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Sample records for wargocki pawel max

  1. Max Schulze

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Today, he is a three-time unicycling world champion, with world wins in New Zealand in 2010, Italy in 2012 and Canada in 2014. June 9, 2015 Max Schulze Max Schulze "I really thrive ...

  2. Summary Max Total Units

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Summary Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water

  3. Max Ambiental S A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ambiental S A Jump to: navigation, search Name: Max Ambiental S.A. Place: Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 01452-938 Sector: Carbon Product: Max Ambiental is a company involved in the...

  4. MaxWest Environmental Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MaxWest Environmental Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name: MaxWest Environmental Systems Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77057 Product: MaxWest Environmental Systems designs,...

  5. SolarMax Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Korea (Republic) Zip: 445-912 Sector: Solar Product: Manufacturer and engineer of solar heating systems and boilers. References: SolarMax Inc1 This article is a stub. You...

  6. max kwh | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This is likely due to users not understanding the meaning of "Max kWh"--often I see things like: "300, 700, 1000" (derived from "first 300, next 700, greater than 1000") which...

  7. Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition is an annual competition run by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) that challenges students to design...

  8. Rainer Held > Guest Researcher - Max-Planck Institute for Solid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rainer Held Guest Researcher - Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research heldrain@gmail.com Formerly a member of the Schlom Group, he joined the Max-Planck Institute for Solid...

  9. Neutron Damage and MAX Phase Ternary Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barsoum, Michael; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Sindelar, Robert; Garcua-Duaz, Brenda; Kohse, Gordon

    2014-06-17

    The Demands of Gen IV nuclear power plants for long service life under neutron radiation at high temperature are severe. Advanced materials that would withstand high temperatures (up to 1000+ C) to high doses in a neutron field would be ideal for reactor internal structures and would add to the long service life and reliability of the reactors. The objective of this work is to investigate the response of a new class of machinable, conductive, layered, ternary transition metal carbides and nitrides - the so-called MAX phases - to low and moderate neutron dose levels.

  10. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-MAX HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Ford C-MAX HEV (a hybrid electric vehicle).

  11. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High-Intensity Discharge Lamps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Max Tech and ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Max Zuckerman and Sons Inc...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Inc - MD 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MAX ZUCKERMAN & SONS, INC. (MD.04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Maryland...

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Max Zuckerman and Sons ...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - IL 30 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MAX ZUCKERMAN & SONS (IL.30 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1925...

  14. Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method within the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method within the Target-Matrix Paradigm. ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  15. Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method within the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method within the Target-Matrix ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  16. SolarMax Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: SolarMax Technology Inc Place: City of Industry, California Zip: 91745 Product: PV module maker and residential and commercial PV...

  17. University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ultra-Efficient Clothes Dryer | Department of Energy University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for Ultra-Efficient Clothes Dryer University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for Ultra-Efficient Clothes Dryer September 10, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Energy Department announced today that the University of Maryland won the second annual Max Tech and Beyond design competition for ultra-low energy use appliances and equipment for the second year in a row. The

  18. Subkilovolt response of Kodak T max XUV film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dittmore, C.; Stoering, J.P. ); Gullikson, E. )

    1990-02-08

    A calibration of Kodak T max 100 XUV film at six x-ray energies ranging from 0.27 keV to 1.49 keV has been concluded. The primary purpose was to compare the sensitivity of this film to that of Kodak type 101-07 XUV film in order to appraise the feasibility of replacing the type 101-07 film with the type T max 100 film. In addition to being considerably less expensive, the T max 100 film is less disposed to abrasion from handling. A secondary objective was to provide a base for further response measurements should the T max 100 film prove to be an acceptable substitute for the type 101-07 film. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Zhejiang Max Solar Energy Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Energy Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zhejiang Max Solar Energy Co Ltd Place: Huzhou, Zhejiang Province, China Zip: 313009 Product: A Zhejiang-based PV module...

  20. The Max Tech and Beyond Competition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Max Tech and Beyond Competition The Max Tech and Beyond Competition Addthis 1 of 5 Team Cal Poly Solar is working to significantly reduce the cost and construction time on their solar concentrator for cooking. Image: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 of 5 Professor Dale Dolan's students from California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo Electrical Engineering department testing the placement of their Hybrid Solar Photovoltaic Panel for Pool Heating. Image: Lawrence Berkeley

  1. The interactional foundations of MaxEnt: Open questions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harr, Michael S.

    2014-12-05

    One of the simplest and potentially most useful techniques to be developed in the 20{sup th} century, a century noted for an ever more mathematically sophisticated formulation of the sciences, is that of maximising the entropy of a system in order to generate a descriptive, stochastic model of that system in closed form, often abbreviated to MaxEnt. The extension of MaxEnt to systems beyond the physics from which it originated is hampered by the fact that the microscopic physical interactions that are not justified or justifiable within the MaxEnt framework need to be falsifiably evaluated in each new field of application. It is not obvious that such justification exists for many systems in which the interactions are not directly based on physics. For example what is the justification for the use of MaxEnt in biology, climate modelling or economics? Is it simply a useful heuristic or is there some deeper connection with the foundations of some systems? Without further critical examination of the microscopic foundations that give rise to the success of the MaxEnt principle it is difficult to motivate the use of such techniques in other fields except through theoretically an practically unsatisfying analogical arguments. This article briefly presents the basis of MaxEnt principles as originally introduced in statistical mechanics in the Jaynes form, the Tsallis form and the Rnyi form. Several different applications are introduced including that of ecological diversity where maximising the different diversity measures is equivalent to maximising different entropic functionals.

  2. Paul Blom: Research Director, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Energy Efficient Materials Paul Blom: Research Director, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research Jan 22, 2014 | 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Paul Blom Research Director, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research Transport and Recombination in Polymer:fullerene bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells January 22, 2014 | 2:00pm | ESB 2001 Faculty host: Thuc Quyen-Nguyen >>>Video and Slides available after the presentation* Abstract In solar cells, free charge carriers can recombine both via

  3. max walltime for "low" queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper May 31, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) We have increased the...

  4. WPPI GreenMax-Scheller Residence: Near Zero Energy Monitoring Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-11-19

    This report describes results of GreenMax 2 monitoring project referred to as the GreenMax Net Zero Home, a demonstration home that can provide a wealth of information for the building community.

  5. max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper May 31, 2012 by Helen He We have increased the max walltime for the low queue on Hopper from 12 to 24 hrs. Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date February 2013 September 2012 August 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 May 2011 April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 January 2011

  6. runtime error message: "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc" runtime error message: "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc" September 12, 2014 Symptom: User jobs with single or multiple apruns in a batch script may get this runtime error. "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc". This problem is intermittent, started in April, then mid July, and again since late August. Status: This problem is identified as a problem when Torque/Moab batch scheduler becomes out of sync with the

  7. text in "Max kWh" fields | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it should as we are trying to prevent users from writing "less than X", "greater than Y", etc. and follow the intention of the "Max kWh" field. Also there should be a warning...

  8. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier5Max | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:OpenEIUtilityRateDemandRateStructureTier5Max&oldid539754...

  9. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier1Max | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:OpenEIUtilityRateEnergyRateStructureTier1Max&oldid539766...

  10. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier4Max | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:OpenEIUtilityRateDemandRateStructureTier4Max&oldid539751...

  11. Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refrigerant | Department of Energy Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Information flow schematic for an integrated heat pump design model and wrapped tank model. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information flow schematic for an integrated heat pump design model and wrapped tank model. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information flow schematic

  12. Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for plasma physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for plasma physics By John Greenwald March 30, 2012 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook (From left to right) Princeton University Professor of Astrophysical Sciences James Stone, Princeton University President Shirley M. Tilghman, Princeton University Dean for Research A. J. Stewart Smith, Max Planck Society President Peter Gruss, and Consul General of the Federal Republic of Germany in New

  13. THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MAGNIFICATION USING VARIABILITY (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING MAGNIFICATION USING VARIABILITY Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING MAGNIFICATION USING VARIABILITY Accurate measurement of galaxy cluster masses is an essential component not only in studies of cluster physics but also for probes of cosmology. However, different mass measurement

  14. Band gap estimation from temperature dependent Seebeck measurementDeviations from the 2e|S|{sub max}T{sub max} relation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, Zachary M.; Kim, Hyun-Sik; Wang, Heng; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2015-01-12

    In characterizing thermoelectric materials, electrical and thermal transport measurements are often used to estimate electronic band structure properties such as the effective mass and band gap. The Goldsmid-Sharp band gap, E{sub g}?=?2e|S|{sub max}T{sub max}, is a tool widely employed to estimate the band gap from temperature dependent Seebeck coefficient measurements. However, significant deviations of more than a factor of two are now known to occur. We find that this is when either the majority-to-minority weighted mobility ratio (A) becomes very different from 1.0 or as the band gap (E{sub g}) becomes significantly smaller than 10 k{sub B}T. For narrow gaps (E{sub g}???6 k{sub B}T), the Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics applied by Goldsmid-Sharp break down and Fermi-Dirac statistics are required. We generate a chart that can be used to quickly estimate the expected correction to the Goldsmid-Sharp band gap depending on A and S{sub max}; however, additional errors can occur for S?

  15. Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for 12 hours | Department of Energy Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours Docket No. EO-05-01. Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours. Arial photograph showing plant and location of predicted SO2 violations, predicted in 2000. PDF icon Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for

  16. ~max0006

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    MANUAL Approved: 10-1 7-08 NNSA Line Oversight and Contractor Assurance System Supplemental Directive U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Nuclear Security Administration AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: Iink to NNSA Policicsisupplementa1 directives This page is intentionally blank. NNSA LINE OVERSIGHT AND CONTRACTOR ASSUWNCE SYSTEM SUPPLEMENTAL DIRECTIVE 1. PURPOSE. 'The Line Oversight and Contractor Assurance System (1,OCAS) is the National Nuclear Security Administration (NSSA) management system that

  17. Max Schulze

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Today, he is a three-time unicycling world champion, with world wins in New Zealand in 2010, Italy in 2012 and Canada in 2014. "My main competitive unicycling event is 'trials,'" ...

  18. Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fluorescent Lamps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps Fluorescent lamps are the most widely used artificial light source today, responsible for approximately 70% of the lumens delivered to our living spaces globally. The technology was originally commercialized in the 1930's, and manufacturers have been steadily improving the efficacy of these lamps over the years through modifications to the phosphors, cathodes, fill-gas, operating frequency, tube

  19. Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fluorescent Lamps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the National Technical

  20. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect High-Intensity Discharge Lamps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light

  1. Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Garbesi, Karina

    2011-07-20

    It is well established that energy efficiency is most often the lowest cost approach to reducing national energy use and minimizing carbon emissions. National investments in energy efficiency to date have been highly cost-effective. The cumulative impacts (out to 2050) of residential energy efficiency standards are expected to have a benefit-to-cost ratio of 2.71:1. This project examined energy end-uses in the residential, commercial, and in some cases the industrial sectors. The scope is limited to appliances and equipment, and does not include building materials, building envelopes, and system designs. This scope is consistent with the scope of DOE's appliance standards program, although many products considered here are not currently subject to energy efficiency standards. How much energy could the United States save if the most efficient design options currently feasible were adopted universally? What design features could produce those savings? How would the savings from various technologies compare? With an eye toward identifying promising candidates and strategies for potential energy efficiency standards, the Max Tech and Beyond project aims to answer these questions. The analysis attempts to consolidate, in one document, the energy savings potential and design characteristics of best-on-market products, best-engineered products (i.e., hypothetical products produced using best-on-market components and technologies), and emerging technologies in research & development. As defined here, emerging technologies are fundamentally new and are as yet unproven in the market, although laboratory studies and/or emerging niche applications offer persuasive evidence of major energy-savings potential. The term 'max tech' is used to describe both best-engineered and emerging technologies (whichever appears to offer larger savings). Few best-on-market products currently qualify as max tech, since few apply all available best practices and components. The three primary analyses presented in this report are: Nevertheless, it is important to analyze best-on-market products, since data on truly max tech technologies are limited. (1) an analysis of the cross-cutting strategies most promising for reducing appliance and equipment energy use in the U.S.; (2) a macro-analysis of the U.S. energy-saving potential inherent in promising ultra-efficient appliance technologies; and (3) a product-level analysis of the energy-saving potential.

  2. Max Phase Materials And Coatings For High Temperature Heat Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Olson, L.; Fuentes, R.; Sindelar, R.

    2015-10-19

    Molten salts have been used as heat transfer fluids in a variety of applications within proposed Gen IV nuclear designs and in advanced power system such as Concentrating Solar Power (CSP). However, operating at elevated temperatures can cause corrosion in many materials. This work developed coating technologies for MAX phase materials on Haynes-230 and characterized the corrosion of the coatings in the presence of commercial MgCl2-KCl molten salt. Cold spraying of Ti2AlC and physical vapor deposition (PVD) of Ti2AlC or Zr2AlC were tested to determine the most effective form of coating MAX phases on structural substrates. Corrosion testing at 850°C for 100 hrs showed that 3.9 μm Ti2AlC by PVD was slightly protective while 117 μm Ti2AlC by cold spray and 3.6 μm Zr2AlC by PVD were completely protective. None of the tests showed decomposition of the coating (Ti or Zr) into the salt

  3. Boride-based nano-laminates with MAX-phase-like behaviour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telle, Rainer . E-mail: telle@ghi.rwth-aachen.de; Momozawa, Ai; Music, Denis; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-09-15

    MAX-phases being usually composed of transition metals, group A elements and carbon/nitrogen are considered interesting materials for many applications because of their tremendous bulk modulus, 'reversible' plasticity, and machinability. This is mainly due to their unique kind of bonding comprising covalent, ionic as well as metallic bonds providing 'easy' planes of rupture and deformability due to the layered crystal structures. In transition metal boride systems, similar types of bonding are available. In particular the W{sub 2}B{sub 5}-structure type and its stacking variations allow the synthesis of strongly layered crystal structures exhibiting unique delamination phenomena. The paper presents ab initio calculations showing the similarities of bonding between the ternary carbides and the corresponding ternary or quaternary borides. Formation of boride-based nano-laminates from auxiliary liquid phases, from the melt as well as during sintering and precipitation from supersaturated solid solutions will be discussed by means of SEM and TEM studies. The role of impurities weakening the interlayer bonding will be addressed in particular. The pronounced cleavage parallel to the basal plane gives rise for crack deflection and pull-out mechanisms if the laminates are dispersed in brittle matrices such as boron carbide, silicon carbide or other transition metal borides. - Graphical abstract: Some transition metal borides crystallise in a layered structure of alternating stacks of metal and boron atoms giving rise for strongly anisotropic properties. Their preferred cleavage parallel and the deformability perpendicular to the basal plan are similar to the peculiar mechanical behaviour recently described for MAX-phases. Ab initio calculations of the crystal structure prove the weak bonds between the layers for a variety of borides which can be used to reinforce ceramic materials on a nano-scale level.

  4. An In-Depth Look at Ground Source Heat Pumps and Other Electric Loads in Two GreenMax Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puttagunta, Srikanth; Shapiro, Carl

    2012-04-01

    Building America research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) partnered with WPPI Energy to answer key research questions on in-field performance of ground-source heat pumps and lighting, appliance, and miscellaneous loads (LAMELs) through extensive field monitoring at two WPPI GreenMax demonstration homes in Wisconsin. These two test home evaluations provided valuable data on the true in-field performance of various building mechanical systems and LAMELs.

  5. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN {nu}{sub max} AND AGE t FROM ZAMS TO RGB-TIP FOR LOW-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y. K.; Gai, N. E-mail: ning.gai@hotmail.com

    2013-07-10

    Stellar age is an important quantity in astrophysics, which is useful for many fields both in the universe and galaxies. It cannot be determined by direct measurements, but can only be estimated or inferred. We attempt to find a useful indicator of stellar age, which is accurate from the zero-age main sequence to the tip of red giant branch for low-mass stars. Using the Yale Rotation and Evolution Code (YREC), a grid of stellar models has been constructed. Meanwhile, the frequency of maximum oscillations' power {nu}{sub max} and the large frequency separation {Delta}{nu} are calculated using the scaling relations. For the stars, the masses of which are from 0.8 M{sub Sun} to 2.8 M{sub Sun }, we can obtain the {nu}{sub max} and stellar age by combing the scaling relations with the four sets of grid models (YREC, Dotter et al., Marigo et al., and YY isochrones). We find that {nu}{sub max} is tightly correlated and decreases monotonically with the age of the star from the main sequence to the red giant evolutionary stages. Moreover, we find that the line shapes of the curves in the Age versus {nu}{sub max} diagram, which is plotted by the four sets of grid models, are consistent for red giants with masses from 1.1 M{sub Sun} to 2.8 M{sub Sun }. For red giants, the differences of correlation coefficients between Age and {nu}{sub max} for different grid models are minor and can be ignored. Interestingly, we find two peaks that correspond to the subgiants and bump of red giants in the Age versus {nu}{sub max} diagram. By general linear least-squares, we make the polynomial fitting and deduce the relationship between log(Age) and log({nu}{sub max}) in red giants' evolutionary state.

  6. Borehole SASW testing to evaluate log(G{sub max}) - log({sigma}{prime}) relationships in situ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinski, M.E.; Stokoe, K.H. II; Young, Y.L.; Roesset, J.M.

    1999-07-01

    A new method is being developed for the in-situ measurement of shear wave velocity, V{sub s}, in the soil surrounding a borehole. The method involves the measurement of axially propagating surface waves inside an uncased borehole using the Spectral-Analysis-of-Surface-Waves (SASW) approach. Testing if performed with instrumentation housed inside an inflatable tool. Inflation pressures applied by the tool are used to vary radial stresses in the soil surrounding the borehole. Surface wave velocities over a range of frequencies are measured at each inflation pressure. These measurements are then theoretically modeled so that the variation in V{sub s} (an hence small-strain shear module, G{sub max}) with distance behind the borehole wall is determined at each pressure. The results of field tests with the borehole SASW tool at two sites composed of unsaturated clayey soil are presented. These results are compared with independent field seismic measurements and with laboratory tests on intact specimens using the torsional resonant column to assess the validity of the new field method.

  7. Bent Diamond Crystals and Multilayer Based Optics at the new 5-Station Protein Crystallography Beamline 'Cassiopeia' at MAX-lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mammen, Christian B.; Als-Nielsen, Jens; Ursby, Thomas; Thunnissen, Marjolein

    2004-05-12

    A new 5-station beamline for protein crystallography is being commissioned at the Swedish synchrotron light source MAX-II at Lund University. Of the 2K/{gamma} = 14 mrad horizontal wiggler fan, the central 2 mrad are used and split in three parts. The central 1 mrad will be used for a station optimized for MAD experiments and on each side of the central fan, from 0.5 mrad to 1 mrad, there are two fixed energy stations using different energies of the same part of the beam. These, in total five stations, can be used simultaneously and independently for diffraction data collection. The two upstream monochromators for the side stations are meridionally bent asymmetric diamond(111) crystals in Laue transmission geometry. The monochromators for the downstream side stations are bent Ge(111) crystals in asymmetric Bragg reflection geometry. Curved multilayer mirrors inserted in the monochromatic beams provide focusing in the vertical plane. The first side station is under commissioning, and a preliminary test protein data set has been collected.

  8. X{sub max}{sup μ} vs. N{sup μ} from extensive air showers as estimator for the mass of primary UHECR's. Application for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arsene, Nicusor; Sima, Octavian

    2015-02-24

    We study the possibility of primary mass estimation for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR's) using the X{sub max}{sup μ} (the height where the number of muons produced on the core of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) is maximum) and the number N{sup μ} of muons detected on ground. We use the 2D distribution - X{sub max}{sup μ} against N{sup μ} in order to find its sensitivity to the mass of the primary particle. For that, we construct a 2D Probability Function Prob(p,Fe | X{sub max}{sup μ}, N{sup μ}) which estimates the probability that a certain point from the plane (X{sub max}{sup μ}, N{sup μ}) corresponds to a shower induced by a proton, respectively an iron nucleus. To test the procedure, we analyze a set of simulated EAS induced by protons and iron nuclei at energies of 10{sup 19}eV and 20° zenith angle with CORSIKA. Using the Bayesian approach and taking into account the geometry of the infill detectors from the Pierre Auger Observatory, we observe an improvement in the accuracy of the primary mass reconstruction in comparison with the results obtained using only the X{sub max}{sup μ} distributions.

  9. The bonding, charge distribution, spin ordering, optical, and elastic properties of four MAX phases Cr{sub 2}AX (A = Al or Ge, X = C or N): From density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Neng; Mo, Yuxiang; Ching, Wai-Yim

    2013-11-14

    In this work, we assess a full spectrum of properties (chemical bonding, charge distribution, spin ordering, optical, and elastic properties) of Cr{sub 2}AC (A = Al, Ge) and their hypothetical nitride counterparts Cr{sub 2}AN (A = Al, Ge) based on density functional theory calculations. The calculated total energy values indicate that a variety of spin ordering of these four compounds depending on interlayer-interactions between M-A and M-X within the sublattice, which is supported by bonding analysis. MAX phase materials are discovered to possess exotic magnetic properties which indicates that these materials could serve as promising candidates for novel layered magnetic materials for various electronic and spintronic applications. Further analysis of optical properties for two polarization vectors of Cr{sub 2}AX shows that the reflectivity is high in the visible-ultraviolet region up to ∼15 eV suggesting Cr{sub 2}AX as a promising candidate for use as a coating material. The elastic coefficients (C{sub ij}) and bulk mechanical properties [bulk modulus (K), shear modulus (G), Young's modulus (E), Poisson's ratio (η), and Pugh ratio (G/K)] of these four Cr{sub 2}AX compounds are also calculated and analyzed, which pave the way to predict or design new MAX phases that are less brittle or tougher by having a lower G/K value or higher η.

  10. MaxPower Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: Pennsylvania-based firm offering research, development and production of lithium ion batteries. Coordinates: 40.281201, -75.393534 Show Map Loading map......

  11. T10K Change Max Capacity

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-08-16

    This command line utility will enable/disable the Oracle StorageTek T10000 tape drive's maximum capacity feature.

  12. Effects of Surface Modification Conditions on Hydrophobicity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Armstrong, Beth L 1 ; Pawel, Steven J 1 ; Hunter, Scott Robert 1 ; Haynes, James A 1 ; Hillesheim, Daniel A 1 + Show Author Affiliations ORNL ORNL Publication ...

  13. Probing the high momentum component of the deuteron at high Q...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Boeglin, Werner ; Ambrozewicz, Pawel ; Aniol, Konrad ; Arrington, John ; Batigne, Guillaume ; Bosted, Peter ; Camsonne, Alexandre ; Chang, C ; Chen, Jian-Ping ; Choi, ...

  14. Composite Solid-State Scintillators for Neutron Detection - Energy...

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    Applications and Industries Manufacturing of neutron detectors with large areas for ... Patent Sheng Dai, Hee-Jung Im, and Michelle D. Pawel, Composite Solid-State Scintillators ...

  15. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-Max Energi PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road....

  16. Property:Incentive/MaxInc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 20% of the annual C&I Standard Offer Program budget AEP SWEPCO - SMART Source Solar PV Program (Texas) + Residential: 15,000
    Non-residential: 30,000 AEP Texas Central...

  17. runtime error message: "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This problem is intermittent, started in April, then mid July, and again since late August. Status: This problem is identified as a problem when TorqueMoab batch scheduler becomes ...

  18. Populations Voss, R.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; Ajello...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    study the populations of X-ray sources in the Milky Way in the 15-55 keV band using a deep survey with the BAT instrument aboard the Swift observatory. We present the logN-logS...

  19. Max Data Report Jet Stability versus Inlet Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Bremer, N.

    2015-09-01

    This document describes experiments investigating the effect of inlet geometry on the flow field within a glass tank where two jets mix and impinge upon the lid. The setup mimics the outlet plenum of a fast reactor where core exit flows of different temperatures can mix in ways that induce thermal cycling in neighboring structures.

  20. Crivelli, Silvia; Kreylos, Oliver; Max, Nelson; Hamann, Bernd...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and steer a protein structure prediction process that may be running on a remote machine. ProteinShop was used to create initial configurations for a protein structure...

  1. Max Tech Electric HPWH with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Matthew Ringer - Laboratory Program Manager, National Renewable Energy Laboratory ringer.png Matthew Ringer is a Laboratory Program Manager at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. He has worked at NREL for more than 11 years. In his current role, Matt oversees the Lab-Corps Program, SBV CAP, and the Energy Innovation Portal. Additionally, he works with EERE on various commercialization initiatives, assists companies interested in commercializing NREL IP, and improving many of NREL's

  2. Property:Incentive/WindResPercMax | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I Independence Light & Power - Renewable Energy Rebates (Iowa) + 25% + L Local Small Wind Rebate Programs (Colorado) + 50% + M Maquoketa Municipal Electric Utility - Renewable...

  3. Property:Incentive/PVPbiFitMaxKW | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    P Palmetto Clean Energy (PaCE) Program (South Carolina) + 6 + Preston Municipal Electric Utility - Renewable Energy Rebates (Iowa) + 20 + Progress Energy Carolinas - SunSense...

  4. Is a 'Mad Max' apocalypse possible? | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is Your Home as Ready for Summer as You Are? Is Your Home as Ready for Summer as You Are? June 2, 2014 - 4:09pm Addthis Learn about home energy audits in this Energy 101 video. Harris Walker Communications Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program What does this mean for me? You can save money this summer by checking your home for air leaks and seeing if it has sufficient insulation and energy-saving lightbulbs. It took longer than expected, but the harsh winter is finally over

  5. Microsoft Word - Draft Annncmnt of Max Aggregate Payments 11...

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    6, 2012 Announcement of Estimated Maximum Amount of Aggregate Payments BPA will Accept for the 2012 Prepayment Program Background The Bonneville Power Administration ("BPA") issued...

  6. Cover option 1 presentation title two lines max

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    © 2015 General Electric Company - All rights reserved 2015 DOE-NEET: Environmental Cracking and Irradiation Resistant Stainless Steel by Additive Manufacturing (AM) Xiaoyuan Lou ( loux@ge.com ) Ceramics and Metallurgy Technologies GE Global Research, Niskayuna, NY 2015 DOE AMM Workshop, Arlington, VA Sep. 29, 2015 This material was prepared with the internal support from General Electric Company. Additive Manufacturing for Nuclear Overview 3 © 2015 General Electric Company - All rights

  7. Cover option 1 presentation title two lines max

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Powder atomization Low Cobalt 5 2015 General ... Eliminating post treatment cost from HIP ... process: 1. high local temperature 2. extremely fast ...

  8. Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Smith delivered a statement from William Brinkman, director of the DOE's Office of Science, who was unable to attend. Brinkman noted that the DOE "welcomes the creation of this new ...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Penczek, Pawel A. (2) Tetrault, David (2) Chen, Zhijian J. (1) Chu, Feixia (1) Hur , Sun (Harvard-Med) (1) Hur, Sun (Harvard-Med) (1) Lin, Cecilie (1) Richards, Claire (1) Xu, Hui ...

  10. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-Max Energi Fleet PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Ford CMAX Energi (a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle).

  11. Claire E. Max, 2004 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Physics: For her contributions to the theory of laser guide star adaptive optics and its application in ground-based astronomy to correct ...

  12. DOE-CX-00009_WiMAX_Upgrades_on_Gable_Mountain.pdf

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  13. Index of /datasets/files/41/pub/PUBID8_0001/MaxTech

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Size DIR Parent Directory - DIR Sim1 18-Apr-2012 11:06 - 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 653191376 Varnish...

  14. THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Bauer, Anne H. 1 ; Baltay, Charles ; Ellman, Nancy ; Jerke, Jonathan ; Rabinowitz, David ; Scalzo, Richard, E-mail: bauer@ieec.uab.es 2 + Show Author Affiliations ...

  15. Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information flow schematic for an integrated heat ... options, cycle configurations, and system designs to determine the best path ...

  16. Webinar: Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition for Ultra-Low-Energy-Use Appliances & Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The competition invited twelve University faculty-led student engineering teams to participate in a year long effort to design, build and test their original energy savings technologies and prototypes.

  17. Onshore wind max capacity 50.4% - what wind farm, what year?...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    willing to learn.) Submitted by Bob Wallace on 15 June, 2013 - 00:23 1 answer Points: 0 Hi Bob- Thank you for posting your question. It seems that your question developed after...

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    characterization of the aerosols, on aerosol transformations including aging of the black carbon during outflow from the region, and on the effects of the megacity aerosol plume on...

  19. Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garbesi, Karina; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Bolduc, Christopher; Burch, Gabriel; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Saltiel, Seth

    2011-05-06

    This study surveyed the technical potential for efficiency improvements in 150 categories of appliances and equipment representing 33 quads of primary energy use across the US economy in 2010 and (1) documented efficient product designs, (2) identified the most promising cross-cutting strategies, and (3) ranked national energy savings potential by end use. Savings were estimated using a method modeled after US Department of Energy priority-setting reports - simplified versions of the full technical and economic analyses performed for rulemakings. This study demonstrates that large savings are possible by replacing products at the end-of-life with ultra-efficient models that use existing technology. Replacing the 50 top energy-saving end-uses (constituting 30 quads of primary energy consumption in 2010) with today's best-on-market equivalents would save {approx}200 quads of US primary energy over 30 years (25% of consumption anticipated there from). For the 29 products for maximum feasible savings potential could be estimated, the savings were twice as high. These results demonstrate that pushing ultra-efficient products to market could significantly escalate carbon emission reductions and is a viable strategy for sustaining large emissions reductions through standards. The results of this analysis were used by DOE for new coverage prioritization, to identify key opportunities for product prototyping and market development, and will leverage future standards rulemakings by identifying the full scope of maximum feasible technology options. High leverage products include advances lighting systems, HVAC, and televisions. High leverage technologies include electronic lighting, heat pumps, variable speed motors, and a host of controls-related technologies.

  20. Engine Materials Compatibility with Alternate Fuels | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon pm039_pawel_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Engine Materials Compatibility with Alternate Fuels Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

  1. WCI Book - WCI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Guide to Authors DYNAMICS AND THERMODYNAMICS WITH NUCLEONIC DEGREES OF FREEDOM I-Introduction Science Goals (The WCI steering committee) II-Transport properties Editorial Committee: Pawel Danielewicz, William G. Lynch, Wolfgang Trautmann 1. Modelization of the EOS (C.Fuchs, H.Wolter) 2. Deducing the nuclear matter incompressibility coefficient from data on isoscalar compression modes (S.Shlomo, V.M.Kolomietz, G.Colo) 3. Systematics of Stopping and Flow in Au+Au Collisions (A. Andronic,

  2. Nanoscale thermal transport II (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale thermal transport II Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale thermal transport II Authors: Cahill, David G. ; Braun, Paul V. ; Chen, Gang ; Clarke, David R. ; Fan, Shanhui ; Goodson, Kenneth E. ; Keblinski, Pawel ; King, William P. ; Mahan, Gerald D. ; Majumdar, Arun ; Maris, Humphrey J. ; Phillpot, Simon R. ; Pop, Eric ; Shi, Li OSTI Identifier: 1161586 DOE Contract Number: AC07-05ID14517 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Applied Physics

  3. Molecular Imprinting as a Signal-Activation Mechanism of the Viral RNA

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sensor RIG- (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Molecular Imprinting as a Signal-Activation Mechanism of the Viral RNA Sensor RIG- Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Imprinting as a Signal-Activation Mechanism of the Viral RNA Sensor RIG- Authors: Wu, Bin ; Peisley, Alys ; Tetrault, David ; Li, Zongli ; Egelman, Edward H. ; Magor, Katharine E. ; Walz, Thomas ; Penczek, Pawel A. ; Hur, Sun [1] ; Harvard-Med) [2] ; Texas-MED)

  4. Engine Materials Compatibility with Alternate Fuels | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon pm039_pawel_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Engine Materials Compatibility with Alternate Fuels Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report

  5. Separation of Hexane Isomers in a Metal-Organic Framework with Triangular

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Channels | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Separation of Hexane Isomers in a Metal-Organic Framework with Triangular Channels Previous Next List Zoey R. Herm, Brian M. Wiers, Jarad A. Mason, Jasper M. van Baten, Matthew R. Hudson, Pawel Zajdel, Craig M. Brown, Norberto Masciocchi, Rajamani Krishna, Jeffrey R. Long, Science, 340, 960-964 (2013) DOI: 10.1126/science.1234071 F1.large.jpg Abstract: Metal-organic frameworks can offer pore

  6. Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman's Remarks at demosEUROPA Event in Warsaw,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Poland - As Prepared for Delivery | Department of Energy demosEUROPA Event in Warsaw, Poland - As Prepared for Delivery Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman's Remarks at demosEUROPA Event in Warsaw, Poland - As Prepared for Delivery September 28, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Thank you, Ambassador Feinstein, for the introduction. And thank you to demosEUROPA and President Pawel Swieboda for hosting today's event. We are here today to talk about the future - our collective future - and how we can work

  7. Syntaxin 1a Variants Lacking an N-peptide or Bearing the LE Mutation Bind

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to Munc18a in a Closed Conformation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Syntaxin 1a Variants Lacking an N-peptide or Bearing the LE Mutation Bind to Munc18a in a Closed Conformation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Syntaxin 1a Variants Lacking an N-peptide or Bearing the LE Mutation Bind to Munc18a in a Closed Conformation Authors: Colbert, Karen N. ; Hattendorf, Douglas A. ; Weiss, Thomas M. ; Burkhardt, Pawel ; Fasshauer, Dirk ; Weis, William I. Publication Date: 2014-05-13 OSTI

  8. Process Limits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 0 file size (blocks) unlimited unlimited pending signals 4199424 4199424 max locked memory (kbytes) 32 32 max memory size (kbytes) unlimited unlimited open files 1024 1024 pipe...

  9. Ocean Carbon Cycle Models from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    \tPacific data-model intercomparison from Patrick Wetzel (Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Germany)

  10. Job Scheduling Policies on Cooley | Argonne Leadership Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Max. running jobs per user: 10 Max. node-hours (queued and running): 1488 Priority: FIFO -- (jobs are run in order, with small, short jobs run on any otherwise-free nodes) In...

  11. Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Germany). Research funding: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES); the National Research Foundation of Korea; the Max...

  12. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... C-max Hybrid Ford C-max Energi Mitsubishi I-MiEV Nissan Leaf Ford Fusion Energi Ford Focus Electric Smart Fortwo ED Dodge Ram Idle Stop Honda Accord PHEV AVTA Test Cars Level 1 ...

  13. The 60-month all-sky BAT Survey of AGN and the Anisotropy of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE ; Madejski, G.M. ; KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Gehrels, N. ; NASA, Goddard ; Burlon, D. ; Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE Publication Date: 2012-04-02...

  14. Microsoft Word - ITSI award doc 06-D0008 conformed to P00001...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    87 Section B - Supplies or Services and Prices ITEM NO SUPPLIESSERVICES MAX QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE MAX AMOUNT 0001 1 Lump Sum 226,000,000.00 226,000,000.00 EST Firm Fixed...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Filter by Author Gunzburger, Max D (7) Webster, Clayton G (6) Zhang, Guannan (5) Gunzburger, Max D ORNL (4) Webster, Clayton G ORNL (4) Zhang, Guannan ORNL (4) Lu, Dan (2) ...

  16. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2014 runtime error message: "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc" September 1

  17. Ocean Carbon Cycle Models from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    •\tPacific data-model intercomparison from Patrick Wetzel (Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Germany)

  18. Microsoft Word - Final Industrial Documentation AEO2008 _6-12...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    factors are multiplicative for all fuels which have values greater than zero and are additive otherwise. ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) - - - max...

  19. CAMD Nanofabrication Links

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    Infrastructure :: News :: Related sites National Nanotechnology Initiative Nano Technology Industries Advanced Materials Research Institute Institute of Physics Max-Planck...

  20. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 2012 high thruput queue now available on Hopper August 30, 2012 by Helen He A new batch queue named "thruput" has been implemented on Hopper to support the increased high throughput computing needs from the user community. The queue limits for this queue are as follows: -- max wall time is 168 hrs -- max node count is 2 (max core count is 48) -- max queue-able jobs per user is 500 -- max running jobs from all users in this queue is 500 -- has same priority as of the

  1. high thruput queue now available on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high thruput queue now available on Hopper high thruput queue now available on Hopper August 30, 2012 by Helen He A new batch queue named "thruput" has been implemented on Hopper to support the increased high throughput computing needs from the user community. The queue limits for this queue are as follows: -- max wall time is 168 hrs -- max node count is 2 (max core count is 48) -- max queue-able jobs per user is 500 -- max running jobs from all users in this queue is 500 -- has same

  2. Post Quench Ductility Evaluation of Zircaloy-4 and Select Iron Alloys under Design Basis and Extended LOCA Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Yong; Keiser, James R; Terrani, Kurt A; Bell, Gary L; Snead, Lance

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted at 1200 C in flowing steam with tubing specimens of Zircaloy-4, 317, 347 stainless steels, and the commercial FeCrAl alloy APMT. The purpose was to determine the oxidation behavior and post quench ductility of these alloys under postulated loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The parabolic rate constant for Zircaloy-4 tubing samples at 1200 were determined to be k = 2.173 107 g2/cm4/s C, in excellent agreement with the Cathcart-Pawel correlation. The APMT alloy experienced the slowest oxidation rate among all materials examined in this work. The ductility of post quenched samples was evaluated by ring compression tests at 135 C. For Zircaloy-4, the ductile to brittle transition occurs at an equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) of 19.3%. SS-347 was still ductile after being oxidized for 2400 s (CP-ECR 50%), but the maximum load was reduced significantly owing to the metal layer thickness reduction. No ductility decrease was observed for the post-quenched APMT samples oxidized up to four hours.

  3. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B. Van Waeyenberge (Ghent University, Belgium), K.W. Chou, H. Stoll, M. Curcic, G. Schutz (Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Germany), T. Tyliszczak (ALS), G....

  4. Metagenomic and Metaproteomic Analyses of Symbioses between Bacteria and Gutless Marine Worms (2014 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubilier, Nicole

    2014-03-19

    Nicole Dubilier of the Max Planck Institute speaks at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  5. BPA-2010-00492-FResponse.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DAVID A FILER DAVID A. FILER, ATTORNEY US POSTMASTER USPS CENTRALIZED ACCOUNT PROCESSING SYSTEM RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATES WIND SITE MAINTENANCE SUPPORT (MAX HOLDER) RESOURCE...

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPEMuenchen, Tech. U. Universe" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program...

  7. An Iridate with Fermi Arcs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Univ. of Michigan); and B.J Kim (Argonne National Laboratory, Univ. of Michigan, and Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research). Research funding: National Science...

  8. Microsoft Word - exposure_request_form.dot

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (torr) Proximity Gap: (m) Min. Bottom Dose: (Jcm3) Max. Ratio of Top to Bottom Dose: Scan Length: (cm or inch)...

  9. --No Title--

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    some the revisions for both chapters includes DOE's annual reporting performance targets, MAX site quarterly reporting by the DOE Agency Coordinator, the requirement for 100%...

  10. stamnes-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... pressure and temperature, flow rates, film speed, condensation nuclei concentration (r > 0.02 micrometer) * max altitude: 2500 m with battery pack, 1 km on powered tether * ...

  11. Porterfield named ASTM Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Nuclear Fuel Cycle International Committee may bestow on an individual; and the Max Hecht Award, the highest award the Water International Committee can bestow on an - 2 -...

  12. Porterfield named ASTM Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Nuclear Fuel Cycle International Committee may bestow on an individual; and the Max Hecht Award, the highest award the Water International Committee can bestow on an...

  13. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... capabilities 6) Minimal to zero water consumption (energy water nexus issues ... and Key Participants; Abstract (200 words max) - Introduction - Impact of the ...

  14. Accelerated Aging Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerated Aging Studies LA-UR -15-27339 This document is approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited Property (max) log (aging time) Property (failure) Property ...

  15. Contact | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Student Participation Other * Comments max. 1000 characters Captcha Display another text. Play audio version of text. Image Verification Submit Last modified: 8142013 5:25:36...

  16. Contact | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Letters of Recommendation Other * Comments max. 1000 characters Captcha Display another text. Play audio version of text. Image Verification Submit Last modified: 8142013 5:25:36...

  17. Posters

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    San Diego La Jolla, California H. Grassl Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Hamburg, Germany A. Heymsfield National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado J. Spinhirne...

  18. Markus Mezger | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Presently: Project leader, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, Germany Email: mezger at mpip-mainz.mpg.de Diploma in Physics, Stuttgart University,...

  19. X-ray and neutron scattering studies of the complex compounds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by Dr. Hoyoung Jang, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany In condensed matter physics, in particular a field of complex oxide materials, most...

  20. Index of /datasets/files/41/pub/PUBID8_1234

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MaxTech 21-May-2012 23:38 - 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 99456974...

  1. MSExcel Document (7k)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    usrlocalmorph3etccatdocxls2csv -cutf-8 -g -M -l --timeout60 --error-logusrlocalmorph3texisnleeiaoutlookanytotx-errors.15607 --max-depth9...

  2. Ji-Woong Lee | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Max-Planck Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Germany BSc and MSc in Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Korea EFRC research: We are currently developing a methodology for a...

  3. Three years of Swift/BAT Survey of AGN: Reconciling Theory and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A. ; Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE Muenchen, Tech. U. Universe ; Gehrels, N. ; NASA, Goddard Publication Date: 2011-02-07 OSTI Identifier: 1004918 Report Number(s):...

  4. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flinn, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0-20Fe, 10-30Cr, 2-12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05-3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01-0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni.

  5. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flinn, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0--20Fe, 10--30Cr, 2--12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05--3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01--0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni. 3 figs.

  6. FELIX: advances in modeling forward and inverse icesheet problems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    icesheet problems. Authors: Perego, Mauro ; Eldred, Michael S. ; Gunazburger, Max ; Salinger, Andrew G. ; Kalashnikova, Irina ; Ju, L. ; Hoffman, M. ; Leng, W. ; Price, S ;...

  7. Healthy Efficient Homes Research & Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Smart ventilation savings (Turner & Walker, 2013 ) 9 Approach: Distinctive Characteristics ... Max Sherman Iain Walker Woody Delp Rengie Chan Brennan Less Brett Singer 10 Progress and ...

  8. A drone's-eye view of a wind turbine | GE Global Research

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    by Revolutionary Onboard Turbine Reshape) - Making it Real bowman2 Is a 'Mad Max' apocalypse possible? Luis-Felipe-WillcoxM&DV Monitoring and Diagnosis of Transformers...

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    by Revolutionary Onboard Turbine Reshape) - Making it Real bowman2 Is a 'Mad Max' apocalypse possible? Luis-Felipe-WillcoxM&DV Monitoring and Diagnosis of Transformers...

  10. Physics Case for the International Linear Collider (Technical...

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    ; Munich, Max Planck Inst. ; Tanabe, Tomohiko ; Tokyo U., ICEPP ; Yu, Jaehoon ; Texas U., Arlington ; Wells, James D. ; Michigan U., MCTP ; Murayama, Hitoshi ; UC, ...

  11. Combined Heat and Power (CHP): Is It Right For Your Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of peak electric demand Digester Gas: Often times considered "free gas" - consider sizing for max. electricity given available volume of digester gas (selling back to utility). ...

  12. Building America Case Study: New Town Builders' Power of Zero...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Well done" - Diane Wildrick, ReMax Masters References Yankelovich, D. and Meer, D., "Rediscovering Market Segmentation." Harvard Business Review, February 2006. hbr.org Image ...

  13. Stimulated X-Ray Emission for Spectroscopy | Stanford Synchrotron...

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    Room 108A Speaker: Clemens Weninger, Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems Program Description The recent advance of x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs)...

  14. Designs for a Linac-Ring LHeC (Conference) | SciTech Connect

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    Accel. Sci. Tech. ; Dainton, John ; Liverpool U. ; Klein, Max ; Liverpool U. ; Eide, Anders ; Paris U., VI-VII less Publication Date: 2012-06-21 OSTI Identifier: 1043845 ...

  15. A Method to Analyze the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission with the Fermi...

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    Park SLAC ; Moskalenko, Igor V. ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC ; Porter, Troy ; UC, Santa Cruz ; Reimer, Olaf ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC ; Strong, Andrew ; Garching, Max Planck ...

  16. Stencil Computation Optimization

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    ... To evaluate the effectiveness of our optimization strate- ... We also show that the more aggressive software-controlled ... a combination of explicit search for global max- ima with ...

  17. One Direction: Researchers grow nanocircuitry with semiconducting...

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    Matthieu Fortin-Deschenes, Pierre L. Levesque, Kyle M. McElhinny, Gerald J. Brady, Richard Rojas Delgado, Susmit Singha Roy, Andrew Mannix, Max G. Lagally, Paul G....

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    Writing an Effective ISR (max 8000 characters including spaces) Before writing: * Read definitions of rating levels and critical element targets carefully * Review Strategic Plan ...

  19. "Rip" Perkins, pioneering PPPL physicist and a design leader...

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    describe Rip," Hammett recalled. "He was dedicated to helping others in scientific enterprises and to working in fusion." Claire Max, a professor of astronomy and astrophysics at...

  20. Management Council - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

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    Organization  MANAGEMENT COUNCIL Peter Green, Dir. MSE Rachel Goldman MSE Ctirad Uher Physics Jamie Phillips EECS Max Shtein MSE Roy Clarke Physics Ted Goodson III Chemistry ...

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    New Jersey 08543, USA Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Greifswald 17491, Germany Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA Publication Date:...

  2. The 2-79 keV X-ray Spectrum of the Circinus Galaxy with NuSTAR...

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    Park, IGC ; Brightman, M. ; Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE ; Christensen, F. E. ; Denmark Tech U. ; Comastri, A. ; Bologna Observ. more ; Craig, W. W. ; Space Sci. ...

  3. Burlington Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency...

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    Lighting Air conditioners Compressed air Tankless Water Heater Maximum Rebate 3200 max incentive for air compressors Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Burlington...

  4. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

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    order stochastic collocation method for Bayesian inference in groundwater reactive transport modeling Zhang Guannan ORNL Webster Clayton G ORNL Gunzburger Max D ORNL Although...

  5. An adaptive sparse-grid high-order stochastic collocation method...

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    stochastic collocation method for Bayesian inference in groundwater reactive transport modeling Zhang, Guannan ORNL; Webster, Clayton G ORNL; Gunzburger, Max D ORNL...

  6. Opacity of iron, nickel, and copper plasmas in the x-ray wavelength...

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    2 more ; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching 3 ; Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain and Laboratoire d'Optique...

  7. Alchemix Corporation | Open Energy Information

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    Sector: Hydro Product: Alchemix Corporation is a development stage company which has as its principal asset the HydroMax technology. References: Alchemix Corporation1 This...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.Tokyo U., ICRR" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software...

  9. NuSTAR Detection of the Blazar B2 1023+25 at Redshift 5.3 (Journal...

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    Dept. Penn State U., IGC ; Chirstensen, F.E. ; Denmark Tech. U. more ; Giommi, P. ; ASDC, Frascati Rome Observ. ; Greiner, J. ; Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE ; Hailey, ...

  10. The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation

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    for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters The distribution of galaxies in position and velocity around the centers of galaxy clusters encodes important information about cluster mass and structure. Using the maxBCG galaxy cluster

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    Two organizers who did not attend the conference were Gabriel Aeppli (University College London & London Centre for Nanotechnology) and Andrea Cavalleri (Oxford University & Max ...

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    Christina Martos Hilton Deirdre Monroe Hai Ah Nam Denise Neudecker Phil & Monica Noll Amy Ross Bryant Roybal Max Schulze Denise Thronas Michael Torrez Jos Valdez Darleen...

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    Christina Martos Hilton Deirdre Monroe Hai Ah Nam Denise Neudecker Phil & Monica Noll Amy Ross Bryant Roybal Max Schulze Denise Thronas Michael Torrez Jos Valdez Darleen...

  14. Links

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    Related Sites National Nanotechnology Initiative Nano Technology Industries Advanced Materials Research Institute Institute of Physics Max-Planck Institute for Kohlenforschung The...

  15. IN-VEHICLE, HIGH-POWER ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS

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    Engineering advisor C.Y. Wang - Battery and fuel cell research * Max Ripepi - Masters Engineering Mechanics advisor Charles Bakis - Self levitating flywheel design...

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    2 value in eV 2 sin 2 2 e,max (90% CL): upper limit in sin 2 2 e , at 90% confidence level sin 2 2 e,max (3 CL): upper limit in sin 2 2 e , at 3 confidence...

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    DIRECTIONS AND TIPS FOR USING INTEGRITY Accessing Integrity: The website address for Integrity is www.integrity.gov. When you get to the website, click on the yellow box labeled "Login to Integrity." Integrity is connected to the OMB MAX Central Authentication Service. Employees who have previously used OMB MAX should use their MAX user ID and password. Do not use the CIC or PIV login option. This is not enabled for DOE Integrity filers. If you used Integrity last year, you have an OMB

  18. CONTENTS

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    ... ENVIRONMENTS February 18, 2010 Rev 1 Page 4 1 Kevlar is a registered trademark of DuPont de Nemours. 2 K-Spec is a registered trademark of SlingMax. 18.4 MARKING AND POSTING ...

  19. Manhattan Project: A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919

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    concepts with Max Planck's quantum theory to produce the first modern model of the atom. ... on the history of "Chemistry" and "Physics" in Roy Porter and Marilyn Ogilvie, eds., ...

  20. Scientists use plasma shaping to control turbulence in stellarators...

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    at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics in Germany have devised a new method for minimizing...

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    and its partners are among the honorees. July 8, 2013 MiniMAX is a battery powered, digital x-ray imaging system that is completely self-contained, lightweight, compact and...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    CreatorsAuthors contains: "Webster, Clayton G" Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest ... Filter by Author Webster, Clayton G (8) Gunzburger, Max D (6) Webster, Clayton G ORNL ...

  3. Project of the Month | Department of Energy

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    and Washington River Protection Services Company to implement a WiMAX-based communications infrastructure at Hanford to augment the existing fiber optic and Wi-Fi-based systems...

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    BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal,...

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    o To avoid these problems, they will use a bounding max based on data since not enough data to figure central tendency. o C-200 tanks had big difference between estimated...

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    ... dispensing pressure 350 bar Max dispensing time (standard fill) 10 hours 60 minutes Min. ... Home Community Home & Community 1 350 bar or higher 10 hours or less 60 minutes or ...

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    Miami, Florida P. Formenti and M. O. Andreae Max Planck Institute for Chemistry Mainz, Germany V. N. Kapustin University of Hawaii Honolulu, Hawaii T. S. Bates and P. K. Quinn...

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    Max Schreck in Nosferatu, presumably climbing the stairs to plug in some unused appliances. | Photo from Wikipedia, Public Domain in the U.S. Are Energy Vampires Sucking You Dry?

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    2011 Serena DeBeer of Cornell University and the Max Planck Institute for Bioinorganic Chemistry, led the the team that performed crucial experiments at SLAC. Dr. DeBeer is...

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    regions of the highest strength shown in yellow. The MPX design is named for coauthors Harry Mynick and Neil Pomphrey of PPPL and Pavlos Xanthopoulos of the Max Planck Institute...

  11. Microsoft Word - Y12GammaAppendicesAand B.doc

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    %) Max Dose 2174 Dose(mrem) Frequency 0 200 400 600 800 0 20 40 60 80 Quarterly Y-12 Film Badge Gamma Dose for 1952 Note change in vertical scale, frequency or number of workers...

  12. Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600

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    Biology Matthias Scheffler Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin, Germany CNMS D D I I S S C C O O V V E E R R Y Y SEMINAR SERIES Abstract: Dispersive or van...

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    Exist 22-May-2012 01:04 - DIR MaxTech 22-May-2012 01:04 - 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1006824916 Varnish...

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    Apr-2012 11:07 - DIR MaxTech 18-Apr-2012 11:07 - 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 979859487 Varnish cache...

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    Exist 21-May-2012 23:49 - DIR MaxTech 21-May-2012 23:49 - 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1006824909 Varnish...

  16. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

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    A screen shows multiple images of the first plasma in the W7-X control room. (Photo by Sam Lazerson) PPPL physicist Novimir Pablant and Andreas Langenberg, of the Max Planck...

  17. Next-Generation Genetics in Plants: Evolutionary Trade-off, Immunity and Speciation (2010 JGI User Meeting)

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    Wiegel, Detlef

    2011-04-25

    Detlef Wiegel from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology on "Next-generation genetics in plants: Evolutionary tradeoffs, immunity and speciation" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  18. Ford Debuts Solar Energy Concept Car

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    The Ford Motor Company unveiled the C-MAX Solar Energi Concept, a sun-powered vehicle with the potential to deliver what a plug-in hybrid offers without depending on the electric grid for fuel.

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    Testing of Irradiated MAX Phase Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/13/2014 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - poster for ARM 2007 5

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    m as function of z n . D m decreases with z n . This indicates ice crystal has bigger max dimension with deceasing height . FIG 12 Variation of averaged area ratio as function of z...

  1. tiers | OpenEI Community

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    This is likely due to users not understanding the meaning of "Max kWh"--often I see things like: "300, 700, 1000" (derived from "first 300, next 700, greater than 1000") which...

  2. Tritium Instrument Demonstration Station (TIDS)

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    - 488 nm; 200 mW max power RoMack Inc. 20' fiber optic (6 around 1) on " VCR fitting Kaiser Optical Holospec- f1.8 I VIS w 488 grating Andor DV-420-OE CCD detector Detection...

  3. BPA Visitor Center

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    and is located at BPA headquarters in Portland, Oregon at 905 NE 11th Ave. (Public Transit @ the Lloyd Center MAX Station). Many of the publications available in the Visitor...

  4. Sputnik Engineering AG | Open Energy Information

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    Zip: CH-2502 Sector: Solar Product: Manufacturer of SolarMax grid tie inverters for photovoltaic applications. References: Sputnik Engineering AG1 This article is a stub. You can...

  5. Posters Comparison Between General Circulation Model Simulation...

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    GCM used for this study is from the Max-Planck Institute and the University of Hamburg, Germany (ECHAM3); it is described in detail by Roeckner et al. (1992). The simulation for...

  6. "Group IV Nanomembranes, Nanoribbons, and Quantum Dots: Processing...

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    This theoretical project has been carried out in close interaction with the experimental project at UW-Madison under the same title led by PI Max Lagally and co-PI Mark Eriksson. ...

  7. Property:Buildings/ModelType | Open Energy Information

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    Minimum Cost Max Tech PV Takeoff Cost Neutral 30% Energy Savings 50% Energy Savings 70% Energy Savings Other Pages using the property "BuildingsModelType" Showing 12 pages using...

  8. The NuSTAR View of Nearby Compton-thick Active Galactic Nuclei...

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    Dept. ; Brandt, W.N. ; Pennsylvania U. Penn State U., University Park, IGC ; Brightman, M. ; Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE Denmark, Tech. U. ; Christensen, F.E. ; Craig, W.W. ...

  9. Policy Specialist | Department of Energy

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    apply under the Merit Promotion announcement. Work Schedule Full time Work Type Permanent Series 1101 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1313 Salary Min 87,994.00 Salary Max 114,390...

  10. Deputy Director, EMCBC | Department of Energy

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    Who May Apply All U.S Citizens Work Schedule Full Time Work Type Permanent Series 0340 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 0000 Salary Min 121,956.00 Salary Max 183,300.00 Start Date...

  11. Senior Advisor, Chief Information Security Officer | Department...

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    May Apply ALL U.S. CITIZENS Work Schedule FULL-TIME Work Type PERMANENT Series 2210 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 0000 Salary Min 121,956.00 Salary Max 183,300.00 Start Date...

  12. Policy Specialist | Department of Energy

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    apply under the Merit Promotion announcement. Work Schedule Full time Work Type Permanent Series 1101 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1212 Salary Min 73,998.00 Salary Max 96,203...

  13. Diversity and Inclusion Specialist | Department of Energy

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    Merit Promotion announcement. Work Schedule Full time Work Type Permanent Series 0301 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1313 Salary Min 87,994.00 Salary Max 114,390.00 Start Date...

  14. Program Support Specialist | Department of Energy

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    vacancy WAPA-16-MP-19. Work Schedule Full-Time Work Type Permanent Series 0301 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1111 Salary Min 62,850.00 Salary Max 81,706.00 Start Date...

  15. Director, Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics | Department...

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    from all U.S. Citizens. Work Schedule Full-Time Work Type Permanent Series 0340 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 0000 Salary Min 121,956.00 Salary Max 183,300.00 Start Date...

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    ... Goldsmith, Elizabeth J. (10) Luo, Xuelian (10) Wynn, R. Max (10) Chuang, David T. (9) Deisenhofer, Johann (9) Gardner, Kevin H. (9) Norgard, Michael V. (9) Phillips, Margaret A. ...

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    McKean, Hiroshi Nishimura, Bill Kelius. Row 5: Ryan Sprague, Tom Scarvie, Mike Kritscher, Max Vinco, Fernando Sannibale. Row 6: Warren Byrne, Mike Chin. Row 7: Jonathan Elkins,...

  18. Frederic Laquai Seminar: Photocurrent Generation in Low-Bandgap...

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    Laquai Seminar: Photocurrent Generation in Low-Bandgap Polymer and Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells Apr 18, 2014 | 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM Frederic Laquai Head, Max Planck...

  19. Helicopter Pilot | Department of Energy

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    Apply on USAJOBS Who May Apply All U.S. Citizens Work Schedule Full-Time Work Type Permanent Series 2181 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1313 Salary Min 90,779.00 Salary Max ...

  20. Final Report. Institute for Ultralscale Visualization (Technical...

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    The scientific findings and experience of the Institute team helped plan the SciDAC3 program. Authors: Ma, Kwan-Liu 1 ; Galli, Giulia 1 ; Gygi, Francois 1 ; Max, Nelson 1 ; ...

  1. BENEFIT 2015 Funding Opportunity Announcement Webinar 1 (Text...

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    ... The first one is primary seasonal COP, installed cost ... Remember, the abstract has a requirement of 200 words max. ... Pat Phelan: Of course, if there is any confusion, if you ...

  2. Index of /datasets/files/41/pub/PUBID8_3482

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    Directory Base Exist MaxTech Wiki Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Facebook icon Twitter icon Directory Listing This is a file-level view of datasets. Go...

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    theoretical capacity of MXenes? Technical Details: MXenes were produced by selective etching A atoms from MAX phases (Figure 1). The latter have composition of M n+1 AX n ; where...

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    water system, resistivity 18.2M.cm, TOC < 5ppb, max. flow fate 2 Lminute. Sanyo MIR-154 Cooled Incubator Temperature Control The Panasonic MIR series offers accurate...

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    From corrosion to batteries: Electrochemical interface studies Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 11:00am SSRL, Bldg. 137, Rm 226 Dr. Frank Uwe Renner Max-Planck-Institut fr ...

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    loved ones, viewing photographs and documents with Truman Library historians and listening to WWII veteran Max DeWeese reminisce about his experience in the war.

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    Characterization of a Genuine S12 Fe(V) Complex Nria Aliaga-Alcalde,1 Serena DeBeer George,2 Bernd Mienert,1 Eckhard Bill,1 Karl Wieghardt1 and Frank Neese1 1Max Planck...

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    for attenuation effects a) observed (i.e., attenuated) X-band radar reflectivity in rain b) for the same scene attenuation - corrected reflectivity max range is 40 km in this...

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Max Tech and Beyond Competition The Max Tech and Beyond Competition Addthis 1 of 5 Team Cal Poly Solar is working to significantly reduce the cost and construction time on their solar concentrator for cooking. Image: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 of 5 Professor Dale Dolan's students from California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo Electrical Engineering department testing the placement of their Hybrid Solar Photovoltaic Panel for Pool Heating. Image: Lawrence Berkeley

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    Super Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition Super Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition August 23, 2012 - 2:44pm Addthis The winners of the Max Tech and Beyond competition -- a team of University of Maryland students -- designed and built a prototype for a wall unit air conditioner that showed more than 30 percent energy savings when tested in a lab. | Photo courtesy of Yunho Hwang, University of Maryland. The winners of the Max Tech and Beyond competition -- a team of

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    Energy Maryland Heats Up Student Appliance Design Competition Maryland Heats Up Student Appliance Design Competition September 10, 2013 - 11:43am Addthis Students from the University of Maryland won the Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition for their heat pump clothes dryer prototype, which achieved a 59 percent energy savings compared to standard U.S. electric dryers. | Photo courtesy of the University of Maryland. Students from the University of Maryland won the Max Tech and Beyond Design

  12. Maryland team wins Virginia/Maryland Regional Middle School Science Bowl;

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    Energy Maryland Heats Up Student Appliance Design Competition Maryland Heats Up Student Appliance Design Competition September 10, 2013 - 11:43am Addthis Students from the University of Maryland won the Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition for their heat pump clothes dryer prototype, which achieved a 59 percent energy savings compared to standard U.S. electric dryers. | Photo courtesy of the University of Maryland. Students from the University of Maryland won the Max Tech and Beyond Design

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NSUF Research Highlights 2015 James I. Cole, PhD Chief Scientist, NSUF Idaho National Laboratory 2 n NSUF Research Highlights * Irradiation experiments * PIE * RTE * Nuclear data measurement and instrumentation development 3 Motivation MAX (M n+1 AX stoichiometry) phase ceramics have properties of a mixture of traditional ceramics and metals (toughness and high temperature strength). The irradiation data for MAX phase ceramics is needed for their application in nuclear reactor systems.

  14. Frederic Laquai Seminar: Photocurrent Generation in Low-Bandgap Polymer and

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    Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells | Center for Energy Efficient Materials Frederic Laquai Seminar: Photocurrent Generation in Low-Bandgap Polymer and Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells Apr 18, 2014 | 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM Frederic Laquai Head, Max Planck Research Group for Organic Optoelectronics Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research Photocurrent Generation in Low-Bandgap Polymer and Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells April 18, 2014 | 3:30pm | Elings Hall (CNSI) 1605 Faculty host: Quyen

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    Accelerated Aging Studies LA-UR -15-27339 This document is approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited Property (max) log (aging time) Property (failure) Property (time=0) Accelerated Aging Data Predicted Storage Aging Response log (predicted lifetime) Property (max) log (aging time) Property (failure) Property (time=0) Accelerated Aging Data Predicted Storage Aging Response log (predicted lifetime) Accelerated Aging Studies Factors such as temperature, pressure, or radiation

  16. Heterogeneity-corrected vs -uncorrected critical structure maximum point doses in breast balloon brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Leonard; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have reported potentially clinically meaningful dose differences when heterogeneity correction is used in breast balloon brachytherapy. In this study, we report on the relationship between heterogeneity-corrected and -uncorrected doses for 2 commonly used plan evaluation metrics: maximum point dose to skin surface and maximum point dose to ribs. Maximum point doses to skin surface and ribs were calculated using TG-43 and Varian Acuros for 20 patients treated with breast balloon brachytherapy. The results were plotted against each other and fit with a zero-intercept line. Max skin dose (Acuros) = max skin dose (TG-43) ? 0.930 (R{sup 2} = 0.995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 1.1% (max 2.8%). Max rib dose (Acuros) = max rib dose (TG-43) ? 0.955 (R{sup 2} = 0.9995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 0.7% (max 1.6%). Heterogeneity-corrected maximum point doses to the skin surface and ribs were proportional to TG-43-calculated doses. The average deviation from proportionality was 1%. The proportional relationship suggests that a different metric other than maximum point dose may be needed to obtain a clinical advantage from heterogeneity correction. Alternatively, if maximum point dose continues to be used in recommended limits while incorporating heterogeneity correction, institutions without this capability may be able to accurately estimate these doses by use of a scaling factor.

  17. Inviscid evolution of large amplitude filaments in a uniform gravity field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angus, J. R.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-11-15

    The inviscid evolution of localized density stratifications under the influence of a uniform gravity field in a homogeneous, ambient background is studied. The fluid is assumed to be incompressible, and the stratification, or filament, is assumed to be initially isotropic and at rest. It is shown that the center of mass energy can be related to the center of mass position in a form analogous to that of a solid object in a gravity field g by introducing an effective gravity field g{sub eff}, which is less than g due to energy that goes into the background and into non-center of mass motion of the filament. During the early stages of the evolution, g{sub eff} is constant in time and can be determined from the solution of a 1D differential equation that depends on the initial, radially varying density profile of the filament. For small amplitude filaments such that ?{sub 0} ? 1, where ?{sub 0} is the relative amplitude of the filament to the background, the early stage g{sub eff} scales linearly with ?{sub 0}, but as ?{sub 0}??,?g{sub eff}?g and is thus independent of ?{sub 0}. Fully nonlinear simulations are performed for the evolution of Gaussian filaments, and it is found that the time t{sub max}, which is defined as the time for the center of mass velocity to reach its maximum value U{sub max}, occurs very soon after the constant acceleration phase and so U{sub max}?g{sub eff}(t=0)t{sub max}. The simulation results show that U{sub max}?1/t{sub max}??(?{sub 0}) for ?{sub 0} ? 1, in agreement with theory and results from previous authors, but that U{sub max} and t{sub max} both scale approximately with ?(?{sub 0}) for ?{sub 0} ? 1. The fact that U{sub max} and t{sub max} have the same scaling with ?{sub 0} for large amplitude filaments is in agreement with the theory presented in this paper.

  18. Pretreatment [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose Positron Emission Tomography Maximum Standardized Uptake Value as Predictor of Distant Metastasis in Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy: Rethinking the Role of Positron Emission Tomography in Personalizing Treatment Based on Risk Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, Vimoj J.; MacRae, Robert; Sirisegaram, Abby; Pantarotto, Jason R.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether the preradiation maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the primary tumor for [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has a prognostic significance in patients with Stage T1 or T2N0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with curative radiation therapy, whether conventional or stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2007 and December 2011, a total of 163 patients (180 tumors) with medically inoperable histologically proven Stage T1 or T2N0 NSCLC and treated with radiation therapy (both conventional and SBRT) were entered in a research ethics board approved database. All patients received pretreatment FDG-PET / computed tomography (CT) at 1 institution with consistent acquisition technique. The medical records and radiologic images of these patients were analyzed. Results: The overall survival at 2 years and 3 years for the whole group was 76% and 67%, respectively. The mean and median SUV{sub max} were 8.1 and 7, respectively. Progression-free survival at 2 years with SUV{sub max} <7 was better than that of the patients with tumor SUV{sub max} ?7 (67% vs 51%; P=.0096). Tumors with SUV{sub max} ?7 were associated with a worse regional recurrence-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival. In the multivariate analysis, SUV{sub max} ?7 was an independent prognostic factor for distant metastasis-free survival. Conclusion: In early-stage NSCLC managed with radiation alone, patients with SUV{sub max} ?7 on FDG-PET / CT scan have poorer outcomes and high risk of progression, possibly because of aggressive biology. There is a potential role for adjuvant therapies for these high-risk patients with intent to improve outcomes.

  19. Section 54

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    eT ' A (z T &z b ) )s vT m zT zB wNsN v dz BIR' I z C z B (wNsN v ) dz I z T z C (wNsN v ) dz < BIR max , q wM z T z B q w s v )s vT s v w eB z c BIR max z B BIR max 2 q v Session Papers 227 Development of an Elevated Mixed Layer Model for Parameterizing Altocumulus Cloud Layers S. Liu and S. K. Krueger Department of Meteorology University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Altocumulus (Ac) clouds play an important role in the earth's energy budget through their effects on solar

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Performance and Testing Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Data on the plug-in hybrid electric version of the following vehicles is available: 2013 Ford Fusion Energi, 2013 Ford C-Max Energi Fleet, 2013 Ford C-Max Energi, 2012 Chevrolet Volt, 2012 Toyota Prius, 2013 Toyota Prius, 2013 Chevrolet Volt, 2011 Chrysler Town & Country, 2010 Quantum Escape, and 2010 Ford Escape Advanced Research Vehicle.

  1. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 2012 max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper May 31, 2012 by Helen He We have increased the max walltime for the low queue on Hopper from 12 to 24 hrs. Read the full post Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 May 10, 2012 Due to a scheduled maintenance for the License Servers, most of the compilers (except GNU) and the DDT debugger on Hopper will not be available from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm on Wednesday, May 16. If there are any questions or concerns,

  2. P:\JODI\P393-396.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R ¯ Q ¯ R ¯ Q 1, R i,j Q i,j Xl l nx 2 . Q i,j R i,j D D min D max nx 2 D min D max µm Header 393 Simulation of Solar Radiative Transfer in Cumulus Clouds V. E. Zuev and G. A. Titov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Russian Academy of Sciences Tomsk, Russia Current radiation codes of general circulation models The stochastic geometry of cumulus clouds is, to date, (GCMs) are still largely based on plane-parallel models, poorly understood. To avoid expensive computations, we which

  3. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  4. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  5. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  6. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  7. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  8. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8.3.1 Beamline 8.3.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:55 Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x

  9. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  10. Are Energy Vampires Sucking You Dry? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Are Energy Vampires Sucking You Dry? Are Energy Vampires Sucking You Dry? October 29, 2015 - 10:22am Addthis Max Schreck in Nosferatu, presumably climbing the stairs to plug in some unused appliances. | Photo from Wikipedia, Public Domain in the U.S. Max Schreck in Nosferatu, presumably climbing the stairs to plug in some unused appliances. | Photo from Wikipedia, Public Domain in the U.S. John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for

  11. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  12. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  13. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8.3.1 Beamline 8.3.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:55 Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x

  14. RADIOLOGICAL DATA FOR ALARA PLANNING PURPOSES Rev. 1 Contact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RADIOLOGICAL DATA FOR ALARA PLANNING PURPOSES Rev. 1 Contact 1 ft 3 ft 10 ft 25 ft 50 ft 125 ft 100 mR/hr line 5 mR/hr line (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (feet) (feet) Outside of Cask (max) *Unshielded Liner (max) Top of *Unshielded Liner after the cask lid is removed *Unshielded Liner Inside of Cask/Lid Outside of Cask Lifting rig or any other support equipment Does the cask have fixed contamination that may "leach out" during transport (Yes/No)? If yes, please list

  15. Are excitation spectral lineshapes in semicrystalline polymeric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Are Energy Vampires Sucking You Dry? Are Energy Vampires Sucking You Dry? October 29, 2015 - 10:22am Addthis Max Schreck in Nosferatu, presumably climbing the stairs to plug in some unused appliances. | Photo from Wikipedia, Public Domain in the U.S. Max Schreck in Nosferatu, presumably climbing the stairs to plug in some unused appliances. | Photo from Wikipedia, Public Domain in the U.S. John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for

  16. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Government. i ~"~ t Departmknti of Energy,' me' tnorandu,m' .' ?' . .:. ,,' ,. cATE: APR 1 y ' 624 y;;J; EM-421,(W.'A.:Williams, 903-81'49)' ,I ' , c I v : ., -Elimination,o,f the Max,Zuckerman &,Sons'Company Sites, Il.l,inois and ~'SUSJECT: Mary, and .: '. I To The File I, 1 .' , ,,.I have reviewed the attached site summary and elimination recommendati,od ,;. _ 'for the Max Zuckerman ,& Sons Company sites'in Chicago (IL), .Owings I iills % I ,' (MD) @.Baltimore (MD). '.I have

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Data on Display at New Climate Research Facility Bookmark and Share Senator Stevens (second from left) and Max Ahgeak (far left) of the Ukpeagvik Iñupiat Corporation cut a red ribbon at the building's front door to commence the new science facility's opening ceremony. On June 1, Senator Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) joined Max Ahgeak of the Ukpeagvik Iñupiat Corporation to officially open the new Barrow Global Climate Change Research Facility in Alaska. ARM was represented by Mark Ivey, North

  18. Fact #796: September 9, 2013 Electric Vehicle and Plug-In Hybrid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    E Prius PHEV Ford Focus Honda Fit EV Tesla Model S* RAV4 EV Ford C-Max Energi Honda ... 13,050 600 4,856 200 1,584 27 112,724 *Tesla Model S numbers are estimated. Source: ...

  19. A=12Be (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is rendered uncertain by the discovery of 11Li (PO66H). A calculation by Kurath (see ref 8 in (PO65B)) suggests log ft 3.5 for the ground state; E-(max) is then 11.7 MeV...

  20. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photonssec Resolving power (EE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 m...

  1. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photonssec Resolving power (EE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.5 (v) mrad Measured spot size (FWHM) 100 m Endstations...

  2. Hydroshear Simulation Lab Test 2

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bauer, Steve

    2014-08-01

    This data file is for test 2. In this test a sample of granite with a pre cut (man made fracture) is confined, heated and differential stress is applied. max temperature in this this system development test is 95C. test details on the spreadsheets--note thta there are 2 spreadsheets

  3. DOE Technical Targets for Hydrogen Storage Systems for Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    bar (abs) 3 3 Max delivery pressure from storage system bar (abs) 12 12 Shock and Vibration Shock g 40 40 Vibration g 5@10Hz-0.75@200Hz 10@10Hz-1@200Hz ChargingDischarging ...

  4. Hydroshear Simulation Lab Test 2

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bauer, Steve

    This data file is for test 2. In this test a sample of granite with a pre cut (man made fracture) is confined, heated and differential stress is applied. max temperature in this this system development test is 95C. test details on the spreadsheets--note thta there are 2 spreadsheets

  5. Section 27

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ( m) 0max < +J,exp 1&2p 1&2 &H <4 Session Papers 109 Figure 1. Water vapor transmission spectra for solar zenith angle 2 60. From the top: from TOA...

  6. Ecloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL MI for a Mixed Fill Pattern: Dependence on Peak SEY and Pulse Intensity During the Ramp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, M. A.

    2010-12-11

    We present simulation results of the build-up of the electron-cloud density n{sub e} in three regions of the FNAL Main Injector (MI) for a beam fill pattern made up of 5 double booster batches followed by a 6th single batch. We vary the pulse intensity in the range N{sub t} = (2-5) x 10{sup 13}, and the beam kinetic energy in the range E{sub k} = 8-120 GeV. We assume a secondary electron emission model qualitatively corresponding to TiN, except that we let the peak value of the secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max} vary as a free parameter in a fairly broad range. Our main conclusions are: (1) At fixed N{sub t} there is a clear threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of {delta}{sub max} in the range {approx} 1.1-1.3. (2) At fixed {delta}{sub max}, there is a threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of N{sub t} provided {delta}{sub max} is sufficiently high; the threshold value of N{sub t} is a function of the characteristics of the region being simulated. (3) The dependence on E{sub k} is weak except possibly at transition energy. Most of these results were informally presented to the relevant MI personnel in April 2010.

  7. CX-007656: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operation of Extrel MAX300LG Mass Spectrometer and VICI Metronics Dynacalibrator Calibration Gas Generator at 999-1W CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/30/2011 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  8. A global scale mechanistic model of the photosynthetic capacity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ali, A. A.; Xu, C.; Rogers, A.; Fisher, R. A.; Wullschleger, S. D.; McDowell, N. G.; Massoud, E. C.; Vrugt, J. A.; Muss, J. D.; Fisher, J. B.; et al

    2015-08-10

    Although plant photosynthetic capacity as determined by the maximum carboxylation rate (i.e., Vc, max25) and the maximum electron transport rate (i.e., Jmax25) at a reference temperature (generally 25 C) is known to vary substantially in space and time in response to environmental conditions, it is typically parameterized in Earth system models (ESMs) with tabulated values associated to plant functional types. In this study, we developed a mechanistic model of leaf utilization of nitrogen for assimilation (LUNA V1.0) to predict the photosynthetic capacity at the global scale under different environmental conditions, based on the optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture,moreelectron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The LUNA model was able to reasonably well capture the observed patterns of photosynthetic capacity in view that it explained approximately 55 % of the variation in observed Vc, max25 and 65 % of the variation in observed Jmax25 across the globe. Our model simulations under current and future climate conditions indicated that Vc, max25 could be most affected in high-latitude regions under a warming climate and that ESMs using a fixed Vc, max25 or Jmax25 by plant functional types were likely to substantially overestimate future global photosynthesis.less

  9. Microsoft Word - Document2

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    min, average, and max average CO 2 emissions by month for AZNM subregion (lbs CO 2 MWh load) 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 January 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 February 800 1,100 1,400 1,700...

  10. New asteroseismic scaling relations based on the Hayashi track relation applied to red giant branch stars in NGC 6791 and NGC 6819

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, T.; Li, Y.; Hekker, S. E-mail: ly@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-01-20

    Stellar mass M, radius R, and gravity g are important basic parameters in stellar physics. Accurate values for these parameters can be obtained from the gravitational interaction between stars in multiple systems or from asteroseismology. Stars in a cluster are thought to be formed coevally from the same interstellar cloud of gas and dust. The cluster members are therefore expected to have some properties in common. These common properties strengthen our ability to constrain stellar models and asteroseismically derived M, R, and g when tested against an ensemble of cluster stars. Here we derive new scaling relations based on a relation for stars on the Hayashi track (?(T{sub eff})?g{sup p}R{sup q}) to determine the masses and metallicities of red giant branch stars in open clusters NGC 6791 and NGC 6819 from the global oscillation parameters ?? (the large frequency separation) and ?{sub max} (frequency of maximum oscillation power). The ?? and ?{sub max} values are derived from Kepler observations. From the analysis of these new relations we derive: (1) direct observational evidence that the masses of red giant branch stars in a cluster are the same within their uncertainties, (2) new methods to derive M and z of the cluster in a self-consistent way from ?? and ?{sub max}, with lower intrinsic uncertainties, and (3) the mass dependence in the ?? - ?{sub max} relation for red giant branch stars.

  11. CX-003351: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Convert CargoMAX Vehicles to Run on Compressed Natural GasCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 08/09/2010Location(s): Okarche, OklahomaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  12. DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    bar (abs) 3 3 Max delivery pressure from storage system bar (abs) 12 12 Shock and Vibration Shock g 40 40 Vibration g 5@10Hz-0.75@200Hz 10@10Hz-1@200Hz ChargingDischarging ...

  13. Pyrotechnic ignition studies using a gun tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    A gun tunnel is being used to investigate the ignition characteristics of center-hole iron/potassium perchlorate thermal battery discs. Details are given of the construction, operation, and data reduction method for the gun tunnel. To simulate an igniter, this system can readily produce a pulse of hot argon at maximum pressures and temperatures up to P/sub max/ = 8 MPa and T/sub max/ = 4000K, respectively, with flow times of the order of 3 msec. For a single battery disc, a segment of the ignition boundary was found to lie in the region of T/sub max/ = 1200 to 1300K and 0.7 MPa < P/sub max/ < 2.0 MPa. The results also showed two types of ignition: prompt ignition, requiring an average delivered enthalpy /ovr /Delta/H//sub ig/ = 6 cal during an average flow time /ovr /Delta/t//sub ig/ = 0.7 msec, and delayed ignition, with /ovr /Delta/H//sub ig/ = 16 cal and /ovr /Delta/t//sub ig/ = 2.4 msec. In addition, near an ignition boundary, high speed motion photography showed the ignition delay increased to 6 msec with significant spatial non-uniformity. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  14. A general maximum entropy framework for thermodynamic variational principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewar, Roderick C.

    2014-12-05

    Minimum free energy principles are familiar in equilibrium thermodynamics, as expressions of the second law. They also appear in statistical mechanics as variational approximation schemes, such as the mean-field and steepest-descent approximations. These well-known minimum free energy principles are here unified and extended to any system analyzable by MaxEnt, including non-equilibrium systems. The MaxEnt Lagrangian associated with a generic MaxEnt distribution p defines a generalized potential ? for an arbitrary probability distribution p-hat, such that ? is a minimum at (p-hat) = p. Minimization of ? with respect to p-hat thus constitutes a generic variational principle, and is equivalent to minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between p-hat and p. Illustrative examples of min? are given for equilibrium and non-equilibrium systems. An interpretation of changes in ? is given in terms of the second law, although min? itself is an intrinsic variational property of MaxEnt that is distinct from the second law.

  15. Update on electron-cloud power deposition for the LHC arcdipoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, Miguel A.; Chaplin, Vernon H.

    2006-01-30

    We revisit the estimation of the power deposited by the electron cloud (EC) in the arc dipoles of the LHC by means of simulations. We adopt, as simulation input, a set of electron-related parameters closely resembling those used in recent simulations at CERN [1]. We explore values for the bunch population Nb in the range 0.4 x 10^11 <= Nb <=1.6 x 10^11, peak secondary electron yield (SEY) delta max in the range 1.0 <= delta max <= 2.0, and bunch spacing tb either 25 or 75 ns. For tb=25 ns we find that the EC average power deposition per unit length of beam pipe, dPbar/dz, will exceed the available cooling capacity, which we take to be 1.7 W/m at nominal Nb [2], if delta max exceeds ~1.3, but dPbar/dz will be comfortably within the cooling capacity if delta max <= 1.2. For tb =75 ns dPbar/dz exceeds the cooling capacity only when delta max > 2 and Nb > 1.5 x 10^11 taken in combination. The rediffused component of the secondary electron emission spectrum plays a significant role: if we artificially suppress this component while keeping delta max fixed, dPbar/dz is roughly cut in half for most values of Nb explored here, and in this case we find good agreement with the results in Ref. 1, as expected. We provide a fairly detailed explanation of the mechanism responsible for such a relatively large effect. We assess the sensitivity of our results to numerical simulation parameters, and to physical parameters such as the photoelectric yield, bunch train length, etc. Owing to the lack of detailed knowledge of the electron emission spectrum, the sensitivity of dPbar/dz to the rediffused component appears to be the most significant source of uncertainty in our results. Nevertheless, taking our results as a whole, the condition delta max <= 1.2 seems to be a conservative requirement for the cooling capacity not to be exceeded.

  16. The F-theory geometry with most flux vacua

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Washington; Wang, Yi -Nan

    2015-12-28

    Applying the Ashok-Denef-Douglas estimation method to elliptic Calabi-Yau fourfolds suggests that a single elliptic fourfold Mmax gives rise to O(10272,000) F-theory flux vacua, and that the sum total of the numbers of flux vacua from all other F-theory geometries is suppressed by a relative factor of O(10–3000). The fourfold Mmax arises from a generic elliptic fibration over a specific toric threefold base Bmax, and gives a geometrically non-Higgsable gauge group of E89 × F48 × (G 2 × SU(2))16, of which we expect some factors to be broken by G-flux to smaller groups. It is not possible to tune an SU(5) GUT group on any further divisors in Mmax, or even an SU(2) or SU(3), so the standard model gauge group appears to arise in this context only from a broken E8 factor. Furthermore, the results of this paper can either be interpreted as providing a framework for predicting how the standard model arises most naturally in F-theory and the types of dark matter to be found in a typical F-theory compactification, or as a challenge to string theorists to explain why other choices of vacua are not exponentially unlikely compared to F-theory compactifications on Mmax.

  17. Potential third-party radiation exposure from outpatients treated with {sup 131}I for hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matheoud, Roberta; Reschini, Eugenio; Canzi, Cristina; Voltini, Franco; Gerundini, Paolo

    2004-12-01

    Thirty-three hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine (mean administered activity 414 MBq, range 163-555) were studied to determine if pretreatment dosimetry could be used to give radiation protection advice that could assure compliance with the effective dose constraints suggested by the European Commission. Effective doses to travelers, co-workers, and sleeping partners were estimated by integrating the effective dose rate-versus-time curve obtained by fitting the dose rates measured several times after radioiodine administration to a biexponential function. The mean estimated effective doses to travelers, co-workers, and sleeping partners were 0.11 mSv (0.05-0.24), 0.24 mSv (0.07-0.52), and 1.8 mSv (0.6-4.1), respectively. The best correlation was found between effective dose (D) in mSv and maximum activity (AU{sub max}) in MBq taken up in the thyroid: D{sub traveler}=0.0005*(AU{sub max})+0.04 (r=0.88,p<0.01); D{sub co-worker}=0.0013*(AU{sub max})+0.03(r=0.89,p<0.01); D{sub sleepingpartners}=0.0105*(AU{sub max})+0.16 (r=0.93,p<0.01). Private/public transports are always allowed. For the co-workers the effective dose constraint of 0.3 mSv is met without restrictions and with 3 days off work if AU{sub max} is lower or higher than 185 MBq, respectively. For the sleeping partners the effective dose constraint of 3 mSv is met without restriction and with 4 nights separate sleeping arrangements if AU{sub max} is lower or higher than 185 MBq, respectively. The potential for contamination by the patients was determined from perspiration samples taken from the patient's hands, forehead, and neck and in saliva at 4, 24, and 48 h after radioiodine treatment. The mean highest {sup 131}I activity levels for hands, forehead, neck, and saliva were 4.1 Bq/cm{sup 2}, 1.9 Bq/cm{sup 2}, 0.9 Bq/cm{sup 2}, and 796 kBq/g, respectively. The results indicate that there is minimal risk of contamination from these patients.

  18. 100-F/IU Area ROD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area ROD Christopher Guzzetti US EPA Topics  15 waste sites with ICs for contamination at depth  1 waste site with IC for Irrigation  MNA for Groundwater 15 ft HH GW/SW 15 waste sites with deep ICs IC Boundaries Waste site with IC for Irrigation Waste site with IC for Irrigation Max Conc. 3.23 mg/kg 22 ft. 0.27 mg/kg 48.9 ft. Max Conc. 7.5 mg/kg CVP ND 20 µg/L Interim 10 µg/L Final Waste Site vs. Cr6 Plume MNA for Groundwater  Timeframes to achieve cleanup levels are based on the

  19. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-14-667-672 AND MCU-14-846-847: AUGUST AND SEPTEMBER 2014 MONTHLY SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2014-10-20

    SRNL received two sets of SHT samples (MCU-14-667-672, pulled 8/27/2014 and MCU-14-846-847, pulled on 9/22/2014) for analysis. The samples were analyzed for composition. It is recommended that the solvent receives Isopar L and TiDG trimming at this time. Analysis of sample MCU-14-846-847 indicates the solvent has evaporated IsoparL and has lost TiDG to a level below the recommended minimum 1 mM level. Since the addition of MaxCalix to the SHT in early July 2014, the MaxCalix concentration in the solvent has reached nominal values. The laboratory will continue to monitor the quality of the solvent in particular for any new impurity or degradation of the solvent components.

  20. Electron energy spectrum in circularly polarized laser irradiated overdense plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.; Shao, Xi; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-10-15

    A circularly polarized laser normally impinged on an overdense plasma thin foil target is shown to accelerate the electrons in the skin layer towards the rear, converting the quiver energy into streaming energy exactly if one ignores the space charge field. The energy distribution of electrons is close to Maxwellian with an upper cutoff ?{sub max}=mc{sup 2}[(1+a{sub 0}{sup 2}){sup 1/2}?1], where a{sub 0}{sup 2}=(1+(2?{sup 2}/?{sub p}{sup 2})|a{sub in}|{sup 2}){sup 2}?1, |a{sub in}| is the normalized amplitude of the incident laser of frequency ?, and ?{sub p} is the plasma frequency. The energetic electrons create an electrostatic sheath at the rear and cause target normal sheath acceleration of protons. The energy gain by the accelerated ions is of the order of ?{sub max}.

  1. Sample dependence of giant magnetocaloric effect in a cluster-glass system Ho{sub 5}Pd{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toyoizumi, Saori Tamaki, Akira; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Mamiya, Hiroaki; Terada, Noriki; Tamura, Ryo; Dönni, Andreas; Kawamura, Yukihiko; Morita, Kengo

    2015-05-07

    In order to investigate the effect of vacancy on the magnetocaloric effect in Ho{sub 5}Pd{sub 2}, we have carried out X-ray diffraction, magnetization, and specific heat measurements in the rare-earth intermetallic compound Ho{sub 5+x}Pd{sub 2}(−0.4 ≤ x ≤ 0.4). The maximum magnetic entropy change −ΔS{sub m}{sup max}, the maximum adiabatic temperature change ΔT{sub ad}{sup max}, and the relative cooling power of Ho{sub 5+x}Pd{sub 2} take large values at x = 0−0.4 for the field change of 5 T. The paramagnetic Curie temperature θ{sub p} increases with an increase of x. This fact suggests that the enhancement of ferromagnetic coupling among the correlated spins leads to the increase of magnetocaloric effect.

  2. Organ localization: Toward prospective patient-specific organ dosimetry in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segars, W. P. Rybicki, K.; Norris, Hannah; Samei, E.; Frush, D.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: With increased focus on radiation dose from medical imaging, prospective radiation dose estimates are becoming increasingly desired. Using available populations of adult and pediatric patient phantoms, radiation dose calculations can be catalogued and prospectively applied to individual patients that best match certain anatomical characteristics. In doing so, the knowledge of organ size and location is a required element. Here, the authors develop a predictive model of organ locations and volumes based on an analysis of adult and pediatric computed tomography (CT) data. Methods: Fifty eight adult and 69 pediatric CT datasets were segmented and utilized in the study. The maximum and minimum points of the organs were recorded with respect to the axial distance from the tip of the sacrum. The axial width, midpoint, and volume of each organ were calculated. Linear correlations between these three organ parameters and patient age, BMI, weight, and height were determined. Results: No statistically significant correlations were found in adult patients between the axial width, midpoint, and volume of the organs versus the patient age or BMI. Slight, positive linear trends were found for organ midpoint versus patient weight (max r{sup 2} = 0.382, mean r{sup 2} = 0.236). Similar trends were found for organ midpoint versus height (max r{sup 2} = 0.439, mean r{sup 2} = 0.200) and for organ volume versus height (max r{sup 2} = 0.410, mean r{sup 2} = 0.153). Gaussian fits performed on probability density functions of the adult organs resulted in r{sup 2}-values ranging from 0.96 to 0.996. The pediatric patients showed much stronger correlations overall. Strong correlations were observed between organ axial midpoint versus age, height, and weight (max r{sup 2} = 0.842, mean r{sup 2} = 0.790; max r{sup 2} = 0.949, mean r{sup 2} = 0.894; and max r{sup 2} = 0.870, mean r{sup 2} = 0.847, respectively). Moderate linear correlations were also observed for organ axial width versus height (max r{sup 2} = 0.772, mean r{sup 2} = 0.562) and for organ volume versus height (max r{sup 2} = 0.781, mean r{sup 2} = 0.601). Conclusions: Adult patients exhibited small variations in organ volume and location with respect to height and weight, but no meaningful correlation existed between these parameters and age or BMI. Once adulthood is reached, organ morphology and positioning seem to remain static. However, clear trends are evident between pediatric organ locations versus age, height, and weight. Such information can be incorporated into a matching methodology that may provide the highest probability of representing the anatomy of a patient undergoing a clinical exam to prospectively estimate the radiation dose.

  3. A=12N (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 12N) GENERAL: See also Table 12.12 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 12N: From the Q of the 10B(3He, n)12N reaction, 1.46 ± 0.06 MeV, and the Wapstra (WA55C) atomic masses for 10B, 3He and n, the mass excess of 12N is 21.00 ± 0.06 MeV. 1. 12N(β+)12C Qm = 17.46 The half life is 12.5 ± 1 msec; Eβ(max) = 16.6 ± 0.2 MeV (AL49A), τ1/2 = 11.43 ± 0.05 msec; Eβ(max) = 16.37 ± 0.06 MeV (VE58A). The decay is complex; 12N decays to the

  4. Anisotropic swelling and microcracking of neutron irradiated Ti3AlC2-Ti5Al2C3 materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ang, Caen K.; Silva, Chinthaka M.; Shih, Chunghao Phillip; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Katoh, Yutai; Zinkle, Steven J.

    2015-12-17

    Mn + 1AXn (MAX) phase materials based on Ti–Al–C have been irradiated at 400 °C (673 K) with fission neutrons to a fluence of 2 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), corresponding to ~ 2 displacements per atom (dpa). We report preliminary results of microcracking in the Al-containing MAX phase, which contained the phases Ti3AlC2 and Ti5Al2C3. Equibiaxial ring-on-ring tests of irradiated coupons showed that samples retained 10% of pre-irradiated strength. Volumetric swelling of up to 4% was observed. Phase analysis and microscopy suggest that anisotropic lattice parameter swelling caused microcracking. Lastly, variants of titanium aluminum carbide may bemore » unsuitable materials for irradiation at light water reactor-relevant temperatures.« less

  5. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1981-02-11

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

  6. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1983-10-04

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t[sub max]--t[sub min]) of a series of paired time signals t[sub 1] and t[sub 2] varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t[sub 1][<=]t[sub 2] and t[sub 1]+t[sub 2] equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t[sub min]) of the first signal t[sub 1] closer to t[sub max] and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20--800. 6 figs.

  7. Recovery Act: Novel Kerf-Free PV Wafering that provides a low-cost approach to generate wafers from 150um to 50um in thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fong, Theodore E.

    2013-05-06

    The technical paper summarizes the project work conducted in the development of Kerf-Free silicon wafering equipment for silicon solar wafering. This new PolyMax technology uses a two step process of implantation and cleaving to exfoliate 50um to 120um wafers with thicknesses ranging from 50um to 120um from a 125mm or 156mm pseudo-squared silicon ingot. No kerf is generated using this method of wafering. This method of wafering contrasts with the current method of making silicon solar wafers using the industry standard wire saw equipment. The report summarizes the activity conducted by Silicon Genesis Corporation in working to develop this technology further and to define the roadmap specifications for the first commercial proto-type equipment for high volume solar wafer manufacturing using the PolyMax technology.

  8. A=8He (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8He (66LA04) (Not illustrated) GENERAL: See (GO60P, ZE60A, BA61F, LO61C, YA61B, GO64, BA65M). Mass of 8He: From the systematics of neutron binding energies (GO60O) and from the calculated mass excess of 7He, the mass excess of 8He is estimated as 31.6 to 32.4 MeV. It is thus stable against 6He + 2n by 1.3 to 2.1 MeV and should exhibit β--decay to 8Li*(0.98) with Eβ(max) = 9.7 to 10.5 MeV (DE65F). 1. 8He(β-)8Li* Qm ~ 10 An activity with half-life 30 ± 20 msec, Eβ(max) = 13 ± 2 MeV,

  9. On quantum Rnyi entropies: A new generalization and some properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mller-Lennert, Martin; Dupuis, Frdric; Szehr, Oleg; Fehr, Serge; Tomamichel, Marco

    2013-12-15

    The Rnyi entropies constitute a family of information measures that generalizes the well-known Shannon entropy, inheriting many of its properties. They appear in the form of unconditional and conditional entropies, relative entropies, or mutual information, and have found many applications in information theory and beyond. Various generalizations of Rnyi entropies to the quantum setting have been proposed, most prominently Petz's quasi-entropies and Renner's conditional min-, max-, and collision entropy. However, these quantum extensions are incompatible and thus unsatisfactory. We propose a new quantum generalization of the family of Rnyi entropies that contains the von Neumann entropy, min-entropy, collision entropy, and the max-entropy as special cases, thus encompassing most quantum entropies in use today. We show several natural properties for this definition, including data-processing inequalities, a duality relation, and an entropic uncertainty relation.

  10. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, George E.; Dawson, John W.

    1983-01-01

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t.sub.max -t.sub.min) of a series of paired time signals t.sub.1 and t.sub.2 varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t.sub.1 .ltoreq.t.sub.2 and t.sub.1 +t.sub.2 equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t.sub.min) of the first signal t.sub.1 closer to t.sub.max and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20-800.

  11. Rutgers University Subcontract B611610 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soundarajan, Sucheta; Eliassi-Rad, Tina; Gallagher, Brian; Pinar, Ali

    2015-09-30

    Given an incomplete (i.e., partially-observed) network, which nodes should we actively probe in order to achieve the highest accuracy for a given network feature? For example, consider a cyber-network administrator who observes only a portion of the network at time t and wants to accurately identify the most important (e.g., highest PageRank) nodes in the complete network. She has a limited budget for probing the network. Of all the nodes she has observed, which should she probe in order to most accurately identify the important nodes? We propose a novel and scalable algorithm, MaxOutProbe, and evaluate it w.r.t. four network features (largest connected component, PageRank, core-periphery, and community detection), five network sampling strategies, and seven network datasets from different domains. Across a range of conditions, MaxOutProbe demonstrates consistently high performance relative to several baseline strategies

  12. Recipe for potassium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izutani, Natsuko [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-11-12

    I investigate favorable conditions for producing potassium (K). Observations show [K/Fe] > 0 at low metallicities, while zero-metal supernova models show low [K/Fe] (< 0). Theoretically, it is natural that the odd-Z element, potassium decreases with lower metallicity, and thus, the observation should imply new and unknown sites for potassium. In this proceedings, I calculate proton-rich nucleosynthesis with three parameters, the initial Y{sub e} (from 0.51 to 0.60), the initial density {rho}{sub max} (10{sup 7}, 10{sup 8}, and 10{sup 9} [g/cm{sup 3}]), and the e-fold time {tau} for the density (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 [sec]). Among 90 models I have calculated, only 26 models show [K/Fe] > 0, and they all have {rho}{sub max} = 10{sup 9}[g/cm{sup 3}]. I discuss parameter dependence of [K/Fe].

  13. Global Illumination for Fun and Profit

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anisotropic Ellipsoidal Smoothing of Volume Data Bai Xue 1 , Nelson Max 1,2 , Cristina Siegerist 2 1 University of California, Davis 2 Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory ABSTRACT: ing the sharp edges between them [2, 3, 4, 5]. They are appropriate for removing noise before edge detection. However, they are not as useful for filling gaps in surface-like high density regions. We developed a simple filter specifically tailored for this purpose. Briefly, we predicted the surface normal direction, and then

  14. Interdisciplinary plasma theory workshop | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interdisciplinary plasma theory workshop April 15, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook (Photo by Elle Starkman/ PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL postdoctoral fellow Ammar Hakim, center, described his poster on unified methods for simulating plasmas to physicists Steve Cowley, left, director of the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy in the United Kingdom and a member of the PPPL Advisory Committee; and Frank Jenko of the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics in Germany. The

  15. Public invited to comment on Draft Environmental Assessment for the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Services Public Services Find out more about our work with our National Labs Saving Energy Saves You Money Find out more about how technologies move from the lab to the market For Consumers Homes Energy Efficiency 6 Smart Energy Resolutions for 2016 Max Schreck in Nosferatu, presumably climbing the stairs to plug in some unused appliances. | Photo from Wikipedia, Public Domain in the U.S. Appliances & Electronics Are Energy Vampires Sucking You Dry? Now's your chance to ask Energy

  16. Tomče Runčevski | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Tomče Runčevski Previous Next List Runchevski Postdoctoral Researcher Department of Chemistry University of California, Berkeley Email: runcevski@berkeley.edu Phone: 510-708-2455 PhD in Materials Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research and Stuttgart University, Germany BS and MS in Applied Chemistry, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Macedonia EFRC Research Structural characterization of materials is the key step in understanding their

  17. PPPL engineers complete the design of Wendelstein 7-X scraper unit |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab engineers complete the design of Wendelstein 7-X scraper unit By Raphael Rosen January 12, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook PPPL Scientist Hutch Neilson (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL Scientist Hutch Neilson Engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have finished designing a novel component for the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator, which recently opened at the Max

  18. PPPL, Princeton University physicists join German Chancellor Angela Merkel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Wendelstein 7-X celebration | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab PPPL, Princeton University physicists join German Chancellor Angela Merkel at Wendelstein 7-X celebration By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe February 4, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook An image of the hydrogen plasma inside the Wendelstein 7-X. (Photo by the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics) An image of the hydrogen plasma inside the Wendelstein 7-X. Gallery: A.J. Stewart Smith, Princeton University vice president

  19. PPPL-designed coil critical to experiment arrives in stellar condition |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab U.S.-German collaboration bears first fruits PPPL-designed coil critical to experiment arrives in stellar condition By John Greenwald July 10, 2012 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Max Planck staffers with delivered trim coil. Front row from left: Dr. Thomas Rummel, head of magnet and cryostat subdivision; Stefan Freundt, engineer; Dr. Hans-Stephan Bosch, associate director for coordination; Victor Bykov, engineer. Back row, from left: Konrad Risse,

  20. X:\ARM_19~1\P259-271.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Figure. 1. Conceptual relationships of studies pre- sented in this report. Interaction of Clouds, Radiation, and the Tropical Warm Pool Sea Surface Temperatures N. Schneider, G. J. Zhang, T. P. Barnett, and V. Ramanathan Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California U. Lohmann, and E. Roeckner Max-Planck-Institut für Meteorologie Hamburg, Germany Introduction The primary focus of this study is the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP). In this study, we combine in-situ observa- tions

  1. A Pilot Evaluation of a 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Scheme Based on Simultaneous Motion Estimation and Image Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dang, Jun; Gu, Xuejun; Pan, Tinsu; Wang, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a 4-dimensional (4-D) cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) reconstruction scheme based on simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) through patient studies. Methods and Materials: The SMEIR algorithm contains 2 alternating steps: (1) motion-compensated CBCT reconstruction using projections from all phases to reconstruct a reference phase 4D-CBCT by explicitly considering the motion models between each different phase and (2) estimation of motion models directly from projections by matching the measured projections to the forward projection of the deformed reference phase 4D-CBCT. Four lung cancer patients were scanned for 4 to 6 minutes to obtain approximately 2000 projections for each patient. To evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm on a conventional 1-minute CBCT scan, the number of projections at each phase was reduced by a factor of 5, 8, or 10 for each patient. Then, 4D-CBCTs were reconstructed from the down-sampled projections using Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, total variation (TV) minimization, prior image constrained compressive sensing (PICCS), and SMEIR. Using the 4D-CBCT reconstructed from the fully sampled projections as a reference, the relative error (RE) of reconstructed images, root mean square error (RMSE), and maximum error (MaxE) of estimated tumor positions were analyzed to quantify the performance of the SMEIR algorithm. Results: The SMEIR algorithm can achieve results consistent with the reference 4D-CBCT reconstructed with many more projections per phase. With an average of 30 to 40 projections per phase, the MaxE in tumor position detection is less than 1 mm in SMEIR for all 4 patients. Conclusion: The results from a limited number of patients show that SMEIR is a promising tool for high-quality 4D-CBCT reconstruction and tumor motion modeling.

  2. Stochastic finite element methods for partial differential equations with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    random input data (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Stochastic finite element methods for partial differential equations with random input data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stochastic finite element methods for partial differential equations with random input data Authors: Gunzburger, Max D [1] ; Webster, Clayton G [1] ; Zhang, Guannan [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date: 2014-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1159494 DOE Contract Number:

  3. Beamline 12.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Structurally Integrated Biology for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Frequency range 2.5-0.73 Angstrom wavelength Beam size 100 µm round beam default 10 µm and 30 µm collimators available for small samples with flux reduced to 1% and 12%, respectively. 120 µm x 120 µm Gaussian uncollimated beam shape at sample. Scientific discipline

  4. Beamline 12.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Structurally Integrated Biology for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Frequency range 2.5-0.73 Angstrom wavelength Beam size 100 µm round beam default 10 µm and 30 µm collimators available for small samples with flux reduced to 1% and 12%, respectively. 120 µm x 120 µm Gaussian uncollimated beam shape at sample. Scientific discipline

  5. Beamline 12.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.1 Print Structurally Integrated Biology for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Frequency range 2.5-0.73 Angstrom wavelength Beam size 100 µm round beam default 10 µm and 30 µm collimators available for small samples with flux reduced to 1% and 12%, respectively. 120 µm x 120 µm Gaussian uncollimated beam shape at sample. Scientific discipline

  6. Beamline 12.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12.3.1 Print Structurally Integrated Biology for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Frequency range 2.5-0.73 Angstrom wavelength Beam size 100 µm round beam default 10 µm and 30 µm collimators available for small samples with flux reduced to 1% and 12%, respectively. 120 µm x 120 µm Gaussian uncollimated beam shape at sample. Scientific discipline

  7. Beamline 12.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Structurally Integrated Biology for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Frequency range 2.5-0.73 Angstrom wavelength Beam size 100 µm round beam default 10 µm and 30 µm collimators available for small samples with flux reduced to 1% and 12%, respectively. 120 µm x 120 µm Gaussian uncollimated beam shape at sample. Scientific discipline

  8. Beamline 12.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Structurally Integrated Biology for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Frequency range 2.5-0.73 Angstrom wavelength Beam size 100 µm round beam default 10 µm and 30 µm collimators available for small samples with flux reduced to 1% and 12%, respectively. 120 µm x 120 µm Gaussian uncollimated beam shape at sample. Scientific discipline

  9. Beamline 12.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Structurally Integrated Biology for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Frequency range 2.5-0.73 Angstrom wavelength Beam size 100 µm round beam default 10 µm and 30 µm collimators available for small samples with flux reduced to 1% and 12%, respectively. 120 µm x 120 µm Gaussian uncollimated beam shape at sample. Scientific discipline

  10. Beamline 12.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Structurally Integrated Biology for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Frequency range 2.5-0.73 Angstrom wavelength Beam size 100 µm round beam default 10 µm and 30 µm collimators available for small samples with flux reduced to 1% and 12%, respectively. 120 µm x 120 µm Gaussian uncollimated beam shape at sample. Scientific discipline

  11. Beamline 12.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Structurally Integrated Biology for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Frequency range 2.5-0.73 Angstrom wavelength Beam size 100 µm round beam default 10 µm and 30 µm collimators available for small samples with flux reduced to 1% and 12%, respectively. 120 µm x 120 µm Gaussian uncollimated beam shape at sample. Scientific discipline

  12. Biography Walter Steininger

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Walter Steininger Mr. Steininger is a representative of the sponsoring organization Project Management Agency Karlsruhe, Water Technology and Waste Management (PTKA-WTE) at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology for this workshop. His introductory remarks will give an overview of the previous workshops. Walter Steininger is a physicist (University of Stuttgart). He made his doctoral thesis at the Max-Planck-Institute for Material Research, Material Science, and worked as a project scientist at

  13. 2013 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy 2 Presentations 2013 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations The Transmission Reliability R&D Reliability & Markets Peer Review included 6 sessions over 2 days on August 6 - 7, 2013. Presentations from Day 2 (Sessions V and VI) are available below. Session V: Tim Mount (Cornell), Bill Schulze (Cornell), Lang Tong (Cornell) Session VI: Max Zhang (Cornell) PDF icon 2013 R&M Peer Review - Evaluating the Effects of Managing Controllable Demand and

  14. Conceptual design for the ZEPHYR neutral-beam injection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, W.S.; Elischer, V.P.; Goldberg, D.A.; Hopkins, D.B.; Jacobson, V.L.; Lou, K.H.; Tanabe, J.T.

    1981-03-01

    In June 1980, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory began a conceptual design study for a neutral beam injection system for the ZEPHYR ignition tokamak proposed by the Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik in Garching, Germany. The ZEPHYR project was cancelled, and the LBL design effort concluded prematurely in January 1981. This report describes the conceptual design as it existed at that time, and gives brief consideration to a schedule, but does not deal with costs.

  15. A Sparse-Grid Method for Multi-Dimensional Backward Stochastic Differential

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Equations (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect A Sparse-Grid Method for Multi-Dimensional Backward Stochastic Differential Equations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Sparse-Grid Method for Multi-Dimensional Backward Stochastic Differential Equations Authors: Zhang, Guannan [1] ; Gunzburger, Max D [1] ; Zhao, Weidong [2] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Shandong University, Jinan, China Publication Date: 2013-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1093164 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725

  16. An Adaptive Wavelet Stochastic Collocation Method for Irregular Solutions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of PDEs with Random Input Data (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect An Adaptive Wavelet Stochastic Collocation Method for Irregular Solutions of PDEs with Random Input Data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An Adaptive Wavelet Stochastic Collocation Method for Irregular Solutions of PDEs with Random Input Data Authors: Gunzburger, Max D [1] ; Webster, Clayton G [1] ; Zhang, Guannan [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date: 2013-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1096319 DOE Contract

  17. An Efficient Surrogate Modeling Approach in Bayesian Uncertainty Analysis

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: An Efficient Surrogate Modeling Approach in Bayesian Uncertainty Analysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An Efficient Surrogate Modeling Approach in Bayesian Uncertainty Analysis Authors: Zhang, Guannan [1] ; Gunzburger, Max D [1] ; Lu, Dan [1] ; Webster, Clayton G [1] ; Ye, Ming [2] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Florida State University, Tallahassee Publication Date: 2013-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1096320 DOE Contract Number:

  18. An adaptive sparse-grid-based iterative ensemble Kalman filter approach for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    parameter field estimation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect An adaptive sparse-grid-based iterative ensemble Kalman filter approach for parameter field estimation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An adaptive sparse-grid-based iterative ensemble Kalman filter approach for parameter field estimation Authors: Gunzburger, Max D [1] ; Webster, Clayton G [1] ; Zhang, Guannan [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date: 2013-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1096322 DOE Contract Number:

  19. Anisotropic Ellipsoidal Smoothing of Volume Data (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Conference: Anisotropic Ellipsoidal Smoothing of Volume Data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anisotropic Ellipsoidal Smoothing of Volume Data This paper describes a simple image processing algorithm for identifying and smoothing cell membranes in tomographic reconstructions of electron micrographs of frozen bacteria. Authors: Xue, Bai ; Max, Nelson ; Siegerist, Cristina Publication Date: 2005-04-13 OSTI Identifier: 861517 Report Number(s): LBNL--57418 R&D Project:

  20. Reduced diurnal temperature range does not change warming impacts on ecosystem carbon balance of Mediterranean grassland mesocosms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Claire L.; Gregg, Jillian W.; Wilson, John K.

    2011-11-01

    Daily minimum temperature (Tmin) has increased faster than daily maximum temperature (Tmax) in many parts of the world, leading to decreases in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Projections suggest these trends are likely to continue in many regions, particularly northern latitudes and in arid regions. Despite wide speculation that asymmetric warming has different impacts on plant and ecosystem production than equal-night-and-day warming, there has been little direct comparison of these scenarios. Reduced DTR has also been widely misinterpreted as a result of night-only warming, when in fact Tmin occurs near dawn, indicating higher morning as well as night temperatures. We report on the first experiment to examine ecosystem-scale impacts of faster increases in Tmin than Tmax, using precise temperature controls to create realistic diurnal temperature profiles with gradual day-night temperature transitions and elevated early morning as well as night temperatures. Studying a constructed grassland ecosystem containing species native to Oregon, USA, we found the ecosystem lost more carbon at elevated than ambient temperatures, but was unaffected by the 3ºC difference in DTR between symmetric warming (constantly ambient +3.5ºC) and asymmetric warming (dawn Tmin=ambient +5ºC, afternoon Tmax= ambient +2ºC). Reducing DTR had no apparent effect on photosynthesis, likely because temperatures were most different in the morning and late afternoon when light was low. Respiration was also similar in both warming treatments, because respiration temperature sensitivity was not sufficient to respond to the limited temperature differences between asymmetric and symmetric warming. We concluded that changes in daily mean temperatures, rather than changes in Tmin/Tmax, were sufficient for predicting ecosystem carbon fluxes in this reconstructed Mediterranean grassland system.

  1. PPPL engineers complete the design of Wendelstein 7-X scraper unit |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab engineers complete the design of Wendelstein 7-X scraper unit By Raphael Rosen January 12, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook PPPL Scientist Hutch Neilson (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL Scientist Hutch Neilson Engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have finished designing a novel component for the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator, which recently opened at the Max

  2. PPPL, Princeton University physicists join German Chancellor Angela Merkel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Wendelstein 7-X celebration | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab PPPL, Princeton University physicists join German Chancellor Angela Merkel at Wendelstein 7-X celebration By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe February 4, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook An image of the hydrogen plasma inside the Wendelstein 7-X. (Photo by the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics) An image of the hydrogen plasma inside the Wendelstein 7-X. Gallery: A.J. Stewart Smith, Princeton University vice president

  3. ARM - Campaign Instrument - aerosmassspec

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentsaerosmassspec Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AEROSMASSSPEC) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Airborne Observations, Atmospheric Carbon Campaigns 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City [ Download Data ] Off Site Campaign : various, including non-ARM sites, 2006.03.03 - 2006.03.28 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Process Study (CHAPS) [ Download Data ] Off

  4. Critical Point Finder () | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Critical Point Finder Citation Details Software Request Title: Critical Point Finder The program robustly finds the critical points in the electric field generated by a specified collection of point charges. Authors: Max, Nelson Publication Date: 2007-03-15 OSTI Identifier: 1231069 Report Number(s): CRIT; 002212WKSTN00 LLNL-CODE-402108 DOE Contract Number: AC52-07NA27344 Software Revision: 00 Software Package Number: 002212 Software Package Contents: Media Directory; Software Abstract; Media

  5. Large scale simulations of the mechanical properties of layered transition metal ternary compounds for fossil energy power system applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ching, Wai-Yim

    2014-12-31

    Advanced materials with applications in extreme conditions such as high temperature, high pressure, and corrosive environments play a critical role in the development of new technologies to significantly improve the performance of different types of power plants. Materials that are currently employed in fossil energy conversion systems are typically the Ni-based alloys and stainless steels that have already reached their ultimate performance limits. Incremental improvements are unlikely to meet the more stringent requirements aimed at increased efficiency and reduce risks while addressing environmental concerns and keeping costs low. Computational studies can lead the way in the search for novel materials or for significant improvements in existing materials that can meet such requirements. Detailed computational studies with sufficient predictive power can provide an atomistic level understanding of the key characteristics that lead to desirable properties. This project focuses on the comprehensive study of a new class of materials called MAX phases, or Mn+1AXn (M = a transition metal, A = Al or other group III, IV, and V elements, X = C or N). The MAX phases are layered transition metal carbides or nitrides with a rare combination of metallic and ceramic properties. Due to their unique structural arrangements and special types of bonding, these thermodynamically stable alloys possess some of the most outstanding properties. We used a genomic approach in screening a large number of potential MAX phases and established a database for 665 viable MAX compounds on the structure, mechanical and electronic properties and investigated the correlations between them. This database if then used as a tool for materials informatics for further exploration of this class of intermetallic compounds.

  6. DOE Isotope Program Provides Target Material for the Discovery of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Contact Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) VFP Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Contact Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Name Email Address * Subject * Type of Inquiry or Feedback Eligibility Application System Question Application Requirements Choosing a Laboratory Letters of Recommendation Student Participation Other * Comments max. 1000 characters Captcha Display another text. Play audio version of text.

  7. Heavy fermion Ce{sub 3}Co{sub 4}Sn{sub 13} compound under pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collave, J. R.; Borges, H. A.; Ramos, S. M.; Hering, E. N.; Mendona-Ferreira, L.; Pagliuso, P. G.

    2015-05-07

    The non-magnetic heavy fermion compound Ce{sub 3}Co{sub 4}Sn{sub 13} was studied under pressure. We report single crystalline measurements of electrical resistivity as a function of temperature ?(T) under pressure. Some characteristic features related to a structural transition (T{sub S}), crystalline field effects (T{sub CEF}), and a low temperature maximum (T{sub max}), possibly connected simultaneously to the onset of Kondo lattice coherence and short range magnetic correlations, were identified in the ?(T) data. A pressure-temperature phase diagram with T{sub S} and T{sub max} was constructed by mapping these features. Like for most Ce-based heavy fermion compounds, T{sub max} moves to higher temperatures with pressure, indicating that it is related to the Kondo energy scale, due to the increase of hybridization induced by pressure. On the other hand, T{sub S}, associated to a superlattice distortion and probably combined with a charge density wave transition, decreases as a function of pressure. However, differently from the Sr{sub 3?x}Ca{sub x}Ir{sub 4}Sn{sub 13} system, where a superlattice quantum phase transition is observed [L. E. Klintberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 237?008 (2012)], in Ce{sub 3}Co{sub 4}Sn{sub 13} T{sub S}???154?K, at ambient pressure (P?=?0), seems to stabilize at around 143?K for P???19 kilobars. We also investigated ?(T) in external magnetic fields, at P?=?0. Negative magnetoresistance and increase of T{sub max} are observed, suggesting suppression of low temperature short range magnetic correlations.

  8. Queues and Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Queues and Policies Queues and Policies Queues and Job Scheduling Jobs must be submitted to a valid Submit Queue. Upon submission the job is routed to the appropriate Torque execution class. Users can not directly access the Torque execution classes. Submit Queue Execution Queue (Do not use in batch script) Nodes Available Processors Max Wallclock Relative Priority (1 being the highest) Run Limit Queued Limit (eligible to run limit) Queue Charge Factor xfer xfer 1 4 6 hrs 3 3 2 1 interactive

  9. Runtime Tuning Options

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Runtime Tuning Options Runtime Tuning Options Cray MPI Environment Variables Cray and NERSC attempt to set MPI environment variable to the best defaults for the majority of applications; however, adjusting the environment variables may in some cases improve application performance or may be necessary to enable an application to run. Environment Variable Name Description Default Range Recommendations MPICH_GNI_MAX_EAGER_MSG_SIZE Controls the threshold for switching from eager to rendezvous

  10. Beamline 12.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Structurally Integrated Biology for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Frequency range 2.5-0.73 Angstrom wavelength Beam size 100 µm round beam default 10 µm and 30 µm collimators available for small samples with flux reduced to 1% and 12%, respectively. 120 µm x 120 µm Gaussian uncollimated beam shape at sample. Scientific discipline

  11. Bruno Van Wonterghem

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bruno Van Wonterghem Bruno Van Wonterghem Operations Manager National Ignition Facility Dr. Bruno Van Wonterghem became commissioning manager of NIF in 2001 and operations manager in 2008. He earned his Ph.D. in chemical physics at the University of Leuven in Belgium in 1987. He has extensive experience in developing laser systems for plasma research in academia through work at the University of California, Irvine; the Max Planck Institute; and LLNL. He was manager of Beamlet Installation and

  12. Aspen Elementary, Los Alamos Middle School students take top award in 26th

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge 26th New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge Aspen Elementary, Los Alamos Middle School students take top award in 26th New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge Andy Corliss, Phillip Ionkov and Ming Lo of Aspen Elementary, and Max Corliss of Los Alamos Middle School won first place in the New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge. April 27, 2016 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop

  13. X-ray and neutron scattering studies of the complex compounds | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource X-ray and neutron scattering studies of the complex compounds Wednesday, September 25, 2013 - 1:00pm SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Dr. Hoyoung Jang, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany In condensed matter physics, in particular a field of complex oxide materials, most of the research-activity is focusing on finding a new functionality in materials as well as its understanding. In this fashion, during past few

  14. *

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    $65 million FY14 Budget Authority (Congressional Appropriation). * $69 million FY15 President's Budget (Request); i.e., +6% (+4% over inflation). * $76 million FY16 President's Budget; i.e., +10% (max) * $75.6 million FY15 Budget Authority; i.e., +7% over inflation. * FY17 Embargoed: NERSC-9 power and cooling (similar to Argonne and Oak Ridge). NERSC SUPPORT From Congress, Administration, and DOE. Due to the productivity of NERSC and the NERSC users

  15. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Vapor Profiling During WVIOP#3 and AFWEX2000 Using Ground-Based Differential Absorption Lidar Boesenberg, J. (a), Linne, H. (a), Jansen, F. (a), Ertel, K. (a), Lammert, A. (a), and Wilkerson, T. (b), Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (a), Utah State Univerity (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system of the MPI participated in both the WVIOP#3 and AFWEX2000 experiments. It was operated on 11 days

  16. Scientists use plasma shaping to control turbulence in stellarators |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Scientists use plasma shaping to control turbulence in stellarators By John Greenwald October 21, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Magnetic field strength in the turbulence-optimized MPX stellarator design with regions of the highest strength shown in yellow. The MPX design is named for coauthors Harry Mynick and Neil Pomphrey of PPPL and Pavlos Xanthopoulos of the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics. Magnetic field strength in the

  17. SCUBA TECHNIQUES USED IN RISK ASSESSMENT OF POSSIBLE NUCLEAR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SCUBA TECHNIQUES USED IN RISK ASSESSMENT OF POSSIBLE NUCLEAR LEAKAGE AROUND AMCHITKA ISLAND, ALASKA Stephen Jewett, Max Hoberg, Heloise Chenelot, Shawn Harper Institute of Marine Science, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7220 Joanna Burger Division of Life Sciences, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), 604 Allison Road, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8082

  18. Distributed PV Interconnection Screening Procedures and Online Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Screening Procedures and Online Tools Page 1 of 9 Kristen Ardani, Joel Dickinson, Max Berger, David Crowell, Jeff Dickinson, Kelly Webster Page 1 of 9 [Speaker: Kristen Ardani] Cover Slide: Thank you everyone for joining us today for the DG Interconnection Collaborative. My name is Kristen Ardani,I'm an analyst here at NREL and the lead facilitator of the DGIC. We are fortunate today to have speakers Joel Dickinson of Salt River Project. We are going to discuss distributed PV interconnection

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Hybrid Electric Vehicles Performance and Testing Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. This page provides data on the hybrid electric versions of the Volkswagen Jetta, Ford C-Max, Chevrolet Malibu, Honda Civic, Hyundai Sonata, Honda CRZ, Honda Civic with Advanced Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery, Mercedes Benz, Toyota Prius Gen III, Ford Fusion, Honda Insight and Honda CR-Z.

  20. Measurement and control of the carrier-envelope phase of laser pulses |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Measurement and control of the carrier-envelope phase of laser pulses Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Günter Steinmeyer, Max Born Institute Program Description Throughout the early laser days, the relative phase between the envelope of a laser pulse and the underlying carrier wave remained a mysterious parameter. Access to this parameter was only established in the early 2000s with optical

  1. Safety analysis report: packages. GPHS shipping package supplement 2 to the PISA shipping package (packaging of fissile and other radioactive materials). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chalfant, G. G.

    1981-06-01

    Safety Analysis Report DPST-78-124-1 is amended to permit shipment of 6 General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) capsules (max.). Each capsule contains an average of 2330 curies of /sup 238/Pu, and each pair of capsules is contained in a welded stainless steel primary containment vessel, all of which are doubly contained in a flanged secondary containment vessel. This is in addition to the forms discussed in DPST-78-124-1 and Supplement 1.

  2. Poster Presentations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Poster Presentations Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home 2011 Accelerator Detector RD PI Meeting files Poster Presentations Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page High Stability LINACs (Yu) .pdf file (284KB) Coherent LS @ MIT (Graves) .pdf file (1.2MB) XLD-2011 Workshops (Brock) .pdf file (2.6MB) Status of MAX IV (Ericksson) .pdf file (3.0MB) Multi

  3. Limitations of the planning organ at risk volume (PRV) concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stroom, Joep C. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: j.stroom@nki.nl; Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: Previously, we determined a planning target volume (PTV) margin recipe for geometrical errors in radiotherapy equal to M{sub T} = 2{sigma} + 0.7{sigma}, with {sigma} and {sigma} standard deviations describing systematic and random errors, respectively. In this paper, we investigated margins for organs at risk (OAR), yielding the so-called planning organ at risk volume (PRV). Methods and Materials: For critical organs with a maximum dose (D{sub max}) constraint, we calculated margins such that D{sub max} in the PRV is equal to the motion averaged D{sub max} in the (moving) clinical target volume (CTV). We studied margins for the spinal cord in 10 head-and-neck cases and 10 lung cases, each with two different clinical plans. For critical organs with a dose-volume constraint, we also investigated whether a margin recipe was feasible. Results: For the 20 spinal cords considered, the average margin recipe found was: M{sub R} = 1.6{sigma} + 0.2{sigma} with variations for systematic and random errors of 1.2{sigma} to 1.8{sigma} and -0.2{sigma} to 0.6{sigma}, respectively. The variations were due to differences in shape and position of the dose distributions with respect to the cords. The recipe also depended significantly on the volume definition of D{sub max}. For critical organs with a dose-volume constraint, the PRV concept appears even less useful because a margin around, e.g., the rectum changes the volume in such a manner that dose-volume constraints stop making sense. Conclusion: The concept of PRV for planning of radiotherapy is of limited use. Therefore, alternative ways should be developed to include geometric uncertainties of OARs in radiotherapy planning.

  4. Microsoft Word - S07834_2011 Ann Rpt_ag comment revs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Supplementary Time-Trend Sparkline Plots This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico January 2012 Doc. No. S07834 Page A-1 Legend In these sparkline diagrams, red markers denote maximum (max) concentrations and green markers denote minima (min); black markers denote the most recent (current) March 2011 measurement. The x-axis is hidden but corresponds to the Feb-00 to Mar-11 date range noted above each plot. Vertical (y-) axis

  5. Advanced Lidars for ARM: What Would We Get?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMWG Breakout Session 2009 ARM Science Team Meeting Advanced Lidars for ARM: What Would We Get? Dave Turner, Ed Eloranta University of Wisconsin - Madison CMWG Breakout Session 2009 ARM Science Team Meeting What is an "Advanced Lidar?" (1) * Ceilometer - Max range ~7km, unpolarized, uncalibrated * Micropulse lidar (MPL) - Sensitive to clouds & aerosols throughout troposphere - Small telescope, rep rate is 1.5 kHz, microjoules of power - Loses sensitivity to cirrus in upper trop

  6. Secrets of the Motor That Drives Archaea Revealed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secrets of the Motor That Drives Archaea Revealed Secrets of the Motor That Drives Archaea Revealed Print Thursday, 14 February 2013 00:00 An international team led by John Tainer of the Life Sciences Division and Sonja-Verena Albers of the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology has solved the protein structure of the archaellum, the motor that propels motile species of Archaea (microorganisms), life's third domain. The Albers lab zeroed in on the crucial protein with genetics, and

  7. World War II | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    World War II Keeping the "Spirit of '45 Alive" in Kansas City National Security Campus employees commemorated the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II by sharing stories of their loved ones, viewing photographs and documents with Truman Library historians and listening to WWII veteran Max DeWeese reminisce about his experience in the war. The August

  8. Ultra high energy cosmic rays: implications of Auger data for source spectra and chemical composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aloisio, R.; Blasi, P.

    2014-10-01

    We use a kinetic-equation approach to describe the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic ray protons and nuclei and calculate the expected spectra and mass composition at the Earth for different assumptions on the source injection spectra and chemical abundances. When compared with the spectrum, the elongation rate X{sub max}(E) and dispersion ?(X{sub max}) as observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory, several important consequences can be drawn: a) the injection spectra of nuclei must be very hard, ?E{sup -?} with ??1- 1.6; b) the maximum energy of nuclei of charge Z in the sources must be ?5Zנ10{sup 18} eV, thereby not requiring acceleration to extremely high energies; c) the fit to the Auger spectrum can be obtained only at the price of adding an ad hoc light extragalactic component with a steep injection spectrum ?E{sup -2.7}). In this sense, at the ankle E{sub A}?5נ10{sup 18} eV) all the components are of extragalactic origin, thereby suggesting that the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays occurs below the ankle. Interestingly, the additional light extragalactic component postulated above compares well, in terms of spectrum and normalization, with the one recently measured by KASCADE-Grande.

  9. Solvent Hold Tank Sample Results for MCU-15-556-557-558. March 2015 Monthly Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2015-05-04

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received one set of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-15-556, MCU-15-557, and MCU-15-558), pulled on 03/16/2015 for analysis. The samples were combined and analyzed for composition. Analysis of the composite sample MCU-15-556-557-558 indicated a low concentration (~ 78 % of nominal) of the suppressor (TiDG) and concentrations of the extractant (MaxCalix), and of the modifier (CS-7SB) in the solvent that were slightly lower than nominal. This analysis confirms the addition of TiDG, MaxCalix, and modifier to the solvent in February 2015. Based on the current monthly sample, the levels of TiDG, MaxCalix, and modifier are sufficient for continuing operation without adding a trim at this time. No impurities above the 1000 ppm level were found in this solvent by the Semi-Volatile Organic Analysis (SVOA). However, the p-nut vials that delivered the samples contained small (1 mm) droplets of oxidized modifier and amides (as detected by the FTIR analysis). In addition, up to 21 microgram of mercury per gram of solvent (or 17.4 µg/mL) was detected in this sample. The laboratory will continue to monitor the quality of the solvent in particular for any new impurities or degradation of the solvent components.

  10. Solvent Hold Tank Sample Results for MCU-15-389-390 and MCU-15-439-440-441. February 2015 Monthly Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2015-05-04

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received two sets of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-15-389 and MCU-15-390 pulled on February 23, 2015 and MCU-15-439, MCU-15-440, and MCU-15-441 pulled on February 28, 2015) for analysis. The samples in each set were combined and analyzed for composition. Analysis of the composite samples MCU-15-389-390 and MCU-15-439-440- 441 indicated a low concentration (~ 92 to 93 % of nominal) of the suppressor (TiDG) and slightly below nominal concentrations of the extractant (MaxCalix), but nominal levels of the modifier (CS-7SB) and of the Isopar™ L. This analysis confirms the addition of TiDG, MaxCalix, and modifier to the solvent on February 22, 2015. Despite that the values are below the target component levels, the current levels of TiDG and MaxCalix are sufficient for continuing operation without adding a trim at this time. No impurities above the 1000 ppm level were found in this solvent. However, the p-nut vials that delivered the samples contained small (1 mm) droplets of oxidized modifier and amides. The laboratory will continue to monitor the quality of the solvent in particular for any new impurity or degradation of the solvent components.

  11. Fracture toughness results and preliminary analysis for International Cooperative Test Program on specimens containing surface cracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, W.G.; Elfer, N.C.; Hull, D.A.; Newman, J.C. Jr.; Munz, D.; Panontin, T.L.

    1997-12-31

    Specimens containing surface cracks were tested in either tension or bending to compare the stress intensity factor at failure with plane strain fracture toughness (K{sub Ic}) in an International Cooperative Test Program. The material was heat treated to {sigma}{sub ys} = 1 587 MPa and K{sub Ic} = 54 MPa m{sub 1/2}. Because substantial stable crack growth occurred for some specimens, the test plan was modified to include detecting the onset of crack growth. It is shown that P{sub max} and the original fatigue precrack size cannot be employed to calculate K{sub max} for comparison with K{sub Ic} when significant stable crack growth occurs. However, using P{sub init} (load at which stable crack growth is initiated) and the original fatigue precrack size to calculate K{sub max} or K{sub {phi}=30{degree}} provides a very useful comparison with K{sub Ic}. The influence of variations in fatigue precrack configuration on test results are also discussed.

  12. Solvent Hold Tank Sample Results For MCU-15-750-751-752-: June Monthly Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2015-10-07

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received one set of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-15-750, MCU-15-751, and MCU-15-752), pulled on 06/22/2015 for analysis. The samples were combined and analyzed for composition. Analysis of the composite sample MCU-15-750-751-752 indicated a low concentration (~ 49 % of nominal) of the suppressor (TiDG) and slightly lower than nominal concentrations of the extractant (MaxCalix), and of the modifier (Cs-7SB) in the solvent. This analysis confirms the addition of TiDG, MaxCalix, and modifier to the solvent in February 2015. Based on the current monthly sample, the levels of TiDG, MaxCalix, and modifier are sufficient for continuing operation without adding a trim at this time but it is recommended that an addition of TiDG, modifier and Isopar™L should be made in the near future. No impurities above the 1000 ppm level were found in this solvent by the Semi-Volatile Organic Analysis (SVOA). No impurities were observed in the Hydrogen Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HNMR). In addition, up to 13.9 micrograms of mercury per gram of solvent (or 11.5 µg/mL) was detected in this sample. The laboratory will continue to monitor the quality of the solvent in particular for any new impurities or degradation of the solvent components.

  13. Neointimal Hyperplasia after Silverhawk Atherectomy versus Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty (PTA) in Femoropopliteal Stent Reobstructions: A Controlled, Randomized Pilot Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodmann, Marianne Rief, Peter; Froehlich, Harald; Dorr, Andreas; Gary, Thomas; Eller, Philipp; Hafner, Franz; Deutschmann, Hannes; Seinost, Gerald; Pilger, Ernst

    2013-02-15

    Due to intimal hyperplasia instent reobstruction in the femoropopliteal arterial segment is still an unsolved problem. Different techniques have been discussed in case of reintervention to guarantee longlasting patency rate. We conducted a randomized, controlled, pilot trial comparing Silverhawk atherectomy with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in patients with a first instent reobstruction in the femoropopliteal arterial segment, to evaluate intima media thickness (IMT) within the treated segment, as a parameter of recurrence of intimal hyperplasia. In a total 19 patients were included: 9 patients in the atherectomy device and 10 patients in the PTA arm. IMT within the treated segment was statistically significantly elevated in all patients treated with the Silverhawk device versus the patients treated with PTA. The obvious differentiation in elevation of IMT in nonfavor for patients treated with the Silverhawk device started at month 2 (max IMT SH 0.178 mm vs. IMT PTA 0.1 mm, p = 0.001) with a spike at month 5 (max IMT SH 0.206 mm vs. IMT PTA 0.145 mm, p = 0.003) and a decline once again at month 6 (max IMT SH 0.177 mm vs. IMT PTA 0.121 mm, p = 0.02). The values for mean IMT performed the same way. Although Silverhawk atherectomy provides good results at first sight, in the midterm follow-up of treatment of first instent restenosis it did not perform better than PTA as it showed elevated reoccurrence of intimal media hyperplasia.

  14. Exact seismic velocities for VTI and HTI media and extendedThomsen Formulas for stronger anisotropies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2007-05-14

    I explore a different type of approximation to the exactanisotropic wave velocities as a function of incidence angle invertically transversely isotropic (VTI) media. This method extends theThomsen weak anisotropy approach to stronger anisotropy withoutsignificantly affecting the simplicity of the formulas. One importantimprovement is that the peak of the quasi-SV-wave speed vsv(theta) islocated at the correct incidence angle theta= theta max, rather thanalways being at the position theta = 45o, which universally holds forThomsen's approximation although max theta = 45o is actually nevercorrect for any VTI anisotropic medium. The magnitudes of all the wavespeeds are also more closely approximated for all values of the incidenceangle. Furthermore, the value of theta max (which is needed in the newformulas) can be deduced from the same data that are typically used inthe weak anisotropy data analysis. The two examples presented are basedon systems having vertical fractures. The first set of model fractureshas their axes of symmetry randomly oriented in the horizontal plane.Such a system is then isotropic in the horizontal plane and, therefore,exhibits vertical transverse isotropic (VTI) symmetry. The second set offractures also has axes of symmetry in the horizontal plane, but it isassumed these axes are aligned so that the system exhibits horizontaltransverse isotropic (HTI) symmetry. Both types of systems are easilytreated with the new wave speed formulation.

  15. Observed 1970-2005 cooling of summer daytime temperatures in coastal California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebassi, B.; Gonzalez, J.; Fabris, D.; Maurer, E.; Miller, N.; Milesi, C.; Bornstein, R.

    2009-05-15

    The study evaluated 1948-2004 summer (JJA) mean monthly air temperatures for two California air basins: SoCAB and SFBA. The study focuses on the more rapid post-1970 warming period, and its daily T{sub min} and T{sub max} values were used to produce average monthly values and spatial distributions of trends for each air basins. Additional analyses included T{sub D} values at two NWS sites, SSTs, NCEP reanalysis sea-level pressures, and GCM T{sub ave}-values. Results for all California COOP sites together showed increased JJA T{sub ave}-values; asymmetric warming, as T{sub min}-values increase faster than T{sub max}-values; and thus decreased DTR values. The spatial distribution of observed SoCAB and SFBA T{sub max} values exhibited a complex pattern, with cooling in low-elevation coastal-areas open to marine air penetration and warming at inland areas. Results also showed that decreased DTR values in the valleys arose from small increases at 'inland' sites combined with large decreases at 'coastal' sites. Previous studies suggest that cooling JJA T{sub max}-values in coastal California were due to increased irrigation, coastal upwelling, or cloud cover, while the current hypothesis is that they arises from GHG-induced global-warming of 'inland' areas, which results in increased sea breeze flow activity. Sea level pressure trends showed increases in the oceanic Pacific High and decreases in the central-California Thermal Low. The corresponding gradient thus showed a trend of 0.02 hPa 100-km{sup -1} decade{sup -1}, supportive of the hypothesis of increased sea breeze activity. Trends in T{sub D} values showed a larger value at coastal SFO than at inland SEC, which indicative of increased sea breeze activity; calculated SST trends (0.15 C decade{sup -1}) could also have increase T{sub D}-values. GCM model Tave-values showed warming that decreases from 0.13 C decade{sup -1} at inland California to 0.08 C decade{sup -1} at coastal areas. Significant societal impacts may result from this observed 'reverse-reaction' to GHG-warming, i.e., the decreased JJA T{sub max}-values in coastal areas. Possible beneficial effects include decreased: maximum O{sub 3} levels, human thermal-stress, and energy requirements for cooling.

  16. Field-in-field plan does not improve the dosimetric outcome compared with the wedged beams plan for breast cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Li-Min; Meng, Fan-Yun; Yang, Tsung-Han; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate and compare the dosimetry of field-in-field (FIF) and wedged beams (WB) techniques for patients with breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiotherapy after conservative surgery. A total of 89 patients with breast cancer participated in this study. Each patient received a computed tomographybased treatment plan with opposed tangential fields. Two planning techniques (FIF and WB) were generated for each patient by using the Pinnacle treatment-planning system. Three indices, the homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), and uniformity index (UI), as well as maximum dose (D{sub max}), median dose (D{sub 50}), number of portals, monitor unit (MU), and lung volume at 20 Gy (lung{sub 20}) were used for comparison. The mean values tested using a t-test indicated that the WB technique had a significantly lower HI (p < 0.0001), a significantly higher CI (p < 0.0001), and a significantly higher D{sub 50} (p = 0.0002) than did the FIF technique. The FIF technique had a significantly higher D{sub max} compared with the WB technique, but lung{sub 20} did not exhibit a significant difference. By contrast, the FIF technique had a significantly higher UI and a significantly lower MU compared with the WB technique, but a significantly higher number of portals were found in the FIF technique. The FIF technique did not demonstrate superior dosimetric results. The WB technique had a significantly lower HI, higher CI, lower D{sub max}, and lower number of portals; but the FIF technique had a significantly higher UI and lower MU.

  17. COMPLEXITY&APPROXIMABILITY OF QUANTIFIED&STOCHASTIC CONSTRAINT SATISFACTION PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, H. B.; Marathe, M. V.; Stearns, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    Let D be an arbitrary (not necessarily finite) nonempty set, let C be a finite set of constant symbols denoting arbitrary elements of D, and let S and T be an arbitrary finite set of finite-arity relations on D. We denote the problem of determining the satisfiability of finite conjunctions of relations in S applied to variables (to variables and symbols in C) by SAT(S) (by SATc(S).) Here, we study simultaneously the complexity of decision, counting, maximization and approximate maximization problems, for unquantified, quantified and stochastically quantified formulas. We present simple yet general techniques to characterize simultaneously, the complexity or efficient approximability of a number of versions/variants of the problems SAT(S), Q-SAT(S), S-SAT(S),MAX-Q-SAT(S) etc., for many different such D,C ,S, T. These versions/variants include decision, counting, maximization and approximate maximization problems, for unquantified, quantified and stochastically quantified formulas. Our unified approach is based on the following two basic concepts: (i) strongly-local replacements/reductions and (ii) relational/algebraic represent ability. Some of the results extend the earlier results in [Pa85,LMP99,CF+93,CF+94O]u r techniques and results reported here also provide significant steps towards obtaining dichotomy theorems, for a number of the problems above, including the problems MAX-&-SAT( S), and MAX-S-SAT(S). The discovery of such dichotomy theorems, for unquantified formulas, has received significant recent attention in the literature [CF+93,CF+94,Cr95,KSW97

  18. COMPLEXITY & APPROXIMABILITY OF QUANTIFIED & STOCHASTIC CONSTRAINT SATISFACTION PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. B. HUNT; M. V. MARATHE; R. E. STEARNS

    2001-06-01

    Let D be an arbitrary (not necessarily finite) nonempty set, let C be a finite set of constant symbols denoting arbitrary elements of D, and let S and T be an arbitrary finite set of finite-arity relations on D. We denote the problem of determining the satisfiability of finite conjunctions of relations in S applied to variables (to variables and symbols in C) by SAT(S) (by SATc(S).) Here, we study simultaneously the complexity of decision, counting, maximization and approximate maximization problems, for unquantified, quantified and stochastically quantified formulas. We present simple yet general techniques to characterize simultaneously, the complexity or efficient approximability of a number of versions/variants of the problems SAT(S), Q-SAT(S), S-SAT(S),MAX-Q-SAT(S) etc., for many different such D,C,S,T. These versions/variants include decision, counting, maximization and approximate maximization problems, for unquantified, quantified and stochastically quantified formulas. Our unified approach is based on the following two basic concepts: (i) strongly-local replacements/reductions and (ii) relational/algebraic representability. Some of the results extend the earlier results in [Pa85,LMP99,CF+93,CF+94] Our techniques and results reported here also provide significant steps towards obtaining dichotomy theorems, for a number of the problems above, including the problems MAX-Q-SAT(S), and MAX-S-SAT(S). The discovery of such dichotomy theorems, for unquantified formulas, has received significant recent attention in the literature [CF+93, CF+94, Cr95, KSW97]. Keywords: NP-hardness; Approximation Algorithms; PSPACE-hardness; Quantified and Stochastic Constraint Satisfaction Problems.

  19. Electron-Cloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL Main Injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, Miguel .A.

    2008-08-25

    We present a summary on ongoing simulation results for the electron-cloud (EC) buildup in the context of the proposed FNAL Main Injector (MI) intensity upgrade effort [1]. Most of the results presented here are for the field-free region at the location of the retarding field analyzer (RFA) electron detector [2-4]. The primary input variable we exercise is the peak secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max}, which we let vary in the range 1.2 {le} {delta}{sub max} {le} 1.7. By combining our simulated results for the electron flux at the vacuum chamber wall with the corresponding RFA measurements we infer that 1.25 {approx}< {delta}{sub max} {approx}< 1.35 at this location. From this piece of information we estimate features of the EC distribution for various fill patterns, including the average electron number density n{sub e}. We then compare the behavior of the EC for a hypothetical RF frequency f{sub RF} = 212 MHz with the current 53 MHz for a given total beam population N{sub tot}. The density n{sub e} goes through a clear threshold as a function of N{sub tot} in a field-free region. As expected, the higher frequency leads to a weaker EC effect: the threshold in N{sub tot} is a factor {approx} 2 higher for f{sub RF} = 212 MHz than for 53 MHz, and ne is correspondingly lower by a factor {approx} 2 when N{sub tot} is above threshold. We briefly describe further work that needs to be carried out, sensitivities in the calculation, and puzzles in the results that remain to be addressed.

  20. Solvent Hold Tank Sample Results For MCU-15-710-711-712: June 2015 Monthly Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2015-10-07

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received one set of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-15-710, MCU-15-711, and MCU-15-712), pulled on 06/15/2015 for analysis. The samples were combined and analyzed for composition. Analysis of the composite sample MCU-15-710-711-712 indicated a low concentration (~ 55 % of nominal) of the suppressor (TiDG) and concentrations of the extractant (MaxCalix), and of the modifier (Cs-7SB) in the solvent that were slightly lower than nominal. This analysis confirms the addition of TiDG, MaxCalix, and modifier (92 % of nominal) to the solvent in February 2015. Based on the current monthly sample, the levels of TiDG, MaxCalix, and modifier were sufficient when this solvent sample was collected from MCU. A higher cesium concentration (9.3 E6 dpm/mL) was observed in this sample relative to recent samples. In the past, this level of cesium appeared to correlate with upsets in the MCU operation. It is not known at this time the reason for the higher cesium level in this solvent. No impurities above the 1000 ppm level were found in this solvent by the Semi-Volatile Organic Analysis (SVOA). In addition, the sample contains up to 10.4 micrograms of mercury per gram of solvent (or 8.7 µg/mL). A relatively large cesium concentration (9.3 E 6 dpm/mL) was measured in this solvent and it may indicate poor cesium stripping. The laboratory will continue to monitor the quality of the solvent in particular for any new impurities or degradation of the solvent components.

  1. Sprague-Dawley rats display sex-linked differences in the pharmacokinetics of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and its metabolite 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fonsart, Julien, E-mail: julien.fonsart@lrb.aphp.f [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France); CNRS, UMR 7157, Paris F-75006 (France); INSERM, U705, Paris F-75006 (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Laboratoire de Toxicologie Biologique, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris F-75010 (France); Menet, Marie-Claude [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Plateau Spectrometrie de Masse (IFR 71), Service de Chimie Analytique, Paris F-75006 (France); Debray, Marcel; Hirt, Deborah; Noble, Florence; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Decleves, Xavier [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France); CNRS, UMR 7157, Paris F-75006 (France); INSERM, U705, Paris F-75006 (France)

    2009-12-15

    The use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) has increased in recent years; it can lead to life-threatening hyperthermia and serotonin syndrome. Human and rodent males appear to be more sensitive to acute toxicity than are females. MDMA is metabolized to five main metabolites by the enzymes CYP1A2, CYP2D and COMT. Little is presently known about sex-dependent differences in the pharmacokinetics of MDMA and its metabolites. We therefore analyzed MDMA disposition in male and female rats by measuring the plasma and urine concentrations of MDMA and its metabolites using a validated LC-MS method. MDA AUC{sub last} and C{sub max} were 1.6- to 1.7-fold higher in males than in females given MDMA (5 mg/kg sc), while HMMA C{sub max} and AUC{sub last} were 3.2- and 3.5-fold higher, respectively. MDMA renal clearance was 1.26-fold higher in males, and that of MDA was 2.2-fold higher. MDMA AUC{sub last} and t{sub 1/2} were 50% higher in females given MDMA (1 mg/kg iv). MDA C{sub max} and AUC{sub last} were 75-82% higher in males, with a 2.8-fold higher metabolic index. Finally, the AUC{sub last} of MDA was 0.73-fold lower in males given 1 mg/kg iv MDA. The volumes of distribution of MDMA and MDA at steady-state were similar in the two sexes. These data strongly suggest that differences in the N-demethylation of MDMA to MDA are major influences on the MDMA and MDA pharmacokinetics in male and female rats. Hence, males are exposed to significantly more toxic MDA, which could explain previously reported sexual dysmorphism in the acute effects and toxicity of MDMA in rats.

  2. Drug safety evaluation through biomarker analysis-A toxicity study in the cynomolgus monkey using an antibody-cytotoxic conjugate against ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, Frank Y. Tengstrand, Elizabeth; Lee, J.-W.; Li, Lily Y.; Silverman, Lee; Riordan, Bill; Miwa, Gerald; Milton, Mark; Alden, Carl; Lee, Frank

    2007-10-01

    Antibody-cytotoxin conjugates are complex novel therapeutic agents whose toxicological properties are not presently well understood. The objective of this study was to identify serum biomarkers that correlate with MLN8866 (an Antibody-Cytotoxic Conjugate, mAb8866-CT) pathological events in monkeys and to predict the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) level using biomarkers. Cynomolgus monkeys were administered a single dose MLN8666 (5, 15 or 30 mg/kg) by intravenous infusion and evaluated over a 7-day period. Exposure levels were determined by quantifying MLN8866 levels (C{sub max} and AUC{sub 0-96h}) in serum. The increase in MLN8866 C{sub max} and AUC{sub 0-96h} was approximately dose proportional. Two biomarkers in serum (m/z 316 and m/z 368) were identified to be correlated with MLN8866 toxicological outcomes. The predicted MTD, 11.4 mg/kg, was within the MTD range set by pathology results (5-15 mg/kg). Administration of MLN8866 at 15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg dose levels resulted in changes in hematology parameters associated with impaired hematopoiesis and bone marrow toxicity. The projected MLN8866 MTD exposure level was integrated with toxicokinetic analysis and showed C{sub max} = 236 {mu}g/mL and AUC{sub 0-96h} = 7246 h mg/mL. The safety of three different MLN8866 dosing regimens with three dosing schedules was explored with pharmacokinetic modeling.

  3. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bethke, Siegfried; Hoang, Andre H.; Kluth, Stefan; Schieck, Jochen; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  4. Microsoft Word - ATTACHMENT A Suppl 5.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ATTACHMENT A: Modeling in Support of Additional Two-Unit Operating Configurations Unit 1 & Unit 2 Operation - SO2 Table Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME Compliance Based on Highest, Second-Highest Short-term and Highest Annual Concentrations Units 1 & 2 on 24 hrs/day @ Max load SO2 = 0.31 lb/MBtu for both units. AERMOD- PRIME Monitored Background AERMOD-PRIME + Background NAAQS Distance Direction Ground Elevation Flagpole Elevation X (m) Y

  5. HIGH-VELOCITY LINE FORMING REGIONS IN THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2009ig (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect VELOCITY LINE FORMING REGIONS IN THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2009ig Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HIGH-VELOCITY LINE FORMING REGIONS IN THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2009ig We report measurements and analysis of high-velocity (HVF) (>20,000 km s{sup -1}) and photospheric absorption features in a series of spectra of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2009ig obtained between -14 days and +13 days with respect to the time of maximum B-band luminosity (B-max). We identify

  6. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 2011 Hopper batch walltime increase and new xfer queue June 29, 2011 by Helen He There are two batch queue configuration changes on Hopper: 1) User jobs using fewer than 4,096 nodes can now run for up to 36 hrs. In particular, the max wall time limits for reg_small (1-683 nodes), reg_med (684-2,048 nodes), and reg_big (2,049-4,096 nodes) jobs have been increased from 24 to 36 hrs. 2) A new "xfer" queue has been introduced. Users can use the xfer job to pre-stage input files for a

  7. ISC2005v2.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputing: The Top Three Breakthroughs of the Last 20 Years and the Top Three Challenges for the Next 20 Years Horst Simon Associate Laboratory Director Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ISC 2005 Heidelberg June 22, 2005 Signpost System 1985 Cray-2 * 244 MHz (4.1 nsec) * 4 processors * 1.95 Gflop/s peak * 2 GB memory (256 MW) * 1.2 Gflop/s LINPACK R_max * 1.6 m 2 floor space * 0.2 MW power Signpost System in 2005 IBM BG/L @ LLNL * 700 MHz (x 2.86) * 65,536 nodes (x 16,384) * 180 (360)

  8. Laser Ionized Preformed Plasma at FACET (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Laser Ionized Preformed Plasma at FACET Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laser Ionized Preformed Plasma at FACET Authors: Li, S.Z. ; /SLAC ; Adli, E. ; /SLAC /U. Oslo ; Clarke, C.I. ; Corde, S. ; Edstrom, S.A. ; Fisher, A.S. ; Frederico, J. ; Frisch, J.C. ; Gessner, S. ; Gilevich, S. ; Hering, P. ; Hogan, M.J. ; Jobe, R.K. ; Litos, M. ; May, J.E. ; Walz, D.R. ; Yakimenko ; /SLAC more »; Clayton, C.E. ; Joshi, C. ; Marsh, K.A. ; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N. ; /UCLA /Munich, Max

  9. MPP-2005-1 LBNL-56798

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MPP-2005-1 LBNL-56798 hep-ph/0502134 Perturbative corrections to the determination of V ub from the P + spectrum in B → X u ¯ ν Andre H. Hoang, 1 Zoltan Ligeti, 2 and Michael Luke 3 1 Max-Planck-Institut f¨ ur Physik, Werner-Heisenberg-Institut, F¨ ohringer Ring 6, 80805 M¨ unchen, Germany 2 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 3 Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S

  10. Tidal Flow Turbulence Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Northwest)Na+onal)Marine) Renewable)Energy)Center) Applied)Physics)Lab,)) University)of)Washington) Field)measurements)of) turbulence)at)+dal)energy)sites) Jim)Thomson)(UW)) Brian)Polagye)(UW),)Marshall)Richmond)(PNNL),)) Vibhav)Durgesh)(PNNL),)Eric)Nelson)(NREL),)Levi)Kilcher)(NREL)) Northwest)Na+onal)Marine) Renewable)Energy)Center) Applied)Physics)Lab,)) University)of)Washington) What)do)we)want)to)know?) * Turbulence)intensity,))) * Turbulence)spectra,)TKE(f) * Extreme)values,)u max quire

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 2 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Gunzburger, Max D" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Select page number Go to page: 1 of 2 1 » Next » Everything11 Electronic Full Text3 Citations8 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject adaptive sparse grid (1) adaptive sparse grids (1) best n-term

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 2 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Max, Nelson" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Select page number Go to page: 1 of 2 1 » Next » Everything14 Electronic Full Text4 Citations7 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software3 Filter Results Filter by Subject applied life sciences (7) carcinogens (4) neoplasms (4) nickel (4) chromium (3)

  13. Wave-driven

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    driven dynamo action in spherical magnetohydrodynamic systems K. Reuter, 1 F. Jenko, 1 A. Tilgner, 2 and C. B. Forest 3 1 Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany 2 Institute of Geophysics, University of Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen, Germany 3 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA ͑Received 22 September 2009; published 11 November

  14. Search for the giant pairing vibration through (p,t) reactions around 50 and 60 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mouginot, B.; Khan, E.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Ramus, A.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Stefan, I.; Neveling, R.; Buthelezi, E. Z.; Foertsch, S. V.; Smit, F. D.; Fujita, H.; Usman, I.; Mabiala, J.; Mira, J. P.; Swartz, J. A.; Papka, P.

    2011-03-15

    The existence of the giant pairing vibration (GPV) in {sup 120}Sn and {sup 208}Pb was investigated using the (p,t) reaction at incident proton energies of 50 MeV and 60 MeV for the scattering angles 0 deg. and 7 deg. No clear signature for the GPV was found, providing an upper limit for the cross section of {sigma}{sub max} = 0.2 mb. Theoretical interpretations for the low cross section of the GPV are discussed.

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 2 of 2 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Gunzburger, Max D" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Select page number Go to page: 2 of 2 2 » Next » Everything11 Electronic Full Text3 Citations8 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject adaptive sparse grid (1) adaptive sparse grids (1) best n-term

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 2 of 2 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Max, Nelson" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Select page number Go to page: 2 of 2 2 » Next » Everything14 Electronic Full Text4 Citations7 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software3 Filter Results Filter by Subject applied life sciences (7) carcinogens (4) neoplasms (4) nickel (4) chromium (3)

  17. Acquisition Guide, Chapters 42.15, Contractor Performance Information and 42.16 Reporting Other Contractor Information into Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The subject Acquisition Guide Chapters have been updated to incorporate guidance from the Office of Federal Procurement Policy's (OFPP) March 6, 2013 memorandum Improving the Collection and Use of Information about Contractor Performance and Integrity. A summary of some the revisions for both chapters includes DOE's annual reporting performance targets, MAX site quarterly reporting by the DOE Agency Coordinator, the requirement for 100% reporting compliance at all levels from the local office through the Headquarters, describing monitoring methods integrity information for FAPIIS, and updating list of the available past performance and FAPIIS training opportunities.

  18. Double Precision Differential/Algebraic Sensitivity Analysis Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-06-02

    DDASAC solves nonlinear initial-value problems involving stiff implicit systems of ordinary differential and algebraic equations. Purely algebraic nonlinear systems can also be solved, given an initial guess within the region of attraction of a solution. Options include automatic reconciliation of inconsistent initial states and derivatives, automatic initial step selection, direct concurrent parametric sensitivity analysis, and stopping at a prescribed value of any user-defined functional of the current solution vector. Local error control (in the max-normmore » or the 2-norm) is provided for the state vector and can include the sensitivities on request.« less

  19. Beamline 12.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.1 Beamline 12.3.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 09:33 Structurally Integrated Biology for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Frequency range 2.5-0.73 Angstrom wavelength Beam size 100 µm round beam default 10 µm and 30 µm collimators available for small samples with flux reduced to 1% and 12%, respectively. 120 µm x 120 µm Gaussian uncollimated

  20. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8.2.2 Beamline 8.2.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:54 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot

  1. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  2. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  3. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  4. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  5. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  6. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  7. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Beamline 8.2.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:54 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size

  8. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  9. No Slide Title

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    comparison of water uptake by aerosols using two thermodynamic models Li Xu 1 (lixum@umich.edu), Joyce E. Penner 1 and Swen Metzger 2 1 Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan 2 Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany Initial composition TNH 3 / TH 2 SO4 mole ratio TNO 3 / TH 2 SO4 mole ratio TNaCl /TH 2 SO4 mole ratio TK/ TH 2 SO4 mole ratio TCa/ TH 2 SO4 mole ratio TMg/ TH 2 SO4 mole ratio Sulfate condition Case No. Sulfate Rich 1 0.5 1.0 0 0 0

  10. June

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June /newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg June We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. A hand-held calculator that was X-rayed by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers using the MiniMAX camera, a lightweight, portable X-ray machine that could revolution imaging of closed containers. Los Alamos/Tribogenics create highly portable imaging system A unique,

  11. Keeping the Ions Close: A New Activity | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Administration Keeping the "Spirit of '45 Alive" in Kansas City Friday, August 28, 2015 - 9:25am National Security Campus employees commemorated the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II by sharing stories of their loved ones, viewing photographs and documents with Truman Library historians and listening to WWII veteran Max DeWeese reminisce about his experience in the war. NNSA Blog The August 13 event was inspired by the National Spirit of '45 Day, a way to honor

  12. Events - Seminars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Special Joint EFRC and Bioenergy Center Seminar 5/20/14 20 May 2014 "The Structure of Nature's Water Splitting Catalyst Prior to O-O Bond Formation: Water Binding and Water Splitting in Photosynthesis" Nicholas Cox Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Mülheim/Ruhr, Germany WHEN: May 20, 2014 at 11:00 AM WHERE: Physical Sci C-101 Abstract EPR spectroscopy is a versatile technique for the study of transition metal cofactors, providing chemical information on the

  13. Investigation of magnetic spin glass property in La{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} sample using non-linear AC susceptibility measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Punith V. Manju, M. R. Dayal, Vijaylakshmi

    2014-04-24

    We present a comprehensive study on origin of Spin Glass (SG) property in polycrystalline La{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} perovskite oxide using linear and higher order ac susceptibility (χ) measurements. The third order harmonic susceptibility (χ{sub 3}) vs. temperature (K) with varying magnetic fields from 0.95 to 9.45 Oe and the divergence in their χ{sub 3} (max) allows us to infer the SG behavior occurring in the sample possibly due to co-operative freezing of the spins.

  14. Role

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subdominant stable modes in plasma microturbulence a) D. R. Hatch, 1,b) P. W. Terry, 1 F. Jenko, 2 F. Merz, 2 M. J. Pueschel, 2 W. M. Nevins, 3 and E. Wang 3 1 University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA 2 Max-Planck-Institut fu ¨r Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching, Germany 3 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA (Received 22 November 2010; accepted 19 January 2011; published online 26 April 2011) In gyrokinetic simulations,

  15. "Group IV Nanomembranes, Nanoribbons, and Quantum Dots: Processing, Characterization, and Novel Devices"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    liu, feng

    2014-08-28

    This theoretical project has been carried out in close interaction with the experimental project at UW-Madison under the same title led by PI Max Lagally and co-PI Mark Eriksson. Extensive computational studies have been performed to address a broad range of topics from atomic structure, stability, mechanical property, to electronic structure, optoelectronic and transport properties of various nanoarchitectures in the context of Si and other solid nanomembranes. These have been done by using combinations of different theoretical and computational approaches, ranging from first-principles calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to finite-element (FE) analyses and continuum modeling.

  16. Ga, Ca, and 3d transition element (Cr through Zn) partitioning among spinel-lherzolite phases from the Lanzo massif, Italy: Analytical results and crystal chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wogelius, R.A.; Fraser, D.G.

    1994-06-01

    Ultramafic rocks exposed in Lanzo massif, Italy is a record of mantle geochemistry, melting, sub-solidus re-equilibration. Plagioclase(+ spinel)-lherzolite samples were analyzed by Scanning Proton Microscopy, other techniques. Previous work postulated partial melting events and a two-stage sub-solidus cooling history; this paper notes Ga enrichment on spinel-clinopyroxene grain boundaries, high Ga and transition element content of spinel, and pyroxene zonation in Ca and Al. Trace element levels in olivine and orthopyroxene are also presented. Zoning trends are interpreted as due to diffusion during cooling. Olivine-clinopyroxene Cr and Ca exchange as well as clinopyroxene and spinel zonation trends indicate that the massif experienced at least two sub-solidus cooling episodes, one at 20 kbar to 1000 C and one at 8 kbar <750C. Ga levels in cores of Lanzo high-Cr spinels are high (82-66 ppM) relative to other mantle spinels (66-40 ppM), indicating enrichment. Ga content of ultramafic spinels apparently increases with Cr content; this may be due to: increased Ga solubility stemming from crystal chemical effects and/or higher Ga activities in associated silicate melts. Thus, during melting, high-Cr residual spinel may tend to buffer solid-phase Ga level. These spinels are not only rich in Ga and Cr (max 26.37 el. wt %), but also in Fe (max 21.07 el. wt %), Mn (max 3400 ppM), and Zn (max 2430 ppM). These enrichments are again due to melt extraction and partitioning into spinel structure. Low Ni (min 1050 ppM) levels are due to unsuccessful competition of Ni with Cr for octahedral structural sites caused by crystal field. Comparisons of change in partitioning vs Cr content among several 3d transition elements for spinels from Lanzo, other localities allow us to separate crystal field effects from bulk chemical effects and to show that in typical assemblages, inversion of olivine-spinel partition coefficient for Ni from <1 to >1 should occur at 11% el. wt. Cr in spinel.

  17. history | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    history Keeping the "Spirit of '45 Alive" in Kansas City National Security Campus employees commemorated the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II by sharing stories of their loved ones, viewing photographs and documents with Truman Library historians and listening to WWII veteran Max DeWeese reminisce about his experience in the war. The August... Y-12 has almost 500 visitors from 23 states tour site during Secret City Festival B&W Y-12 employee and tour guide Bill Wilburn,

  18. ARM - Campaign Instrument - cas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentscas Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Airborne Observations, Cloud Properties Campaigns 2005 MASE-MArine Stratus Experiment-Pt. Reyes, CA [ Download Data ] Off Site Campaign : various, including non-ARM sites, 2005.07.05 - 2005.07.27 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City [ Download Data ] Off Site Campaign :

  19. ARM - Campaign Instrument - cldaerosmicro

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentscldaerosmicro Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Cloud and Aerosol Microphysical Properties (CLDAEROSMICRO) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Airborne Observations, Cloud Properties Campaigns 2005 MASE-MArine Stratus Experiment-Pt. Reyes, CA [ Download Data ] Off Site Campaign : various, including non-ARM sites, 2005.07.05 - 2005.07.27 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City [ Download

  20. ARM - Campaign Instrument - hsrl-air

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentshsrl-air Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : NASA Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-AIR) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Airborne Observations, Cloud Properties Campaigns 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City [ Download Data ] Off Site Campaign : various, including non-ARM sites, 2006.03.03 - 2006.03.28 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Process Study (CHAPS) [ Download Data ]

  1. ARM - Campaign Instrument - ptr-ms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentsptr-ms Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) Instrument Categories Aerosols Campaigns 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City [ Download Data ] Off Site Campaign : various, including non-ARM sites, 2006.03.03 - 2006.03.28 Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiation Effects Study (CARES) - Surface Meteorological Sounding [ Download Data ] Off

  2. ARM - Campaign Instrument - tdma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentstdma Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) Instrument Categories Aerosols Campaigns 2005 MASE-MArine Stratus Experiment-Pt. Reyes, CA [ Download Data ] Off Site Campaign : various, including non-ARM sites, 2005.07.05 - 2005.07.27 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City [ Download Data ] Off Site Campaign : various, including non-ARM sites,

  3. A=17B (1982AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ01) (Not illustrated) 17B has been observed in the 4.8 GeV proton bombardment of uranium: it is particle stable and its ground state Jπ is probably 3/2- (1974BO05). Its atomic mass excess is calculated to be 44.37 MeV (transverse form of the mass equation): it is then stable with respect to decay into 15B + 2n by 0.73 MeV (1974TH01, 1975JE02). The Eβ-(max) for the decay to 17C would then be 23.3 MeV. See also (1977WA08) and (1981SE06

  4. A=17B (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (Not illustrated) 17B has been observed in the 4.8 GeV proton bombardment of uranium: it is particle stable and its ground state Jπ is probably 3/2- (1974BO05). Its atomic mass excess is estimated by (1985WA02) to be 44.01 ± 0.70 MeV. It is then stable with respect to decay into 15B + 2n by 1.10 MeV. Eβ-(max) for the decay to 17Cg.s. would then be 22.98 MeV. See also (1984MU27) and (1983ANZQ, 1985PO10

  5. Queues and Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Queues and Policies Queues and Policies Overview Jobs must be submitted to a valid submit queue. Upon submission the job is routed to the appropriate execution queue. Users can not directly access the execution queues. Submit Queue Execution Queue Nodes Available Cores Max Wallclock Relative Priority Run Limit Eligible Limit Charge Factor* interactive interactive 1-8 1-64 30 mins 1 2 1 1.5 debug debug 1-32 1-256 30 mins 2 2 1 1.5 regular reg_short 1-16 1-128 4 hrs 3 8 4 1.5 reg_small 1-16 1-128

  6. Beamline 12.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.1 Beamline 12.3.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 09:33 Structurally Integrated Biology for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Frequency range 2.5-0.73 Angstrom wavelength Beam size 100 µm round beam default 10 µm and 30 µm collimators available for small samples with flux reduced to 1% and 12%, respectively. 120 µm x 120 µm Gaussian uncollimated

  7. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  8. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Beamline 8.2.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:54 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size

  9. Dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste: Methane production modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fdez-Gueelfo, L.A.; Alvarez-Gallego, C.; Sales, D.; Romero Garcia, L.I.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methane generation may be modeled by means of modified product generation model of Romero Garcia (1991). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic matter content and particle size influence the kinetic parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher organic matter content and lower particle size enhance the biomethanization. - Abstract: The influence of particle size and organic matter content of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) in the overall kinetics of dry (30% total solids) thermophilic (55 Degree-Sign C) anaerobic digestion have been studied in a semi-continuous stirred tank reactor (SSTR). Two types of wastes were used: synthetic OFMSW (average particle size of 1 mm; 0.71 g Volatile Solids/g waste), and OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant (average particle size of 30 mm; 0.16 g Volatile Solids/g waste). A modification of a widely-validated product-generation kinetic model has been proposed. Results obtained from the modified-model parameterization at steady-state (that include new kinetic parameters as K, Y{sub pMAX} and {theta}{sub MIN}) indicate that the features of the feedstock strongly influence the kinetics of the process. The overall specific growth rate of microorganisms ({mu}{sub max}) with synthetic OFMSW is 43% higher compared to OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant: 0.238 d{sup -1} (K = 1.391 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.167 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 7.924 days) vs. 0.135 d{sup -1} (K = 1.282 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.150 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 9.997 days) respectively. Finally, it could be emphasized that the validation of proposed modified-model has been performed successfully by means of the simulation of non-steady state data for the different SRTs tested with each waste.

  10. Machine Partitions | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partitions Mira In the prod-capability queue, partition sizes of 8192, 12288, 16384, 24576, 32768, and 49152 nodes are available. All partitions have a full torus network except for the 32768 partition that in the default queue is mesh in one dimension. The full torus network for the 32768 partition is available by the special queue: prod-32768-torus. The max runtime of jobs submitted to the prod-capability and the prod-32768-torus queues is 24 hours. The prod-short and prod-long queues support

  11. MOA-2010-BLG-523: 'FAILED PLANET' = RS CVn STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gould, A.; Yee, J. C.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L.-W.; Bond, I. A.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Greenhill, J.; Tsapras, Y.; Bensby, T.; Allen, W.; Almeida, L. A.; Jablonski, F.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Lee, C.-U.; Collaboration: muFUN Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; RoboNet Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; and others

    2013-02-15

    The Galactic bulge source MOA-2010-BLG-523S exhibited short-term deviations from a standard microlensing light curve near the peak of an A {sub max} {approx} 265 high-magnification microlensing event. The deviations originally seemed consistent with expectations for a planetary companion to the principal lens. We combine long-term photometric monitoring with a previously published high-resolution spectrum taken near peak to demonstrate that this is an RS CVn variable, so that planetary microlensing is not required to explain the light-curve deviations. This is the first spectroscopically confirmed RS CVn star discovered in the Galactic bulge.

  12. An Octahedral Coordination Complex of Iron(VI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John F. Berry,1* Eckhard Bill,1 Eberhard Bothe,1 Serena DeBeer George,2 Bernd Mienert,1 Frank Neese1+ and Karl Wieghardt1 1 Max-Planck-Institut für Bioanorganische Chemie, Stiftstrasse 34-36, D-45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr, Germany 2 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, SLAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94309, USA * Present address: The University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Chemistry, 1101 University Ave. Madison, WI 53706-1322, USA + Present address: Institut für

  13. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radioactive Beams Delivered by ATLAS Updated July, 2009 a Beams produced using the "In-flight" method (Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 380 (2008)) (see below). b Beams produced using the "Two-accelerator" or "Batch" method (see below). c Allowed maximum radiation may limit beam current. d Used so far for implantation only. Ion Half-Life Reaction Intensity (ions/sec/pnA) Opening Angle (degrees) Production Energy (MeV) Max. Rate (ions/sec) 6Hea,c 0.807 sec d(7Li,6He)3He 150 19

  14. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radioactive Beams Delivered by ATLAS Updated July, 2009 a Beams produced using the "In-flight" method (see below). b Beams produced using the "Two-accelerator" or "Batch" method (see below). c Allowed maximum radiation may limit beam current. d Used so far for implantation only. Ion Half-Life Reaction Intensity (ions/sec/pnA) Opening Angle (degrees) Production Energy (MeV) Max. Rate (ions/sec) 6Hea,c 0.807 sec d(7Li,6He)3He 150 19 75 1 x 104 8Lia,c 0.838 sec

  15. mpimemu

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mpimemu mpimemu Description The code mpimemu is a simple tool that helps approximate MPI library memory usage as a function of scale. It takes samples of /proc/meminfo (node level) and /proc/self/status (process level) and outputs the min, max and avg values for a specified period of time. More information can be found in the README and README.QUICKSTART files. Download mpimemu tar file (updated July 5, README only) How to Build ./configure CC=mpicc (or your appropriate MPI C compiler) make How

  16. Microsoft Word - FeV.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fe K-edge XAS spectra of the Fe(III)-azide precursor (black) and the Fe(V)-nitrido complex (red) Characterization of a Genuine S=1/2 Fe(V) Complex Núria Aliaga-Alcalde, 1 Serena DeBeer George, 2 Bernd Mienert, 1 Eckhard Bill, 1 Karl Wieghardt 1 and Frank Neese 11 1 Max Planck Institut für Bioanorganische Chemie, Mülheim an der Ruhr, Germany 2 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, SLAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA High-valent Fe(IV) and Fe(V) intermediates are invoked in the

  17. Results From Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at FACET

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Results From Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at FACET Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Results From Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at FACET Authors: Li, S.Z. ; Clarke, C.I. ; England, R.J. ; Frederico, J. ; Gessner, S.J. ; Hogan, M.J. ; Jobe, R.K. ; Litos, M.D. ; Walz, D.R. ; /SLAC ; Muggli, P. ; /Munich, Max Planck Inst. ; An, W. ; Clayton, C.E. ; Joshi, C. ; Lu, W. ; Marsh, K.A. ; Mori, W. ; Tochitsky, S. ; /UCLA more »; Adli,

  18. History and Solution of the Phase Problem in theTheory of Structure Determination of Crystals from X-ray Diffraction Experiments

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wolf, Emil [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, United States

    2010-09-01

    Since the pioneering work of Max von Laue on interference and diffraction of x-rays, carried out almost 100 years ago, numerous attempts have been made to determine structures of crystalline media from x-ray diffraction experiments. The usefulness of all of them has been limited by the inability of measuring phases of the diffracted beams. In this talk, the most important research carried out in this field will be reviewed and a recently obtained solution of the phase problem will be presented.

  19. Scanned Document

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    EPA-402-R-04-006 Environmental Protection Indoor Air November 2004 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Annual Water Sampling and Analysis, Calendar Year 2004: SHOAL Test Site Area FAULTLESS Test Site Area RULISON Test Site Area RIO BLANCO Test Site Area GASBUGGY Test Site Area GNOME Test Site Area Annual Water Sampling and Analysis, Calendar Year 2004 SHOAL Test Site Area FAULTLESS Test Site Area RULISON Test Site Area RIO BLANCO Test Site Area GASBUGGY Test Site Area GNOME Test Site Area Max G. Davis

  20. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OEce of Radiation and 12nvirorunentai Protection Indoor Ailr Washington., DC 20460 Annual Water Sampling and Analysis, Calendar Year 2000: R'ULISON Tes,t Site Area RLO BLANCO Test Site Area FAULTLESS Tes it Site Area SHOAL Test Site Area GASBUGGY Test Site, Area GNOME Test Site Area Annual Water Sampling and Analysis, Calendar Year 2000 RULISON Test Site Area RIO BLANCO Test Site Area FAULTLESS Test Site Area SHOAL Test Site Area GASBUGGY Test Site Area GNOME Test Site Area by Max G. Davis

  1. Errvironmentaf Research

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    online at www.sciencedirect.com Environmental Research 10 1 (2006) 3 4 4 1 Errvironmentaf Research Do scientists and fishermen collect the same size fish? Possible implications for exposure assessment Joanna urger^^^^', Michael ~ o c h f e l d ~ ~ ~ , Sean Christian W. ~ e i t n e r ~ . ~ , Stephen ~ e w e t t ~ , Daniel SnigarofP, Ronald snigarofff, Tim Starnrng, Shawn ~ a r ~ e f , Max ~ o b e r ~ * , Heloise chenelotd, Robert patrickh, Conrad D. volzi, James ~ e s t o d 'Division of Life

  2. PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION OF THREE MOJAVE DESERT GRASSES IN RESPONSE TO ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; C. K. IVANS; P. VIVIN; J. R. SEEMANN; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Gas exchange, biomass and N allocation were compared among three Mojave Desert grasses representing different functional types to determine if photosynthetic responses and the associated allocation of resources within the plant changed after prolonged exposure to elevated CO{sub 2}. Leaf gas exchange characteristics were measured for Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens (C{sub 3} invasive annual), Achnatherum hymenoides (C{sub 3} native perennial) and Pleuraphis rigida (C{sub 4} native perennial) exposed to 360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (ambient) and 1000 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (elevated) CO{sub 2} concentrations in a glasshouse experiment, and tissue biomass and total N pools were quantified from three harvests during development. The maximum rate of carboxylation by the N-rich enzyme Rubisco (Vc{sub max}), which was inferred from the relationship between net CO{sub 2} assimilation (A{sub net}) and intracellular CO{sub 2} concentration (c{sub i}), declined in the C{sub 3} species Bromus and Achnatherum across all sampling dates, but did not change at elevated CO{sub 2} for the C{sub 4} Pleuraphis. Whole plant N remained the same between CO{sub 2} treatments for all species, but patterns of allocation differed for the short- and long-lived C{sub 3} species. For Bromus, leaf N used for photosynthesis was reallocated to reproduction at elevated CO{sub 2} as inferred from the combination of lower Vc{sub max} and N per leaf area (NLA) at elevated CO{sub 2}, but similar specific leaf area (SLA, cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}), and of greater reproductive effort (RE) for the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment. Vc{sub max}, leaf N concentration and NLA declined for the perennial Achnatherum at elevated CO{sub 2} potentially due to accumulation of carbohydrates or changes in leaf morphology inferred from lower SLA and greater total biomass at elevated CO{sub 2}. In contrast, Vc{sub max} for the C{sub 4} perennial Pleuraphis did not change at elevated CO{sub 2}, and tissue biomass and total N were the same between CO{sub 2} treatments. Adjustments in photosynthetic capacity at elevated CO{sub 2} may optimize N allocation of C{sub 3} species in the Mojave Desert, which may influence plant performance and plant-plant interactions of these co-occurring species.

  3. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-06-01

    This sixteenth quarterly report describes work done during the sixteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

  4. Scandium induced structural transformation and B?:B? cationic ordering in Pb(Fe{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} multiferroic ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallesham, B.; Ranjith, R.; Manivelraja, M.

    2014-07-21

    The current study explores non-magnetic Sc{sup 3+} induced structural transformation, evolution of local B-site cation ordering and associated effect on ferroelectric phase transition temperature T{sub max} (temperature corresponding to dielectric maxima) on increasing the atom percent of Sc substitution in [Pb(Fe{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} (PFN)] ceramics. In this regard, the phase pure Pb[(Fe{sub 0.5?x}Sc{sub x})Nb{sub 0.5}]O{sub 3} ceramics with x varying from 0 to 0.5 were synthesized through solid state reaction route. The detailed structural analysis through Rietveld refinement confirms the room temperature transformation from a monoclinic Cm to rhombohedral R3m structure at x?=?0.3?mol.?% of Sc. Absorption spectra studies show that there is a considerable increment in the bandgap at higher scandium content. Most interestingly, the T{sub max} exhibited an increment for lower scandium contents (x?=?0.1 to 0.25) followed by a drop in T{sub max} (x?=?0.3 to 0.5). Such anomalous behavior in T{sub max} is expected to arise due to the onset of B?, B? local cation ordering beyond Sc content x?=?0.25. The B-site cation ordering at and beyond x?=?0.3 was also confirmed by the evolution of cation order induced Pb-O coupled vibrational mode in Raman scattering studies. In addition, the Mssbauer spectra of PFN (x?=?0) and Pb(Fe{sub 0.4}Sc{sub 0.1}Nb{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} (x?=?0.1) are reported to verify the spin state and oxidation state of iron. The lattice distortion due to the radius ratio difference between a Sc{sup 3+} cation and Fe{sup 3+} cation in low spin state is responsible for the structural transformation, which in turn facilitates a B?:B? cation ordering.

  5. August 2015 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    August 2015 Keeping the "Spirit of '45 Alive" in Kansas City Friday, August 28, 2015 - 9:25am National Security Campus employees commemorated the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II by sharing stories of their loved ones, viewing photographs and documents with Truman Library historians and listening to WWII veteran Max DeWeese reminisce about his experience in the war. NNSA Blog The August 13 event was inspired by the National Spirit of '45 Day, a way to honor the achievements

  6. Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The NNMCAB is comprised of citizens appointed by the Department of Energy to serve up to three two-year terms on the board. The Board members represent broad: geographic, cultural, and ethnic demographics. NNMCAB Membership Roster Members as of March 2016 1 Abeyta, Carla Chimayo EM&R Committee Baca, Max Las Vegas WM Committee Friday, Mary Taos EM&R Committee Girardi, Nona Los Alamos EM&R Committee Gurulé, Angelica Española WM Committee (Chair) Herrera, Ashlee Alcalde Student

  7. Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Management Committee Roster 1. Angelica Gurulé, NNMCAB, Waste Management Committee Chair 2. Michael Whiting, NNMCAB, Waste Management Committee Vice-Chair 3. Alex Puglisi, NNMCAB 4. Angel Quintana, NNMCAB 5. Carlos Valdez, NNMCAB 6. Daniel Mayfield, NNMCAB 7. Gerard Martinez y Valencia, NNMCAB 8. Irene Tse-Pe, NNMCAB 9. Joey Tiano, NNMCAB 10. Max Baca, NNMCAB 11. Mona Varela, NNMCAB 12. Tessa Jo Mascareñas, NNMCAB 13. M. Lee Bishop, DOE Co-Deputy Designated Federal Officer (CDDFO) 14.

  8. Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    energy.gov/em/nnmcab NNMCAB Members Douglas Sayre, Chair Santa Fe, NM Gerard Martínez y Valencia, Vice-Chair Santa Fe, NM Carla Abeyta Chimayo, NM Max Baca Las Vegas, NM Diahann Cordova Alcalde, NM Mary Friday Taos, NM Nona Girardi Los Alamos, NM Angelica Gurulé Española, NM Joshua Madalena Pueblo of Jemez, NM Tessa Mascareñas Española, NM Daniel Mayfield Nambe, NM Alex Puglisi Santa Fe, NM Angel Quintana Pueblo of Pojoaque, NM Rod Sanchez Corrales, NM Ashley Sanderson Santa Fe, NM Stephen

  9. Summary Notes from 1 November 2007 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Removal of Highly Radioactive Radionuclides/Key Radionuclides to the Maximum Extent Practical

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig

  10. THE MERGER RATE OF BINARY WHITE DWARFS IN THE GALACTIC DISK (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect THE MERGER RATE OF BINARY WHITE DWARFS IN THE GALACTIC DISK Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE MERGER RATE OF BINARY WHITE DWARFS IN THE GALACTIC DISK We use multi-epoch spectroscopy of {approx}4000 white dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to constrain the properties of the Galactic population of binary white dwarf systems and calculate their merger rate. With a Monte Carlo code, we model the distribution of {Delta}RV{sub max}, the maximum radial

  11. Ultra-Scale Visualization: Research and Education. (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Conference: Ultra-Scale Visualization: Research and Education. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultra-Scale Visualization: Research and Education. Abstract not provided. Authors: Moreland, Kenneth D. ; Ma, Kwan-Liu ; Ross, Robert ; Huang, Jian ; Humphreys, Greg ; Max, Nelson ; Owens, John D. ; Shen, Han-Wei Publication Date: 2007-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1147497 Report Number(s): SAND2007-4947C 522191 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource

  12. MO-C-17A-10: Comparison of Dose Deformable Accumulation by Using Parallel and Serial Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Z; Li, M; Wong, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The uncertainty of dose accumulation over multiple CT datasets with deformable fusion may have significant impact on clinical decisions. In this study, we investigate the difference of two dose summation approaches involving deformable fusion. Methods: Five patients, four external beam and one brachytherapy(BT), were chosen for the study. The BT patient was treated with CT-based HDR. The CT image sets acquired in the imageguidance process (8-11 CTs/patient) were used to determine the dose delivered to the four external beam patients. (prostate, pelvis, lung and head and neck). For the HDR patient (cervix), five CT image sets and the corresponding BT plans were used. In total 44 CT datasets and RT dose/plans were imported into the image fusion software MiM (6.0.4) for analysis.For each of the five clinical cases, the dose from each fraction was accumulated into the primary CT dataset by using both Parallel and Serial approaches. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) for CTV and selected organs-at-risks (OAR) were generated. The D95(CTV), OAR(mean) and OAR(max) for the four external beam cases the D90(CTV), and the max dose to bladder and rectum for the BT case were compared. Results: For the four external beam patients, the difference in D95(CTV) were <1.2% PD between the parallel and the serial approaches. The differences of the OAR(mean) and the OAR(max ) range from 0 to 3.7% and <1% PD respectively. For the HDR patient, the dose difference for D90 is 11% PD while that of the max dose to bladder and rectum were 11.5% and 23.3% respectively. Conclusion: For external beam treatments, the parallel and serial approaches have <5% difference probably because tumor volume and OAR have less changes from fraction to fraction. For the brachytherapy case, >10% dose difference between the two approaches was observed as significant volume changes of tumor and OAR were observed among treatment fractions.

  13. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15, 2005 [Facility News] Bad Gas Examined During Field Campaign at North Slope of Alaska Bookmark and Share About the size of a toaster, the MAX-DOAS instrument system at Atqasuk is well-insulated to protect it from the Arctic cold. As the unit rotates on its side axis, measurements are obtained through the optical inlet. Springtime in the Arctic produces reactive halogen gases, such as bromine monoxide, that form from evaporating sea salt. These gases destroy ground-level ozone and convert

  14. Argonne X-rays validate quantum magnetism model | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory X-rays validate quantum magnetism model May 20, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany have validated a theorized model of quantum magnetism by observing it firsthand in a honeycomb lattice. The research is featured in an article titled "Direct evidence for dominant bond-directional interactions in a honeycomb lattice iridate Na2IrO3" published

  15. Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, December 30, 1996--March 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this project is to utilize coal ashes to process hazardous materials such as industrial waste water treatment residues, contaminated soils, and air pollution control dusts from the metal industry and municipal waste incineration. This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon continuing evaluation of aged samples from Phase 1, planning supportive laboratory studies for Phase 2, completing scholarly work, reestablishing MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., as the subcontractor for the field work of Phase 2, proposing two presentations for later in 1997, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

  16. Modeling pre-failure stress-strain properties of sedimentary softrock based on very small strain stiffness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayano, K.; Tatsuoka, F.; Yoshiizumi, N.

    1999-07-01

    The pre-peak stress-strain properties of sedimentary softrocks were investigated by triaxial compression tests and large-amplitude cyclic loading tests extending triaxial compression and extension stress states. Axial strains were measured locally to a resolution of 0.0001%. Young's moduli E{sub v} at quasi-elastic small axial strains of less than about 0.001% were evaluated at different isotropic and anisotropic stress states during those tests and isotropic compression tests. The E{sub v} value increased rather uniquely with the vertical stress {sigma}{sub v} while it decreased with large-amplitude cyclic straining, compared with those measured at isotropic stress states. A normalization method is proposed for the drained tangent Young's modulus E{sub tan} to exclude the effects of pressure change and damage by shearing on the E{sub tan} values by dividing each E{sub tan} value by the current E{sub v} value. The E{sub tan}/E{sub v} and q/q{sub max} relationships are considered to have more general strain-nonlinear features than the relationships between the ratio of E{sub tan} to the initial elastic Young's modulus E{sub 0} and q/q{sub max}.

  17. Azimuthal asymmetry in the risetime of the surface detector signals of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aab, Alexander

    2016-04-07

    The azimuthal asymmetry in the risetime of signals in Auger surface detector stations is a source of information on shower development. The azimuthal asymmetry is due to a combination of the longitudinal evolution of the shower and geometrical effects related to the angles of incidence of the particles into the detectors. The magnitude of the effect depends upon the zenith angle and state of development of the shower and thus provides a novel observable, (secθ)max, sensitive to the mass composition of cosmic rays above 3 x 1018 eV. By comparing measurements with predictions from shower simulations, we find for bothmore » of our adopted models of hadronic physics (QGSJETII-04 and EPOS-LHC) an indication that the mean cosmic-ray mass increases slowly with energy, as has been inferred from other studies. However, the mass estimates are dependent on the shower model and on the range of distance from the shower core selected. Furthermore, the method has uncovered further deficiencies in our understanding of shower modelling that must be resolved before the mass composition can be inferred from (secθ)max.« less

  18. Magnetocaloric effect and magnetostructural coupling in Mn{sub 0.92}Fe{sub 0.08}CoGe compound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J. L.; Shamba, P.; Md Din, M. F.; Cheng, Z. X.; Dou, S. X.; Hutchison, W. D.; Ren, Q. Y.; Campbell, S. J.; Gu, Q. F.; Kennedy, S. J.

    2015-05-07

    The structural properties of Mn{sub 0.92}Fe{sub 0.08}CoGe have been investigated in detail using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in zero and applied pressure (p = 0–10 GPa). A ferromagnetic transition occurs around T{sub C} = 300 K and a large magnetic-entropy change −ΔS{sub M} = 17.3 J/kg K detected at T{sub C} for a field change of ΔB = 5 T. The field dependence of −ΔS{sub M}{sup max} can be expressed as −ΔS{sub M}{sup max} ∝ B. At ambient temperature and pressure, Mn{sub 0.92}Fe{sub 0.08}CoGe exhibits a co-existence of the orthorhombic TiNiSi-type structure (space group Pnma) and hexagonal Ni{sub 2}In-type structure (space group P63/mmc). Application of external pressure drives a structure change from the orthorhombic TiNiSi-type structure to the hexagonal Ni{sub 2}In-type structure. A large anomaly in heat capacity around T{sub C} is detected and the Debye temperature θ{sub D} (=319(±10) K) has been derived from analyses of the low temperature heat capacity, T ≲ 10 K.

  19. Anisotropic swelling and microcracking of neutron irradiated Ti3AlC2-Ti5Al2C3 materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ang, Caen K.; Silva, Chinthaka M.; Shih, Chunghao Phillip; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Katoh, Yutai; Zinkle, Steven J.

    2015-12-17

    Mn + 1AXn (MAX) phase materials based on Ti–Al–C have been irradiated at 400 °C (673 K) with fission neutrons to a fluence of 2 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), corresponding to ~ 2 displacements per atom (dpa). We report preliminary results of microcracking in the Al-containing MAX phase, which contained the phases Ti3AlC2 and Ti5Al2C3. Equibiaxial ring-on-ring tests of irradiated coupons showed that samples retained 10% of pre-irradiated strength. Volumetric swelling of up to 4% was observed. Phase analysis and microscopy suggest that anisotropic lattice parameter swelling caused microcracking. Lastly, variants of titanium aluminum carbide may be unsuitable materials for irradiation at light water reactor-relevant temperatures.

  20. Measurement of high energy x-ray beam penumbra with Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT radiochromic film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung Tsang; Butson, Martin J.; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2006-08-15

    High energy x-ray beam penumbra are measured using Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT film. Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT, due to its limited energy dependence and high spatial resolution provide a high level of accuracy for dose assessment in penumbral regions. The spatial resolution of film detector systems is normally limited by the scanning resolution of the densitometer. Penumbral widths (80%/20%) measured at D{sub max} were found to be 2.8, 3.0, 3.2, and 3.4 mm ({+-}0.2 mm) using 5, 10, 20, and 30 cm square field sizes, respectively, for a 6 MV linear accelerator produced x-ray beam. This is compared to 3.2 mm{+-}0.2 mm (Kodak EDR2) and 3.6 mm{+-}0.2 mm (Kodak X-Omat V) at 10 cmx10 cm measured using radiographic film. Using a zero volume extrapolation technique for ionization chamber measurements, the 10 cmx10 cm field penumbra at D{sub max} was measured to be 3.1 mm, a close match to Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT results. Penumbral measurements can also be made at other depths, including the surface, as the film does not suffer significantly from dosimetric variations caused by changing x-ray energy spectra. Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT film provides an adequate measure of penumbral dose for high energy x-ray beams.

  1. Occupant radon exposure in houses with basements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franklin, E.M.; Fuoss, S.

    1995-12-31

    This study compares basement and main-level radon exposure based on bi-level week-long radon measurements, occupancy and activity data collected in normal use during heating and non-heating seasons in a geographically-stratified random sample of about 600 Minnesota homes, in response to critiques of radon measurement protocol. Basement radon (RN1) (M=4.5, SD=4.5) and main level (Rn2)(M=2.9, SD=3.4) correlation was 0.8 (p=.00), including seasonal variation. In a 101-house subsample where Rn1 >=4.0 pCi/L and Rn2 <=3.9 pCi/L, maximum household exposure in basements was 1162 pCiHrs (M=120, Sd=207), main-level 2486 pCiHrs (M-434, SD=421). In same households, persons with most basement-time maxed 100 hrs (M=13,SD=23), persons with most main-level time maxed 160 hrs (M=79, SD=39). Basement activities show two patterns, (1) member used it for personal domain, e.g. sleeping, and (2) household used it for general activities, e.g. TV or children`s play. Basement occupancy justifies measurement of radon in the lowest livable housing level.

  2. Studies of E-Cloud Build up for the FNAL Main Injector and for theLHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, M.A.

    2006-06-14

    We present a summary of recent simulation studies of the electron-cloud (EC) build-up for the FNAL MI and for the LHC. In the first case we pay particular attention to the dependence on bunch intensity N{sub b} at injection energy assuming the nominal bunch spacing t{sub b} = 19 ns, and we focus on the dipole magnets and field-free regions. The saturated value of the average EC density shows a clear threshold in N{sub b} beyond which the beam will be approximately neutralized on average. For the case of the LHC we limit our discussion to arc dipoles at collision energy, and bunch spacings t{sub b} = 25 ns or t{sub b} = 75 ns. The main variables exercised in this study are N{sub b} and the peak value of the secondary emission yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max}. For t{sub b} = 25 ns we conclude that the EC power deposition is comfortably below the available cooling capacity of the cryogenic system if {delta}{sub max} is below {approx} 1.2 at nominal N{sub b}. For t{sub b} = 75 ns, the EC power deposition is insignificant. As a byproduct of this exercise, we reach a detailed understanding of the significant role played by the backscattered secondary electrons. This article summarizes the results, an slightly extends the discussions, presented in Refs. 1 and 2.

  3. Novel materials for laser refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hehlen, Markus P

    2009-01-01

    The status of optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids is reviewed, and the various factors that limit the performance of current laser-cooling materials are discussed. Efficient optical refrigeration is possible in materials for which {Dirac_h}{omega}{sub max} < E{sub p}/8, where {Dirac_h}{omega}{sub max} is the maximum phonon energy of the host material and E{sub p} is the pump energy of the rare-earth dopant. Transition-metal and OH{sup -}impurities at levels >100 ppb are believed to be the main factors for the limited laser-cooling performance in current materials. The many components of doped ZBLAN glass pose particular processing challenges. Binary fluoride glasses such as YF{sub 3}-LiF are considered as alternatives to ZBLAN. The crystalline system KPb{sub 2}CI{sub 5} :Dy{sup 3+} is identified as a prime candidate for high-efficiency laser cooling.

  4. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIGUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Pak, D.; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.; Caldwell, T.

    2011-11-29

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive is used to improve stripping performance and to mitigate the effects of any surfactants present in the feed stream. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008.

  5. Λb→pl⁻ν¯l form factors from lattice QCD with static b quarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detmold, William; Lin, C.-J. David; Meinel, Stefan; Wingate, Matthew

    2013-07-23

    We present a lattice QCD calculation of form factors for the decay Λb→pμ⁻ν¯μ, which is a promising channel for determining the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vub| at the Large Hadron Collider. In this initial study we work in the limit of static b quarks, where the number of independent form factors reduces to two. We use dynamical domain-wall fermions for the light quarks, and perform the calculation at two different lattice spacings and at multiple values of the light-quark masses in a single large volume. Using our form factor results, we calculate the Λb→pμ⁻ν¯μ differential decay rate in the range 14 GeV²≤q²≤q²max, and obtain the integral ∫max 14 GeV²[dΓ/dq²]dq²/|Vub|²=15.3±4.2 ps⁻¹. Combined with future experimental data, this will give a novel determination of |Vub| with about 15% theoretical uncertainty. The uncertainty is dominated by the use of the static approximation for the b quark, and can be reduced further by performing the lattice calculation with a more sophisticated heavy-quark action.

  6. Material selection for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pint, B. A.; Terrani, K. A.; Yamamoto, Y.; Snead, L. L.

    2015-09-14

    Alternative cladding materials are being investigated for accident tolerance, which can be defined as >100X improvement (compared to current Zr-based alloys) in oxidation resistance in steam environments at ?1200C for short (?4 h) times. After reviewing a wide range of candidates, current steam oxidation testing is being conducted on Mo, MAX phases and FeCrAl alloys. Recently reported low mass losses for Mo in steam at 800C could not be reproduced. Both FeCrAl and MAX phase Ti2AlC form a protective alumina scale in steam. Therefore, commercial Ti2AlC that is not single phase, formed a much thicker oxide at 1200C in steam and significant TiO2, and therefore may be challenging to use as a cladding or a coating. Alloy development for FeCrAl is seeking to maintain its steam oxidation resistance to 1475C, while reducing its Cr content to minimize susceptibility to irradiation assisted Cr-rich ? formation. The composition effects and critical limits to retaining protective scale formation at >1400C are still being evaluated.

  7. Extrinsic Sources of Scatter in the Richness-Mass Relation of Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli; Koester, Benjamin; Nord, Brian; Wu, Hao-Yi; Evrard, August; Wechsler, Risa; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2012-03-27

    Maximizing the utility of upcoming photometric cluster surveys requires a thorough understanding of the richness-mass relation of galaxy clusters. We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the impact of various sources of observational scatter on this relation. Cluster ellipticity, photometric errors, photometric redshift errors, and cluster-to-cluster variations in the properties of red-sequence galaxies contribute negligible noise. Miscentering, however, can be important, and likely contributes to the scatter in the richness - mass relation of galaxy maxBCG clusters at the low mass end, where centering is more difficult. We also investigate the impact of projection effects under several empirically motivated assumptions about cluster environments. Using SDSS data and the maxBCG cluster catalog, we demonstrate that variations in cluster environments can rarely ({approx} 1%-5% of the time) result in significant richness boosts. Due to the steepness of the mass/richness function, the corresponding fraction of optically selected clusters that suffer from these projection effects is {approx} 5%-15%. We expect these numbers to be generic in magnitude, but a precise determination requires detailed, survey-specific modeling.

  8. A disoriented chiral condensate search at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Convery, M.E.

    1997-05-01

    MiniMax (Fermilab T-864) was a small test/experiment at the Tevatron designed to search for disoriented chiral condensates (DCC) in the forward direction. Relativistic quantum field theory treats the vacuum as a medium, with bulk properties characterized by long-range order parameters. This has led to suggestions that regions of {open_quotes}disoriented vacuum{close_quotes} might be formed in high-energy collision processes. In particular, the approximate chiral symmetry of QCD could lead to regions of vacuum which have chiral order parameters disoriented to directions which have non-zero isospin, i.e. disoriented chiral condensates. A signature of DCC is the resulting distribution of the fraction of produced pions which are neutral. The MiniMax detector at the C0 collision region of the Tevatron was a telescope of 24 multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC`s) with a lead converter behind the eighth MWPC, allowing the detection of charged particles and photon conversions in an acceptance approximately a circle of radius 0.6 in pseudorapidity-azimuthal-angle space, centered on pseudorapidity {eta} {approx} 4. An electromagnetic calorimeter was located behind the MWPC telescope, and hadronic calorimeters and scintillator were located in the upstream anti-proton direction to tag diffractive events.

  9. Possible dynamical explanations for Paltridge's principle of maximum entropy production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virgo, Nathaniel Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-12-05

    Throughout the history of non-equilibrium thermodynamics a number of theories have been proposed in which complex, far from equilibrium flow systems are hypothesised to reach a steady state that maximises some quantity. Perhaps the most celebrated is Paltridge's principle of maximum entropy production for the horizontal heat flux in Earth's atmosphere, for which there is some empirical support. There have been a number of attempts to derive such a principle from maximum entropy considerations. However, we currently lack a more mechanistic explanation of how any particular system might self-organise into a state that maximises some quantity. This is in contrast to equilibrium thermodynamics, in which models such as the Ising model have been a great help in understanding the relationship between the predictions of MaxEnt and the dynamics of physical systems. In this paper we show that, unlike in the equilibrium case, Paltridge-type maximisation in non-equilibrium systems cannot be achieved by a simple dynamical feedback mechanism. Nevertheless, we propose several possible mechanisms by which maximisation could occur. Showing that these occur in any real system is a task for future work. The possibilities presented here may not be the only ones. We hope that by presenting them we can provoke further discussion about the possible dynamical mechanisms behind extremum principles for non-equilibrium systems, and their relationship to predictions obtained through MaxEnt.

  10. Material selection for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pint, B. A.; Terrani, K. A.; Yamamoto, Y.; Snead, L. L.

    2015-09-14

    Alternative cladding materials are being investigated for accident tolerance, which can be defined as >100X improvement (compared to current Zr-based alloys) in oxidation resistance in steam environments at ≥1200°C for short (≤4 h) times. After reviewing a wide range of candidates, current steam oxidation testing is being conducted on Mo, MAX phases and FeCrAl alloys. Recently reported low mass losses for Mo in steam at 800°C could not be reproduced. Both FeCrAl and MAX phase Ti2AlC form a protective alumina scale in steam. Therefore, commercial Ti2AlC that is not single phase, formed a much thicker oxide at 1200°C in steammore » and significant TiO2, and therefore may be challenging to use as a cladding or a coating. Alloy development for FeCrAl is seeking to maintain its steam oxidation resistance to 1475°C, while reducing its Cr content to minimize susceptibility to irradiation assisted Cr-rich α’ formation. The composition effects and critical limits to retaining protective scale formation at >1400°C are still being evaluated.« less

  11. Neutron dosimetry in organs of an adult human phantom using linacs with multileaf collimator in radiotherapy treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Ovalle, S. A.; Barquero, R.; Gomez-Ros, J. M.; Lallena, A. M.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To calculate absorbed doses due to neutrons in 87 organs/tissues for anthropomorphic phantoms, irradiated in position supine (head first into the gantry) with orientations anteroposterior (AP) and right-left (RLAT) with a 18 MV accelerator. Conversion factors from monitor units to {mu}Gy per neutron in organs, equivalent doses in organs/tissues, and effective doses, which permit to quantify stochastic risks, are estimated. Methods: MAX06 and FAX06 phantoms were modeled with MCNPX and irradiated with a 18 MV Varian Clinac 2100C/D accelerator whose geometry included a multileaf collimator. Two actual fields of a pelvic treatment were simulated using electron-photon-neutron coupled transport. Absorbed doses due to neutrons were estimated from kerma. Equivalent doses were estimated using the radiation weighting factor corresponding to an average incident neutron energy 0.47 MeV. Statistical uncertainties associated to absorbed doses, as calculated by MCNPX, were also obtained. Results: Largest doses were absorbed in shallowest (with respect to the neutron pathway) organs. In {mu}GyMU{sup -1}, values of 2.66 (for penis) and 2.33 (for testes) were found in MAX06, and 1.68 (for breasts), 1.05 (for lenses of eyes), and 0.94 (for sublingual salivary glands) in FAX06, in AP orientation. In RLAT, the largest doses were found for bone tissues (leg) just at the entrance of the beam in the body (right side in our case). Values, in {mu}GyMU{sup -1}, of 1.09 in upper leg bone right spongiosa, for MAX06, and 0.63 in mandible spongiosa, for FAX06, were found. Except for gonads, liver, and stomach wall, equivalent doses found for FAX06 were, in both orientations, higher than for MAX06. Equivalent doses in AP are higher than in RLAT for all organs/tissues other than brain and liver. Effective doses of 12.6 and 4.1 {mu}SvMU{sup -1} were found for AP and RLAT, respectively. The organs/tissues with larger relative contributions to the effective dose were testes and breasts, in AP, and breasts and red marrow, in RLAT. Equivalent and effective doses obtained for MAX06/FAX06 were smaller (between 2 and 20 times) than those quoted for the mathematical phantoms ADAM/EVA in ICRP-74. Conclusions: The new calculations of conversion coefficients for neutron irradiation in AP and RLAT irradiation geometries show a reduction in the values of effective dose by factors 7 (AP) and 6 (RLAT) with respect to the old data obtained with mathematical phantoms. The existence of tissues or anatomical regions with maximum absorbed doses, such as penis, lens of eyes, fascia (part of connective tissue), etc., organs/tissues that classic mathematical phantoms did not include because they were not considered for the study of stochastic effects, has been revealed. Absorbed doses due to photons, obtained following the same simulation methodology, are larger than those due to neutrons, reaching values 100 times larger as the primary beam is approached. However, for organs far from the treated volume, absorbed photon doses can be up to three times smaller than neutron ones. Calculations using voxel phantoms permitted to know the organ dose conversion coefficients per MU due to secondary neutrons in the complete anatomy of a patient.

  12. A Measurement of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilday, Benjamin; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter; Goobar, Ariel; Hopp, Ulrich; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ. /Tokyo U.

    2010-03-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {le} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.17+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.55{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.13+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12}L{sub x{circle_dot}}{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.18+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.49{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.15+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sub -1.11-0.04}{sup +1.99+0.07}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.36{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.84+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sub -0.91-0.015}{sup +1.31+0.043} and 3.02{sub -1.03-0.048}{sup +1.31+0.062}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sub -0.14}{sup +0.15}) + (0.91{sub -0.81}{sup +0.85}) x z] SNuB h{sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most 3 hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are hostless to be (9.4{sub -5.1}{sup +8.3})%.

  13. SU-E-J-229: Quantitative Assessment for Timely Adaptive Re-Planning Using Weekly Dose Monitoring for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, Q; Liu, H; Greskovich, J; Koyfman, S; Xia, P; Li, Z

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For patients with head and neck (HN) cancer, mid-course adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is a common practice in our institution to accommodate anatomic changes. The aim of the study is to evaluate whether dose re-calculation on weekly verification images can provide quantitative assessment for timely adaptive re-planning with daily image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: We retrospectively selected sixty daily verification images acquired on CT-on-rail/CBCT from ten HN patients. These image sets were typically a week apart. Among these patients, six patients received a mid-course ART. Contours of the tumors and organ-at-risks (OARs) were manually delineated by a physician on each verification CT. After placing the treatment iso-center on the verification CTs according to the recorded clinical shifts, daily dose was re-calculated with the same beam configuration as the original plan. For the purpose of this study, electron densities for both verification CTs and planning CTs were set to 1.0 g/cm3. Results: Two patients had D99 of the CTV < 97% of the planned dose for more than three fractions due to remarkable tumor volume shrinkages. D-max of the spinal cord exceeded a tolerance of 45 Gy for four fractions in additional two patients. D-mean of the parotid increased within 25% of the planned value. D-max of the brainstem and D-mean of the oral cavity did not show significant variation. If the re-planning criteria included D99 of the CTV < 97% of the planned dose and D-max of the spinal cord > 45 Gy, two out ten patients required ART at week 2 and two patients required ART at week 3, respectively. Conclusion: Weekly dose monitoring with re-calculation on verification images can provide quantitative dose guidance for timely adaptive re-planning. Future work will include accumulative dose analysis for the decision of adaptive re-planning. The study is supported in part by Siemens Medical Solutions.

  14. THE GEMINI PLANET-FINDING CAMPAIGN: THE FREQUENCY OF GIANT PLANETS AROUND DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Liu, Michael C.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Ftaclas, Christ; Chun, Mark; Biller, Beth A.; Hayward, Thomas L.; Thatte, Niranjan; Tecza, Matthias; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Kuchner, Marc; Reid, I. Neill; De Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete M.; Gregorio-Hetem, Jane; Boss, Alan; Lin, Douglas N. C.; and others

    2013-08-20

    We have completed a high-contrast direct imaging survey for giant planets around 57 debris disk stars as part of the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign. We achieved median H-band contrasts of 12.4 mag at 0.''5 and 14.1 mag at 1'' separation. Follow-up observations of the 66 candidates with projected separation <500 AU show that all of them are background objects. To establish statistical constraints on the underlying giant planet population based on our imaging data, we have developed a new Bayesian formalism that incorporates (1) non-detections, (2) single-epoch candidates, (3) astrometric and (4) photometric information, and (5) the possibility of multiple planets per star to constrain the planet population. Our formalism allows us to include in our analysis the previously known {beta} Pictoris and the HR 8799 planets. Our results show at 95% confidence that <13% of debris disk stars have a {>=}5 M{sub Jup} planet beyond 80 AU, and <21% of debris disk stars have a {>=}3 M{sub Jup} planet outside of 40 AU, based on hot-start evolutionary models. We model the population of directly imaged planets as d {sup 2} N/dMda{proportional_to}m {sup {alpha}} a {sup {beta}}, where m is planet mass and a is orbital semi-major axis (with a maximum value of a{sub max}). We find that {beta} < -0.8 and/or {alpha} > 1.7. Likewise, we find that {beta} < -0.8 and/or a{sub max} < 200 AU. For the case where the planet frequency rises sharply with mass ({alpha} > 1.7), this occurs because all the planets detected to date have masses above 5 M{sub Jup}, but planets of lower mass could easily have been detected by our search. If we ignore the {beta} Pic and HR 8799 planets (should they belong to a rare and distinct group), we find that <20% of debris disk stars have a {>=}3 M{sub Jup} planet beyond 10 AU, and {beta} < -0.8 and/or {alpha} < -1.5. Likewise, {beta} < -0.8 and/or a{sub max} < 125 AU. Our Bayesian constraints are not strong enough to reveal any dependence of the planet frequency on stellar host mass. Studies of transition disks have suggested that about 20% of stars are undergoing planet formation; our non-detections at large separations show that planets with orbital separation >40 AU and planet masses >3 M{sub Jup} do not carve the central holes in these disks.

  15. Morphology and orientation of β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals patterned by laser in the inside of samarium barium borate glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishii, Akihito; Shinozaki, Kenji; Honma, Tsuyoshi; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2015-01-15

    Nonlinear optical β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystal lines (β-BBO) were patterned in the inside of 8Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}–42BaO–50B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass by irradiations of continuous-wave Yb:YVO{sub 4} lasers with a wavelength of 1080 nm (power: P=0.8–1.0 W, scanning speed: S=0.2–2.5 μm/s), in which the laser focal position was moved gradually from the surface to the inside. The morphology, size, and orientation of β-BBO crystals were examined from polarization optical microscope and birefringence imaging observations. It was demonstrated that c-axis oriented β-BBO crystals with long lengths (e.g., 20 mm) were patterned in the inside of the glass. The morphology of β-BBO in the cross-section of lines was a rectangular shape with rounded corners, and the volume of β-BBO formed increased with increasing laser power and with decreasing laser scanning speed. The maximum depth in the inside from the surface for β-BBO patterning increased with increasing laser power, e.g., D{sub max}∼100 μm at P=0.8 W, D{sub max}∼170 μm at P=0.9 W, and D{sub max}∼200 μm at P=1 W. The present study proposes that the laser-induced crystallization opens a new door for applied engineering in glassy solids. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the POM photographs for β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystal lines patterned by cw Yb:YVO{sub 4} fiber laser irradiations with a laser power of P=0.8 W and a laser scanning speed S=2 μm/s in the glass. The laser focal point was moved gradually from the surface into the inside. The results shown in Fig. 1 demonstrate that it is possible to pattern highly oriented β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals even in the inside of glasses. - Highlights: • β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystal lines were patterned in the inside of a glass by lasers. • Laser focal position was moved gradually from the surface to the inside. • Birefringence imaging was observed. • Morphology, size, and orientation of crystals were clarified. • Crystal lines with long lengths (e.g., 20 mm) were patterned at the depth of 200 μm.

  16. HINS R&D Collaboration on Electron Cloud Effects: MidyearReport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, M.A.; Sonnad, K.; Vay, J.-L.

    2006-11-07

    We present a report on ongoing activities on electron-cloud R&D for the MI upgrade. These results update and extend those presented in Refs. 1, 2. In this report we have significantly expanded the parameter range explored in bunch intensity Nb, RMS bunch length {sigma}{sub z} and peak secondary emission yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max}, but we have constrained our simulations to a field-free region. We describe the threshold behaviors in all of the above three parameters. For {delta}{sub max} {ge} 1.5 we find that, even for N{sub b} = 1 x 10{sup 11}, the electron cloud density, when averaged over the entire chamber, exceeds the beam neutralization level, but remains significantly below the local neutralization level (ie., when the electron density is computed in the neighborhood of the beam). This 'excess' of electrons is accounted for by narrow regions of high concentration of electrons very close to the chamber surface, especially at the top and bottom of the chamber, akin to virtual cathodes. These virtual cathodes are kept in equilibrium, on average, by a competition between space-charge forces (including their images) and secondary emission, a mechanism that shares some features with the space-charge saturation of the current in a diode at high fields. For N{sub b} = 3 x 10{sup 11} the electron cloud build-up growth rate and saturation density have a strong dependence on {sigma}{sub z} as {sigma}{sub z} decreases below {approx} 0.4 m, when the average electron-wall impact energy roughly reaches the energy E{sub max} where {delta} peaks. We also present improved results on emittance growth simulations of the beam obtained with the code WARP/POSINST in quasi-static mode, in which the beam-(electron cloud) interaction is lumped into N{sub s} 'stations' around the ring, where N{sub s} = 1, 2,..., 9. The emittance shows a rapid growth of {approx} 20% during the first {approx} 100 turns, followed by a much slower growth rate of {approx} 0.03%/turn. Concerning the electron cloud detection technique using microwave transmission, we present an improved dispersion relation for the TE mode of the microwaves, and a corresponding analytic estimate of the phase shift.

  17. System, apparatus and methods to implement high-speed network analyzers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ezick, James; Lethin, Richard; Ros-Giralt, Jordi; Szilagyi, Peter; Wohlford, David E

    2015-11-10

    Systems, apparatus and methods for the implementation of high-speed network analyzers are provided. A set of high-level specifications is used to define the behavior of the network analyzer emitted by a compiler. An optimized inline workflow to process regular expressions is presented without sacrificing the semantic capabilities of the processing engine. An optimized packet dispatcher implements a subset of the functions implemented by the network analyzer, providing a fast and slow path workflow used to accelerate specific processing units. Such dispatcher facility can also be used as a cache of policies, wherein if a policy is found, then packet manipulations associated with the policy can be quickly performed. An optimized method of generating DFA specifications for network signatures is also presented. The method accepts several optimization criteria, such as min-max allocations or optimal allocations based on the probability of occurrence of each signature input bit.

  18. Measurement of the Depth of Maximum of Extensive Air Showers above 10^18 eV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; /Lisbon, IST /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb

    2010-02-01

    We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, X{sub max}, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 10{sup 18} eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are selected for the analysis. The average shower maximum was found to evolve with energy at a rate of (106{sub -21}{sup +35}) g/cm{sup 2}/decade below 10{sup 18.24 {+-} 0.05}eV, and (24 {+-} 3) g/cm{sup 2}/decade above this energy. The measured shower-to-shower fluctuations decrease from about 55 to 26 g/cm{sup 2}. The interpretation of these results in terms of the cosmic ray mass composition is briefly discussed.

  19. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flinn, J.E.; Kelly, T.F.

    1999-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains. 20 figs.

  20. Comparison of prone versus supine 18F-FDG-PET of locally advanced breast cancer: Phantom and preliminary clinical studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Jason M.; Rani, Sudheer D.; Li, Xia; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Abramson, Richard G.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Partridge, Savannah C.; Kang, Hakmook; Linden, Hannah M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have demonstrated how imaging of the breast with patients lying prone using a supportive positioning device markedly facilitates longitudinal and/or multimodal image registration. In this contribution, the authors primary objective was to determine if there are differences in the standardized uptake value (SUV) derived from [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in breast tumors imaged in the standard supine position and in the prone position using a specialized positioning device. Methods: A custom positioning device was constructed to allow for breast scanning in the prone position. Rigid and nonrigid phantom studies evaluated differences in prone and supine PET. Clinical studies comprised 18F-FDG-PET of 34 patients with locally advanced breast cancer imaged in the prone position (with the custom support) followed by imaging in the supine position (without the support). Mean and maximum values (SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max}, respectively) were obtained from tumor regions-of-interest for both positions. Prone and supine SUV were linearly corrected to account for the differences in 18F-FDG uptake time. Correlation, BlandAltman, and nonparametric analyses were performed on uptake time-corrected and uncorrected data. Results: SUV from the rigid PET breast phantom imaged in the prone position with the support device was 1.9% lower than without the support device. In the nonrigid PET breast phantom, prone SUV with the support device was 5.0% lower than supine SUV without the support device. In patients, the median (range) difference in uptake time between prone and supine scans was 16.4 min (13.430.9 min), which was significantlybut not completelyreduced by the linear correction method. SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} from prone versus supine scans were highly correlated, with concordance correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.90, respectively. Prone SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} were significantly lower than supine in both original and uptake time-adjusted data across a range of index times (P < < 0.0001, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Before correcting for uptake time differences, BlandAltman analyses revealed proportional bias between prone and supine measurements (SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max}) that increased with higher levels of FDG uptake. After uptake time correction, this bias was significantly reduced (P < 0.01). Significant prone-supine differences, with regard to the spatial distribution of lesions relative to isocenter, were observed between the two scan positions, but this was poorly correlated with the residual (uptake time-corrected) prone-supine SUV{sub peak} difference (P = 0.78). Conclusions: Quantitative 18F-FDG-PET/CT of the breast in the prone position is not deleteriously affected by the support device but yields SUV that is consistently lower than those obtained in the standard supine position. SUV differences between scans arising from FDG uptake time differences can be substantially reduced, but not removed entirely, with the current correction method. SUV from the two scan orientations is quantitatively different and should not be assumed equivalent or interchangeable within the same subject. These findings have clinical relevance in that they underscore the importance of patient positioning while scanning as a clinical variable that must be accounted for with longitudinal PET measurement, for example, in the assessment of treatment response.

  1. MIENS Minimum Information about an ENvironmental Sequence and The GSC's Not-for-Profit (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Yilmaz, Pelin [Max Planck Institute - Bremen]; Kolker, Eugene [Seattle Childrens Hospital

    2011-04-29

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding Research Coordination Network from the National Science Foundation and was held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Pelin Yilmaz of the Max Planck Institute-Bremen talks about the MIENS specification and Eugene Kolker of Seattle Children's Hospital discusses the GSC's non-for-profit at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009

  2. A digital optical phase-locked loop for diode lasers based on field programmable gate array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Zhouxiang; Zhang Xian; Huang Kaikai; Lu Xuanhui

    2012-09-15

    We have designed and implemented a highly digital optical phase-locked loop (OPLL) for diode lasers in atom interferometry. The three parts of controlling circuit in this OPLL, including phase and frequency detector (PFD), loop filter and proportional integral derivative (PID) controller, are implemented in a single field programmable gate array chip. A structure type compatible with the model MAX9382/MCH12140 is chosen for PFD and pipeline and parallelism technology have been adapted in PID controller. Especially, high speed clock and twisted ring counter have been integrated in the most crucial part, the loop filter. This OPLL has the narrow beat note line width below 1 Hz, residual mean-square phase error of 0.14 rad{sup 2} and transition time of 100 {mu}s under 10 MHz frequency step. A main innovation of this design is the completely digitalization of the whole controlling circuit in OPLL for diode lasers.

  3. Semi-synthetic preparation of 1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (platelet activating factor) using plant cell cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, N.; Mangold, H.K.

    1985-04-01

    Incubation of photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures of rape (Brassica napus) and heterotrophic cell suspension cultures of soya (Glycine max) with 1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecyl-sn-glycerol or rac-1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecylglycerol leads in high yield (up to 78%) to labeled 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. Alkaline hydrolysis of the choline glycerophospholipids yields pure 1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. 1-O-(1'-14C)Hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (platelet activating factor) is obtained by acetylating the lyso compound. The semi-synthetic preparation described leads to labeled platelet activating factor in an overall yield of 50-60% without loss of specific activity.

  4. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kelly, Thomas F. (Madison, WI)

    1999-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains.

  5. Cross calibration of new x-ray films against direct exposure film from 1 to 8 keV using the X-pinch x-ray source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.M.; Pikuz, S.A.; Shelkovenko, T.A.; Mitchell, M.D.; Hammer, D.A.; Knauer, J.P.

    2005-11-15

    A cross calibration of readily available x-ray sensitive films has been carried out against the calibrated direct exposure film (DEF) which is no longer being manufactured by Kodak. Four-wire X pinches made from various metal wires were used as x-ray sources for this purpose. Tests were carried out for the Kodak films Biomax MS, Biomax XAR, M100, Technical Pan, and T-Max over the energy range of 1-8 keV (12.4-1.5 A wavelength). The same hand-development procedures as described by Henke et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 3, 1540 (1986)] were followed for all films in every test. Sensitivity curves as a function of wavelength for these films relative DEF are presented. These relative calibrations show that Biomax MS is likely to be the best replacement film for DEF for most purposes over the energy range tested here.

  6. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-14-259/260/261 AND MCU-14-315/316/317: APRIL AND MAY 2014 MONTHLY SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2014-08-05

    SRNL received two sets of SHT samples (MCU-14-259/260/261 in April 2014 and MCU-14- 315/316/317 in May 2014) for analysis. The samples were analyzed for composition. Both samples have similar chemical composition. As with the previous solvent sample results, these analyses indicate that the solvent does not require Isopar® L trimming at this time. Since an addition of TiDG and MaxCalix to the SHT was added in early July 2014, the solvent does not require TiDG addition at this time. The current TiDG level (1.5 mM) is above the minimum recommended operating level of 1 mM.

  7. Electron-cloud Build-up Simulations in the Proposed PS2: Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, M. A.; De Maria, R.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Rumolo, G.

    2010-05-05

    A replacement for the PS storage ring is being considered, in the context of the future LHC accelerator complex upgrade, that would likely place the new machine (the PS2) in a regime where the electron-cloud (EC) effect might be significant. We report here our current estimate of the EC density ne in the bending magnets and the field-free regions at injection and extraction beam energy, for both proposed bunch spacings, tb = 25 and 50 ns. The primary model parameters exercised are the peak secondary emission yield (SEY) delta max, the electron-wall impact energy at which the SEY peaks, Emax, and the chamber radius a in the fieldfree regions. We present many of our results as a function of the bunch intensity Nb, and we provide a tentative explanation for the non-monotonic behavior of ne as a function of Nb.

  8. Spin power and efficiency in an Aharnov-Bohm ring with an embedded magnetic impurity quantum dot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xi; Guo, Yong; Zheng, Jun; Chi, Feng

    2015-05-11

    Spin thermoelectric effects in an Aharnov-Bohm ring with a magnetic impurity quantum dot (QD) are theoretically investigated by using the nonequilibrium Green's function method. It is found that due to the exchange coupling between the impurity and the electrons in QD, spin output power, and efficiency can be significant and be further modulated by the gate voltage. The spin thermoelectric effect can be modulated effectively by adjusting the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) and the magnetic flux. The spin power and efficiency show zigzag oscillations, and thus spin thermoelectric effect can be switched by adjusting the magnetic flux phase factor and RSOI ones. In addition, the spin efficiency can be significantly enhanced by the coexistence of the RSOI and the magnetic flux, and the maximal value of normalized spin efficiency ?{sub max}/?{sub C}?=?0.35 is obtained. Our results show that such a QD ring device may be used as a manipulative spin thermoelectric generator.

  9. A=10C (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10C) GENERAL: See (TA60L, IN62, GR64C, VO64C). See also Table 10.24 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 10C: From the Q-value of the 10B(p, n)10C reaction (TA61E: Q0 = -4.393 ± 0.025 MeV) and the β+ end-point energy (BA63R: Eβ+(max) = 1.865 ± 0.015 MeV), the mass excess of 10C is 15.658 ± 0.013 MeV, based on 12C ≡ 0 (MA65A). 1. 10C(β+)10B Qm = 3.606 The decay is complex. See 10B. 2. 10B(p, n)10C Qm = -4.388 The ground state threshold

  10. A=11Be (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (Not illustrated) GENERAL: Mass of 11Be: From the decay energy, 11Be(β-)11B, and using the Wapstra mass (WA55C) for 11B, the mass excess of 11Be, M - A = 23.39 ± 0.15 MeV (WI59). The binding energies of a neutron, deuteron and triton in 11Be are, respectively, 0.54, 18.4 and 15.76 MeV. 1. 11Be(β-)11B Qm = 11.48 The decay proceeds to 11Bg.s. and to several excited states. For the ground-state transition, Eβ(max) = 11.48 ± 0.15 MeV; τ1/2 = 13.57 ± 0.15 sec, log ft = 6.77 (AL58E,

  11. A=11C (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 11C) GENERAL: See also Table 11.8 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (KU56, KU57A, FR58B). 1. 11C(β+)11B Qm = 1.981 The spectrum is simple; Eβ+(max) = 968 ± 8 keV (WO54A). The mean of half-lives reported in (55AJ61) is 20.36 ± 0.05 min. Recent values of the half-lives are 20.26 ± 0.1 min (BA55E), 20.8 ± 0.2 min (PR57B) and 20.11 ± 0.13 min (AR58); log ft = 3.62 (WO54A). The ratio of K-capture to positron emission is 0.19 ± 0.03

  12. A=15B (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 15B) Mass of 15B: Wapstra adopts 28970 ± 22 keV (1988WA18, and private communication) and so do we: see (1986AJ01). 15B is then stable with respect to 14B + n by 2.77 MeV. Decay of 15B: 15B decays by β- emission to 15C: Qβ- (max) = 19.10 MeV. The character of the decay is not known but measurements of the half-life are 11 ± 1 ms (1984DU15), 8.8 ± 0.6 ms (1986CU01), 10.4 ± 0.3 ms (1988MU08), 10.8 ± 0.5 ms (1988SA04), 10.3+0.6-0.5 ms (1989LE16). The

  13. A=17B (1977AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    77AJ02) (Not illustrated) 17B has been observed in the 4.8 GeV proton bombardment of uranium: it is particle stable and its ground state Jπ is probably 3/2- (1973BO30, 1974BO05). Its atomic mass excess is calculated to be 44.37 MeV (transverse form of the mass equation): it is then stable with respect to decay into 15B + 2n by 0.53 MeV (1974TH01, 1975JE02). The Eβ-(max) for the decay to 17C would then be 23.1 MeV. See also (1971AJ02) and (1972GA1F, 1972TH13, 1972WI1C, 1975BE31

  14. A=17C (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17C) A Q-value measurement of the 48Ca(18O, 17C)49Ti reaction leads to an atomic mass excess of 21.039 ± 20 keV (1982FI10; E(18O) = 112 MeV) for 17C, using the (1985WA02) a.m.e. values for 18O, 48Ca and 49Ti. See also (1982AJ01). 17C is then stable with respect to 16C + n by 0.73 MeV. Eβ-(max) to 17Ng.s. = 13.17 MeV. See also (1984KL06). The half-life of 17C is 202 ± 17 msec (1986CU01). An excited state of 17C is reported at Ex = 292 ± 20 keV [see

  15. A=17C (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17C) The atomic mass excess given by (1988WA18) for 17C is 21035 ± 17 keV. See also (1986AN07). 17C is then stable with respect to 16C + n by 0.73 MeV. Eβ- (max) to 17Ng.s. = 13.16 MeV. See also (1986BI1A). The half-life of 17C has been measured to be 202 ± 17 msec (1986CU01), 220 ± 80 msec (1986DU07), 180 ± 31 msec (1988SA04), and 174 ± 31 msec (1991RE02). Relative intensities of β-delayed gammas were measured by (1986DU07, 1986HU1A, 1986JEZY) [see

  16. Partial Differential Algebraic Sensitivity Analysis Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-05-15

    PDASAC solves stiff, nonlinear initial-boundary-value in a timelike dimension t and a space dimension x. Plane, circular cylindrical or spherical boundaries can be handled. Mixed-order systems of partial differential and algebraic equations can be analyzed with members of order or 0 or 1 in t, 0,1 or 2 in x. Parametric sensitivities of the calculated states are compted simultaneously on request, via the Jacobian of the state equations. Initial and boundary conditions are efficiently reconciled.more » Local error control (in the max-norm or the 2-norm) is provided for the state vector and can include the parametric sensitivites if desired.« less

  17. MOA-2010-BLG-311: A PLANETARY CANDIDATE BELOW THE THRESHOLD OF RELIABLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, J. C.; Hung, L.-W.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Bond, I. A.; Allen, W.; Monard, L. A. G.; Albrow, M. D.; Fouque, P.; Dominik, M.; Tsapras, Y.; Udalski, A.; Zellem, R.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Drummond, J.; Gorbikov, E.; Han, C. E-mail: rzellem@lpl.arizona.edu; Collaboration: muFUN Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; and others

    2013-05-20

    We analyze MOA-2010-BLG-311, a high magnification (A{sub max} > 600) microlensing event with complete data coverage over the peak, making it very sensitive to planetary signals. We fit this event with both a point lens and a two-body lens model and find that the two-body lens model is a better fit but with only {Delta}{chi}{sup 2} {approx} 80. The preferred mass ratio between the lens star and its companion is q = 10{sup -3.7{+-}0.1}, placing the candidate companion in the planetary regime. Despite the formal significance of the planet, we show that because of systematics in the data the evidence for a planetary companion to the lens is too tenuous to claim a secure detection. When combined with analyses of other high-magnification events, this event helps empirically define the threshold for reliable planet detection in high-magnification events, which remains an open question.

  18. A=18N (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78AJ03) (See the Isobar Diagram for 18N) GENERAL: See also (1972AJ02) and Table 18.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). See (1972GA1F, 1973TO16, 1973WI15, 1974TH01, 1975BE31, 1977AR06). 1. 18N(β-)18O Qm = 14.06 The half-life of 18N is 0.63 ± 0.03 sec (1964CH19): Eβ(max) = 9.4 ± 0.4 MeV. The decay is to 18O*(4.46), which subsequently decays via 18O*(3.63, 1.98) [see reaction 21 in 18O]. The allowed nature [log ft = 4.88] of the decay to the 1- state at 4.46 MeV leads to Jπ = 0-, 1- or

  19. Electron contamination modeling and reduction in a 1 T open bore inline MRI-linac system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oborn, B. M.; Kolling, S.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Crozier, S.; Litzenberg, D. W.; Keall, P. J.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: A potential side effect of inline MRI-linac systems is electron contamination focusing causing a high skin dose. In this work, the authors reexamine this prediction for an open bore 1 T MRI system being constructed for the Australian MRI-Linac Program. The efficiency of an electron contamination deflector (ECD) in purging electron contamination from the linac head is modeled, as well as the impact of a helium gas region between the deflector and phantom surface for lowering the amount of air-generated contamination. Methods: Magnetic modeling of the 1 T MRI was used to generate 3D magnetic field maps both with and without the presence of an ECD located immediately below the MLCs. Forty-seven different ECD designs were modeled and for each the magnetic field map was imported into Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations including the linac head, ECD, and a 30 30 30 cm{sup 3} water phantom located at isocenter. For the first generation system, the x-ray source to isocenter distance (SID) will be 160 cm, resulting in an 81.2 cm long air gap from the base of the ECD to the phantom surface. The first 71.2 cm was modeled as air or helium gas, with the latter encased between two windows of 50 ?m thick high density polyethlyene. 2D skin doses (at 70 ?m depth) were calculated across the phantom surface at 1 1 mm{sup 2} resolution for 6 MV beams of field size of 5 5, 10 10, and 20 20 cm{sup 2}. Results: The skin dose was predicted to be of similar magnitude as the generic systems modeled in previous work, 230% to 1400% ofD {sub max} for 5 5 to 20 20 cm{sup 2}, respectively. Inclusion of the ECD introduced a nonuniformity to the MRI imaging field that ranged from ?20 to ?140 ppm while the net force acting on the ECD ranged from ?151 N to ?1773 N. Various ECD designs were 100% efficient at purging the electron contamination into the ECD magnet banks; however, a small percentage were scattered back into the beam and continued to the phantom surface. Replacing a large portion of the extended air-column between the ECD and phantom surface with helium gas is a key element as it significantly minimized the air-generated contamination. When using an optimal ECD and helium gas region, the 70 ?m skin dose is predicted to increase moderately inside a small hot spot over that of the case with no magnetic field present for the jaw defined square beams examined here. These increases include from 12% to 40% of D {sub max} for 5 5 cm{sup 2}, 18% to 55% of D {sub max} for 10 10 cm{sup 2}, and from 23% to 65% of D {sub max} for 20 20 cm{sup 2}. Conclusions: Coupling an efficient ECD and helium gas region below the MLCs in the 160 cm isocenter MRI-linac system is predicted to ameliorate the impact electron contamination focusing has on skin dose increases. An ECD is practical as its impact on the MRI imaging distortion is correctable, and the mechanical forces acting on it manageable from an engineering point of view.

  20. Observation of Spontaneous Neoclassical Tearing Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.D. Fredrickson

    2001-10-03

    We present data in this paper from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) which challenges the commonly held belief that extrinsic MHD events such as sawteeth or ELMs [edge localized modes] are required to provide the seed islands that trigger Neoclassical Tearing Modes (NTMs). While sawteeth are reported to provide the trigger for most of the NTMs on DIII-D [at General Atomics in San Diego, California] and ASDEX-U [at Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik in Garching, Germany], the majority of NTMs seen in TFTR occur in plasmas without sawteeth, that is which are above the beta threshold for sawtooth stabilization. Examples of NTMs appearing in the absence of any detectable extrinsic MHD activity will be shown. Conversely, large n=1 modes in plasmas above the NTM beta threshold generally do not trigger NTMs. An alternative mechanism for generating seed islands will be discussed.

  1. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Morrow, Bill; Price, Lynn

    2011-01-14

    After over two decades of staggering economic growth and soaring energy demand, China has started taking serious actions to reduce its economic energy and carbon intensity by setting short and medium-term intensity reduction targets, renewable generation targets and various supporting policies and programs. In better understanding how further policies and actions can be taken to shape China's future energy and emissions trajectory, it is important to first identify where the largest opportunities for efficiency gains and emission reduction lie from sectoral and end-use perspectives. Besides contextualizing China's progress towards reaching the highest possible efficiency levels through the adoption of the most advanced technologies from a bottom-up perspective, the actual economic costs and benefits of adopting efficiency measures are also assessed in this study. This study presents two modeling methodologies that evaluate both the technical and economic potential of raising China's efficiency levels to the technical maximum across sectors and the subsequent carbon and energy emission implications through 2030. The technical savings potential by efficiency measure and remaining gap for improvements are identified by comparing a reference scenario in which China continues the current pace of with a Max Tech scenario in which the highest technically feasible efficiencies and advanced technologies are adopted irrespective of costs. In addition, from an economic perspective, a cost analysis of selected measures in the key industries of cement and iron and steel help quantify the actual costs and benefits of achieving the highest efficiency levels through the development of cost of conserved energy curves for the sectors. The results of this study show that total annual energy savings potential of over one billion tonne of coal equivalent exists beyond the expected reference pathway under Max Tech pathway in 2030. CO2 emissions will also peak earlier under Max Tech, though the 2020s is a likely turning point for both emission trajectories. Both emission pathways must meet all announced and planned policies, targets and non-fossil generation targets, or an even wider efficiency gap will exist. The savings potential under Max Tech varies by sector, but the industrial sector appears to hold the largest energy savings and emission reduction potential. The primary source of savings is from electricity rather than fuel, and electricity savings are magnified by power sector decarbonization through increasing renewable generation and coal generation efficiency improvement. In order to achieve the maximum energy savings and emission reduction potential, efficiency improvements and technology switching must be undertaken across demand sectors as well as in the growing power sector. From an economic perspective, the cost of conserved energy analysis indicates that nearly all measures for the iron and steel and cement industry are cost-effective. All 23 efficiency measures analyzed for the cement industry are cost-effective, with combined CO2 emission reduction potential of 448 Mt CO2. All of the electricity savings measures in the iron and steel industry are cost-effective, but the cost-effective savings potential for fuel savings measures is slightly lower than total technical savings potential. The total potential savings from these measures confirm the magnitude of savings in the scenario models, and illustrate the remaining efficiency gap in the cement and iron and steel industries.

  2. Fermion resonances on a thick brane with a piecewise warp factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Haitao; Liu Yuxiao; Zhao Zhenhua; Guo Heng

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, we mainly investigate the problems of resonances of massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) fermions on a single scalar constructed thick brane with a piecewise warp factor matching smoothly. The distance between two boundaries and the other parameters are determined by one free parameter through three junction conditions. For the generalized Yukawa coupling {eta}{Psi}{phi}{sup k{Psi}} with odd k=1,3,5,..., the mass eigenvalue m, width {Gamma}, lifetime {tau}, and maximal probability P{sub max} of fermion resonances are obtained. Our numerical calculations show that the brane without internal structure also favors the appearance of resonant states for both left- and right-handed fermions. The scalar-fermion coupling and the thickness of the brane influence the resonant behaviors of the massive KK fermions.

  3. Comparison with Carrier Multiplication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complete Theory of Down-Conversion, and a Comparison with Carrier Multiplication 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 Measured Quantum Efficiency (QE) Efficiency [%] with Down-Conversion Single- Junction Threshold Solar Cell 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Peak Efficiency [%] Splitting Multiplicity (M) C=max C=1000 C=100 C=1 C=10 Down Conversion Carrier Multiplication Ze'ev R. Abrams, Avi Niv, Majid Gharghi, Chris Gladden & Xiang Zhang Materials Science

  4. 3D electromagnetic inversion for environmental site characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1997-04-01

    A 3-D non-linear electromagnetic inversion scheme has been developed to produce images of subsurface conductivity structure from electromagnetic geophysical data. The solution is obtained by successive linearized model updates where full forward modeling is employed at each iteration to compute model sensitivities and predicted data. Regularization is applied to the problem to provide stability. Because the inverse part of the problem requires the solution of 10`s to 100`s of thousands of unknowns, and because each inverse iteration requires many forward models to be computed, the code has been implemented on massively parallel computer platforms. The use of the inversion code to image environmental sites is demonstrated on a data set collected with the Apex Parametrics {open_quote}MaxMin I-8S{close_quote} over a section of stacked barrels and metal filled boxes at the Idaho National Laboratory`s {open_quote}Cold Test Pit{close_quote}. The MaxMin is a loop-loop frequency domain system which operates from 440 Hz up to 56 kHz using various coil separations; for this survey coil separations of 15, 30 and 60 feet were employed. The out-of phase data are shown to be of very good quality while the in-phase are rather noisy due to slight mispositioning errors, which cause improper cancellation of the primary free space field in the receiver. Weighting the data appropriately by the estimated noise and applying the inversion scheme is demonstrated to better define the structure of the pit. In addition, comparisons are given for single coil separations and multiple separations to show the benefits of using multiple offset data.

  5. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Chonggang [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fisher, Rosie [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cai, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); McDowell, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V{sub c,max} (maximum carboxylation rate) and J{sub max} (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the vegetation feedbacks to climate in Earth system models.

  6. Magnetic phase transitions and entropy change in layered NdMn{sub 1.7}Cr{sub 0.3}Si{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Md Din, M. F. Dou, S. X.; Wang, J. L.; Campbell, S. J.; Studer, A. J.; Avdeev, M.; Kennedy, S. J.; Gu, Q. F.; Zeng, R.

    2014-01-27

    A giant magnetocaloric effect has been observed around the Curie temperature, T{sub C} ∼ 42 K, in NdMn{sub 1.7}Cr{sub 0.3}Si{sub 2} with no discernible thermal and magnetic hysteresis losses. Below 400 K, three magnetic phase transitions take place around 380 K, 320 K and 42 K. Detailed high resolution synchrotron and neutron powder diffraction (10–400 K) confirmed the magnetic transitions and phases as follows: T{sub N}{sup intra} ∼ 380 K denotes the transition from paramagnetism to intralayer antiferromagnetism (AFl), T{sub N}{sup inter} ∼ 320 K represents the transition from the AFl structure to the canted antiferromagnetic spin structure (AFmc), while T{sub C} ∼ 42 K denotes the first order magnetic transition from AFmc to canted ferromagnetism (Fmc + F(Nd)) due to ordering of the Mn and Nd sub-lattices. The maximum values of the magnetic entropy change and the adiabatic temperature change, around T{sub C} for a field change of 5 T are evaluated to be −ΔS{sub M}{sup max} ∼ 15.9 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} and ΔT{sub ad}{sup max} ∼ 5 K, respectively. The first order magnetic transition associated with the low levels of hysteresis losses (thermal <∼0.8 K; magnetic field <∼0.1 T) in NdMn{sub 1.7}Cr{sub 0.3}Si{sub 2} offers potential as a candidate for magnetic refrigerator applications in the temperature region below 45 K.

  7. Magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect in the RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and RCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R = Ho, Er) compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mo, Zhao-Jun; Shen, Jun E-mail: tangcc@hebut.edu.cn; Wu, Jian-Feng; Yan, Li-Qin; Wang, Li-Chen; Sun, Ji-rong; Shen, Bao-Gen; Gao, Xin-Qiang; Tang, Cheng-Chun E-mail: tangcc@hebut.edu.cn

    2014-02-21

    The magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and RCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R = Ho, Er) compounds have been investigated. All these compounds possess an antiferromagnetic (AFM)-paramagnetic (PM) transition around their respective Neel temperatures. The RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} compounds undergo spin-glassy behavior above Neel temperature. Furthermore, a field-induced metamagnetic transition from AFM to ferromagnetic (FM) states is observed in these compounds. The calculated magnetic entropy changes show that all RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and RCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R = Ho, Er) compounds, especially, ErCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} exhibits large MCEs with no thermal hysteresis and magnetic hysteresis loss. The value of −ΔS{sub M}{sup max} reaches 22.8 J/Kg K for magnetic field changes from 0 to 5 T. In particular, for field changes of 1 and 2 T, the giant reversible magnetic entropy changes −ΔS{sub M}{sup max} are 8.3 and 15.8 J/kg K at 2.5 K, which is lower than the boiling point of helium. The low-field giant magnetic entropy change, together with ignorable thermal hysteresis and field hysteresis loss of ErCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} compound is expected to have effective applications in low temperature magnetic refrigeration.

  8. Crossover from first-order to second-order phase transitions and magnetocaloric effect in La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.91}Ni{sub 0.09}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phan, The-Long; Zhang, P.; Yu, S. C.; Thanh, T. D.

    2014-05-07

    We have prepared La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.91}Ni{sub 0.09}O{sub 3} and then studied its critical behavior and magnetocaloric effect. Analyzing temperature and field dependences of magnetization around the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition reveals the sample undergoing the second-order magnetic phase transition with the critical parameters T{sub C} ≈ 199.4 K, β = 0.171 ± 0.006, and γ = 0.976 ± 0.012. A considerable difference of these critical exponents compared with those expected for the standard models is due to the sample exhibiting the crossover property (tricriticality); its exponent values are more close to those expected for the tricritical mean-field theory with β = 0.25 and γ = 1. Under the field 40 kOe, the maximum magnetic entropy change (−ΔS{sub max}) around T{sub C} is about 7.1 J·kg{sup −1}·K{sup −1}, corresponding to a refrigerant capacity RC ≈ 170 J/kg. Particularly, its magnetic-field dependence obeys a power law |ΔS{sub max}| ∝ H{sup n}, where n = 0.55 is quite far from the value calculated from the relation n = 1 + (β − 1)/(β + γ)

  9. Solvent Hold Tank Sample Results for MCU-15-661-662-663: April 2015 Monthly Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2015-07-08

    The Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) received one set of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-15-661, MCU-15-662, and MCU-15-663 pulled on April 2, 2015) for analysis. The samples were combined and analyzed for composition. Analysis of the composite sample MCU-15-661-662-663 indicated a low concentration (~ 63% of nominal) of the suppressor (TiDG) and a slightly below the nominal concentration (~ 10% below nominal) of the extractant (MaxCalix). The modifier (CS-7SB) level was also 10% below its nominal value while the Isopar™ L level was slightly above its nominal value. This analysis confirms the addition of Isopar™L to the solvent on March 6, 2015. Despite that the values are below target component levels, the current levels of TiDG, CS-7SB and MaxCalix are sufficient for continuing operation without adding a trim at this time until the next monthly sample. No impurities above the 1000 ppm level were found in this solvent. However, the sample was found to contain approximately 18.4 ug/gsolvent mercury. The gamma level increased to 8 E5 dpm/mLsolvent and it represents an order of magnitude increase relative to previous solvent samples. The increase means less cesium is being stripped from the solvent. Further analysis is needed to determine if the recent spike in the gamma measurement is due to external factors such as algae or other material that may impede stripping. The laboratory will continue to monitor the quality of the solvent in particular for any new impurity or degradation of the solvent components.

  10. China's Pathways to Achieving 40% ~ 45% Reduction in CO{sub 2} Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Ke, Jing

    2011-09-30

    Achieving China’s goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO{sub 2} per unit of GDP) by 40% to 45% percent below 2005 levels by 2020 will require the strengthening and expansion of energy efficiency policies across the buildings, industries and transport sectors. This study uses a bottom-up, end-use model and two scenarios -- an enhanced energy efficiency (E3) scenario and an alternative maximum technically feasible energy efficiency improvement (Max Tech) scenario – to evaluate what policies and technical improvements are needed to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. The findings from this study show that a determined approach by China can lead to the achievement of its 2020 goal. In particular, with full success in deepening its energy efficiency policies and programs but following the same general approach used during the 11th Five Year Plan, it is possible to achieve 49% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions per unit of GDP (CO{sub 2} emissions intensity) in 2020 from 2005 levels (E3 case). Under the more optimistic but feasible assumptions of development and penetration of advanced energy efficiency technology (Max Tech case), China could achieve a 56% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions intensity in 2020 relative to 2005 with cumulative reduction of energy use by 2700 Mtce and of CO{sub 2} emissions of 8107 Mt CO{sub 2} between 2010 and 2020. Energy savings and CO{sub 2} mitigation potential varies by sector but most of the energy savings potential is found in energy-intensive industry. At the same time, electricity savings and the associated emissions reduction are magnified by increasing renewable generation and improving coal generation efficiency, underscoring the dual importance of end-use efficiency improvements and power sector decarbonization.

  11. Single Stage Contactor Testing Of The Next Generation Solvent Blend

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D. T.; Peters, T. B.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Poirier, M. R.; Brass, E. A.; Garrison, A. G.; Ketusky, E. T.

    2014-01-06

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent to increase the cesium decontamination factor. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facility the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing utilized a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the new extractant, MaxCalix, as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 liquid-to-liquid centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. The results indicate that hydraulically, the NGS solvent performed hydraulically similar to the current solvent which was expected. For the organic carryover 93% of the solvent is predicted to be recovered from the stripping operation and 96% from the extraction operation. As for the mass transfer, the NGS solvent significantly improved the cesium DF by at least an order of magnitude when extrapolating the One-stage results to actual Seven-stage extraction operation with a stage efficiency of 95%.

  12. Stochastic acceleration of electrons by fast magnetosonic waves in solar flares: the effects of anisotropy in velocity and wavenumber space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2014-11-20

    We develop a model for stochastic acceleration of electrons in solar flares. As in several previous models, the electrons are accelerated by turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )} via transit-time-damping (TTD) interactions. (In TTD interactions, fast waves act like moving magnetic mirrors that push the electrons parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field). We also include the effects of Coulomb collisions and the waves' parallel electric fields. Unlike previous models, our model is two-dimensional in both momentum space and wavenumber space and takes into account the anisotropy of the wave power spectrum F{sub k} and electron distribution function f {sub e}. We use weak turbulence theory and quasilinear theory to obtain a set of equations that describes the coupled evolution of F{sub k} and f {sub e}. We solve these equations numerically and find that the electron distribution function develops a power-law-like non-thermal tail within a restricted range of energies E in (E {sub nt}, E {sub max}). We obtain approximate analytic expressions for E {sub nt} and E {sub max}, which describe how these minimum and maximum energies depend upon parameters such as the electron number density and the rate at which fast-wave energy is injected into the acceleration region at large scales. We contrast our results with previous studies that assume that F{sub k} and f {sub e} are isotropic, and we compare one of our numerical calculations with the time-dependent hard-X-ray spectrum observed during the 1980 June 27 flare. In our numerical calculations, the electron energy spectra are softer (steeper) than in models with isotropic F{sub k} and f {sub e} and closer to the values inferred from observations of solar flares.

  13. Effect of neutron irradiation on defect evolution in Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tallman, Darin J.; He, Lingfeng; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Hoffman, Elizabeth N.; Kohse, Gordon; Sindelar, Robert L.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2015-10-23

    Here, we report on the characterization of defects formed in polycrystalline Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples exposed to neutron irradiation – up to 0.1 displacements per atom (dpa) at 350 ± 40 °C or 695 ± 25 °C, and up to 0.4 dpa at 350 ± 40 °C. Black spots are observed in both Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC after irradiation to both 0.1 and 0.4 dpa at 350 °C. After irradiation to 0.1 dpa at 695 °C, small basal dislocation loops, with a Burgers vector of b = 1/2 [0001] are observed in both materials. At 9 ± 3 and 10 ±more » 5 nm, the loop diameters in the Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples, respectively, were comparable. At 1 × 1023 loops/m3, the dislocation loop density in Ti2AlC was ≈1.5 orders of magnitude greater than in Ti3SiC2, at 3 x 1021 loops/m3. After irradiation at 350 °C, extensive microcracking was observed in Ti2AlC, but not in Ti3SiC2. The room temperature electrical resistivities increased as a function of neutron dose for all samples tested, and appear to saturate in the case of Ti3SiC2. The MAX phases are unequivocally more neutron radiation tolerant than the impurity phases TiC and Al2O3. Based on these results, Ti3SiC2 appears to be a more promising MAX phase candidate for high temperature nuclear applications than Ti2AlC.« less

  14. DEEP, LOW-MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. XII. CK BOOTIS WITH POSSIBLE CYCLIC MAGNETIC ACTIVITY AND ADDITIONAL COMPANION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.-G.; Qian, S.-B.; Soonthornthum, B. E-mail: qsb@ynao.ac.cn

    2012-05-15

    We present precision CCD photometry, a period study, and a two-color simultaneous Wilson code solution of the short-period contact binary CK Bootis. The asymmetric light curves were modeled by a dark spot on the primary component. The result identifies that CK Boo is an A-type W UMa binary with a high fillout of f = 71.7({+-} 4.4)%. From the O - C curve, it is found that the orbital period changes in a complicated mode, i.e., a long-term increase with two sinusoidal variations. One cyclic oscillation with a period of 10.67({+-} 0.20) yr may result from magnetic activity cycles, which are identified by the variability of Max. I - Max. II. Another sinusoidal variation (i.e., A = 0.0131 days({+-} 0.0009 days) and P{sub 3} = 24.16({+-} 0.64) yr) may be attributed to the light-time effect due to a third body. This kind of additional companion can extract angular momentum from the central binary system. The orbital period secularly increases at a rate of dP/dt = +9.79 ({+-}0.80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} days yr{sup -1}, which may be interpreted by conservative mass transfer from the secondary to the primary. This kind of deep, low-mass ratio overcontact binaries may evolve into a rapid-rotating single star, only if the contact configuration do not break down at J{sub spin} > (1/3)J{sub orb}.

  15. Solvent Blending Strategy to Upgrade MCU CSSX Solvent to Equivalent Next-Generation CSSX Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-12-01

    The results of the present study have validated an equal-volume blending strategy for upgrading freshly prepared CSSX solvent to a blended solvent functionally equivalent to NG-CSSX solvent. It is shown that blending fresh CSSX solvent as currently used in MCU with an equal volume of an NG-CSSX solvent concentrate of appropriate composition yields a blended solvent composition (46.5 mM of MaxCalix, 3.5 mM of BOBCalixC6, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, 3 mM of guanidine suppressor, and 1.5 mM of TOA in Isopar L) that exhibits equivalent batch ESS performance to that of the NG-CSSX solvent containing 50 mM of MaxCalix, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, and 3 mM of guanidine suppressor in Isopar L. The solvent blend composition is robust to third-phase formation. Results also show that a blend containing up to 60% v/v of CSSX solvent could be accommodated with minimal risk. Extraction and density data for the effect of solvent concentration mimicking diluent evaporation or over-dilution of the equal-volume blended solvent are also given, providing input for setting operational limits. Given that the experiments employed all pristine chemicals, the results do not qualify a blended solvent starting with actual used MCU solvent, which can be expected to have undergone some degree of degradation. Consequently, further work should be considered to evaluate this risk and implement appropriate remediation if needed.

  16. Next Generation Solvent Performance in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Process - 15495

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Tara E.; Scherman, Carl; Martin, David; Suggs, Patricia

    2015-01-14

    Changes to the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) flow-sheet were implemented in the facility. Implementation included changing the scrub and strip chemicals and concentrations, modifying the O/A ratios for the strip, scrub, and extraction contactor banks, and blending the current BoBCalixC6 extractant-based solvent in MCU with clean MaxCalix extractant-based solvent. During the successful demonstration period, the MCU process was subject to rigorous oversight to ensure hydraulic stability and chemical/radionuclide analysis of the key process tanks (caustic wash tank, solvent hold tank, strip effluent hold tank, and decontaminated salt solution hold tank) to evaluate solvent carryover to downstream facilities and the effectiveness of cesium removal from the liquid salt waste. Results indicated the extraction of cesium was significantly more effective with an average Decontamination Factor (DF) of 1,129 (range was 107 to 1,824) and that stripping was effective. The contactor hydraulic performance was stable and satisfactory, as indicated by contactor vibration, contactor rotational speed, and flow stability; all of which remained at or near target values. Furthermore, the Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) level and specific gravity was as expected, indicating that solvent integrity and organic hydraulic stability were maintained. The coalescer performances were in the range of processing results under the BOBCalixC6 flow sheet, indicating negligible adverse impact of NGS deployment. After the Demonstration period, MCU began processing via routine operations. Results to date reiterate the enhanced cesium extraction and stripping capability of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) flow sheet. This paper presents process performance results of the NGS Demonstration and continued operations of MCU utilizing the blended BobCalixC6-MaxCalix solvent under the NGS flowsheet.

  17. Nanocrystalline SiC and Ti3SiC2 Alloys for Reactor Materials: Diffusion of Fission Product Surrogates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Jiang, Weilin

    2014-11-01

    MAX phases, such as titanium silicon carbide (Ti3SiC2), have a unique combination of both metallic and ceramic properties, which make them attractive for potential nuclear applications. Ti3SiC2 has been suggested in the literature as a possible fuel cladding material. Prior to the application, it is necessary to investigate diffusivities of fission products in the ternary compound at elevated temperatures. This study attempts to obtain relevant data and make an initial assessment for Ti3SiC2. Ion implantation was used to introduce fission product surrogates (Ag and Cs) and a noble metal (Au) in Ti3SiC2, SiC, and a dual-phase nanocomposite of Ti3SiC2/SiC synthesized at PNNL. Thermal annealing and in-situ Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) were employed to study the diffusivity of the various implanted species in the materials. In-situ RBS study of Ti3SiC2 implanted with Au ions at various temperatures was also performed. The experimental results indicate that the implanted Ag in SiC is immobile up to the highest temperature (1273 K) applied in this study; in contrast, significant out-diffusion of both Ag and Au in MAX phase Ti3SiC2 occurs during ion implantation at 873 K. Cs in Ti3SiC2 is found to diffuse during post-irradiation annealing at 973 K, and noticeable Cs release from the sample is observed. This study may suggest caution in using Ti3SiC2 as a fuel cladding material for advanced nuclear reactors operating at very high temperatures. Further studies of the related materials are recommended.

  18. Residual stress and damage-induced critical fracture on CO2 laser treated fused silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, M; Stolken, J; Vignes, R; Norton, M

    2009-11-02

    Localized damage repair and polishing of silica-based optics using mid- and far-IR CO{sub 2} lasers has been shown to be an effective method for increasing optical damage threshold in the UV. However, it is known that CO{sub 2} laser heating of silicate surfaces can lead to a level of residual stress capable of causing critical fracture either during or after laser treatment. Sufficient control of the surface temperature as a function of time and position is therefore required to limit this residual stress to an acceptable level to avoid critical fracture. In this work they present the results of 351 nm, 3 ns Gaussian damage growth experiments within regions of varying residual stress caused by prior CO{sub 2} laser exposures. Thermally stressed regions were non-destructively characterized using polarimetry and confocal Raman microscopy to measure the stress induced birefringence and fictive temperature respectively. For 1 {approx} 40s square pulse CO{sub 2} laser exposures created over 0.5-1.25 kW/cm{sup 2} with a 1-3 mm 1/e{sup 2} diameter beam (T{sub max} {approx} 1500-3000 K), the critical damage site size leading to fracture increases weakly with peak temperature, but shows a stronger dependence on cooling rate, as predicted by finite element hydrodynamics simulations. Confocal micro-Raman was used to probe structural changes to the glass over different thermal histories and indicated a maximum fictive temperature of 1900K for T{sub max} {ge} 2000 K. The effect of cooling rate on fictive temperature caused by CO{sub 2} laser heating are consistent with finite element calculations based on a Tool-Narayanaswamy relaxation model.

  19. Vapor deposition of water on graphitic surfaces: Formation of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupi, Laura; Kastelowitz, Noah; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-11-14

    Carbonaceous surfaces are a major source of atmospheric particles and could play an important role in the formation of ice. Here we investigate through molecular simulations the stability, metastability, and molecular pathways of deposition of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, and ice I from water vapor on graphitic and atomless Lennard-Jones surfaces as a function of temperature. We find that bilayer ice is the most stable ice polymorph for small cluster sizes, nevertheless it can grow metastable well above its region of thermodynamic stability. In agreement with experiments, the simulations predict that on increasing temperature the outcome of water deposition is amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water. The deposition nucleation of bilayer ice and ice I is preceded by the formation of small liquid clusters, which have two wetting states: bilayer pancake-like (wetting) at small cluster size and droplet-like (non-wetting) at larger cluster size. The wetting state of liquid clusters determines which ice polymorph is nucleated: bilayer ice nucleates from wetting bilayer liquid clusters and ice I from non-wetting liquid clusters. The maximum temperature for nucleation of bilayer ice on flat surfaces, T{sub B}{sup max} is given by the maximum temperature for which liquid water clusters reach the equilibrium melting line of bilayer ice as wetting bilayer clusters. Increasing water-surface attraction stabilizes the pancake-like wetting state of liquid clusters leading to larger T{sub B}{sup max} for the flat non-hydrogen bonding surfaces of this study. The findings of this study should be of relevance for the understanding of ice formation by deposition mode on carbonaceous atmospheric particles, including soot.

  20. Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

    2010-05-03

    The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar magnitude.

  1. Solvent hold tank sample results for MCU-15-802-803-804-805-806-807 August monthly sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Jones, D. H.

    2016-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received one set of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-15-802-803-804-805-806-807), pulled on 08/31/2015 for analysis. The samples were combined and analyzed for composition. Analysis of the composite sample MCU-15-802-803-804-805-806-807 indicated a low concentration (~ 45 % of nominal) of the suppressor (TiDG) and a slightly lower than nominal concentration of the modifier (Cs-7SB) in the solvent. The extractant (MaxCalix) concentration was at its nominal value. Based on this current monthly sample, the levels of TiDG, MaxCalix, and modifier were sufficient for continuing operation without adding a trim during that time but it is recommended that an addition of TiDG, modifier and Isopar™L should be made in the next few months. This monthly sample’s rheology, as determined by Hydrogen Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H-NMR), is consistent with the rheology of the standard NGS solvent made in the lab (Scratch solvent 5/14/2014). No impurities above the 1000 ppm level were found in this solvent by the Semi-Volatile Organic Analysis (SVOA). No impurities were observed in the Hydrogen Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HNMR). In addition, up to 16.7 micrograms of mercury per gram of solvent (or 14 μg/mL) was detected in this sample. The laboratory will continue to monitor the quality of the solvent in particular for any new impurities or degradation of the solvent components.

  2. Mechanistic studies of the reaction of reduced methane monooxygenase hydroxylase with dioxygen and substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentine, A.M.; Stahl, S.S.; Lippard, S.J.

    1999-04-28

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) catalyzes the oxidation of methane to methanol. Single-turnover reactions of sMMO from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) were studied by stopped-flow optical spectroscopy to examine further the activated dioxygen intermediates and their reactions with hydrocarbon substrates. A diiron(III) peroxo species designated H{sub peroxo} is the first intermediate observed in the reaction between the chemically reduced hydroxylase (H{sub red}) and dioxygen. The optical spectrum of this species determined by diode array detection is presented for the first time and exhibits visible absorption bands with {lambda}{sub max} {approx} 420 nm ({epsilon} = 4,000 M{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1}) and {lambda}{sub max} = 725 nm ({epsilon} = 1,800 M{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1}). The temperature dependences of the rate constants for formation and decay of H{sub peroxo} and for the subsequent intermediate, Q, were examined in the absence and in the presence of hydrocarbon substrates, and activation parameters for these reactions were determined. For single-turnover reaction kinetics monitored at 420 nm, the {lambda}{sub max} for Q, a nonlinear Eyring plot was obtained when acetylene or methane was present in sufficiently high concentration. This behavior reflects a two-step mechanism, Q formation followed by Q decay, in which the rate-determining step changes depending on the temperature. The rate of H{sub peroxo} formation does not depend on dioxygen concentration, indicating that an effectively irreversible step involving dioxygen precedes formation of the diiron(III) peroxo species. The rate constant observed at 4 C for H{sub peroxo} formation, 1--2 s{sup {minus}1}, is slower than that determined previously by Moessbauer and optical spectroscopy, {approximately}20--25 s{sup {minus}1} (Liu, K. E., et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1995, 117, 4997--4998; 10174--10185). Possible explanations for this discrepancy include the existence of two distinct peroxo species. Intermediate Q exhibits photosensitivity when monitored by diode array methodology, a property that may arise from enhanced reactivity of a transient charge-transfer species. The photoreaction can be avoided by using a monochromator to obtain kinetics data at single wavelengths. The reactions of substrates with intermediate species were studied by single- and double-mixing stopped-flow spectroscopy. The Q decay rate exhibits an approximate first-order dependence on substrate concentration for a wide range of hydrocarbons, the relative reactivity varying according to the sequence acetylene > ethylene > ethane > methane > propylene > propane. In addition, the data indicate that H{sub peroxo} can oxidize olefins but not acetylene or saturated hydrocarbons.

  3. Time resolved spectroscopy of SGR J15505418 bursts detected with Fermi/gamma-ray burst monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younes, G. [Universities Space Research Association, 6767 Old Madison Pike, Suite 450, Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); Kouveliotou, C.; Collazzi, A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP 12, NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, A. J.; Watts, A. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Van der Klis, M.; Van Putten, T. [Astronomical Institute "Anton Pannekoek," University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ranana 43537 (Israel); Bhat, P. N.; Gorgone, N. [University of Alabama in Huntsville CSPAR, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Gehrels, N.; Mcenery, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); G??, E.; Kaneko, Y.; Lin, L. [Sabanc? University, Orhanl?-Tuzla, ?stanbul 34956 (Turkey); Gruber, D.; Von Kienlin, A. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Grunblatt, S. [University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2500 Campus Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2014-04-10

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J15505418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a Comptonized model, we find that the peak energy, E {sub peak}, anti-correlates with flux, while the low-energy photon index remains constant at ? 0.8 up to a flux limit F ? 10{sup 5} erg s{sup 1} cm{sup 2}. Above this flux value, the E {sub peak}flux correlation changes sign, and the index positively correlates with the flux reaching ?1 at the highest fluxes. Using a two blackbody model, we find that the areas and fluxes of the two emitting regions correlate positively. Further, we study here for the first time the evolution of the temperatures and areas as a function of flux. We find that the areakT relation follows the lines of constant luminosity at the lowest fluxes, R {sup 2}?kT {sup 4}, with a break at the higher fluxes (F > 10{sup 5.5} erg s{sup 1} cm{sup 2}). The area of the high-kT component increases with the flux while its temperature decreases, which we interpret as being due to an adiabatic cooling process. The area of the low-kT component, on the other hand, appears to saturate at the highest fluxes, toward R {sub max} ? 30 km. Assuming that crust quakes are responsible for soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts and considering R {sub max} as the maximum radius of the emitting photon-pair plasma fireball, we relate this saturation radius to a minimum excitation radius of the magnetosphere, and we put a lower limit on the internal magnetic field of SGR J15505418, B {sub int} ? 4.5 10{sup 15} G.

  4. Effect of neutron irradiation on defect evolution in Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallman, Darin J.; He, Lingfeng; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Hoffman, Elizabeth N.; Kohse, Gordon; Sindelar, Robert L.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2015-10-23

    Here, we report on the characterization of defects formed in polycrystalline Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples exposed to neutron irradiation – up to 0.1 displacements per atom (dpa) at 350 ± 40 °C or 695 ± 25 °C, and up to 0.4 dpa at 350 ± 40 °C. Black spots are observed in both Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC after irradiation to both 0.1 and 0.4 dpa at 350 °C. After irradiation to 0.1 dpa at 695 °C, small basal dislocation loops, with a Burgers vector of b = 1/2 [0001] are observed in both materials. At 9 ± 3 and 10 ± 5 nm, the loop diameters in the Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples, respectively, were comparable. At 1 × 1023 loops/m3, the dislocation loop density in Ti2AlC was ≈1.5 orders of magnitude greater than in Ti3SiC2, at 3 x 1021 loops/m3. After irradiation at 350 °C, extensive microcracking was observed in Ti2AlC, but not in Ti3SiC2. The room temperature electrical resistivities increased as a function of neutron dose for all samples tested, and appear to saturate in the case of Ti3SiC2. The MAX phases are unequivocally more neutron radiation tolerant than the impurity phases TiC and Al2O3. Based on these results, Ti3SiC2 appears to be a more promising MAX phase candidate for high temperature nuclear applications than Ti2AlC.

  5. Digital field ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sijbrandij, S.J.; Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.; Thomson, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    Due to environmental concerns, there is a trend to avoid the use of chemicals needed to develop negatives and to process photographic paper, and to use digital technologies instead. Digital technology also offers the advantages that it is convenient, as it enables quick access to the end result, allows image storage and processing on computer, allows rapid hard copy output, and simplifies electronic publishing. Recently significant improvements have been made to the performance and cost of camera-sensors and printers. In this paper, field ion images recorded with two digital cameras of different resolution are compared to images recorded on standard 35 mm negative film. It should be noted that field ion images exhibit low light intensity and high contrast. Field ion images were recorded from a standard microchannel plate and a phosphor screen and had acceptance angles of {approximately} 60{degree}. Digital recordings were made with a Digital Vision Technologies (DVT) MICAM VHR1000 camera with a resolution of 752 x 582 pixels, and a Kodak DCS 460 digital camera with a resolution of 3,060 x 2,036 pixels. Film based recordings were made with Kodak T-MAX film rated at 400 ASA. The resolving power of T-MAX film, as specified by Kodak, is between 50 and 125 lines per mm, which corresponds to between 1,778 x 1,181 and 4,445 x 2,953 pixels, i.e. similar to that from the DCS 460 camera. The intensities of the images were sufficient to be recorded with standard fl:1.2 lenses with exposure times of less than 2 s. Many digital cameras were excluded from these experiments due to their lack of sensitivity or the inability to record a full frame image due to the fixed working distance defined by the vacuum system. The digital images were output on a Kodak Digital Science 8650 PS dye sublimation color printer (300 dpi). All field ion micrographs presented were obtained from a Ni-Al-Be specimen.

  6. The BigBoss Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schelgel, D.; Abdalla, F.; Abraham, T.; Ahn, C.; Allende Prieto, C.; Annis, J.; Aubourg, E.; Azzaro, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Baugh, C.; Bebek, C.; Becerril, S.; Blanton, M.; Bolton, A.; Bromley, B.; Cahn, R.; Carton, P.-H.; Cervanted-Cota, J.L.; Chu, Y.; Cortes, M.; /APC, Paris /Brookhaven /IRFU, Saclay /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, CPT /Durham U. / /IEU, Seoul /Fermilab /IAA, Granada /IAC, La Laguna / /IAC, Mexico / / /Madrid, IFT /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. / / /New York U. /Valencia U.

    2012-06-07

    BigBOSS is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey over 14,000 square degrees. It has been conditionally accepted by NOAO in response to a call for major new instrumentation and a high-impact science program for the 4-m Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak. The BigBOSS instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking 5000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 340 nm to 1060 nm, with a resolution R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} = 3000-4800. Using data from imaging surveys that are already underway, spectroscopic targets are selected that trace the underlying dark matter distribution. In particular, targets include luminous red galaxies (LRGs) up to z = 1.0, extending the BOSS LRG survey in both redshift and survey area. To probe the universe out to even higher redshift, BigBOSS will target bright [OII] emission line galaxies (ELGs) up to z = 1.7. In total, 20 million galaxy redshifts are obtained to measure the BAO feature, trace the matter power spectrum at smaller scales, and detect redshift space distortions. BigBOSS will provide additional constraints on early dark energy and on the curvature of the universe by measuring the Ly-alpha forest in the spectra of over 600,000 2.2 < z < 3.5 quasars. BigBOSS galaxy BAO measurements combined with an analysis of the broadband power, including the Ly-alpha forest in BigBOSS quasar spectra, achieves a FOM of 395 with Planck plus Stage III priors. This FOM is based on conservative assumptions for the analysis of broad band power (k{sub max} = 0.15), and could grow to over 600 if current work allows us to push the analysis to higher wave numbers (k{sub max} = 0.3). BigBOSS will also place constraints on theories of modified gravity and inflation, and will measure the sum of neutrino masses to 0.024 eV accuracy.

  7. Projection imaging of photon beams by the Cerenkov effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaser, Adam K.; Davis, Scott C.; McClatchy, David M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Pogue, Brian W.; Gladstone, David J.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: A novel technique for beam profiling of megavoltage photon beams was investigated for the first time by capturing images of the induced Cerenkov emission in water, as a potential surrogate for the imparted dose in irradiated media. Methods: A high-sensitivity, intensified CCD camera (ICCD) was configured to acquire 2D projection images of Cerenkov emission from a 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 cm{sup 2} 6 MV linear accelerator (LINAC) x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 400 MU/min incident on a water tank with transparent walls. The ICCD acquisition was gated to the LINAC sync pulse to reduce background light artifacts, and the measurement quality was investigated by evaluating the signal to noise ratio and measurement repeatability as a function of delivered dose. Monte Carlo simulations were used to derive a calibration factor for differences between the optical images and deposited dose arising from the anisotropic angular dependence of Cerenkov emission. Finally, Cerenkov-based beam profiles were compared to a percent depth dose (PDD) and lateral dose profile at a depth of d{sub max} from a reference dose distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system (TPS). Results: The signal to noise ratio was found to be 20 at a delivered dose of 66.6 cGy, and proportional to the square root of the delivered dose as expected from Poisson photon counting statistics. A 2.1% mean standard deviation and 5.6% maximum variation in successive measurements were observed, and the Monte Carlo derived calibration factor resulted in Cerenkov emission images which were directly correlated to deposited dose, with some spatial issues. The dose difference between the TPS and PDD predicted by Cerenkov measurements was within 20% in the buildup region with a distance to agreement (DTA) of 1.5-2 mm and {+-}3% at depths beyond d{sub max}. In the lateral profile, the dose difference at the beam penumbra was within {+-}13% with a DTA of 0-2 mm, {+-}5% in the central beam region, and 2%-3% in the beam umbra. Conclusions: The results from this initial study demonstrate the first documented use of Cerenkov emission imaging to profile x-ray photon LINAC beams in water. The proposed modality has several potential advantages over alternative methods, and upon future refinement may prove to be a robust and novel dosimetry method.

  8. SU-E-T-569: Evaluation of VMAT Plans Generated with HD120 and Millennium 120 MLC Between Two Matched Linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, G; Ballas, L; Chang, E; Chung, E; Chiu, R; Cummings, D; Shiu, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate VMAT treatment plans generated with HD120 MLC and Millennium 120 MLC between two matched linacs and to determine if one can back up the other. Methods: The 6x photon beams are matched for our Varian TrueBeam STx and Trilogy linacs, which are equipped with HD120 MLC and Millennium 120 MLC, respectively. Three prostate and three brain VMAT plans were used for the evaluation. Five plans (three prostate and two brain plans) were originally generated with the TrueBeam STx and re-computed with the Trilogy. One brain plan was evaluated the other way around. For each plan, the PTV coverage of V95 was made the same between two linacs. The dosimetric differences associated with the plans were compared using: 1) Percentage mean dose differences to the PTV, 2) Homogeneity index, HI = (Dmax − Dmin)/Dmean for the PTV. For prostate plans, the mean dose differences to the rectum were evaluated. While for brain plans, the percentage max dose differences to the lenses (left and right lens) were evaluated. Results: For three prostate plans, the average of the percentage mean dose differences to the PTV was 0.5 ± 0.1% and the HI was 0.1 ± 0.0%. The average of the percentage mean dose difference to the rectum was 3.5 ± 0.5%. For three brain plans, the average of the percentage mean dose differences to the PTV was 0.2 ± 1.1% and the HI was 0.2 ± 0.1%. The average of the percentage max dose differences to the lenses was 22.9 ± 4.0%. Conclusion: For prostate VMAT plans, changing the treatment from the TrueBeam STx to the Trilogy does not necessarily need re-optimization. But for brain plans, in order to minimize dose to the lenses, it is recommended to re-optimize the plan if changing the treatment between these two linacs.

  9. SU-E-T-61: Capabilities and Considerations for the Clinical Use of Flattening Filter Free (FFF) Beams for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, J; Zhang, Y; Duhon, M; Smith, K; McNutt, T; Wong, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Machines with FFF beams are becoming more prevalent. As technology evolves, guidelines for its use need to be developed. FFF beams have the potential for much greater dose rates and lower out-of-field dose. The use of VMAT with FFF adds additional complexity. This work attempts to define the capabilities and limitations of FFF when applied to VMAT fields and characterize the situations which this technology is best suited. Methods: The total monitor units of a VMAT delivery is modified to determine the minimum deliverable dose rate for FFF and non-FFF beams on an Elekta VersaHD linear accelerator. The minimum dose rate limits the minimum dose per segments, thus reducing the available modulation. Time is assessed by recording the beam-on time for FFF and non-FFF beams. For 10 plans with standard fraction sizes (180–212 cGy/Fx) maximum dose rate per control point and number of control points exceeding 400 MU/min are recorded. Results: VMAT minimum dose rate is related to the pulse rate. The minimum deliverable dose rate is ∼36 MU/min (0.12 MU/deg) for 6x-FFF (max 1400 MU/min) and ∼75 MU/min (0.27 MU/deg) for 10x-FFF (max 2400 MU/min) beams. Delivery time is independent of dose rate for dose rates below 1500 MU/min as it is limited by gantry speed. The maximum dose rate across in all plans according to Pinnacle is 1170 MU/min for FFF plans and 800 MU/min for non-FFF plans. The percentage of control points exceeding 400 MU/min is 13.3% for FFF and 9% for non-FFF beams. Conclusion: FFF does not improve delivery time of VMAT fields for conventional fraction sizes, since the dominant factor is gantry speed instead of dose rate. However, there may be potential for speed improvement for very large fraction sizes. Due to pulse rate dependency, FFF beams require a higher minimum dose rate.

  10. Turbulent Flame Propagation Characteristics of High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitzman, Jerry; Lieuwen, Timothy

    2014-09-30

    This final report describes the results of an effort to better understand turbulent flame propagation, especially at conditions relevant to gas turbines employing fuels with syngas or hydrogen mixtures. Turbulent flame speeds were measured for a variety of hydrogen/carbon monoxide (H2/CO) and hydrogen/methane (H2/CH4) fuel mixtures with air as the oxidizer. The measurements include global consumption speeds (ST,GC) acquired in a turbulent jet flame at pressures of 1-10 atm and local displacement speeds (ST,LD) acquired in a low-swirl burner at atmospheric pressure. The results verify the importance of fuel composition in determining turbulent flame speeds. For example, different fuel-air mixtures having the same unstretched laminar flame speed (SL,0) but different fuel compositions resulted in significantly different ST,GC for the same turbulence levels (u'). This demonstrates the weakness of turbulent flame speed correlations based simply on u'/SL,0. The results were analyzed using a steady-steady leading points concept to explain the sensitivity of turbulent burning rates to fuel (and oxidizer) composition. Leading point theories suggest that the premixed turbulent flame speed is controlled by the flame front characteristics at the flame brush leading edge, or, in other words, by the flamelets that advance farthest into the unburned mixture (the so-called leading points). For negative Markstein length mixtures, this is assumed to be close to the maximum stretched laminar flame speed (SL,max) for the given fuel-oxidizer mixture. For the ST,GC measurements, the data at a given pressure were well-correlated with an SL,max scaling. However the variation with pressure was not captured, which may be due to non-quasi-steady effects that are not included in the current model. For the ST,LD data, the leading points model again faithfully captured the variation of turbulent flame speed over a wide range of fuel-compositions and turbulence intensities. These results provide evidence that the leading points model can provide useful predictions of turbulent flame speed over a wide range of operating conditions and flow geometries.

  11. A VIRTUAL SKY WITH EXTRAGALACTIC H I AND CO LINES FOR THE SQUARE KILOMETRE ARRAY AND THE ATACAMA LARGE MILLIMETER/SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreschkow, D.; Kloeckner, H.-R.; Heywood, I.; Rawlings, S.; Levrier, F.

    2009-10-01

    We present a sky simulation of the atomic H I-emission line and the first 10 {sup 12}C{sup 16}O rotational emission lines of molecular gas in galaxies beyond the Milky Way. The simulated sky field has a comoving diameter of 500 h {sup -1} Mpc; hence, the actual field of view depends on the (user-defined) maximal redshift z {sub max}; e.g., for z {sub max} = 10, the field of view yields approx4 x 4 deg{sup 2}. For all galaxies, we estimate the line fluxes, line profiles, and angular sizes of the H I and CO-emission lines. The galaxy sample is complete for galaxies with cold hydrogen masses above 10{sup 8} M {sub sun}. This sky simulation builds on a semi-analytic model of the cosmic evolution of galaxies in a LAMBDA cold dark matter (LAMBDACDM) cosmology. The evolving CDM distribution was adopted from the Millennium Simulation, an N-body CDM simulation in a cubic box with a side length of 500 h {sup -1} Mpc. This side length limits the coherence scale of our sky simulation: it is long enough to allow the extraction of the baryon acoustic oscillations in the galaxy power spectrum, yet the position and amplitude of the first acoustic peak will be imperfectly defined. This sky simulation is a tangible aid to the design and operation of future telescopes, such as the Square Kilometre Array, Large Millimeter Telescope, and Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. The results presented in this paper have been restricted to a graphical representation of the simulated sky and fundamental dN/dz analyses for peak flux density limited and total flux limited surveys of H I and CO. A key prediction is that H I will be harder to detect at redshifts z approx> 2 than predicted by a no-evolution model. The future verification or falsification of this prediction will allow us to qualify the semi-analytic models.

  12. How consistent are top-down hydrocarbon emissions based on formaldehyde observations from GOME-2 and OMI?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J. F.; Bauwens, M.; De Smedt, I.; Van Roozendael, M.; De Maziere, M.; Vigouroux, C.; Hendrick, F.; George, M.; Clerbaux, C.; Coheur, P-F; Guenther, Alex B.

    2015-10-26

    The vertical columns of formaldehyde (HCHO) retrieved from two satellite instruments, the Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument-2 (GOME-2) on Metop-A and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on Aura, are used to constrain global emissions of HCHO precursors from open fires, vegetation and human activities in the year 2010. To this end, the emissions are varied and optimized using the ad-joint model technique in the IMAGESv2 global CTM (chem-ical transport model) on a monthly basis and at the model res-olution. Given the different local overpass times of GOME- 2 (09:30 LT) and OMI (13:30 LT), the simulated diurnal cy-cle of HCHO columns is investigated and evaluated against ground-based optical measurements at seven sites in Europe, China and Africa. The modeled diurnal cycle exhibits large variability, reflecting competition between photochemistry and emission variations, with noon or early afternoon max-ima at remote locations (oceans) and in regions dominated by anthropogenic emissions, late afternoon or evening max-ima over fire scenes, and midday minima in isoprene-rich re-gions. The agreement between simulated and ground-based columns is generally better in summer (with a clear after-noon maximum at mid-latitude sites) than in winter, and the annually averaged ratio of afternoon to morning columns is slightly higher in the model (1.126) than in the ground-based measurements (1.043).The anthropogenic VOC (volatile organic compound) sources are found to be weakly constrained by the inversions on the global scale, mainly owing to their generally minor contribution to the HCHO columns, except over strongly pol-luted regions, like China. The OMI-based inversion yields total flux estimates over China close to the bottom-up inven-tory (24.6 vs. 25.5 TgVOC yr-1 in the a priori) with, how-ever, pronounced increases in the northeast of China and re-ductions in the south. Lower fluxes are estimated based on GOME-2 HCHO columns (20.6 TgVOC yr-1), in particular over the northeast, likely reflecting mismatches between the observed and the modeled diurnal cycle in this region.

  13. Crystal structures and luminescence properties of novel compounds K{sub 4}M{sub 2}[Al{sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 24}] (M = Ce, Gd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aksenov, S. M., E-mail: aks.crys@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Rassulov, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Fedorovsky All-Russian Research Institute of Mineral Resources (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Fedorovsky All-Russian Research Institute of Mineral Resources (Russian Federation); Rastsvetaeva, R. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Taroev, V. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geochemistry, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geochemistry, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    Two novel potassium rare earth silicates, obtained by hydrothermal synthesis, have been investigated by X-ray diffraction and described by the general formula K{sub 4}M{sub 2}[Al{sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 24}] (M = Ce, Gd). The parameters of the monoclinic K{sub 4}Ce{sub 2}[Al{sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 24}] and K{sub 4}Gd{sub 2}[Al{sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 24}] cells are, respectively, as follows: a = 26.867(1), 26.6520(2) A; b = 7.4150(2), 7.2854(1) A; c = 14.910(1), 14.8182(1) A; {beta} = 123.52(1) Degree-Sign , 123.46(1) Degree-Sign ; and sp. gr. P2{sub 1}/n. The structures are solved by the charge flipping method and refined in the anisotropic approximation of thermal vibrations for atoms to R = 5.2 and 2.5%, respectively. The compounds under study are crystallized into a new structural type, which is based on two-level [Al{sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 24}] layers, combined into a three-dimensional framework by columns of edge-sharing seven-vertex REE polyhedra. Potassium atoms are located in the framework channels. The spectral luminescence characteristics are determined. The luminescence bands are typical of Gd{sup 3+} and Ce{sup 3+} ions. Upon excitation by light with {lambda}{sub exc} = 246 nm, a band due to the {sup 2}D {yields} {sup 8}F{sub 5/2} transition with {lambda}{sub max} = 430 nm is observed in the spectrum of K{sub 4}Ce{sub 2}[Al{sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 24}] and a band related to the {sup 6}P{sub 7/2} {yields} {sup 8}S{sub 7/2} transition with {lambda}{sub max} = 311 nm is observed in the spectrum of K{sub 4}Gd{sub 2}[Al{sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 24}].

  14. TU-F-12A-04: Differential Radiation Avoidance of Functional Liver Regions Defined by 99mTc-Sulfur Colloid SPECT/CT with Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, S; Miyaoka, R; Kinahan, P; Sandison, G; Vesselle, H; Nyflot, M; Apisarnthanarax, S; Saini, J; Wong, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma patients is conventionally planned without consideration of spatial heterogeneity in hepatic function, which may increase risk of radiation-induced liver disease. Pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton radiotherapy (pRT) plans were generated to differentially decrease dose to functional liver volumes (FLV) defined on [{sup 99m}Tc]sulfur colloid (SC) SPECT/CT images (functional avoidance plans) and compared against conventional pRT plans. Methods: Three HCC patients underwent SC SPECT/CT scans for pRT planning acquired 15 min post injection over 24 min. Images were reconstructed with OSEM following scatter, collimator, and exhale CT attenuation correction. Functional liver volumes (FLV) were defined by liver:spleen uptake ratio thresholds (43% to 90% maximum). Planning objectives to FLV were based on mean SC SPECT uptake ratio relative to GTV-subtracted liver and inversely scaled to mean liver dose of 20 Gy. PTV target coverage (V{sub 95}) was matched between conventional and functional avoidance plans. PBS pRT plans were optimized in RayStation for single field uniform dose (SFUD) and systematically perturbed to verify robustness to uncertainty in range, setup, and motion. Relative differences in FLV DVH and target dose heterogeneity (D{sub 2}-D{sub 98})/D50 were assessed. Results: For similar liver dose between functional avoidance and conventional PBS pRT plans (D{sub mean}?5% difference, V{sub 18Gy}?1% difference), dose to functional liver volumes were lower in avoidance plans but varied in magnitude across patients (FLV{sub 70%max} D{sub mean}?26% difference, V{sub 18Gy}?8% difference). Higher PTV dose heterogeneity in avoidance plans was associated with lower functional liver dose, particularly for the largest lesion [(D{sub 2}-D{sub 98})/D{sub 50}=13%, FLV{sub 90%max}=50% difference]. Conclusion: Differential avoidance of functional liver regions defined on sulfur colloid SPECT/CT is feasible with proton therapy. The magnitude of benefit appears to be patient specific and dependent on tumor location, size, and proximity to functional volumes. Further investigation in a larger cohort of patients may validate the clinical utility of functional avoidance planning of HCC radiotherapy.

  15. Multiple scattering of electrons in solids and molecules: A cluster-model approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia de Abajo, F. J.; Van Hove, M. A.; Fadley, C. S.

    2001-02-15

    A method for the simulation of electron scattering and diffraction in solids and molecules within the cluster approach is presented with explicit applications to photoelectron diffraction, electron scattering in molecules, and low-energy electron diffraction. No approximations are made beyond the muffin-tin model, and, in particular, an exact representation of the free-electron Green function is used. All multiple-scattering paths are accounted for up to an order of scattering that ensures convergence. The method relies upon a convenient separation of the free-electron Green function in rotation matrices and translations along the z axis, which greatly reduces the computation time and storage demand. The evaluation of the multiple-scattering expansion is implemented using the fully convergent recursion method, which permits one to perform an iterative refinement of the final-state wave function, as expressed in the basis set of spherical harmonics attached to each atom of the cluster. Examples are offered in which the direct multiple-scattering expansion and the more elaborated simultaneous relaxation method fail to converge, whereas the recursion method leads to convergence. The computation time needed by the resulting computer program of electron diffraction in atomic clusters to determine the self-consistently scattered wave function is proportional to N{sup 2}(l{sub max}+1){sup 3}, where N is the number of atoms in the cluster and l{sub max} is the maximum angular momentum for which the scattering phase shifts take non-negligible values. Within this method it is possible to establish that in practical cases N>1000 might be needed for a convergence of the cluster size, although the angular averaging inherent in many experiments may reduce this. The recursion method was also modified to reduce the effort in computing angular distributions of photoelectrons and low-energy diffracted electrons, which now require negligible time for each angle of emission once the wave function has been determined for a given electron energy. Angle and energy distributions of core-level photoemission, elastic scattering of electrons from a free molecule, and low-energy electron diffraction in large-unit-cell surfaces are calculated.

  16. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2014-10-28

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb?, with 4.9 fb? at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb? at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSM parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, mhmax, mhmod+ , mhmod , light-stop, light-stau, ?-phobic, and low-mH. Upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.

  17. Search for charged Higgs bosons decaying via H+ -> tau nu in top quark pair events using pp collision data at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Dumlupinar U. /Gazi U. /TOBB ETU, Ankara /TAEK, Ankara /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington

    2012-04-01

    The results of a search for charged Higgs bosons are presented. The analysis is based on 4.6 fb{sup -1} of proton-proton collision data at {radical}s = 7 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, using top quark pair events with a {tau} lepton in the final state. The data are consistent with the expected background from Standard Model processes. Assuming that the branching ratio of the charged Higgs boson to a {tau} lepton and a neutrino is 100%, this leads to upper limits on the branching ratio of top quark decays to a b quark and a charged Higgs boson between 5% and 1% for charged Higgs boson masses ranging from 90 GeV to 160 GeV, respectively. In the context of the m{sub h}{sup max} scenario of the MSSM, tan {beta} above 12-26, as well as between 1 and 2-6, can be excluded for charged Higgs boson masses between 90 GeV and 150 GeV.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of interfacially polymerized films of tetraphenylporphyrin derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Wamser, C.C.

    1995-10-01

    Thin films of polymeric porphyrins have been made by interfacial polymerization of derivatives of tetraphenyl porphyrins, in particular by condensation of a dichloromethane solution of the acid chloride derivative (TCCPP) with a buffered aqueous solution of either the amine derivative (TAPP) or the phenol derivative (THPP). Spectroscopic and other studies are consistent with cross-linked polyamide or polyester network structures. The polyamide and polyester films display a novel asymmetry of functional groups on opposite sides of the film; excess amine (or hydroxyl) groups appear on one side of the film and excess carboxyl groups on the other. Film thickness can be correlated with the intensity of the UV-visible absorption spectrum, x (in nm) = 120 A{sub max} (at the Soret peak), with typical thicknesses in the range 10-500 nm, easily controlled by reaction time and conditions. Significantly thicker films (up to several {mu}m) can be prepared using an aliphatic diamine orpolyamine as the comonomer with TCCPP. Addition of 2, 6-lutidine to the organic phase substantially increases the rate of polymerization, which is especially useful for TAPP reactions. In addition, control experiments show that TCCPP with lutidine in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} reacts at the interface with an aqueous pH 3 buffer, giving a very thin, easily hydrolyzed film, apparently due to anhydride linkages formed by condensation reactions with partially hydrolyzed TCCPP. 56 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Multi analysis of the effect of grain size on the dynamic behavior of microalloyed steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zurek, Anna K; Muszka, K; Majta, J; Wielgus, M

    2009-01-01

    This study presents some aspects of multiscale analysis and modeling of variously structured materials behavior in quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. The investigation was performed for two different materials of common application: high strength microalloyed steel (HSLA, X65), and as a reference more ductile material, Ti-IF steel. The MaxStrain technique and one pass hot rolling processes were used to produce ultrafine-grained and coarse-grained materials. The efficiency and inhomogeneity of microstructure refinement were examined because of their important role in work hardening and the initiation and growth of fracture under tensile stresses. It is shown that the combination of microstructures characterized by their different features contributes to the dynamic behavior and final properties of the product. In particular, the role of solute segregation at grain boundaries as well as precipitation of carbonitrides in coarse and ultrafine-grained structures is assessed. The predicted mechanical response of ultrafine-grained structures, using modified KHL model is in reasonable agreement with the experiments. This is a result of proper representation of the role of dislocation structure and the grain boundary and their multiscale effects included in this model.

  20. Wind turbine performance under icing conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasinski, W.J.; Noe, S.C.; Selig, M.S.; Bragg, M.B.

    1998-02-01

    The effects of rime ice on horizontal axis wind turbine performance were estimated. For typical supercooled fog conditions found in cold northern regions, four rime ice accretions on the S809 wind turbine airfoil were predicted using the NASA LEWICE code. The resulting airfoil/ice profile combinations were wind tunnel tested to obtain the lift, drag, and pitching moment characteristics over the Reynolds number range 1--2 {times} 10{sup 6}. These data were used in the PROPID wind turbine performance prediction code to predict the effects of rime ice on a 450-kW rated-power, 28.7-m diameter turbine operated under both stall-regulated and variable-speed/variable-pitch modes. Performance losses on the order of 20% were observed for the variable-speed/variable-pitch rotor. For the stall-regulated rotor, however, a relatively small rime ice profile yielded significantly larger performance losses. For a larger 0.08c-long rime ice protrusion, however, the rated peak power was exceeded by 16% because at high angles the rime ice shape acted like a leading edge flap, thereby increasing the airfoil C{sub l,max} and delaying stall.