resolve issues relating to Water, Sanitation and Hygiene within developing countries around the world. One area within the ...

Dieudonne, Rudy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Separation of oil and water produced by micellar-solution/ polymer flooding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phase behavior of produced fluids from a micellar/polymer project is dominated by producedsulfonate equivalent-weight distribution, total sulfonate production, and aqueous-phase salt concentration and type. Produced fluids at Marathon Oil Co.'s 219-R Project showed evidence of having passed through a salinity gradient created by reservoir brine at the leading edge of the displacement and fresh polymer water behind the micellar solution. During early production, when aqueousphase salt concentration was relatively high, highequivalent-weight sulfonates were permanently entrained in produced oil. Significant amounts of water also remained. As the salt content of produced water declined, high-equivalent-weight sulfonates moved to middle and aqueous phases. The middle and aqueous phases carried significant quantities of oil during these periods. All three problems-water in oil, oil in the middle phase, and oil in water-were corrected by treatment with demulsifying chemicals that rendered all sulfonates highly watersoluble. Water-soluble amines and alcohols were effective. Because of large quantities of sulfonate production and resulting low oil/water tensions, extended retention times were needed in separation vessels. In the absence of adequate retention (highest sulfonate production), a freshwater wash of the oil with an appropriate demulsifying chemical after initial oil/water separation removed the remaining sulfonate (and water) from the oil. All production from the 219-R Project was successfully treated and sold with strict quality control. Data from laboratory corefloods pertinent to the characterization of produced-fluid phase behavior are presented.

Dreher, K.D.; Shoppman, T.D.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Diesel exhaust treatment produces cyanide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel exhaust treatment produces cyanide ... Studies at the Swiss Federal Technical Institute (ETH), Zurich, have produced results that, if confirmed by further research, could pose problems for the developers of catalytic converters that reduce emissions from diesel and leanburn gasoline engines. ... Use of low molecular weight olefins as reductants for selective removal of nitrogen oxides from exhaust gases, either by bleeding the olefins into the exhaust stream or blending them into the fuel itself, has attracted the interest of engine makers and regulatory agencies. ...

JOSEPH HAGGIN

1994-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

214

Process for producing chalcogenide semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing chalcogenide semiconductor material is disclosed. The process includes forming a base metal layer and then contacting this layer with a solution having a low pH and containing ions from at least one chalcogen to chalcogenize the layer and form the chalcogenide semiconductor material.

Noufi, R.; Chen, Y.W.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

Additive manufacturing method of producing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive manufacturing method of producing silver or copper tracks on polyimide film Problem/stripping) using an additive process support by a novel bio- degradable photo-initiator package. technology. Building on previous work by Hoyd- Gigg Ng et al. [1,2], Heriot-Watt has developed an additive film

Painter, Kevin

216

Acid Washed Glass Beads 1. Weigh 50 g of 0.5 mm glass beads (Sigma G-9268, 425-600 m) into a 100 ml-orange cap Pyrex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acid Washed Glass Beads 1. Weigh 50 g of 0.5 mm glass beads (Sigma G-9268, 425-600 µm) into a 100 ml-orange cap Pyrex bottle. The volume of glass beads should be no more than 1/5 of the volume of the bottle used for washes. To scale up, use 100 g of glass beads and a 250 ml orange cap Pyrex bottle. 2

Aris, John P.

217

Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella Oneidensis Strain MR-1 and Other Microorganisms . Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...

218

Gas separation by pressure swing adsorption for producing hydrogen from coal: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project demonstrated the feasibility of producing high purity hydrogen from a coal gasification product gas mixture by Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) using a commercial 5A zeolite as the adsorbent. The major advantage of PSA over conventional hydrogen upgrading processes is associated with lower overall production costs. This is mainly due to the integration of PSA into H/sub 2/ production plants as a single unit operation by replacing the low temperature carbon monoxide shift, carbon dioxide wash and methanation steps. In this way, hydrogen production costs are typically reduced from 7 to 40%. A single bed PSA process was designed to simulate the various steps of commercial multibed PSA plants. A new and very important step, ''Vacuum Purge'', was also investigated. 45 refs., 38 figs., 50 tabs.

Kapoor, A.; Ritter, J.A.; Yang, R.T.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

On the Oscillation of Neutrinos Produced by the Annihilation of Dark Matter inside the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The annihilation of dark matter particles captured by the Sun can lead to a neutrino flux observable in neutrino detectors. Considering the fact that these dark matter particles are non-relativistic, if a pair of dark matter annihilates to a neutrino pair, the spectrum of neutrinos will be monochromatic. We show that in this case, even after averaging over production point inside the Sun, the oscillatory terms of the oscillation probability do not average to zero. This leads to interesting observable features in the annual variation of the number of muon track events. We show that smearing of the spectrum due to thermal distribution of dark matter inside the Sun is too small to wash out this variation. We point out the possibility of studying the initial flavor composition of neutrinos produced by the annihilation of dark matter particles via measuring the annual variation of the number of muon-track events in neutrino telescopes.

Arman Esmaili; Yasaman Farzan

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven. Note that other radiotracers that are described in the literature can Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven. Note that other radiotracers that are described in the literature can also be transferred to our laboratory. Molecular Target/use Radiotracer Name Structure Chemical Name Hexokinase/glucose metabolism, cancer, brain function 18 FDG 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose Dopamine D2/D3 receptors/addiction, psychiatric disorders [ 11 C]raclopride 3,5-dichloro-N-{[(2S)-1-ethylpyrrolidin- 2-yl]methyl}-2-hydroxy-6- [ 11 C]methoxybenzamide Dopamine transporters / cocaine pharmacokinetics, addiction, neurological disorders [ 11 C]cocaine methyl (1R,2R,3S,5S)-3-s(benzoyloxy)- 8-[ 11 C]methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1] octane-2-carboxylate Blood flow/nicotine pharmacokinetics [ 11 C]nicotine 3-[(2S)-1-[ 11 C]methylpyrrolidin-2-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Influence of solubilizing agents (cyclodextrin or surfactant) on phenanthrene degradation by electro-Fenton process Study of soil washing recycling possibilities and environmental impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One of the aims in soil washing treatment is to reuse the extracting agent and to remove the pollutant in the meantime. Thus, electro-Fenton (EF) degradation of synthetic soil washing solutions heavily loaded with phenanthrene was suggested for the first time. Two solubilising agents hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and Tween 80 (TW 80) were chosen as cyclodextrin (CD) and surfactant representatives, respectively. In order to reuse HPCD and to degrade the pollutant simultaneously, the following optimal parameters were determined: [Fe2+]=0.05mM (catalyst), I=2000mA, and natural solution pH (around 6), without any adjustment. Only 50% of TW 80 (still higher than the critical micelle concentration (CMC)) can be reused against 90% in the case of HPCD while phenanthrene is completely degraded in the meantime, after only 180min of treatment. This can be explained by the ternary complex formation (Fe2+-HPCD-organic pollutant) (equilibrium constant K=56mM?1) that allows OH to directly degrade the contaminant. This confirms that Fe2+ plays an important role as a catalyst since it can promote formation of hydroxyl radicals near the pollutant and minimize HPCD degradation. After 2h of treatment, HPCD/phenanthrene solution got better biodegradability (BOD5/COD=0.1) and lower toxicity (80% inhibition of luminescence of Vibrio fischeri bacteria) than TW 80/phenanthrene (BOD5/COD=0.08; 99% inhibition of V. fischeri bacteria). According to these data, HPCD employed in this integrated (soil washing+EF degradation) approach gave promising results in order to be reused whereas the pollutant is degraded in the meanwhile.

Emmanuel Mousset; Nihal Oturan; Eric D. van Hullebusch; Gilles Guibaud; Giovanni Esposito; Mehmet A. Oturan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Washing Effect of a LiNi0.83Co0.15Al0.02O2 Cathode in Water Jisuk Kim,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

high capacity active materials, such as Si, Sn, or LiNi1-x-yCoxMnyO2 with a 4.2 V cutoff.1-5 OneWashing Effect of a LiNi0.83Co0.15Al0.02O2 Cathode in Water Jisuk Kim,a Youngsik Hong,b,d Kwang Sun mAh Li-ion cell was commercialized in 2004. Despite the fact that the electrode materials used were

Cho, Jaephil

223

Number of Producing Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Producing Gas Wells Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 1989-2012 Alabama 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 1989-2012 Alaska 239 261 261 269 277 185 1989-2012 Arizona 7 6 6 5 5 5 1989-2012 Arkansas 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 1989-2012 California 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1989-2012 Colorado 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 1989-2012 Gulf of Mexico 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Illinois 43 45 51 50 40 40 1989-2012 Indiana 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Kansas

224

Leucoagaricus gongylophorus Produces Diverse Enzymes for the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Leucoagaricus gongylophorus Produces Diverse Enzymes for the Degradation of Recalcitrant Plant Polymers in Leaf-Cutter Ant Leucoagaricus gongylophorus Produces Diverse Enzymes for...

225

Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 . Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 . Abstract: The reduction of...

226

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biodiesel Producer Biodiesel Producer Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Producer Requirements Biodiesel is defined as a fuel that is composed of mono-alkyl esters of long-chain fatty acids derived from plant or animal matter, meets the

227

Removal of Cu, Pb and Zn by foam fractionation and a soil washing process from contaminated industrial soils using soapberry-derived saponin: A comparative effectiveness assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The feasibility of using the eco-friendly biodegradable surfactant saponin (a plant-based surfactant) from soapberry and surfactin from Bacillus subtilis (BBK006) for the removal of heavy metals from contaminated industrial soil (6511mgkg?1 copper, 4955mgkg?1 lead, and 15090mgkg?1 zinc) by foam fractionation and a soil flushing process was evaluated under variation of fundamental factors (surfactant concentration, pH, temperature and time). The results of latter process showed that 12% Pb, 1617% Cu and 2124% Zn was removed by surfactin after 48h, whereas the removal of Pb, Cu and Zn was increased from 40% to 47%, 30% to 36% and 16% to 18% in presence of saponin with an increase from 24 to 72h at room temperature by the soil washing process at pH 4. In the foam fractionation process, the metal removal efficiencies were increased with increases in the saponin concentration (0.0750.15gL?1) and time (2472h), whereas the efficiency was decreased with increasing pH (410) and temperature (>40C). The removal efficiencies of Pb, Cu and Zn were increased significantly from 57% to 98%, 85% to 95% and 55% to 56% with an increase in the flow rate from 0.2 to 1.0Lmin?1 at 0.15gL?1 saponin (pH 4 and 30C). The present investigation indicated that the foam fractionation process is more efficient for the removal of heavy metal from contaminated industrial soil in comparison to the soil washing process. The plant-based eco-friendly biodegradable biosurfactant saponin can be used for environmental cleanup and pollution management.

Jyoti Prakash Maity; Yuh Ming Huang; Chun-Mei Hsu; Ching-I Wu; Chien-Cheng Chen; Chun-Yi Li; Jiin-Shuh Jean; Young-Fo Chang; Chen-Yen Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Quantifying the parameters of successful agricultural producers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary purpose of the study was to quantify the parameters of successful agricultural producers. Through the use of the Financial and Risk Management (FARM) Assistance database, this study evaluated economic measures for row-crop producers...

Kaase, Gregory Herman

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

229

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oregon Department of Energy provides a tax credit for agricultural producers or collectors of biomass. The credit can be used for eligible biomass used to produce biofuel; biomass used in...

230

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Process for selection of oxygen-tolerant algal mutants that produce H{sub 2}  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for selection of oxygen-tolerant, H{sub 2}-producing algal mutant cells comprises: (a) growing algal cells photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase; (b) inducing algal cells grown photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase in step (a) anaerobically by (1) resuspending the cells in a buffer solution and making said suspension anaerobic with an inert gas and (2) incubating the suspension in the absence of light at ambient temperature; (c) treating the cells from step (b) with metronidazole, sodium azide, and added oxygen to controlled concentrations in the presence of white light; (d) washing off metronidazole and sodium azide to obtain final cell suspension; (e) plating said final cell suspension on a minimal medium and incubating in light at a temperature sufficient to enable colonies to appear; (f) counting the number of colonies to determine the percent of mutant survivors; and (g) testing survivors to identify oxygen-tolerant H{sub 2}-producing mutants. 5 figs.

Ghirardi, M.L.; Seibert, M.

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

233

Experiments with Wind to Produce Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nat EXPERIMENTS WITH WIND TO PRODUCE ENERGY Curriculum: Wind Power (simple machines, weatherclimatology, aerodynamics, leverage, mechanics, atmospheric pressure, and energy...

234

PAFC fed by biogas produced by the anaerobic fermentation of the waste waters of a beet-sugar refinery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beet-washing waters of a beet-sugar refinery carry a high COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand), and their conditioning to meet legal constraints before disposal considerably contributes to the operation costs of the refinery. Their fermentation in an anaerobic digestor could instead produce readily disposable non-polluting waters, fertilizers and biogas, useful to feed a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) heat and power generator system. A real refinery case is considered in this work, where the electrical characteristics V = V(I) of a laboratory PAFC stack, fueled with a dry simulated reforming gas (having the same H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} content as the biogas obtainable by the above said anaerobic digestion), are determined. The encouraging results show that a possible market niche for fuel cells, in the food-industry waste partial recovery and residual disposal, deserves attention.

Ascoli, A.; Elias, G. [Univ. Diegli Studi di Milano (Italy); Bigoni, L. [CISE Tecnologie Innovative S.p.A., Segrate (Italy); Giachero, R. [Du Pont Pharma Italia, Firenze (Italy)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Northern Tool + Equipment Find the Right Fitting for Your Pressure Washer at Northern Tool! NorthernTool.com/PressureWashers Pristine Pressure Pressure/power washing in Maryland Vinyl siding cleaned, decks cleaned www.pristinepressure.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ability to clean while saving on our most important resources, water and energy." In recognition! NorthernTool.com/PressureWashers Pristine Pressure Pressure/power washing in Maryland Vinyl siding cleaned, decks cleaned www.pristinepressure.com Siding Cleaning Bring back the life to your siding! Estimates

Sóbester, András

236

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report 1st Quarter FY 1996  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Success Stories: Success Stories: Articles from Department of Energy NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports 1996 Mar Hanford Tanks Public participation in NEPA process resulted in changes to the scope of the proposed project. The NEPA process resulted in enforceable mitigation commitments. 1997 Dec NPR Sale The NEPA process resulted in enforceable mitigation commitments for biological and cultural resources. 1999 Mar SPR Pipeline Integrating NEPA and the Section 404 permit processes proved efficient and resulted in mitigation commitments. 1999 Jun LANL Habitat Plan The NEPA process resulted in a site-wide habitat management plan (reducing future need for biological assessments), geographic information system (reference for future project analyses), and endangered species protection.

237

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report 1st Quarter FY 1996  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS N E P A Inside LESSONS LEARNED March 1, 1996 Quarterly Report LESSONS LEARNED National Environmental Policy Act U.S. Department of Energy Welcome to the newly-revised Quarterly Report of Lessons Learned in the NEPA process. In response to reader suggestions, we have expanded the scope of the report to provide a wider variety of NEPA- related information, and enhanced the format for better clarity and overall readability. This Quarterly Report includes: * NEPA lessons learned at the Hanford Site - Page 1 * Mini-guidance on the preparation of EIS summaries, properly eliminating alternatives and impacts from detailed analysis, application of DOE NEPA regulations to procurement, and NEPA questions and answers - Pages 3-6 * Updates on the proposed amendments to DOE's NEPA

238

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report - 1st Quarter FY 1999  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 1 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT For First Quarter FY 1999 March 1, 1999; Issue No. 18 continued on page 3 Dr. David Michaels, new Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, enthusiastically supports the Lessons Learned approach. Dr. David Michaels — DOE’s New Leader for Environment, Safety and Health The new Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, Dr. David Michaels, recognizes the value of NEPA in supporting good decisions. “I understand the importance of examining options carefully before we make decisions that will affect our workers, the public, and the environment in lasting and profound ways,” he said. “We must be fully informed of the environmental

239

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report - 1st Quarter FY2000  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2000 2000 1 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT For First Quarter FY 2000 March 1, 2000; Issue No. 22 Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan EIS Helps DOE Preserve Unique Resources continued on page 4 By: Thomas W. Ferns, NEPA Document Manager, Richland Operations Office, and Yardena Mansoor, Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance A 50-year land-use plan for the Hanford Site? Some said it couldn't be done. Too many factions, they said, with irreconcilably different visions for the future. Would NEPA be a help or a hindrance in developing such a land-use plan? It turns out that the Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan EIS Record of Decision (ROD) (64 FR 61615; November 12, 1999) marks the end of a successful, albeit

240

Microsoft Word - Progress_Report(1st_qtr).doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 2010 to September 30 2010 1 2010 to September 30 2010 Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01 Submitted by: College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Science Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97331 Principal Investigator: Anne M. Trehu Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory November 10, 2010 Oil & Natural Gas Technology 1
 
 Table
of
Contents:
 
 Summary
 2
 Justification
for
modeling
1D
sedimentation
in
the
Andaman
Basin
 3
 Porosity
and
Compaction
 7
 Modeling
 9
 Scenario
1
 11
 Scenario
2
 12
 Scenario
3
 14
 Scenario
4
 15
 Discussion
 17
 References
 18
 Cost
Status
 
 19
 Publications,
Conference
Presentations
and
other
Products


Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report - 1st Quarter FY 1997  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Decisionmakers Decisionmakers States/Local Governm ents Agencies Academ icians Congress Framers of NEPA Drafters of CEQ Regs Native Am erican Tribes La wyers NGOs/ Citizen Groups Businesses Council on Environmental Quality NEPA Effectiveness Study Partners continued next page -- Improved Implementation Needed -- -- DOE Leadership Highlighted -- CEQ Study: NEPA a "Success" Overall National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. Department of Energy Quarterly Report LESSONS LEARNED LESSONS LEARNED For First Quarter FY 1997 March 3, 1997 The President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) issued in January the results of its extensive study on the effectiveness of the National Environmental Policy Act during the statute's 25-year history. From the cover letter by CEQ Chair Kathleen McGinty to its four short appendices, the 50-page booklet entitled The National Environmental

242

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report - 1st Quarter FY 1998  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 1998 1 March 1998 1 continued on page 2 For First Quarter FY 1998 March 2, 1998, Issue No. 14 National Environmental Policy Act N E P A LESSONS LEARNED LESSONS LEARNED U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT Managing Progress on the Repository EIS How to Move a Mountain Tour members approach the entry to the Yucca Mountain Exploratory Studies Facility. The EIS Management Council, along with members and technical advisors of the EIS Preparation Team, visited the site in January while participating in briefings on technical, legal, and policy issues. How do you manage preparation of a major EIS that is important to five Program Offices, four Field Offices, and other Federal agencies, not to mention a wide array of stakeholders? How do you address extremely complex and

243

1st Year Orientation 2013-14 Farid N. Najm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in many exciting things to come in mobile, internet, sensors, HCI, energy, biology, medicine) Registration and Schedules Academic and Program Advising Counselling and Referrals Contact: Jennifer Fabro

Prodiæ, Aleksandar

244

Baby Come Back - Volume 4, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Baby Come Back is the final installment in the 'Baby Series'. This novella follows Treys brother Tristan and Tys best friend Gina. It is written from Gina's point of view, providing insight into her past and secrets that she has shared with no one. Unfortunately, ...

Andrea Smith, Tami Norman, Janell Parque

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

1st International Requirements Engineering Efficiency Workshop REEW 2011.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Requirements engineering research has for a long time focused on specification quality, leading to recommendations of how to engineer perfect requirements specifications. Practitioners, however, do (more)

Fricker, Samuel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Microsoft PowerPoint - 1st Quarter 2009 Presentation - Final...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

identify preferred nitrate treatment media. Evaluating two pilot-scale cells: inert (plastic) media fed liquid carbon source and corn stover. Status: Construction completed,...

247

NS&T Managment Observations - 1st Quarter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of managements observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&Ts MOP.

David Gianotto

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Instant Design: Fundamentals of Autodesk Inventor 2010, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combining theoretical information with hands-on applications, Instant Design, Fundamentals of Autodesk Inventor 2010, provides a quick and easy-to-understand introduction to the basics of part and assembly creation from sketch to production drawings. ...

Stephen J. Ethier; Christine A. Ethier; Autodesk Autodesk

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Autodesk Revit Architecture 2010 in Practice, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Autodesk Revit Architecture software provides building information modeling (BIM) data that allows you to design buildings with modeling and drafting elements. This book provides basic, step-by-step instructions for getting started and using the Revit ...

Kogent Inc.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Premiere Pro CC Digital Classroom, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Complete Training Package!Full-color, step-by-step instructional bookVideo training from expert instructorsTutorials and lesson files on companion DVDYou have a personal tutor in the Digital ClassroomIf you want expert instruction that fits into your ...

Jerron Smith / AGI Creative Team

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Data Architecture: From Zen to Reality, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data is an expensive and expansive asset. Information capture has forced storage capacity from megabytes to terabytes, exabytes and, pretty soon, zetabytes of data. So the need for accessible storage space for this data is great. To make this huge amount ...

Charles Tupper

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

1st TECCS meeting, 26th April 2007 Adsorption Refrigeration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TECCS meeting, 26th April 2007 Adsorption refrigerators and heat pumps These machines ADsorb cycles for: Heat pumps Refrigerators Air conditioning Driven by heat from: Fossil fuels Bio fuels Waste of concept forced convection adsorption machine [#1] · Generating temperature 225° C · Heat rejection

Davies, Christopher

253

New Hampshire's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cate Street Capital Inc Environmental Power Corp Eolian Renewable Energy LLC Freedom Energy Logistics JP Sercel Associates Inc Microgy Financial Services Inc Teletrol Systems Inc...

254

class rooms H.R. Bright Building 1st  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cao Cheng Cao Yixin Choi Jinho Chung Jiryang Creel James Crosby Ralph Duncan Brittany Fan Jia-hao Guo Elena Rodriguez #12;115 129 423D 423C 115 115 423B 423A (Welch) 115 115 419D 419C H.R. Bright Building

255

Cloud Computing: Theory and Practice, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cloud Computing: Theory and Practice provides students and IT professionals with an in-depth analysis of the cloud from the ground up. Beginning with a discussion of parallel computing and architectures and distributed systems, the book turns to contemporary ...

Dan C. Marinescu

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

West Virginia's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West Virginia. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWestVirginia%27s1stcongressionaldistrict&oldid191133...

257

1st workshop on diffusion networks and cascade analytics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diffusion and cascades have been studied for many years in sociology, and different theoretical models have been developed. However, experimental validation has been always carried out in relatively small datasets. In recent years, with the availability ... Keywords: cascade modeling, diffusion networks

Peng Cui; Fei Wang; Hanghang Tong; Manuel Gomez Rodriguez

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

awarded to four deserving future water environment professionals: 1st  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, studying the use of ultrafiltration mem- branes as a tertiary-treatment option for wastewater reuse treatment processes and storage conditions on endocrine-dis- rupting compounds (EDCs) in biosolids, using work in water provision and sanitation in southeast Asia. Joel hopes to continue focusing on wastewater

Ellis, Randy

259

Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation - 1st Quarter 2014 (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Practitioner's Guide to Data Quality Improvement, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Business problems are directly related to missed data quality expectations. Flawed information production processes introduce risks preventing the successful achievement of critical business objectives. However, these flaws are mitigated through data ...

David Loshin

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

GPU Computing Gems Emerald Edition, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are designed to be parallel - having hundreds of cores versus traditional CPUs. Increasingly, you can leverage GPU power for any computationally-intense operation - not just for graphics. If you're facing the challenge ...

Wen-mei W. Hwu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Grounded Innovation: Strategies for Creating Digital Products, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

How will you design the next big thing? And the thing after that? And after that.? This book can help, by providing practical techniques for the innovation process which consists of invention and investigation. Smart products are popping up everywhere ...

Lars Erik Holmquist

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

2010 1st Annual CEFRC Conference - Combustion Energy Frontier...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Diagnostics Nils Hansen, Sandia National Laboratories Chemical Kinetics of Combustion Processes Hai Wang, University of Southern California Chemistry and Transport Flame and...

264

Microsoft Word - S07730_1st Qtr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site. LM provides periodic communications through several means, such as this report, Web-based tools, and public meetings. LM prepared the Rocky Flats Site Operations Guide...

265

Annual Energy Outlook 2015 1st Coal Working Group  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

legislative and regulation assumptions in the AEO2015 Reference case (2) 7 * Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR) to replace Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) in AEO2015 if...

266

Annual Energy Outlook 2014 1st Coal Working Group  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or equations from AEO2013 * Legislation and regulations * Retirements and additions * Pollution control retrofits * Coal productivity trends * Projected consumption (CTL),...

267

Software Engineering Reviews and Audits, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate software engineering reviews and audits have become essential to the success of software companies and military and aerospace programs. These reviews and audits define the framework and specific requirements for verifying software development ...

Boyd L. Summers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

GPU Computing Gems Jade Edition, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is the second volume of Morgan Kaufmann's GPU Computing Gems, offering an all-new set of insights, ideas, and practical "hands-on" skills from researchers and developers worldwide. Each chapter gives you a window into the work being performed ...

Wen-mei W. Hwu

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Nanobrain: Making an Intelligent Molecular Machine, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Written for computer scientists, materials scientists, and others in fields related to nanotechnology, this reference explores recent efforts to realize a practical physical device that follows the neural network principles of the brain, incorporating ...

Anirban Bandyopadhyay

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Definition: Independent Power Producer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Producer Producer Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Independent Power Producer Any entity that owns or operates an electricity generating facility that is not included in an electric utility's rate base. This term includes, but is not limited to, cogenerators and small power producers and all other nonutility electricity producers, such as exempt wholesale generators, who sell electricity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition An Independent Power Producer is an entity, which is not a public utility, but which owns facilities to generate electric power for sale to utilities and end users. NUGs may be privately held facilities, corporations, cooperatives such as rural solar or wind energy producers, and non-energy industrial concerns capable of feeding excess energy into

271

Ocean Currents Produced by Evaporation and Precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 September 1933 research-article Ocean Currents Produced by Evaporation and Precipitation G. R. Goldsbrough The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve...

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

On Ocean Currents Produced by Winds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 January 1935 research-article On Ocean Currents Produced by Winds G. R. Goldsbrough The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access...

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Lead in Maple Syrup Produced in Connecticut  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lead in Maple Syrup Produced in Connecticut ... Department of Analytical Chemistry, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, P.O. ... Box 1106, New Haven, Connecticut 06504 ...

David E. Stilwell; Craig L. Musante

1996-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

274

Fracture characteristics and their relationships to producing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

area Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book: Fracture characteristics and their relationships to producing zones in deep wells, Raft River...

275

California: Agricultural Residues Produce Renewable Fuel | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

that validated the viability of this technology platform for producing cellulosic ethanol from corn stover at reasonable yields. The California Energy Commission has awarded...

276

Hydrogenase mimic produces hydrogen under the light  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

about Center Center Video Library Bisfuel Picture Gallery Hydrogenase mimic produces hydrogen under the light 24 Jan 2013 Researchers from the laboratory of Giovanna Ghirlanda...

277

Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transparent, light-harvesting material Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material The material could be used in development of transparent solar panels. November 3,...

278

PRODUCER -SCROUNGER GAME n-Person Game  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

size, ESS frequency of scrounging Assumptions of Producer-Scrounger Game Fix group (or population size Producer invades Scrounger n-Person Game with ESS q* : 0 ESS ** q P q S dq dW dq dW ESS frequency of scrounger

Caraco, Thomas

279

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 ii This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 iii The Financial Reporting System, 1977-1993 diskette is available from the Energy Information Administration.

280

Why Sequencea Biogas-Producing Microbial Community?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a Biogas-Producing Microbial Community? a Biogas-Producing Microbial Community? The world population is steadily growing, and so is the amount of waste produced by human activity. For example, an estimated 236 million tons of municipal solid waste are produced annually in the U.S., 50% of which is biomass. At the same time, energy sources are rapidly depleting. Converting organic waste to renewable biofuel by anaerobic digestion hence represents one appealing option to mitigate this problem. Biogas is a natural by-product of the decomposition of organic matter in an oxygen-free environment and comprises primarily methane and carbon dioxide. This naturally occurring process has been known for more than a century. More recently, it has been gaining importance as more efficient anaerobic digestion technologies have been developed to treat and recover energy (in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

California: Agricultural Residues Produce Renewable Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Logos Technologies and EERE are partnering with Edeniq of Visalia to build a plant that will produce cellulosic ethanol from switchgrass, wood chips, and corn leaves, stalks, and husks--all plentiful, nonfood feedstock sources in California.

282

Ex Parte Communications- Uranium Producers of America  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On Thursday, February 12, 2015, representatives from the Uranium Producers of America (UPA) met with the Department of Energy (DOE) officials to discuss the management of the federal excess...

283

Producing X-rays at the APS  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

None

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

284

Methods and systems for producing syngas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and systems are provided for producing syngas utilizing heat from thermochemical conversion of a carbonaceous fuel to support decomposition of at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells. Simultaneous decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells may be employed to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A portion of oxygen produced from at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells is fed at a controlled flow rate in a gasifier or combustor to oxidize the carbonaceous fuel to control the carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide ratio produced.

Hawkes, Grant L; O'Brien, James E; Stoots, Carl M; Herring, J. Stephen; McKellar, Michael G; Wood, Richard A; Carrington, Robert A; Boardman, Richard D

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

285

Washing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics, Acts of Congress of May 8, 1914, as amended, and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the United...

Scott, Amanda

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Washing of the Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the willows in the name of flood control. LISSA And when aredeluge, downpour, or flood. You are my mugwort. LISSAarea, summer camp, and flood control basin--a floor wax and

Renner, Marcus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the reactor. Batch tests were conducted to examine naphthenic acid biodegradability under several conditions. The conditions used were seed from the anaerobic reactor, wetland sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and a sterile control. The naphthenic acid was from a commercial source isolated from Gulf Coast petroleum as was dosed at 2 mg/mL. The incubations were for 30 days at 30 C. The results showed that the naphthenic acids were not biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, but were degraded under aerobic conditions. Despite poor performance of the anaerobic reactor, it remains likely that anaerobic treatment of acetate, toluene, and, potentially, other produced-water components is feasible.

John R. Gallagher

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

How is shale gas produced? | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

How is shale gas produced? How is shale gas produced? How is shale gas produced? More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary...

289

Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

Ren, Zhifen (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian Guo (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Y. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Li, Wenzhi (Brookline, MA)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

290

Solid fuel volatilization to produce synthesis gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method comprising contacting a carbon and hydrogen-containing solid fuel and a metal-based catalyst in the presence of oxygen to produce hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide gas, wherein the contacting occurs at a temperature sufficiently high to prevent char formation in an amount capable of stopping production of the hydrogen gas and the carbon monoxide gas is provided. In one embodiment, the metal-based catalyst comprises a rhodium-cerium catalyst. Embodiments further include a system for producing syngas. The systems and methods described herein provide shorter residence time and high selectivity for hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

Schmidt, Lanny D.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.; Degenstein, Nick J.; Dreyer, Brandon J.; Colby, Joshua L.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

291

FAQ 7-How is depleted uranium produced?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? Depleted uranium is produced during the uranium enrichment process. In the United States, uranium is enriched through the gaseous diffusion process in which the compound uranium hexafluoride (UF6) is heated and converted from a solid to a gas. The gas is then forced through a series of compressors and converters that contain porous barriers. Because uranium-235 has a slightly lighter isotopic mass than uranium-238, UF6 molecules made with uranium-235 diffuse through the barriers at a slightly higher rate than the molecules containing uranium-238. At the end of the process, there are two UF6 streams, with one stream having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the other. The stream having the greater uranium-235 concentration is referred to as enriched UF6, while the stream that is reduced in its concentration of uranium-235 is referred to as depleted UF6. The depleted UF6 can be converted to other chemical forms, such as depleted uranium oxide or depleted uranium metal.

292

Do hormonal control systems produce evolutionary inertia?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...A2006Neural crest cells and the community of plan for craniofacial development: historical...Rev. Ecol. Evol. 38, 793-817. Review. Do hormonal control systems produce evolutionary...Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S. Review | 0 Gonadal Steroid Hormones | Animals...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

6, 1006310086, 2006 Lightning-produced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with lightning flash data from the Canadian Lightning Detection Network and Environment Canada Doppler radar measurements, the pro-15 duction of NO2 molecules per lightning flash is determined. Using these two methodsACPD 6, 10063­10086, 2006 Lightning-produced NO2 observed at Vanscoy, SK A. Fraser et al. Title

294

SOVIETS BUILD MACHINES TO PRODUCE KRILL PASTE'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EUROPE SOVIETS BUILD MACHINES TO PRODUCE KRILL PASTE' The Soviet Federal Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography ( V N I R 0) has built machines for production of a protein- rich paste from protein paste from Black Sea shrimp. Each machine, operated by 2 people, has a processing capacity of 1

295

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The information and analyses in Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers is intended to provide a critical review, and promote an understanding, of the possible motivations and apparent consequences of investment decisions made by some of the largest corporations in the energy industry.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE funded study was performed to evaluate the potential for treatment and beneficial reuse of produced water from the San Ardo oilfield in Monterey County, CA. The potential benefits of a successful full-scale implementation of this project include improvements in oil production efficiency and additional recoverable oil reserves as well as the addition of a new reclaimed water resource. The overall project was conducted in two Phases. Phase I identified and evaluated potential end uses for the treated produced water, established treated water quality objectives, reviewed regulations related to treatment, transport, storage and use of the treated produced water, and investigated various water treatment technology options. Phase II involved the construction and operation of a small-scale water treatment pilot facility to evaluate the process's performance on produced water from the San Ardo oilfield. Cost estimates for a potential full-scale facility were also developed. Potential end uses identified for the treated water include (1) agricultural use near the oilfield, (2) use by Monterey County Water Resources Agency (MCWRA) for the Salinas Valley Water Project or Castroville Seawater Intrusion Project, (3) industrial or power plant use in King City, and (4) use for wetlands creation in the Salinas Basin. All of these uses were found to have major obstacles that prevent full-scale implementation. An additional option for potential reuse of the treated produced water was subsequently identified. That option involves using the treated produced water to recharge groundwater in the vicinity of the oil field. The recharge option may avoid the limitations that the other reuse options face. The water treatment pilot process utilized: (1) warm precipitation softening to remove hardness and silica, (2) evaporative cooling to meet downstream temperature limitations and facilitate removal of ammonia, and (3) reverse osmosis (RO) for removal of dissolved salts, boron, and organics. Pilot study results indicate that produced water from the San Ardo oilfield can be treated to meet project water quality goals. Approximately 600 mg/l of caustic and 100 mg/l magnesium dosing were required to meet the hardness and silica goals in the warm softening unit. Approximately 30% of the ammonia was removed in the cooling tower; additional ammonia could be removed by ion exchange or other methods if necessary. A brackish water reverse osmosis membrane was effective in removing total dissolved solids and organics at all pH levels evaluated; however, the boron treatment objective was only achieved at a pH of 10.5 and above.

Robert A. Liske

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995 ii To download the Financial Reporting System 1977-1995 data files, access the Energy Information Center's FTP site, at ftp: //ftp.eia.doe.gov or access the Energy Information Administration's Home Page at http://www.eia.doe.gov.

298

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996 January 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996 ii The Financial Reporting System 1977-1996 data files can be downloaded from the Energy Information

299

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997 January 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997 ii The Financial Reporting System 1977-1997 data files can be downloaded from the Energy Information Administration's

300

The potential of algae blooms to produce renewable gaseous fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ulva lactuca (commonly known as sea letuce) is a green sea weed which dominates Green Tides or algae blooms. Green Tides are caused by excess nitrogen from agriculture and sewage outfalls resulting in eutrophication in shallow estuaries. Samples of U. lactuca were taken from the Argideen estuary in West Cork on two consecutive years. In year 1 a combination of three different processes/pretreatments were carried out on the Ulva. These include washing, wilting and drying. Biomethane potential (BMP) assays were carried out on the samples. Fresh Ulva has a biomethane yield of 183LCH4/kgVS. For dried, washed and macerated Ulva a BMP of 250LCH4/kgVS was achieved. The resource from the estuary in West Cork was shown to be sufficient to provide fuel to 264 cars on a year round basis. Mono-digestion of Ulva may be problematic; the C:N ratio is low and the sulphur content is high. In year 2 co-digestion trials with dairy slurry were carried out. These indicate a potential increase in biomethane output by 17% as compared to mono-digestion of Ulva and slurry.

E. Allen; J. Browne; S. Hynes; J.D. Murphy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Products Produced in Countries Other Than Iran  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

April 25, 2013 April 25, 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 The eighth in a series of reports required by section 1245 (d) (4) (A) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 April 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products Produced in Countries Other Than Iran 1 Table of Contents March - April 2013 Update ........................................................................................................................... 2 Tables ............................................................................................................................................................ 4 Figures ......................................................................................................................................................... 10

302

Producing and Marketing High-Value Calves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carcasses. Oklahoma State University (Smith et al., 2000) and University of Arkansas (Troxel et al., 2001) researchers conducted livestock market surveys to determine factors that affect value in feeder cattle. Their data indicate that small... cattle that will produce calves with adequate muscling. Body condition. The Oklahoma study found that thin cattle received discounts of $9 to $10 per cwt when compared to cattle of average condition, and that fat cattle received discounts of $6...

Cleere, Jason; Boleman, Larry L.

2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

303

Process for producing furan from furfural aldehyde  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of producing furan and derivatives thereof is disclosed. The process includes generating furfural aldehyde vapors and then passing those vapors over a zeolite catalyst at a temperature and for a residence time effective to decarbonylate the furfural aldehydes to form furans and derivatives thereof. The resultant furan vapors and derivatives are then separated. In a preferred form, the furfural aldehyde vapors are generated during the process of converting biomass materials to liquid and gaseous fuels.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Method and apparatus for producing cryogenic targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method and apparatus are given for producing cryogenic inertially driven fusion targets in the fast isothermal freezing (FIF) method. Improved coupling efficiency and greater availability of volume near the target for diagnostic purposes and for fusion driver beam propagation result. Other embodiments include a new electrical switch and a new explosive detonator, all embodiments making use of a purposeful heating by means of optical fibers.

Murphy, James T. (Los Alamos, NM); Miller, John R. (Penfield, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed from 1 April 2003 to 30 September 2003 and recommends the tasks to be performed during Phase II (Pilot Evaluation). During this period discussions were held with various water agencies regarding use of the treated produced water either directly or indirectly through a water trading arrangement. In particular, several discussions were held with Monterey County Water Resources Agency, that has been charged with the long-term management and preservation of water resources in Monterey County. The Agency is very supportive of the program. However, they would like to see water quality/cost estimate data for the treated produced water from the pilot study prior to evaluating water use/water trade options. The agency sent a letter encouraging the project team to perform the pilot study to evaluate feasibility of the project. In addition, the regulations related to use of the treated water for various applications were updated during this period. Finally, the work plan, health and safety plan and sample analyses plan for performing pilot study to treat the oilfield produced water were developed during this period.

Robert A. Liske

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

306

Method of producing a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulose-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

Dees, H.C.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

307

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001 January 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration

308

High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

Ljungdahl, Lars G. (Athens, GA); Carriera, Laura H. (Athens, GA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

Ljungdahl, L.G.; Carriera, L.H.

1983-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

310

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1989 is the thirteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments, with particular reference to the 23 major energy companies (the FRS companies'') required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, and other energy operations. Domestic and international operations are examined separately in this report. It also traces key developments affecting the financial performance of major energy companies in 1989, as well as review of important trends.

Not Available

1991-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

311

Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400 C to about 600 C at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1--3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof. 16 figs.

Agblevor, F.A.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Method of producing .beta.-spodumene bodies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Beta-spodumene bodies and method of preparing the bodies that involves providing a uniform plastic batch of inorganic raw materials, organic binder, and vehicle, wherein the inorganic raw materials are composed of, in percent by weight, about 75% to 95% minerals, and about 5% to 25% glass. The batch is formed into a green body that is fired to produce a body composed substantially of beta-spodumene, and having a thermal expansion coefficient of <10.times.10.sup.-7 /.degree.C.(0-800.degree. C.), and a strength of .gtoreq.4 Ksi.

Chyung, Kenneth (Painted Post, NY); Day, J. Paul (Big Flats, NY); Holleran, Louis M. (Big Flats, NY); Olszewski, Anthony R. (Bath, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Carbene reactions produced by recoil excitation methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLUORINE REACTIONS IN THE CH2F2-OLEFIN-02 SYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~ . ~ . ~ . . 44 V-2, RELATIVE YIELDS OF PRODUCTS FROM SCAVENGED AND NON-SCAVENGED CH2C12 SYSTEMS RELATIVE YIELDS OF PRODUCTS FROM SCAVENGED AND NON-SCAVENGED CH3C1 SYSTEMS.... and phosphorus 6 produced by recoil methods. Carbene Chemistry ~Bk d. Carbenes are 'species which have a carbon atom that is directly bonded to only two other atoms by single bonds. This divalent char- acter of carbenes was fi. rst observed by Dumas...

Lowery, Kirby

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

314

Method of producing particulate-reinforced composites and composties produced thereby  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing particle-reinforced composite materials through utilization of an in situ reaction to produce a uniform dispersion of a fine particulate reinforcement phase. The process includes forming a melt of a first material, and then introducing particles of a second material into the melt and subjecting the melt to high-intenisty acoustic vibration. A chemical reaction initiates between the first and second materials to produce reaction products in the melt. The reaciton products comprise a solide particulate phase, and the high-intensity acoustic vibration fragments and/or separates the reaction products into solid particles that are dispersed in the melt and are smaller than the particles of the second material. Also encompassed are particles-reinforced composite materials produced by such a process.

Han, Qingyou; Liu, Zhiwei

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

315

Method for producing and treating coal gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of generating a de-sulphurized volatile matter and a relatively low Btu gas includes the initial step of pyrolyzing coal to produce volatile matter and a char. The volatile matter is fed to a first de-sulphurizer containing a de-sulphurizing agent to remove sulphur therefrom. At the same time, the char is gasified to produce a relatively low Btu gas. The low Btu gas is fed to a second de-sulphurizer containing the de-sulphurizing agent to remove sulphur therefrom. A regenerator is provided for removing sulphur from the de-sulphurizing agent. Portions of the de-sulphurizing agent are moved among the first de-sulphurizer, the second de-sulphurizer, and the regenerator such that the regenerator regenerates the de-sulphurizing agent. Preferably, the portions of the de-sulphurizing agent are moved from the second de-sulphurizer to the first de-sulphurizer, from the first de-sulphurizer to the regenerator, and from the regenerator to the second de-sulphurizer.

Calderon, Albert (P.O. Box 126, Bowling Green, OH 43402)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

A Laboratory Method of Producing High Potentials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Details are given of the experimental arrangement by which, using Tesla coils in oil, very high potentials have been produced and measured. Excited at the rate of 120 sparks per second Tesla coils have been operated at 3,000,000 volts in ordinary transformer oil at atmospheric pressure. In oil under a pressure of 500 pounds per square inch, voltages as high as 5,200,000 have been produced with intermittent excitation. These voltages (peak values) are measured by a simple capacity-potentiometer, in which an insulated electrode "picks up" a known fraction of the total voltage, this fractional voltage being measured by means of a sphere gap. Measurements are given of the voltage-distribution along Tesla coils. Calculations and measurements of the efficiency and power-output of such coils show that at 120 sparks per second, a coil operating at 5,000,000 volts provides sufficient power, if used to accelerate helium nuclei in a suitable vacuum-tube, to yield the equivalent of about 2,600 grams of radium.

G. Breit; M. A. Tuve; O. Dahl

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Method for producing small hollow spheres  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing small hollow spheres of glass having an outer diameter ranging from about 100.mu. to about 500.mu. with a substantially uniform wall thickness in the range of about 0.5-20.mu.. The method involves introducing aqueous droplets of a glass-forming solution into a long vertical drop oven or furnace having varying temperature regions. In one embodiment, one of the temperature regions is lower than both the preceeding region and the subsequent region. One region utilizes a temperature of at least 200.degree. C. higher than the melting point of the glass-forming material in the solution and, for example, may be at least 3 times higher than the temperature of the preceeding region. In addition, there is a sharp temperature gradient between these regions. As each droplet of solution passes through a first region it forms into a gel membrane having a spherical shape and encapsulates the rest of the drop retained in the elastic outer surface and the water entrapped within diffuses rapidly through the thin gel membrane which causes more of the glass-forming material to go out of solution and is incorporated into the gel membrane causing it to grow in size and become hollow. thus produced hollow glass sphere has a sphericity, concentricity, and wall uniformity of better than 5%. The sphere is capable of retaining material of up to at least 100 atmospheres therein over long periods of time. In one embodiment.

Rosencwaig, Allen (Danville, CA); Koo, Jackson C. (San Ramon, CA); Dressler, John L. (Spring Valley, OH)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Green method to produce propylene oxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Materials Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials U.S. Department of Energy Search CNM ... Search Argonne Home > Center for Nanoscale Materials > CNM Home About CNM Research Facilities People For Users Publications News & Highlights News Research Highlights Newsletters CNM Images on Flickr Events Jobs CNM Users Organization Contact Us Other DOE Nanoscale Science Research Centers Green method to produce propylene oxide conversion of propylene to polyene oxide via silver nanoclusters Simulation of propylene to propylene oxide conversion via silver nanoclusters supported on an alumina surface. Propylene oxide is an important chemical whose current industrial production is energy intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Attempts to solve this problem by using catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with

319

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore. The project was directed by Mark E. Rodekohr, Director of the Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (202) 586-1441, and Mary E. Northup, Chief of

320

Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transparent, light-harvesting material Transparent, light-harvesting material Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material The material could be used in development of transparent solar panels. November 3, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact James E. Rickman Communications Office (505) 665-9203

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Integrated structural repair of a producing FPSO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The state of the art in FPSO design is advancing rapidly. The long-term reliability of FPSO systems has improved as maintenance issues, have received greater emphasis in both new-builds and conversions. Despite this new emphasis, problems will still arise and repairs will still be required. Ultimately, the ability of any FPSO to stay on location and on production will depend on the scope of repairs which can be economically performed in-situ. In 1994 and 1995, Marathon Petroleum Indonesia Limited (MPIL) performed an in-situ repair on the FPSO Kakap Natuna. The scope and complexity of this work suggests there are few, if any, limits on in-situ structural repairs which can be successfully performed on a producing FPSO. The use of an integrated execution strategy for the repairs greatly reduced their cost.

Johnson, P.R. [Marathon Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States); Smith, T.A. [Aker Omega Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The economics of producing biodiesel from algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for conventional diesel that is made from natural plant oils, animal fats, and waste cooking oils. This paper discusses the economics of producing biodiesel fuel from algae grown in open ponds. There is potential for large-scale production of biodiesel from algal farms on non-arable land; however, previous studies have failed to demonstrate an economically viable process that could be scalable to a commercialized industry. The problems include inconsistent and insufficient algal productivities, uncertain capital and operating costs, volatile market prices and unknown levels of government support. Although intensive work is being done on many technological issues, the economic studies and data are incomplete and out of date. This paper presents an updated financial analysis of the production and economic conditions that could have a profound effect on the success of this important alternative fuel production process.

Brian J. Gallagher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

System and method for producing metallic iron  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hearth furnace for producing metallic iron material has a furnace housing having a drying/preheat zone, a conversion zone, a fusion zone, and optionally a cooling zone, the conversion zone is between the drying/preheat zone and the fusion zone. A moving hearth is positioned within the furnace housing. A hood or separation barrier within at least a portion of the conversion zone, fusion zone or both separates the fusion zone into an upper region and a lower region with the lower region adjacent the hearth and the upper region adjacent the lower region and spaced from the hearth. An injector introduces a gaseous reductant into the lower region adjacent the hearth. A combustion region may be formed above the hood or separation barrier.

Bleifuss, Rodney L; Englund, David J; Iwasaki, Iwao; Fosnacht, Donald R; Brandon, Mark M; True, Bradford G

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

324

Plasma treatment for producing electron emitters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Plasma treatment for producing carbonaceous field emission electron emitters is disclosed. A plasma of ions is generated in a closed chamber and used to surround the exposed surface of a carbonaceous material. A voltage is applied to an electrode that is in contact with the carbonaceous material. This voltage has a negative potential relative to a second electrode in the chamber and serves to accelerate the ions toward the carbonaceous material and provide an ion energy sufficient to etch the exposed surface of the carbonaceous material but not sufficient to result in the implantation of the ions within the carbonaceous material. Preferably, the ions used are those of an inert gas or an inert gas with a small amount of added nitrogen.

Coates, Don Mayo (Santa Fe, NM); Walter, Kevin Carl (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 is the seventeenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 25 major US energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major liens of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the US and abroad. This year`s report analyzes financial and operating developments for 1993 (Part 1: Developments in 1993) and also reviews key developments during the 20 years following the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973--1974 (Part 2: Major Energy Company Strategies Since the Arab Oil Embargo). 49 figs., 104 tabs.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Automated apparatus for producing gradient gels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for producing a gradient gel which serves as a standard medium for a two-dimensional analysis of proteins, the gel having a density gradient along its height formed by a variation in gel composition, with the apparatus including first and second pumping means each including a plurality of pumps on a common shaft and driven by a stepping motor capable of providing small incremental changes in pump outputs for the gel ingredients, the motors being controlled, by digital signals from a digital computer, a hollow form or cassette for receiving the gel composition, means for transferring the gel composition including a filler tube extending near the bottom of the cassette, adjustable horizontal and vertical arms for automatically removing and relocating the filler tube in the next cassette, and a digital computer programmed to automatically control the stepping motors, arm movements, and associated sensing operations involving the filling operation.

Anderson, Norman L. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Broadband microwave burst produced by electron beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical and experimental study of fast electron beams attracts a lot of attention in the astrophysics and laboratory. In the case of solar flares the problem of reliable beam detection and diagnostics is of exceptional importance. This paper explores the fact that the electron beams moving oblique to the magnetic field or along the field with some angular scatter around the beam propagation direction can generate microwave continuum bursts via gyrosynchrotron mechanism. The characteristics of the microwave bursts produced by beams differ from those in case of isotropic or loss-cone distributions, which suggests a new tool for quantitative diagnostics of the beams in the solar corona. To demonstrate the potentiality of this tool, we analyze here a radio burst occurred during an impulsive flare 1B/M6.7 on 10 March 2001 (AR 9368, N27W42). Based on detailed analysis of the spectral, temporal, and spatial relationships, we obtained firm evidence that the microwave continuum burst is produced by electron beams. For the first time we developed and applied a new forward fitting algorithm based on exact gyrosynchrotron formulae and employing both the total power and polarization measurements to solve the inverse problem of the beam diagnostics. We found that the burst is generated by a oblique beam in a region of reasonably strong magnetic field ($\\sim 200-300$ G) and the burst is observed at a quasi-transverse viewing angle. We found that the life time of the emitting electrons in the radio source is relatively short, $\\tau_l \\approx 0.5$ s, consistent with a single reflection of the electrons from a magnetic mirror at the foot point with the stronger magnetic field. We discuss the implications of these findings for the electron acceleration in flares and for beam diagnostics.

A. T. Altyntsev; G. D. Fleishman; G. -L. Huang; V. F. Melnikov

2007-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

328

Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cancer therapy gets a boost from new isotope Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium A new medical isotope project shows promise for rapidly producing major...

329

Biological pretreatment of produced water for reuse applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry represents a significant waste stream in the United States. Produced water is characterized by high levels of (more)

Kwon, Soondong, 1973-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Jefferson Lab's upgraded Free-Electron Laser produces first ligh...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

upgraded Free-Electron Laser produces first light June 18, 2003 Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility have produced first...

331

Neutrons Reveal New Electrocatalyst Family for Producing Hydrogen...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

systems currently in use. Summary Most renewable energy is produced in the form of electricity, which is expensive to store and transport in large quantities. Producing hydrogen...

332

Lattice Distortions and Oxygen Vacancies Produced in Au+-Irradiated...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lattice Distortions and Oxygen Vacancies Produced in Au+-Irradiated Nanocrystalline Cubic Zirconia. Lattice Distortions and Oxygen Vacancies Produced in Au+-Irradiated...

333

ASEM Green Independent Power Producers Network | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ASEM Green Independent Power Producers Network Jump to: navigation, search Name: ASEM Green Independent Power Producers Network Place: Germany Sector: Renewable Energy Product: A...

334

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biodiesel Producer Tax Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund A biodiesel producer may apply for a refund of Iowa state sales or use taxes paid on purchases. To qualify, the producer must be registered with

335

Process for producing large grain cadmium telluride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for producing a cadmium telluride polycrystalline film having grain sizes greater than about 20 {micro}m. The process comprises providing a substrate upon which cadmium telluride can be deposited and placing that substrate within a vacuum chamber containing a cadmium telluride effusion cell. A polycrystalline film is then deposited on the substrate through the steps of evacuating the vacuum chamber to a pressure of at least 10{sup {minus}6} torr.; heating the effusion cell to a temperature whereat the cell releases stoichiometric amounts of cadmium telluride usable as a molecular beam source for growth of grains on the substrate; heating the substrate to a temperature whereat a stoichiometric film of cadmium telluride can be deposited; and releasing cadmium telluride from the effusion cell for deposition as a film on the substrate. The substrate then is placed in a furnace having an inert gas atmosphere and heated for a sufficient period of time at an annealing temperature whereat cadmium telluride grains on the substrate grow to sizes greater than about 20 {micro}m.

Hasoon, F.S.; Nelson, A.J.

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

336

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

337

Co-Produced Geothermal Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Produced Geothermal Systems Produced Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps Dictionary.png Co-Produced Geothermal System: Co-Produced water is the water that is produced as a by-product during oil and gas production. If there is enough water produced at a high enough temperature co-produced water can be utilized for electricity production. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle General Air Cooled Co-Produced geothermal system demonstration at RMOTC oil site.

338

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biodiesel Producer Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax Municipalities, counties, or school districts producing biodiesel must file a return documenting their biodiesel production activities and pay $0.03 of

339

NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information, (2) a web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries, (3) a fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water, and (4) a corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project has been focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collection of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 4000 entries for southeast New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices (Stiff-Davis and Oddo-Thomson) to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (11) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (12) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (13) Cleanup and integration of water quality databases. (14) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung; Naomi Davidson; Ajeet Kumar Reddy; Mingzhen Wei

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) Databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information. (2) A web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries. (3) A fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water. (4) A corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project was focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collecting of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 7000 entries for New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (1) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (2) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (3) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (Macrobatch) 6 have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The Pu, Sr, and Cs results from the current Macrobatch 6 samples are similar to those from comparable samples in previous Macrobatch 5. In addition the SEHT and DSSHT heel samples (i.e. preliminary) have been analyzed and reported to meet NGS Demonstration Plan requirements. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous samples. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST has increased in ARP at the higher free hydroxide concentrations in the current feed.

Peters, T. B.

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

342

Structural and immunological characterization of a biosurfactant produced by Bacillus licheniformis JF-2.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1 B. LICHENIFORMIS JF-2 SURFACTANT 33 96.6 uJO z 60 V l'0...deionized water 10 times; washing was followed by the addition...Since the concentration of the surfactant in the fermentation broth...0 B. LICHENIFORMIS JF-2 SURFACTANT 35 Glu Leu Fatty Fatty Acid...

S C Lin; M A Minton; M M Sharma; G Georgiou

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Second Generation Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit

344

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS by Elliott Paul Barnhart ..................................................................................14 Ability of the Consortium to Produce Methane from Coal and Metabolites ................16.............................................................................................21 Coal and Methane Production

Maxwell, Bruce D.

345

SABIC's Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Material used to Produce the...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SABIC's Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Material used to Produce the World's First 3D-Printed Vehicle at IMTS 2014 SABIC's Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Material used to Produce the World's...

346

EWO Meeting March 2013 Reliable Produc.on Planning of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by regions - ProducIon capacity of each plant and its producIon costs - Availability of key raw material - Inventory holding costs, inventory capacity, and ini - SaIsfy customer demand across all markets - Achieve mass balance across

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

347

Factors Affecting Cotton Producers' Choice of Marketing Outlet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, changes in government policies, supply and demand fundamentals and price patterns in the cotton market have led to several shifts in how producers market their cotton. This thesis examined producer cash marketing choices, including...

Pace, Jason 1979-

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

348

Functionally gradient titanium-aluminide composites produced by laser cladding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The laser surface cladding of Ti-Al/TiB2...composites was investigated as a means of producing a functionally gradient material on a commercially pure Ti substrate. Single and double layers were produced. The pro...

J. H. Abboud; D. R. F. West; R. D. Rawlings

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

How Much Energy Does Each State Produce? | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Much Energy Does Each State Produce? How Much Energy Does Each State Produce? Energy Production in Trillion Btu: 2012 Click on each state to learn more about how much energy it...

350

USA Biomass Power Producers Alliance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Producers Alliance Producers Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Name USA Biomass Power Producers Alliance Place Sacramento, California Sector Biomass Product National trade association of biomass power producers in US. References USA Biomass Power Producers Alliance[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. USA Biomass Power Producers Alliance is a company located in Sacramento, California . References ↑ "USA Biomass Power Producers Alliance" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=USA_Biomass_Power_Producers_Alliance&oldid=352626" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages

351

Low-Temperature and Co-Produced Resources Fact Sheet  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fact sheet on the U.S. Department of Energy's low-temperature and co-produced resources program area.

352

Cracking catalyst and method of producing the same  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This invention relates to exchanged ammoniated cogels having improved catalytic activity and process for producing the same.

Alafandi, H.; Stamires, D.

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

353

Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame. 1 fig.

Salyer, I.O.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

354

Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

355

Method for Producing Flame Retardant Porous Products and Products Produced Thereby  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

356

Neutron producing target for accelerator based neutron source for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

247 Neutron producing target for accelerator based neutron source for NCT V. Belov1 , S. Fadeev1, Russia Summary Neutron producing targets for novel accelerator based neutron source [1, 2] are presented Neutron producing target is one of the main elements of proposed accelerator based facility for neutron

Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

357

ccsd00001732, Development behavior of liquid plasma produced by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water with a melted NaCl is used as a test liquid. The liquid plasma is produced by the fundamental waveccsd­00001732, version 2 ­ 7 Nov 2004 Development behavior of liquid plasma produced by YAG laser the hazardous material called the environment material. Then, the plasma produced in liquid by the laser light

358

NETL: Releases & Briefs - Producing hydrogen from water, without  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Producing Hydrogen from Water, without Electrolysis Producing Hydrogen from Water, without Electrolysis Electrochemical potential difference drives the reaction Electrochemical potential difference drives the reaction Researchers at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have patented a "Method of Generating Hydrogen by Catalytic Decomposition of Water." The invention potentially leapfrogs current capital and energy intensive processes that produce hydrogen from fossil fuels or through the electrolysis of water. According to co-inventor Arun Bose, "Hydrogen can be produced by electrolysis, but the high voltage requirements are a commercial barrier. The invention provides a new route for producing hydrogen from water by using mixed proton-electron conducting membranes." Water is

359

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on AddThis.com...

360

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Excise Tax Exemption Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma: Screening for gentle process conditions and antibacterial efficiency on perishable fresh produce  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fresh fruits and vegetables, destined to be eaten raw or minimally processed only, harbor the risk of conveying pathogenic microorganisms. Factors such as weather conditions, which favor survival or growth of microorganisms, and improper handling during cultivation or in the postharvest chain, can contribute to outbreaks of food-borne illness. Application of chemical sanitizers or physical treatments often shows a limited efficiency or does not meet consumer acceptance. Availability of gentle and effective techniques for disinfection of fresh produce, therefore, is highly desirable. Non-thermal gas plasma (NTP) treatment is a promising novel technique to reduce the microbial load on fresh fruits and vegetables. However, knowledge on practical applicability of NTP for fresh fruits and vegetables is very limited. In this study, chlorophyll fluorescence imaging (CFI) was used to elucidate suitable process parameters for application of an atmospheric pressure plasma-jet (kINPen 09, INP Greifswald, Germany) on corn salad, a perishable leafy green. Keeping a distance of 17mm to the plasma-jet, corn salad leaves could be treated for up to 60s at a fixed power (8W) and 5Lmin?1 of argon mixed with 0.1% oxygen. Surface temperature on leaves did never exceed 35.2C. Antibacterial tests were performed on corn salad, cucumber, apple, and tomato and achieved an inactivation of artificially inoculated Escherichia coli DSM 1116 of 4.11.2, 4.70.4, 4.70, and 3.30.9logunits, respectively, after 60s treatment time. Additional tests with a dielectric barrier discharge plasma and indirect plasma treatment within a remote exposure reactor, fed by a microwave induced plasma torch, did not result in equivalent levels of quality retention as observed using the plasma-jet. Industrial relevance Development of gentle non-thermal disinfection methods aims to provide the industry with new tools to actively improve the microbial status of fresh produce beyond the preventive benefits of good hygiene practices and the limited efficacy of post-harvest washing. The presented study shows how cold plasma can be applied to heat-sensitive lettuce leaves without detrimental effects to product quality. The additional microbiological tests offer insights into the antibacterial capacity of cold plasma on different produce surfaces. The results contribute to prompt the development of appropriate large-scale plasma sources to establish a new plasma-based sanitation technique for fresh fruits and vegetables, which should also be implementable into running process lines.

Matthias Baier; Mandy Grgen; Jrg Ehlbeck; Dietrich Knorr; Werner B. Herppich; Oliver Schlter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

4th Quarter 2009/1st Quarter 20104th Quarter 2009/1st Quarter 2010 Accelerator Radioisotopes Save Lives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cancer therapy Stable Isotopes Inventory Top 10 stable isotopes sold over the last five years: Ca-48, Ga-69, Rb-87, CI-37, Pt-195, Nd-146, Sm-149, Ru-99, Zr-96 Inventory Ac-255 Cancer therapy Brookhaven, smoke detectors, neutron detectors, explosives detectors, environmental tracers, and oil exploration all

363

Produced Water R&D | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Shale Gas » Produced Water Shale Gas » Produced Water R&D Produced Water R&D Developed as a result of lessons learned from the NETL funded demonstration project, the Altela 600 water treatment system (shown above) treats about 25,000 gallons per day of produced and flowback water from hydraulic fracturing. [Photo courtesy of Altela Inc.] Developed as a result of lessons learned from the NETL funded demonstration project, the Altela 600 water treatment system (shown above) treats about 25,000 gallons per day of produced and flowback water from hydraulic fracturing. [Photo courtesy of Altela Inc.] Drilling and fracturing wells produce water along with the natural gas. Some of this water is returned fracture fluid and some is natural formation water. The actual water production of a particular well depends on the well

364

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #600: December 7, 2009 China Produced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0: December 7, 0: December 7, 2009 China Produced More Vehicles than the U.S. in 2008 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #600: December 7, 2009 China Produced More Vehicles than the U.S. in 2008 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #600: December 7, 2009 China Produced More Vehicles than the U.S. in 2008 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #600: December 7, 2009 China Produced More Vehicles than the U.S. in 2008 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #600: December 7, 2009 China Produced More Vehicles than the U.S. in 2008 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #600: December 7, 2009 China Produced More Vehicles than the U.S. in 2008 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #600:

365

Toxic methylmercury-producing microbes more widespread than realized...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

published in Environmental Science and Technology, explains why deadly methylated mercury is produced in areas where the neurotoxin's presence has puzzled researchers for...

366

Sandia National Laboratories: wind turbines produce rated power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbines produce rated power Increasing the Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility's Power Production On April 7, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

367

Organic Agriculture in Oklahoma: Catalysts and Roadblocks for Producers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study surveyed certified and non-certified Oklahoma organic producers to examine their personal and farm characteristics, the reasons cited for their extent of involvement in (more)

Mitchell, Shelley

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

369

Treatment of produced water using chemical and biological unit operations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Water generated along with oil and gas during coal bed methane and oil shale operations is commonly known as produced water, formation water, or oilfield (more)

Li, Liang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Producing Beneficial Materials from Biomass and Biodiesel Byproducts...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Producing Beneficial Materials from Biomass and Biodiesel Byproducts Lawrence Berkeley National...

371

Evaluation of cirrus statistics produced by general circulation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

models for producing climatological cloud statistics by comparing them to the cirrus climatology compiled over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) ARM site. This evaluation includes...

372

Scientists propose a solution to a critical barrier to producing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

could provide essential improvements for future tokamaks that will need to produce self-sustaining fusion reactions, or "burning plasmas," to generate electric power. Such machines...

373

Upgrading of Pitch Produced by Mild Gasification of Subbituminous Cal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Upgrading of Pitch Produced by Mild Gasification of Subbituminous Cal ... Structural Characterization of Coal Tar Pitches Obtained by Heat Treatment under Different Conditions ...

Robert L. McCormick; Mahesh C. Jha

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Geothermal Energy Production with Co-produced and Geopressured...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Geopressured Resources (Fact Sheet), Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) Geothermal Energy Production with Co-produced and Geopressured Resources (Fact Sheet),...

375

Making biomimetic complexes to produce hydrogen fuel | Center...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biomimetic complexes to produce hydrogen fuel 4 Nov 2012 Souvik Roy, graduate student (Subtask 3, laboratory of Anne Jones). "I am involved mostly in mimicking Fe-hydrogenases,...

376

Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for treating a subsurface formation and compositions produced therefrom are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Hunh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

377

RPSEA Final Report Small Producers Program Development Strategies...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Final Report Small Producers Program Development Strategies for Maximizing East Texas Oil Field Production Contract No. 08123-16 July 15, 2014 Fred P. Wang Research Scientist...

378

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, And Caustic Wash Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 4 Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) samples from several of the ?microbatches? of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (?Macrobatch?) 4 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES). Furthermore, samples from the CWT have been analyzed by a variety of methods to investigate a decline in the decontamination factor (DF) of the cesium observed at MCU. The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 3 samples indicate generally consistent operations. There is no indication of a disruption in plutonium and strontium removal. The average cesium DF and concentration factor (CF) for samples obtained from Macrobatch 4 are slightly lower than for Macrobatch 3, but still well within operating parameters. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in Actinide Removal Process (ARP).

Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

379

Photoassisted degradation of pentachlorophenol in a simulated soil washing system containing nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 with LaB codoped TiO2 under visible and solar light irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel method to remediate soil washing contaminants was developed through the utilization of LaB codoped TiO2 (LaBTiO2) nanoparticle in the photocatalysis of a simulated complex system containing hydrophobic pentachlorophenol (PCP) and nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) under visible and solar light irradiation. The photocatalyst synthesized by the solgel hydrothermal process exhibited excellent visible light photocatalytic activity and a modified surface. The investigation of the adsorption kinetics and isotherms showed that the distribution of PCP between the catalyst surface and the bulk solution significantly depended on the initial TX-100 concentration (CTX-0). The formed superficial reactive monolayer at CTX-0 ranging from 0.023 to 0.23mM by the dramatic hydrophobic interactions between the TX-100 moiety and hydrophobic sites on the LaBTiO2 could remarkably capture the target pollutant. The PCP implanted into the hydrophobic space could be removed effectively in the photocatalysis process induced by visible and solar light, ascribing to the facile availability of PCP to the photo-yielded oxidative radicals on the LaBTiO2 surface. Additionally, the preferential decomposition of the incorporated PCP, rather than the TX-100, facilitated the removal of the target contaminant and the recycling of the surfactant, which is beneficial to the practical application of this technique under mild and natural light sources.

J.W. Liu; R. Han; H.T. Wang; Y. Zhao; Z. Chu; H.Y. Wu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Transporting Produce SafelyTransporting Produce Safely etting fresh produce from the field to the market is another step where care must be taken to keep the product safe.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

points for microorganisms that cause disease or hasten spoilage. Ice used in the transport of produceTransporting Produce SafelyTransporting Produce Safely G etting fresh produce from the field contamination of the produce with microorganisms that could cause foodborne illness and also to hold the produce

Liskiewicz, Maciej

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Application of colloidal gas aphron suspensions produced from Sapindus mukorossi for arsenic removal from contaminated soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Colloidal gas aphron dispersions (CGAs) can be described as a system of microbubbles suspended homogenously in a liquid matrix. This work examines the performance of \\{CGAs\\} in comparison to surfactant solutions for washing low levels of arsenic from an iron rich soil. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and saponin, a biodegradable surfactant, obtained from Sapindus mukorossi or soapnut fruit were used for generating \\{CGAs\\} and solutions for soil washing. Column washing experiments were performed in down-flow and up flow modes at a soil pH of 5 and 6 using varying concentration of SDS and soapnut solutions as well as CGAs. Soapnut \\{CGAs\\} removed more than 70% arsenic while SDS \\{CGAs\\} removed up to 55% arsenic from the soil columns in the soil pH range of 56. \\{CGAs\\} and solutions showed comparable performances in all the cases. \\{CGAs\\} were more economical since it contains 35% of air by volume, thereby requiring less surfactant. Micellar solubilization and low pH of soapnut facilitated arsenic desorption from soil column. FT-IR analysis of effluent suggested that soapnut solution did not interact chemically with arsenic thereby facilitating the recovery of soapnut solution by precipitating the arsenic. Damage to soil was minimal arsenic confirmed by metal dissolution from soil surface and SEM micrograph.

Soumyadeep Mukhopadhyay; Sumona Mukherjee; Mohd. Ali Hashim; Bhaskar Sen Gupta

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Making Food, Producing Sustainability Many contemporary approaches to environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making Food, Producing Sustainability Abstract Many contemporary approaches to environmental sustainability focus on the end-consumer. In this panel, we explore lessons from small food producers for future development of HCI as an agency of sustainable ways of being. We argue that attention to the relationship

Parikh, Tapan S.

383

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Funding Source SaskPower State Saskatchewan Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Provider SaskPower The Small Power Producers Program accommodates customers who wish to generate up to 100 kilowatts (kW) of electricity for the purpose of offsetting power that would otherwise be purchased from SaskPower or for selling all of the power generated to SaskPower. At the beginning of the application process, you need to choose between one of two options: Sell all of the power you produce to SaskPower, or sell the

384

Financial News for Major Energy Producers, Third Quarter 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Producers, Third Quarter 2010 Producers, Third Quarter 2010 Release Date: January 5, 2011 Next Release Date: To Be Determined Report Sections: Corporate and Petroleum Net Income Worldwide Oil and Gas Production Operations Worldwide Refining/Marketing Operations Worldwide Petroleum Capital Expenditures Worldwide Downstream Natural Gas and Power, and Chemicals Operations Supplemental Figures Supplemental Tables Download this Report: Full Report in PDF-Format Past Issues in PDF-Format Additional Information FRS Home Financial Terms Glossary Contacts Notes: The "Financial News for Major Energy Producers" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy producers. "Major energy producers" are respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System). All U.S.-based respondent companies that

385

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor December 20, 1951 Arco, ID Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor

386

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops December 9, 2009 - 11:12am Addthis Joshua DeLung What are the key facts? Utilizing sites in Nevada that are currently used as buffers around roads for biofuel production instead could meet up to 22 percent of the state's energy requirements. That's 11 times the energy the state currently produces from biomass. Nebraska is known for its rolling cornfields in America's heartland, and agriculture is so thick in the state that people there can smell the fresh produce in the air. Many more in the U.S. might end up tasting the hearty vegetables as well. But one concern about new technologies that use crops for fuel is that those crops, and the land on which they're grown,

387

Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Louisiana Department of Natural Resources In order to prevent waste and to avoid the drilling of unnecessary wells and to encourage the development of coal seam natural gas producing areas in Louisiana, the commissioner of conservation is authorized, as provided in this law, to establish a single unit to be served by one or more wells for a coal seam natural gas producing area. Without in any way modifying the authority granted to the commissioner to establish a drilling unit or

388

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops December 9, 2009 - 11:12am Addthis Joshua DeLung What are the key facts? Utilizing sites in Nevada that are currently used as buffers around roads for biofuel production instead could meet up to 22 percent of the state's energy requirements. That's 11 times the energy the state currently produces from biomass. Nebraska is known for its rolling cornfields in America's heartland, and agriculture is so thick in the state that people there can smell the fresh produce in the air. Many more in the U.S. might end up tasting the hearty vegetables as well. But one concern about new technologies that use crops for fuel is that those crops, and the land on which they're grown,

389

Methods and apparatus for producing and storing positrons and protons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for producing and storing positrons may include a trap that defines an interior chamber therein and that contains an electric field and a magnetic field. The trap may further include a source material that includes atoms that, when activated by photon bombardment, become positron emitters to produce positrons. The trap may also include a moderator positioned adjacent the source material. A photon source is positioned adjacent the trap so that photons produced by the photon source bombard the source material to produce the positron emitters. Positrons from the positron emitters and moderated positrons from the moderator are confined within the interior chamber of the trap by the electric and magnetic fields. Apparatus for producing and storing protons are also disclosed.

Akers, Douglas W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

390

When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic compounds in the fish and the fish becomes spoiled. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy neural network (ANN) for the development of an ANN based FT-IR Screening System for fish

Michel, Howard E.

391

Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Munsterman, Erwin Henh (Amsterdam, NL); Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus (Amsterdam, NL); Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius (Amsterdam, NL)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

The feasibility of producing alcohol fuels from biomass in Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Apart from cost, the net production of energy is the most important factor in evaluating the feasibility of producing renewable fuels from woody biomass. Unlike sugar, the effort required to make woody materials fermentable is considerable, and has been a major barrier to the use of such materials to produce renewable fuels. The Energy Profit Ratio (EPR) of fossil fuels is declining rapidly as conventional oil resources decline, but the EPR of biomass fuels is often not as high as commonly thought. I conclude that producing methanol from wood not only has a much higher yield, but is also cheaper than the more popular ethanol.

Chris Mardon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Producing a trimethylpentanoic acid using hybrid polyketide synthases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a method of producing the trimethylpentanoic acid, comprising: providing a host cell of the present invention, and culturing said host cell in a suitable culture medium such that the trimethylpentanoic acid is produced, optionally isolating the trimethylpentanoic acid, and optionally, reducing the isolated trimethylpentanoic acid into a trimethylpentanol or an iso-octane.

Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

394

Analysis of magnetic fields produced far from electric power lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the authors develop a simple and general method for analyzing the magnetic fields produced by power lines at far distances, that is, at distances large in comparison to the spacing between the line's phase conductors. Magnetic fields produced far from conventional power lines have remarkably simple properties. The authors present formulae for the fields produced by various conventional and unconventional power line configurations; included are line designs characterized by reduced magnetic-field levels. Errors in the formulae are less than [plus minus]10% at the edge of a typical transmission right-of-way.

Kaune, W.T. (Enertech Consultants Campbell, CA (United States)); Zaffanella, L.E. (High Voltage Transmission Research Center, Lenox, MA (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Hand Washing in Emergency Situations (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ER-009S 10-07 Courtney J. Schoessow, Especialista de Programa de Extensi?n - Salud Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Luego de una emergencia como un hurac?n o inundaci?n, es posible que se hayan contaminado o cortado temporalmente los suministros... de agua. Sin embargo, resulta importante que usted y su familia se laven las manos con frecuencia para evitar enfermedades. ?Cu?ndo deber?a higienizarse las manos? ? Antes de preparar comidas o comer ? Luego de utilizar el ba?o ? Luego de cambiar...

Schoessow, Courtney

2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

396

Notes of a Surgeon: On Washing Hands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sweating breast, most of us do little more than wipe our hands on our white coats and move on to see the next patient, to scribble a note in the chart, to eat a sandwich. This is, of course, nothing new. Sherwin Nuland's recent book, The Doctors' Plague: Germs, Childbed Fever, and the Strange Story... One afternoon last December, I took a tour of my hospital with Deborah Yokoe, an infectious-disease specialist, and Susan Marino, a medical technologist by training. They work in our infection-control unit. Their full-time job is to stop the spread of ...

Gawande A.

2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

397

19 May 1987 PROC. BIOL. SOC. WASH.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.-Palau, Peleliu Island, Airport Well, 26 Feb 1985, leg. Thomas M. Iliffe, Jeff Bozanic, and Dennis Williams, holo- type (USNM 232000) and 16 paratypes (USNM 232001); 2 Apr 1985, leg. Dennis Williams and Jeff Bozanic

Iliffe, Thomas M.

398

15 January 1986 PROC. ENTOMOL. SOC. WASH.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Möschler wrote three major faunal works on neotropical Lepidoptera. Two of these, treating Surinam 1876

Davis, Don R.

399

Washing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?reas de cocinar Lave sus manos con agua caliente con jab?n por 20 segundos antes y despu?s de haber manipulado alimentos y despu?s de haber tocado carne cruda, cambiado un pa?al, usado el ba?o, tocado a una mascota o tocado cualquier cosa que... cloro casero en 1 cuarto de gal?n de agua. Haga esto antes y despu?s de preparar la comida. Cuando lave productos frescos, tambi?n es importante tener un fregadero o lavaplatos limpio. Lave el fregadero con agua caliente con jab?n y despu?s enju...

Scott, Amanda

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

400

Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

Ayers, Marion Jay (Brentwood, CA); Ayers, Shannon Lee (Brentwood, CA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fine Anthracite Coal Washing Using Spirals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spiral performed well in cleaning the coarse 8 x 16 mesh size fraction, as demonstrated by the Ep ranging from 0.091 to 0.177. This is in line with typical spiral performance. In addition, the presence of the coarser size fraction did not significantly affect spiral performance on the typical 16 x 100 mesh fraction, in which the Ep ranged from 0.144 to 0.250. Changes in solids concentration and flow rate did not show a clear correlation with spiral performance. However, for difficult-to-clean coals with high near-gravity material, such as this anthracite, a single-stage spiral cleaning such a wide size fraction may not be able to achieve the clean coal ash and yield specifications required. In the first place, while the performance of the spiral on the coarse 8 x 16 mesh fraction is good with regard to Ep, the cutpoints (SG50s) are high (1.87 to 1.92), which may result in a clean coal with a higher-than-desired ash content. And second, the combination of the spiral's higher overall cutpoint (1.80) with the high near-gravity anthracite results in significant misplaced material that increases the clean coal ash error. In a case such as this, one solution may be to reclean the clean coal and middlings from the first-stage spiral in a second stage spiral.

R.P. Killmeyer; P.H. Zandhuis; M.V. Ciocco; W. Weldon; T. West; D. Petrunak

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

flu preparations Wash your hands, cover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and audiology. Koop currently co-leads the three-year GenomicsinLiceandSalmonprojectusing advanced genomics in Genomics and Molecular Biology. He was also part of the world-wide team of scientists who mapped the human genome. Koop's team is

Victoria, University of

403

Admittance relay helps wash out system instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes how delta-current admittance relays detect severe power system disturbances and initiate a power reduction signal on the dc transmission system to help stabilize the integrated ac/HVDC transmission system. It is always desirable to transmit as much power as possible over major transmission line interconnections, and the 500 kV line linking Manitoba in Canada to Minnesota in the US is a good example. A static var system (SVS) is part of this strategy. Note the southern end of an HVDC line through which the power is delivered from northern hydro-electric generation. The ability to quickly control dc-delivered power combined with the complication of SVS switching and the installation of series capacitors has led to special circumstances requiring an unusual approach to maintenance of system stability. The availability of a new protection-oriented computing platform has made the required algorithms feasible.

Sweezy, G. [Minnesota Power, Duluth, MN (United States)] [Minnesota Power, Duluth, MN (United States); Swift, G.; Zhang, Z.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

DOE Offers Support for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will Produce  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Support for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will Support for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will Produce High Quality Solar Silicon at Low Cost DOE Offers Support for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will Produce High Quality Solar Silicon at Low Cost June 16, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the offer of a conditional commitment for a $275 million loan guarantee to Calisolar Inc. to commercialize its innovative solar silicon manufacturing process. Calisolar's innovative process should produce silicon for use in solar cells at less than half the cost of traditional polysilicon purification processes, which will reduce the overall cost of solar modules and panels. At full production, the manufacturing plant is expected to produce 16,000 metric tons (MT) of solar silicon annually, equivalent to

405

Fish Producers Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Producers Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Fish Producers Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fish Producers Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Fish Producers Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Niland, California Coordinates 33.2400366°, -115.5188756° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

406

DOE Solar Decathlon: Solar Decathlon Team-Produced Videos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Video Walkthroughs Video Walkthroughs Animated Walkthroughs Architecture Presentations Engineering Presentations Sales Presentations Consumer Workshops Building Industry Workshops Technical Resources Sponsors Where Are the Houses Now? Quick Links Solar Decathlon Home Solar Decathlon 2011 Solar Decathlon 2009 Solar Decathlon 2007 Solar Decathlon 2005 Solar Decathlon 2002 Solar Decathlon 2011 Solar Decathlon Team-Produced Videos Watch videos produced by the teams themselves for the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 competition. Solar Decathlon 2011 Team Video Walkthroughs See inside the Solar Decathlon 2011 houses in these team-produced video tours. Solar Decathlon 2011 Team Computer-Animated Walkthroughs Learn about the teams' plans and concepts by watching these team-produced

407

Timken Producing Parts for Wind Turbines | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Timken Producing Parts for Wind Turbines Timken Producing Parts for Wind Turbines Timken Producing Parts for Wind Turbines June 28, 2010 - 3:38pm Addthis Some of Timken’s bearings are so large that a small car could conceivably drive through the center. | Photo courtesy of The Timken Company Some of Timken's bearings are so large that a small car could conceivably drive through the center. | Photo courtesy of The Timken Company Lindsay Gsell The Timken Company - which will be 111-years-old this year - has a long tradition of investing in new technologies. After assessing their business in recent years, the Ohio-based, global manufacturer saw a market opportunity and decided to invest in a new manufacturing capability: producing the massive bearings for large wind turbines. "Timken has the tenacity to continue to invest into the trough of the

408

Association of Renewable Energy Producers Spain | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Producers Spain Producers Spain Jump to: navigation, search Name Association of Renewable Energy Producers (Spain) Place Barcelona, Spain Zip 8008 Sector Renewable Energy Product Spain's Association of renewable energy producers Coordinates 41.385589°, 2.168745° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.385589,"lon":2.168745,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

409

Producing bulk residual stresses in gas turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inhomogeneous plastic strain has been used to produce a pattern of bulk compressive stresses that counteract macrodefect formation and growth in machine components, which increases the working life. Studies ha...

V. A. Boguslaev; A. P. Lopatenko; N. B. Makarenko; N. I. Obodan

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Biodiesel-fuel: Content, production, producers, contemporary biotechnology (Review)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The necessity of expanding studies on producing renewable biofuel is reviewed. Special attention is given to biodiesel, the history of its creation, and ... fungi, yeasts, plants, photo- and heterotrophic algae.

E. P. Feofilova; Ya. E. Sergeeva

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Micro-mechanical logic for field produceable gate arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A paradigm of micro-mechanical gates for field produceable logic is explored. A desktop manufacturing system is sought after which is capable of printing functional logic devices in the field. A logic scheme which induces ...

Prakash, Manu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Impacts of Biofuel Produc3on on Minnesota Agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of Biofuel Produc3on on Minnesota Agricultural Transporta3on Jerry of renewable fuels that must be used each year for transportation fuel, home heating or jet fuel. The volumes

Minnesota, University of

413

Efficient steam turbines produced by the Ural Turbine Plant company  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Design features and efficiency of some steam turbines produced at present by a plant formed as a result of division of the Turbine Motor Plant Company into several enterprises are...

G. D. Barinberg; A. E. Valamin

414

Fluorination of Arc-Produced Carbon Material Containing Multiwall Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we studied the fluorination process of MWNTs produced in an electric arc. ... Carbon material was synthesized by using a setup for arc-discharge graphite evaporation described elsewhere. ...

Nicolai F. Yudanov; Alexander V. Okotrub; Yuri V. Shubin; Lyudmila I. Yudanova; Lyubov G. Bulusheva; Andrew L. Chuvilin; Jean-Marc Bonard

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

415

Method for Detection of Microorganisms That Produce Gaseous Nitrogen Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with 02-free nitrogen; the tubes were...dishes to reduce water evaporation...Detection of gas producers. Culture...conductivity detector; nitrogen was used as the...Low-pressure solubility of gases in liquid water. Chem. Rev...

Gary E. Jenneman; Anne D. Montgomery; Michael J. McInerney

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

An experimental investigation of nitrogen gas produced during...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AD Peacock, M Oostrom, and TW Wietsma.2007."An experimental investigation of nitrogen gas produced during denitrification."Ground Water 45(4):461-467. Authors: JD Istok MM Park AD...

417

Biochar Produced from Anaerobically Digested Fiber Reduces Phosphorus...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dairy lagoons. The ADF was collected from a plugged flow digester, air-dried to <8% water content, and pelletized. Biochar was produced by slow pyrolysis in a barrel retort....

418

Tearing Graphene Sheets From Adhesive Substrates Produces Tapered Nanoribbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin films Tearing Graphene Sheets From Adhesive Substrates Produces Tapered Nanoribbons Dipanjan Sen, Kostya S. Novoselov, Pedro M. Reis, and Markus J. Buehler* Graphene is a truly two- film materials have been studied extensively, the key mechanical properties of graphene

Entekhabi, Dara

419

Ethanol as an Energy Producing Substrate in the Liver  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The existence of more than one pathway for ethanol metabolism in the liver is becoming increasingly ... implications of this development for the utilization of ethanol as an energy-producing substance will be dis...

F. Lundquist; H. Thieden; N. Grunnet

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Treatment of produced waters by electrocoagulation and reverse osmosis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two oil field produced waters and one coal bed methane produced water from Wyoming were treated with electrocoagulation and reverse osmosis. All three produced waters would require treatment to meet the new Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality requirements for effluent discharge into a class III or IV stream. The removal of radium 226 and oil and grease was the primary focus of the study. Radium 226 and oil and grease were removed from the produced waters with electrocoagulation. The best removal of radium 226 (>84%) was achieved with use of a non-sacrificial anode (titanium). The best removal of oil and grease (>93%) was achieved using a sacrificial anode (aluminum). By comparison, reverse osmosis removed up to 87% of the total dissolved solids and up to 95% of the radium 226.

Tuggle, K.; Humenick, M.; Barker, F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1995, January 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication examines developments in the operations of the major U.S. energy-producing companies on a corporate level, by major line of business, by major function within each line of business, and by geographic area.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Coalbed methane produced water in China: status and environmental issues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As one of the unconventional natural gas family members, coalbed methane (CBM) receives great attention throughout the world. The major associated problem of CBM production is the management of produced water. In...

Yanjun Meng; Dazhen Tang; Hao Xu; Yong Li

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

From Processing Juice to Producing Biofuels | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

From Processing Juice to Producing Biofuels From Processing Juice to Producing Biofuels From Processing Juice to Producing Biofuels June 25, 2010 - 4:00pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell INEOS Bio -- one of the 17 global companies of the chemicals company INEOS -- is on schedule to begin construction this fall on the new Indian River BioEnergy Center near Vero Beach, Florida. The INEOS facility -- which was formerly a grapefruit processing plant for Ocean Spray -- will produce nearly eight million gallons of bioethanol per year from renewable biomass including yard, wood and vegetable waste. As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Department of Energy awarded cost-share grants to 19 integrated biorefinery projects throughout the country. INEOS Bio was selected to for a matching grant of up to $50 million, which will fund the construction for the new center.

424

Modern Processes of Producing Two-Layer Filtering Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper describes developments of the Powder Metallurgy Institute (National Academy of Sciences of Belarus) in the field of producing two-layer permeable structures with a filtering layer 0.30.4mm in thick...

P. A. Vityaz; A. F. Ilyushchenko; V. M. Kaptsevich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Method for producing high quality thin layer films on substrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing high quality, thin layer films of inorganic compounds upon the surface of a substrate is disclosed. The method involves condensing a mixture of preselected molecular precursors on the surface of a substrate and subsequently inducing the formation of reactive species using high energy photon or charged particle irradiation. The reactive species react with one another to produce a film of the desired compound upon the surface of the substrate.

Strongin, Myron (Center Moriches, NY); Ruckman, Mark (Middle Island, NY); Strongin, Daniel (Port Jefferson, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Method for producing high quality thin layer films on substrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing high quality, thin layer films of inorganic compounds upon the surface of a substrate is disclosed. The method involves condensing a mixture of preselected molecular precursors on the surface of a substrate and subsequently inducing the formation of reactive species using high energy photon or charged particle irradiation. The reactive species react with one another to produce a film of the desired compound upon the surface of the substrate. 4 figures.

Strongin, M.; Ruckman, M.; Strongin, D.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

427

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Laser plasma focus produced in a ring target  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new geometry for generating a laser?produced plasma is presented. A toroidalmirror is used to focus a CO2laser beam on the inside wall of a copper ring target. The plasma produced converges at the center of the ring where an axial plasma focus is formed. High?speed photography shows details of a plasma generated at a distance from the target surface. This new geometry could have important applications in the field of x?ray lasers.

G. Saint?Hilaire; Z. Szili

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

431

Health risk assessment for radium discharged in produced waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Produced water generated during the production of oil and gas can contain enhanced levels of radium. This naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is discharged into freshwater streams, estuarine, coastal and outer continental shelf waters. Large volumes of produced waters are discharged to coastal waters along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The Gulf of Mexico is an important producer of fish and shellfish, and there is concern that radium discharged to coastal Louisiana could contaminate fish and shellfish used by people for food, and present a significant increase in cancer risk. This paper describes a screening-level assessment of the potential cancer risks posed by radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in oil-field produced waters. This screening analysis was performed to determine if a more comprehensive and realistic assessment is necessary, and because of the conservative assumptions embedded in the analysis overestimates the risk associated with the discharge of radium in produced waters. Two isotopes of radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) are the radionuclides of most concern in produced water in terms of potential human health effects.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Health risk assessment for radium discharged in produced waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Produced water generated during the production of oil and gas can contain enhanced levels of radium. This naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is discharged into freshwater streams, estuarine, coastal and outer continental shelf waters. Large volumes of produced waters are discharged to coastal waters along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The Gulf of Mexico is an important producer of fish and shellfish, and there is concern that radium discharged to coastal Louisiana could contaminate fish and shellfish used by people for food, and present a significant increase in cancer risk. This paper describes a screening-level assessment of the potential cancer risks posed by radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in oil-field produced waters. This screening analysis was performed to determine if a more comprehensive and realistic assessment is necessary, and because of the conservative assumptions embedded in the analysis overestimates the risk associated with the discharge of radium in produced waters. Two isotopes of radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) are the radionuclides of most concern in produced water in terms of potential human health effects.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

433

Review of technologies for oil and gas produced water treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Produced water is the largest waste stream generated in oil and gas industries. It is a mixture of different organic and inorganic compounds. Due to the increasing volume of waste all over the world in the current decade, the outcome and effect of discharging produced water on the environment has lately become a significant issue of environmental concern. Produced water is conventionally treated through different physical, chemical, and biological methods. In offshore platforms because of space constraints, compact physical and chemical systems are used. However, current technologies cannot remove small-suspended oil particles and dissolved elements. Besides, many chemical treatments, whose initial and/or running cost are high and produce hazardous sludge. In onshore facilities, biological pretreatment of oily wastewater can be a cost-effective and environmental friendly method. As high salt concentration and variations of influent characteristics have direct influence on the turbidity of the effluent, it is appropriate to incorporate a physical treatment, e.g., membrane to refine the final effluent. For these reasons, major research efforts in the future could focus on the optimization of current technologies and use of combined physico-chemical and/or biological treatment of produced water in order to comply with reuse and discharge limits.

Ahmadun Fakhrul-Razi; Alireza Pendashteh; Luqman Chuah Abdullah; Dayang Radiah Awang Biak; Sayed Siavash Madaeni; Zurina Zainal Abidin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Ship-produced cloud line of 13 July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steaming ships can produce long linear cloud lines in regions of fog and broken stratus as well as in marine stratus layers. The lines are not always detected in 0.63 {mu}m satellite images, but are often detected in the corresponding 3.7 {mu}m images because the lines contain smaller and more numerous droplets than the stratus in which they are embedded as deduced by Coakley, et al. and measured by Radke, et al. They postulate cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) from steaming ships produced the more numerous and, hence, smaller cloud droplets. The ship-produced clouds are not always detected in 0.63 {mu}m images because this wavelength is not as sensitive to changes in droplet size as is 3.7 {mu}m. On 13 July 1991 a dramatic, ship-produced cloud line formed offshore of Baja California. The authors present satellite images of the line and corresponding photographs from the R/V EGABRAG III which passed under the line. The images and photos reveal the structure of the line. The EGABRAG was a source of CCN but did not produce a cloud line; they attempt to explain this important finding.

Hindman, E.E. [City Coll. of New York, NY (US); Porch, W.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Hudson, J.G. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (US); Durkee, P.A. [Navel Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (US)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Ship-produced cloud line of 13 July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steaming ships can produce long linear cloud lines in regions of fog and broken stratus as well as in marine stratus layers. The lines are not always detected in 0.63 [mu]m satellite images, but are often detected in the corresponding 3.7 [mu]m images because the lines contain smaller and more numerous droplets than the stratus in which they are embedded as deduced by Coakley, et al. and measured by Radke, et al. They postulate cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) from steaming ships produced the more numerous and, hence, smaller cloud droplets. The ship-produced clouds are not always detected in 0.63 [mu]m images because this wavelength is not as sensitive to changes in droplet size as is 3.7 [mu]m. On 13 July 1991 a dramatic, ship-produced cloud line formed offshore of Baja California. The authors present satellite images of the line and corresponding photographs from the R/V EGABRAG III which passed under the line. The images and photos reveal the structure of the line. The EGABRAG was a source of CCN but did not produce a cloud line; they attempt to explain this important finding.

Hindman, E.E. (City Coll. of New York, NY (United States)); Porch, W.M. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Hudson, J.G. (Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States)); Durkee, P.A. (Navel Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Union Helps Produce Women Workers | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Union Helps Produce Women Workers Union Helps Produce Women Workers Union Helps Produce Women Workers January 21, 2010 - 3:15pm Addthis Joshua DeLung At the Community Environmental Center in Long Island City, N.Y. - and across the country - you don't always see a lot of women in the construction business. Locating experienced female weatherization technicians to recruit had proven difficult for CEC, but 30-year-old Tahlia Williams is the beginning of a new era in the clean energy economy. "Construction is something I had wanted to do for a long time," Tahlia says. "I had no way of knowing how to get into this field because I always heard it was a man's world. I wanted in." When the Recovery Act passed, providing more funding than ever to weatherize an unprecedented number of homes, CEC needed to train and hire

437

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Green Power Purchasing Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Docket No. 4822 was enacted by the Georgia Public Service Commission in accordance with The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA)

438

Midwest Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI Jump to: navigation, search Name Midwest Ethanol Producers Inc (MEPI) Place O'Neill, Nebraska Zip 68763 Product Focused on ethanol production. Coordinates 34.82186°, -97.513329° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.82186,"lon":-97.513329,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

439

Calpine: America's largest geothermal energy producer | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Calpine: America's largest geothermal energy producer Calpine: America's largest geothermal energy producer Calpine: America's largest geothermal energy producer October 6, 2010 - 12:37pm Addthis Calpine operates 15 plants at The Geysers in northwest California, which generate enough clean energy daily to power a city the size of San Francisco.| Photo Courtesy of Calpine Calpine operates 15 plants at The Geysers in northwest California, which generate enough clean energy daily to power a city the size of San Francisco.| Photo Courtesy of Calpine Paul Lester Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Amid the Mayacamas Mountains in northwest California sits the world's largest geothermal field: The Geysers. Since 1960, steam from the 45 square mile field spanning Lake and Sonoma

440

Chelan County PUD - Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers Program Chelan County PUD - Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Water Wind Maximum Rebate $1.50/kWh Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount Varies; 2012 payment was $0.16/kWh Provider Chelan County Public Utility District The Sustainable Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) program encourages customers to install alternative power generators such as solar panels and wind turbines and connect them to the District's electrical distribution system by offering an incentive payment based on the system's production.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

LANL researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds, candidates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds Researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds LANL researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds, candidates for advanced nuclear fuels Enhance the ability to develop advanced nuclear fuels in a safer, simpler manner. April 7, 2011 This illustration shows the structures of UI4(1,4-dioxane)2 (left) and the UI3(1,4-dioxane)1.5 complexes. This illustration shows the structures of UI4(1,4-dioxane)2 (left) and the UI3(1,4-dioxane)1.5 complexes. Contact Kevin Roark Communicatons Office (505) 665-9202 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, April 7, 2010- Advances made by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory could enhance the ability of scientists to develop advanced nuclear fuels in a safer, simpler manner. Uranium chemistry research relies heavily on a variety of uranium "starting

442

Union Helps Produce Women Workers | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Union Helps Produce Women Workers Union Helps Produce Women Workers Union Helps Produce Women Workers January 21, 2010 - 3:15pm Addthis Joshua DeLung At the Community Environmental Center in Long Island City, N.Y. - and across the country - you don't always see a lot of women in the construction business. Locating experienced female weatherization technicians to recruit had proven difficult for CEC, but 30-year-old Tahlia Williams is the beginning of a new era in the clean energy economy. "Construction is something I had wanted to do for a long time," Tahlia says. "I had no way of knowing how to get into this field because I always heard it was a man's world. I wanted in." When the Recovery Act passed, providing more funding than ever to weatherize an unprecedented number of homes, CEC needed to train and hire

443

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production at INEOS Bio's Indian River BioEnergy Center in Vero Beach, Florida. Developed through a joint venture between INEOS Bio and New Planet Energy, the project uses a unique hybrid of gasification and fermentation technology - originally developed with Energy Department support starting in the 1990's - to convert wood scraps, grass clippings and other waste materials into transportation fuels as well as energy for heat and power.

444

Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass November 30, 2011 - 12:08pm Addthis ThermoChem Recovery International's process demonstration unit -- where wood waste and forest residue is converted into renewable fuel. | Courtesy of TRI. ThermoChem Recovery International's process demonstration unit -- where wood waste and forest residue is converted into renewable fuel. | Courtesy of TRI. Paul Bryan Biomass Program Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy After a rigorous testing process, Energy Department project partners at ThermoChem Recovery International (TRI) have validated a process that converts wood waste and forest residue into clean, renewable fuel. Pilot validation is a key milestone for biofuels companies like TRI. With

445

Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 2006-Dec 12/29 841 2007-Jan 01/05 823 01/12 806 01/19 755 01/26 716 2007-Feb 02/02 666 02/09 613 02/16 564 02/23 538 2007-Mar 03/02 527 03/09 506 03/16 519 03/23 528 03/30 550 2007-Apr 04/06 560 04/13 556 04/20 568 04/27 590 2007-May 05/04 610 05/11 629 05/18 648 05/25 670

446

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production at INEOS Bio's Indian River BioEnergy Center in Vero Beach, Florida. Developed through a joint venture between INEOS Bio and New Planet Energy, the project uses a unique hybrid of gasification and fermentation technology - originally developed with Energy Department support starting in the 1990's - to convert wood scraps, grass clippings and other waste materials into transportation fuels as well as energy for heat and power.

447

Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/31 570 1994-Jan 01/07 532 01/14 504 01/21 440 01/28 414 1994-Feb 02/04 365 02/11 330 02/18 310 02/25 309 1994-Mar 03/04 281 03/11 271 03/18 284 03/25 303 1994-Apr 04/01 287 04/08 293 04/15 308 04/22 334 04/29 353 1994-May 05/06 376 05/13 399 05/20 429 05/27 443

448

Electrochemical method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets with an average thickness smaller than 30 nm from a layered graphite material. The method comprises (a) forming a carboxylic acid-intercalated graphite compound by an electrochemical reaction; (b) exposing the intercalated graphite compound to a thermal shock to produce exfoliated graphite; and (c) subjecting the exfoliated graphite to a mechanical shearing treatment to produce the nano-scaled graphene platelets. Preferred carboxylic acids are formic acid and acetic acid. The exfoliation step in the instant invention does not involve the evolution of undesirable species, such as NO.sub.x and SO.sub.x, which are common by-products of exfoliating conventional sulfuric or nitric acid-intercalated graphite compounds. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Joan; Jang, Bor Z.

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

449

Electrical Energy Producer's License Tax (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Producer's License Tax (Montana) Energy Producer&#039;s License Tax (Montana) Electrical Energy Producer's License Tax (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Fees Provider Montana Department of Revenue Each person or other organization engaged in the generation, manufacture, or production of electricity and electrical energy in the state of Montana,

450

Producing Natural Gas From Shale | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Producing Natural Gas From Shale Producing Natural Gas From Shale Producing Natural Gas From Shale January 26, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The Office of Fossil Energy sponsored early research that refined more cost-effective and innovative production technologies for U.S. shale gas production -- such as directional drilling. By 2035, EIA projects that shale gas production will rise to 13.6 trillion cubic feet, representing nearly half of all U.S. natural gas production. | Image courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. The Office of Fossil Energy sponsored early research that refined more cost-effective and innovative production technologies for U.S. shale gas production -- such as directional drilling. By 2035, EIA projects that shale gas production will rise to 13.6 trillion cubic feet, representing

451

DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Greenhouse  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Greenhouse Gas-Free Hydrogen at Existing Nuclear Power Plants DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Greenhouse Gas-Free Hydrogen at Existing Nuclear Power Plants April 13, 2006 - 10:19am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - In support of President Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI), Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will allocate up to $1.6 million this year to fund industry studies on the best ways to utilize energy from existing commercial nuclear reactors for production of hydrogen in a safe and environmentally-sound manner. DOE is seeking industry proposals for these Federal Financial Assistance Awards, worth up to 80 percent of the total

452

Low-cost method for producing extreme ultraviolet lithography optics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Spherical and non-spherical optical elements produced by standard optical figuring and polishing techniques are extremely expensive. Such surfaces can be cheaply produced by diamond turning; however, the roughness in the diamond turned surface prevent their use for EUV lithography. These ripples are smoothed with a coating of polyimide before applying a 60 period Mo/Si multilayer to reflect a wavelength of 134 .ANG. and have obtained peak reflectivities close to 63%. The savings in cost are about a factor of 100.

Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA); Montcalm, Claude (Fort Collins, CO); Taylor, John S. (Livermore, CA); Spiller, Eberhard A. (Mt. Kisco, NY)

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

453

Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

Dunning, John S. (Corvallis, OR); Alman, David E. (Salem, OR)

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

454

Engineered microorganisms capable of producing target compounds under anaerobic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention is generally provides recombinant microorganisms comprising engineered metabolic pathways capable of producing C3-C5 alcohols under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The invention further provides ketol-acid reductoisomerase enzymes which have been mutated or modified to increase their NADH-dependent activity or to switch the cofactor preference from NADPH to NADH and are expressed in the modified microorganisms. In addition, the invention provides isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes expressed in modified microorganisms. Also provided are methods of producing beneficial metabolites under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by contacting a suitable substrate with the modified microorganisms of the present invention.

Buelter, Thomas (Denver, CO); Meinhold, Peter (Denver, CO); Feldman, Reid M. Renny (San Francisco, CA); Hawkins, Andrew C. (Parker, CO); Urano, Jun (Irvine, CA); Bastian, Sabine (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Frances (La Canada, CA)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

455

Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

456

Autogenous electrolyte, non-pyrolytically produced solid capacitor structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid electrolytic capacitor having a solid electrolyte comprising manganese dioxide dispersed in an aromatic polyamide capable of further cure to form polyimide linkages, the solid electrolyte being disposed between a first electrode made of valve metal covered by an anodic oxide film and a second electrode opposite the first electrode. The electrolyte autogenously produces water, oxygen, and hydroxyl groups which act as healing substances and is not itself produced pyrolytically. Reduction of the manganese dioxide and the water molecules released by formation of imide linkages result in substantially improved self-healing of anodic dielectric layer defects.

Sharp, Donald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Armstrong, Pamela S. (Abingdon, MD); Panitz, Janda Kirk G. (Edgewood, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Autogenous electrolyte, non-pyrolytically produced solid capacitor structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid electrolytic capacitor is described having a solid electrolyte comprising manganese dioxide dispersed in an aromatic polyamide capable of further cure to form polyimide linkages, the solid electrolyte being disposed between a first electrode made of valve metal covered by an anodic oxide film and a second electrode opposite the first electrode. The electrolyte autogenously produces water, oxygen, and hydroxyl groups which act as healing substances and is not itself produced pyrolytically. Reduction of the manganese dioxide and the water molecules released by formation of imide linkages result in substantially improved self-healing of anodic dielectric layer defects. 2 figs.

Sharp, D.J.; Armstrong, P.S.; Panitz, J.K.G.

1998-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

458

Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

459

Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of "whiskers" or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C. to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900.degree. C.

Morgan, Peter E. D. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Pugar, Eloise A. (Newbury Park, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Method of producing nano-scaled inorganic platelets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., transition metal dichalcogenide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites.

Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wash producers 1st" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Microsoft Word - S07310_1st_qtr_2011_report.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 1-December 31, 2010 U.S. Department of Energy October 1-December 31, 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S07310 February 2011 Page 6 Environmental Compliance All EC activities are performed in such a manner that the safety of workers and the public and the protection of the environment are given the highest priority. EC is committed to complying with all applicable environmental regulations and using best management practices as deemed necessary to achieve adequate protection of the environment and to ensure conformance with both the letter and spirit of regulatory requirements. The EC team has consistently met regulatory-compliance permitting and reporting requirements and provided regulatory updates and expertise as requested. During this reporting quarter, the EC team completed EC deliverables and regulatory reports on

462

OECD Crude "Demand" Remains Flat Between 1st and 2nd Quarters  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: As we enter the year 2000, we can expect crude oil demand to follow the usual pattern and remain relatively flat in OECD countries between first and second quarters. Note that for OECD, product demand is greater than crude use. These areas import products from outside the region. While product demand falls during the second and third quarters, crude inputs to refineries remain high enough to allow for some product stock building Additionally, purchases of crude oil exceed inputs to refineries for a time, allowing crude oil stocks to build as well in order to cover the shortfall between crude oil production and demand during the fourth and first quarters. Price can strengthen during the "weak product demand" summer months when the market feels stock building is inadequate to meet the

463

PPA_CONSOL_1st KL draft_2_11_2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

11/1454 11/1454 GREENIDGE MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL PROJECT A DOE Assessment September 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory National Energy Technology Laboratory 2 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product,

464

Report on the 1ST Meeting of the Joint Working Group on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FINAL FINAL Report on the 2 nd Meeting of the Joint Working Group on Safety for the U.S.-PRC Coordinating Committee of Fusion Energy (U.S.-PRC Safety Monitoring Program) Meeting in USA, November 4-17, 2010 A. PURPOSE The purpose of the 2nd meeting of the U.S.-China Joint Working Group on Safety was to informally evaluate the programmatic aspects of environmental, health and safety (ESH) programs in US fusion research facilities by touring laboratory areas and meeting with researchers and safety professionals. Based on these interactions, the U.S.-China delegation was able to share information and provide suggestions in an effort to reduce the likelihood of bodily injury and/or property damage. In addition, good approaches and practices developed at

465

REVISED-FINAL-1ST-QUARTER-FY-2013-SCORECARD-09-05-13.xlsx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3-SCORECARD-09-05-13.xlsx 3-SCORECARD-09-05-13.xlsx Page 1 of 95 EA & PEA MILESTONES MET DURING QUARTER (10/2012 - 12/2012) / TOTAL QUARTER EA & PEA MILESTONES ON SCHEDULE EA & PEA MILESTONES NEXT FOUR QUARTERS (01/2013 - 12/2013) / TOTAL FOUR QUARTERS EA & PEA MILESTONES Argonne (ANL) GREEN N / A (0 / 0) N / A (0 / 0) N / A N / A N / A Brookhaven (BNL) GREEN GREEN (1 / 1) GREEN (0 / 0) N / A N / A N / A Carlsbad / Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (CBFO / WIPP) GREEN N / A (0 / 0) N / A (0 / 0) N / A N / A SA Completed Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) GREEN GREEN (0 / 0) GREEN (0 / 0) N / A N / A EIS Idaho (INL) GREEN GREEN (2 / 2) GREEN (7 / 7) N / A PA Revision ROD Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) GREEN GREEN (0 / 0) GREEN (1 / 1) N / A N / A N / A Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

466

Microsoft Word - STTR Proposal IP Rights Agreement 1st Cut-DOE 6-13.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE-Name of SBC) SRM/ATY DOE-Name of SBC) SRM/ATY 1 Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program AGREEMENT ON ALLOCATION OF RIGHTS IN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND RIGHTS TO CARRY OUT FOLLOW-ON RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, OR COMMERCIALIZATION This Agreement between Small Business Concern , a small business concern (hereinafter referred to as "SBC") organized as a(n) corporate structure of SBC (C corporation, LLC, Limited Partnership, Sole Proprietorship, etc.) under the laws of the State of SBC's state of incorporation and having a principal place of business at SBC's business address, and UT-Battelle, LLC, Managing and Operating Contractor for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC- 00OR22725, a research institution (hereinafter referred to as "RI") having a principal place of business at

467

Microsoft Word - S08546_1st_qtr_2012_report.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 1-December 31, 2011 October 1-December 31, 2011 February 2012 Doc. No. S08546 Page 9 Environmental Compliance All EC activities are performed in such a manner that the safety of workers and the public and the protection of the environment are given the highest priority. EC is committed to complying with all applicable environmental regulations and requirements, policy directives, and contracts, and to using best management practices as deemed necessary to protect the environment and ensure conformance with both the letter and spirit of regulatory requirements. The EC team has consistently met regulatory-compliance permitting and reporting requirements and provided regulatory updates and expertise as requested. During this reporting quarter, the EC team completed EC deliverables and regulatory reports on or ahead of schedule, including

468

MA FI QPR Scoring Elements 1st Qtr FY 2010_091020.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

st st Blank Reference Due Date Element Measure Critical? Score > ≤ 11/15 11/15 11/22 11/22 90% 100% 80% 90% 0% 80% 11/13 11/13 10/14 12/30 1/1/10 2/13/10 11/13 11/13 11/13 11/13 11/13 11/13 Program specific elements, negotiated with Programs: Program specific measures, negotiated with Programs: Overall Score: Green * All critical elements green, and * No more then one non-critical element yellow Yellow * Any critical element yellow, or * Any non-critical red, or * Two or more non-critical elements yellow Red * Any critical element red or * Two or more non-critical elements red TYRT 3.4 DOE O 430.1B Yes Submission timeliness Capture sustainability data in FIMS. November 13, 2009 Provide OECM FIMS Data Validation schedule for each of your sites

469

2012-VPFA-01, January 2013 Page | 1 Effective Date: January 1st  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is treated under other legislation such as the Quebec Pension Plan (QPP), the Quebec Parental Insurance Plan the Canada Revenue Agency and/or Revenue Quebec. All non-remitted amounts assessed including income taxes. Such payments have their own definitions and tax treatment in accordance with the Federal and Quebec Income Tax

470

Database Archiving: How to Keep Lots of Data for a Very Long Time, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the amount of data a business accumulates now doubling every 12 to 18 months, IT professionals need to know how to develop a system for archiving important database data, in a way that both satisfies regulatory requirements and is durable and secure. ... Keywords: Database Management, Information Management, Information Technology, Library & Information Science

Jack E. Olson

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

The Hacker's Guide to OS X: Exploiting OS X from the Root Up, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Written by two experienced penetration testers the material presented discusses the basics of the OS X environment and its vulnerabilities. Including but limited to; application porting, virtualization utilization and offensive tactics at the kernel, ...

Robert Bathurst; Russ Rogers; Alijohn Ghassemlouei

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

E-Print Network 3.0 - albuquerque nm 1st Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the following locations: Wingate, Crowne Point Ojo Encino, NM; Wide Ruins, and Hunters Point AZ. The Albuquerque... U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Albuquerque District Bureau of...

473

Proceedings of the 1st IEEE International Conference on Nano/Micro Engineered and Molecular Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a heat exchanger device is a high efficiency method. When superheated vapor passes over a sub that degrades the heat transfer efficiency. In this case, condensation mechanism changes from drop as the surface is ready for new drop-wise condensation, high heat flux due to phase change can continuously

Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

474

Engi 9601: Environmental Pollution and Mitigation, Assignment #1, Oct. 1st , 2013, "Climate Wars"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the planet and its capacity and resources. (p. xiii) 4. The author is saying that the first scenario on some justifications. It means that not everyone will be assisted because resources are not sufficient they are needed." (p. 11) "There now, that wasn't so bad, was it?...and Bangladesh." (p.6) (These are a few

Coles, Cynthia

475

Development of UCTE and reconnection of 1 st and 2nd Pan-European synchronous zones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Size and features of European electric power systems, like any other in the world, is subject to changes. The reason is of technical nature - increased work safety, as well as economic - the possibility of electricity trading i.e. increased production ... Keywords: UCTE, executive team for reconnection, reconnection, syncronous zone

Ivica Toljan; Eraldo Banovac; Sejid Tenjak

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

FISMA and the Risk Management Framework: The New Practice of Federal Cyber Security, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If you are responsible for meeting federal information security requirements such as FISMA, this book is all you need to know to get a system authorized. Now in the first full revision of FISMA since its inception in 2002, a new wave of stronger security ...

Stephen D. Gantz; Daniel R. Philpott

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Introduction to Programming Test 1st March 2000 Page 1 QUEEN MARY AND WESTFIELD COLLEGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(14,25); Weapon excalibur = new Weapon("sword",50); Weapon w1 = new Weapon("sword",20), w2 = new Weapon("spear",30); Hero h1 = new Hero(50,100,200,"Arthur",excalibur); Hero h2 = new Hero(30(wyrm instanceof Dragon) wyrm.attack(h1); j) h3 = new Hero(40,50,35,"tom",new Weapon(10)); #12; Introduction

Huntbach, Matthew

478

Semiannual report - 1st half FY 1984, October 1, 1983-March 31, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Inspector General has made steady progress during this reporting period in fulfilling its mandate to prevent and detect fraud and abuse and to promote efficiency and economy in the Department of Energy's (DOE) programs and operations. The Office of Audits issued four public reports and 71 other reports which primarily resulted from our reviews of departmental contracts. Based on our report recommendations, DOE managers have made commitments to more effectively use over $8 million. An additional $6.3 million of contractor costs that were questioned in audit reports were recovered by the Department during the six months ending March 31, 1984. The Office of Inspections issued 13 reports during the first half of Fiscal Year 1984. Issues addressed ranged from an evaluation of the Department's capability to conduct an emergency drawdown of crude oil inventories at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound site to critical issues raised by concerned citizens relative to the Department's policies on the control of radioactive waste. In addition, the Office of Inspections continued to monitor a 1982 report wherein we questioned the estimated cost of construction for Phase I of the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Aiken, South Carolina. After a recommended review of the estimates was made, the Department's Acquisition Executive made a decision supporting the reduction of the estimated cost of the facility from $910 million to $870 million. During this reporting period, 11 Office of Investigations cases were referred to prosecutive authorities and other investigative agencies. One of the cases was accepted for prosecution. During the reporting period we had 30 indictments and 29 convictions. We also recovered $38,804. Three hundred twenty-six cases remained open on March 31, 1984.

Richards, J.R.

1984-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

Design Wise: A Guide for Evaluating the Interface Design of Information Resources, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From the Publisher:The increased usage of computers and the Internet for accessing information, the drastic growth in end users, and the creation of more and more multimedia products has put a definite spin on the evaluation of information resources. ...

Alison J. Head

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Physics 268r: Classical and Quantum Phase Transitions 1st lecture: January 28th Wednesday, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density function (see the note on the website) a(T; J) and b(T; J) behave a (T Tc) (6) (note to Prof Demler's course. The reading assignment is from "Fields" a book by Kardar, vol 2 chapters 1-5. We) i = 1 (3) We learned to solve this system using Mean ...eld theory and Landau theory. Let us review

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481

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlas 1st-level muon Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

First Result of Global Commissioning of the ATALS Endcap Muon Trigger System in ATLAS Cavern Summary: The First Result of Global Commissioning of the ATALS Endcap Muon Trigger...

482

1st ACM international workshop on interactive multimedia for consumer electronics (IMCE'09)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ACM International workshop on Interactive Multimedia for Consumer Electronics (IMCE) aims to bring together researchers from both academia and industry in domains including computer vision, machine learning, audio and speech processing, communications, ... Keywords: computer vision, consumer electronics, context-awareness, human-computer interaction, multimedia

Ling Shao; Caifeng Shan; Jiebo Luo; Minoru Etoh

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Multimedia Interaction and Intelligent User Interfaces: Principles, Methods and Applications, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Consumer electronics (CE) devices, providing multimedia entertainment and enabling communication, have become ubiquitous in daily life. However, consumer interaction with such equipment currently requires the use of devices such as remote controls and ...

Ling Shao; Caifeng Shan; Jiebo Luo; Minoru Etoh

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

G34051 1st pages GEOLOGY | April 2013 | www.gsapubs.org 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and paleocanyon drainage that was directed northeast along the south- western flank of the Colorado Plateau (e center of the Colorado Plateau. It marks a knickpoint along the Colorado River at the top of the steep that this is intermediate between slower rates downstream in Grand Canyon and even faster rates in the central Colorado

Pederson, Joel L.

485

Volume 6 Issue 9 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis September 2011 Stennis hosts 1st  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicle & Hypersonic Systems for Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne. An area student prepares to ask a question

486

Android Forensics: Investigation, Analysis and Mobile Security for Google Android, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The open source nature of the platform has not only established a new direction for the industry, but enables a developer or forensic analyst to understand the device at the most fundamental level. Android Forensics covers an open source mobile ...

Andrew Hoog

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Precision Correcting for Random Error The following material should be read thoroughly before your 1st  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are not capable of giving us exact measurements. For instance, a meter stick can only measure accurately always come up with a more accurate method for measuring a given quantity, there exists no "correct" value. The second source of uncertainty in our measurements is the effect of human bias. If five people

Spalding, Gabriel Cooper

488

RACE AND (STAKES) RECORD Age Starts 1st 2nd 3rd Earnings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

foals will arrive in 2010. MALE LINE CHELOKEE is by CHEROKEE RUN, stakes winner of 13 races, $1, Del Mar Futurity-G2, 3rd Santa Anita Derby-G1. Sire. SIR CHEROKEE. 6 wins, $628,296, Arkansas Derby-G2,HutchesonS.-G2, Fall Highweight H.-G2, etc. Sire. CHEROKEE ARTIST. 5 wins at 3 and 4, 2009, $528

Guerriero, Vince

489

AutoCAD 2014 Essentials: Autodesk Official Press, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Learn crucial AutoCAD tools and techniques with this Autodesk Official Press BookQuickly become productive using AutoCAD 2014 and AutoCAD LT 2014 with this full color Autodesk Official Press guide. This unique learning resource features concise, straightforward ...

Scott Onstott

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

AutoCAD 2000 Tutor for Engineering Graphics, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From the Publisher:At Autodesk Press we know that you want your books on AutoCAD out "fast and accurate". So, after rigorous peer and accuracy reviews, we are releasing the latest version of The AutoCAD Tutor for Engineering Graphics fully updated ...

Alan J. Kalameja

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Harnessing AutoCAD Civil 3D 2011, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

HARNESSING AUTOCAD CIVIL 3D 2011, introduces readers to Autodesk? Civil 3D 2011, the very latest release of this software. Strategically developed exercises printed within the book are supported by over 600 pages of online text emphasizing industry best ...

Phillip J. Zimmerman

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Living on and Under the Wing: A Biography of 1st Lt. Joaquin Castro.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preparing for War 54 Hawaii in 1942 (January-April) 59 On Captain Hall?s Crew 66 Midway... Preparing for War 54 Hawaii in 1942 (January-April) 59 On Captain Hall?s Crew 66 Midway...

Guerrero, Arnold

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

493

110TH CONGRESS REPORT " !HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES1st Session 110185  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves ......................................... 19 75 Strategic Petroleum Reserve

494

Designing the Search Experience: The Information Architecture of Discovery, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Search is not just a box and ten blue links. Search is a journey: an exploration where what we encounter along the way changes what we seek. But in order to guide people along this journey, designers must understand both the art and science of search.In ...

Tony Russell-Rose; Tyler Tate

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Advanced Persistent Threat: Understanding the Danger and How to Protect Your Organization, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The newest threat to security has been categorized as the Advanced Persistent Threat or APT. The APT bypasses most of an organization's current security devices, and is typically carried out by an organized group, such as a foreign nation state or rogue ...

Eric Cole

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Embedded Systems Design with Platform FPGAs: Principles and Practices, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This book will introduce professional engineers and students alike to system development using Platform FPGAs. The focus is on embedded systems but it also serves as a general guide to building custom computing systems. The text describes the fundamental ...

Ronald Sass; Andrew G. Schmidt

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

LBNL Computational Research & Theory Facility Groundbreaking - Full Press Conference. Feb 1st, 2012  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Energy Secretary Steven Chu, along with Berkeley Lab and UC leaders, broke ground on the Lab's Computational Research and Theory (CRT) facility yesterday. The CRT will be at the forefront of high-performance supercomputing research and be DOE's most efficient facility of its kind. Joining Secretary Chu as speakers were Lab Director Paul Alivisatos, UC President Mark Yudof, Office of Science Director Bill Brinkman, and UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau. The festivities were emceed by Associate Lab Director for Computing Sciences, Kathy Yelick, and Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates joined in the shovel ceremony.

Yelick, Kathy

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

498

FIREBALL: The Faint Intergalactic medium Redshifted Emission Balloon --Overview and 1st Science Flight Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ly (1216?), OVI (1033?) and CIV (1549?) are redshifted into the 1950-2250? stratospheric balloon

Martin, Chris

499

MATH 257/316 Assignment 6 Due: Friday, 1 st of November in class  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to solve "Mixed Boundary Value Problem A: Ice Left and Insulation Right," whose Eigenfunctions ends of the bar are insulated. a) Determine the steady-state temperature in the bar. b) Find the temperature u(x, t) using Fourier Series. c) NUMERICS: The insulated boundary condition at the right endpoint

Peirce, Anthony

500

Modern Embedded Computing: Designing Connected, Pervasive, Media-Rich Systems, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modern embedded systems are used for connected, media-rich, and highly integrated handheld devices such as mobile phones, digital cameras, and MP3 players. All of these embedded systems require networking, graphic user interfaces, and integration with ...

Peter Barry; Patrick Crowley

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z