Sample records for warming requires minimizing

  1. Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreatment Systems via an Oil Conditioning Filter Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission...

  2. Modeling Multi-Reservoir Hydropower Systems in the Sierra Nevada with Environmental Requirements and Climate Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    i Modeling Multi-Reservoir Hydropower Systems in the Sierra Nevada with Environmental Requirements and the Sierra Nevada, their majestic backyard. #12;iii Abstract Hydropower systems and other river regulation that ecosystems have historically depended on. These effects are compounded at regional scales. As hydropower

  3. Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

  4. Original article Predicted global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Predicted global warming and Douglas-fir chilling requirements DD McCreary1 DP to predicted global warming. Douglas-fir / chilling / global warming / bud burst / reforestation Résumé offer evidence that mean global warming of 3-4 °C could occur within the next century, particularly

  5. global warming's six indias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    global warming's six indias: An Audience Segmentation Analysis #12;Global Warming's Six Indias 1............................................................................................................................................20 2. Global Warming Beliefs and Attitudes................................................................................ 21 Knowledge about global warming varies widely by group

  6. Nitrogen and Sulfur Requirements for Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii on Cellulosic Substrates in Minimal Nutrient Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kridelbaugh, Donna M [ORNL; Nelson, Josh C [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth media for cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii bacteria usually contain excess nutrients that would increase costs for consolidated bioprocessing for biofuel production and create a waste stream with nitrogen, sulfur and phosphate. C. thermocellum was grown on crystalline cellulose with varying concentrations of nitrogen and sulfur compounds, and growth rate and alcohol production response curves were determined. Both bacteria assimilated sulfate in the presence of ascorbate reductant, increasing the ratio of oxidized to reduced fermentation products. From these results, a low ionic strength, defined minimal nutrient medium with decreased nitrogen, sulfur, phosphate and vitamin supplements was developed for the fermentation of cellobiose, cellulose and acid-pretreated Populus. Carbon and electron balance calculations indicate the unidentified residual fermentation products must include highly reduced molecules. Both bacterial populations were maintained in co-cultures with substrates containing xylan or hemicellulose in defined medium with sulfate and basal vitamin supplements.

  7. 1994 Annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention successes at the Hanford Site occur every day without formal recognition. A few of the successful projects are: T-Plant helps facilities reuse equipment by offering decontamination services for items such as gas cylinders, trucks, and railcars, thus saving disposal and equipment replacement costs. Custodial Services reviewed its use of 168 hazardous cleaning products, and, through a variety of measures, replaced them with 38 safer substitutes, one for each task. Scrap steel contaminated with low level radioactivity from the interim stabilization of 107-K and 107-C was decontaminated and sold to a vendor for recycling. Site-wide programs include the following: the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (P2OA) program at the Hanford site was launched during 1994, including a training class, a guidance document, technical assistance, and goals; control over hazardous materials purchased was achieved by reviewing all purchase requisitions of a chemical nature; the Office Supply Reuse Program was established to redeploy unused or unwanted office supply items. In 1994, pollution prevention activities reduced approximately 274,000 kilograms of hazardous waste, 2,100 cubic meters of radioactive and mixed waste, 14,500,000 kilograms of sanitary waste, and 215,000 cubic meters off liquid waste and waste water. Pollution Prevention activities also saved almost $4.2 million in disposal, product, and labor costs. Overall waste generation increased in 1994 due to increased work and activity typical for a site with an environmental restoration mission. However, without any Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention activities, solid radioactive waste generation at Hanford would have been 25% higher, solid hazardous waste generation would have been 30% higher, and solid sanitary waste generation would have been 60% higher.

  8. Natural warm inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visinelli, Luca, E-mail: u0583682@utah.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East 201, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0830 (United States)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the requirements that a generic axion-like field has to satisfy in order to play the role of the inflaton field in the warm inflation scenario. Compared to the parameter space in ordinary Natural Inflation models, we find that the parameter space in our model is enlarged. In particular, we avoid the problem of having an axion decay constant f that relates to the Planck scale, which is instead present in the ordinary Natural Inflation models; in fact, our model can easily accommodate values of the axion decay constant that lie well below the Planck scale.

  9. Comparing the effects of greenhouse gas emissions on global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckaus, Richard S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies dealing with global warming require a measure of the effects of the emissions of greenhouse gases that create different magnitudes of instantaneous radiative forcing and have different lifetimes. The Global Warming ...

  10. Effects of warming on the structure and function of a boreal black spruce forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stith T.Gower

    2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A strong argument can be made that there is a greater need to study the effect of warming on boreal forests more than on any other terrestrial biome. Boreal forests, the second largest forest biome, are predicted to experience the greatest warming of any forest biome in the world, but a process-based understanding of how warming will affect the structure and function of this economically and ecologically important forest biome is lacking. The effects of warming on species composition, canopy structure and biogeochemical cycles are likely to be complex; elucidating the underlying mechanisms will require long-term whole-ecosystem manipulation to capture all the complex feedbacks (Shaver et al. 2000, Rustad et al. 2001, Stromgren 2001). The DOE Program for Ecosystem Research funded a three year project (2002-2005) to use replicated heated chambers on soil warming plots in northern Manitoba to examine the direct effects of whole-ecosystem warming. We are nearing completion of our first growing season of measurements (fall 2004). In spite of the unforeseen difficulty of installing the heating cable, our heating and irrigation systems worked extremely well, maintaining environmental conditions within 5-10% of the specified design 99% of the time. Preliminary data from these systems, all designed and built by our laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, support our overall hypothesis that warming will increase the carbon sink strength of upland boreal black spruce forests. I request an additional three years of funding to continue addressing the original objectives: (1) Examine the effect of warming on phenology of overstory, understory and bryophyte strata. Sap flux systems and dendrometer bands, monitored by data loggers, will be used to quantify changes in phenology and water use. (2) Quantify the effects of warming on nitrogen and water use by overstory, understory and bryophytes. (3) Compare effects of warming on autotrophic respiration and above- and belowground net primary production (NPP) budgets. Autotrophic respiration budgets will be constructed using chamber measurements for each tissue and NPP and standard allometry techniques (Gower et al. 1999). (4) Compare microbial and root dynamics, and net soil surface CO2 flux, of control and warmed soils to identify causes that may explain the hypothesized minimal effect of soil warming on soil surface CO2 flux. Fine root production and turnover will be quantified using minirhizotrons, and microbial dynamics will be determined using laboratory mineralization incubations. Soil surface CO2 flux will be measured using automated soil surface CO2 flux systems and portable CO2 analyzers. The proposed study builds on the existing research programs Gower has in northern Manitoba and would not be possible without in-kind services and financial support from Manitoba Hydro and University of Wisconsin.

  11. Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite minimally contributed $10­30% of the global surface temperature warming over the period 1980­2002. Citation: Scafetta, N., and B. J. West (2005), Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using

  12. QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING IS IT REAL? IS IT IMPORTANT? WHAT IS IT DUE TO? HOW MUCH MORE in the atmosphere, giving Earth its temperate climate. Global Atmosphere, Global Warming GLOBAL TEMPERATURE TREND IS THIS CARBON DIOXIDE COMING FROM? Other sources are home heating and electric power production. WE ARE ALL

  13. global warming's six americas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    Energy Sources 17 Subsidies for Fossil Fuel and Renewable Energy Industries 18 Support for a Carbon Tax and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming 8 The Alarmed 9 The Concerned 10 The Cautious 11 the spring and fall of 2012. Perceived Benefits and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming

  14. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  15. Cows Causing Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Remember when President Reagan blamed trees for air pollution? Well now the Japanese are blaming cows for global warming. Apparently, the methane emissions from burping cows account for 5% of all global greenhouse gases. Simple...

  16. Global warming elucidated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meaning of global warming and its relevance to everyday life is explained. Simple thermodynamics is used to predict an oscillatory nature of the change in climate due to global warming. Global warming causes extreme events and bad weather in the near term. In the long term it may cause the earth to transition to another equilibrium state through many oscillation in climatic patterns. The magnitudes of these oscillations could easily exceed the difference between the end points. The author further explains why many no longer fully understands the nature and magnitudes of common phenomena such as storms and wind speeds because of these oscillations, and the absorptive properties of clouds. The author links the increase in duration of the El Nino to global warming, and further predicts public health risks as the earth transitions to another equilibrium state in its young history.

  17. Tachyon warm inflationary universe models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Herrera; S. del Campo; C. Campuzano

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflationary universe models in a tachyon field theory are studied. General conditions required for these models to be realizable are derived and discussed. We describe scalar perturbations (in the longitudinal gauge) and tensor perturbations for these scenarios. We develop our models for a constant dissipation parameter $\\Gamma$ in one case and one dependent on $\\phi$ in the other case. We have been successful in describing such of inflationary universe models. We use recent astronomical observations for constraining the parameters appearing in our model. Also, our results are compared with their analogous found in the cool inflationary case.

  18. Warm-VM Reboot Warm-VM Reboot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kourai, Kenichi

    Tos Warm-VM Reboot VMM OS Warm-VM Reboot VMM OS OS 1 Tvmm > Tos Tvmm Tos Warm-VM Reboot Tvmm Dw(n) Warm-VM Reboot VM n Dos OS OS rejuvenation VMM rejuvenation time (a) Tvmm > Tos VMM rejuvenation OS rejuvenation time (b) Tvmm Tos 1 Warm-VM Reboot Nw Tvmm OS Nw Tvmm-Dw(n) Tos Dw(n) + NwDos Aw = 1 - Dw(n) + Nw

  19. Long range global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolle, K.C.; Pulkrabek, W.W.; Fiedler, R.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Platteville, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores one of the causes of global warming that is often overlooked, the direct heating of the environment by engineering systems. Most research and studies of global warming concentrate on the modification that is occurring to atmospheric air as a result of pollution gases being added by various systems; i.e., refrigerants, nitrogen oxides, ozone, hydrocarbons, halon, and others. This modification affects the thermal radiation balance between earth, sun and space, resulting in a decrease of radiation outflow and a slow rise in the earth`s steady state temperature. For this reason the solution to the problem is perceived as one of cleaning up the processes and effluents that are discharged into the environment. In this paper arguments are presented that suggest, that there is a far more serious cause for global warming that will manifest itself in the next two or three centuries; direct heating from the exponential growth of energy usage by humankind. Because this is a minor contributor to the global warming problem at present, it is overlooked or ignored. Energy use from the combustion of fuels and from the output of nuclear reactions eventually is manifest as warming of the surroundings. Thus, as energy is used at an ever increasing rate the consequent global warming also increases at an ever increasing rate. Eventually this rate will become equal to a few percent of solar radiation. When this happens the earth`s temperature will have risen by several degrees with catastrophic results. The trends in world energy use are reviewed and some mathematical models are presented to suggest future scenarios. These models can be used to predict when the global warming problem will become undeniably apparent, when it will become critical, and when it will become catastrophic.

  20. Warm-Chaplygin inflationary universe model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio del Campo; Ramon Herrera

    2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflationary universe models in the context of a Chaplygin gas equation are studied. General conditions required for these models to be realizable are derived and discussed. By using a chaotic potential we develop models for a dissipation coefficient of the form $\\Gamma\\propto \\phi^n$, with $n=0$ or $n\

  1. Warm-Logamediate inflationary universe model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Ramon

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflationary universe models in the context of logamediate expansion are studied. General conditions required for these models to be realizable and discussed. This study is done in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. The parameters of our models are constrained from the observational data.

  2. Warm-Logamediate inflationary universe model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramon Herrera; Marco Olivares

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflationary universe models in the context of logamediate expansion are studied. General conditions required for these models to be realizable and discussed. This study is done in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. The parameters of our models are constrained from the observational data.

  3. Proving anthropogenic global warming and disproving natural warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    1 Proving anthropogenic global warming and disproving natural warming in global temperatures between 5 and 6o C. Although he was aware that his, these were negligible: global fossil fuel consumption was less than a twentieth

  4. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  5. Global Warming, endogenous risk and irreversibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony C.; Narain, Urvashi

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economics of global warming, Institute for InternationalEconomic Models of Global Warming, Cambridge, Mass. MITstochastic losses from global warming, Risk Analysis 16(2):

  6. Global Warming: Connecting the Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: Connecting the Dots from Causes to Solutions* Jim Hansen 26 February 2007 National://www.columbia.edu/~jeh1/worldwatch_nov2006.pdf) 5. Communicating dangers and opportunities in global warming, Amer-16, 2006. (http://pubs.giss.nasa.gov/docs/2006/2006_Hansen.pdf) 8. Global warming: Connecting the dots from

  7. 4, 10591092, 2007 Global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 4, 1059­1092, 2007 Global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger et al. Title Page Predicting the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger, B. Gabrielle, E. Larmanou, P. Laville Correspondence to: S. Lehuger (simon.lehuger@grignon.inra.fr) 1059 #12;BGD 4, 1059­1092, 2007 Global warming

  8. Minimizing sulfur contamination and rinse water volume required following a sulfuric acid/hydrogen peroxide clean by performing a chemically basic rinse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clews, P.J.; Nelson, G.C.; Resnick, P.J.; Matlock, C.A.; Adkins, C.L.J.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfuric acid hydrogen peroxide mixtures (SPM) are commonly used in the semiconductor industry to remove organic contaminants from wafer surfaces. This viscous solution is very difficult to rinse off wafer surfaces. Various rinsing conditions were tested and the resulting residual contamination on the wafer surface was measured. The addition of small amounts of a chemical base such as ammonium hydroxide to the rinse water has been found to be effective in reducing the surface concentration of sulfur and also mitigates the particle growth that occurs on SPM cleaned wafers. The volume of room temperature water required to rinse these wafers is also significantly reduced.

  9. ARM - Global Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, FeatureListGeneral Changes in DailyWarming

  10. Warm-Intermediate inflationary universe model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio del Campo; Ramon Herrera

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflationary universe models in the context of intermediate expansion, between power law and exponential, are studied. General conditions required for these models to be realizable are derived and discussed. This study is done in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. The inflaton potentials considered in this study are negative-power-law and powers of logarithms, respectively. The parameters of our models are constrained from the WMAP three and five year data.

  11. The warm inflationary universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arjun Berera

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade, the importance of dissipation and fluctuation to inflationary dynamics has been realized and has led to a new picture of inflation called warm inflation. Although these phenomena are common to condensed matter systems, for inflation models their importance has only recently started to be appreciated. The article describes the motivation for these phenomenon during inflation and then examines their origins from first principles quantum field theory treatments of inflation models. Cosmology today is a data intensive field and this is driving theory to greater precision and predictability. This opens the possibility to consider tests for detecting observational signatures of dissipative processes, which will be discussed. In addition it will be discussed how particle physics and cosmology are now working in tandem to push the boundaries of our knowledge about fundamental physics.

  12. Benefits of Radial Build Minimization and Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    #12;6 Breeder Multiplier Structure FW/Blanket Shield VV Coolant Coolant Coolant ARIES-CS: Internal VV TOFE Meeting September 14 - 16, 2004 Madison, WI #12;2 Define radial builds for proposed blanket shielding function: Blanket protects shield Blanket & shield protect VV Blanket, shield & VV protect

  13. Minimally refined biomass fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pearson, Richard K. (Pleasanton, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  14. Introduction Minimal Fusion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Introduction Minimal Fusion Systems Maximal Parabolics Results Minimal Fusion Systems Ellen Henke University of Birmingham Ellen Henke Minimal Fusion Systems #12;Introduction Minimal Fusion Systems Maximal Parabolics Results Contents 1 Introduction 2 Minimal Fusion Systems 3 Maximal Parabolics 4 Results Ellen

  15. Computer modeling of the global warming effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, W.M. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of knowledge of global warming will be presented and two aspects examined: observational evidence and a review of the state of computer modeling of climate change due to anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases. Observational evidence, indeed, shows global warming, but it is difficult to prove that the changes are unequivocally due to the greenhouse-gas effect. Although observational measurements of global warming are subject to ``correction,`` researchers are showing consistent patterns in their interpretation of the data. Since the 1960s, climate scientists have been making their computer models of the climate system more realistic. Models started as atmospheric models and, through the addition of oceans, surface hydrology, and sea-ice components, they then became climate-system models. Because of computer limitations and the limited understanding of the degree of interaction of the various components, present models require substantial simplification. Nevertheless, in their present state of development climate models can reproduce most of the observed large-scale features of the real system, such as wind, temperature, precipitation, ocean current, and sea-ice distribution. The use of supercomputers to advance the spatial resolution and realism of earth-system models will also be discussed.

  16. A procedure for analyzing energy and global warming impacts of foam insulation in U.S. commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, J.; Yarbrough, D.W.; Desjarlais, A.O.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to develop a procedure for evaluating the energy and global warming impacts of alternative insulation technologies for US commercial building applications. The analysis is focused on the sum of the direct contribution of greenhouse gas emissions from a system and the indirect contribution of the carbon dioxide emission resulting from the energy required to operate the system over its expected lifetime. In this paper, parametric analysis was used to calculate building related CO{sub 2} emission in two US locations. A retail mail building has been used as a model building for this analysis. For the analyzed building, minimal R-values of insulation are estimated using ASHRAE 90.1 requirements.

  17. Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    CHEM 001A Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate" Global warming is one of the most contentious issues of our time. There is an ongoing debate about whether global warming is caused by human activity.S., and because the scientific evidence used to determine if global warming is man-made is so difficult

  18. PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A. Global Warming: 0.6°C or Less? [#1035] The peculiarities of global warming on the Earth during the last century are discussed. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVIII (2007) full818.pdf #12;GLOBAL WARMING: 0.6 OR LESS? V.A.Alexeev; Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry

  19. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, T. [Physics Department, University of Lancaster, Lancaster, UK (United Kingdom); Wolfendale, A. W. [Physics Department, Durham University, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Some workers have claimed that the observed temporal correlations of (low level) terrestrial cloud cover with the cosmic ray intensity changes, due to solar modulation, are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim in some detail. So far, we have not found any evidence in support and so our conclusions are to doubt it. From the absence of corroborative evidence we estimate that less than 15% at the 95% confidence level, of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 43 years is due to this cause. The origin of the correlation itself is probably the cycle of solar irradiance although there is, as yet, no certainty.

  20. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Sloan; A W Wolfendale

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been claimed by others that observed temporal correlations of terrestrial cloud cover with `the cosmic ray intensity' are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim to look for evidence to corroborate it. So far we have not found any and so our tentative conclusions are to doubt it. Such correlations as appear are more likely to be due to the small variations in solar irradiance, which, of course, correlate with cosmic rays. We estimate that less than 15% of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 35 years is due to this cause.

  1. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz September 22, 2004 http://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve/schwartz.html #12;#12;THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL does anything about it. Mark Twain Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we ARE doing something

  2. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter about it.But nobody does anything about it. Mark Twain Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we

  3. An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing (revised version) K. Miyazaki E that the anthropogenic global warming is severely limited because the Earth is a water planet. 1 Introduction Now,2,3] on this anthropogenic global warming (AGW) is essentially based on the results of elaborate and enormous computer

  4. Global Warming: The Threat to the Planet*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: The Threat to the Planet* Jim Hansen 17 April 2007 2007 Leo Szilard Lecture. Graham Red Squirrel #12;Survival of Species 1. "Business-as-Usual" Scenario - Global Warming ~ 3ºC - Likely Extinctions ~ 50 percent 2. "Alternative" Scenario - Global Warming ~ 1ºC - Likely Extinctions

  5. An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro that the climate sensitivity never exceeds 6 C. Consequently, the anthropogenic global warming is severely limited be calculated in simple terms. Global warming is like that." However, there will be not a few physicists who do

  6. The Global Warming Debate: A July Hottest Month on Record in U.S.--Warming and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    The Global Warming Debate: A Case Study July Hottest Month on Record in U.S.--Warming and Drought was the hottest month on record in the United States, perhaps due to a combination of global warming the fact that there is more than just natural variability playing a role: Global warming from human

  7. Global Warming: Is There Still Time to Avoid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: Is There Still Time to Avoid Disastrous Human -Made Climate Change? i.e. Have We simulations. (B) Simulated and observed surface temperature change. #12;21st Century Global Warming Climate) Simulated Global Warming Warming

  8. Hydrological consequences of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Norman L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change indicates there is strong evidence that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide far exceeds the natural range over the last 650,000 years, and this recent warming of the climate system is unequivocal, resulting in more frequent extreme precipitation events, earlier snowmelt runoff, increased winter flood likelihoods, increased and widespread melting of snow and ice, longer and more widespread droughts, and rising sea level. The effects of recent warming has been well documented and climate model projections indicate a range of hydrological impacts with likely to very likely probabilities (67 to 99 percent) of occurring with significant to severe consequences in response to a warmer lower atmosphere with an accelerating hydrologic cycle.

  9. Minimize Boiler Blowdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on minimizing boiler blowdown provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  10. LLNL Waste Minimization Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the February 14, 1990 version of the LLNL Waste Minimization Program Plan (WMPP). The Waste Minimization Policy field has undergone continuous changes since its formal inception in the 1984 HSWA legislation. The first LLNL WMPP, Revision A, is dated March 1985. A series of informal revision were made on approximately a semi-annual basis. This Revision 2 is the third formal issuance of the WMPP document. EPA has issued a proposed new policy statement on source reduction and recycling. This policy reflects a preventative strategy to reduce or eliminate the generation of environmentally-harmful pollutants which may be released to the air, land surface, water, or ground water. In accordance with this new policy new guidance to hazardous waste generators on the elements of a Waste Minimization Program was issued. In response to these policies, DOE has revised and issued implementation guidance for DOE Order 5400.1, Waste Minimization Plan and Waste Reduction reporting of DOE Hazardous, Radioactive, and Radioactive Mixed Wastes, final draft January 1990. This WMPP is formatted to meet the current DOE guidance outlines. The current WMPP will be revised to reflect all of these proposed changes when guidelines are established. Updates, changes and revisions to the overall LLNL WMPP will be made as appropriate to reflect ever-changing regulatory requirements. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Global Warming and Human Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC) GettingGit GitGlobal Warming and Human

  12. Warm inflation in the presence of magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriella Piccinelli; Angel Sanchez; Alejandro Ayala; Ana Julia Mizher

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of primordial magnetic fields on the inflationary potential in the context of a warm inflation scenario. The model, based on global supersymmetry with a new-inflation-type potential and a coupling between the inflaton and a heavy intermediate superfield, is already known to preserve the flatness required for slow-roll conditions even after including thermal contributions. Here we show that the magnetic field makes the potential even flatter, retarding the transition and rendering it smoother.

  13. Soil degradation, global warming and climate impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddema, Johannes J.; Freire, Sergio Carneiro

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will demonstrate one methodology for assessing the potential large-scale impacts of soil degradation on African climates and water resources. In addition it will compare and contrast these impacts to those expected from global warming and compare impacts for differ...- ent watershed regions on the continent. 2. METHODS In order to make a similar comparison between pro- jected climate change scenarios due to global warming Inter-Research 2001 *E-mail: feddema@ku.edu Soil degradation, global warming and climate...

  14. Global Warming Systemically Caused Hurricane Sandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakoff, George

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Warming Systemically Caused Hurricane Sandy by George Lakoffsystemically caused Hurricane Sandy -- and the Midwestenormous energy and size of Hurricane Sandy, as well as the

  15. Nuclear energy output slows as climate warms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, David

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the US government say the window is closing for actions to avert the worst effects of warming.

  16. Background: Global Warming, 2009 1. Unequivocally, the climate is warming. Natural systems are affected.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    ." #12;Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transportation Sources in Minnesota A Study gas (GHG) emissions from Minnesota's transportation sector. #12;Research Study Team UniversityBackground: Global Warming, 2009 1. Unequivocally, the climate is warming. Natural systems

  17. Warm Anisotropic Inflationary Universe Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharif, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to study the warm inflation using vector fields in the background of locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I universe model. We formulate the field equations, slow-roll and perturbation parameters (scalar and tensor power spectra as well as their spectral indices) under slow-roll approximation. We evaluate all these parameters in terms of directional Hubble parameter during intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by taking the dissipation factor as a function of scalar field as well as a constant. In each case, we calculate the observational parameter of interest, i.e., tensor-scalar ratio in terms of inflation. The graphical behavior of these parameters shows that the anisotropic model is also compatible with WMAP7 and Planck observational data.

  18. Warm Anisotropic Inflationary Universe Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Rabia Saleem

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to study the warm inflation using vector fields in the background of locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I universe model. We formulate the field equations, slow-roll and perturbation parameters (scalar and tensor power spectra as well as their spectral indices) under slow-roll approximation. We evaluate all these parameters in terms of directional Hubble parameter during intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by taking the dissipation factor as a function of scalar field as well as a constant. In each case, we calculate the observational parameter of interest, i.e., tensor-scalar ratio in terms of inflation. The graphical behavior of these parameters shows that the anisotropic model is also compatible with WMAP7 and Planck observational data.

  19. The Science of Global Warming Energy Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    The Science of Global Warming ·Energy Balance ·Feedback Loops Global Warming can be understood complexities ·Introduce a Simple Model of Energy Balance ·Understand the Vocabulary ·Point out some units of energy input from the Sun = Temperature: 5.3 oC Greenhouse Effect 101: A Balance is Achieved

  20. Global warming, insurance losses and financial industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, N.C. [UOB Life Assurance Limited, Singapore (Singapore)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. They have already caught the attention of the insurance industry, as they suffered massive losses in the last decade. Twenty-one out of the 25 largest catastrophes in the US, mainly in the form of hurricanes have occurred in the last decade. The insurance industry has reacted by taking the risk of global warming in decisions as to pricing and underwriting decisions. But they have yet to take a more active role in regulating the factors that contributes to global warming. How global warming can impact the financial industry and the modern economy is explored. Insurance and modern financial derivatives are key to the efficient functioning of the modern economy, without which the global economy can still function but will take a giant step backward. Any risk as global warming that causes economic surprises will hamper the efficient working of the financial market and the modern economy.

  1. The Impact of Global Warming and Air Pollution on Patient Visits in the Emergency Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derlet, Robert W

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review The Impact sf Global Warming and 1 Air pollution onair pollution problems and global warming will effect thesites in the human body. Global Warming Global warming goes

  2. Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials of perfluorocarbons: Comparison. (1995) and combined with atmospheric lifetimes from the literature to determine global warming

  3. Free Boundaries and Minimal Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Freeboundariesariseastheinterfacebetweenmaterialsinwhichthematerialsretain some energy. In contrast, the interface represented by a minimal surface lives in.

  4. Minimize environmental impacts when replacing underground pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, L.R. [Ashland Petroleum Co., Catlettsburg, KY (United States); Kroll, T.R. [Insituform Technologies, Inc., Memphis, TN (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A US refiner urgently needed to repair a 40-year-old oily-water sewer system without disrupting processing operations. Equally important, the refiner wanted to minimize soil and groundwater contamination. In this case history, the refiner elected to use an alternative method--trenchless rehabilitation--to make required underground repairs.

  5. Electronic Structure of Warm Dense Matter via Multicenter Green...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic Structure of Warm Dense Matter via Multicenter Green's Function Technique Research Personnel Modeling The proposed research addresses the Warm Dense Matter area...

  6. Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Space Heating Low...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for...

  7. Secretary Moniz Warms Up For Earth Day Pitch | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Warms Up For Earth Day Pitch Secretary Moniz Warms Up For Earth Day Pitch Addthis Speakers Secretary Ernest Moniz Duration :32...

  8. Cloudy Skies: Assessing Public Understanding of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterman, John

    2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Surveys show most Americans believe global warming is real. But many advocate delaying action until there is more evidence that warming is harmful. The stock and ...

  9. Cloudy Skies: Assessing Public Understanding of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterman, John

    2003-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Surveys show most Americans believe global warming is real. But many advocate delaying action until there is more evidence that warming is harmful. The stock and ...

  10. air warming system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from negative biases in total cloud amounts and biases in the location 2 Background: Global Warming, 2009 1. Unequivocally, the climate is warming. Natural systems are...

  11. Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildfires may contribute more to global warming Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted They suggest that fire emissions could contribute a lot...

  12. Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First Comparisong Using External Costs on Urban Buses Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First...

  13. aarhus warm ebis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including variations in solar output and cosmic ray intensity. Agw Anthropogenic; Global Warming 138 Global Warming: Connecting the Dots Multidisciplinary Databases and...

  14. Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review...

  15. Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Emerging Technologies...

  16. Annual Waste Minimization Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred J. Karns

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the waste minimization efforts undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), during CY06. This report was developed in accordance with the requirements of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit (No. NEV HW0021) and as clarified in a letter dated April 21, 1995, from Paul Liebendorfer of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to Donald Elle of the DOE, Nevada Operations Office. The NNSA/NSO Pollution Prevention (P2) Program establishes a process to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by the NNSA/NSO and ensures that proposed methods of treatment, storage, and/or disposal of waste minimize potential threats to human health and the environment. The following information provides an overview of the P2 Program, major P2 accomplishments during the reporting year, a comparison of the current year waste generation to prior years, and a description of efforts undertaken during the year to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by the NNSA/NSO.

  17. Managing Warm-season Improved Pastures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stichler, Charles; Prostko, Eric P.; Livingston, Stephen

    1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    M anaging Warm-season Improved Pastures Charles Stichler, Eric Prostko, Steve Livingston* he quality and quantity of forage in pastures can vary greatly and are constantly changing throughout the year. The goal of forage management is to provide...

  18. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a plasma. Therefore, to probe a warm dense state undergoing a nonreversible process, an ultrafast technique faster than the ALS pulse duration (70 ps) and a single-shot...

  19. Global Warming Effects on Us Hurricane Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

    While many studies of the effects of global warming on hurricanes predict an increase in various metrics of Atlantic basin-wide activity, it is less clear that this signal will emerge from background noise in measures of ...

  20. Warm-Intermediate inflationary universe model in braneworld cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Ramon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm-intermediate inflationary universe models in the context of braneworld cosmologies, are studied. This study is done in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. We find that, the scalar potentials and dissipation coefficients in terms of the scalar field, evolves as type-power-law and powers of logarithms, respectively. General conditions required for these models to be realizable are derived and discussed. We also study the scalar and tensor perturbations for each regime. We use recent astronomical observations to constraint the parameters appearing in the braneworld models.

  1. Warm-Intermediate inflationary universe model in braneworld cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramon Herrera; Eugenio San Martin

    2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm-intermediate inflationary universe models in the context of braneworld cosmologies, are studied. This study is done in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. We find that, the scalar potentials and dissipation coefficients in terms of the scalar field, evolves as type-power-law and powers of logarithms, respectively. General conditions required for these models to be realizable are derived and discussed. We also study the scalar and tensor perturbations for each regime. We use recent astronomical observations to constraint the parameters appearing in the braneworld models.

  2. Monitoring Massive Appliances by a Minimal Number of Smart Meters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yongcai

    56 Monitoring Massive Appliances by a Minimal Number of Smart Meters YONGCAI WANG, XIAOHONG HAO. This article presents a framework for deploying a minimal number of smart meters to accurately track the ON of required smart meters is studied by an entropy-based approach, which qualifies the impact of meter

  3. Coding-based Energy Minimization for Phase Change Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1-4503-1199-1/12/06 ...$10.00. states of the phase-change material. In one state, the ma- terial is amorphous with a highCoding-based Energy Minimization for Phase Change Memory Azalia Mirhoseini Electrical and Computer Phase Change Memory write energy. Our method minimizes the energy required for memory rewrites

  4. Advanced pyrochemical technologies for minimizing nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, M.C.; Dodson, K.E.; Riley, D.C.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to reduce the size of the current nuclear weapons complex and consequently minimize operating costs. To meet this DOE objective, the national laboratories have been asked to develop advanced technologies that take uranium and plutonium, from retired weapons and prepare it for new weapons, long-term storage, and/or final disposition. Current pyrochemical processes generate residue salts and ceramic wastes that require aqueous processing to remove and recover the actinides. However, the aqueous treatment of these residues generates an estimated 100 liters of acidic transuranic (TRU) waste per kilogram of plutonium in the residue. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing pyrochemical techniques to eliminate, minimize, or more efficiently treat these residue streams. This paper will present technologies being developed at LLNL on advanced materials for actinide containment, reactors that minimize residues, and pyrochemical processes that remove actinides from waste salts.

  5. The ZOOM minimization package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischler, Mark S.; Sachs, D.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new object-oriented Minimization package is available for distribution in the same manner as CLHEP. This package, designed for use in HEP applications, has all the capabilities of Minuit, but is a re-write from scratch, adhering to modern C++ design principles. A primary goal of this package is extensibility in several directions, so that its capabilities can be kept fresh with as little maintenance effort as possible. This package is distinguished by the priority that was assigned to C++ design issues, and the focus on producing an extensible system that will resist becoming obsolete.

  6. Is the basinwide warming in the North Atlantic Ocean related to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming? Chunzai Wang1 and Shenfu Dong1,2 Received 31 January 2010 is controversial. Some studies argued that the warming is due to global warming in association with the secular sea surface temperature. Here we show that both global warming and AMO variability make a contribution

  7. 3. MATERIAL CERTIFICATIONS REQUIRED. 100% DYE PENETRANT INSPECTION REQUIRED.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    WELDS SHOULD BE MINIMIZED. NO CODE STAMP REQUIRED. IN ACCORDANCE WITH ASME SECTION IX. 1. WELDING and applicable 1. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES 2. INTERPRET DIMENSIONS AND TOLERANCES PER ASME Y14.5M 3. MACHINED

  8. Minimally intrusive strategies for fault detection and energy monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Robert Williams, 1979-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the need for automated monitoring systems that rely on minimally intrusive sensor arrays. The monitoring techniques employed in this thesis require fewer sensors because they take a different approach ...

  9. Comparison of "warm and wet" and "cold and icy" scenarios for early Mars in a 3D climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wordsworth, Robin D; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Forget, Francois; Head, James W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a 3D general circulation model to compare the primitive Martian hydrological cycle in "warm and wet" and "cold and icy" scenarios. In the warm and wet scenario, an anomalously high solar flux or intense greenhouse warming artificially added to the climate model are required to maintain warm conditions and an ice-free northern ocean. Precipitation shows strong surface variations, with high rates around Hellas basin and west of Tharsis but low rates around Margaritifer Sinus (where the observed valley network drainage density is nonetheless high). In the cold and icy scenario, snow migration is a function of both obliquity and surface pressure, and limited episodic melting is possible through combinations of seasonal, volcanic and impact forcing. At surface pressures above those required to avoid atmospheric collapse (~0.5 bar) and moderate to high obliquity, snow is transported to the equatorial highland regions where the concentration of valley networks is highest. Snow accumulation in the Aeolis quadr...

  10. Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreatment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,Official FileEnergy Midsize9 Suggested Actions ■ ■63

  11. Warm inflationary model in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrera, Ramon [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A warm inflationary universe model in loop quantum cosmology is studied. In general we discuss the condition of inflation in this framework. By using a chaotic potential, V({phi}){proportional_to}{phi}{sup 2}, we develop a model where the dissipation coefficient {Gamma}={Gamma}{sub 0}=constant. We use recent astronomical observations for constraining the parameters appearing in our model.

  12. Minimization of Fractional Power Densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minimization of Fractional Power Densities. Robert Hardt, Rice University. Abstract: A k dimensional rectifiable current is given by an oriented k dimensional

  13. ENERGY-MINIMIZING NEMATIC ELASTOMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT. We prove weak lower semicontinuity and existence of energy- minimizers for a free energy describing stable deformations and the correspond.

  14. ENERGY-MINIMIZING INCOMPRESSIBLE NEMATIC ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove weak lower semi-continuity and existence of energy-minimizers for a free energy describing stable deformations and the corresponding director...

  15. Review: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions, 2nd ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science,Jacobson, Mark Z. Air Pollution and Global Warming: History,His timely book, Air Pollution and Global Warming: History,

  16. Review: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions, 2nd ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, andZ. Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, andAir Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and

  17. Is the Ozone Depletion Regime a Model for an Emerging Regime on Global Warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Winfried

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the for- mation of a global warming regime produces a highlydepletion and the global warming regimes was recognized byan Emerging Regime on Global Warming? by Winfried Lang I.

  18. Editorial The Global Warming Fight is Bringing Sexy Back, Are You Ready?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jankowska, Marta Maja

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006, September 25). Is global warming raising a tempest?or her behavior towards global warming in 2007. *Timberlake,Editorial: The Global Warming Fight is Bringing Sexy

  19. Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Mitigation can slow down but not prevent sea level rise for...

  20. Optimization of High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet Alloys Optimization of High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet Alloys 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  1. Why hasn't earth warmed as much as expected?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, S.E.; Charlson, R.; Kahn, R.; Ogren, J.; Rodhe, H.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed increase in global mean surface temperature (GMST) over the industrial era is less than 40% of that expected from observed increases in long-lived greenhouse gases together with the best-estimate equilibrium climate sensitivity given by the 2007 Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Possible reasons for this warming discrepancy are systematically examined here. The warming discrepancy is found to be due mainly to some combination of two factors: the IPCC best estimate of climate sensitivity being too high and/or the greenhouse gas forcing being partially offset by forcing by increased concentrations of atmospheric aerosols; the increase in global heat content due to thermal disequilibrium accounts for less than 25% of the discrepancy, and cooling by natural temperature variation can account for only about 15%. Current uncertainty in climate sensitivity is shown to preclude determining the amount of future fossil fuel CO2 emissions that would be compatible with any chosen maximum allowable increase in GMST; even the sign of such allowable future emissions is unconstrained. Resolving this situation by empirical determination of Earths climate sensitivity from the historical record over the industrial period or through use of climate models whose accuracy is evaluated by their performance over this period is shown to require substantial reduction in the uncertainty of aerosol forcing over this period.

  2. Guidelines for mixed waste minimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, C.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

  3. The Once and Future Warm Earth: A Paleoceanographic View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    The Once and Future Warm Earth: A Paleoceanographic View Dr. Ted C. Moore, Jr., University of Michigan Predictions of climatic warming in the near future, if true, will approximate the very warm--and ended. In the early and mid Eocene the Arctic Ocean was ice-free and subtropical flora and fauna were

  4. California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming Effects by Richard J: _______________________________________ Date #12;California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming Effects Richard J, 2006 #12;#12;ABSTRACT California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming

  5. Genetic shift in photoperiodic response correlated with global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    Genetic shift in photoperiodic response correlated with global warming William E. Bradshaw observed in insects, birds, amphibians, and plants associated with global warm- ing during the latter half- tent with an adaptive evolutionary response to recent global warming. The latter half of the 20th

  6. Global warming and hurricane intensity and frequency: The debate continues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    Global warming and hurricane intensity and frequency: The debate continues Megan Mc of these changes. Some scientists believe that global warming and increased sea surface temperatures are to blame, global warming and increased sea surface temperatures do appear to have influenced hurricane frequency

  7. Global Warming Time Bomb:* Actions Needed to Avert Disaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming Time Bomb:* Actions Needed to Avert Disaster James Hansen 26 October 2009 Club statements relating to policy are personal opinion Global Warming Status 1. Knowledge Gap Between - What Benefits of Solution Despite the publicity that global warming has received, there is a large gap between

  8. Global warming and body mass decline in Israeli passerine birds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yom-Tov, Yoram

    Global warming and body mass decline in Israeli passerine birds Yoram Yom-Tov Department of Zoology,Tel Aviv University,Tel Aviv 69978, Israel ( yomtov@post.tau.ac.il) Global warming may a¡ect the physiology in body mass and tarsus length are due to global warming and also in accordance with Bergmann's rule

  9. Separating Signal from Noise in Global Warming Bert W. Rust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rust, Bert W.

    Separating Signal from Noise in Global Warming Bert W. Rust Reprinted from the CD Rust, B. W. (2003) "Separating Signal from Noise in Global Warming," Computing Science and Statistics, 35, 263-277. ­ or ­ Rust, B. W. (2003) "Separating Signal from Noise in Global Warming," Computing Science and Statistics, 35

  10. Communicating Dangers and Opportunities in Global Warming 13 December Draft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Communicating Dangers and Opportunities in Global Warming 13 December Draft James Hansen American: "Subversion of Public Affairs Chart 7: The Global Warming Story C. Tenets of a Democracy: "An Informed Public, not as a spokesman for NASA There is a huge gap between what is understood about global warming and what is known

  11. Observationally based assessment of polar amplification of global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    Observationally based assessment of polar amplification of global warming Igor V. Polyakov,1) are similar, and do not support the predicted polar amplification of global warming. The possible moderating amplification of global warming. Intrinsic arctic variability obscures long-term changes, limiting our ability

  12. WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE May 2014 #12;What's In A Name? Global NATIONAL SURVEY STUDY 2: GLOBAL WARMING VS. CLIMATE CHANGE............................ 10 Is global?................................................................10 When you think of global warming / climate change, what comes first to mind

  13. GLOBAL WARMING: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF LONG TERM RISK Guest Editorial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todorov, Alex

    GLOBAL WARMING: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF LONG TERM RISK Guest Editorial Beyond its objective basis in natural science, understanding, discussion, and res- olution of the policy issue labeled "global warming the global warming problem. In public discussion, natu- ral scientists tend to frame the issue through

  14. Global Warming 20 Years Later: Tipping Points Near

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming 20 Years Later: Tipping Points Near Jim Hansen 23 June 2008 National Press Club, and House Select Committee on Energy Independence & Global Warming Washington, DC #12;1988 Testimony Has Big Effects Did Not Emphasize That Global Warming Enhances Both Extremes of Water Cycle - More

  15. The Logic of Global Warming A bitter pill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    The Logic of Global Warming A bitter pill Vaughan Pratt Stanford University June 23, 2011 Vaughan PrattStanford University () The Logic of Global WarmingA bitter pill June 23, 2011 1 / 1 What is climate population growth. 2. Accumulation of hazardous materials: lead, mercury, CFCs, . . . 3. Global warming

  16. Strategies to Address Global Warming Is Sundance Kid a Criminal?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Strategies to Address Global Warming & Is Sundance Kid a Criminal? Jim Hansen In my opinion, it is still feasible to solve the global warming problem before we pass tipping points that would guarantee ppm yields global warming about 2°C (3.6°F) above the preindustrial level. Such a level of atmospheric

  17. Carbon Dioxide, Global Warming, and Michael Crichton's "State of Fear"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rust, Bert W.

    Carbon Dioxide, Global Warming, and Michael Crichton's "State of Fear" Bert W. Rust Mathematical- tioned the connection between global warming and increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide by pointing out of these plots to global warming have spilled over to the real world, inviting both praise [4, 17] and scorn [15

  18. Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials of newly.mdpi.com/journal/atmosphere Article Infrared Absorption Spectra, Radiative Efficiencies, and Global Warming Potentials of Newly of 600­1730 cm-1 . These spectra are then used to calculate the radiative efficiencies and global warming

  19. Measuring evolutionary responses to global warming: cautionary lessons from Drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel

    Measuring evolutionary responses to global warming: cautionary lessons from Drosophila FRANCISCO. Understanding evolutionary responses to global climate warming can be daunt- ingly complex. But, primarily of the magnitude of long-term responses to global warming; standardising by equivalent seasonal tem- perature

  20. Possible global warming futures Minh Ha-Duong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Possible global warming futures Minh Ha-Duong Minh.Ha.Duong@cmu.edu CNRS, France HDGC, Carnegie Mellon Possible global warming futures ­ p.1/36 #12;SRES: Forecasts or scenarios? +5.5 C in 2100 the controversy using imprecise probabilities, a more general information theory. . . Possible global warming

  1. Global warming and United States landfalling hurricanes Chunzai Wang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    Global warming and United States landfalling hurricanes Chunzai Wang1 and Sang-Ki Lee2 Received 18] A secular warming of sea surface temperature occurs almost everywhere over the global ocean. Here we use observational data to show that global warming of the sea surface is associated with a secular increase

  2. Global warming potentials and radiative efficiencies of halocarbons and related

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Global warming potentials and radiative efficiencies of halocarbons and related compounds 7A=E472C43AD.A0794E 0794E:CA27C725 AD383CADE64E7 #12;1 Global Warming Potentials and Radiative of REs and global39 warming potentials (GWPs) for these compounds, mostly employing atmospheric lifetimes

  3. The global warming signal is the average of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    , uncertainty in the isopycnal diffusivity causes uncertainty of up to 50% in the global warming signalThe global warming signal is the average of years 70-80 in the increasing CO2 run minus the average represent significant uncertainty in the global warming signal (Fig. 5). The differences at high latitudes

  4. Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

  5. Warm inflationary universe model with viscous pressure on the brane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setare, M R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work warm inflationary universe model with viscous pressure on the brane in high-dissipation regime is studied. We derive a condition which is required for this model to be realizable in slow-roll approximation. We also present analytic expressions for density perturbation and amplitude of tensor perturbation in longitudinal gauge. General expressions of tensor-to-scalar ratio, scalar spectral index and its running are obtained. We develop our model by using chaotic potential, the characteristics of this model are calculated for two specific cases: 1- Dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$ and bulk viscous parameter $\\zeta$ are constant parameters. 2- Dissipative parameter as a function of scalar field $\\phi$ and bulk viscous parameter as a function of radiation-matter mixture energy density $\\rho$. The parameters of the model are restricted by the nine-year Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe (WMAP9) and Planck observational data.

  6. Global warming, bad weather, insurance losses and the global economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, N.C. [UOB Life Assurance Ltd., Singapore (Singapore); Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. The impact on the insurance industry is described. Why global warming in the near term causes very bad weather is explained. The continuing trend of very bad weather and the future impact on the insurance industry is explored. How very bad weather can affect the global financial market is explained. Taking a historical view of the development of the modern economy, the authors describe in the near term the impact of global warming on the global economy. The long term impact of global warming on the global economy and the human race is explored. Opportunities presented by global warming are described.

  7. Hanford site waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkendall, J.R.

    1996-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan documents the requirements of the Hanford Site Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention (WMin/P2) Program. The plan specifies requirements for Hanford contractors to prevent pollution from entering the environment, to conserve resources and energy, and to reduce the quantity and toxicity of hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and sanitary waste generated at Hanford. The Pollution Prevention Awareness Program required by DOE 5400.1 (DOE 1988A) is included in the Hanford WMin/P2 Program.

  8. Two-Higgs Leptonic Minimal Flavour Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botella, F J; Nebot, M; Rebelo, M N

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct extensions of the Standard Model with two Higgs doublets, where there are flavour changing neutral currents both in the quark and leptonic sectors, with their strength fixed by the fermion mixing matrices $V_{CKM}$ and $V_{PMNS}$. These models are an extension to the leptonic sector of the class of models previously considered by Branco, Grimus and Lavoura, for the quark sector. We consider both the cases of Dirac and Majorana neutrinos and identify the minimal discrete symmetry required in order to implement the models in a natural way.

  9. Global Warming and Caspian Sea Level Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardakanian, Reza

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coastal regions have a high social, economical and environmental importance. Due to this importance the sea level fluctuations can have many bad consequences. In this research the correlation between the increasing trend of temperature in coastal stations due to Global Warming and the Caspian Sea level has been established. The Caspian Sea level data has been received from the Jason-1 satellite. It was resulted that the monthly correlation between the temperature and sea level is high and also positive and almost the same for all the stations. But the yearly correlation was negative. It means that the sea level has decreased by the increase in temperature.

  10. Warm-polytropic inflationary universe model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setare, M R; Kamali, V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we study warm inflationary universe models in the context of a polytropic gas. We derive the characteristics of this model in slow-roll approximation and develop our model in two cases, 1- For a constant dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$. 2- $\\Gamma$ as a function of scalar field $\\phi$. In these cases we will obtain exact solution for the scalar field and Hubble parameter. We will also obtain explicit expressions for the tensor-scalar ratio $R$, scalar spectrum index $n_s$ and its running $\\alpha_s$, in slow-roll approximation.

  11. Warm-polytropic inflationary universe model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Setare; M. J. S. Houndjo; V. Kamali

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we study warm inflationary universe models in the context of a polytropic gas. We derive the characteristics of this model in slow-roll approximation and develop our model in two cases, 1- For a constant dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$. 2- $\\Gamma$ as a function of scalar field $\\phi$. In these cases we will obtain exact solution for the scalar field and Hubble parameter. We will also obtain explicit expressions for the tensor-scalar ratio $R$, scalar spectrum index $n_s$ and its running $\\alpha_s$, in slow-roll approximation.

  12. Warm or Steaming Ground | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide Permit webpageWalthallFacility | Open Energy InformationWarm

  13. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |FrankUltrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

  14. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |FrankUltrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense

  15. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |FrankUltrafast Spectroscopy of Warm

  16. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |FrankUltrafast Spectroscopy of WarmUltrafast

  17. Global warming potentials and radiative efficiencies of halocarbons and related

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Global warming potentials and radiative efficiencies of halocarbons and related compounds4599857392 CentAUR #7326E125C47E3E3C7E=472B43!E.E07D4 07D4:BE27B725CE9393BE647 #12;GLOBAL WARMING POTENTIALS. In addition, we provide a comprehensive and self-consistent set of new calculations of REs and global warming

  18. Which BPS baryons minimize volume?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evslin, Jarah; Kuperstein, Stanislav [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA), Strada Costiera, Via Beirut n.2-4, 34013 Trieste (Italy); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) 3-cycle in a Sasaki-Einstein 5-manifold in general does not minimize volume in its homology class, as we illustrate with several examples of nonminimal volume BPS cycles on the 5-manifolds Y{sup p,q}. Instead they minimize the energy of a wrapping D-brane, extremizing a generalized calibration. We present this generalized calibration and demonstrate that it reproduces both the Born-Infeld and the Wess-Zumino parts of the D3-brane energy.

  19. Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  20. Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  1. Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas Warm Cleanup...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas Warm Cleanup: Proof-of-Concept Process Demonstration of Multicontaminant Removal Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas...

  2. Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    E. JOUBERT & G.PLASSAT, August 2004 Pollutants Emissions Global warming Potential Effect First Comparison using External Costs on Urban Buses Gabriel PLASSAT, ADEME French Agency...

  3. Color-converting combinations of nanocrystal emitters for warm-white light generation with high color rendering index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    color rendering index Sedat Nizamoglu, Gulis Zengin, and Hilmi Volkan Demira Department of Electrical 2008 Warm-white light emitting diodes with high color rendering indices are required for the widespreadSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystals hybridized on InGaN/GaN LEDs for high color rendering index. Three sets

  4. Air-cooled CWS warm air furnace. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litka, A.F.; Becker, F.E.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermo Power Corporation, Tecogen Division, has developed coal water slurry (CWS) combustion technologies specifically tailored to meet the space heating needs of the residential, commercial, and industrial market sectors. This furnace was extensively tested and met all the design and operating criteria of the development program, which included combustion efficiencies in excess of 99%, response to full load from a cold start in less than 5 minutes, and steady-state thermal efficiencies as high as 85%. While this furnace design is extremely versatile, versatility came at the expense of system complexity and cost. To provide a more cost effective CWS-based option for the residential market sector, Tecogen, developed a totally air-cooled CWS-fired residential warm air heating system. To minimize system cost and to take advantage of industry manufacturing practices and experience, a commercially available oil/gas solid fuel-fired central furnace, manufactured by Yukon Energy Corporation, was used as the platform for the CWS combustor and related equipment. A prototype furnace was designed, built, and tested in the laboratory to verify system integrity and operation. This unit was then shipped to the PETC to undergo demonstration operation and serve as a showcase of the CWS technology. An in-depth Owners Manual was prepared and delivered with the furnace. This Owners Manual, which is included as Appendix A of this report, includes installation instructions, operating procedures, wiring diagrams, and equipment bulletins on the major components. It also contains coal water slurry fuel specifications and typical system operating variables, including key temperatures, pressures, and flowrates.

  5. Exergy Optimized Wastewater Heat Recovery: Minimizing Losses and Maximizing Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meggers, F.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    output to minimize the temperature lift required by a heat pump. This would create an integrated low exergy space and water heating system. The project theory is a part of the IEA ECBCS Annex 49, and also collaboration has been setup with Geberit AG...

  6. Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaleris, Panagiotis

    1 Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures P. Michaleris at Champaign Urbana, Urbana, IL Abstract Welding distortion in large structures is usually caused by buckling due to the residual stress. In cases where the design is fixed and minimum weld size requirements

  7. Convergence of the k-Means Minimization Problem using -Convergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theil, Florian

    Convergence of the k-Means Minimization Problem using -Convergence Matthew Thorpe1 , Florian Theil1-ES, Luton, LU1 3PG, United Kingdom Abstract The k-means method is an iterative clustering algorithm which space as the observed data. By relaxing this requirement, it is possible to apply the k-means method

  8. An Evaluation of the Environmental Impact of Different Commercial Supermarket Refrigeration Systems Using Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beshr, Mohamed [University of Maryland, College Park; Aute, Vikrant [University of Maryland, College Park; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Radermacher, Reinhard [University of Maryland, College Park

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial refrigeration systems consumed 1.21 Quads of primary energy in 2010 and are known to be a major source for refrigerant charge leakage into the environment. Thus, it is important to study the environmental impact of commercial supermarket refrigeration systems and improve their design to minimize any adverse impacts. The system s Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) was presented as a comprehensive metric with the aim of calculating the equivalent mass of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere throughout its lifetime, from construction to operation and destruction. In this paper, an open source tool for the evaluation of the LCCP of different air-conditioning and refrigeration systems is presented and used to compare the environmental impact of a typical multiplex direct expansion (DX) supermarket refrigeration systems based on three different refrigerants as follows: two hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants (R-404A, and R-407F), and a low global warming potential (GWP) refrigerant (N-40). The comparison is performed in 8 US cities representing different climates. The hourly energy consumption of the refrigeration system, required for the calculation of the indirect emissions, is calculated using a widely used building energy modeling tool (EnergyPlus). A sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the impact of system charge and power plant emission factor on the LCCP results. Finally, we performed an uncertainty analysis to determine the uncertainty in total emissions for both R-404A and N-40 operated systems. We found that using low GWP refrigerants causes a considerable drop in the impact of uncertainty in the inputs related to direct emissions on the uncertainty of the total emissions of the system.

  9. Fusion Algebras of Logarithmic Minimal Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorgen Rasmussen; Paul A. Pearce

    2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present explicit conjectures for the chiral fusion algebras of the logarithmic minimal models LM(p,p') considering Virasoro representations with no enlarged or extended symmetry algebra. The generators of fusion are countably infinite in number but the ensuing fusion rules are quasi-rational in the sense that the fusion of a finite number of representations decomposes into a finite direct sum of representations. The fusion rules are commutative, associative and exhibit an sl(2) structure but require so-called Kac representations which are reducible yet indecomposable representations of rank 1. In particular, the identity of the fundamental fusion algebra is in general a reducible yet indecomposable Kac representation of rank 1. We make detailed comparisons of our fusion rules with the results of Gaberdiel and Kausch for p=1 and with Eberle and Flohr for (p,p')=(2,5) corresponding to the logarithmic Yang-Lee model. In the latter case, we confirm the appearance of indecomposable representations of rank 3. We also find that closure of a fundamental fusion algebra is achieved without the introduction of indecomposable representations of rank higher than 3. The conjectured fusion rules are supported, within our lattice approach, by extensive numerical studies of the associated integrable lattice models. Details of our lattice findings and numerical results will be presented elsewhere. The agreement of our fusion rules with the previous fusion rules lends considerable support for the identification of the logarithmic minimal models LM(p,p') with the augmented c_{p,p'} (minimal) models defined algebraically.

  10. f4: Facebook's Warm BLOB Storage System Subramanian Muralidhar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindan, Ramesh

    f4: Facebook's Warm BLOB Storage System Subramanian Muralidhar , Wyatt Lloyd , Sabyasachi Roy , Sanjeev Kumar Facebook Inc., University of Southern California, Princeton University Abstract Facebook, and datacenter failures; and provides sufficient throughput for warm BLOBs. 1. Introduction As Facebook has grown

  11. Warming caused by cumulative carbon emissions towards the trillionth tonne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    to avoid poten- tially dangerous levels of global warming48 . Similar problems apply to the carbon cycle . But the eventual equilibrium global mean temperature associated with a given stabilization level of atmo- spheric atmospheric composition approaches a stabilization level consistent with a desired equilibrium warming

  12. When Weather Warms, Water Wises Control No. #2281

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, James A.

    . In the next century, the most important result of this global warming will be the melting of the polar ice caps and the associated rise in sea levels. We develop a model for global climate change, with both . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 7 Effect of global warming on the state of Florida 14 7.1 Previously conjectured effects

  13. The Apollo Alliance: How Global Warming Can Save

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    The Apollo Alliance: How Global Warming Can Save Democracy Joel Rogers UW-Madison, COWS, JR Commons. #12;I really wonder about power point sometimes #12;Global warming and Apollo #12;The end (orange) in recent years. Source: Arctic Climate Impact Assessment #12;Global Climate Disruption · Carbon

  14. Decision-making in Electricity Generation Based on Global Warming Potential and Life-cycle Assessment for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, Arpad

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the global warming effect associated with electricityin Electricity Generation Based on Global Warming Potentialin Electricity Generation Based on Global Warming Potential

  15. Global Warming: What It Is What Is Controversial About It and What We Might Do in Response to It

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botkin, Daniel B.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    along coasts. If global warming occurs, many environmentalSee, eg. , S. SCHNEIDER, GLOBAL WARMING: ARE WE ENTERING THETRANSITION (1989); Roberts, Global Warming: Blaming The Sun,

  16. Will U.S. Agriculture Really Benefit from Global Warming? Accounting for Irrigation in the Hedonic Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlenker, Wolfram; Hanemann, W. Michael; Fisher, Anthony C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Really Benefit from Global Warming? Accounting forR. , The Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture: Comment,371411. , The Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture: A

  17. A Minimally Symmetric Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian Low

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Models addressing the naturalness of a light Higgs boson typically employ symmetries, either bosonic or fermionic, to stabilize the Higgs mass. We consider a setup with the minimal amount of symmetries: four shift symmetries acting on the four components of the Higgs doublet, subject to the constraints of linearly realized SU(2)xU(1) electroweak symmetry. Up to terms that explicitly violate the shift symmetries, the effective lagrangian can be derived, irrespective of the spontaneously broken group G in the ultraviolet, and is universal in all models where the Higgs arises as a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (PNGB). Very high energy scatterings of vector bosons could provide smoking gun signals of a minimally symmetric Higgs boson.

  18. A Minimally Symmetric Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian Low

    2015-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Models addressing the naturalness of a light Higgs boson typically employ symmetries, either bosonic or fermionic, to stabilize the Higgs mass. We consider a setup with the minimal amount of symmetries: four shift symmetries acting on the four components of the Higgs doublet, subject to the constraints of linearly realized SU(2)xU(1) electroweak symmetry. Up to terms that explicitly violate the shift symmetries, the effective lagrangian can be derived, irrespective of the spontaneously broken group G in the ultraviolet, and is universal in all models where the Higgs arises as a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (PNGB). Very high energy scatterings of vector bosons could provide smoking gun signals of a minimally symmetric Higgs boson.

  19. On how nanomechanical systems can minimize dissipation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Muratore-Ginanneschi; Kay Schwieger

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Information processing machines at the nanoscales are unavoidably affected by thermal fluctuations. Efficient design requires understanding how nanomachines can operate at minimal energy dissipation. In this letter we focus on mechanical systems controlled by smoothly varying potential forces. We show that optimal control equations come about in a natural way if the energy cost to manipulate the potential is taken into account. When such cost becomes negligible, the optimal control strategy can be constructed by transparent geometrical methods and recovers the solution of optimal mass transport equations in the overdamped limit. Our equations are equivalent to hierarchies of kinetic equations of a form well-known in the theory of dilute gases. From our results, optimal strategies for energy efficient nanosystems may be devised

  20. Review: The Global Warming Reader: A Century of Writing About Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: The Global Warming Reader: A Century of WritingMcKibben, Bill, ed. The Global Warming Reader: A Century ofrecord of no action on global warming. Those who have done

  1. Review: Behind the Curve: Science and the Politics of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ryder W.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    realities of global warming history and contemporary climatemoral discussions about global warming at home that gives meScience and the Politics of Global Warming By Joshua P. Howe

  2. Global warming from chlorofluorocarbons and their alternatives: Time scales of chemistry and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Malcolm K.W.; Sze, Nien Dak; Molnar, Gyula; Prather, Michael J

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and their replacements on global warming. Nature Hansen J. ,gas emissions to global warming. Nature London Amendment toNature 315, 649-652, Global warming time scales WMO (World

  3. Review: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions, 2nd ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science,Jacobson, Mark Z. Air Pollution and Global Warming: History,and hazards related to pollution, Professor Mark Z. Jacobson

  4. Optimization of inflow waveform phase-difference for minimized total cavopulmonary power loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pekkan, Kerem

    Optimization of inflow waveform phase-difference for minimized total cavopulmonary power loss minimized power loss, inside the TCPC pathway is required for the best optimal surgical outcomes we focused on the characterization of power loss changes due to the temporal variations in between

  5. Halo Formation in Warm Dark Matter Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Bode; Jeremiah P. Ostriker; Neil Turok

    2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrepancies have emerged between the predictions of standard cold dark matter (CDM) theory and observations of clustering on sub-galactic scales. Warm dark matter (WDM) is a simple modification of CDM in which the dark matter particles have initial velocities due either to their having decoupled as thermal relics, or having been formed via non-equilibrium decay. We investigate the nonlinear gravitational clustering of WDM with a high resolution N-body code, and identify a number of distinctive observational signatures. Relative to CDM, halo concentrations and core densities are lowered, core radii are increased, and large halos emerge with far fewer low mass satellites. The number of small halos is suppressed, and those present are formed by `top down' fragmentation of caustics, as part of a `cosmic web' connecting massive halos. Few small halos form outside this web. If we identify small halos with dwarf galaxies, their number, spatial distribution, and formation epoch appear in better agreement with the observations for WDM than they are for CDM.

  6. About the ZOOM minimization package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischler, M.; Sachs, D.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new object-oriented Minimization package is available for distribution in the same manner as CLHEP. This package, designed for use in HEP applications, has all the capabilities of Minuit, but is a re-write from scratch, adhering to modern C++ design principles. A primary goal of this package is extensibility in several directions, so that its capabilities can be kept fresh with as little maintenance effort as possible. This package is distinguished by the priority that was assigned to C++ design issues, and the focus on producing an extensible system that will resist becoming obsolete.

  7. On the minimization of operational risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. P. Maslov

    2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a risk-minimizing formula for government investments taking into account the zero intelligence law for financial markets.

  8. Polynomial Fusion Rings of Logarithmic Minimal Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorgen Rasmussen; Paul A. Pearce

    2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We identify quotient polynomial rings isomorphic to the recently found fundamental fusion algebras of logarithmic minimal models.

  9. Analysis and control of a cellular converter system with stochastic ripple cancellation and minimal magnetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perreault, David J.

    A parallel converter architecture based on the resonant pole inverter (RPI) topology is presented. It is shown that this architecture minimizes the output magnetics required for current sharing. A new current control scheme ...

  10. Minimizing or eliminating refueling of nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doncals, Richard A. (Washington, PA); Paik, Nam-Chin (Pittsburgh, PA); Andre, Sandra V. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Porter, Charles A. (Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Rathbun, Roy W. (Greensburg, PA); Schwallie, Ambrose L. (Greensburg, PA); Petras, Diane S. (Penn Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand for refueling of a liquid metal fast nuclear reactor having a life of 30 years is eliminated or reduced to intervals of at least 10 years by operating the reactor at a low linear-power density, typically 2.5 kw/ft of fuel rod, rather than 7.5 or 15 kw/ft, which is the prior art practice. So that power of the same magnitude as for prior art reactors is produced, the volume of the core is increased. In addition, the height of the core and it diameter are dimensioned so that the ratio of the height to the diameter approximates 1 to the extent practicable considering the requirement of control and that the pressure drop in the coolant shall not be excessive. The surface area of a cylinder of given volume is a minimum if the ratio of the height to the diameter is 1. By minimizing the surface area, the leakage of neutrons is reduced. By reducing the linear-power density, increasing core volume, reducing fissile enrichment and optimizing core geometry, internal-core breeding of fissionable fuel is substantially enhanced. As a result, core operational life, limited by control worth requirements and fuel burnup capability, is extended up to 30 years of continuous power operation.

  11. St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but has a high tolerance for shade-season grass. It does best in full sun and high temperatures. Goes dormant and turns brown in winter. Very

  12. Probing warm dense lithium by inelastic X-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    of warm dense matter states has practical applications for controlled thermonuclear fusion, where, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX, UK 4 Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics

  13. Plants reverse warming effect on ecosystem water balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavaleta, Erika

    ; and Carnegie Institution of Washington, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305 Edited by W. G. Ernst, Stanford. Since November 1998, we have exposed these plots to simulated warming (80 W m-2 of thermal radiation

  14. Environmental Impact on Applied Technology- Global Warming CFCs & VOCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    Hardly a day goes by that the threats to our environment are not brought to our attention. Whether you are following oil spills, groundwater contamination, global warming, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or volatile organic compounds (VOCs), you must...

  15. Are You Keeping Warm This Winter? | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    your heating options to warm your home while saving money. Last week, I turned on the weather forecast to find that the entire central United States was hovering somewhere between...

  16. The variability of warm absorbers in Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Robert R. (Robert Ross)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents three studies of warm (photoionized) absorber variability in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) using high-resolution X-ray spectra provided by the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG). The first ...

  17. americas warm water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012. Yale University and George Mason and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming 8 The Alarmed 9 The Concerned 10 The Cautious 11 Haller, Gary L. 2...

  18. The Climate Policy Narrative for a Dangerously Warming World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, Todd [Union of Concerned Scientists] [Union of Concerned Scientists; Frumhoff, Peter [Union of Concerned Scientists] [Union of Concerned Scientists; Luers, Amy [Skoll Global Threats Fund] [Skoll Global Threats Fund; Gulledge, Jay [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is time to acknowledge that global average temperatures will likely rise above the 2 C policy target and consider how that deeply troubling prospect should affect priorities for communicating and managing the risks of a dangerously warming climate.

  19. A pulsed power hydrodynamics approach to exploring properties of warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinovsky, Robert Emil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed Power Hydrodynamics, as an application of low-impedance, pulsed power, and high magnetic field technology developed over the last decade to study advanced hydrodynamic problems, instabilities, turbulence, and material properties, can potentially be applied to the study of the behavior and properties of warm dense matter (WDM) as well. Exploration of the properties, such as equation of state and conductivity, of warm dense matter is an emerging area of study focused on the behavior of matter at density near solid density (from 10% of solid density to a few times solid density) and modest temperatures ({approx}1-10 eV). Warm dense matter conditions can be achieved by laser or particle beam heating of very small quantities of matter on timescales short compared to the subsequent hydrodynamic expansion timescales (isochoric heating) and a vigorous community of researchers is applying these techniques using petawatt scale laser systems, but the microscopic size scale of the WDM produced in this way limits access to some physics phenomena. Pulsed power hydrodynamics techniques, either through high convergence liner compression of a large volume, modest density, low temperature plasma to densities approaching solid density or through the explosion and subsequent expansion of a conductor (wire) against a high pressure (density) gas background (isobaric expansion) techniques both offer the prospect for producing warm dense matter in macroscopic quantities. However, both techniques demand substantial energy, proper power conditioning and delivery, and an understanding of the hydrodynamic and instability processes that limit each technique. Similarly, liner compression of normal density material, perhaps using multiple reflected shocks can provide access to the challenging region above normal density -- again with the requirement of very large amounts of driving energy. In this paper we will provide an introduction to techniques that might be applied to explore this interesting new application of the energy-rich technology of pulse power and high magnetic fields.

  20. GUT Cosmic Magnetic Fields in a Warm Inflationary Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arjun Berera; Thomas W. Kephart; Stuart D. Wick

    1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Sources of magnetic fields from grand unified theories are studied in the warm inflation regime. A ferromagnetic Savvidy vacuum scenario is presented that yields observationally interesting large scale magnetic fields. As an intermediate step, a general analysis is made of defect production at the onset of warm inflation and monopole constraints are obtained. Many features of this Savvidy vacuum scenario are applicable within a supercooled inflation regime and these points are discussed.

  1. Control optimization of the cryoplant warm compressor station for EAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, M.; Hu, L. B.; Zhou, Z. W.; Xia, G. H. [Cryogenic Engineering Division, Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O.Box 1126,Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The cryogenic control system for EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) was designed based on DeltaV DCS of Emerson Corporation. The automatic control of the cryoplant warm compressors has been implemented. However, with ever-degrading performance of critical equipment, the cryoplant operation in the partial design conditions makes the control system fluctuate and unstable. In this paper, the warm compressor control system was optimized to eliminate the pressure oscillation based on the expert PID theory.

  2. Needed : a realistic strategy for global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.; Prinn, Ronald G.; Schmalensee, Richard.

    Through a brief look at the science and economics of climate, the authors show that if climate change turns out to be a serious threat, an effective response will require a substantial and very long-term global effort. ...

  3. Consistency of the tachyon warm inflationary universe models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiao-Min

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The consistency of the tachyon warm inflationary models is studied. We perform a linear stability analysis to give the slow-roll conditions characterized by the potential slow-roll (PSR) parameters for the existence of a tachyon warm inflationary attractor in the system. The PSR parameters in the tachyon warm inflationary models are new defined in our paper. The two cases of an exponential potential and an inverse power law potential are studied when the dissipative coefficient $\\Gamma=\\Gamma_0$ and $\\Gamma=\\Gamma(\\phi)$, respectively. A crucial condition for a workable tachyon warm inflationary model characterized by the Hubble slow-roll (HSR) parameter $\\epsilon_{_H}$ is obtained and extends to some other inflationary models. We can get a proper number of the e-folds in both cases of the tachyon warm inflation, contrary to some existing papers. We also point out that a constant dissipative coefficient $(\\Gamma=\\Gamma_0)$ is usually not a good assumption for a workable warm inflationary model.

  4. Consistency of the tachyon warm inflationary universe models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Min Zhang; Jian-Yang Zhu

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study concerns the consistency of the tachyon warm inflationary models. A linear stability analysis is performed to find the slow-roll conditions, characterized by the potential slow-roll (PSR) parameters, for the existence of a tachyon warm inflationary attractor in the system. The PSR parameters in the tachyon warm inflationary models are redefined. Two cases, an exponential potential and an inverse power-law potential, are studied, when the dissipative coefficient $\\Gamma=\\Gamma_0$ and $\\Gamma=\\Gamma(\\phi)$, respectively. A crucial condition is obtained for a tachyon warm inflationary model characterized by the Hubble slow-roll (HSR) parameter $\\epsilon_{_H}$, and the condition is extendable to some other inflationary models as well. A proper number of e-folds is obtained in both cases of the tachyon warm inflation, in contrast to existing works. It is also found that a constant dissipative coefficient $(\\Gamma=\\Gamma_0)$ is usually not a suitable assumption for a warm inflationary model.

  5. Waste minimization by process modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, J.R.; Yaws, C.L.; Ho, T.C.; Vichailak, M. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation of the Sohio process for the production of acrylonitrile from the catalytic ammoxidation of propylene has been performed, using published kinetic and thermodynamic data to illustrate the concepts of pollution prevention by process modification. The study has determined the reaction parameters which will minimize the production of by-products while maintaining the conversion of propylene above 80%. The reaction parameters studied were reactor type (plug flow reactor [PFR], continuous stirred tank reactor [CSTR], and fluidized bed reactor [FBC]), reaction temperature, residence time, and entering feed temperature. The minimum by-products were produced in an FBR operating at 450 C at a residence time of 7 seconds for a conversion of 81%.

  6. Non-minimal Inflationary Attractors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei, E-mail: kallosh@stanford.edu, E-mail: alinde@stanford.edu [Department of Physics and SITP, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently we identified a new class of (super)conformally invariant theories which allow inflation even if the scalar potential is very steep in terms of the original conformal variables. Observational predictions of a broad class of such theories are nearly model-independent. In this paper we consider generalized versions of these models where the inflaton has a non-minimal coupling to gravity with a negative parameter ? different from its conformal value -1/6. We show that these models exhibit attractor behavior. With even a slight increase of |?| from |?| = 0, predictions of these models for n{sub s} and r rapidly converge to their universal model-independent values corresponding to conformal coupling ? = ?1/6. These values of n{sub s} and r practically coincide with the corresponding values in the limit ? ? ??.

  7. B4WARMED: Boreal Forest Warming at an Ecotone in Danger Principal Investigator: Peter Reich (Regents Professor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    composition by experimentallywarming forest plots (with infrared lamps and soil heating cables of warming treatment and Infrared lamps used in experiment (Bruce Kimball ARS,USDA) Our central hypothesis

  8. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Measurements of Ionization in Warm, Dense Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Paul

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    attention to hydrogens high-pressure properties has sinceal. , Thermophysical properties of warm dense hydrogen using

  9. Game Theory and Global Warming Steve Schecter (North Carolina State University)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schecter, Stephen

    Game Theory and Global Warming Steve Schecter (North Carolina State University) Mary Lou Zeeman global warming game It's time to negotiate a new treaty to stop global warming. · Player 1: Governments, Brazil, Mexico, . . . ). Situation: · An investment of $2 trillion is needed to stop global warming

  10. KNMI PR 2003-05, revised On the relationship between global warming,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    KNMI PR 2003-05, revised On the relationship between global warming, local warming. This is supported by the spatial homogeneity of global warming during the twentieth century, the lack of seasonality century. This study addresses the statistical relationships of this rise to global warming (IPCC, 2001

  11. Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1 Atsumu Ohmura,1 and Knut February 2007. [1] Speculations on the impact of variations in surface solar radiation on global warming was responsible for the observed warming. To disentangle surface solar and greenhouse influences on global warming

  12. Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming Michael response to global warming in a set of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) is investigated. The global-warmed climate is forced by a global pattern of warmed ocean surface temperatures

  13. Predicting the fate of a living fossil: how will global warming affect sex determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Predicting the fate of a living fossil: how will global warming affect sex determination, an unlikely response to global warming, as many oviparous species are nesting earlier as the climate warms. Keywords: climate change; global warming; temperature-dependent sex determination; reptile; Sphenodon 1

  14. Increased Climate Variability Is More Visible Than Global Warming: A General

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Increased Climate Variability Is More Visible Than Global Warming: A General System@utep.edu Abstract While global warming is a statistically confirmed long-term phenomenon, its most visible than the global warming itself. 1 Formulation of the Problem What is global warming. The term "global

  15. Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehugera 1 , B and methane are the main biogenic greenhouse gases (GHG) con-2 tributing to the global warming potential (GWP to design productive16 agro-ecosystems with low global warming impact.17 Keywords18 Global warming potential

  16. Joint CO2 and CH4 accountability for global warming Kirk R. Smitha,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    the causes of global warming, because the amount of global warming occurring at any time is ac- tually dueJoint CO2 and CH4 accountability for global warming Kirk R. Smitha,1,2 , Manish A. Desaia,1 for global warming is its current annual emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs)*. The second most common

  17. Thermal plant bids and market clearing in an electricity pool minimization of costs vs. minimization of consumer payments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, J.; Trias, A.; Gaitan, V.; Alba, J.J.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spanish wholesale electricity market has started on January 1, 1998. Though it is based on simple price/quantity bids, it incorporates some provisions to take thermal plant running requirements into account. This paper presents these rules and its mathematical treatment, focusing on a possible implementation of the minimum income condition, which allows thermal generators to declare minimum stable loads. It also shows another key point in the debate: whether the algorithm should minimize costs or consumer payments.

  18. Waste Minimization Policy at the Romanian Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei, V.; Daian, I.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The radioactive waste management system at Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in Romania was designed to maintain acceptable levels of safety for workers and to protect human health and the environment from exposure to unacceptable levels of radiation. In accordance with terminology of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), this system consists of the ''pretreatment'' of solid and organic liquid radioactive waste, which may include part or all of the following activities: collection, handling, volume reduction (by an in-drum compactor, if appropriate), and storage. Gaseous and aqueous liquid wastes are managed according to the ''dilute and discharge'' strategy. Taking into account the fact that treatment/conditioning and disposal technologies are still not established, waste minimization at the source is a priority environmental management objective, while waste minimization at the disposal stage is presently just a theoretical requirement for future adopted technologies . The necessary operational and maintenance procedures are in place at Cernavoda to minimize the production and contamination of waste. Administrative and technical measures are established to minimize waste volumes. Thus, an annual environmental target of a maximum 30 m3 of radioactive waste volume arising from operation and maintenance has been established. Within the first five years of operations at Cernavoda NPP, this target has been met. The successful implementation of the waste minimization policy has been accompanied by a cost reduction while the occupational doses for plant workers have been maintained at as low as reasonably practicable levels. This paper will describe key features of the waste management system along with the actual experience that has been realized with respect to minimizing the waste volumes at the Cernavoda NPP.

  19. Overtwisted energy-minimizing curl eigenfields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Ghrist; R. Komendarczyk

    2004-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider energy-minimizing divergence-free eigenfields of the curl operator in dimension three from the perspective of contact topology. We give a negative answer to a question of Etnyre and the first author by constructing curl eigenfields which minimize $L^2$ energy on their co-adjoint orbit, yet are orthogonal to an overtwisted contact structure. We conjecture that $K$-contact structures on $S^1$-bundles always define tight minimizers, and prove a partial result in this direction.

  20. Hazardous waste minimization report for CY 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendrick, C.M.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a multipurpose research and development facility. Its primary role is the support of energy technology through applied research and engineering development and scientific research in basic and physical sciences. ORNL also is a valuable resource in the solution of problems of national importance, such as nuclear and chemical waste management. In addition, useful radioactive and stable isotopes which are unavailable from the private sector are produced at ORNL. As a result of these activities, hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes are generated at ORNL. A formal hazardous waste minimization program for ORNL was launched in mid 1985 in response to the requirements of Section 3002 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). During 1986, a task plan was developed. The six major tasks include: planning and implementation of a laboratory-wide chemical inventory and the subsequent distribution, treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) of unneeded chemicals; establishment and implementation of a distribution system for surplus chemicals to other (internal and external) organizations; training and communication functions necessary to inform and motivate laboratory personnel; evaluation of current procurement and tracking systems for hazardous materials and recommendation and implementation of improvements; systematic review of applicable current and proposed ORNL procedures and ongoing and proposed activities for waste volume and/or toxicity reduction potential; and establishment of criteria by which to measure progress and reporting of significant achievements. 8 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  1. Enhanced Optomechanical Levitation of Minimally Supported Dielectrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tina Mller; Christoph Reinhardt; Jack C. Sankey

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Optically levitated mechanical sensors promise isolation from thermal noise far beyond what is possible using flexible materials alone. One way to access this potential is to apply a strong optical trap to a minimally supported mechanical element, thereby increasing its quality factor $Q_m$. Current schemes, however, require prohibitively high laser power ($\\sim10$ W), and the $Q_m$ enhancement is ultimately limited to a factor of $\\sim$ 50 by hybridization between the trapped mode and the dissipative modes of the supporting structure. Here we propose a levitation scheme taking full advantage of an optical resonator to reduce the circulating power requirements by many orders of magnitude. Applying this scheme to the case of a dielectric disk in a Fabry-Perot cavity, we find a tilt-based tuning mechanism for optimizing both center-of-mass and torsional mode traps. Notably, the two modes are trapped with comparable efficiency, and we estimate that a 10-micron-diameter, 100-nm-thick Si disc could be trapped to a frequency of $\\sim$ 10 MHz with only $30$ mW circulating in a cavity of (modest) finesse 1500. Finally, we simulate the effect such a strong trap would have on a realistic doubly-tethered disc. Of central importance, we find torsional motion is comparatively immune to $Q_m$-limiting hybridization, allowing a $Q_m$ enhancement factor of $\\sim$ 1500. This opens the possibility of realizing a laser-tuned 10 MHz mechanical system with a quality factor of order a billion.

  2. Optimization Online - Hankel Matrix Rank Minimization with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryam Fazel

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 29, 2012 ... Abstract: We introduce a flexible optimization framework for nuclear norm minimization of matrices with linear structure, including Hankel,...

  3. Managing Warm-season Improved Pastures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stichler, Charles; Prostko, Eric P.; Livingston, Stephen

    1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    of livestock on pasture will determine the quality and quantity of forage needed. The qual- ity of forage, in turn, determines animal perfor- mance. Non-lactating, mature, breeding animals require a different diet than lactating or young, grow- ing animals... of phosphorus, 40 pounds of potassium, 5 pounds of sulfur and 3 pounds of magnesium from the soil.These nutrients, mined from soils, must be replaced by nutrients from commercial fertilizers or manures. Forage produc- tion will be reduced if nutrients...

  4. Combating global warming while the Senate fiddles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokach, Joshua Z.

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    No action in Congress? A simpler, more effective solution would be to allow utilities to use existing economic dispatch but require cost to include a price of pollution. Dispatchers would use current pricing models to calibrate the costs of various plants, so that cheaper units equal cleaner units. Working within current rules avoids the complexity of EPA regulation and the disruption of enacting new dispatch rules. It offers a more comprehensive solution than state-by-state permit proceedings. (author)

  5. The Great Season Climatic Oscillation and the Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucenna, Ahmed

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present earth warming up is often explained by the atmosphere gas greenhouse effect. This explanation is in contradiction with the thermodynamics second law. The warming up by greenhouse effect is quite improbable. It is cloud reflection that gives to the earth s ground its 15 degres C mean temperature. Since the reflection of the radiation by gases is negligible, the role of the atmosphere greenhouse gases in the earth warming up by earth radiation reflection loses its importance. We think that natural climatic oscillations contribute more to earth climatic disturbances. The oscillation that we hypothesize to exist has a long period (800 to 1000 years). The glacier melting and regeneration cycles lead to variations in the cold region ocean water density and thermal conductibility according to their salinity. These variations lead one to think about a macro climate oscillating between maximum hot and minimum cold temperatures. This oscillation is materialized by the passages of the planet through hot, mil...

  6. Quantifying global warming from the retreat of glaciers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oerlemans, J. (Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands))

    1994-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Records of glacier fluctuations compiled by the World Glacier Monitoring Service can be used to derive an independent estimate of global warming during the last 100 years. Records of different glaciers are made comparable by a two-step scaling procedure; one allowing for differences in glacier geometry, the other for differences in climate sensitivity. The retreat of glaciers during the last 100 years appears to be coherent over the globe. On the basis of modeling of the climate sensitivity of glaciers, the observed glacier retreat can be explained by a linear warming trend of 0.66 kelvin per century.

  7. Orbit equivalence for Cantor minimal Zd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putnam, Ian F.

    Orbit equivalence for Cantor minimal Zd -systems Thierry Giordano Department of Mathematics on the Cantor set is (topologically) orbit equivalent to an AF relation. As a consequence, this extends the classification up to orbit equivalence of minimal dynamical systems on the Cantor set to include AF relations

  8. ISOLATED p-MINIMAL SUBGROUPS ULRICH MEIERFRANKENFELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meierfrankenfeld, Ulrich

    ISOLATED p-MINIMAL SUBGROUPS ULRICH MEIERFRANKENFELD CHRISTOPHER PARKER PETER ROWLEY 1. Introduction Suppose that p is a prime, P is a finite group and S Sylp(P). Then P is p-minimal if S is not normal in P and S is contained in a unique maximal subgroup of P. Now suppose that G is a finite group

  9. Minimizing electrode contamination in an electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Yu Seung; Zelenay, Piotr; Johnston, Christina

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell assembly that is expected to prevent or at least minimize electrode contamination includes one or more getters that trap a component or components leached from a first electrode and prevents or at least minimizes them from contaminating a second electrode.

  10. Aluminum: Principled Scenario Exploration through Minimality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dougherty, Daniel J.

    Aluminum: Principled Scenario Exploration through Minimality Tim Nelson1, Salman Saghafi1, Daniel J. We present Aluminum, a modification of Alloy that presents only minimal scenarios: those that contain no more than is necessary. Aluminum lets users explore the scenario space by adding to scenarios

  11. Aluminum: Principled Scenario Exploration through Minimality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamurthi, Shriram

    Aluminum: Principled Scenario Exploration through Minimality Tim Nelson1, Salman Saghafi1, Daniel J Aluminum, a modification of Alloy that presents only minimal scenarios: those that contain no more than is necessary. Aluminum lets users explore the scenario space by adding to scenarios and backtracking. It also

  12. Technical report Minimizing Calibrated Loss using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Technical report Minimizing Calibrated Loss using Stochastic Low-Rank Newton Descent for large algorithm (SGD) for the minimization of classical Hinge Loss in the primal space. Although com- plexity- imization of any calibrated loss in the primal space. SLND approximates the inverse Hessian by the best low

  13. Minimal ancilla mediated quantum computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy J. Proctor; Viv Kendon

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Schemes of universal quantum computation in which the interactions between the computational elements, in a computational register, are mediated by some ancillary system are of interest due to their relevance to the physical implementation of a quantum computer. Furthermore, reducing the level of control required over both the ancillary and register systems has the potential to simplify any experimental implementation. In this paper we consider how to minimise the control needed to implement universal quantum computation in an ancilla-mediated fashion. Considering computational schemes which require no measurements and hence evolve by unitary dynamics for the global system, we show that when employing an ancilla qubit there are certain fixed-time ancilla-register interactions which, along with ancilla initialisation in the computational basis, are universal for quantum computation with no additional control of either the ancilla or the register. We develop two distinct models based on locally inequivalent interactions and we then discuss the relationship between these unitary models and the measurement-based ancilla-mediated models known as ancilla-driven quantum computation.

  14. Pollution prevention and waste minimization tools workshops: Proceedings. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the second workshop was to bring together representatives of DOE and DOE contractor organizations to discuss four topics: process waste assessments (PWAs), a continuation of one of the sessions held at the first workshop in Clearwater; waste minimization reporting requirements; procurement systems for waste minimization; and heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) and replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The topics were discussed in four concurrent group sessions. Participants in each group were encouraged to work toward achieving two main objectives: establish a ``clear vision`` of the overall target for their session`s program, focusing not just on where the program is now but on where it should go in the long term; and determine steps to be followed to carry out the target program.

  15. American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine, and Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    1 American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine warming has been happening · What might have caused global warming · Whether global warming

  16. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Joshua Eugene

    2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K{sup +} ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally, comparisons of improved experimental and calculated axial focus (> 100 x axial compression, < 2 ns pulses) and higher peak energy deposition on target are also presented. These achievements demonstrate the capabilities for near term target heating experiments to T{sub e} {approx} 0.1 eV and for future ion accelerators to heat targets to T{sub e} > 1 eV.

  17. What Geology Has To Say About Global Warming William Menke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    insights about earth's climate that can be applied to the present-day global warming debate. The geological record of ancient climate is excellent. Ancient temperatures can be determined very precisely, because the composition of the shells of corals and other marine organisms varies measurably with it. Furthermore

  18. The multimillennial sea-level commitment of global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    The multimillennial sea-level commitment of global warming Anders Levermanna,b,1 , Peter U. Clarkc Board June 13, 2013 (received for review November 7, 2012) Global mean sea level has been steadily for different levels of global mean temperature increase above preindustrial levels. Although sea- level rise

  19. Tachyon warm inflationary universe model in the weak dissipative regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio del Campo; Ramon Herrera; Joel Saavedra

    2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflationary universe model in a tachyon field theory is studied in the weak dissipative regime. We develop our model for an exponential potential and the dissipation parameter $\\Gamma=\\Gamma_0$=constant. We describe scalar and tensor perturbations for this scenario.

  20. From the warm magnetized atomic medium to molecular clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Hennebelle; R. Banerjee; E. Vazquez-Semadeni; R. Klessen; E. Audit

    2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    {It has recently been proposed that giant molecular complexes form at the sites where streams of diffuse warm atomic gas collide at transonic velocities.} {We study the global statistics of molecular clouds formed by large scale colliding flows of warm neutral atomic interstellar gas under ideal MHD conditions. The flows deliver material as well as kinetic energy and trigger thermal instability leading eventually to gravitational collapse.} {We perform adaptive mesh refinement MHD simulations which, for the first time in this context, treat self-consistently cooling and self-gravity.} {The clouds formed in the simulations develop a highly inhomogeneous density and temperature structure, with cold dense filaments and clumps condensing from converging flows of warm atomic gas. In the clouds, the column density probability density distribution (PDF) peaks at $\\sim 2 \\times 10^{21} \\psc$ and decays rapidly at higher values; the magnetic intensity correlates weakly with density from $n \\sim 0.1$ to $10^4 \\pcc$, and then varies roughly as $n^{1/2}$ for higher densities.} {The global statistical properties of such molecular clouds are reasonably consistent with observational determinations. Our numerical simulations suggest that molecular clouds formed by the moderately supersonic collision of warm atomic gas streams.}

  1. On the consistency of tachyon warm inflation with viscous pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cid, Antonella

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain conditions for the existence of an attractor in the system of equations describing a tachyon warm inflationary model with bulk viscosity taken into account. When these conditions are met the evolution approaches slow-roll regime. We present the primordial power spectrum for the tachyon field by considering a dissipation coefficient depending on the scalar field and temperature.

  2. Non-linear Langmuir waves in a warm quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinov, Alexander E., E-mail: dubinov-ae@yandex.ru; Kitaev, Ilya N. [Russian Federal Nuclear CenterAll-Russia Scientific and Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF), 37 Mira Ave., Nizhny Novgorod region, Sarov 607188 (Russian Federation); Sarov State Institute of Physics and Technology (SarFTI), National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, 607186 Sarov, Nizhny Novgorod region (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-linear differential equation describing the Langmuir waves in a warm quantum electron-ion plasma has been derived. Its numerical solutions of the equation show that ordinary electronic oscillations, similar to the classical oscillations, occur along with small-scale quantum Langmuir oscillations induced by the Bohm quantum force.

  3. ORIGINAL PAPER Global warming impact on the dominant precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    is then used to simulate the changes due to global warming over the twenty-first century. The regional climate to potentially negative impacts of climate change while decreasing the likelihood of successful region-wide adaptation strategies emerging. While much of the region has a Mediterranean-type climate, the region spans

  4. Global warming and Arctic climate. Raymond S. Bradley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Global warming and Arctic climate. Raymond S. Bradley Climate System Research Center University of Massachusetts Amherst #12;How have global temperatures changed & why? 1. Average instrumental records from around the world; express all as anomalies from 1961-90 average #12;#12;Overall trend is upward ("global

  5. Sweet potatoes are a warm-weather vegetable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweet potatoes are a warm- weather vegetable related to the morning glory family.Although Louisiana sweet potatoes are often referred to as yams, they truly are sweet potatoes. The Louisiana producers began calling the orange-fleshed sweet potatoes grown in Louisiana"yams" to distinguish them from

  6. Minimizing damage to a propped fracture by correct selection of proppant and controlled flowback procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Bradley Mason

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MINIMIZING DAMAGE TO A PROPPED FRACTURE BY CORRECT SELECTION OF PROPPANT AND CONTROLLED FLOWBACK PROCEDURES A Thesis by BRADLEY MASON ROBINSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering MINIMIZING DAMAGE TO A PROPPED FRACTURE BY CORRECT SELECTION OF PROPPANT AND CONTROLLED FLOWBACK PROCEDURES A Thesis by BRADLEY MASON ROBINSON Approved...

  7. Effect of Minimal lengths on Electron Magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khireddine Nouicer

    2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the magnetic properties of electron in a constant magnetic field and confined by a isotropic two dimensional harmonic oscillator on a space where the coordinates and momenta operators obey generalized commutation relations leading to the appearance of a minimal length. Using the momentum space representation we determine exactly the energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. We prove that the usual degeneracy of Landau levels is removed by the presence of the minimal length in the limits of weak and strong magnetic field.The thermodynamical properties of the system, at high temperature, are also investigated showing a new magnetic behavior in terms of the minimal length.

  8. The potential to mitigate global warming with no-tillage management is only realized when practised in the long term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Six, J; Ogle, S M; Breidt, F J; Conant, R T; Mosier, A R; Paustian, K

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to mitigate global warming with no-tillageNT adoption reduces the net global warming potential (GWP)soil for purposes of global warming mitigation. Our results

  9. The Impact of Global Warming on U.S. Agriculture: An Econometric Analysis of Optimal Growing Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlenker, Wolfram; Hanemann, W. Michael; Fisher, Anthony C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Really Bene?t From Global Warming? Accounting for IrrigationR. , The Economics of Global Warming, Washington, D.C. :1992. , The Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture:

  10. Is global warming just a giant natural fluctuation? When estimating voter's intentions, pollsters know that statements like "40%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Is global warming just a giant natural fluctuation? When estimating voter theory. So what about global warming? Shouldn't we apply the same warming since the mid-20th century" (IPCC, Assessment Report 5, AR5), then surely

  11. How strong is carbon cycle-climate feedback under global warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    and physical climate system in a global warming scenario is studied using an Earth system model including

  12. Winter 2010 in Europe: A cold extreme in a warming climate J. Cattiaux,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codron, Francis

    by a mean warm anomaly at global scale, especially over Greenland, Canada, North Africa and Middle East (see

  13. Waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this plan is to document the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program. The plan specifies those activities and methods that are or will be employed to reduce the quantity and toxicity of wastes generated at the site. The intent of this plan is to respond to and comply with (DOE's) policy and guidelines concerning the need for pollution prevention. The Plan is composed of a LLNL Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan and, as attachments, Program- and Department-specific waste minimization plans. This format reflects the fact that waste minimization is considered a line management responsibility and is to be addressed by each of the Programs and Departments. 14 refs.

  14. MINIMAL VOLUME Laurent BESSI`ERES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remy, Bertrand

    MINIMAL VOLUME by Laurent BESSI`ERES Abstract. -- The aim of this text is to explain some rigidity manifold, simplicial volume, global topological meth- ods (`a la Gromov). #12;2 LAURENT BESSI`ERES 1

  15. Penalty Decomposition Methods for Rank Minimization ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 22, 2010 ... In Section 2, we establish some technical results on a class of rank minimization ..... Without loss of generality, assume that {( Zk. X,. . Zk ...... Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, 2009.

  16. Heterotrophic Soil Respiration in Warming Experiments: Using Microbial Indicators to Partition Contributions from Labile and Recalcitrant Soil Organic Carbon. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradford, M A; Melillo, J M; Reynolds, J F; Treseder, K K; Wallenstein, M D

    2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The central objective of the proposed work was to develop a genomic approach (nucleic acid-based) that elucidates the mechanistic basis for the observed impacts of experimental soil warming on forest soil respiration. The need to understand the mechanistic basis arises from the importance of such information for developing effective adaptation strategies for dealing with projected climate change. Specifically, robust predictions of future climate will permit the tailoring of the most effective adaptation efforts. And one of the greatest uncertainties in current global climate models is whether there will be a net loss of carbon from soils to the atmosphere as climate warms. Given that soils contain approximately 2.5 times as much carbon as the atmosphere, a net loss could lead to runaway climate warming. Indeed, most ecosystem models predict that climate warming will stimulate microbial decomposition of soil carbon, producing such a positive feedback to rising global temperatures. Yet the IPCC highlights the uncertainty regarding this projected feedback. The uncertainty arises because although warming-experiments document an initial increase in the loss of carbon from soils, the increase in respiration is short-lived, declining to control levels in a few years. This attenuation could result from changes in microbial physiology with temperature. We explored possible microbial responses to warming using experiments and modeling. Our work advances our understanding of how soil microbial communities and their activities are structured, generating insight into how soil carbon might respond to warming. We show the importance of resource partitioning in structuring microbial communities. Specifically, we quantified the relative abundance of fungal taxa that proliferated following the addition of organic substrates to soil. We added glycine, sucrose, cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein to soils in conjunction with 3-bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU), a nucleotide analog. Active microbes absorb BrdU from the soil solution; if they multiply in response to substrate additions, they incorporate the BrdU into their DNA. After allowing soils to incubate, we extracted BrdU-labeled DNA and sequenced the ITS regions of fungal rDNA. Fungal taxa that proliferated following substrate addition were likely using the substrate as a resource for growth. We found that the structure of active fungal communities varied significantly among substrates. The active fungal community under glycine was significantly different from those under other conditions, while the active communities under sucrose and cellulose were marginally different from each other and the control. These results indicate that the overall community structure of active fungi was altered by the addition of glycine, sucrose, and cellulose and implies that some fungal taxa respond to changes in resource availability. The community composition of active fungi is also altered by experimental warming. We found that glycine-users tended to increase under warming, while lignin-, tannin/protein-, and sucrose-users declined. The latter group of substrates requires extracellular enzymes for use, but glycine does not. It is possible that warming selects for fungal species that target, in particular, labile substrates. Linking these changes in microbial communities and resource partitioning to soil carbon dynamics, we find that substrate mineralization rates are, in general, significantly lower in soils exposed to long-term warming. This suggests that microbial use of organic substrates is impaired by warming. Yet effects are dependent on substrate identity. There are fundamental differences in the metabolic capabilities of the communities in the control and warmed soils. These differences might relate to the changes in microbial community composition, which appeared to be associated with groups specialized on different resources. We also find that functional responses indicate temperature acclimation of the microbial community. There are distinct seasonal patterns and to long-term soil warming, with

  17. Minimally refined biomass fuel. [carbohydrate-water-alcohol mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, R.K.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1981-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water-solubilizes the carbohydrate; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the viscosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  18. On Quantum Channel Estimation with Minimal Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Zorzi; F. Ticozzi; A. Ferrante

    2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the minimal experimental resources that ensure a unique solution in the estimation of trace-preserving quantum channels with both direct and convex optimization methods. A convenient parametrization of the constrained set is used to develop a globally converging Newton-type algorithm that ensures a physically admissible solution to the problem. Numerical simulations are provided to support the results, and indicate that the minimal experimental setting is sufficient to guarantee good estimates.

  19. The Parisi formula has a unique minimizer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Auffinger; Wei-Kuo Chen

    2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979, G. Parisi predicted a variational formula for the thermodynamic limit of the free energy in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model and described the role played by its minimizer. This formula was verified in the seminal work of Talagrand and later generalized to the mixed p-spin models by Panchenko. In this paper, we prove that the minimizer in Parisi's formula is unique at any temperature and external field by establishing the strict convexity of the Parisi functional.

  20. Tropical drought regions in global warming and El Nin~o teleconnections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, Chia

    warming, and the drought regions are particularly likely to have substantial human impacts. [3] VariationsTropical drought regions in global warming and El Nin~o teleconnections J. D. Neelin Department; accepted 19 November 2003; published 24 December 2003. [1] Climate model global warming simulations predict

  1. DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE AND ENVIRONMENT? By Michael E. Mann I. Introduction The subjects of "global warming" and "climate change" have become parts of both the popular lexicon and the public discourse. Discussions of global warming often evoke passionate

  2. Rapid and extensive warming following cessation of1 solar radiation management2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    , and sustained warming over land occurs17 that is well outside 20th century climate variability bounds. Global controlled by background GHG levels. Thus, a risk of22 abrupt and dangerous warming is inherent to the large aerosol34 layer could effectively curb global warming. In order to stabilize global climate near35 present

  3. Greenhouse-gas emission targets for limiting global warming to 2 6C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imamoglu, Atac

    LETTERS Greenhouse-gas emission targets for limiting global warming to 2 6C Malte Meinshausen1. Frame6,7 & Myles R. Allen7 More than 100 countries have adopted a global warming limit of 2 6C or below levels in 2050 are robust indicators of the probability that twenty-first century warming will not exceed

  4. How Does the Eye Warm? Part II: Sensitivity to Vertical Wind Shear and a Trajectory Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How Does the Eye Warm? Part II: Sensitivity to Vertical Wind Shear and a Trajectory Analysis DANIEL of vertical wind shear on the structure of warming and descent in the eye; results are compared with the no environment, time-averaged eye descent is maximized at 12­13-km height. Warming is not generally maximized

  5. Equatorial currents transport changes for extreme warm and cold events in the Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Equatorial currents transport changes for extreme warm and cold events in the Atlantic Ocean Marlos compositedevents.For the cold(warm)eventthe EUC shows a greater (reduced) transport and core velocity, and a deeper.Wainer, Equatorial currents transport changes for extreme warm and cold events in the Atlantic Ocean, Geophys. Res

  6. Can ozone depletion and global warming interact to produce rapid climate change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limpasuvan, Varavut

    Can ozone depletion and global warming interact to produce rapid climate change? Dennis L. Hartmann of Climate Change (IPCC) assess- ment of the status of global warming, which reported that winter stratospheric ozone depletion and greenhouse warming are possible. These interactions may be responsible

  7. 16 APRIL 2004 VOL 304 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org388 Future Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazzaniga, Michael

    16 APRIL 2004 VOL 304 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org388 Future Global Warming Scenarios INA STUDY the short-term consequences of global warming. This scenario, which predicts a shutdown of the Atlantic, if global warming were to cause a repeat of such an abrupt change, the consequences would be akin to those

  8. Climate changes mirror global warming predictions BY THOMAS CROWLEY Guest columnist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate changes mirror global warming predictions BY THOMAS CROWLEY Guest columnist The Herald" and must reflect, at least in part, the climate system response to the increase in global warming. What if we wanted to prevent global warming. This is just doomsday speaking of the same type that he

  9. Influence of weather and global warming in chloride ingress into concrete: a stochastic approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Influence of weather and global warming in chloride ingress into concrete: a stochastic approach E the influence of weather conditions and global warming on chloride ingress into concrete. The assessment including seasonal variations and global warming is also proposed in this work. Three scenarios of global

  10. Role of global warming on the statistics of record-breaking temperatures S. Redner1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redner, Sidney

    Role of global warming on the statistics of record-breaking temperatures S. Redner1, * and Mark R in Philadelphia, as a function of the number of years of observation. We then consider the case of global warming question arises: is global warming the cause of such heat waves or are they merely statistical fluctuations

  11. Needed: A Realistic Strategy for Global Warming Henry D. Jacoby, Ronald G. Prinn and Richard Schmalensee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Needed: A Realistic Strategy for Global Warming Henry D. Jacoby, Ronald G. Prinn and Richard of this issue. One day we hear that all responsible scientists agree that global warming is a dagger be slashed immediately to save our planet. The next day we're told that global warming is the illegitimate

  12. The Threat to the Planet* Dark & Bright Sides of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    The Threat to the Planet* Dark & Bright Sides of Global Warming Jim Hansen 3 October 2007 presented provides most important information on global warming. Recorded human history occurs within the Holocene for these large climate change is perturbations of Earth's orbit. #12;Continental Drift Fig. 1 "Global Warming

  13. Response of the Zonal Mean Atmospheric Circulation to El Nio versus Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Gang

    Response of the Zonal Mean Atmospheric Circulation to El Niño versus Global Warming JIAN LU Pacific. The hydrological impacts of global warming also exhibit distinct patterns over the subtropics response to global warming: 1) The increase in static stability of the subtropical and midlatitude

  14. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature09407 Global metabolic impacts of recent climate warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huey, Raymond B.

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature09407 Global metabolic impacts of recent climate warming Michael E. Dillon and projected climate warming2,13,14 . Global warming is probably having profound and diverse effects phenology3,4 , community interactions5 , genetics3,6 and extinctions7 have been attributed to recent global

  15. Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location MinHo Kwon,1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location Tim Li,1 MinHo Kwon,1,3 Ming Zhao,3 Jong) is used to investigate the change of tropical cyclone frequency in the North Pacific under global warming, and W. Yu (2010), Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L

  16. What should we do about the dangers posed by global warming? Judging by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    What should we do about the dangers posed by global warming? Judging by the collective actions rainandozonedepletioninanattempt toconfusethepublicaboutthescience of global warming and delay regula- tion of greenhouse of Engineering,itdiffersfromtheothers in its attitude towards those who deny the reality of global warming, or hu

  17. Report narrows down impact of global warming People will soon be able to find out how

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Report narrows down impact of global warming People will soon be able to find out how vulnerable their own local area is to global warming, thanks to a new report led by UEA. STARDEX, a European Union is taken to reduce human-induced global warming. "Although more research is needed to increase our

  18. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch William W. L changes in sea surface temperature5 . This study shows that ocean warming has already affected global. Cheung1 , Reg Watson2 & Daniel Pauly3 Marine fishes and invertebrates respond to ocean warming through

  19. Journal of Mammalogy, 84(2):354368, 2003 MAMMALIAN RESPONSE TO GLOBAL WARMING ON VARIED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    354 Journal of Mammalogy, 84(2):354­368, 2003 MAMMALIAN RESPONSE TO GLOBAL WARMING ON VARIED how Rocky Mountain mam- malian communities changed during past global warming events characterized not) in different ways. Nevertheless, examination of past global warming episodes suggested

  20. Can Oceanic Freshwater Flux Amplify Global Warming? LIPING ZHANG AND LIXIN WU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can Oceanic Freshwater Flux Amplify Global Warming? LIPING ZHANG AND LIXIN WU Physical Oceanography in global warming are studied using simulations of a climate model in which the freshwater flux changes that the warm climate leads to an acceleration of the global water cycle, which causes freshening in the high

  1. Detection-attribution of global warming at the regional scale: How to deal with precipitation variability?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    Detection-attribution of global warming at the regional scale: How to deal with precipitation record over recent decades. Citation: Douville, H. (2006), Detection-attribution of global warming at recent climate scenarios, Douville et al. [2005] showed that the precipitation response to global warming

  2. Global warming, Bergmann's rule and body mass are they related? The chukar partridge (Alectoris chukar) case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yom-Tov, Yoram

    Global warming, Bergmann's rule and body mass ± are they related? The chukar partridge (Alectoris of chukar partridges Alectoris chukar has changed as a result of global warming. Body mass showed warming, Israel INTRODUCTION Recent global environmental changes are providing scientists

  3. Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well? Reto Knutti1 global surface warming so well?, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L18704, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL034932. 1 models reproduce the observed surface warming better than one would expect given the uncertainties

  4. Mechanisms for Tropical Tropospheric Circulation Change in Response to Global Warming*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Mechanisms for Tropical Tropospheric Circulation Change in Response to Global Warming* JIAN MA change in global warming is studied by comparing the response of an atmospheric general circulation model globally in response to SST warming. A diagnostic framework is developed based on a linear baroclinic model

  5. A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE"?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE on the global warming that can be tolerated without risking dangerous anthropogenic interference with climate. I" mainly as a metaphor for the danger posed by global warming. So I changed "Hell" to "disaster." What

  6. Thursday, November 13 2014 Global warming could increase U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romps, David M.

    Thursday, November 13 2014 Ad Wonkblog Global warming could increase U.S. lightning strikes by 50, a team of researchers deliver an alarming prediction: A global warming world will see a major increase affect lightning. The upshot was that while precipitation may increase in some areas under global warming

  7. Sensitivities of zonal mean atmospheric circulation to SST warming in an aquaplanet model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Gang

    ] What causes these circulation changes is not fully understood. Since global warming and El Niño, storm tracks, or the boundaries of Hadley cell circulations under global warming [e.g., Yin, 2005 and the latitude of surface westerlies in response to El Niño versus global warming [Lu et al., 2008; Chen et al

  8. WARMING TRENDS IN THE TAHOE HAPPY HOUR WITH ROBERT COATS, PH.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    to the causes of global warming lie at the national and international level, addressing the consequencesWARMING TRENDS IN THE TAHOE BASIN HAPPY HOUR WITH ROBERT COATS, PH.D. (HYDROIKOS LTD.) Date scientists agree that the earth's atmosphere and oceans are warming and the consequences will fall somewhere

  9. Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.K.; Hughes, P.J.; Fairchild, P.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Kusik, C.L.; Dieckmann, J.T.; McMahon, E.M.; Hobday, N. (Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study is to develop representative indications of the relative energy use, associated CO{sub 2} emissions, and total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) of viable option to replace CFCs in their major energy-related application areas. It was motivated, in part, by a concern that most attention to data has focused on the DIRECT global warming effect of CFCs and their alternatives, with inadequate attention being paid to the INDIRECT effect of the CO{sub 2} emissions arising from the differences in energy consumption by systems using different alternatives. The DIRECT and INDIRECT contributions are combined in this analysis to determine the TEWI of the various technical options. The study is international in scope and takes into account significant differences in present CFC end-use practices, sources of energy, and other societal factors between Europe, Japan, and North America.

  10. Surface electromagnetic wave equations in a warm magnetized quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Chunhua; Yang, Weihong [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei (China); Wu, Zhengwei, E-mail: wuzw@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Center of Low Temperature Plasma Application, Yunnan Aerospace Industry Company, Kunming, 650229 Yunnan (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the single-fluid plasma model, a theoretical investigation of surface electromagnetic waves in a warm quantum magnetized inhomogeneous plasma is presented. The surface electromagnetic waves are assumed to propagate on the plane between a vacuum and a warm quantum magnetized plasma. The quantum magnetohydrodynamic model includes quantum diffraction effect (Bohm potential), and quantum statistical pressure is used to derive the new dispersion relation of surface electromagnetic waves. And the general dispersion relation is analyzed in some special cases of interest. It is shown that surface plasma oscillations can be propagated due to quantum effects, and the propagation velocity is enhanced. Furthermore, the external magnetic field has a significant effect on surface wave's dispersion equation. Our work should be of a useful tool for investigating the physical characteristic of surface waves and physical properties of the bounded quantum plasmas.

  11. A General Systems Theory for Rain Formation in Warm Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cumulus cloud model which can explain the observed characteristics of warm rain formation in monsoon clouds is presented. The model is based on classical statistical physical concepts and satisfies the principle of maximum entropy production. Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations that are ubiquitous to all dynamical systems in nature, such as physical, chemical, social, etc and are characterized by inverse power law form for power (eddy energy) spectrum signifying long-range space-time correlations. A general systems theory model for atmospheric flows developed by the author is based on the concept that the large eddy energy is the integrated mean of enclosed turbulent (small scale) eddies. This model gives scale-free universal governing equations for cloud growth processes. The model predicted cloud parameters are in agreement with reported observations, in particular, the cloud dropsize distribution. Rain formation can occur in warm clouds within 30minutes lifetime under favourable conditions of moisture supply in the environment.

  12. Equipment Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  13. Gametogenesis of the warm water coral Astrangia astreiformis (Anthozoa: Scleractinia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St. Pierre, Lauren Jean

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 19g6 Major Subject: Zoology GAMETOGENESIS OF THE WARM WATER CORAL ASTRANGIA ASTREIFORMIS (ANTHOZOA: SCLERACTINIA) A Thesis by LAUREN 3EAN ST. PIERRE Approved as to style and content by: ary K. Wicksten Chair of Committee... Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Mary K. Wicksten ~At t f (?th: I t ) h tyy (non-reef building) coral naturally occurring with and without symbiotic zooxanthellae (endosymbiotic dfnoflagellates). It has a recorded range from Massachusetts, along...

  14. Nuclear stopping power in warm and hot dense matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faussurier, Gerald; Blancard, Christophe [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91 297 Arpajon (France); Gauthier, Maxence [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91 297 Arpajon (France); LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to estimate the nuclear component of the stopping power of ions propagating in dense matter. Three kinds of effective pair potentials are proposed. Results from the warm dense matter regime and the domain of high energy density physics are presented and discussed for proton and helium. The role of ionic temperature is examined. The nuclear stopping power can play a noticeable role in hot dense matter.

  15. Discussion on common errors in analyzing sea level accelerations, solar trends and global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Errors in applying regression models and wavelet filters used to analyze geophysical signals are discussed: (1) multidecadal natural oscillations (e.g. the quasi 60-year Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)) need to be taken into account for properly quantifying anomalous accelerations in tide gauge records such as in New York City; (2) uncertainties and multicollinearity among climate forcing functions prevent a proper evaluation of the solar contribution to the 20th century global surface temperature warming using overloaded linear regression models during the 1900-2000 period alone; (3) when periodic wavelet filters, which require that a record is pre-processed with a reflection methodology, are improperly applied to decompose non-stationary solar and climatic time series, Gibbs boundary artifacts emerge yielding misleading physical interpretations. By correcting these errors and using optimized regression models that reduce multico...

  16. Cosmological perturbations in warm-tachyon inflationary universe model with viscous pressure on the brane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Setare; V. Kamali

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study warm-viscous inflationary universe model on the brane, in a tachyon field theory. We obtain the general conditions which are required for this model to be realizable. In longitudinal gauge, the primoradial perturbation parameters are found in great details, using slow-roll and quasi-stable approximations. The general expressions of the tensor-to-scalar ratio, scalar spectral index and its running are found. We derive the characteristics of the inflationary universe model by using an effective exponential potential in two cases: 1- Dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$ and bulk viscous parameter $\\zeta$ are constant parameters. 2- Dissipative parameter as a function of tachyon field $\\phi$ and bulk viscous parameter as a function of radiation-matter mixture energy density $\\rho$. The parameters of the model are restricted by recent observational data from the seven-year Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe (WMAP7).

  17. Warm-viscous inflation model on the brane in the light of BICEP2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Setare; V. Kamali

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work warm inflationary universe model with viscous pressure on the brane in high-dissipation regime is studied. We derive a condition which is required for this model to be realizable in slow-roll approximation. We also present analytic expressions for density perturbation and amplitude of tensor perturbation in longitudinal gauge. General expressions of tensor-to-scalar ratio, scalar spectral index and its running are obtained. We develop our model by using chaotic potential, the characteristics of this model are calculated for two specific cases: 1- Dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$ and bulk viscous parameter $\\zeta$ are constant parameters. 2- Dissipative parameter as a function of scalar field $\\phi$ and bulk viscous parameter as a function of radiation-matter mixture energy density $\\rho$. The parameters of the model are restricted by WMAP9, Planck and BICEP2 observational data.

  18. Cosmological perturbations in warm-tachyon inflationary universe model with viscous pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setare, M R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the warm-tachyon inflationary universe model with viscous pressure in high-dissipation regime. General conditions which are required for this model to be realizable are derived in the slow-roll approximation. We present analytic expressions for density perturbation and amplitude of tensor perturbation in longitudinal gauge. Expressions of tensor-to-scalar ratio, scalar spectral index and its running are obtained. We develop our model by using exponential potential, the characteristics of this model are calculated for two specific cases in great details: 1- Dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$ and bulk viscous parameter $\\zeta$ are constant parameters. 2- Dissipative parameter is a function of tachyon field $\\phi$ and bulk viscous parameter is a function of matter-radiation mixture energy density $\\rho$. The parameters of the model are restricted by recent observational data from the nine-year Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe (WMAP9), Planck and BICEP2 data.

  19. Cosmological perturbations in warm-tachyon inflationary universe model with viscous pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Setare; V. Kamali

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the warm-tachyon inflationary universe model with viscous pressure in high-dissipation regime. General conditions which are required for this model to be realizable are derived in the slow-roll approximation. We present analytic expressions for density perturbation and amplitude of tensor perturbation in longitudinal gauge. Expressions of tensor-to-scalar ratio, scalar spectral index and its running are obtained. We develop our model by using exponential potential, the characteristics of this model are calculated for two specific cases in great details: 1- Dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$ and bulk viscous parameter $\\zeta$ are constant parameters. 2- Dissipative parameter is a function of tachyon field $\\phi$ and bulk viscous parameter is a function of matter-radiation mixture energy density $\\rho$. The parameters of the model are restricted by recent observational data from the nine-year Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe (WMAP9), Planck and BICEP2 data.

  20. Cosmological perturbations in warm-tachyon inflationary universe model with viscous pressure on the brane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setare, M R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study warm-viscous inflationary universe model on the brane, in a tachyon field theory. We obtain the general conditions which are required for this model to be realizable. In longitudinal gauge, the primoradial perturbation parameters are found in great details, using slow-roll and quasi-stable approximations. The general expressions of the tensor-to-scalar ratio, scalar spectral index and its running are found. We derive the characteristics of the inflationary universe model by using an effective exponential potential in two cases: 1- Dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$ and bulk viscous parameter $\\zeta$ are constant parameters. 2- Dissipative parameter as a function of tachyon field $\\phi$ and bulk viscous parameter as a function of radiation-matter mixture energy density $\\rho$. The parameters of the model are restricted by recent observational data from the seven-year Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe (WMAP7).

  1. Warm inflation dynamics in the low temperature regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastero-Gil, Mar [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Granada-18071 (Spain); Berera, Arjun [School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflation scenarios are studied with the dissipative coefficient computed in the equilibrium approximation. Use is made of the analytical expressions available in the low temperature regime with focus on the possibility of achieving strong dissipation within this approximation. Two different types of models are examined: monomial or equivalently chaotic type potentials, and hybrid like models where the energy density during inflation is dominated by the false vacuum. In both cases dissipation is shown to typically increase during inflation and bring the system into the strong dissipative regime. Observational consequences are explored for the amplitude of the primordial spectrum and the spectral index, which translate into constraints on the number of fields mediating the dissipative mechanism, and the number of light degrees of freedom produced during inflation. This paper furthers the foundational development of warm inflation dynamics from first principles quantum field theory by calculating conservative lower bound estimates on dissipative effects during inflation using the well established thermal equilibrium approximation. This approximation does not completely represent the actual physical system and earlier work has shown relaxing both the equilibrium and low temperature constraints can substantially enlarge the warm inflation regime, but these improvements still need further theoretical development.

  2. Global warming and global dioxide emission: An empirical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linyan Sun [Xian Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China); Wang, M. [Saint Mary`s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the dynamic relationship between global surface temperature (global warming) and global carbon dioxide emission (CO{sub 2}) is modelled and analyzed by causality and spectral analysis in the time domain and frequency domain, respectively. Historical data of global CO{sub 2} emission and global surface temperature anomalies over 129 years from 1860-1988 are used in this study. The causal relationship between the two phenomena is first examined using the Sim and Granger causality test in the time domain after the data series are filtered by ARIMA models. The Granger causal relationship is further scrutinized and confirmed by cross-spectral and multichannel spectral analysis in the frequency domain. The evidence found from both analyses proves that there is a positive causal relationship between the two variables. The time domain analysis suggests that Granger causality exists between global surface temperature and global CO{sub 2} emission. Further, CO{sub 2} emission causes the change in temperature. The conclusions are further confirmed by the frequency domain analysis, which indicates that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission causes climate warming because a high coherence exists between the two variables. Furthermore, it is proved that climate changes happen after an increase in CO{sub 2} emission, which confirms that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission does cause global warming. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Waste Minimization Study on Pyrochemical Reprocessing Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boussier, H.; Conocar, O.; Lacquement, J. [CEA/DEN Valrho Marcoule/DRCP/SCPS/Pyrochemical Processes Laboratory, BP 17171 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ideally a new pyro-process should not generate more waste, and should be at least as safe and cost effective as the hydrometallurgical processes currently implemented at industrial scale. This paper describes the thought process, the methodology and some results obtained by process integration studies to devise potential pyro-processes and to assess their capability of achieving this challenging objective. As example the assessment of a process based on salt/metal reductive extraction, designed for the reprocessing of Generation IV carbide spent fuels, is developed. Salt/metal reductive extraction uses the capability of some metals, aluminum in this case, to selectively reduce actinide fluorides previously dissolved in a fluoride salt bath. The reduced actinides enter the metal phase from which they are subsequently recovered; the fission products remain in the salt phase. In fact, the process is not so simple, as it requires upstream and downstream subsidiary steps. All these process steps generate secondary waste flows representing sources of actinide leakage and/or FP discharge. In aqueous processes the main solvent (nitric acid solution) has a low boiling point and evaporate easily or can be removed by distillation, thereby leaving limited flow containing the dissolved substance behind to be incorporated in a confinement matrix. From the point of view of waste generation, one main handicap of molten salt processes, is that the saline phase (fluoride in our case) used as solvent is of same nature than the solutes (radionuclides fluorides) and has a quite high boiling point. So it is not so easy, than it is with aqueous solutions, to separate solvent and solutes in order to confine only radioactive material and limit the final waste flows. Starting from the initial block diagram devised two years ago, the paper shows how process integration studies were able to propose process fittings which lead to a reduction of the waste variety and flows leading at an 'ideal' new block diagram allowing internal solvent recycling, and self eliminating reactants. This new flowsheet minimizes the quantity of inactive inlet flows that would have inevitably to be incorporated in a final waste form. The study identifies all knowledge gaps to be filled and suggest some possible R and D issues to confirm or infirm the feasibility of the proposed process fittings. (authors)

  4. Environmental Restoration Program waste minimization and pollution prevention self-assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Program within Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. is currently developing a more active waste minimization and pollution prevention program. To determine areas of programmatic improvements within the ER Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program, the ER Program required an evaluation of the program across the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Environmental Restoration and Waste Minimization Site, and the Portsmouth Environmental Restoration and Waste Minimization Site. This document presents the status of the overall program as of fourth quarter FY 1994, presents pollution prevention cost avoidance data associated with FY 1994 activities, and identifies areas for improvement. Results of this assessment indicate that the ER Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program is firmly established and is developing rapidly. Several procedural goals were met in FY 1994 and many of the sites implemented ER waste minimization options. Additional growth is needed, however, for the ER Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program.

  5. New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmenta...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish August...

  6. Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivity of Refineries Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivity of Refineries This...

  7. Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Mission The team supports efforts that promote a more sustainable environment and implements...

  8. Approximate error conjugation gradient minimization methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallman, Jeffrey S

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In one embodiment, a method includes selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In another embodiment, a system includes a processor for executing logic, logic for selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, logic for calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and logic for calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In other embodiments, computer program products, methods, and systems are described capable of using approximate error in constrained conjugate gradient minimization problems.

  9. Permutation groups, minimal degrees and quantum computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julia Kempe; Laszlo Pyber; Aner Shalev

    2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study permutation groups of given minimal degree without the classical primitivity assumption. We provide sharp upper bounds on the order of a permutation group of minimal degree m and on the number of its elements of any given support. These results contribute to the foundations of a non-commutative coding theory. A main application of our results concerns the Hidden Subgroup Problem for the symmetric group in Quantum Computing. We completely characterize the hidden subgroups of the symmetric group that can be distinguished from identity with weak Quantum Fourier Sampling, showing these are exactly the subgroups with bounded minimal degree. This implies that the weak standard method for the symmetric group has no advantage whatsoever over classical exhaustive search.

  10. Global minimizers for axisymmetric multiphase membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rustum Choksi; Marco Morandotti; Marco Veneroni

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a Canham-Helfrich-type variational problem defined over closed surfaces enclosing a fixed volume and having fixed surface area. The problem models the shape of multiphase biomembranes. It consists of minimizing the sum of the Canham-Helfrich energy, in which the bending rigidities and spontaneous curvatures are now phase-dependent, and a line tension penalization for the phase interfaces. By restricting attention to axisymmetric surfaces and phase distributions, we extend our previous results for a single phase (arXiv:1202.1979) and prove existence of a global minimizer.

  11. Linearized Non-Minimal Higher Curvature Supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farakos, Fotis; Koutrolikos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of linearized non-minimal supergravity (20/20), we present the embedding of the $R + R^2$ model and we analyze its field spectrum. As usual, the auxiliary fields of the Einstein theory now become propagating, giving rise to additional degrees of freedom, which organize themselves into on-shell irreducible supermultiplets. By performing the analysis both in component and superspace formulations we identify the new supermultiplets. On top of the two massive chiral superfields reminiscent of the old-minimal supergravity embedding, the spectrum contains also a consistent physical, massive, vector supermultiplet and a tachyonic ghost, massive, vector supermultiplet.

  12. Linearized Non-Minimal Higher Curvature Supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fotis Farakos; Alex Kehagias; Konstantinos Koutrolikos

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of linearized non-minimal supergravity (20/20), we present the embedding of the $R + R^2$ model and we analyze its field spectrum. As usual, the auxiliary fields of the Einstein theory now become propagating, giving rise to additional degrees of freedom, which organize themselves into on-shell irreducible supermultiplets. By performing the analysis both in component and superspace formulations we identify the new supermultiplets. On top of the two massive chiral superfields reminiscent of the old-minimal supergravity embedding, the spectrum contains also a consistent physical, massive, vector supermultiplet and a tachyonic ghost, massive, vector supermultiplet.

  13. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, D. Wayne (Santa Fe, NM); Bennett, Bryan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Cockroft, Nigel J. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal.

  14. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, D.W.; Bennett, B.L.; Cockroft, N.J.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal. 5 figs.

  15. Climate Change over the Equatorial Indo-Pacific in Global Warming* CHIE IHARA, YOCHANAN KUSHNIR, AND MARK A. CANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change over the Equatorial Indo-Pacific in Global Warming* CHIE IHARA, YOCHANAN KUSHNIR to global warming is investigated using model outputs submitted to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate equatorial Indian Ocean warm more than the SSTs in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean under global warming

  16. Graduation Requirements and Procedures Graduation Requirements and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Degree Audit (DARS) or contact the department offering the major. Graduation Average Requirement The minimum

  17. Mineral minimization in nature's alternative teeth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zok, Frank

    REVIEW Mineral minimization in nature's alternative teeth Christopher C. Broomell1, , Rashda K, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA Contrary to conventional wisdom, mineralization, with little to no help from mineralization. Based on biochemical analyses, three of these mouthparts, the jaws

  18. clock period selection method slack minimization criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    An optimal clock period selection method based on slack minimization criteria EnShou Chang Daniel the effect of clock slack on the performance of designs and present an algorithm to find a slack]: allocation, scheduling and binding. The purpose of alloca tion is to determine the number of resources

  19. Efficient wavefunction propagation by minimizing accumulated action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachary B. Walters

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new technique to calculate the evolution of a quantum wavefunction in a chosen spatial basis by minimizing the accumulated action. Introduction of a finite temporal basis reduces the problem to a set of linear equations, while an appropriate choice of temporal basis set offers improved convergence relative to methods based on matrix exponentiation for a class of physically relevant problems.

  20. FINAL REPORT WIND POWER WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION TRIBAL LANDS DOE GRANT NUMBER DE-FG36-07GO17077 SUBMITTED BY WARM SPRINGS POWER & WATER ENTERPRISES A CORPORATE ENTITY OF THE CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF WARM SPRINGS WARM SPRINGS, OREGON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim Manion; Michael Lofting; Wil Sando; Emily Leslie; Randy Goff

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Generation Feasibility Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises (WSPWE) is a corporate entity owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, located in central Oregon. The organization is responsible for managing electrical power generation facilities on tribal lands and, as part of its charter, has the responsibility to evaluate and develop renewable energy resources for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. WSPWE recently completed a multi-year-year wind resource assessment of tribal lands, beginning with the installation of wind monitoring towers on the Mutton Mountains site in 2003, and collection of on-site wind data is ongoing. The study identified the Mutton Mountain site on the northeastern edge of the reservation as a site with sufficient wind resources to support a commercial power project estimated to generate over 226,000 MWh per year. Initial estimates indicate that the first phase of the project would be approximately 79.5 MW of installed capacity. This Phase 2 study expands and builds on the previously conducted Phase 1 Wind Resource Assessment, dated June 30, 2007. In order to fully assess the economic benefits that may accrue to the Tribes through wind energy development at Mutton Mountain, a planning-level opinion of probable cost was performed to define the costs associated with key design and construction aspects of the proposed project. This report defines the Mutton Mountain project costs and economics in sufficient detail to allow the Tribes to either build the project themselves or contract with a developer under the most favorable terms possible for the Tribes.

  1. A WARM MODE OF GAS ACCRETION ON FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murante, Giuseppe [Osservatorio di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, I-10025, Pino Torinese (Tonga) (Italy); Calabrese, Matteo [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale 'Amedeo Avogadro', Universita degli Studi di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125, Torino (Italy); De Lucia, Gabriella [I.N.A.F, Osservatorio di Trieste, Via Tiepolo 11, I- 34131, Trieste (Italy); Monaco, Pierluigi; Borgani, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica - Sezione di Astronomia, Universita di Trieste, via Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); Dolag, Klaus, E-mail: murante@oato.inaf.it, E-mail: monaco@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: borgani@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: calabrese@oato.inaf.it, E-mail: delucia@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: kdolag@mpa-garching.mpg.de [University Observatory Muenchen, Scheinerstr. 1, 81679, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of a Milky-Way-sized halo, aimed at studying the effect of feedback on the nature of gas accretion. Simulations include a model of interstellar medium and star formation, in which supernova (SN) explosions provide effective thermal feedback. We distinguish between gas accretion onto the halo, which occurs when gas particles cross the halo virial radius, and gas accretion onto the central galaxy, which takes place when gas particles cross the inner one-tenth of the virial radius. Gas particles can be accreted through three different channels, depending on the maximum temperature value, T{sub max}, reached during the particles' past evolution: a cold channel for T{sub max} < 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K, a hot one for T > 10{sup 6} K, and a warm one for intermediate values of T{sub max}. We find that the warm channel is at least as important as the cold one for gas accretion onto the central galaxy. This result is at variance with previous findings that the cold mode dominates gas accretion at high redshift. We ascribe this difference to the different SN feedback scheme implemented in our simulations. While results presented so far in the literature are based on uneffective SN thermal feedback schemes and/or the presence of a kinetic feedback, our simulations include only effective thermal feedback. We argue that observational detections of a warm accretion mode in the high-redshift circumgalactic medium would provide useful constraints on the nature of the feedback that regulates star formation in galaxies.

  2. Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. In older homes in warm-humid climates, cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and some winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and avoids adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

  3. Sensitivity of glaciers and small ice caps to greenhouse warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oerlemans, J.; Fortuin, J.P.F. (Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands))

    1992-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent field programs on glaciers have supplied information that makes simulation of glacier mass balance with meteorological models meaningful. An estimate of world-wide glacier sensitivity based on a modeling study of 12 selected glaciers situated in widely differing climatic regimes shows that for a uniform 1 K warming the area-weighted glacier mass balance will decrease by 0.40 meter per year. This corresponds to a sea-level rise of 0.58 millimeter per year, a value significantly less than earlier estimates.

  4. KeV Warm Dark Matter and Composite Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean J Robinson; Yuhsin Tsai

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Elementary keV sterile Dirac neutrinos can be a natural ingredient of the composite neutrino scenario. For a certain class of composite neutrino theories, these sterile neutrinos naturally have the appropriate mixing angles to be resonantly produced warm dark matter (WDM). Alternatively, we show these sterile neutrinos can be WDM produced by an entropy-diluted thermal freeze-out, with the necessary entropy production arising not from an out-of-equilibrium decay, but rather from the confinement of the composite neutrino sector, provided there is sufficient supercooling.

  5. Sheet metal stamping die design for warm forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Amit K. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In metal stamping dies, by taking advantage of improved material flow by selectively warming the die, flat sections of the die can contribute to the flow of material throughout the workpiece. Local surface heating can be accomplished by placing a heating block in the die. Distribution of heating at the flat lower train central regions outside of the bend region allows a softer flow at a lower stress to enable material flow into the thinner, higher strain areas at the bend/s. The heating block is inserted into the die and is powered by a power supply.

  6. Warm Weather and the Daily Commute | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sureReportsofDepartmentSeries |Attacks |VisualizingWarm Weather and the

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperational ManagementDemand Module ThisAtAugust2Tropical Warm

  8. Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to global warming Wildfires may

  9. Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to global warming Wildfires

  10. Production of High Quality Dust Control Foam to Minimize Moisture Addition to Coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Termine, F.; Jordan, S. T.

    PRODUCTION OF HIGH QUALITY DUST CONTROL FOAM TO MINIMIZE MOISTURE ADDITION TO COAL Frank Tenni ne Steve T. Jordan BETZ Laboratories, Trevose, PA Inc. ABSTRACT Foam is displacing wet suppression as the method of choice for controlling... fugitive emissions from coal. Coal treated by wet suppression consumes through moisture addition, a heat energy equivalent of 1 ton out of every 500 tons fired. The application of foam requires less than 10% of the moisture usually required for wet...

  11. Finding a Minimally Informative Dirichlet Prior Distribution Using Least Squares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana Kelly; Corwin Atwood

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a Bayesian framework, the Dirichlet distribution is the conjugate distribution to the multinomial likelihood function, and so the analyst is required to develop a Dirichlet prior that incorporates available information. However, as it is a multiparameter distribution, choosing the Dirichlet parameters is less straight-forward than choosing a prior distribution for a single parameter, such as p in the binomial distribution. In particular, one may wish to incorporate limited information into the prior, resulting in a minimally informative prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data. In the case of binomial p or Poisson, the principle of maximum entropy can be employed to obtain a so-called constrained noninformative prior. However, even in the case of p, such a distribution cannot be written down in closed form, and so an approximate beta distribution is used in the case of p. In the case of the multinomial model with parametric constraints, the approach of maximum entropy does not appear tractable. This paper presents an alternative approach, based on constrained minimization of a least-squares objective function, which leads to a minimally informative Dirichlet prior distribution. The alpha-factor model for common-cause failure, which is widely used in the United States, is the motivation for this approach, and is used to illustrate the method. In this approach to modeling common-cause failure, the alpha-factors, which are the parameters in the underlying multinomial aleatory model for common-cause failure, must be estimated from data that is often quite sparse, because common-cause failures tend to be rare, especially failures of more than two or three components, and so a prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data is needed.

  12. Finding A Minimally Informative Dirichlet Prior Using Least Squares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana Kelly

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a Bayesian framework, the Dirichlet distribution is the conjugate distribution to the multinomial likelihood function, and so the analyst is required to develop a Dirichlet prior that incorporates available information. However, as it is a multiparameter distribution, choosing the Dirichlet parameters is less straightforward than choosing a prior distribution for a single parameter, such as p in the binomial distribution. In particular, one may wish to incorporate limited information into the prior, resulting in a minimally informative prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data. In the case of binomial p or Poisson \\lambda, the principle of maximum entropy can be employed to obtain a so-called constrained noninformative prior. However, even in the case of p, such a distribution cannot be written down in the form of a standard distribution (e.g., beta, gamma), and so a beta distribution is used as an approximation in the case of p. In the case of the multinomial model with parametric constraints, the approach of maximum entropy does not appear tractable. This paper presents an alternative approach, based on constrained minimization of a least-squares objective function, which leads to a minimally informative Dirichlet prior distribution. The alpha-factor model for common-cause failure, which is widely used in the United States, is the motivation for this approach, and is used to illustrate the method. In this approach to modeling common-cause failure, the alpha-factors, which are the parameters in the underlying multinomial model for common-cause failure, must be estimated from data that are often quite sparse, because common-cause failures tend to be rare, especially failures of more than two or three components, and so a prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data is needed.

  13. Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.K.; Hughes, P.J.; Fairchild, P.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Kusik, C.L.; Dieckmann, J.T.; McMahon, E.M.; Hobday, N. (Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study is to develop representative indications of the relative energy use, associated CO{sub 2} emissions, and total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) of viable options to replace CFCs in their major energy-related application areas. It was motivated, in part, by a concern that most attention to date has focused on the DIRECT global warming effect of CFC's and their alternatives, with adequate attention being paid to the INDIRECT effect of the CO{sub 2} emissions arising from the differences in energy consumption by systems using different alternatives. The DIRECT and INDIRECT contributions are combined in this analysis to determine the TEWI of the various technical options. The study is international in scope and takes into account significant differences in present CFC end-use practices, sources of energy, and other societal factors between Europe, Japan, and North America. This study should be considered an overview of key issues. The analysis addressed CFCs as well as alternative chemicals and technology alternatives in uses such as refrigeration, foam insulation, and metal and electronic cleaning and drying processes.

  14. Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.K.; Hughes, P.J.; Fairchild, P.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kusik, C.L.; Dieckmann, J.T.; McMahon, E.M.; Hobday, N. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study is to develop representative indications of the relative energy use, associated CO{sub 2} emissions, and total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) of viable options to replace CFCs in their major energy-related application areas. It was motivated, in part, by a concern that most attention to date has focused on the DIRECT global warming effect of CFC`s and their alternatives, with adequate attention being paid to the INDIRECT effect of the CO{sub 2} emissions arising from the differences in energy consumption by systems using different alternatives. The DIRECT and INDIRECT contributions are combined in this analysis to determine the TEWI of the various technical options. The study is international in scope and takes into account significant differences in present CFC end-use practices, sources of energy, and other societal factors between Europe, Japan, and North America. This study should be considered an overview of key issues. The analysis addressed CFCs as well as alternative chemicals and technology alternatives in uses such as refrigeration, foam insulation, and metal and electronic cleaning and drying processes.

  15. Persisting cold extremes under 21st-century warming scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kodra, Evan A [ORNL; Steinhaeuser, Karsten J K [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses of climate model simulations and observations reveal that extreme cold events are likely to persist across each land-continent even under 21st-century warming scenarios. The grid-based intensity, duration and frequency of cold extreme events are calculated annually through three indices: the coldest annual consecutive three-day average of daily maximum temperature, the annual maximum of consecutive frost days, and the total number of frost days. Nine global climate models forced with a moderate greenhouse-gas emissions scenario compares the indices over 2091 2100 versus 1991 2000. The credibility of model-simulated cold extremes is evaluated through both bias scores relative to reanalysis data in the past and multi-model agreement in the future. The number of times the value of each annual index in 2091 2100 exceeds the decadal average of the corresponding index in 1991 2000 is counted. The results indicate that intensity and duration of grid-based cold extremes, when viewed as a global total, will often be as severe as current typical conditions in many regions, but the corresponding frequency does not show this persistence. While the models agree on the projected persistence of cold extremes in terms of global counts, regionally, inter-model variability and disparity in model performance tends to dominate. Our findings suggest that, despite a general warming trend, regional preparedness for extreme cold events cannot be compromised even towards the end of the century.

  16. Annual Waste Minimization Summary Report, Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the waste minimization efforts undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), during calendar year 2009. This report was developed in accordance with the requirements of the Nevada Test Site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit (No. NEV HW0021), and as clarified in a letter dated April 21, 1995, from Paul Liebendorfer of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to Donald Elle of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office. The NNSA/NSO Pollution Prevention (P2) Program establishes a process to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by NNSA/NSO activities and ensures that proposed methods of treatment, storage, and/or disposal of waste minimize potential threats to human health and the environment. The following information provides an overview of the P2 Program, major P2 accomplishments during the reporting year, a comparison of the current year waste generation to prior years, and a description of efforts undertaken during the year to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by NNSA/NSO.

  17. Annual Waste Minimization Summary Report Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the waste minimization efforts undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), during calendar year (CY) 2007. This report was developed in accordance with the requirements of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit (number NEV HW0021), and as clarified in a letter dated April 21, 1995, from Paul Liebendorfer of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to Donald Elle of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office. The NNSA/NSO Pollution Prevention (P2) Program establishes a process to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by the NNSA/NSO and ensures that proposed methods of treatment, storage, and/or disposal of waste minimize potential threats to human health and the environment. The following information provides an overview of the P2 Program, major P2 accomplishments during the reporting year, a comparison of the current year waste generation to prior years, and a description of efforts undertaken during the year to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by the NNSA/NSO.

  18. Criteria for minimal model of driven polymer translocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Suhonen; K. Kaski; R. P. Linna

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    While the characteristics of the driven translocation for asymptotically long polymers are well understood, this is not the case for finite-sized polymers, which are relevant for real-world experiments and simulation studies. Most notably, the behavior of the exponent $\\alpha$, which describes the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length, when the driving force $f_p$ in the pore is changed, is under debate. By Langevin dynamics simulations of regular and modified translocation models using the freely-jointed-chain polymer model we find that a previously reported incomplete model, where the {\\it trans} side and fluctuations were excluded, gives rise to characteristics that are in stark contradiction with those of the complete model, for which $\\alpha$ increases with $f_p$. Our results suggest that contribution due to fluctuations is important. We construct a minimal model where dynamics is completely excluded to show that close alignment with a full translocation model can be achieved. Our findings set very stringent requirements for a minimal model that is supposed to describe the driven polymer translocation correctly.

  19. Hybrid textures in minimal seesaw mass matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srubabati Goswami; Subrata Khan; Atsushi Watanabe

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of minimal seesaw framework, we study the implications of Dirac and Majorana mass matrices in which two rigid properties coexist, namely, equalities among mass matrix elements and texture zeros. In the first part of the study, we discuss general possibilities of the Dirac and Majorana mass matrices for neutrinos with such hybrid structures. We then classify the mass matrices into realistic textures which are compatible with global neutrino oscillation data and unrealistic ones which do not comply with the data. Among the large number of general possibilities, we find that only 6 patterns are consistent with the observations at the level of the most minimal number of free parameters. These solutions have only 2 adjustable parameters, so that all the mixing angles can be described in terms of the two mass differences or pure numbers. We analyze these textures in detail and discuss their impacts for future neutrino experiments and for leptogenesis.

  20. Measurable Maximal Energy and Minimal Time Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eiman Abou El Dahab; Abdel Nasser Tawfik

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of finding the measurable maximal energy and the minimal time interval is discussed in different quantum aspects. It is found that the linear generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) approach gives a non-physical result. Based on large scale Schwarzshild solution, the quadratic GUP approach is utilized. The calculations are performed at the shortest distance, at which the general relativity is assumed to be a good approximation for the quantum gravity and at larger distances, as well. It is found that both maximal energy and minimal time have the order of the Planck time. Then, the uncertainties in both quantities are accordingly bounded. Some physical insights are addressed. Also, the implications on the physics of early Universe and on quantized mass are outlined. The results are related to the existence of finite cosmological constant and minimum mass (mass quanta).

  1. The structure of tame minimal dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eli Glasner

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamical version of the Bourgain-Fremlin-Talagrand dichotomy shows that the enveloping semigroup of a dynamical system is either very large and contains a topological copy of $\\beta \\N$, or it is a "tame" topological space whose topology is determined by the convergence of sequences. In the latter case the dynamical system is called tame. We use the structure theory of minimal dynamical systems to show that, when the acting group is Abelian, a tame metric minimal dynamical system (i) is almost automorphic (i.e. it is an almost 1-1 extension of an equicontinuous system), and (ii) admits a unique invariant probability measure such that the corresponding measure preserving system is measure theoretically isomorphic to the Haar measure system on the maximal equicontinuous factor.

  2. Next Generation Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants R&D...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of low-global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants. DOE commissioned this roadmap to establish a set of high-priority research and development (R&D) activities that...

  3. Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    mccarty13.pdf More Documents & Publications Warm Forming of AluminumAMD 307 Magnesium Front End Research And Development (AMD604) Magnesium Front End Design And Development...

  4. Minimizing the consequences of rolling blackouts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haslem, J.R. (Mayer, Brown and Platt, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the potential political and legal consequences of rolling blackouts. Those situations under which utilities have been previously determined to be negligent are examined in order to provide ideas for avoiding those situations. Examples of legal decisions for accidental blackouts are also examined. Steps to minimize the political consequences of rolling blackouts are outlined including preparation for responding to questions regarding the situation.

  5. The Minimal Geometric Deformation Approach Extended

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casadio, Roberto; da Rocha, Roldao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The minimal geometric deformation approach was introduced in order to study the exterior space-time around spherically symmetric self-gravitating systems, like stars or similar astrophysical objects as well, in the Randall-Sundrum brane-world framework. A consistent extension of this approach is developed here, which contains modifications of both the time component and the radial component of a spherically symmetric metric. A modified Schwarzschild geometry is obtained as an example of its simplest application.

  6. An algorithm for minimization of quantum cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anindita Banerjee; Anirban Pathak

    2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A new algorithm for minimization of quantum cost of quantum circuits has been designed. The quantum cost of different quantum circuits of particular interest (eg. circuits for EPR, quantum teleportation, shor code and different quantum arithmetic operations) are computed by using the proposed algorithm. The quantum costs obtained using the proposed algorithm is compared with the existing results and it is found that the algorithm has produced minimum quantum cost in all cases.

  7. Analysis of local warm forming of high strength steel using near infrared ray energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, W. H., E-mail: whyang21@hyundai.com [Hyundai Motor Company, 700 Yeompo-ro, Buk-Gu, Ulsan, 683-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K., E-mail: klee@deform.co.kr [Solution Lab, 502, 102, Dunsan-daero 117 beon-gil, Seo-Gu, Daejeon, 302-834 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, E. H., E-mail: mtgs2@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: dyyang@kaist.ac.kr; Yang, D. Y., E-mail: mtgs2@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: dyyang@kaist.ac.kr [KAIST, Science Town291, Daehak-ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The automotive industry has been pressed to satisfy more rigorous fuel efficiency requirements to promote energy conservation, safety features and cost containment. To satisfy this need, high strength steel has been developed and used for many different vehicle parts. The use of high strength steels, however, requires careful analysis and creativity in order to accommodate its relatively high springback behavior. An innovative method, called local warm forming with near infrared ray, has been developed to help promote the use of high strength steels in sheet metal forming. For this method, local regions of the work piece are heated using infrared ray energy, thereby promoting the reduction of springback behavior. In this research, a V-bend test is conducted with DP980. After springback, the bend angles for specimens without local heating are compared to those with local heating. Numerical analysis has been performed using the commercial program, DEFORM-2D. This analysis is carried out with the purpose of understanding how changes to the local stress distribution will affect the springback during the unloading process. The results between experimental and computational approaches are evaluated to assure the accuracy of the simulation. Subsequent numerical simulation studies are performed to explore best practices with respect to thermal boundary conditions, timing, and applicability to the production environment.

  8. Reducing Energy Costs And Minimizing Capital Requirements: Case Studies of Thermal Energy Storage (TES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrepont, J. S.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and thus during those times when power has its highest cost or value. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) provides a means of de-coupling the generation of cooling from the provision of cooling to the peak cooling loads. In this manner, peak power demand...

  9. Background Knowledge Requirement The concepts covered here are considered to constitute a minimal core body of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Development. Topics include: design and analysis of programs, software development tools and methods, debugging, I/O, state machines, exception handling, testing, coding standards, software lifecycle models Operating Systems - CSCI 4061 o Programming & Software Development - CSCI 3081 3. By passing the final exam

  10. BENEFITS OF RADIAL BUILD MINIMIZATION AND REQUIREMENTS IMPOSED ON ARIES COMPACT STELLARATOR DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    field at the coil. During the first phase of the study, several blanket/shield systems have been considered employing advanced ferritic steel (FS) structure (such as IEA MF82H) and SiC/SiC composites-based systems (self-cooled Flibe/FS/Be and LiPb/SiC, and dual-cooled LiPb/FS/He and Li/FS/He). The newly

  11. Buffer Requirements at ECN-Capable RED Gateways to Minimize Packet Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Honeywell Labs 3660 Technology Drive Minneapolis, MN 55418, USA E-mail: haowei.bai@honeywell.com Department

  12. Environmental screening tools for assessment of infrastructure plans based on biodiversity preservation and global warming (PEIT, Spain)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Montero, Luis G., E-mail: luisgonzaga.garcia@upm.e [Dept. Forest Engineering, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Montes, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Lopez, Elena, E-mail: elopez@caminos.upm.e [TRANSyT, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Avda. Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Monzon, Andres, E-mail: amonzon@caminos.upm.e [TRANSyT, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Avda. Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Otero Pastor, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.otero@upm.e [TRANSyT, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Avda. Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) research has been concerned with SEA as a procedure, and there have been relatively few developments and tests of analytical methodologies. The first stage of the SEA is the 'screening', which is the process whereby a decision is taken on whether or not SEA is required for a particular programme or plan. The effectiveness of screening and SEA procedures will depend on how well the assessment fits into the planning from the early stages of the decision-making process. However, it is difficult to prepare the environmental screening for an infrastructure plan involving a whole country. To be useful, such methodologies must be fast and simple. We have developed two screening tools which would make it possible to estimate promptly the overall impact an infrastructure plan might have on biodiversity and global warming for a whole country, in order to generate planning alternatives, and to determine whether or not SEA is required for a particular infrastructure plan.

  13. Simulation of fluid displacement in porous media - improved methods to minimize numerical dispersion and grid orientation effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laprea-Bigott, Marcelo

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMULATION OF FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN POROUS MEDIA ? IMPROVED METHODS TO MINIMIZE NUMERICAL DISPERSION AND GRID ORIENTATION EFFECTS A Thesis by MARCELO LAPREA-BIGOTT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering SIMULATION OF FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN POROUS MEDIA - IMPROVED METHODS TO MINIMIZE NUMERICAL DISPERSION AND GRID ORIENTATION EFFECTS A...

  14. Storage and Retrieval of Thermal Light in Warm Atomic Vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young-Wook Cho; Yoon-Ho Kim

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report slowed propagation and storage and retrieval of thermal light in warm rubidium vapor using the effect of electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT). We first demonstrate slowed-propagation of the probe thermal light beam through an EIT medium by measuring the second-order correlation function of the light field using the Hanbury-Brown$-$Twiss interferometer. We also report an experimental study on the effect of the EIT slow-light medium on the temporal coherence of thermal light. Finally, we demonstrate the storage and retrieval of thermal light beam in the EIT medium. The direct measurement of the photon number statistics of the retrieved light field shows that the photon number statistics is preserved during the storage and retrieval process.

  15. Status of the warm front end of PXIE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shemyakin, A; Andrews, R; Baffes, C; Chen, A; Hanna, B; Prost, L; Saewert, G; Scarpine, V; Steimel, J; Sun, D; Li, D; D'Arcy, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CW-compatible, pulsed H- superconducting linac is envisaged as a possible path for upgrading Fermilab's injection complex. To validate the concept of the front- end of such a machine, a test accelerator (a.k.a. PXIE) is under construction. The warm part of this accelerator comprises a 10 mA DC, 30 keV H- ion source, a 2m-long LEBT, a 2.1 MeV CW RFQ, and a 10-m long MEBT that is capable of creating a large variety of bunch structures. The paper will report commissioning results of a partially assembled LEBT, status of RFQ manufacturing, and describe development of the MEBT, in particular, of elements of its chopping system.

  16. Warm Water Oxidation Verification - Scoping and Stirred Reactor Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Scoping tests to evaluate the effects of agitation and pH adjustment on simulant sludge agglomeration and uranium metal oxidation at {approx}95 C were performed under Test Instructions(a,b) and as per sections 5.1 and 5.2 of this Test Plan prepared by AREVA. (c) The thermal testing occurred during the week of October 4-9, 2010. The results are reported here. For this testing, two uranium-containing simulant sludge types were evaluated: (1) a full uranium-containing K West (KW) container sludge simulant consisting of nine predominant sludge components; (2) a 50:50 uranium-mole basis mixture of uraninite [U(IV)] and metaschoepite [U(VI)]. This scoping study was conducted in support of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Phase 2 technology evaluation for the treatment and packaging of K-Basin sludge. The STP is managed by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) for the U.S. Department of Energy. Warm water ({approx}95 C) oxidation of sludge, followed by immobilization, has been proposed by AREVA and is one of the alternative flowsheets being considered to convert uranium metal to UO{sub 2} and eliminate H{sub 2} generation during final sludge disposition. Preliminary assessments of warm water oxidation have been conducted, and several issues have been identified that can best be evaluated through laboratory testing. The scoping evaluation documented here was specifically focused on the issue of the potential formation of high strength sludge agglomerates at the proposed 95 C process operating temperature. Prior hydrothermal tests conducted at 185 C produced significant physiochemical changes to genuine sludge, including the formation of monolithic concretions/agglomerates that exhibited shear strengths in excess of 100 kPa (Delegard et al. 2007).

  17. Constructing warm inflationary model in finite temperature BIon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Setare; A. Sepehri

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We study warm inflationary universe model on the BIon in thermal background. The BIon is a configuration in flat space of a D-brane and a parallel anti-D-brane connected by a wormhole with F-string charge. When the branes and antibranes are well separated and the brane's spike is far from the antibrane's spike, wormhole isn't formed however when two branes are close to each other, they can be connected by a wormhole. In this condition, there exists many channels for flowing energy from extra dimensions into our universe and inflation may naturally occur in a warm region. We present a model that allows all cosmological parameters like the scale factor $a$, the Hubble parameter $H$ and universe energy density depend on the shape function and temperature of wormhole in transverse dimension between two branes. In our model, the expansion of 4D universe is controlled by the thermal wormhole between branes and ends up in Big-Rip singularity. We show that at this singularity, universe would be destroyed and one black F-string formed. Finally, we test our model against WMAP, Planck and BICEP2 data and obtain the ripping time. According to experimental data, $N\\simeq 50$ case leads to $n_{s}\\simeq 0.96$, where \\emph{N} and $n_{s}$ are the number e-folds and the spectral index respectively. This standard case may be found in $0.01 data and $t_{rip}=27.5(Gyr)$ for BICEP2 data. Comparing this time with the time of Big Rip in brane-antibrane, we find that the wormhole in BIonic system accelerates the destruction of the universe.

  18. Polar versus temperate grounding-line sedimentary systems and marine glacier stability during sea level rise by global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, R.D. (Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Geology Dept.); Pyne, A.R. (Victoria Univ., Wellington (New Zealand). Antarctic Research Center); Hunter, L.E.; Rynes, N.R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine-ending glaciers may retreat with global warming as sea level rises by ocean thermal expansion. If the sea floor rises by sediment accumulation, then glaciers may not feel the effect of sea level rise. A submersible ROV and other techniques have been used to collect data from temperate and polar glaciers to compare sediment production and mass balance of their grounding-line systems. Temperature Alaskan valley glaciers flow at about 0.2--2 km/a and have high volumes of supraglacial, englacial and subglacial debris. However, most sediment contributed to the base of their tidewater cliffs comes from subglacial streams or squeezing out subglacial sediment and pushing it with other marine sediment into a morainal bank. Blue Glacier, a thin, locally fed polar glacier in Antarctica, flows slowly and has minimal glacial debris. The grounding-line system at the tidewater cliff is a morainal bank that forms solely by pushing of marine sediment. An Antarctic polar outlet glacier, Mackay Glacier, terminating as a floating glacier-tongue, has similar volumes of basal debris to Alaskan temperature glaciers and flows at 250 m/a. However, no subglacial streams issued from Mackay's grounding line and all sedimentation was by rockfall and grainfall rainout from seawater undermelt of the tongue. A grounding-line wedge of glacimarine diamicton is deposited over subglacial (lodgement ) till. Although Antarctic grounding-line accumulation rates are three orders of magnitude smaller than Alaskan rates, both are capable of compensating for predicted rises in sea level by thermal heating from global warming.

  19. The requirements discovery process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahill, A.T. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirement process. This paper provides a high-level overview of the requirements discovery process.

  20. Changes in microclimate induced by experimental warming and clipping in tallgrass prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the diurnal air-temperature range. Keywords: climate warming, clipping, infrared heater, soil moisture, solar as the secondary factor. Infrared heater was used in order to simulate climatic warming and clipping to mimic in reduced diurnal air-temperature range. Infrared heaters substantially increased daily maximum (2.5 and 3

  1. Acclimatization of soil respiration to warming in a tall grass prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to climatic warming24 . The feedback mechanism is usually based on the assumption that observed sensitivity feedbacks into the climatic system. Climatic warming, on one hand, potentially stimulates nutrient) since 21 November 1999 to study respiratory sensitivity to climate change. We also used clipping

  2. Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    but occurs over a much broader area of the ice pack. Citation: Steele, M., J. Zhang, and W. Ermold (2010Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt Michael Steele,1 summertime upper ocean warming and sea ice melt during the 21st century in the Arctic Ocean. Our first

  3. GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL RESEARCH Warming and the dependence of limber pine (Pinus flexilis)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    experimental warming did not appear to reduce cold limitation at high elevation. Instead, gas exchange users. A. B. Moyes (&) L. M. Kueppers School of Natural Sciences, University of California Merced) 171:271282 DOI 10.1007/s00442-012-2410-0 #12;models forecast warming of 26 C (median 3.4 C) across

  4. Monsoons in a warming and more populous world: the question of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the 1990's 45% were in Asia 30% in US 10% in Europe Human impact 2 billion people affected 400. Global warming and climate change 3. Population increase and attendant problems 4. Societal and human if global warming were to occur? Monsoons Tropical cyclones Droughts Floods Dust Storms How can

  5. Global warming due to increasing absorbed solar radiation Kevin E. Trenberth1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fasullo, John

    Global warming due to increasing absorbed solar radiation Kevin E. Trenberth1 and John T. Fasullo1 from an energy budget standpoint comes from increases in absorbed solar radiation that stem directly. T. Fasullo (2009), Global warming due to increasing absorbed solar radiation, Geophys. Res. Lett

  6. Teaching Energy Balance using Round Numbers: A Quantitative Approach to the Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    Teaching Energy Balance using Round Numbers: A Quantitative Approach to the Greenhouse Effect, 2003 Abstract The idea of energy balance used to explain the greenhouse effect and global warming and astronomy curricula. The idea of energy balance is used to explain the greenhouse effect and global warming

  7. The Effects of Three-Dimensional Canopy Management on Overseeded Warm-Season Fairway Turf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a sustainable warm-season turfgrass but a lack of cultural management data has hindered its acceptance. FineThe Effects of Three-Dimensional Canopy Management on Overseeded Warm-Season Fairway Turf Scientist: Kurt Steinke, Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Funding: $7,000 The objectives are to 1) discover

  8. Warming may create substantial water supply shortages in the Colorado River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warming may create substantial water supply shortages in the Colorado River basin Gregory J. Mc (2007), Warming may create substantial water supply shortages in the Colorado River basin, Geophys. Res; published 27 November 2007. [1] The high demand for water, the recent multiyear drought (1999

  9. Ion beam heated target simulations for warm dense matter physics and inertial fusion energy$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Ion beam heated target simulations for warm dense matter physics and inertial fusion energy$ J Keywords: Ion beam heating Warm dense matter Inertial fusion energy targets Hydrodynamic simulation a b fusion energy-related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids

  10. Climate Change: Sources of Warming in the Late 20th Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of the North Atlantic Oscillation, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, volcanic and other aerosols, as well as the extraordinary solar activity of the late 20th century are discussed in the context of the warming since the mid-1970s. Much of that warming is found to be due to natural causes.

  11. Entropy Shows that Global Warming Should Cause Increased Variability in the Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Michael Williams

    2001-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Elementary physical reasoning seems to leave it inevitable that global warming would increase the variability of the weather. The first two terms in an approximation to the global entropy are used to show that global warming has increased the free energy available to drive the weather, and that the variance of the weather should increase correspondingly.

  12. A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming Paul N. Edwards models, climate data, and the politics of global warming / Paul N. Edwards. p. cm. Includes. Climatology--History. 3. Meteorology--History. 4. Climatology--Technological innovation. 5. Global temperature

  13. The warming climate could put food supplies at risk over the next decade or two.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floeter, Sergio Ricardo

    change. The results suggest that with climate warming, the risk of losing 10% or more of the global wheat by 20 times, to a 1 in 10 chance. Environ. Res. Lett. 9, 074003 (2014) AGRICULTURE Global warming could, has a buried ocean that is saltier than many seas on Earth. Titan, with its thick atmosphere

  14. Status of the minimal supersymmetric SO(10)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorsner, Ilja [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia and Faculty of Natural Sciences, Zmaja od Bosne 33-35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina)

    2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss status of the minimal supersymmetric SO(10) in both low and split supersymmetry regime. To demonstrate viability of the model we present a good fit of the fermion masses and their mixings. The solution needs a strongly split supersymmetry with gauginos and higgsinos around 10{sup 2} TeV, sfermions close to 10{sup 14} GeV and a GUT scale of around 6x10{sup 15} GeV. It predicts fast proton decay rates, hierarchical neutrino masses and large leptonic mixing angle sin{theta}{sub 13}{approx_equal}0.1.

  15. A Maxwell field minimally coupled to torsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikodem J. Poplawski

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the Lagrangian density for a free Maxwell field, in which the electromagnetic field tensor minimally couples to the affine connection, in the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory of gravity. We derive the formulae for the torsion and electromagnetic field tensors in terms of the electromagnetic potential. The divergence of the magnetic field does not vanish: the photon-torsion coupling acts like an effective magnetic monopole density. Such a coupling, which breaks U(1) gauge invariance, is significant only at extremely high energies existing in the very early Universe or inside black holes. It may, however, provide a mechanism for Dirac's quantization of electric charge.

  16. Minimal model for spoof acoustoelastic surface states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, J., E-mail: jochri@fotonik.dtu.dk; Willatzen, M. [Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Liang, Z. [College of Electronic Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen (China)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Similar to textured perfect electric conductors for electromagnetic waves sustaining artificial or spoof surface plasmons we present an equivalent phenomena for the case of sound. Aided by a minimal model that is able to capture the complex wave interaction of elastic cavity modes and airborne sound radiation in perfect rigid panels, we construct designer acoustoelastic surface waves that are entirely controlled by the geometrical environment. Comparisons to results obtained by full-wave simulations confirm the feasibility of the model and we demonstrate illustrative examples such as resonant transmissions and waveguiding to show a few examples of many where spoof elastic surface waves are useful.

  17. Guide to Minimizing Compress-based Cooling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGrid Integration0-1 March 2013 WHAT:Minimizing

  18. capacity and the market for bio-fuels, a num-ber of breakthroughs are required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    . "The world is on the verge of a catastrophe due to global warming." With those words in November 2007capacity and the market for bio-fuels, a num- ber of breakthroughs are required: ·Technical Fundraiser 011-36 31 28 tommy.hoglund@liu.se www.liu.se/expanding_excellence Bio-fuels and energy

  19. SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSVWONVS PELAMIS, HABITAT BASED ON TEMPERATURE AND OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSVWONVS PELAMIS, HABITAT BASED ON TEMPERATURE AND OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS RICHARD A,Katsuwonus pelamis, has generally been assumed to be the warm surface layers oftropical and subtropical ocean, where. For skipjack tuna, Katsllwonus pelamis (Lin- naeus), the question "Where are the fish?" is par- ticularly hard

  20. Minimal Proton Channel Enables H2 Oxidation and Production with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minimal Proton Channel Enables H2 Oxidation and Production with a Water-Soluble Nickel-Based Catalyst. Minimal Proton Channel Enables H2 Oxidation and Production with a...

  1. BER Requirements Review 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Attendees 2015 ASCR Requirements Review 2015 Previous Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet...

  2. ASCR Requirements Review 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements Review 2015 ASCR Attendees 2015 Previous Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet...

  3. Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Webinar transcript. sustainabilityglobalbiofuelswebinar.doc More Documents & Publications Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry Minimizing Risks and Maximizing...

  4. Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry Minimizing Risks...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    nationalpresentation.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Webinar Transcript...

  5. Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Opportunities Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Introduction slides for the webinar describing bioenergy and...

  6. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA/MTR Warm Waste System Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Winterholler

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan was developed for portions of the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System located in the Materials Test Reactor Building (TRA-603) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan SITE-TANK-005 for the Tank System TRA-007. The reactor drain tank and canal sump to be closed are included in the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System. The reactor drain tank and the canal sump will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and Code of Federal Regulations 265. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.

  7. Subspace Segmentation with A Minimal Squared Frobenius Norm Representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Yizhou

    Minimal Squared Frobenius Norm Representa- tion (MSFNR). MSFNR performs data clustering by solving benchmark [9]. However, LRR in- volves nuclear norm1 minimization. Solving LRR re- quires computing multiple Representation (MSFNR). It employs convex optimization to perform subspace clustering. The method minimizes

  8. MINIMIZING THE PROFILE OF A SYMMETRIC MATRIX WILLIAM W. HAGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hager, William

    MINIMIZING THE PROFILE OF A SYMMETRIC MATRIX WILLIAM W. HAGER SIAM J. SCI. COMPUT. c 2002 Society for minimizing the profile of a sparse, symmetric matrix. The heuristic approaches seek to minimize the profile in an initial ordering to strictly improve the profile. Comparisons with the spectral algorithm, a level

  9. Trees and Power Lines: Minimizing Conflicts between Electric Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Trees and Power Lines: Minimizing Conflicts between Electric Power Infrastructure and the Urban: Minimizing Conflicts between Electric Power Infrastructure and the Urban Forest ISSUE BRIEF | March 2012 1: Minimizing Conflicts between Electric Power Infrastructure and the Urban Forest 1 Trees and overhead power

  10. PLANE-LIKE MINIMAL SURFACES IN PERIODIC MEDIA WITH ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SIAM (#1) 1035 2001 Apr 10 12:32:38

    2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Key words. minimal surfaces, sets of finite perimeter, homogenization, .... troduce a particular example, and we perform several explicit computations in search .... E minimizes area outside the exclusions, it follows from Lemma A.5 that if x ? K ...... It is an easy exercise to check that, for n = 2, minimizers must enter the...

  11. Power Minimization techniques for Networked Data Centers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, Steven; Tang, Kevin

    2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Our objective is to develop a mathematical model to optimize energy consumption at multiple levels in networked data centers, and develop abstract algorithms to optimize not only individual servers, but also coordinate the energy consumption of clusters of servers within a data center and across geographically distributed data centers to minimize the overall energy cost and consumption of brown energy of an enterprise. In this project, we have formulated a variety of optimization models, some stochastic others deterministic, and have obtained a variety of qualitative results on the structural properties, robustness, and scalability of the optimal policies. We have also systematically derived from these models decentralized algorithms to optimize energy efficiency, analyzed their optimality and stability properties. Finally, we have conducted preliminary numerical simulations to illustrate the behavior of these algorithms. We draw the following conclusion. First, there is a substantial opportunity to minimize both the amount and the cost of electricity consumption in a network of datacenters, by exploiting the fact that traffic load, electricity cost, and availability of renewable generation fluctuate over time and across geographical locations. Judiciously matching these stochastic processes can optimize the tradeoff between brown energy consumption, electricity cost, and response time. Second, given the stochastic nature of these three processes, real-time dynamic feedback should form the core of any optimization strategy. The key is to develop decentralized algorithms that can be implemented at different parts of the network as simple, local algorithms that coordinate through asynchronous message passing.

  12. Parallel computation of Steiner Minimal Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, F.C. Jr. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a set of N cities, construct a connected network which has minimum length. The problem is simple enough, but the catch is that you are allowed to add junctions in your network. Therefore the problem becomes how many extra junctions should be added, and where should they be placed so as to minimize the overall network length. This intriguing optimization problem is known as the Steiner Minimal Tree Problem (SMT), where the junctions that are added to the network are called Steiner Points. The focus of this paper is the parallel computation for the generation of what Pawel Winter termed T-list and its implementation. This generation of T-list is followed by the extraction of the proper answer. When Winter developed his algorithm, the time for extraction dominated the overall computation time. After Cockayne and Hewgill`s work, the time to generate T-list dominated the overall computation time. The ideas we present were implemented in a program called PARSTEINER94, and the results show that the time to generate T-list has now been cut by an order of magnitude. So now the extraction time once again dominates the overall computation time.

  13. 130 LPW 1000 Lm Warm White LED for Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soer, Wouter

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An illumination-grade warm-white LED, having correlated color temperature (CCT) between 2700 and 3500 K and capable of producing 1000 lm output at over 130 lm/W at room temperature, has been developed in this program. The high-power warm-white LED is an ideal source for use in indoor and outdoor lighting applications. Over the two year period, we have made the following accomplishments: Developed a low-cost high-power white LED package and commercialized a series of products with CCT ranging from 2700 to 5700 K under the product name LUXEON M; Demonstrated a record efficacy of 124.8 lm/W at a flux of 1023 lm, CCT of 3435 K and color rendering index (CRI) over 80 at room temperature in the productized package; Demonstrated a record efficacy of 133.1 lm/W at a flux of 1015 lm, CCT of 3475 K and CRI over 80 at room temperature in an R&D package. The new high-power LED package is a die-on-ceramic surface mountable LED package. It has four 2 mm2 InGaN pump dice, flip-chip attached to a ceramic submount in a 2x2 array configuration. The submount design utilizes a design approach that combines a high-thermal- conductivity ceramic core for die attach and a low-cost and low-thermal-conductivity ceramic frame for mechanical support and as optical lens carrier. The LED package has a thermal resistance of less than 1.25 K/W. The white LED fabrication also adopts a new batch level (instead of die-by-die) phosphor deposition process with precision layer thickness and composition control, which provides not only tight color control, but also low cost. The efficacy performance goal was achieved through the progress in following key areas: (1) high-efficiency royal blue pump LED development through active region design and epitaxial growth quality improvement (funded by internal programs); (2) improvement in extraction efficiency from the LED package through improvement of InGaN-die-level and package-level optical extraction efficiency; and (3) improvement in phosphor system efficiency by improving the lumen equivalent (LE) and phosphor package efficiency (PPE) through improvement in phosphor-package interactions. The high-power warm-white LED product developed has been proven to have good reliability through extensive reliability tests. The new kilo-lumen package has been commercialized under the product name LUXEON M. As of the end of the program, the LUXEON M product has been released in the following CCT/CRI combinations: 3000K/70, 4000K/70, 5000K/70, 5700K/70, 2700K/80, 3000K/80 and 4000K/80. LM-80 tests for the products with CCTs of 4000 K and higher have reached 8500 hours, and per IESNA TM-21-11 have established an L70 lumen maintenance value of >51,000 hours at A drive current and up to 120 C board temperature.

  14. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 25 MARCH 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1430 Broad range of 2050 warming from an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    assessments. From our simulations, we conclude that warming by the mid- dle of the twenty-first century

  15. Minimally Informative Prior Distributions for PSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana L. Kelly; Robert W. Youngblood; Kurt G. Vedros

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A salient feature of Bayesian inference is its ability to incorporate information from a variety of sources into the inference model, via the prior distribution (hereafter simply the prior). However, over-reliance on old information can lead to priors that dominate new data. Some analysts seek to avoid this by trying to work with a minimally informative prior distribution. Another reason for choosing a minimally informative prior is to avoid the often-voiced criticism of subjectivity in the choice of prior. Minimally informative priors fall into two broad classes: 1) so-called noninformative priors, which attempt to be completely objective, in that the posterior distribution is determined as completely as possible by the observed data, the most well known example in this class being the Jeffreys prior, and 2) priors that are diffuse over the region where the likelihood function is nonnegligible, but that incorporate some information about the parameters being estimated, such as a mean value. In this paper, we compare four approaches in the second class, with respect to their practical implications for Bayesian inference in Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). The most commonly used such prior, the so-called constrained noninformative prior, is a special case of the maximum entropy prior. This is formulated as a conjugate distribution for the most commonly encountered aleatory models in PSA, and is correspondingly mathematically convenient; however, it has a relatively light tail and this can cause the posterior mean to be overly influenced by the prior in updates with sparse data. A more informative prior that is capable, in principle, of dealing more effectively with sparse data is a mixture of conjugate priors. A particular diffuse nonconjugate prior, the logistic-normal, is shown to behave similarly for some purposes. Finally, we review the so-called robust prior. Rather than relying on the mathematical abstraction of entropy, as does the constrained noninformative prior, the robust prior places a heavy-tailed Cauchy prior on the canonical parameter of the aleatory model.

  16. Progress in Beam Focusing and Compression for Target Heating and Warm Dense Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seidl, Peter; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Grote, D.P.; Jung, J.Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Ni, P.; Roy, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion Sciences Virtual National Laboratory is pursuing an approach to target heating experiments in the warm dense matter regime, using space-charge-dominated ion beams that are simultaneously longitudinally bunched and transversely focused. Longitudinal beam compression by large factors has been demonstrated in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) with controlled ramps and forced neutralization. Using an injected 30 mA K{sup +} ion beam with initial kinetic energy 0.3 MeV, axial compression leading to {approx}50X current amplification and simultaneous radial focusing to a few mm have led to encouraging energy deposition approaching the intensities required for eV-range target heating experiments. We discuss the status of several improvements to NDCX to reach the necessary higher beam intensities, including: beam diagnostics, greater axial compression via a longer velocity ramp; and plasma injection improvements to establish a plasma density always greater than the beam density, expected to be > 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}.

  17. Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.; Cameron-Smith, P.J.

    2011-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Geochemical environments, fates, and effects are modeled for methane released into seawater by the decomposition of climate-sensitive clathrates. A contemporary global background cycle is first constructed, within the framework of the Parallel Ocean Program. Input from organics in the upper thermocline is related to oxygen levels, and microbial consumption is parameterized from available rate measurements. Seepage into bottom layers is then superimposed, representing typical seabed fluid flow. The resulting CH{sub 4} distribution is validated against surface saturation ratios, vertical sections, and slope plume studies. Injections of clathrate-derived methane are explored by distributing a small number of point sources around the Arctic continental shelf, where stocks are extensive and susceptible to instability during the first few decades of global warming. Isolated bottom cells are assigned dissolved gas fluxes from porous-media simulation. Given the present bulk removal pattern, methane does not penetrate far from emission sites. Accumulated effects, however, spread to the regional scale following the modeled current system. Both hypoxification and acidification are documented. Sensitivity studies illustrate a potential for material restrictions to broaden the perturbations, since methanotrophic consumers require nutrients and trace metals. When such factors are considered, methane buildup within the Arctic basin is enhanced. However, freshened polar surface waters act as a barrier to atmospheric transfer, diverting products into the deep return flow. Uncertainties in the logic and calculations are enumerated including those inherent in high-latitude clathrate abundance, buoyant effluent rise through the column, representation of the general circulation, and bacterial growth kinetics.

  18. Intensity, duration, and frequency of precipitation extremes under 21st-century warming scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent research on the projection of precipitation extremes has either focused on conceptual physical mechanisms that generate heavy precipitation or rigorous statistical methods that extrapolate tail behavior. However, informing both climate prediction and impact assessment requires concurrent physically and statistically oriented analysis. A combined examination of climate model simulations and observation-based reanalysis data sets suggests more intense and frequent precipitation extremes under 21st-century warming scenarios. Utilization of statistical extreme value theory and resampling-based uncertainty quantification combined with consideration of the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship reveals consistently intensifying trends for precipitation extremes at a global-average scale. However, regional and decadal analyses reveal specific discrepancies in the physical mechanisms governing precipitation extremes, as well as their statistical trends, especially in the tropics. The intensifying trend of precipitation extremes has quantifiable impacts on intensity-duration-frequency curves, which in turn have direct implications for hydraulic engineering design and water-resources management. The larger uncertainties at regional and decadal scales suggest the need for caution during regional-scale adaptation or preparedness decisions. Future research needs to explore the possibility of uncertainty reduction through higher resolution global climate models, statistical or dynamical downscaling, as well as improved understanding of precipitation extremes processes.

  19. WARM AND FUZZY: TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY ANALYSIS OF AN Fe XV EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER LOOP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Rightmire, L. A.; Kimble, J. A.; Worley, B. T.; Pathak, S. [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Saar, S. H., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) were designed in part to work together. They have the same spatial resolution and cover different but overlapping coronal temperature ranges. These properties make a combined data set ideal for multithermal analysis, where EIS provides the best information on the cooler corona (log T < 6.5) and XRT provides the best information on the hotter corona (log T > 6.5). Here, we analyze a warm non-flaring loop detected in images made in a strong EIS Fe XV emission line with a wavelength of 284.16 A and peak formation temperature of log T = 6.3. We perform differential emission measure (DEM) analysis in three pixels at different heights above the footpoint and find multithermal results with the bulk of the emission measure in the range 6.0 < log T < 6.6. Analysis with the EIS lines alone gave a DEM with huge amounts of emission measure at very high temperatures (log T >7.2); analysis with XRT data alone resulted in a DEM that was missing most of the cooler emission measure required to produce many of the EIS lines. Thus, both results were misleading and unphysical. It was only by combining the EIS and XRT data that we were able to produce a reasonable result, one without ad hoc assumptions on the shape and range of the DEM itself.

  20. 3. MATERIAL CERTIFICATIONS REQUIRED NO RADIOGRAPHY REQUIRED.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    SHALL BE DYE PENETRANT INSPECTED. ASME SECTION IX. NO CODE STAMP REQUIRED. 1. WELDING TO BE PERFORMED is property of 1. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES 2. INTERPRET DIMENSIONS AND TOLERANCES PER ASME Y14.5M 3

  1. Long-term experimental warming reduces soil nematode populations in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    warming is expected to increase snow and glacial melt, resulting in higher stream discharge, rising lake levels, and an increase in areas of moist soil, but the potential influence of warming and associated changes in hydrology on the soil ecosystem is poorly understood. To examine the effects of soil warming

  2. Role of global warming on the statistics of recordbreaking temperatures S. Redner 1, * and Mark R. Petersen 2,+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redner, Sidney

    Role of global warming on the statistics of record­breaking temperatures S. Redner 1, * and Mark R of global warming, where the mean temperature systematically in­ creases with time. Over the 126­year time question arises: is global warming the cause of such heat waves or are they merely statistical fluctuations

  3. Scientist warns against overselling climate change Climate change forecasters should admit that they cannot predict how global warming will affect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    that they cannot predict how global warming will affect individual countries, a leading physicist has said-of-deaths-from-ozone-predicted.html) Antarctic sea floor gives clues about effects of future global warming (/earth/environment/climatechange /5279223/Antarctic-sea-floor-gives-clues-about-affects-of-future-global-warming.html) The Vanishing Face

  4. What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies (Figure 1), relative to the average

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies (Figure 1 anomalies an example of what we can expect global warming to look like? Maps of temperature anomalies, such as Figure 1, are useful for helping people understand the role of global warming in extreme events

  5. Response and impact of equatorial ocean dynamics and tropical instability waves in the tropical Atlantic under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Atlantic under global warming: A regional coupled downscaling study Hyodae Seo1,2 and ShangPing Xie1. Under global warming, both global and regional models exhibit an increased (decreased) rainfall thermal stratification is suggested to be more important under global warming. The strengthened upwelling

  6. A ten-year decrease in plant species richness on a neotropical inselberg:1 detrimental effects of global warming?2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of global warming?2 3 EMILE FONTY*, CORINNE SARTHOU, DENIS LARPIN§ and JEAN-FRAN?OIS4 PONGE*1 5 6 *Muséum 15 Keywords: aridity, biodiversity loss, global warming, low forest, plant communities, tropical16 probable cause of the observed species disappearance is global warming, which severely28 affected northern

  7. An Occam's razor view of the lead-lag dispute in global warming Tadeusz J. Ulrych1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodbury, Allan D.

    1 An Occam's razor view of the lead-lag dispute in global warming Tadeusz J. Ulrych1 and Allan D to the solar flux) which is responsible for the undeniable global warming. For example, "The observation-correlation=non- causality' statement is bogus. The Lead-Lag Dispute in Global Warming An excellent example of the debate

  8. "Global warming and global cooling are physical phenomenon. But the battle over these real or presumed developments is a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez, John

    "Global warming and global cooling are physical phenomenon. But the battle over these real of catastrophic global warming the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people" What is climate change we have ever seen" What is climate change? Lord Nicholas Stern, October 2006 #12;"Global warming

  9. In Proceedings of the 76th American Meteorological SocietyMeetings,January 1996. STUDENT CONFERENCEON GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CONFERENCEON GLOBAL WARMING: A COLLABORATIVENETWORK-SUPPORTED ECOLOGICALLYHlERARCHIC GEOSCIENCES CURRICULUM Schoolof Education and SocialPolicy Evanston, Illinois 60208 1. INTRODUCTION A five week global warming. WHY GLOBALWARMING? The controversyaround global warming has been growing over the past few decades

  10. Minimal five dimensional supergravities and complex geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herdeiro, Carlos A. R. [Departamento Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto e Centro de Fisica do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the relation between solutions admitting Killing spinors of minimal super-gravities in five dimensions, both timelike and null, and complex geometries. For the timelike solutions the results may be summarised as follows. In the ungauged case (vanishing cosmological constant {Lambda} 0) the solutions are determined in terms of a hyper-Kaehler base space; in the gauged case ({Lambda}<0) the complex geometry is Kaehler; in the de Sitter case ({Lambda}>0) the complex geometry is hyper-Kaehler with torsion (HKT). For the null solutions we shall focus on the de Sitter case, for which the solutions are determined by a constrained Einstein-Weyl 3-geometry called Gauduchon-Tod space. The method for constructing explicit solutions is discussed in each case.

  11. Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs on drastically disturbed lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S. [Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs (WSNGs) has been viewed by landowners, agronomists, natural resource managers and reclamation specialists as being too expensive and difficult, especially for reclamation, which requires early stand closure and erosion control. Natural resource managers have learned a great deal about establishing WSNGs since the implementation of the 1985 Farm Bill`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Reclamation specialists must begin to use this information to improve reclamation success. Quality control of seed equipment and planting methods has been proven to be the crucial first step in successful establishment. Seedling germination, growth and development of WSNGs are different from that of introduced cool-season grasses and legumes. Specialized seed drills and spring planting periods are essential. Because shoot growth lags far behind root growth the first two seasons, WSNGs often are rejected for reclamation use. Usually, the rejection is based on preconceived notions that bare ground will erode and on reclamation specialists` desire for a closed, uniform, grassy lawn. WSNG`s extensive root systems inhibit rill and gully erosion by the fall of the first season. Planting a weakly competitive, short-lived nurse crop such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) at low rates with the WSNG mixture can reduce first-season sheet and rill erosion problems and give an appearance of a closed stand. Benefits of WSNGs in soil building and their acid-tolerance make them ideal species for reclamation of drastically disturbed lands. WSNGs and forbs enhance wildlife habitat and promote natural succession and the invasion of the reclamation site by other native species, particularly hardwood trees, increasing diversity and integrating the site into the local ecosystem. This is perhaps their most important attribute. Most alien grasses and legumes inhibit natural succession, slowing the development of a stable mine soil ecosystem. This paper outlines one successful methodology to establish warm-season grasses and forbs on abandoned mine lands in Missouri. The methodology can be successfully adapted for reclamation of all drastically disturbed lands including Title V lands under the Surface Mining Control Reclamation Act of 1977 (PL95-87) to promote ecosystem diversity and stability.

  12. Can Advances in Science and Technology Prevent Global Warming? A Critical Review of Limitations and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.

    2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The most stringent emission scenarios published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) would result in the stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) at concentrations of approximately 550 ppm which would produce a global temperature increase of at least 2 C by 2100. Given the large uncertainties regarding the potential risks associated with this degree of global warming, it would be more prudent to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations at or below current levels which, in turn, would require a greater than 20-fold reduction (i.e., ?95%) in per capita carbon emissions in industrialized nations within the next 50 to 100 years. Using the Kaya equation as a conceptual framework, this paper examines whether CO2 mitigation approaches such as energy efficiency improvements, carbon sequestration, and the development of carbon-free energy sources would be sufficient to bring about the required reduction in per capita carbon emissions without creating unforeseen negative impacts elsewhere. In terms of energy efficiency, large improvements (?5-fold) are in principle possible given aggressive investments in R&D and if market imperfections such as corporate subsidies are removed. However, energy efficiency improvements per se will not result in a reduction in carbon emissions if, as predicted by the IPCC, the size of the global economy has expanded 12-26 fold by 2100. Terrestrial carbon sequestration via reforestation and improved agricultural soil management has many environmental advantages but has only limited CO2 mitigation potential because the global terrestrial carbon sink (ca. 200 Gt C) is small relative to the size of fossil fuel deposits (?4000 Gt C). By contrast, very large amounts of CO2 can potentially be removed from the atmosphere via sequestration in geologic formations and oceans, but carbon storage is not permanent and is likely to create many unpredictable environmental consequences. Renewable solar energy can in theory provide large amounts of carbon-free power. However, biomass and hydroelectric energy can only be marginally expanded and large-scale solar energy installations (i.e., wind, photovoltaics, and direct thermal) are likely to have significant negative environmental impacts. Expansion of nuclear energy is highly unlikely due to concerns over reactor safety, radioactive waste management, weapons proliferation, and cost. In view of the serious limitations and liabilities of many proposed CO2 mitigation approaches it appears that there remain only few no-regrets options such as drastic energy efficiency improvements, extensive terrestrial carbon sequestration, and cautious expansion of renewable energy generation. These promising CO2 mitigation technologies have the potential to bring about the required 20-fold reduction in per capita carbon emission only if population and economic growth are halted without delay. Thus, addressing the problem of global warming requires not only technological research and development but also a reexamination of core values that mistakenly equate material consumption and economic growth to happiness and well-being.

  13. Uranium Mill Tailings remedial action project waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this plan is to establish a waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness (WM/PPA) program for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The program satisfies DOE requirements mandated by DOE Order 5400.1. This plan establishes planning objectives and strategies for conserving resources and reducing the quantity and toxicity of wastes and other environmental releases.

  14. FORMATION OF ORGANIC MOLECULES AND WATER IN WARM DISK ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najita, Joan R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Adamkovics, Mate; Glassgold, Alfred E. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations from Spitzer and ground-based infrared spectroscopy reveal significant diversity in the molecular emission from the inner few AU of T Tauri disks. We explore theoretically the possible origin of this diversity by expanding on our earlier thermal-chemical model of disk atmospheres. We consider how variations in grain settling, X-ray irradiation, accretion-related mechanical heating, and the oxygen-to-carbon ratio can affect the thermal and chemical properties of the atmosphere at 0.25-40 AU. We find that these model parameters can account for many properties of the detected molecular emission. The column density of the warm (200-2000 K) molecular atmosphere is sensitive to grain settling and the efficiency of accretion-related heating, which may account, at least in part, for the large range in molecular emission fluxes that have been observed. The dependence of the atmospheric properties on the model parameters may also help to explain trends that have been reported in the literature between molecular emission strength and mid-infrared color, stellar accretion rate, and disk mass. We discuss whether some of the differences between our model results and the observations (e.g., for water) indicate a role for vertical transport and freezeout in the disk midplane. We also discuss how planetesimal formation in the outer disk (beyond the snowline) may imprint a chemical signature on the inner few AU of the disk and speculate on possible observational tracers of this process.

  15. Valuation of mountain glaciation response on global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ananicheva, M.D.; Davidovich, N.V. [Institute of Geography, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative estimates of main climatic parameters, influencing the glacier regime (summer air temperature and annual solid precipitation), and glaciologic characteristics (mass balance components, equilibrium line altitude and rate of air temperature at this height), received on the basis of the scenario for a climate development according to R. Wetherald and S. Manabe (1982) are submitted. The possible reaction of mountain glaciation on global warming is considered for two mountain countries: South-eastern Alaska and Pamir-Alay (Central Asia). In given paper we have tried to evaluate changes of the mountain glaciation regime for a time of CO{sub 2} doubling in the atmosphere, basing on the scenario of climate development and modern statistical relationships between climatic and glaciologic parameters. The GCM scenario of R. Wetherald and C. Manabe (GFDL model) which is made with respect of mountain territories is in the basis our calculations. As initial materials we used data of long-term observations and the maps of World Atlas of Snow and Ice Resources (WASIR).

  16. Transitional solar dynamics, cosmic rays and global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bershadskii

    2009-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar activity is studied using a cluster analysis of the time-fluctuations of the sunspot number. It is shown that in an Historic period the high activity components of the solar cycles exhibit strong clustering, whereas in a Modern period (last seven solar cycles: 1933-2007) they exhibit a white-noise (non-)clustering behavior. Using this observation it is shown that in the Historic period, emergence of the sunspots in the solar photosphere was strongly dominated by turbulent photospheric convection. In the Modern period, this domination was broken by a new more active dynamics of the inner layers of the convection zone. Then, it is shown that the dramatic change of the sun dynamics at the transitional period (between the Historic and Modern periods, solar cycle 1933-1944yy) had a clear detectable impact on Earth climate. A scenario of a chain of transitions in the solar convective zone is suggested in order to explain the observations, and a forecast for the global warming is suggested on the basis of this scenario. A relation between the recent transitions and solar long-period chaotic dynamics has been found. Contribution of the galactic turbulence (due to galactic cosmic rays) has been discussed. These results are also considered in a content of chaotic climate dynamics at millennial timescales.

  17. Coal-Derived Warm Syngas Purification and CO2 Capture-Assisted Methane Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Robert A.; King, David L.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Xing, Rong; Spies, Kurt A.; Zhu, Yunhua; Rainbolt, James E.; Li, Liyu; Braunberger, B.

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasifier-derived syngas from coal has many applications in the area of catalytic transformation to fuels and chemicals. Raw syngas must be treated to remove a number of impurities that would otherwise poison the synthesis catalysts. Inorganic impurities include alkali salts, chloride, sulfur compounds, heavy metals, ammonia, and various P, As, Sb, and Se- containing compounds. Systems comprising multiple sorbent and catalytic beds have been developed for the removal of impurities from gasified coal using a warm cleanup approach. This approach has the potential to be more economic than the currently available acid gas removal (AGR) approaches and improves upon currently available processes that do not provide the level of impurity removal that is required for catalytic synthesis application. Gasification also lends itself much more readily to the capture of CO2, important in the regulation and control of greenhouse gas emissions. CO2 capture material was developed and in this study was demonstrated to assist in methane production from the purified syngas. Simultaneous CO2 sorption enhances the CO methanation reaction through relaxation of thermodynamic constraint, thus providing economic benefit rather than simply consisting of an add-on cost for carbon capture and release. Molten and pre-molten LiNaKCO3 can promote MgO and MgO-based double salts to capture CO2 with high cycling capacity. A stable cycling CO2 capacity up to 13 mmol/g was demonstrated. This capture material was specifically developed in this study to operate in the same temperature range and therefore integrate effectively with warm gas cleanup and methane synthesis. By combining syngas methanation, water-gas-shift, and CO2 sorption in a single reactor, single pass yield to methane of 99% was demonstrated at 10 bar and 330oC when using a 20 wt% Ni/MgAl2O4 catalyst and a molten-phase promoted MgO-based sorbent. Under model feed conditions both the sorbent and catalyst exhibited favorable stability after multiple test cycles. The cleanup for warm gas cleanup of inorganics was broken down into three major steps: chloride removal, sulfur removal, and the removal for a multitude of trace metal contaminants. Na2CO3 was found to optimally remove chlorides at an operating temperature of 450C. For sulfur removal two regenerable ZnO beds are used for bulk H2S removal at 450C (<5 ppm S) and a non-regenerable ZnO bed for H2S polishing at 300C (<40 ppb S). It was also found that sulfur from COS could be adsorbed (to levels below our detection limit of 40 ppb) in the presence of water that leads to no detectable slip of H2S. Finally, a sorbent material comprising of Cu and Ni was found to be effective in removing trace metal impurities such as AsH3 and PH3 when operating at 300C. Proof-of-concept of the integrated cleanup process was demonstrated with gasifier-generated syngas produced at the Western Research Institute using Wyoming Decker Coal. When operating with a ~1 SLPM feed, multiple inorganic contaminant removal sorbents and a tar-reforming bed was able to remove the vast majority of contaminants from the raw syngas. A tar-reforming catalyst was employed due to the production of tars generated from the gasifier used in this particular study. It is envisioned that in a real application a commercial scale gasifier operating at a higher temperature would produce lesser amount of tar. Continuous operation of a poison-sensitive copper-based WGS catalyst located downstream from the cleanup steps resulted in successful demonstration. ?

  18. Waste minimization in analytical chemistry through innovative sample preparation techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, L. L.

    1998-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Because toxic solvents and other hazardous materials are commonly used in analytical methods, characterization procedures result in significant and costly amount of waste. We are developing alternative analytical methods in the radiological and organic areas to reduce the volume or form of the hazardous waste produced during sample analysis. For the radiological area, we have examined high-pressure, closed-vessel microwave digestion as a way to minimize waste from sample preparation operations. Heated solutions of strong mineral acids can be avoided for sample digestion by using the microwave approach. Because reactivity increases with pressure, we examined the use of less hazardous solvents to leach selected contaminants from soil for subsequent analysis. We demonstrated the feasibility of this approach by extracting plutonium from a NET reference material using citric and tartaric acids with microwave digestion. Analytical results were comparable to traditional digestion methods, while hazardous waste was reduced by a factor often. We also evaluated the suitability of other natural acids, determined the extraction performance on a wider variety of soil types, and examined the extraction efficiency of other contaminants. For the organic area, we examined ways to minimize the wastes associated with the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in environmental samples. Conventional methods for analyzing semivolatile organic compounds are labor intensive and require copious amounts of hazardous solvents. For soil and sediment samples, we have a method to analyze PCBs that is based on microscale extraction using benign solvents (e.g., water or hexane). The extraction is performed at elevated temperatures in stainless steel cells containing the sample and solvent. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to quantitate the analytes in the isolated extract. More recently, we developed a method utilizing solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for natural water samples. In this SPME technique, a fused-silica fiber coated with a polymeric film is exposed to the sample, extraction is allowed to take place, and then the analytes are thermally desorbed for GC analysis. Unlike liquid-liquid extraction or solid-phase extraction, SPME consumes all of the extracted sample in the analysis, significantly reducing the required sample volume.

  19. FES Requirements Review 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review 2014 FES Attendees 2014 BES Requirements Review 2014 Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638...

  20. BES Requirements Review 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review 2014 BES Requirements Review 2014 BES Attendees 2014 Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638...

  1. The Absence of Cold Dust and the Mineralogy and Origin of the Warm Dust Encircling BD +20 307

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinberger, A J; Song, I; Zuckerman, B

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spitzer Space Telescope photometry and spectroscopy of BD +20 307 show that all of the dust around this remarkable Gyr-old spectroscopic binary arises within 1 AU. No additional cold dust is needed to fit the infrared excess. Peaks in the 10 and 20 micron spectrum are well fit with small silicates that should be removed on a timescale of years from the system. This is the dustiest star known for its age, which is >1 Gyr. The dust cannot arise from a steady-state collisional cascade. A catastrophic collision of two rocky, planetary-scale bodies in the terrestrial zone is the most likely source for this warm dust because it does not require a reservoir of planetesimals in the outer system.

  2. THE ABSENCE OF COLD DUST AND THE MINERALOGY AND ORIGIN OF THE WARM DUST ENCIRCLING BD +20 307

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinberger, A. J. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Becklin, E. E.; Zuckerman, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States); Song, I., E-mail: weinberger@dtm.ciw.edu, E-mail: becklin@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: ben@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: song@uga.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States)

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Spitzer Space Telescope photometry and spectroscopy of BD +20 307 show that all of the dust around this remarkable Gyr-old spectroscopic binary arises within 1 AU. No additional cold dust is needed to fit the infrared excess. Peaks in the 10 and 20 {mu}m spectrum are well fit with small silicates that should be removed on a timescale of years from the system. This is the dustiest star known for its age, which is {approx}>1 Gyr. The dust cannot arise from a steady-state collisional cascade. A catastrophic collision of two rocky, planetary-scale bodies in the terrestrial zone is the most likely source for this warm dust because it does not require a reservoir of planetesimals in the outer system.

  3. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petit, Christophe; Canestrari, Francesco; Pannunzio, Valter; Virgili, Amadeo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used to manufacture Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), which is a modified asphalt concrete produced, applied and compacted at temperatures below those typically required. This feature leads to environmental benefits, such as reduced energy consumption, gas and fume emissions, as well as to economic/operational advantages, such as lower production costs and greater hauling distances for extended construction seasons with tighter schedules. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax with a traditional Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) specimen, in terms of shear fatigue response and both complex and stiffness moduli. The experimental results and related modeling work demonstrate that adding synthetic wax into the WMA composition does not hinder either the destructive or non-destructive performance of an HMA, and this finding is corroborated by respectively measuring fatigue life and stiffness.

  4. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christophe Petit; Anne Millien; Francesco Canestrari; Valter Pannunzio; Amadeo Virgili

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used to manufacture Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), which is a modified asphalt concrete produced, applied and compacted at temperatures below those typically required. This feature leads to environmental benefits, such as reduced energy consumption, gas and fume emissions, as well as to economic/operational advantages, such as lower production costs and greater hauling distances for extended construction seasons with tighter schedules. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax with a traditional Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) specimen, in terms of shear fatigue response and both complex and stiffness moduli. The experimental results and related modeling work demonstrate that adding synthetic wax into the WMA composition does not hinder either the destructive or non-destructive performance of an HMA, and this finding is corroborated by respectively measuring fatigue life and stiffness.

  5. Allocating Reserve Requirements (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of present and possible future ways to allocate and assign benefits for reserve requirements.

  6. BER Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management and analysis of geospatial data involvingmanipulation, analysis, and display of geospatial data,Analysis and interpretation require mapping geospatial

  7. FES Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    FES Science Network Requirements Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008 #12;FES Science Network Requirements Workshop Fusion Energy Sciences Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD March 13 and 14, 2008 ESnet

  8. Energy and environmental policy and electric utilities' choice under uncertain global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Masaki

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews and discusses uncertainty about global warming science, impact on society. It also discusses what assumptions have been made and how appropriate the assumptions in scenarios have been for estimating global ...

  9. GR Focus Review Impacts of global warming on Permo-Triassic terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    with long-term aridification and short-term bursts of warming and acid rain. Wildfires at the Permo have succumbed primarily to acid rain, mass wasting, and aridification. Plants may have been more

  10. Global warming, energy efficiency and the role of the built environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DiBona, Donna K

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis attempts to explore the relationships between the Buildings Sector, energy efficiency and global warming. Through a qualitative analysis the author illustrates the connection between these three areas and shows ...

  11. Statistical factors to qualify the superconducting magnets for the SSC based on warm/cold correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.; Devred, A.; Coles, M.; Tompkins, J.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All of the SSC production magnets will be measured at room temperature (warm), but only a fraction of these will be measured at liquid helium temperature (cold). The fractional information will then be analyzed to determine warm acceptance criteria for the field quality of the SSC magnets. Regarding predictors of the field quality based on partial information, there are several observations and studies based on the warm/cold correlation. A different facet of the acceptance test is production control, which interprets the warm/cold correlation to adjust the process parameters. For these applications, we are evaluating statistical techniques relying on asymptotic estimators of the systematic errors and random errors, and their respective confidence intervals. The estimators are useful to qualify the population magnets based on a subset of sample magnets. We present the status of our work, including: (i) a recapitulation of analytic formulas, (ii) a justification based on HERA magnet experience, and (iii) a practical interpretation of these estimators.

  12. Comment on 'Discussions on common errors in analyzing sea level accelerations, solar trends and global warming'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benestad, R E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comment on Scafetta, Nicola. 'Discussion on Common Errors in Analyzing Sea Level Accelerations, Solar Trends and Global Warming.' arXiv:1305.2812 (May 13, 2013a). doi:10.5194/prp-1-37-2013.

  13. Geographic variation in vulnerability to climate warming in a tropical Caribbean lizard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leal, Manuel S.

    Geographic variation in vulnerability to climate warming in a tropical Caribbean lizard Alex R temperatures (Tb) of the tropical Caribbean lizard Anolis cristatellus at nine sites representing two habitat

  14. Polymer material selection and testing of resistive wire arrangement for a transparent infant warming blanket

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, Madeline

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ThermoCloud was designed as a portable, scalable, transparent electrical blanket to warm and insulate infants, while permitting hassle-free medical transportation and maximum visualization of a patient's thorax and ...

  15. Tropical Pacific response to 20th century Atlantic warming F. Kucharski,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, In-Sik

    and L. Feudale1 Received 16 November 2010; accepted 13 December 2010; published 1 February 2011. [1. Feudale (2011), Tropical Pacific response to 20th century Atlantic warming, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L

  16. The effect of surface flooding on the physical-biogeochemical dynamics of a warm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baird, Mark

    Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia Abstract Warm core eddies (WCEs) formed from the East suggest that EAC WCEs with relatively shallow surface flooding contain more phy- toplankton biomass than

  17. How Do You Stay Warm While Saving Money and Energy in Extreme...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Such weather can cause us to use energy a bit differently to stay warm and keep things running. Depending on where you are, you may be keeping the faucet dripping (so pipes don't...

  18. American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.M. Reiner; T.E. Curry; M.A. de Figueiredo; H.J. Herzog; S.D. Ansolabehere; K. Itaoka; F. Johnsson; M. Odenberger [University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Judge Business School

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite sharp differences in government policy, the views of the U.S. public on energy and global warming are remarkably similar to those in Sweden, Britain, and Japan. Americans do exhibit some differences, placing lower priority on the environment and global warming, and with fewer believing that 'global warming has been established as a serious problem and immediate action is necessary'. There also remains a small hard core of skeptics (<10%) who do not believe in the science of climate change and the need for action, a group that is much smaller in the other countries surveyed. The similarities are, however, pervasive. Similar preferences are manifest across a wide range of technology and fuel choices, in support of renewables, in research priorities, in a basic understanding of which technologies produce or reduce carbon dioxide (or misunderstandings in the case of nuclear power), and in willingness to pay for solving global warming. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Collective guilt for harming future ingroup members: The case of American identity and global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Mark Allen

    2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    members on willingness to engage in behaviors that mitigate global warming. An experimental study extended these results by showing similar effects for actual behavior and pro-environmental attitudes. A final experiment extended the other studies...

  20. abiotic-stress resistant warm: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Zeolite on the Decomposition Resistance of Organic Matter in Tropical Soils under Global Warming CiteSeer Summary: AbstractGlobal temperature had increased by about 0.5 o...

  1. Upward Shift of the Atmospheric General Circulation under Global Warming: Theory and Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Martin Simran

    Many features of the general circulation of the atmosphere shift upward in response to warming in simulations of climate change with both general circulation models (GCMs) and cloud-system-resolving models. The importance ...

  2. Planning and Scheduling to Minimize Makespan & Tardiness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    -based Benders. Since classical Benders requires that the subproblem be a linear or nonlinear programming problem to integer programming, SAT. 2001 (Jain & Grossmann) Application to machine assignment and disjunctive/Citron), paint mixing (Barbot). 2003 (JH, Ottosson) Integer programming. Benders cuts less obvious, since

  3. IC5063: AGN driven outflow of warm and cold gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Morganti; J. Holt; L. Saripalli; T. A. Oosterloo; C. N. Tadhunter

    2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new ATCA 17- and 24-GHz radio images and ESO-NTT optical spectra of the radio-loud Seyfert galaxy IC5063, the first galaxy in which a fast (~ 600 km/s) outflow of neutral hydrogen was discovered. The new radio data confirm the triple radio structure with a central core and two resolved radio lobes. This implies that the previously detected fast outflow of neutral gas is occurring off-nucleus, near a radio lobe about 0.5 kpc from the core. The ionised gas shows complex kinematics in the region co-spatial with the radio emission. Broad and blueshifted (~ 500 km/s) emission is observed in the region of the radio lobe, at the same location as the blueshifted HI absorption. The velocity of the ionised outflow is similar to the one found in HI. The first order correspondence between the radio and optical properties suggests that the outflow is driven by the interaction between the radio jet and the ISM. Despite the high outflow velocities, no evidence is found for the ionisation of the gas being due to fast shocks in the region of the outflow, indicating that photoionisation from the AGN is likely to be the dominant ionisation mechanism. The outflow rate of the warm (ionised) gas is small compared to that of the cold gas. The mass outflow rate associated with the HI is in the same range as for ``mild'' starburst-driven superwinds in ULIRGs. However, in IC5063, the AGN-driven outflow appears to be limited to the inner kpc region of the galaxy. The kinetic power associated with the HI outflow is a small fraction (a few x 10^-4) of the Eddington luminosity of the galaxy but is a significant fraction (~ 0.1) of the nuclear bolometric luminosity. In IC5063, the outflows may have sufficient kinetic power to have a significant impact on the evolution of the ISM in the host galaxy.

  4. DISCOVERY OF 'WARM DUST' GALAXIES IN CLUSTERS AT z {approx} 0.3: EVIDENCE FOR STRIPPING OF COOL DUST IN THE DENSE ENVIRONMENT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawle, T. D.; Rex, M.; Egami, E.; Walth, G.; Pereira, M. J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Chung, S. M.; Gonzalez, A. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Perez-Gonzalez, P. G. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas,Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Smail, I. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Altieri, B.; Valtchanov, I. [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC, ESA, P.O. Box 78, Villanueva de la Canada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); Appleton, P.; Fadda, D. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Alba, A. Berciano [ASTRON, Oude Hoogeveensedijk 4, NL-7991 PD Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Blain, A. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Dessauges-Zavadsky, M. [Observatoire de Geneve, Universite de Geneve, 51 Ch. des Maillettes, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Van der Werf, P. P. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Zemcov, M., E-mail: trawle@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Using far-infrared imaging from the 'Herschel Lensing Survey', we derive dust properties of spectroscopically confirmed cluster member galaxies within two massive systems at z {approx} 0.3: the merging Bullet Cluster and the more relaxed MS2137.3-2353. Most star-forming cluster sources ({approx}90%) have characteristic dust temperatures similar to local field galaxies of comparable infrared (IR) luminosity (T{sub dust} {approx} 30 K). Several sub-luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG; L{sub IR} < 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }) Bullet Cluster members are much warmer (T{sub dust} > 37 K) with far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) shapes resembling LIRG-type local templates. X-ray and mid-infrared data suggest that obscured active galactic nuclei do not contribute significantly to the infrared flux of these 'warm dust' galaxies. Sources of comparable IR luminosity and dust temperature are not observed in the relaxed cluster MS2137, although the significance is too low to speculate on an origin involving recent cluster merging. 'Warm dust' galaxies are, however, statistically rarer in field samples (>3{sigma}), indicating that the responsible mechanism may relate to the dense environment. The spatial distribution of these sources is similar to the whole far-infrared bright population, i.e., preferentially located in the cluster periphery, although the galaxy hosts tend toward lower stellar masses (M{sub *} < 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }). We propose dust stripping and heating processes which could be responsible for the unusually warm characteristic dust temperatures. A normal star-forming galaxy would need 30%-50% of its dust removed (preferentially stripped from the outer reaches, where dust is typically cooler) to recover an SED similar to a 'warm dust' galaxy. These progenitors would not require a higher IR luminosity or dust mass than the currently observed normal star-forming population.

  5. Fermion EDMs with Minimal Flavor Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Gang He; Chao-Jung Lee; Siao-Fong Li; Jusak Tandean

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the electric dipole moments (EDMs) of fermions in the standard model supplemented with right-handed neutrinos and its extension including neutrino seesaw mechanism under the framework of minimal flavor violation (MFV). In the quark sector, we find that the current experimental bound on the neutron EDM does not yield a significant restriction on the scale of MFV. In addition, we consider how MFV may affect the contribution of the strong theta-term to the neutron EDM. For the leptons, the existing EDM data also do not lead to strict limits if neutrinos are Dirac particles. On the other hand, if neutrinos are Majorana in nature, we find that the constraints become substantially stronger. Moreover, the results of the latest search for the electron EDM by the ACME Collaboration are sensitive to the MFV scale of order a few hundred GeV or higher. We also look at constraints from $CP$-violating electron-nucleon interactions that have been probed in atomic and molecular EDM searches.

  6. Einstein static Universe in non-minimal kinetic coupled gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Atazadeh; F. Darabi

    2015-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the stability of Einstein static Universe, with FLRW metric, by considering linear homogeneous perturbations in the kinetic coupled gravity. By taking linear homogeneous perturbations, we find that the stability of Einstein static Universe, in the kinetic coupled gravity with quadratic scalar field potential, for closed ($K=1$) isotropic and homogeneous FLRW Universe depends on the coupling parameters $\\kappa$ and $\\varepsilon$. Specifically, for $\\kappa=L_P^2$ and $\\varepsilon=1$ we find that the stability condition imposes the inequality $a_0>\\sqrt{3}L_P$ on the initial size $a_0$ of the closed Einstein static Universe before the inflation. Such inequality asserts that the initial size of the Einstein static Universe must be greater than the Planck length $L_P$, in consistency with the quantum gravity and quantum cosmology requirements. In this way, we have determined the non-minimal coupling parameter $\\kappa$ in the context of Einstein static Universe. Such a very small parameter is favored in the inflationary models constructed in the kinetic coupled gravity. We have also studied the stability against the vector and tensor perturbations and discussed on the acceptable values of the equation of state parameter.

  7. An Outcome Space Algorithm for Minimizing the Product of Two ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 24, 2011 ... Primary: 90 C29; Secondary: 90 C26. Key words. global optimization problem, efficient point, outcome set, minimizing the product of two convex...

  8. Gradient methods for convex minimization: better rates under ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui Zhang

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 20, 2013 ... Gradient methods for convex minimization: better rates under weaker conditions. Hui Zhang(hhuuii.zhang ***at*** gmail.com)

  9. Greening PCB Drilling Process: Burr Minimization and Other Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yu-Chu; Linke, Barbara; Bhandari, Binayak; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Dornfeld, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Analytical Model for Drilling Burr Formation in DuctileJ. and Chen, L. , Drilling Burr Formation in Titaniumfor Burr Minimization in Drilling, PhD dissertation, The

  10. Extended Barzilai-Borwein method for unconstrained minimization ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    May 20, 2008 ... Many researchers study the gradient method for minimizing a strictly ...... gence of the nonmonotone conjugate gradient method, and Raydan...

  11. Parallel Computation of the Minimal Elements of a Poset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leiserson, Charles E.

    Computing the minimal elements of a partially ordered finite set (poset) is a fundamental problem in combinatorics with numerous applications such as polynomial expression optimization, transversal hypergraph generation ...

  12. Not Even Decoupling Can Save Minimal Supersymmetric SU(5)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitoshi Murayama; Aaron Pierce

    2001-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We make explicit the statement that Minimal Supersymmetric SU(5) has been excluded by the Super-Kamiokande search for the process $p \\to K^{+} \\overline{\

  13. Optimization Online - An Outcome Space Algorithm for Minimizing ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thi Bach Kim NGUYEN

    2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 24, 2011 ... ... of minimizing the product of two convex functions over a compact ... Keywords: global optimization problem, efficient point, outcome set,...

  14. Optimization Online - Nuclear norm minimization for the planted ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brendan Ames

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 21, 2009 ... Nuclear norm minimization for the planted clique and biclique problems. Brendan Ames(bpames ***at*** math.uwaterloo.ca) Stephen...

  15. Analysis of Minimizers of the Lawrence-Doniach Energy for ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    an asymptotic formula for the minimum Lawrence-Doniach energy as e and the ... In this case, an analysis of the behavior of energy minimizers and their.

  16. On Minimizing the Energy Consumption of an Electrical Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelkader Merakeb

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 20, 2011 ... The problem that we focus on, is the minimization of the energy consumption of an electrical vehicle achievable on a given driving cycle.

  17. Optimization Online - Minimizing Risk Exposure when the Choice of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erick Delage

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 30, 2015 ... Minimizing Risk Exposure when the Choice of a Risk Measure is Ambiguous. Erick Delage(erick.delage ***at*** hec.ca) Jonathan Y.

  18. Late-time backreaction from inflationary fluctuations of a non-minimally coupled massless scalar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Glavan; T. Prokopec; D. van der Woude

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the late time one-loop quantum backreaction from inflationary fluctuations of a non-minimally coupled, massless scalar field. The scalar is assumed to be a spectator field in an inflationary model with a constant principal slow roll $\\epsilon$ parameter. We regulate the infrared by matching onto a pre-inflationary radiation era. We find a large late time backreaction when the nonminimal coupling $\\xi$ is negative (in which case the scalar exhibits a negative mass term during inflation). The one-loop quantum backreaction becomes significant today for moderately small non-minimal couplings, $\\xi\\sim -1/20$, and it changes sign (from negative to positive) at a recent epoch when inflation lasts not much longer than what is minimally required, $N \\gtrsim 66$. Since currently we do not have a way of treating the classical fluid and the quantum backreaction in a self-consistent manner, we cannot say decidely whether the backreaction from inflationary quantum fluctuations of a non-minimally coupled scalar can mimic dark energy.

  19. Minimizing Irreversible Impacts of Human-Made Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Geophysical Union San Francisco, CA #12;Climate Impacts 1. Ice Sheet Disintegration & Sea Level - Ocean Warming Ice Shelves Melt Ice Streams Surge Disintegration 2. Species Extermination - Shifting Climate-25 meters - Pliocene temperature +3-4C* Ice sheet response time uncertain, but it is shorter than

  20. Alternative stripper configurations to minimize energy for CO2 capture Babatunde A. Oyenekan and Gary T. Rochelle*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    GHGT-8 1 Alternative stripper configurations to minimize energy for CO2 capture Babatunde A. Alternative configurations Figure 1 shows three alternative stripper configurations that reduce the energy, provides 1 to 1.5 times faster rates than 7m MEA. This paper presents energy requirements calculated

  1. Warming of Global Abyssal and Deep Southern Ocean Waters between the 1990s and 2000s: Contributions to Global Heat and Sea Level Rise Budgets*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gregory C.

    Warming of Global Abyssal and Deep Southern Ocean Waters between the 1990s and 2000s: Contributions of recent warming of these regions in global heat and sea level budgets. The authors 1) compute warming produces a 0.053 (60.017) mm yr21 increase in global average sea level and the deep warming south

  2. What causes the excessive response of clear-sky greenhouse effect to El Nin~o warming in Community Atmosphere Models?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Dezheng

    What causes the excessive response of clear-sky greenhouse effect to El Nin~o warming in Community.-Z. Sun (2008), What causes the excessive response of clear-sky greenhouse effect to El Nin~o warming for global warming because the latter may have a different spatial pattern of warming [e.g., Sun and Held

  3. Nutritional requirements of sesame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eller, Joe C

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L)&RARYi ~st t~6~ 0F TEXACO NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF SESAME A Thesis By JOE C. ELLER Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in. partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of M... AS TER 0 F SCIENC E January 1958 Major Subject: Agronomy NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF SESAME A Thesis JOE C. ELLER Approved. as to style and content by. ' Chairman of Committee Head qg Department January 1958 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The author wishes...

  4. RPAM & Energy Order Requirements

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    430.1C, Real Property Asset Management and DOE O 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management Requirements, Overlap & Differences Office of...

  5. Required Annual Notices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Required Annual Notices The Women's Health and Cancer Rights Act of 1998 (WHCRA) The medical programs sponsored by LANS will not restrict benefits if you or your dependent...

  6. Transuranic Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

  7. Resource Minimized Static Mapping and Dynamic Scheduling of SDF Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Soonhoi

    Resource Minimized Static Mapping and Dynamic Scheduling of SDF Graphs Jinwoo Kim, Tae-ho Shin than the previous approaches. Keywords-Mapping, buffer size minimization, SDF graph, dynamic scheduling a model-based approach based on SDF (synchronous data flow) model. Since the parallelism of an application

  8. A MINIMAL MODEL OF ENERGY MANAGEMENT IN THE BRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    a minimal model of energy management inside a single cortical area, featuring local energy storage a simple model for energy man- agement within a single cortical area. By energy management, we mean a setA MINIMAL MODEL OF ENERGY MANAGEMENT IN THE BRAIN Florian A. Dehmelt, Christian K. Machens Group

  9. PSYCHOACOUSTICALLY CONSTRAINED AND DISTORTION MINIMIZED SPEECH ENHANCEMENT ALGORITHM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Chang D.

    PSYCHOACOUSTICALLY CONSTRAINED AND DISTORTION MINIMIZED SPEECH ENHANCEMENT ALGORITHM Seokhwan Jo minimized speech enhancement algorithm is considered. In general, noise reduction leads to speech distortion, and thus, the goal of an enhancement al- gorithm should reduce noise and speech distortion so that both

  10. Harmonic minimization waveforms for modulated heating experiments at HAARP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmonic minimization waveforms for modulated heating experiments at HAARP G. Jin,1 M. Spasojevic,1), Harmonic minimization waveforms for modulated heating experiments at HAARP, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A11315 and Stubbe [1984], and Milikh et al. [1999]. The High Fre- quency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP

  11. Techniques and Technology Article Optimizing Radio Retention and Minimizing Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Techniques and Technology Article Optimizing Radio Retention and Minimizing Radio Impacts the duration of transmitter attachment and minimizing the impacts of radios on the behavior and demography of the study animal. We tested 4 methods of radio attachment for a breeding population of upland sandpipers

  12. Minimal Replication Cost for Availability Computer Science Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vahdat, Amin

    Minimal Replication Cost for Availability Haifeng Yu Computer Science Department Duke University by availability rather than raw performance. To better understand the e ects of replica placement on avail- ability, we propose the problem of minimal replication cost for availability. Let replication cost

  13. CIRCLES MINIMIZE MOST KNOT ENERGIES AARON ABRAMS, JASON CANTARELLA1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Ralph

    GHOMI, AND RALPH HOWARD3 ABSTRACT. We define a new class of knot energies (known as renormalizationCIRCLES MINIMIZE MOST KNOT ENERGIES AARON ABRAMS, JASON CANTARELLA1 , JOSEPH H. G. FU2 , MOHAMMAD energies) and prove that a broad class of these energies are uniquely minimized by the round circle. Most

  14. Characterizing and computing minimal cograph completions Daniel Lokshtanov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fomin, Fedor V.

    to often be good enough for practical purposes [4, 2]. In addition, the study of minimal completions gives to pick the one in the sample with fewest fill edges and have good chances to produce a completion closeCharacterizing and computing minimal cograph completions Daniel Lokshtanov Federico Mancini Charis

  15. UMASS: DWT INSTITUTE Jim Malley UV DISINFECTION Minimizing DBPs With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DBPs formed in the distribution system Switching to chloramines with a short chlorine C*T Switching Minimization strategy develop an understanding of why your specific system is generating higher than allowed constraints and operational skill and reliability Try to minimize Chlorine use as a pre

  16. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort-AC02-05CH11231. #12;Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering thermal comfort through a different low energy space conditioning mechanism than would otherwise

  17. National Institutes of Health: Mixed waste minimization and treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission requested the US Department of Energy`s National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) to assist the biomedical community in becoming more knowledgeable about its mixed waste streams, to help minimize the mixed waste stream generated by the biomedical community, and to identify applicable treatment technologies for these mixed waste streams. As the first step in the waste minimization process, liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste (LLMW) streams generated at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) were characterized and combined into similar process categories. This report identifies possible waste minimization and treatment approaches for the LLMW generated by the biomedical community identified in DOE/LLW-208. In development of the report, on site meetings were conducted with NIH personnel responsible for generating each category of waste identified as lacking disposal options. Based on the meetings and general waste minimization guidelines, potential waste minimization options were identified.

  18. General Responsibilities and Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The material presented in this guide provides suggestions and acceptable ways of implementing DOE M 435.1-1 and should not be viewed as additional or mandatory requirements. The objective of the guide is to ensure that responsible individuals understand what is necessary and acceptable for implementing the requirements of DOE M 435.1-1.

  19. Effort minimization in UI development by reusing existing DGML based UI design for qualitative software development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suri, P K

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the methodology for achieving the user interface design reusability of a qualitative software system and effort minimization by applying the inference on the stored design documents. The pictorial design documents are stored in a special format in the form of keyword text [DGML tag based design]. The design document storage mechanism will expose the keywords per design stored. This methodology is having an inference engine. Inference mechanism search for the requirements and find the match for them in the available design repository. A match found will success in reusing it after checking the quality parameters of the found design module in the result set. DGML notations produces qualitative designs which helps in minimizing the efforts of software development life cycle.

  20. Analyzing the Trade-offs Between Minimizing Makespan and Minimizing Energy Consumption in a Heterogeneous Resource Allocation Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Anthony A.

    @engr.colostate.edu, wcoliver@rams.colostate.edu, HJ@colostate.edu, aam@colostate.edu Abstract--The energy consumption of data a new data center in Manhattan [3]. To battle the rising costs of energy consumption, it is es- sentialAnalyzing the Trade-offs Between Minimizing Makespan and Minimizing Energy Consumption

  1. Green Roof Media Selection forGreen Roof Media Selection for the Minimization of Pollutantthe Minimization of Pollutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    1 Green Roof Media Selection forGreen Roof Media Selection for the Minimization of Pollutantthe Minimization of Pollutant Loadings in Roof RunoffLoadings in Roof Runoff Brett LongBrett Long Shirley Clark for Green Roof Research Green Roofs:Green Roofs: The New BMP (at least in the US)The New BMP (at least

  2. Warm absorber, reflection and Fe K line in the X-ray spectrum of IC 4329A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cappi; T. Mihara; M. Matsuoka; K. Hayashida; K. A. Weaver; C. Otani

    1995-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from the X-ray spectral analysis of the ASCA PV phase observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy IC 4329A are presented. We find that the 0.4 - 10 keV spectrum of IC 4329A is best described by the sum of a steep ($\\Gamma \\sim 1.98$) power-law spectrum passing through a warm absorber plus a strong reflection component and associated Fe K line, confirming recent results (Madejski et al. 1995, Mushotsky et al. 1995). Further cold absorption in excess of the Galactic value and covering the entire source is also required by the data, consistent with the edge-on galactic disk and previous X-ray measurements. The effect of the warm absorber at soft X-ray energies is best parameterized by two absorption edges, one consistent with OVI, OVII or NVII, the other consistent with OVIII. A description of the soft excess in terms of blackbody emission, as observed in some other Seyfert 1 galaxies, is ruled out by the data. A large amount of reflection is detected in both the GIS and SIS detectors, at similar intensities. We find a strong correlation between the amount of reflection and the photon index, but argue that the best solution with the present data is that given by the best statistical fit. The model dependence of the Fe K line parameters is also discussed. Our best fit gives a slightly broad ($\\sigma \\simeq 0.11 \\pm 0.08$ keV) and redshifted (E $\\simeq 6.20 \\pm 0.07$ keV) Fe K line, with equivalent width $\\simeq$ 89 $\\pm$ 33 eV. The presence of a weak Fe K line with a strong reflection can be reconciled if one assumes iron underabundances or ionized reflection. We also have modeled the line with a theoretical line profile produced by an accretion disk. This yields results in better agreement with the constraints obtained from the reflection component.

  3. A possible relationship between Global Warming and Lightning Activity in India during the period 1998-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Pereira B.; Priyadarsini G.; T. E. Girish

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lightning activity on a global scale has been studied season wise using satellite data for the period from 1998 to 2009. Lightning activity shows an increasing trend during the period of study which is highly correlated with atmospheric warming. A similar increasing trend of lightning activity is observed in the Indian region during the pre-monsoon season which is correlated with global lightning trends and warming trends of surface temperature in India. Key words: Global warming, lightning activity, Solar cycle changes

  4. Environmental Impact on Applied Technology- Global Warming CFCs & VOCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cogeneration projects being sited as PURPA machines where the steam host is only a token element in the energy design. In effect, these large systems have lost the potential for true "dual energy use" and many times give the steam away to the host free... contributor. Clearly, the largest changeable producer is combustion of fuels both in the production of electricity and in industrial process heat. The nuclear power option is receiving renewed consideration, but the time required to get new nuclear...

  5. Promulgating Nuclear Safety Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Applies to all Nuclear Safety Requirements Adopted by the Department to Govern the Conduct of its Nuclear Activities. Cancels DOE P 410.1. Canceled by DOE N 251.85.

  6. BES Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedOffice of Basic Energy Sciences. This is LBNL report LBNL-BES Science Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy

  7. Timeline for Net Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x By July 31 of each Forecast Year, BPA publishes all Load Following customers' Net Requirements data for the two years of the upcoming Rate Period. 17.6.1 7312010 Yes...

  8. Conditions Required by Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    No No Sto H 2 NoIs it required by law "Violence on children"?164.512 (c) (1) H CE may disclose to government to LEO HCE may not disclose to LEO H No Yes No Required by law: "reporting certain type of injuries"? H disclose to LEO H 164.512 (f) (1) (ii) (C)(2) It provides that the request is specific and limited in scope

  9. Requirements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,Award RecipientsActMission to ChinaRequirements Requirements

  10. Final Report, Wind Power Resource Assessment on the Warm Springs Reservation Tribal Lands, Report No. DOE/GO/12103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim Manion, Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises; David McClain, McClain & Associates; HDR Engineering; Dr. Stel Walker, Oregon State University

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report concludes a five-year assessment of wind energy potential on the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon lands.

  11. Hydrogen atom in momentum space with a minimal length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djamil Bouaziz; Nourredine Ferkous

    2010-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A momentum representation treatment of the hydrogen atom problem with a generalized uncertainty relation,which leads to a minimal length ({\\Delta}X_{i})_{min}= \\hbar \\sqrt(3{\\beta}+{\\beta}'), is presented. We show that the distance squared operator can be factorized in the case {\\beta}'=2{\\beta}. We analytically solve the s-wave bound-state equation. The leading correction to the energy spectrum caused by the minimal length depends on \\sqrt{\\beta}. An upper bound for the minimal length is found to be about 10^{-9} fm.

  12. Inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Nan; Gong, Yungui

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the second order correction to the scalar and tensor spectral tilts for the inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling. The non-minimally kinetic coupling to Einstein tensor brings the energy scale in the inflationary models down to be sub-Planckian. In the high friction limit, the Lyth bound is modified with an extra suppression factor, so that the field excursion of the inflaton is sub-Planckian. The inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling are more consistent with observations.

  13. Inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nan Yang; Qing Gao; Yungui Gong

    2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the second order correction to the scalar and tensor spectral tilts for the inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling. The non-minimally kinetic coupling to Einstein tensor brings the energy scale in the inflationary models down to be sub-Planckian. In the high friction limit, the Lyth bound is modified with an extra suppression factor, so that the field excursion of the inflaton is sub-Planckian. The inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling are more consistent with observations.

  14. Quantum Process Tomography via L1-norm Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert L. Kosut

    2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    For an initially well designed but imperfect quantum information system, the process matrix is almost sparse in an appropriate basis. Existing theory and associated computational methods (L1-norm minimization) for reconstructing sparse signals establish conditions under which the sparse signal can be perfectly reconstructed from a very limited number of measurements (resources). Although a direct extension to quantum process tomography of the L1-norm minimization theory has not yet emerged, the numerical examples presented here, which apply L1-norm minimization to quantum process tomography, show a significant reduction in resources to achieve a desired estimation accuracy over existing methods.

  15. An Inconvenient Truth. The Planetary Emergency of Global Warming and What We Can Do About It

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gore, Al

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is published to tie in with a documentary film of the same name. Both the book and film were inspired by a series of multimedia presentations on global warming that the author created and delivers to groups around the world. With this book, Gore, brings together leading-edge research from top scientists around the world; photographs, charts, and other illustrations; and personal anecdotes and observations to document the fast pace and wide scope of global warming. He presents, with alarming clarity and conclusiveness, and with humor, too, that the fact of global warming is not in question and that its consequences for the world we live in will be disastrous if left unchecked.

  16. Energy and global warming impacts of HFC refrigerants and emerging technologies: TEWI-III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.; Baxter, V.D.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of hydrofluorocarbons (BFCs) which were developed as alternative refrigerants and insulating foam blowing agents to replace chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) is now being affected by scientific investigations of greenhouse warming and questions about the effects of refrigerants and blowing agents on global warming. A Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) assessment analyzes the environmental affects of these halogenated working fluids in energy consuming applications by combining a direct effect resulting from the inadvertent release of HFCs to the atmosphere with an indirect effect resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels needed to provide the energy to operate equipment using these compounds as working fluids. TEWI is a more balanced measure of environmental impact because it is not based solely on the global warming potential (GWP) of the working fluid. It also shows the environmental benefit of efficient technologies that result in less CO{sub 2} generation and eventual emission to the earth`s atmosphere. The goal of TEWI is to assess total global warming impact of all the gases released to the atmosphere, including CO{sub 2} emissions from energy conversion. Alternative chemicals and technologies have been proposed as substitutes for HFCs in the vapor-compression cycle for refrigeration and air conditioning and for polymer foams in appliance and building insulations which claim substantial environmental benefits. Among these alternatives are: (1) Hydrocarbon (HC) refrigerants and blowing agents which have zero ozone depleting potential and a negligible global warming potential, (2) CO{sub 2} as a refrigerant and blowing agent, (3) Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) vapor compression systems, (4) Absorption chiller and heat pumping cycles using ammonia/water or lithium bromide/water, and (5) Evacuated panel insulations. This paper summarizes major results and conclusions of the detailed final report on the TEWI-111 study.

  17. The Cold Dark Matter Search test stand warm electronics card

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, Bruce; /Colorado U., Denver; Hansen, Sten; /Fermilab; Huber, Martin; /Colorado U., Denver; Kiper, Terry; /Fermilab; Rau, Wolfgang; /Queen's U., Kingston; Saab, Tarek; /Florida U.; Seitz, Dennis; Sundqvist, Kyle; /UC, Berkeley; Mandic, Vuk; /Minnesota U.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A card which does the signal processing for four SQUID amplifiers and two charge sensitive channels is described. The card performs the same functions as is presently done with two custom 9U x 280mm Eurocard modules, a commercial multi-channel VME digitizer, a PCI to GPIB interface, a PCI to VME interface and a custom built linear power supply. By integrating these functions onto a single card and using the power over Ethernet standard, the infrastructure requirements for instrumenting a Cold Dark Matter Search (CDMS) detector test stand are significantly reduced.

  18. Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources Resources About1 SignG.5 $ infeed-image

  19. Warm Forming of Aluminum…AMD 307 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report |toVEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES5Walking the WalkWarmWarm

  20. Minimizing electricity costs with an auxiliary generator using stochastic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafiuly, Paul, 1976-

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the problem of minimizing a facility's electricity costs by generating optimal responses using an auxiliary generator as the parameter of the control systems. The-goal of the thesis is to find an ...

  1. Multi-level logic minimization through fault dictionary analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehler, Ronald W

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in some cases can then be eliminated. Data gathered using these techniques show that matrix analysis is a powerful tool that produces minimization results in selected benchmark circuits superior to any previously published academic work. The algorithm...

  2. Trends and Opportunities in Industrial Hazardous Waste Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlas, M.

    This paper describes trends and opportunities in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste minimization. It uses U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data gathered since 1989 from over 20,000 facilities that account for almost all...

  3. Scheduling to minimize power consumption using submodular functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadimoghaddam, Morteza

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop logarithmic approximation algorithms for extremely general formulations of multiprocessor multi-interval offline task scheduling to minimize power usage. Here each processor has an arbitrary specified power ...

  4. Minimizing High Spatial Frequency Residual in Active Space Telescope Mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Miller June 2008 SSL # 4-08 #12;#12;Minimizing High Spatial Frequency Residual in Active Space Telescope Mirrors Thomas Gray, David W. Miller June 2008 SSL # 4-08 This work is based on the unaltered text

  5. Structural Genomics of Minimal Organisms: Pipeline and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung-Hou

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of recombinant proteins. J. Struct. Funct. Genomics 5:69-74.proteins. J. Struct. Funct. Genomics 5:69-74. Oganesyan,Structural Genomics of Minimal Organisms: Pipeline and

  6. Structural Genomics of Minimal Organisms: Pipeline and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung-Hou

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Minimal Organisms: Pipeline and Results Sung-Hou Kim*,~500 genes, respectively). Pipeline: To achieve our mission,determination. Over all pipeline schemes for the single-path

  7. Annual Waste Minimization Summary Report, Calendar Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the waste minimization efforts undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), during calendar year 2008.

  8. Geothermal Power Plants Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For energy production and development, geothermal power plants don't use much land compared to coal and nuclear power plants. And the environmental impact upon the land they use is minimal.

  9. Absolutely minimal Lipschitz extension of tree-valued mappings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naor, Assaf

    We prove that every Lipschitz function from a subset of a locally compact length space to a metric tree has a unique absolutely minimal Lipschitz extension (AMLE). We relate these extensions to a stochastic game called ...

  10. Droplet minimizers for the Cahn Hilliard free energy functional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Carlen; M. C. Carvalho; R. Esposito; J. L. Lebowitz; R. Marra

    2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove theorem characterizing the minimizers in a model for condensation based on the Cahn Hilliard free energy functional. In particular, we exactly determine the critical density for droplet formation.

  11. Hydrogen-atom spectrum under a minimal-length hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandor Benczik; Lay Nam Chang; Djordje Minic; Tatsu Takeuchi

    2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of the Coulomb potential with minimal length commutation relations $[X_i, P_j] = i\\hbar\\{\\delta_{ij}(1+\\beta P^2) + \\beta'P_iP_j\\}$ is determined both numerically and perturbatively for arbitrary values of $\\beta'/\\beta$ and angular momenta $\\ell$. The constraint on the minimal length scale from precision hydrogen spectroscopy data is of order of a few GeV$\

  12. On the minimality of the order p^6 chiral Lagrangian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz-Femenia, Pedro

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to find relations between the operators in the mesonic Lagrangian of Chiral Perturbation Theory at order p^6 is presented. The procedure can be used to establish if the basis of operators in the Lagrangian is minimal. As an example, we apply the method to the two-flavour case in the absence of scalar and pseudo-scalar sources (s=p=0), and conclude that the minimal Lagrangian contains 27 independent operators.

  13. Annual Report on Waste Generation and Waste Minimization Progress, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is DOE`s first annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress. Data presented in this report were collected from all DOE sites which met minimum threshold criteria established for this report. The fifty-seven site submittals contained herein represent data from over 100 reporting sites within 25 states. Radioactive, hazardous and sanitary waste quantities and the efforts to minimize these wastes are highlighted within the fifty-seven site submittals. In general, sites have made progress in moving beyond the planning phase of their waste minimization programs. This is evident by the overall 28 percent increase in the total amount of materials recycled from 1991 to 1992, as well as individual site initiatives. During 1991 and 1992, DOE generated a total of 279,000 cubic meters of radioactive waste and 243,000 metric tons of non-radioactive waste. These waste amounts include significant portions of process wastewater required to be reported to regulatory agencies in the state of Texas and the state of Tennessee. Specifically, the Pantex Plant in Texas treats an industrial wastewater that is considered by the Texas Water Commission to be a hazardous waste. In 1992, State regulated wastewater from the Pantex Plant represented 3,620 metric tons, 10 percent of the total hazardous waste generated by DOE. Similarly, mixed low-level wastewater from the TSCA Incinerator Facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site in Tennessee represented 55 percent of the total radioactive waste generated by DOE in 1992.

  14. Requirements Definition Stage

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter addresses development of a Software Configuration Management Plan to track and control work products, analysis of the system owner/users' business processes and needs, translation of those processes and needs into formal requirements, and planning the testing activities to validate the performance of the software product.

  15. Requirements for Xenon International

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  16. Spatial patterns of warming off Western Australia during the 2011 Ningaloo Nio: Quantifying impacts of remote and local forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    Spatial patterns of warming off Western Australia during the 2011 Ningaloo Nio: Quantifying and Atmosphere Flagship, Floreat, Western Australia, Australia a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 24 occurred in which a marine heat wave led to extreme warming of Western Australia's coastal waters. The sea

  17. Metrics to assess the mitigation of global warming by carbon capture and storage in the ocean and in geological reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortunat, Joos

    Metrics to assess the mitigation of global warming by carbon capture and storage in the ocean to assess mitigation of global warming by carbon capture and storage are discussed. The climatic impact penalty for carbon capture. For an annual leakage rate of 0.01, surface air temperature becomes higher

  18. The instrumental record goes back to about 1850. A few areas of the globe have not warmed in recent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    the historical rise in temperatures. #12;Are there other indicators of the warming? Global sea level has risen of land and other factors. Global sea levels have risen about 20cm over the past 100 years a rateThe instrumental record goes back to about 1850. A few areas of the globe have not warmed in recent

  19. http://sciencedude.ocregister.com/2012/06/11/uci-heating-soil-could-worsen-warming/172695/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    http://sciencedude.ocregister.com/2012/06/11/uci-heating-soil-could-worsen- warming/172695/ UCI: Heating soil could worsen warming June 11th, 2012, 4:59 pm posted by Pat Brennan, science, environment a longstanding problem: whether the heating of carbon that has lain in soil for decades causes the same release

  20. October 1986 R. H. Johnson 721 Lower-Tropospheric Warming and Drying in Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    October 1986 R. H. Johnson 721 Lower-Tropospheric Warming and Drying in Tropical Mesoscale components of tropical mesoscale convective systems. It is found that while the apparent heat source Q1 of mesoscale downdrafts within the mesoscale convective systems. The warming and drying at low levels