Sample records for walls nan jiang

  1. Helium corona-assisted air discharge Nan Jiang, Lei Gao, Ailing Ji, and Zexian Caoa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zexian, Cao

    Helium corona-assisted air discharge Nan Jiang, Lei Gao, Ailing Ji, and Zexian Caoa) Institute of non-thermal plasmas. By taking advantage of the low onset voltage for helium corona, air discharge was successfully launched at much reduced voltages with a needle-plate system partly contained in a helium

  2. Devlopman ki soti nan baz nan peyi dayiti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maguire, Robert E.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bagay kon sa rive : se paske travay sa yo fèt san patisipasyon popilasyon lokal la. Lekol an Ayiti a rete vid f paske moun nan zhn nan pa soufri pou fè li. PetVt se pat yon priorité pou yo. Petèt yo pat janm konsilte yo avan yo bâti li • Si bagay... soti nan baz la , IAP bay kVb pou yon seri etid sou oganis prive pou devlopman lokal, li mima te ide fonde . IAF gin espoua eiperyans li ap kapab itil pou lit èganis angaje nan batay pou devlopman. ITan etid sa-a , Sganis ki pou fasilite devlopman...

  3. Jimmy Jiang | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jimmy Jiang Jimmy Jiang Jimmy Jiang Graduate Student E-mail: jjiang8@ncsu.edu Website: North Carolina State University...

  4. Nan Sun Curriculum Vitae November 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Nan

    Nan Sun Curriculum Vitae November 2010 Contact Information Maxwell Dworkin Bldg. Rm 317 Voice: 617 Nan Sun, Tae-Jong Yoon, Hakho Lee, William Andress, Ralph Weissleder, and Donhee Ham, "Palm NMR and one-chip NMR," accepted to 2011 January Special Issue of IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits. Nan Sun

  5. Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang Steven Low Computing + Math Sciences Electrical Engineering Caltech Oct 2011 #12;Outline Caltech smart grid research Optimal demand response #12;Global trends 1

  6. Description and demographic analysis of a Mimbres Mogollon population from LA 15049 (NAN RUIN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, Sharlet Suzanne

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Classic. LeBlanc 16 p 4S E ~ ~ 4O & 0 Pa 0 ~ a ~ 'I' T ~ ~ s ao ~ 4 as ~ Ds o a ME TEaS ROOM CLUSTERS; NAN RANCH RUIN POST POTTEST VESSEL SU4IAL INTAUSIVA SUAIAL WALL VENT OOOAWAT Q EToa PE ~ SLAP FALI. s E PIAE SOA/ ~ 4E SAS...

  7. Graduate Student Fellows: TENGFEI JIANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei

    and strokes. CONCURRENT DESIGN PROCESS By developing and using computational tools that allow the engineerGraduate Student Fellows: TENGFEI JIANG AARON STEBNER Concurrent Design of Automotive SMAs DUNAND Academic Disciplines: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, ENGINEERING DESIGN, MATERIALS SCIENCE & ENGINEERING

  8. A Robust Audio Classification and Segmentation Method Lie Lu, Hao Jiang and HongJiang Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Hao

    A Robust Audio Classification and Segmentation Method Lie Lu, Hao Jiang and HongJiang Zhang for audio classification that is capable of segmenting and classifying an audio stream into speech, music, environment sound and silence. Audio classification is processed in two steps, which makes it suitable

  9. Configurable Dynamic Privacy for Pervasive Sensor Networks Nan-Wei Gong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Configurable Dynamic Privacy for Pervasive Sensor Networks by Nan-Wei Gong Submitted Privacy for Pervasive Sensor Networks by Nan-Wei Gong Submitted to the Program in Media Arts and Sciences

  10. Quantum Junction Solar Cells Jiang Tang,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantum Junction Solar Cells Jiang Tang,, Huan Liu,, David Zhitomirsky,§ Sjoerd Hoogland,§ Xihua, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074, China § Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family

  11. Microcontroller Platform Design Mengting Nan, Christopher Salthouse, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Microcontroller Platform Design Mengting Nan, Christopher Salthouse, Ph.D. University interface between computers and external devices. In this work, we developed a microcontroller platform, we demonstrated the applicability of the system to biomedical research by using the platform in two

  12. wwwaspbscom/jnn NAN0SOlEll 0E and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    States of America Journal of N an oscience and Nan otec h n o I ogY Vol. 10, 8l 18-8123, 2010 A Facile

  13. Henan Mingdu Wind Power Co Ltd aka He Nan Ming Du Feng Dian Limited...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company) Place: Jiaozuo, Henan Province, China Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind turbine blades provider. References: Henan Mingdu Wind Power Co Ltd (aka He Nan Ming Du Feng...

  14. Jing Jiang | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beam chargesJennifer Awe AboutJiaJieyingJing Jiang

  15. CEEG NanJing New Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable andBucoda,BurkeNebraska:CDM SustainableRelocationCECOCEEG NanJing

  16. Nan an Sanjing Silicon Refining Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/AmesNS Solar05Zip CategoryNamibia:Nan an

  17. Functional analysis of Mimbres ceramics from the NAN ruin (LA15049), Grant County, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyle, Robyn Pearson

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) seriated corrugated wares fnun the NAN ruin. Her results support Haury's (1936b) ceramic sequence up to and including the Late Pithouse period. Two types of corrugated vessels ? designated as partially corrugated and fully corrugated ? appear to have... Analysis of Mimbres Ceramics From the NAN Ruin (LA15049), Grant County, New Mexico. (May 1996) Robyn Pesrson Lyle, B. S. , Texas ARM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Harry J. Shafer Over 10 years spanning 1978 to 1989, archaeological...

  18. Seismic reliability of lifeline systems He Nan Building Research Institute, Zhengzhou, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer Jr., B.F.

    Seismic reliability of lifeline systems Yang Han He Nan Building Research Institute, Zhengzhou kinds, i.e., continuous and segment. We often use the segment pipe in China, so the seismic reliability to the seismic damage state of buried pipelines we established the probabilistic prediction model

  19. Dynamic Query Forms for Database Queries Liang Tang, Tao Li, Yexi Jiang, and Zhiyuan Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tao

    queries on databases. However, the creation of customized queries totally depends on users' manual editing. Different from traditional document retrieval, users in database · Liang Tang, Tao Li, and Yexi Jiang1 Dynamic Query Forms for Database Queries Liang Tang, Tao Li, Yexi Jiang, and Zhiyuan Chen

  20. Salient Region Detection by UFO: Uniqueness, Focusness and Objectness Peng Jiang 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Haibin

    Salient Region Detection by UFO: Uniqueness, Focusness and Objectness Peng Jiang 1 Haibin Ling 2 three important visual cues namely uniqueness, focusness and objectness (UFO). In particular, uniqueness, named UFO saliency, which

  1. HydroChina ZhongNan Engineering Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms AHefei SungrowHelukabelHonitonHydroChinaZhongNan

  2. Zhiyu Jiang, Department of Marine Technology & Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Dynamic response of wind turbines in fault and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    response of wind turbines in fault and shutdown conditions Zhiyu Jiang Deptartment of Marine Technology://www.newscientist.com/blogs/onepercent/2011/12/why-did-a-wind-turbine-self-co.html #12;3 Zhiyu Jiang, Department of Marine Technology & Centre & Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Control and protection of wind turbines Emergency shutdown Pitch

  3. Ozone production efficiency in an urban area Lawrence I. Kleinman, Peter H. Daum, Yin-Nan Lee, Linda J. Nunnermacker,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozone production efficiency in an urban area Lawrence I. Kleinman, Peter H. Daum, Yin-Nan Lee; accepted 1 August 2002; published 14 December 2002. [1] Ozone production efficiency can be defined and observational results on ozone production efficiency based on measurements made from aircraft flights

  4. KINETICS OF OXIDATION OF AQUEOUS SULFUR(IV) BY NITROGEN DIOXIDE YIN-NAN LEE AND STEPHEN E. SCHWARTZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    clarified the role of aqueous-phase production of strong acids in the atmosphere. Oxidation of dissolvedKINETICS OF OXIDATION OF AQUEOUS SULFUR(IV) BY NITROGEN DIOXIDE YIN-NAN LEE AND STEPHEN E. SCHWARTZ) are the precursors of the strong acids (i.e., HzS04 and HN03) found in precipitation,! the detailed mechanisms

  5. Data Quality Assessment via Robust Clustering Rong Duan Tom Au Wei Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    and manufacturing processes. For 1 #12;example, although total quality management (TQM) principles and techniquesData Quality Assessment via Robust Clustering Rong Duan Tom Au Wei Jiang AT&T Research Labs to improve the quality of decision making, data quality is long time ignored in many practices so

  6. Study of natural ventilation in buildings by large eddy simulation Yi Jiang and Qingyan Chen*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Study of natural ventilation in buildings by large eddy simulation Yi Jiang and Qingyan Chen 02139 *Phone: (617) 253-7714, Fax: (617) 253-6152, Email: qchen@mit.edu Abstract Natural ventilation in the mechanical ventilation systems. Two subgrid-scale models of large eddy simulation (LES), a Smagorinsky

  7. Set systems without a strong simplex (revised) Tao Jiang # Oleg Pikhurko + Zelealem Yilma #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pikhurko, Oleg

    Set systems without a strong simplex (revised) Tao Jiang # Oleg Pikhurko + Zelealem Yilma # April 21, 2010 Abstract A d­simplex is a collection of d + 1 sets such that every d of them have non­empty intersection and the intersection of all of them is empty. A strong d­simplex is a collection of d + 2 sets A

  8. Efficient Deep Web Crawling Using Reinforcement Lu Jiang, Zhaohui Wu, Qian Feng, Jun Liu, Qinghua Zheng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamos, Michael I.

    Efficient Deep Web Crawling Using Reinforcement Learning Lu Jiang, Zhaohui Wu, Qian Feng, Jun Liu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, qhzheng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn Abstract. Deep web refers to the hidden part of the Web that remains unavailable for standard Web crawlers. To obtain content of Deep Web is challenging and has been acknowledged

  9. Learning Deep Web Crawling with Diverse Features Lu Jiang, Zhaohui Wu, Qinghua Zheng and Jun Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamos, Michael I.

    Learning Deep Web Crawling with Diverse Features Lu Jiang, Zhaohui Wu, Qinghua Zheng and Jun Liu@yahoo.com, wzh@stu.xjtu.edu.cn, qhzheng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, liukeen@mail.xjtu.edu.cn Abstract--The key to Deep Web crawling is to submit promising keywords to query form and retrieve Deep Web content efficiently. To select

  10. A taxonomy of virtual worlds usage in education Ishbel Duncan, Alan Miller and Shangyi Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    1 A taxonomy of virtual worlds usage in education Ishbel Duncan, Alan Miller and Shangyi Jiang from around the world. A taxonomy is then derived from these articles, delineating current theoretical and practical work on Virtual World usage, specifically in the field of education. The taxonomy identifies rich

  11. Stochastic Differential Equations for Power Law Behaviors Bo Jiang Roger Brockett Weibo Gong Don Towsley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurose, Jim

    Stochastic Differential Equations for Power Law Behaviors Bo Jiang Roger Brockett Weibo Gong Don- bridge, MA 02138, USA. Email: brockett@seas.harvard.edu. W. Gong is with the Deparment of Electrical and Computer Engineer- ing, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA. Email: gong

  12. Thompson's conjecture for real semisimple Lie groups JiangHua Lu # and Sam Evens +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evens, Sam

    Thompson's conjecture for real semi­simple Lie groups Jiang­Hua Lu # and Sam Evens + June 13, 2005 Dedicated to Professor Alan Weinstein for his 60th birthday Abstract A proof of Thompson's conjecture geometry. 1 Introduction Thompson's conjecture [T] for the group GL(n, C), which relates eigenvalues

  13. First principles study of H2S adsorption and dissociation D.E. Jiang a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Emily A.

    First principles study of H2S adsorption and dissociation on Fe(110) D.E. Jiang a , Emily A. Carter functional theory (DFT) results of H2S and HS adsorption and dissociation on the Fe(110) surface. We investigate the site preference of H2S, HS, and S on Fe(110). H2S is found to weakly adsorb on either

  14. QoS Measurement of Internet Real-Time Multimedia Services Wenyu Jiang, Henning Schulzrinne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Junfeng

    QoS Measurement of Internet Real-Time Multimedia Services Wenyu Jiang, Henning Schulzrinne fwenyu,schulzrinneg@cs.columbia.edu Technical Report CUCS-015-99 Department of Computer Science Columbia University December 1999 Abstract Real the modeling and analysis of delay and loss. Our goal is to establish feasible metrics that can reliably

  15. Mobile Monitoring and Maintenance of Power Systems Bing JIANG and Alexander V. MAMISHEV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamishev, Alexander

    Mobile Monitoring and Maintenance of Power Systems Bing JIANG and Alexander V. MAMISHEV Sensors networks in the new environment. Monitoring of electric power systems in real-time for reliability, aging, robotics. This review paper fo- cuses on one trend of power system monitoring, namely, mobile monitoring

  16. JACOBI-STIRLING POLYNOMIALS AND P-PARTITIONS IRA M. GESSEL, ZHICONG LIN, AND JIANG ZENG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gessel, Ira M.

    JACOBI-STIRLING POLYNOMIALS AND P-PARTITIONS IRA M. GESSEL, ZHICONG LIN, AND JIANG ZENG Abstract. We investigate the diagonal generating function of the Jacobi-Stirling num- bers of the second kind JS(n + k, n; z) by generalizing the analogous results for the Stir- ling and Legendre-Stirling

  17. CINEMA: Columbia InterNet Extensible Multimedia Architecture Kundan Singh, Wenyu Jiang, Jonathan Lennox, Sankaran Narayanan and Henning Schulzrinne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CINEMA: Columbia InterNet Extensible Multimedia Architecture Kundan Singh, Wenyu Jiang, Jonathan Lennox, Sankaran Narayanan and Henning Schulzrinne Department of Computer Science, Columbia University and implementation of our Internet telephony system CINEMA (Columbia InterNet Extensible Multimedia Architecture

  18. CARLOG: A Platform for Flexible and Efficient Automotive Sensing Yurong Jiang, Hang Qiu, Matthew McCartney, William G.J. Halfond, Fan Bai, Donald Grimm,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Guoliang

    CARLOG: A Platform for Flexible and Efficient Automotive Sensing Yurong Jiang, Hang Qiu, Matthew Mc.bai,donald.grimm}@gm.com Abstract Automotive apps can improve efficiency, safety, comfort, and longevity of vehicular use, Algorithms Keywords Automotive, Datalog, Latency, Predicate Acquisition The first 2 authors, Yurong Jiang

  19. Simulation of Branching Blood Flows on Parallel Computers1 Xue Yue, Feng-Nan Hwang, Robin Shandas, Xiao-Chuan Cai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Xiao-Chuan

    Simulation of Branching Blood Flows on Parallel Computers1 Xue Yue, Feng-Nan Hwang, Robin Shandas nonlinearly implicit algorithm for the numerical simulation of some branching blood flow problems, which-Stokes equations that we use to model the blood flow in the left anterior descending coronary artery. Key words

  20. Effects of Alloying on the Chemistry of CO and H2S on Fe Surfaces D. E. Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Emily A.

    Effects of Alloying on the Chemistry of CO and H2S on Fe Surfaces D. E. Jiang Department. Carter* Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Program in Applied and Computational with the metal surface. Here we consider whether alloying the steel surface might be able to inhibit

  1. CRAWLING DEEP WEB CONTENT THROUGH QUERY FORMS Jun Liu, Zhaohui Wu, Lu Jiang, Qinghua Zheng, Xiao Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamos, Michael I.

    CRAWLING DEEP WEB CONTENT THROUGH QUERY FORMS Jun Liu, Zhaohui Wu, Lu Jiang, Qinghua Zheng, Xiao: Deep Web, Deep Web Surfacing, Minimum Executable Pattern, Adaptive Query Abstract: This paper proposes-based Deep Web adaptive query method. The query method extends query interface from single textbox to MEP set

  2. The VocalSearch Music Search Engine Bryan Pardo, David Little, Rui Jiang, Hagai Livni, Jinyu Han

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardo, Bryan

    queries, queries entered as music notation, and text-based lyrics search. Users are also ableThe VocalSearch Music Search Engine Bryan Pardo, David Little, Rui Jiang, Hagai Livni, Jinyu Han@gmail.com ABSTRACT The VocalSearch system is a music search engine developed at Northwestern University and available

  3. Carbon dissolution and diffusion in ferrite and austenite from first principles D. E. Jiang and Emily A. Carter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Emily A.

    Carbon dissolution and diffusion in ferrite and austenite from first principles D. E. Jiang. The solution enthalpy of carbon in an octahedral site in ferrite is predicted to be 0.74 eV, i solubility of C in austenite compared to ferrite. The MEP shows that carbon moves linearly from an octahedral

  4. A High-Efficiency Linear Polar Transmitter for EDGE Nestor D. Lopez, Xufeng Jiang, Dragan Maksimovic and Zoya Popovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovic, Zoya

    A High-Efficiency Linear Polar Transmitter for EDGE N´estor D. L´opez, Xufeng Jiang, Dragan with a total DC-to-RF efficiency of 56%. The transmitter is digitally-controlled, allowing for adjust- ments of delay, phase and amplitude. The amplifier is a 880-MHz class-E high-efficiency circuit with +20 d

  5. YARN: Animating Software Evolution Abram Hindle, Zhen Ming Jiang, Walid Koleilat, Michael W. Godfrey, Richard C. Holt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey, Michael W.

    approach by visualizing the evolution of PostgreSQL DBMS. 1. Introduction Successful software systemsYARN: Animating Software Evolution Abram Hindle, Zhen Ming Jiang, Walid Koleilat, Michael W of software evolution is how to explore the aggregated and cumulative effects of changes that occur within

  6. Articulated Motion Modeling for Activity Analysis Jiang Gao, Robert T. Collins, Alexander G. Hauptmann and Howard D. Wactlar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wactlar, Howard D.

    on blobs and trajectories output from this tracking system. In Zelnik-Manor and Irani (2001), dynamicArticulated Motion Modeling for Activity Analysis Jiang Gao, Robert T. Collins, Alexander G at a nursing home. 1. Introduction Much recent research has been focused on activity analysis in videos

  7. Synthesis and characterization of high power LiFePO4/C nano-plate thin films Nan Zhou a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Synthesis and characterization of high power LiFePO4/C nano-plate thin films Nan Zhou a,b , Yanyi battery Solvothermal growth Nano-carbon coating a b s t r a c t Tunable LiFePO4/C thin films demonstrating.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Thin film lithium ion batteries have been developed over recent

  8. Engineering domain structures in nanoscale magnetic thin films via strain Jia-Mian Hu, T. N. Yang, L. Q. Chen, and C. W. Nan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Engineering domain structures in nanoscale magnetic thin films via strain Jia-Mian Hu, T. N. Yang://scitation.aip.org/termsconditions. Downloaded to ] IP: 146.186.211.66 On: Thu, 09 Jan 2014 19:48:21 #12;Engineering domain structures in nanoscale magnetic thin films via strain Jia-Mian Hu,1,a) T. N. Yang,2 L. Q. Chen,1,2 and C. W. Nan1,a) 1

  9. Covering Walls With Fabrics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TDOC . Z TA24S.7 8873 NO.1227 WALLS with ;FABRICS Texas Agricultural Extension Service . The Texas A&M University System Daniel C. Pfannstiel, Director, College Station, Texas Covering Walls with Fabrics* When tastefully applied, fabrics... it is applied, fabric-covered walls improve the sound-absorbing acoustical properties of a room. Also, fabrics can be used for covering walls of either textured gypsum board or wood paneling. Home decorating magazines are good sources for ideas about fabric...

  10. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maniscalco, James A. (Danville, CA); Meier, Wayne R. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  11. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  12. Webs of Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minoru Eto; Youichi Isozumi; Muneto Nitta; Keisuke Ohashi; Norisuke Sakai

    2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Webs of domain walls are constructed as 1/4 BPS states in d=4, N=2 supersymmetric U(Nc) gauge theories with Nf hypermultiplets in the fundamental representation. Web of walls can contain any numbers of external legs and loops like (p,q) string/5-brane webs. We find the moduli space M of a 1/4 BPS equation for wall webs to be the complex Grassmann manifold. When moduli spaces of 1/2 BPS states (parallel walls) and the vacua are removed from M, the non-compact moduli space of genuine 1/4 BPS wall webs is obtained. All the solutions are obtained explicitly and exactly in the strong gauge coupling limit. In the case of Abelian gauge theory, we work out the correspondence between configurations of wall web and the moduli space CP^{Nf-1}.

  13. Using Large Eddy Simulation to Study Airflows in and around Buildings Yi Jiang, Ph.D. Mingde Su, Ph.D. Qingyan Chen, Ph.D.*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Using Large Eddy Simulation to Study Airflows in and around Buildings Yi Jiang, Ph.D. Mingde Su-scale models of large eddy simulation (LES) to study airflows in and around buildings. They are the Smagorinsky, studies of airflow around a building often use wind tunnels that could simulate wind conditions. Notable

  14. Theoretical study of native and rare-earth defect complexes in -PbF2 Huitian Jiang, Aurora Costales,* Miguel A. Blanco,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Ravi

    and dielectric constants of PbF2 very well. The calculated formation energies for native defects suggestARTICLES Theoretical study of native and rare-earth defect complexes in -PbF2 Huitian Jiang, Aurora Costales,* Miguel A. Blanco, Mu Gu, and Ravindra Pandey Department of Physics, Michigan Technological

  15. Adsorption, Diffusion, and Dissociation of H2S on Fe(100) from First Principles D. E. Jiang and Emily A. Carter*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Emily A.

    Adsorption, Diffusion, and Dissociation of H2S on Fe(100) from First Principles D. E. Jiang-polarized periodic density functional theory (DFT) to characterize H2S and HS adsorption, diffusion, and dissociation on the Fe(100) surface. We investigate the site preference of H2S, HS, and S on Fe(100). H2S is predicted

  16. When HTTPS Meets CDN: A Case of Authentication in Delegated Service Jinjin Liang, Jian Jiang, Haixin Duan, Kang Li , Tao Wan , Jianping Wu,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Kang

    providers also start to offer DDoS mitigation services by hiding the original web site and distributingWhen HTTPS Meets CDN: A Case of Authentication in Delegated Service Jinjin Liang, Jian Jiang technologies, each of which has been well studied individually and independently. This paper provides

  17. Tokamak reactor first wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

    1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

  18. Shahzeen Attari Nan Boonyachut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attari, Shahzeen Z.

    ) A trap system (known as a cartridge), which allows urine to enter and leave without draining out the blue Installation Flush/ pipe attachments Drain connection only Drain connection only Disposal Ceramic with metal Transportation Setup, disposal, and maintenance all the same Urinal Shape/Splash back Similar designs for each

  19. WristQue: A Personal Sensor Wristband Brian D. Mayton, Nan Zhao, Matt Aldrich, Nicholas Gillian, and Joseph A. Paradiso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of infrastructure systems in two ways. First, by moving sensors off of the walls and onto people, automatic control the building. This provides a critical part of the context needed by automatic systems to make optimal control. At the same time, it uniquely identifies and locates users to deliver personalized automatic control

  20. Rammered Earth Wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    FIELD MEASUREMENT OF LATERAL EARTH PRESSURES ON RETAINING WALLS A Thesis by Michael Riggins Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974... Major Subject: Civil Engineering FIELD MEASUREMENT OF LATERAL EARTH PRESSURES ON RETAINING WALLS A Thesis by Michael Riggins Approved as to style and content by: Cha rman of Committee Memb r Head of Departm t P Etc Member August 1974 ABSTRACT...

  1. Thermal treatment wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  2. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daido, Ryuji; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, $m \\simeq 10^8 -10^{13}$ GeV and $f \\simeq 10^{13} - 10^{16}$ GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  3. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  4. THE DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Sampayan, S E

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  5. Building wall heat flux calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Tunstall, J.N.; Childs, K.W.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations of the heat transfer through the standard stud wall structure of a residential building are described. The wall cavity contains no insulation. Four of the five test cases represent progressively more complicated approximations to the heat transfer through and within a hollow wall structure. The fifth adds the model components necessary to severely inhibit the radiative energy transport across the empty cavity. Flow within the wall cavity is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy conservation equation for an ideal gas using the Implicit Compressible Eulerian (ICE) algorithm. The fluid flow calculation is coupled to the radiation-conduction model for the solid portions of the system. Conduction through sill plates is about 4% of the total heat transferred through a composite wall. All of the other model elements (conduction through wall board, sheathing, and siding; convection from siding and wallboard to ambients; and radiation across the wall cavity) are required to accurately predict the heat transfer through a wall. Addition of a foil liner on one inner surface of the wall cavity reduces the total heat transferred by almost 50%.

  6. Domain walls in gapped graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Semenoff; V. Semenoff; Fei Zhou

    2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic properties of a particular class of domain walls in gapped graphene are investigated. We show that they can support mid-gap states which are localized in the vicinity of the domain wall and propagate along its length. With a finite density of domain walls, these states can alter the electronic properties of gapped graphene significantly. If the mid-gap band is partially filled,the domain wall can behave like a one-dimensional metal embedded in a semi-conductor, and could potentially be used as a single-channel quantum wire.

  7. Domain walls in gapped graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semenoff, G W; Zhou, Fei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic properties of a particular class of domain walls in gapped graphene are investigated. We show that they can support mid-gap states which are localized in the vicinity of the domain wall and propagate along its length. With a finite density of domain walls, these states can alter the electronic properties of gapped graphene significantly. If the mid-gap band is partially filled,the domain wall can behave like a one-dimensional metal embedded in a semi-conductor, and could potentially be used as a single-channel quantum wire.

  8. Computer-aided detection of bladder tumors based on the thickness mapping of bladder wall in MR images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    images Hongbin Zhu1 , Chaijie Duan1,3 , Ruirui Jiang2 , Lihong Li4 , Yi Fan1 , Xiaokang Yu2 , Wei Zeng2

  9. Liquid Walls Innovative Concepts for First Walls and Blankets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    with existing technology · Size of plasma devices and power plants can be substantially reduced High PoloidalLiquid Walls Innovative Concepts for First Walls and Blankets Mohamed Abdou Professor, Mechanical as part of the US Restructured Fusion Program Strategy to enhance innovation · Natural Questions

  10. Epitaxial Growth of Iron Phthalocyanine at the Initial Stage on Au(111) Surface Z. H. Cheng, L. Gao, Z. T. Deng, Q. Liu, N. Jiang, X. Lin, X. B. He, S. X. Du, and H.-J. Gao*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    Epitaxial Growth of Iron Phthalocyanine at the Initial Stage on Au(111) Surface Z. H. Cheng, L. Gao, Z. T. Deng, Q. Liu, N. Jiang, X. Lin, X. B. He, S. X. Du, and H.-J. Gao* Beijing National Laboratory

  11. Oven wall panel construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellison, Kenneth (20 Avondale Cres., Markham, CA); Whike, Alan S. (R.R. #1, Caledon East, both of Ontario, CA)

    1980-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

  12. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  13. Product Sheet Wall Mount Lift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Product Sheet Wall Mount Lift Ergotron® Neo-FlexTM 870-05-061, rev. 12/11/07 www. Less effort. Feel the difference. Add greater range of movement to your LCD display or TV with the Neo-Flex Wall Mount Lift! CF patented lift-and-pivot motion technology adjusts with a light touch. Raise

  14. Building wall heat flux calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Tunstall, J.N.; Childs, K.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations of the heat transfer through the standard stud wall structure of a residential building are described. The wall cavity contains no insulation. Four of the five test cases represent progressively more complicated approximations to the heat transfer through and within a hollow wall structure. The fifth adds the model components necessary to severely inhibit the radiative energy transport across the empty cavity. Flow within the wall cavity is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy conservation equation for an ideal gas using the Implicit Compressible Eulerian (ICE) algorithm. The fluid flow calculation is coupled to the radiation-conduction model for the solid portions of the system. Conduction through sill plates is about 4% of the total heat transferred through a composite wall.

  15. Construction Guide: Energy Efficient, Durable Walls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Labs | Upper Marlboro, Md High Performance Walls || CZ 3-5 2 INTRODUCTION Low market penetration of energy efficient walls Construction Guide - energy efficient,...

  16. DefectDomain Wall Interactions in Trigonal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalan, Venkatraman

    Defect­Domain Wall Interactions in Trigonal Ferroelectrics Venkatraman Gopalan,1 Volkmar Dierolf,2 walls in the trigonal ferroelectrics lithium niobate and lithium tantalate. It is shown that extrinsic questions re- garding intrinsic widths, defect­domain wall interactions, and static versus dynamic wall

  17. Weilin Jiang | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and defectimplant migration and clustering processes in carbides (SiC), nitrides (GaN) and oxides (SrTiO3, BaTiO3, and Cd2Nb2O7). He also has been involved in studies of...

  18. Jiang_CDFT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as Ready for(SC) Jetting into the Moments afterCDFT

  19. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  20. Effective Supergravity for Supergravity Domain Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cvetic; N. D. Lambert

    2002-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the low energy effective action for the Bosonic and Fermionic zero-modes of a smooth BPS Randall-Sundrum domain wall, including the induced supergravity on the wall. The result is a pure supergravity in one lower dimension. In particular, and in contrast to non-gravitational domain walls or domain walls in a compact space, the zero-modes representing transverse fluctuations of domain wall have vanishing action.

  1. Domain walls riding the wave.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the ferromagnetic wire is the preferred method, as it combines manipulation and readout of the domain-wall state. The electrons that take part in the process of readout and manipulation of the domain-wall structure in the nanowire do so through the so-called spin transfer torque: When spin-polarized electrons in the ferromagnet nanowire pass through the domain wall they experience a nonuniform magnetization, and they try to align their spins with the local magnetic moments. The force that the electrons experience has a reaction force counterpart that 'pushes' the local magnetic moments, resulting in movement of the domain wall in the direction of the electron flow through the spin-transfer torque. The forces between the electrons and the local magnetic moments in the ferromagnet also create additional electrical resistance for the electrons passing through the domain wall. By measuring resistance across a segment of the nanowire, one determines if a domain wall is present; i.e., one can read the stored information. The interaction of the spin-polarized electrons with the domain wall in the ferromagnetic nanowire is not very efficient. Even for materials achieving high polarization of the free electrons, it is very difficult to move the magnetic domain wall. Several factors contribute to this problem, with imperfections of the ferromagnetic nanowire that cause domain-wall pinning being the dominant one. Permalloy nanowires, one of the best candidates for domain-wall-based memory and logic devices, require current densities of the order of 10{sup 8} A/cm{sup 2} in order to move a domain wall from a pinning well. Considering that this current has to pass through a relatively long wire, it is not very difficult to imagine that most of the energy will go to Joule heating. The efficiency of the process - the ratio of the energy converted to domain-wall motion to the total energy consumed - is comparable to that of an incandescent light bulb converting electricity to light. A step towards more efficient domain-wall-based memory devices is the advance of using alternating currents or curren

  2. Magnetic domain walls driven by interfacial phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emori, Satoru

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A domain wall in a ferromagnetic material is a boundary between differently magnetized regions, and its motion provides a convenient scheme to control the magnetization state of the material. Domain walls can be confined ...

  3. Analysis of Rotating Collectors from the Private Region of JET with Carbon Wall and Metallic ITER-Like Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Rotating Collectors from the Private Region of JET with Carbon Wall and Metallic ITER-Like Wall

  4. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

  5. First Wall and Operational Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasnier, C; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Groth, M; Brooks, N; McLean, A; LaBombard, B; Sharpe, J; Skinner, C; Whyte, D; Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C

    2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this chapter we review numerous diagnostics capable of measurements at or near the first wall, many of which contribute information useful for safe operation of a tokamak. There are sections discussing infrared cameras, visible and VUV cameras, pressure gauges and RGAs, Langmuir probes, thermocouples, and erosion and deposition measurements by insertable probes and quartz microbalance. Also discussed are dust measurements by electrostatic detectors, laser scattering, visible and IR cameras, and manual collection of samples after machine opening. In each case the diagnostic is discussed with a view toward application to a burning plasma machine such as ITER.

  6. SRNL POROUS WALL GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wicks, G; Leung Heung, L; Ray Schumacher, R

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a new medium for storage of hydrogen and other gases. This involves fabrication of thin, Porous Walled, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), with diameters generally in the range of 1 to several hundred microns. What is unique about the glass microballons is that porosity has been induced and controlled within the thin, one micron thick walls, on the scale of 10 to several thousand Angstroms. This porosity results in interesting properties including the ability to use these channels to fill the microballons with special absorbents and other materials, thus providing a contained environment even for reactive species. Gases can now enter the microspheres and be retained on the absorbents, resulting in solid-state and contained storage of even reactive species. Also, the porosity can be altered and controlled in various ways, and even used to filter mixed gas streams within a system. SRNL is involved in about a half dozen different programs involving these PW-HGMs and an overview of some of these activities and results emerging are presented.

  7. Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

  8. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  9. First wall for polarized fusion reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenside, Henry S. (Cranbury, NJ); Budny, Robert V. (Princeton, NJ); Post, Jr., Douglass E. (Buttonwood, CT)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Depolarization mechanisms arising from the recycling of the polarized fuel at the limiter and the first-wall of a fusion reactor are greater than those mechanisms in the plasma. Rapid depolarization of the plasma is prevented by providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec.sup.-1.

  10. Textural break foundation wall construction modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Steven J. (Kennewick, WA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Below-grade, textural-break foundation wall structures are provided for inhibiting diffusion and advection of liquids and gases into and out from a surrounding hydrogeologic environment. The foundation wall structure includes a foundation wall having an interior and exterior surface and a porous medium disposed around a portion of the exterior surface. The structure further includes a modular barrier disposed around a portion of the porous medium. The modular barrier is substantially removable from the hydrogeologic environment.

  11. Multiple moving wall dry coal extrusion pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump for transporting particulate material includes a passageway defined on each side between an inlet and an outlet by a moving wall.

  12. First wall for polarized fusion reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenside, H.S.; Budny, R.V.; Post, D.E. Jr.

    1985-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A first-wall or first-wall coating for use in a fusion reactor having polarized fuel may be formed of a low-Z non-metallic material having slow spin relaxation, i.e., a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/. Materials having these properties include hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous semiconductors. A method for preventing the rapid depolarization of a polarized plasma in a fusion device may comprise the step of providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/.

  13. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  14. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  15. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A serpentine coolant flow path is formed by inner walls in a cavity between pressure and suction side walls of a turbine airfoil, the cavity partitioned by one or more transverse partitions into a plurality of continuous serpentine cooling flow streams each having a respective coolant inlet.

  16. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  17. Final Report for "Stabilization of resistive wall modes using moving metal walls"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forest, Cary B.

    2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The UW experiment used a linear pinch experiment to study the stabilization of MHD by moving metal walls. The methodology of the experiment had three steps. (1) Identify and understand the no-wall MHD instability limits and character, (2) identify and understand the thin-wall MHD instabilities (re- sistive wall mode), and then (3) add the spinning wall and understand its impact on stability properties. During the duration of the grant we accomplished all 3 of these goals, discovered new physics, and completed the experiment as proposed.

  18. Evolution of string-wall networks and axionic domain wall problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiramatsu, Takashi [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken'ichi, E-mail: hiramatz@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: saikawa@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa City, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the cosmological evolution of domain walls bounded by strings which arise naturally in axion models. If we introduce a bias in the potential, walls become metastable and finally disappear. We perform two dimensional lattice simulations of domain wall networks and estimate the decay rate of domain walls. By using the numerical results, we give a constraint for the bias parameter and the Peccei-Quinn scale. We also discuss the possibility to probe axion models by direct detection of gravitational waves produced by domain walls.

  19. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1" to 1 1/2"), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  20. You have remarkable ideas. share them at the Falling Walls lab!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    of the falling wallS lab + conference berlin 8/9 nov 2012 aPPlYnoW!www.falling-walls.com/lab THE FALLING WALLS

  1. Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    High-R Walls Case Study Analysis Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case Study Analysis This report considers a number of promising wall systems with improved...

  2. Domain wall cosmology and multiple accelerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon [CQUeST, Sogang University, Seoul, Korea 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Wonwoo; Nam, Siyoung; Park, Chanyong [CQUeST, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We classify the cosmological behaviors of the domain wall under junctions between two spacetimes in terms of various parameters: cosmological constants of bulk spacetime, a tension of a domain wall, and mass parameters of the black-hole-type metric. Especially, we consider the false-true vacuum-type junctions and the domain wall connecting between an inner AdS space and an outer AdS Reissner-Nordstroem black hole. We find that there exists a solution to the junction equations with multiple accelerations.

  3. Highway noise reduction by barrier walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Murray F

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's Variables 3. Noise Reduction and Noise Reduction Factor 4. Relationship Between Noise Attenuation and d 5. Rettinger's Variables 6. Relationship of Sound-Level Reduction and v 7. Basic Principles in Sound-Transmission Loss 8. The Mass Law Relationship... that the barrier wall is acoustically opaque (i. e. , impermeable to sound waves). Purcell (8) found that the noise transmission loss of a wall was a measure of the ratio of the acoustical energy transmitted through the wall to the acoustical energy incident...

  4. Bacterial wall structure and implications for interaction with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bacterial wall structure and implications for interaction with metal ions and minerals. Bacterial wall structure and implications for interaction with metal ions and minerals....

  5. Security Walls, LLC, January 14-18, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    their contributions to health and safety at Security Walls. Security Walls uses the Job Hazard Analysis process to address protective force hazards and develop controls. Subject...

  6. Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes in Organic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube...

  7. Single Wall Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Filtration Efficiency...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Single Wall Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Filtration Efficiency Studies Using Laboratory Generated Particles. Single Wall Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Filtration Efficiency...

  8. Excitonic effects on radial breathing mode intensity of single wall carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    of a SWNT [18], we have to use the extended tight binding (ETB) wave function for obtaining more accurate exciton-photon and exciton- phonon matrix elements. It is noted that Jiang et al. used ETB wave function the exciton calculations to the ETB exciton-photon and exciton-phonon matrix elements, which is the main

  9. Beautify Your Windows and Glass Walls.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tompkins, Charlotte

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -utside? How do your dqkrie outside of your house? 2 IlnKY color affect , Coloor, De~kn and Tex When choosing draperies to har- monize with a room, consider the room, proportions, exposure, view, walls, floors, furnishings, accessories...

  10. See through walls with Wi-Fi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adib, Fadel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wi-Fi signals are typically information carriers between a transmitter and a receiver. In this thesis, we show that Wi-Fi can also extend our senses, enabling us to see moving objects through walls and behind closed doors. ...

  11. See through walls with WiFi!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adib, Fadel M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wi-Fi signals are typically information carriers between a transmitter and a receiver. In this paper, we show that Wi-Fi can also extend our senses, enabling us to see moving objects through walls and behind closed doors. ...

  12. Axions from cosmic string and wall decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagmann, C A

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    If inflation occurred with a reheat temperature > T{sub PQ}, axions from the decay of global axion strings and domain walls would make an important contribution to the cosmological energy density, comparable to that from vacuum misalignment. Several groups have numerically studied the evolution of axion strings and walls in the past, however substantial uncertainties remain in their contribution to the present density {Omega}{sub a,string+wall} {approx} 1-100 (f{sub a}/10{sup 12} GeV){sup 7/6}, where f{sub a} is the axion decay constant. I will describe the numerical methods used in our simulations and show results for several string and wall configurations.

  13. Axions from cosmic string and wall decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagmann, Chris [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-59, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    If inflation occurred with a reheat temperature > T{sub PQ}, axions from the decay of global axion strings and domain walls would make an important contribution to the cosmological energy density, comparable to that from vacuum misalignment. Several groups have numerically studied the evolution of axion strings and walls in the past, however substantial uncertainties remain in their contribution to the present density {Omega}{sub a,string+wall{approx}}1-100(f{sub a}/10{sup 12} GeV){sup 7/6}, where f{sub a} is the axion decay constant. I will describe the numerical methods used in our simulations and show results for several string and wall configurations.

  14. Anisotropic Expansion of the Plant Cell Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskin, Tobias

    solar panels of leaves to the coiled grap- pling hooks of tendrils. Thompson (1917) re- alized of a unit area of cell wall is characterized by the direction and degree of anisotropy. The direction

  15. INTOR impurity control and first wall system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The highlights of the recent INTOR effort on examining the key issues of the impurity control/first wall system are summarized. The emphasis of the work was an integrated study of the edge-region physics, plasma-wall interaction, materials, engineering and magnetic considerations associated with the poloidal divertor and pump limiter. The development of limiter and divertor collector plate designs with an acceptable lifetime was a major part of the work.

  16. Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doru M. Stefanescu

    2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

  17. Near-wall modeling of an isothermal vertical wall using one-dimensional turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DesJardin, Paul E.

    [5]. The challenge in modeling this class of flows is the coupling between the heat transfer approaches are considered for describing the heat transfer from a vertical isothermal wall. In this approach at the wall surface and the generation of turbulence from buoyancy forces, which in turn, affect

  18. Thermodynamics of free Domain Wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. V. Gavai; Sayantan Sharma

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Studying various thermodynamic quantities for the free domain wall fermions for both finite and infinite fifth dimensional extent N_5, we find that the lattice corrections are minimum for $N_T\\geq10$ for both energy density and susceptibility, for its irrelevant parameter M in the range 1.45-1.50. The correction terms are, however, quite large for small lattice sizes of $N_T\\leq8$. We propose modifications of the domain wall operator, as well as the overlap operator, to reduce the finite cut-off effects to within 10% of the continuum results of the thermodynamic quantities for the currently used N_T=6-8 lattices. Incorporating chemical potential, we show that \\mu^2 divergences are absent for a large class of such domain wall fermion actions although the chiral symmetry is broken for $\\mu\

  19. INTEGRATED ENERGY EFFICIENT WINDOW-WALL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Arney, Ph.D.

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The building industry faces the challenge of reducing energy use while simultaneously improving construction methods and marketability. This paper describes the first phase of a project to address these concerns by designing an Integrated Window Wall System (IWWS) that can be commercialized. This work builds on previous research conducted during the 1990's by Lawrence Berkeley national Laboratories (LBNL). During this phase, the objective was to identify appropriate technologies, problems and issues and develop a number of design concepts. Four design concepts were developed into prototypes and preliminary energy analyses were conducted Three of these concepts (the foam wall, steel wall, and stiffened plate designs) showed particular potential for meeting the project objectives and will be continued into a second phase where one or two of the systems will be brought closer to commercialization.

  20. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Christian X. (Oviedo, FL); Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  1. Standing gravitational waves from domain walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogberashvili, Merab [Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, 6 Tamarashvili Street, Tbilisi 0177 (Georgia); Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze Avenue, Tbilisi 0128 (Georgia); California State University, Fresno, Physics Department, Fresno, California 93740-8031 (United States); Myrzakul, Shynaray [Department of General and Theoretical Physics, Gumilev Eurasian National University, Astana, 010008 (Kazakhstan); California State University, Fresno, Physics Department, Fresno, California 93740-8031 (United States); Singleton, Douglas [California State University, Fresno, Physics Department, Fresno, California 93740-8031 (United States); Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia, Moscow 117198 (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a plane symmetric, standing gravitational wave for a domain wall plus a massless scalar field. The scalar field can be associated with a fluid which has the properties of 'stiff' matter, i.e., matter in which the speed of sound equals the speed of light. Although domain walls are observationally ruled out in the present era, the solution has interesting features which might shed light on the character of exact nonlinear wave solutions to Einstein's equations. Additionally this solution may act as a template for higher dimensional 'brane-world' model standing waves.

  2. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claunch, Scott D. (Broomfield, CO); Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  3. Non-Abelian Webs of Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minoru Eto; Youichi Isozumi; Muneto Nitta; Keisuke Ohashi; Norisuke Sakai

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Domain wall junctions are studied in N=2 supersymmetric U(Nc) gauge theory with Nf(>Nc) flavors. We find that all three possibilities are realized for positive, negative and zero junction charges. The positive junction charge is found to be carried by a topological charge in the Hitchin system of an SU(2) gauge subgroup. We establish rules of the construction of the webs of walls. Webs can be understood qualitatively by grid diagram and quantitatively by associating moduli parameters to web configurations.

  4. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claunch, S.D.; Farrington, R.B.

    1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 17 figs.

  5. Refo?m nan Lajistis = Judicial reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seza, Mari Dyevela

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gen ase tribinal 2 Kdripsyon jij yo 2 Jij yo manke fômasyon 2 Lajistis ap mache kon tóti 3 Kisa ki anpechc jij yo ft travay yo byen? 3 Sou kisa refôm lajistis la dvve chita? 4 Poukisa refôm administratif la enpótan? . . . . 5 Poukisa dwe gen...-Language Books on Haiti. 1995 (Updated). Pp. 21. More than 150 entries, with brief description of each; special list of T o p Ten." Introduction and text in English. Updated periodically. No 4 - Strategy of Aristide Government for Social and Economic...

  6. Wo?ch nan sole?y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paultre, Carrie?; Ross, Jim D.; Freeman, Bryant C.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    yo ap pichkannen 1 pou 1 rakonte yo yon lot ti istwa. Jodi a, li resi ap fe yo kontan. Se sa k fe n ap mande tout moun pou yo rete tou dousman, san pale pou yo sa koute: W O C H N A N S O L E Y Chapit 1 Siklon David te fek ap mache sou kat (4...) mwa depi 1 te fin krabinen tout bagay net andeyo a. Se vre, moun gouvenman yo te fe sa yo te kapab pou manye soulaje mize pep la. Men, se pa tout moun ki te rive jwenn yon lasistans. Se konsa Melani pa t jwenn pesonn moun pou lonje men ba li. Se...

  7. Hot wire production of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dillon, Anne C. (Boulder, CO); Mahan, Archie H. (Golden, CO); Alleman, Jeffrey L. (Lakewood, CO)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus (210) for producing a multi-wall carbon nanotube (213) may comprise a process chamber (216), a furnace (217) operatively associated with the process chamber (216), and at least one filament (218) positioned within the process chamber (216). At least one power supply (220) operatively associated with the at least one filament (218) heats the at least one filament (218) to a process temperature. A gaseous carbon precursor material (214) operatively associated with the process chamber (216) provides carbon for forming the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213). A metal catalyst material (224) operatively associated with the process (216) catalyzes the formation of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213).

  8. THE CHINESE WALL LATTICE Ravi Sandhu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhu, Ravi

    of interest class #12;4 CHINESE WALL EXAMPLE BANKS OIL COMPANIESBANKS OIL COMPANIES A B X Y #12;5 READ ACCESS A Bank B Oil Company X Oil Company XOil Company X Oil Company X · cooperating Trojan Horses can transfer Bank A information to Bank B objects, and vice versa, using Oil Company X objects as intermediaries #12

  9. Domain wall partition functions and KP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O Foda; M Wheeler; M Zuparic

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe that the partition function of the six vertex model on a finite square lattice with domain wall boundary conditions is (a restriction of) a KP tau function and express it as an expectation value of charged free fermions (up to an overall normalization).

  10. Liquid Walls Innovative High Power Density Concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Surface Heat Flux > 2 MW/m2 2. High Power Conversion Efficiency (> 40%) 3. High Availability -Lower rrr ×= V r J r PV r B r 1P 2P g r + - V r #12;V(initial momentum) g rFluidIn FluidOutBackingWall 2Dsurfaceturbulence · Poloidal Pumping + - J r - flowpoloidal direction - Enhancesurfaceheat transferwith2D turbulence

  11. Solitons and Domain Walls in Odd Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. D. Lambert; G. W. Gibbons

    2000-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the existance of smooth soliton solutions which interpolate between supersymmetric vacua in odd-dimensional theories. In particular we apply this analysis to a wide class of supergravities to argue against the existence of smooth domain walls interpolating between supersymmetric vacua. We find that if the superpotential changes sign then any Goldstino modes will diverge.

  12. Design of wetted wall bioaerosol concentration cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Youngjin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    wall bioaerosol cyclone concentrators that consume very low power and are capable of delivering very small liquid effluent flow rate of highly-concentrated hydrosol. The aerosol-to-aerosol penetration cutpoint for the cyclones is about 1µm. The aerosol...

  13. ROOM AIR CONDITIONER WALL MOUNTED type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    SPLIT TYPE ROOM AIR CONDITIONER WALL MOUNTED type Reciprocating Compressor Models Indoor unit.6 - 11.4 ----- MOISTURE REMOVAL ( / hr) 2.0 1.8 2.7 2.7 4.3 3 AIR CIRCULATION - Hi (m / hr) 800 800 1

  14. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowring, D.L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON A CAVITY WITH BERYLLIUM WALLS FOR MUON IONIZATION COOLINGFabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigatepillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate

  15. Electrical signature of magnetic domain-wall dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y.; Tretiakov, O. A.; Abanov, Artem.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current-induced domain-wall dynamics is studied in a thin ferromagnetic nanowire. The domain-wall dynamics is described by simple equations with four parameters. We propose a procedure to unambiguously determine these parameters by all...

  16. Concrete Masonry Wall Retrofit Systems for Blast Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Carol Faye

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    unit (CMU) infill walls, commonly used in reinforced concrete or steel framed structures, are particularly vulnerable to blast loads. Facilities that incorporate CMU walls must either be hardened or retrofitted for explosive events. Conventional...

  17. Interaction between Drilled Shaft and Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aghahadi Forooshani, Mohammad

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilled shafts under horizontal loads are being constructed within Mechanically Stabled Earth (MSE) walls in the reinforced zone especially in overpass bridges and traffic signs. The interaction between the drilled shafts and the MSE wall...

  18. Electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube reinforced polyimide composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ounaies, Zoubeida

    Electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube reinforced polyimide composites Z. Ounaiesa of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) reinforced polyimide composites were investigated as a function nanotube; Composites 1. Introduction Polyimides are widely used in applications ranging from

  19. TBU-0061- In the Matter of Misti Wall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Misti Wall (the complainant or Wall), appeals the dismissal of her complaint of retaliation filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. As...

  20. Engineering the fusion reactor first wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurden, Glen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Willms [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently the National Academy of Engineering published a set of Grand Challenges in Engineering in which the second item listed was entitled 'Provide energy from fusion'. Clearly a key component of this challenge is the science and technology associated with creating and maintaining burning plasmas. This is being vigorously addressed with both magnetic and inertial approaches with various experiments such as ITER and NIF. Considerably less attention is being given to another key component of this challenge, namely engineering the first wall that will contain the burning plasma. This is a daunting problem requiring technologies and materials that can not only survive, but also perform multiple essential functions in this extreme environment. These functions are (1) shield the remainder of the device from radiation. (2) convert of neutron energy to useful heat and (3) breed and extract tritium to maintain the reactor fuel supply. The first wall must not contaminate the plasma with impurities. It must be infused with cooling to maintain acceptable temperatures on plasma facing and structural components. It must not degrade. It must avoid excessive build-up of tritium on surfaces, and, if surface deposits do form, must be receptive to cleaning techniques. All these functions and constraints must be met while being subjected to nuclear and thermal radiation, particle bombardment, high magnetic fields, thermal cycling and occasional impingement of plasma on the surface. And, operating in a nuclear environment, the first wall must be fully maintainable by remotely-operated manipulators. Elements of the first wall challenge have been studied since the 1970' s both in the US and internationally. Considerable foundational work has been performed on plasma facing materials and breeding blanket/shield modules. Work has included neutronics, materials fabrication and joining, fluid flow, tritium breeding, tritium recovery and containment, energy conversion, materials damage and magnetohydrodynamics. While work to date has been quite valuable, no blanket concept has been built and operated in anything approaching a realistic fusion reactor environment. Rather, work has been limited to isolated experiments on first wall components and paper studies. The need now is to complete necessary R&D on first wall components, assemble components into a practical design, and test the first wall in a realistic fusion environment. Besides supporting work, major prototype experiments could be performed in non-nuclear experiments, as part of the ITER project and as part of the Component Test Facility. The latter is under active consideration and is a proposed machine which would use a driven plasma to expose an entire first wall to a fusion environment. Key US contributors to first wall research have been UCLA, UCSD, U of Wisconsin, LANL, ORNL, PNNL, Argonne and Idaho National Lab. Current efforts have been coordinated by UCLA. It is recognized that when this work progresses to a larger scale, leadership from a national laboratory will be required. LANL is well-prepared to provide such leadership.

  1. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist, and reducing the amount of wood penetrating the wall cavity.

  2. STEEL PLATE SHEAR WALL BUILDINGS: DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    , University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260. #12;plate shear wall design and use of light-gage cold form platesSTEEL PLATE SHEAR WALL BUILDINGS: DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND RESEARCH Michel Bruneau, P.E. 1 Dr areas. This paper provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art in steel plate shear wall design

  3. Building Cathedrals and Breaking down Reinforced Concrete Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broué, Michel - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

    Building Cathedrals and Breaking down Reinforced Concrete Walls Michel Brou´e Institut Henri distinction between great mathematicians Concrete walls breakers Michel Brou´e (Institut Henri Poincar´e) John Concrete walls breakers Cathedrals builders Michel Brou´e (Institut Henri Poincar´e) John Thompson

  4. Designing Precast Concrete Cross Wall Joints Against Progressive Collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Designing Precast Concrete Cross Wall Joints Against Progressive Collapse Researcher: Mohamad concrete cross wall constructions. Ronan Point Collapse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronan_Point) #12;Due gap is listed as follows: · Limited number of studies for designing precast concrete cross wall

  5. Enhanced reactive metal wall for dehalogenation of hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howson, P.E.; Mackenzie, P.D.; Horney, D.P.

    1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for remediation of contaminated solutions using a tiered metal wall or column. The tiered metal wall or column has at least three zones with graduated sizes of reducing metal particles. Contaminated solutions pass through the tiered wall or column to dehalogenate contaminant halogenated hydrocarbons. 3 figs.

  6. Light quark masses using domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Blum; Amarjit Soni; Matthew Wingate

    1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the one-loop self-energy correction to the massive domain wall quark propagator. Combining this calculation with simulations at several gauge couplings, we estimate the strange quark mass in the continuum limit. The perturbative one-loop mass renormalization is comparable to that for Wilson quarks and considerably smaller than that for Kogut-Susskind quarks. Also, scaling violations appear mild in comparison to other errors at present. Given their good chiral behavior and these features, domain wall quarks are attractive for evaluating the light quark masses. Our preliminary quenched result is m_s(2 GeV) = 82(15) MeV in the ${\\bar{MS}}$ scheme.

  7. Enhanced dielectric-wall linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is enhanced by a high-voltage, fast e-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface. 6 figs.

  8. Wall Drying in Hot and Humid Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, K.; Weston, T.; Pascual, X.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WALL DRYING IN HOT AND HUMID CLIMATES Kimdolyn Boone Theresa Weston, PhD Xuaco Pascual Product Development Engineer Building Scientist Field Services Engineer E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company Richmond, VA ABSTRACT... time based on the varying weather conditions. Constant interior conditions of 70?F and 55% RH were chosen. This corresponds to typical interior temperatures and a high level of moisture production within the house. This was chosen as a worse...

  9. Soft wall model for a holographic superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afonin, S S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply the soft wall holographic model from hadron physics to a description of the high-$T_c$ superconductivity. In comparison with the existing bottom-up holographic superconductors, the proposed approach is more phenomenological. On the other hand, it is much simpler and has more freedom for fitting the conductivity properties of the real high-$T_c$ materials. We demonstrate some examples of emerging models and discuss a possible origin of the approach.

  10. Hollow clay tile wall program summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Beavers, J.E. [MS Technology, Inc. (United States)

    1995-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

  11. ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WONG, CPC; MALANG, S; NISHIO, S; RAFFRAY, R; SAGARA, S

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK A271 ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS. First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability.

  12. Cutting assembly including expanding wall segments of auger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Treuhaft, Martin B. (San Antonio, TX); Oser, Michael S. (San Antonio, TX)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mining auger comprises a cutting head carried at one end of a tubular shaft and a plurality of wall segments which in a first position thereof are disposed side by side around said shaft and in a second position thereof are disposed oblique to said shaft. A vane projects outwardly from each wall segment. When the wall segments are in their first position, the vanes together form a substantially continuous helical wall. A cutter is mounted on the peripheral edge of each of the vanes. When the wall segments are in their second position, the cutters on the vanes are disposed radially outward from the perimeter of the cutting head.

  13. Effect of elasticity of wall on diffusion in nano channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tankeshwar, K., E-mail: tankesh@pu.ac.in [Computer Centre, Panjab University Chandigarh,- 160014 (India); Srivastava, Sunita [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Confining walls of nano channel are taken to be elastic to study their effect on the diffusion coefficient of fluid flowing through the channel. The wall is elastic to the extent that it responses to molecular pressure exerted by fluid. The model to study diffusion is based on microscopic considerations. Results obtained for fluid confining to 20 atomic diameter width contrasted with results obtained by considering rigid and smooth wall. The effect of roughness of wall on diffusion can be compensated by the elastic property of wall.

  14. Control of magnetohydrodynamic modes with a resistive wall above the wall stabilization limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finn, John M. [T-15, Plasma Theory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies are shown of control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in the presence of a resistive wall, below and above the regime for which stabilization is possible with a perfectly conducting wall, i.e., in and above the ideal wall limit. The results show that resistive plasma (tearing-like) modes can be feedback stabilized for current profiles which are unstable above the ideal wall limit, both for tokamak-like and reversed field pinch (RFP)-like profiles. However, above the limit for wall stabilization of ideal plasma modes, resonant or nonresonant, the feedback scheme cannot provide stabilization. The control scheme senses both normal and tangential components of the perturbed magnetic field, and the feedback is proportional to a linear combination of the two. Neither plasma rotation nor complex gain is included. A cylindrical reduced MHD model, in resistive or ideal form, is used, with tokamak-like profiles [increasing profile of q(r)] or RFP-like profiles [decreasing q(r)]. The possible relevance to RFPs and tokamaks is discussed.

  15. Method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fong, James T. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion of a large and thick walled vessel for a defect by computed tomography is provided. A collimated source of radiation is placed adjacent one side of the wall portion and an array of detectors for the radiation is placed on the other side adjacent the source. The radiation from the source passing through the wall portion is then detected with the detectors over a limited angle, dependent upon the curvature of the wall of the vessel, to obtain a dataset. The source and array are then coordinately moved relative to the wall portion in steps and a further dataset is obtained at each step. The plurality of datasets obtained over the limited angle is then processed to produce a tomogram of the wall portion to determine the presence of a defect therein. In a preferred embodiment, the curved wall portion has a center of curvature so that the source and the array are positioned at each step along a respective arc curved about the center. If desired, the detector array and source can be reoriented relative to a new wall portion and an inspection of the new wall portion can be easily obtained. Further, the source and detector array can be indexed in a direction perpendicular to a plane including the limited angle in a plurality of steps so that by repeating the detecting and moving steps at each index step, a three dimensional image can be created of the wall portion.

  16. Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics Stability Spectrum with a Resistive Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Smith and S.C. Jardin

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the eigenvalue equations describing a cylindrical ideal magnetophydrodynamicsw (MHD) plasma interacting with a thin resistive wall can be put into the standard mathematical form: ??? = ??? ?. This is accomplished by using a finite element basis for the plasma, and by adding an extra degree of freedom corresponding to the electrical current in the thin wall. The standard form allows the use of linear eigenvalue solvers, without additional interations, to compute the complete spectrum of plasma modes in the presence of a surrounding restrictive wall at arbitrary separation. We show that our method recovers standard results in the limits of (1) an infinitely resistive wall (no wall), and (2) a zero resistance wall (ideal wall).

  17. Dynamic load test of Arquin-designed CMU wall.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Richard Pearson

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arquin Corporation has developed a new method of constructing CMU (concrete masonry unit) walls. This new method uses polymer spacers connected to steel wires that serve as reinforcing as well as a means of accurately placing the spacers so that the concrete block can be dry stacked. The hollows of the concrete block are then filled with grout. As part of a New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA), Sandia National Laboratories conducted a series of tests that dynamically loaded wall segments to compare the performance of walls constructed using the Arquin method to a more traditional method of constructing CMU walls. A total of four walls were built, two with traditional methods and two with the Arquin method. Two of the walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every third cell filled with grout. The remaining two walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every cell filled with grout. The walls were dynamically loaded with explosive forces. No significant difference was noted between the performance of the walls constructed by the Arquin method when compared to the walls constructed by the traditional method.

  18. Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stathopoulos, Dimitrios (Glenmont, NY); Xu, Liming (Greenville, SC); Lewis, Doyle C. (Greer, SC)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

  19. Melting Instantons, Domain Walls, and Large N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. B. Thacker

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo studies of $CP^{N-1}$ sigma models have shown that the structure of topological charge in these models undergoes a sharp transition at $N=N_c\\approx 4$. For $NN_c$ it is dominated by extended, thin, 1-dimensionally coherent membranes of topological charge, which can be interpreted as domain walls between discrete quasi-stable vacua. These vacua differ by a unit of background electric flux. The transition can be identified as the delocalization of topological charge, or "instanton melting," a phenomenon first suggested by Witten to resolve the conflict between instantons and large $N$ behavior. Implications for $QCD$ are discussed.

  20. Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide Permit webpage JumpWaikane,(Redirected from WalkerWalkerton,Wall,

  1. Water Wall Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,Area (Wood,Wall Turbine Jump to:

  2. CXD 4606, 9831 Wall Construction Project (4606)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r8.0 -CURRICULUM9831 Wall Construction

  3. Living Walls | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin ZhongdiantouLichuan CityLiqcrytech LLCLiuzhou MinghuiLiving Walls

  4. Thermal performance of steel-framed walls. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbour, E. [NAHB Research Center, Inc., Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Goodrow, J. [Holometrix, Inc., Bedford, MA (United States); Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In wall construction, highly conductive members spaced along the wall, which allow higher heat transfer than that through less conductive areas, are referred to as thermal bridges. Thermal bridges in walls tend to increase heat loss and, under certain adverse conditions, can cause dust streaking (``ghosting``) on interior walls over studs due to temperature differentials, as well as condensation in and on walls. Although such adverse conditions can be easily avoided by proper thermal design of wall systems, these effects have not been well understood and thermal data has been lacking. Therefore, the present study was initiated to provide (1) a better understanding of the thermal behavior of steel-framed walls, (2) a set of R-values for typical wall constructions, and (3) information that could be used to develop improved methods of predicting R-values. An improved method for estimating R-value would allow an equitable comparison of thermal performance with other construction types and materials. This would increase the number of alternative materials for walls available to designers, thus allowing them to choose the optimum choice for construction. Twenty-three wall samples were tested in a calibrated hot box (ASTM C9761) to measure the thermal performance of steel-framed wall systems. The tests included an array of stud frame configurations, exterior sheathing and fiberglass batt insulations. Other studies have not included the use of insulating sheathing, which reduces the extent of the thermal bridges and improves total thermal performance. The purpose of the project was to provide measured R-values for commonly used steel-framed wall configurations and to improve R-value estimating methods. Test results were compared to R-value estimates using the parallel path method, the isothermal planes method and the ASHRAE Zone method. The comparison showed that the known procedures do not fully account for the three-dimensional effects created by steel framing in a wall.

  5. OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    subsystems was performed parametrically to uncover key physics/technology uncertainties and to iden- tify be necessary that may preclude propagation of the laser driver and require assisted pinch transport issue for wetted-wall concepts. KEYWORDS: inertial fusion, fusion technology, IFE chambers *E

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A QUANTITATIVE MEASURE OF THE FUNCTIONALITY OF FRAME WALLS ENHANCED WITH PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS USING A DYNAMIC WALL SIMULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evers, Angela C.

    2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Frame walls enhanced with phase change materials (paraffin-based, hydrated salt-based, and eutectic) mixed in cellulose insulation were developed and tested. The frame walls were heated and allowed to cool in a dynamic wall simulator that replicated...

  7. Intense Magnetized Plasma-Wall Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Bruno S. [UNR] [UNR; Fuelling, Stephan [UNR] [UNR

    2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project studied wall-plasma interactions relevant to fusion science. Such interactions are a critical aspect of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) because flux compression by a pusher material, in particular the metal for the liner approach to MIF, involves strong eddy current heating on the surface of the pusher, and probably interactions and mixing of the pusher with the interior fuel during the time when fusion fuel is being burned. When the pusher material is a metal liner, high-energy-density conditions result in fascinating behavior. For example, "warm dense matter" is produced, for which material properties such as resistivity and opacity are not well known. In this project, the transformation into plasma of metal walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields was studied with an experiment driven by the UNR 1 MA Zebra generator. The experiment was numerically simulated with using the MHRDR code. This simple, fundamental high-energy-density physics experiment, in a regime appropriate to MIF, has stimulated an important and fascinating comparison of numerical modeling codes and tables with experiment. In addition, we participated in developing the FRCHX experiment to compress a field-reversed-configuration (FRC) plasma with a liner, in collaboration with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratory and Los Alamos National Lab, and we helped develop diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL. Last, but not least, this project served to train students in high-energy-density physics.

  8. Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Schumacher, Ray F. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

  9. Design studies of an aluminum first wall for INTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.; Yu, W.S.; Hsieh, S.Y.; Pearlman, H.; Kramer, R.; Franz, E.; Craig, A.; Farrell, K.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Besides the high erosion rates (including evaporation) expected for INTOR, there may also be high heat fluxes to the first wall, e.g., approx. 9 (Case I) to 24 (Case II) W/cm/sup 2/, from two sources - radiation and charge exchange neutrals. There will also be internal heat generation by neutron and gamma deposition. An aluminum first wall design is analyzed, which substantially reduces concerns about survivability of the first wall during INTOR's operating life.

  10. Oscillating light wall above a sunspot light bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Shuhong; Jiang, Fayu; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the high tempo-spatial \\emph{Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph} 1330 {\\AA} images, we find that many bright structures are rooted in the light bridge of NOAA 12192, forming a \\emph{light wall}. The light wall is brighter than the surrounding areas, and the wall top is much brighter than the wall body. The New Vacuum Solar Telescope H$\\alpha$ and the \\emph{Solar Dynamics Observatory} 171 {\\AA} and 131 {\\AA} images are also used to study the light wall properties. In 1330 {\\AA}, 171 {\\AA}, and 131 {\\AA}, the top of the wall has a higher emission, while in the H$\\alpha$ line, the wall top emission is very low. The wall body corresponds to bright areas in 1330 {\\AA} and dark areas in the other lines. The top of the light wall moves upward and downward successively, performing oscillations in height. The deprojected mean height, amplitude, oscillation velocity, and the dominant period are determined to be 3.6 Mm, 0.9 Mm, 15.4 km s$^{-1}$, and 3.9 min, respectively. We interpret the oscillations of the lig...

  11. Seismic design, testing and analysis of reinforced concrete wall buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panagiotou, Marios

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based on the material testing data of concrete cylinders inDESIGN, TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE WALLDESIGN, TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE WALL

  12. Fracture of welded aluminum thin-walled structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive methodology was developed in the thesis for damage prediction of welded aluminum thin-walled structures, which includes material modeling, calibration, numerical simulation and experimental verification. ...

  13. air circulation wall: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manuscript A wall heat transfer correlation for the baffled-rotary kilns with secondary air Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Accepted...

  14. Wall and laser spot motion in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, G.; Courtois, C.; Monteil, M.-C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Wall and laser spot motion measurements in empty, propane-filled and plastic (CH)-lined gold coated cylindrical hohlraums were performed on the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Wall motion was measured using axial two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging and laser spot motion was perpendicularly observed through a thinned wall using streaked hard x-ray imaging. Experimental results and 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that while empty targets exhibit on-axis plasma collision, CH-lined and propane-filled targets inhibit wall expansion, corroborated with perpendicular streaked imaging showing a slower motion of laser spots.

  15. Self-assembling functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Yan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. Wang (2007). "Storage of hydrogen in single-walled carbongravimetric storage capacity of hydrogen in a diamond-shapedfor energy storage applications such as hydrogen absorption.

  16. aligned single wall: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Printed Multilayer Superstructures of Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Materials Science Websites Summary: Printed Multilayer Superstructures of Aligned...

  17. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  18. Seismic design, testing and analysis of reinforced concrete wall buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panagiotou, Marios

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Slender Reinforced Concrete Walls”. Structural Journal,T. (1975). “Reinforced Concrete Structures”. John Wiley &Design of Reinforced Concrete and Masonry Buildings”. John

  19. artery wall thickness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CCA-IMT) were measured using ultrasonography. Gait 22 LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING. Physics Websites Summary: to reduce...

  20. Moisture Management of High-R Walls (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  1. The height of watermelons with wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Feierl

    2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive asymptotics for the moments as well as the weak limit of the height distribution of watermelons with p branches with wall. This generalises a famous result of de Bruijn, Knuth and Rice on the average height of planted plane trees, and results by Fulmek and Katori et al. on the expected value, respectively the higher moments, of the height distribution of watermelons with two branches. The asymptotics for the moments depend on the analytic behaviour of certain multidimensional Dirichlet series. In order to obtain this information we prove a reciprocity relation satisfied by the derivatives of one of Jacobi's theta functions, which generalises the well known reciprocity law for Jacobi's theta functions.

  2. Light-shining-through-walls with lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friederike Januschek

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Light-shining-through-walls experiments are the search experiments for weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs) with the smallest model dependence. They have the advantage that not only the detection, but also the production of the WISPs takes place in the laboratory and can thus be controlled. Using lasers is the preferred option for most of the mass region and has led to the world's most stringent laboratory limits (ALPS I) there. At CERN, OSQAR promises to surpass these and at DESY ALPS II is currently set up, which is planning to probe the axion-like particle to photon coupling down to $|g_{a\\gamma}|\\gtrsim 2\\cdot10^{-11}$ GeV$^{-1}$, which is in a region favored by many astrophysical hints.

  3. Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liska, Richard

    Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1 R. LISKA,2 AND F.B. ROSMEJ3,4 1 Institute, France (RECEIVED 30 August 2009; ACCEPTED 21 September 2009) Abstract Jets of laser­generated plasma surfaces (walls). The pilot experiments carried out on the iodine laser system (5­200 J, 0.44 mm, 0

  4. architecture cell wall: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    architecture cell wall First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Distinct Cell Wall Architectures...

  5. Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U R. Majeski,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U R. Kaita, a R. Majeski, a S. Luckhardt, b R. Doerner, b M ABSTRACT The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance is intensely heated and well diagnosed, and an extensive liquid lithium plasma-facing surface will be used

  6. TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP From: Anter El-Azab (anter@seas.ucla.edu) Re with Lithium will can not work and this concept should be terminated. For the case of vanadium alloy on this concept should be terminated. #12;TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT Best Regards, Anter #12;

  7. An analytic description of thick-wall bubbles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Jooyoo

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approximation scheme to the false-vacuum decay is suggested. In this scheme the bounce solutions can be obtained in an explicit and analytic way even for thick-wall bubbles. The result is compared with Coleman`s thin-wall description, which shows that is nicely comprises the result of the latter prescription. Some applications are also discussed.

  8. The prospects for highbeta tokamaks with Li walls 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    . Why Li walls ? 2. Magnetic propulsion of liquid Li. 3. Plasma profiles in the non­recycling regime. 4 can be magnetically propulsed along the plasma facing surfaces in the tokamak chamber. This allows the stabilizing wall right at the plasma boundary. 2. Intense (V ' 20 m=sec) magnetic propulsion allows to keep Li

  9. Methods for degrading or converting plant cell wall polysaccharides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berka, Randy (Davis, CA); Cherry, Joel (Davis, CA)

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to methods for converting plant cell wall polysaccharides into one or more products, comprising: treating the plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into the one or more products. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into saccharified material; (b) fermenting the saccharified material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microoganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  10. Technology reviews: Dynamic curtain wall systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize die state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends. Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

  11. Pneumatic wall-locking geophone system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuhlman, Harland L. (Minneapolis, MN); Cumerlato, Calvin L. (Minneapolis, MN); Tweeton, Daryl R. (Apple Valley, MN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A seismic signal receiving system is provided for use in boreholes to receive seismic waves in carrying out geophysical investigations. The system includes three pairs of opposed plates, each of the pairs of plates including oppositely facing outer surfaces for engagement with opposite sides of a borehole. A seismic receiver is mounted on the inner surface of each of the plates for receiving seismic signals. A double-acting, fluid-operated actuator selectively causes relative movement of the plates of the pairs of plates away from each other to provide expansion thereof so as to enable the plates to engage the walls of a borehole and selectively causes relative movement of the plates of the pairs of plates toward each other to provide retraction thereof so as to enable the system to be removed from a borehole. The pairs of plates each comprise a relatively long plate and a relatively short plate. An expandable linkage interconnects the long plates at the distal ends thereof. The plates are mechanically biassed into the retracted state so that the plates return to this state in the event of a system failure.

  12. ICRF Specific Plasma Wall Interactions in JET with the ITER-Like Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobkov, V. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching, Germany] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching, Germany; Arnoux, G. [EURATOM, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon England] [EURATOM, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon England; Brezinsek, S. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany] [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Coenen, J. W. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Germany] [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Germany; Colas, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Clever, M. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Germany] [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Germany; Czarnecka, A. [Association EURATOM-IPPLM, Warsaw, Poland] [Association EURATOM-IPPLM, Warsaw, Poland; Braun, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany; Dux, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany; Huber, Alexander [EURATOM / FZ-Juelich, Germany] [EURATOM / FZ-Juelich, Germany; Jacquet, P. [EURATOM / UKAEA, Abingdon, UK] [EURATOM / UKAEA, Abingdon, UK; Klepper, C Christopher [ORNL] [ORNL; Lerche, E. [ERM-KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels, Belgium] [ERM-KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels, Belgium; Maggi, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany; Marcotte, F. [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France] [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France; Maslov, M. [Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, UK] [Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, UK; Matthews, G. [Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, UK] [Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, UK; Mayoral, M.-L. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK] [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; McCormick, K. D. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany; Meigs, A. G. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK] [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Milanesio, D. [Politecnico di Torino] [Politecnico di Torino; Monakhov, I. [EURATOM / UKAEA, Abingdon, UK] [EURATOM / UKAEA, Abingdon, UK; Neu, Rudolf [EURATOM / IPP Garching, Germany] [EURATOM / IPP Garching, Germany; Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany; Putterich, Th. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany; Rimini, F. [Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, UK] [Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, UK; Rooj, G. Van [Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Nieuwegein, Netherlands] [Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Nieuwegein, Netherlands; Sergienko, G. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Germany] [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Germany; Van Eester, D. [ERM-KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels, Belgium] [ERM-KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels, Belgium

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of plasma wall interactions (PWIs) during operation of the so-called A2 ICRF antennas is observed in JET with the ITER-like wall. Amongst effects of the PWIs, the W content increase is the most significant, especially at low plasma densities. No increase of W source from the main divertor and entrance of the outer divertor during ICRF compared to NBI phases was found by means of spectroscopic and WI (400.9 nm) imaging diagnostics. In contrary, the W flux there is higher during NBI. Charge exchange neutrals of hydrogen isotopes could be excluded as considerable contributors to the W source. The high W content in ICRF heated limiter discharges suggests the possibility of other W sources than the divertor alone. Dependencies of PWIs to individual ICRF antennas during q95-scans, and intensification of those for the 90 phasing, indicate a link between the PWIs and the antenna near-fields. The PWIs include heat loads and Be sputtering pattern on antenna limiters. Indications of some PWIs at the outer divertor entrance are observed which do not result in higher W flux compared to the NBI phases, but are characterized by small antenna-specific (up to 25% with respect to ohmic phases) bipolar variations of WI emission. The first TOPICA calculations show a particularity of the A2 antennas compared to the ITER antenna, due to the presence of long antenna limiters in the RF image current loop and thus high near-fields across the most part of the JET outer wall.

  13. New confining force solution of QCD axion domain wall problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Barr; Jihn E. Kim

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The serious cosmological problems created by the axion-string/axion-domain-wall system in standard axion models are alleviated by positing the existence of a new confining force. The instantons of this force can generate an axion potential that erases the axion strings long before QCD effects become important, thus preventing QCD-generated axion walls from ever appearing. Axion walls generated by the new confining force would decay so early as not to contribute significantly to the energy in axion dark matter.

  14. Calculation of the strange quark mass using domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Blum; Amarjit Soni; Matthew Wingate

    2000-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a first calculation of the strange quark mass using domain wall fermions. This paper contains an overview of the domain wall discretization and a pedagogical presentation of the perturbative calculation necessary for computing the mass renormalization. We combine the latter with numerical simulations to estimate the strange quark mass. Our final result in the quenched approximation is 95(26) MeV in the ${\\bar{MS}}$ scheme at a scale of 2 GeV. We find that domain wall fermions have a small perturbative mass renormalization, similar to Wilson quarks, and exhibit good scaling behavior.

  15. Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Huang, Y.Y.

    1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physical sorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics. 17 figs.

  16. Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H. (Evanston, IL); Huang, Yin-Yan (Evanston, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physisorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics.

  17. antibody-functionalized single-walled carbon: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thermal Kono, Junichiro 2 Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Nanoelectronics Materials Science Websites Summary: CHAPTER 6 Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for...

  18. aligned multi-walled carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Structural annealing of carbon coated aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube sheets Materials Science Websites Summary: Structural annealing of carbon coated aligned multi-walled...

  19. aligned double-walled carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reinhard 2 Atomistic Simulations of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (DWCNTs) as Materials Science Websites Summary: Atomistic Simulations of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes...

  20. Penetration through a wall: Is it reality?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ivlev

    2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A tennis ball is not expected to penetrate through a brick wall since a motion under a barrier is impossible in classical mechanics. With quantum effects a motion of a particle through a barrier is allowed due to quantum tunneling. According to usual theories of tunneling, the particle density decays inside a classical barrier resulting in an extremely slow pentration process. However, there are no general laws forbidding fast motion through classical barriers. The problem addressed is investigation of unusual features o quantum tunneling through a classic static barrier which is at least two-dimensional. Here we show that penetration through such barrier can be not slow. When the barrier satisfies the certain conditions, a regime of quantum lens is possible with formation of caustics. De Broglie waves are reflected from the caustics, interfere, and result in a not small flux from under the barrier. This strongly contrasts to the usual scenario with a decaying under-barrier density. We construct a particular example of fast motion through a classical barrier. One can unexectedly conclude that, in principle, nature allows fast penetration through classical barriers which against common sense. The phenomenon may be responsible for a variety of processes in labs and nature. For example, tunneling in solids may occur with a different scenario, in biophysics and chemistry one can specify conditions for unusual reactions, and evanescent optical waves may strongly change their properties. In condensed matter and cosmic physics there are phenomena with misterious reasons of an energy emission, for instance, gamma-ray bursts. One can try to treat them in the context of fast escape from under some barriers.

  1. YMGI Through-the-Wall Air Conditioner Determined Noncompliant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on October 11, 2012, to YMGI Group, LLC (YMGI) regarding through-the-wall split system central air conditioner basic model TTWC-18K-31B. DOE enforcement testing revealed that...

  2. Computational Study of Catalyzed Growth of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Jin

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis process called CoMoCAT yields single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)s of controlled diameter and chirality, making them extremely attractive for technological ...

  3. Characterization of double walled carbon nanotubes-polyvinylidene fluoride nanocomposites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almasri, Atheer Mohammad

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main objectives of this thesis is to disperse double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNT) in a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) matrix, and to characterize the resulting composite using electrical, thermal, and mechanical ...

  4. alternately rotating walls: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chiral molecules act as propellers. When the axis is blocked at the lateral walls of the trough, the accumulated rotation inside creates huge splays and bends. We discuss the...

  5. Computational Study of Catalyzed Growth of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Jin

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis process called CoMoCAT yields single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)s of controlled diameter and chirality, making them extremely attractive for technological applications...

  6. Near wall cooling for a highly tapered turbine blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, George (Palm City, FL)

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine blade having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall connected at chordally spaced leading and trailing edges to define a cooling cavity. Pressure and suction side inner walls extend radially within the cooling cavity and define pressure and suction side near wall chambers. A plurality of mid-chord channels extend radially from a radially intermediate location on the blade to a tip passage at the blade tip for connecting the pressure side and suction side near wall chambers in fluid communication with the tip passage. In addition, radially extending leading edge and trailing edge flow channels are located adjacent to the leading and trailing edges, respectively, and cooling fluid flows in a triple-pass serpentine path as it flows through the leading edge flow channel, the near wall chambers and the trailing edge flow channel.

  7. Analysis of calibrated hot box data for three concrete walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three walls constructed of concrete with different densities were tested in a calibrated hot box at the Construction Technology Laboratories of the Portland Cement Association. The observed dynamic performance of these walls was not in good agreement with analytical solutions based on the assumption of linear heat conduction through the walls. Several sources of potential errors in the data from the hot box were explored. While some of these errors do appear to be real, they do not fully explain the discrepancy between experimental and analytical results. The experimentally determined values of the specific heats for the three concrete walls were identified as the most likely cause for the discrepancies. This report presents the analysis of the data from the hot box experiments and suggestions for future investigation.

  8. Interactions between Liquid-Wall Vapor and Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rognlien, T D; Rensink, M E

    2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of liquid walls for fusion reactors could help solve problems associated with material erosion from high plasma heat-loads and neutronic activation of structures. A key issue analyzed here is the influx of impurity ions to the core plasma from the vapor of liquid side-walls. Numerical 2D transport simulations are performed for a slab geometry which approximates the edge region of a reactor-size tokamak. Both lithium vapor (from Li or SnLi walls) and fluorine vapor (from Flibe walls) are considered for hydrogen edge-plasmas in the high- and low-recycling regimes. It is found that the minimum influx is from lithium with a low-recycling hydrogen plasma, and the maximum influx occurs for fluorine with a high-recycling hydrogen plasma.

  9. Turbulent drag reduction by constant near-wall forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JIN XU, SUCHUAN DONG, MARTIN R. MAXEY and GEORGE E. KARNIADAKIS

    2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of high molecular weight polymer solutions or gas in the near-wall region of a liquid boundary layer can result in turbulent drag reduction of more than ...

  10. abdominal wall safe: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T. Yanagida; Norimi Yokozaki 2014-07-16 265 Hygrothermal Performance of a Masonry Wall CiteSeer Summary: A 4-storey masonry building was retrofitted and converted to offices....

  11. Experimental Investigation of Natural Convection in Trombe Wall Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, B.; Zhao, J.; Chen, C.; Zhuang, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, experiments with a passive solar building with Trombe wall in the north cold climate are carried out and discussed, and the natural convection heat transfer process has been investigated. The relativity of the factors affecting indoor...

  12. Axion-Dilaton Domain Walls and Fake Supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julian Sonner; Paul K. Townsend

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical systems methods are used to investigate domain-wall solutions of a two-parameter family of models in which gravity is coupled to an axion, and to a dilaton with an exponential potential of either sign. A complete global analysis is presented for (i) constant axion and (ii) flat walls, including a study of bifurcations and a new exact domain-wall solution with non-constant axion. We reconsider `fake supergravity' issues in light of these results. We show, by example, how domain walls determine multi-valued superpotentials that branch at stationary points that are not stationary points of the potential, and we apply this result to potentials with anti-de Sitter vacua. We also show by example that `adapted' truncation to a single-scalar model is sometimes inconsistent, and we propose a `generalized' fake supergravity formalism that applies in some such cases.

  13. Axion cosmology with long-lived domain walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiramatsu, Takashi [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken'ichi [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa City, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Toyokazu, E-mail: hiramatz@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: saikawa@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: sekiguti@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya City, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the cosmological constraints on axion models where the domain wall number is greater than one. In these models, multiple domain walls attached to strings are formed, and they survive for a long time. Their annihilation occurs due to the effects of explicit symmetry breaking term which might be raised by Planck-scale physics. We perform three-dimensional lattice simulations and compute the spectra of axions and gravitational waves produced by long-lived domain walls. Using the numerical results, we estimated relic density of axions and gravitational waves. We find that the existence of long-lived domain walls leads to the overproduction of cold dark matter axions, while the density of gravitational waves is too small to observe at the present time. Combining the results with other observational constraints, we find that the whole parameter region of models are excluded unless an unacceptable fine-tuning exists.

  14. Method and apparatus for constructing an underground barrier wall structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dwyer, Brian P. (Albuquerque, NM); Stewart, Willis E. (W. Richland, WA); Dwyer, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for constructing a underground barrier wall structure using a jet grout injector subassembly comprising a pair of primary nozzles and a plurality of secondary nozzles, the secondary nozzles having a smaller diameter than the primary nozzles, for injecting grout in directions other than the primary direction, which creates a barrier wall panel having a substantially uniform wall thickess. This invention addresses the problem of the weak "bow-tie" shape that is formed during conventional jet injection when using only a pair of primary nozzles. The improvement is accomplished by using at least four secondary nozzles, of smaller diameter, located on both sides of the primary nozzles. These additional secondary nozzles spray grout or permeable reactive materials in other directions optimized to fill in the thin regions of the bow-tie shape. The result is a panel with increased strength and substantially uniform wall thickness.

  15. ancient egyptian wall: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    monopoles. It represents a domain wall between a vacuum region and a region of constant energy density, and it is the smoothed-out version of the planar sheet of Dirac monopoles...

  16. angle influences wall: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 41 HYGROTHERMAL BEHAVIOUR OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: INFLUENCE OF SORPTION MODELLING Computer Technologies and Information...

  17. assessing tube wall: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tube drawing is a metal Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 35 LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING. Physics Websites Summary: to reduce...

  18. airway wall thickness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 21 LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING. Physics Websites Summary: to reduce...

  19. Determining heat fluxes from temperature measurements made in massive walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Hedstrom, J.C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is described for determining heat fluxes at the surfaces of masonry walls or floors using temperature data measured at two points within the wall, usually near the surfaces. The process consists of solving the heat diffusion equation in one dimension using finite difference techniques given two measured temperatures as input. The method is fast and accurate and also allows for an in-situ measurement of wall thermal diffusivity if a third temperature is measured. The method is documented in sufficient detail so that it can be readily used by the reader. Examples are given for heat flow through walls. Annual results for two cases are presented. The method has also been used to determine heat flow into floors.

  20. FREE CONVECTIVE LAMINAR FLOW WITHIN THE TROMBE WALL CHANNEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NM 87545, pp. 201-222. J.D. Balcomb, J.C. Hedstrom, R.D.wall have been measured by Balcomb, et al [2J. The problem

  1. Field measurement of lateral earth pressures on retaining walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riggins, Michael

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The measured pressures are compared with the computed Coulomb and Rankine pressures for the active case. The measured pressures on the cantilever wall are in close agreement with the theoretical pressures on the upper half of the wall, but the measured... Pressure Variance with Time and Temperature. INTRODUCTION Present Status of the Question -- The latera1 earth pressure theories developed by Coulomb in 1776 and Rankine in 1S57 are known as the classical earth pressure theories (5)*. The basic equation...

  2. LiveWall Operational Evaluation: Seattle Law Enforcement Pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Stein, Steven L.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LiveWall concept envisioned as an outgrowth of the Precision Information Environment (PIE) project allows communications between separate groups using interactive video, audio, and a shared desktop environment; this allows everyone to participate and collaborate in real time, regardless of location. The LiveWall concept provides a virtual window to other locations, where all parties can interact and collaboratively work with each other. This functionality is intended to improve multi-site coordination amongst emergency operations centers (EOC), field operations sites and across organizations and jurisdictions to accommodate communications during routine and emergency events. For the initial LiveWall operational evaluation PNNL partnered with the Seattle Police Department (SPD). This partnership allowed for the creation of an excellent LiveWall test bed specific to law enforcement. This partnership made it possible to test the LiveWall concept with scenarios involving the many facets of the law enforcement work done by SPD. PNNL and SPD agreed that integrating the systems into operations for a real event would be the best test of the technology and give SPD staff greater visibility into the functionality and benefits offered by the LiveWall concept.

  3. ELM-Induced Plasma Wall Interactions in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudakov, D L; Boedo, J A; Yu, J H; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Groth, M; Hollmann, E M; Lasnier, C J; McLean, A G; Moyer, R A; Stangeby, P C; Tynan, G R; Wampler, W R; Watkins, J G; West, W P; Wong, C C; Zeng, L; Bastasz, R J; Buchenauer, D; Whaley, J

    2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense transient fluxes of particles and heat to the main chamber components induced by edge localized modes (ELMs) are of serious concern for ITER. In DIII-D, plasma interaction with the outboard chamber wall is studied using Langmuir probes and optical diagnostics including a fast framing camera. Camera data shows that ELMs feature helical filamentary structures localized at the low field side of the plasma and aligned with the local magnetic field. During the nonlinear phase of an ELM, multiple filaments are ejected from the plasma edge and propagate towards the outboard wall with velocities of 0.5-0.7 km/s. When reaching the wall, filaments result in 'hot spots'--regions of local intense plasma-material interaction (PMI) where the peak incident particle and heat fluxes are up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those between ELMs. This interaction pattern has a complicated geometry and is neither toroidally nor poloidally symmetric. In low density/collisionality H-mode discharges, PMI at the outboard wall is almost entirely due to ELMs. In high density/collisionality discharges, contributions of ELMs and inter-ELM periods to PMI at the wall are comparable. A Midplane Material Evaluation Station (MiMES) has been recently installed in order to conduct in situ measurements of erosion/redeposition at the outboard chamber wall, including those caused by ELMs.

  4. Static load test of Arquin-designed CMU wall.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Richard Pearson; Cherry, Jeffery L.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arquin Corporation has developed a new method of constructing CMU (concrete masonry unit) walls. This new method uses polymer spacers connected to steel wires that serve as reinforcing as well as means of accurately placing the spacers so that the concrete block can be dry stacked. The hollows of the concrete block used in constructing the wall are then filled with grout. As part of a New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBAP), Sandia National Laboratories conducted a series of tests that statically loaded wall segments to compare the Arquin method to a more traditional method of constructing CMU walls. A total of 12 tests were conducted, three with the Arquin method using a W5 reinforcing wire, three with the traditional method of construction using a number 3 rebar as reinforcing, three with the Arquin method using a W2 reinforcing wire, and three with the traditional construction method but without rebar. The results of the tests showed that the walls constructed with the Arquin method and with a W5 reinforcing wire withstood more load than any of the other three types of walls that were tested.

  5. Wall recession rates in cavity-growth modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grens, E.A. II; Thorsness, C.B.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The predictions of resource utilization obtained from cavity-growth models depend on the methods used to represent the recession rates of the walls of the cavity. Under many circumstances the cavity is largely filled with a bed char rubble. Examination of the mechanisms for recession at walls adjacent to these char beds indicates that the recession rates are controlled by convective heat transfer from the bed to the walls coupled with the thermomechanical breakdown of the walls. A recession-rate representation has been developed, based on this concept, for use in cavity-growth simulation programs. This representation characterizes wall breakdown by either a failure temperature or by a thickness of char layer at failure, and determines rates from a model of heat transfer under these conditions. It gives recession rates that are functions of gas temperature and mass flow rate in the cavity, and depend on effective particle size in the char bed. Wall recession rates calculated for WIDCO, Hoe Creek, and Hanna coals are in the range of 0.1 to 0.8 m/day at a 1300 K cavity temperature, and are consistent with the general rates observed for field tests. 27 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  6. DETERMINING THE OPTIMUM PLACEMENT OF A PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS (PCM) THERMAL SHIELD INSIDE FRAME WALLS USING A DYNAMIC WALL SIMULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reshmeen, Silvia

    2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT This thesis presents the results of an experimental study to determine the optimum placement and the thermal performance of a Phase Change Materials (PCMs) thermal shield incorporated into frame wall insulation systems for the purpose...

  7. Improved Confinement in JET High {beta} Plasmas with an ITER-Like Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Challis, C D; Beurskens, M; Buratti, P; Delabie, E; Drewelow, P; Frassinetti, L; Giroud, C; Hawkes, N; Hobirk, J; Joffrin, E; Keeling, D; King, D B; Maggi, C F; Mailloux, J; Marchetto, C; McDonald, D; Nunes, I; Pucella, G; Saarelma, S; Simpson, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The replacement of the JET carbon wall (C-wall) by a Be/W ITER-like wall (ILW) has affected the plasma energy confinement. To investigate this, experiments have been performed with both the C-wall and ILW to vary the heating power over a wide range for plasmas with different shapes.

  8. Finite element analysis of the Arquin-designed CMU wall under a dynamic (blast) load.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, Carlos; Petti, Jason P.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arquin Corporation designed a CMU (concrete masonry unit) wall construction and reinforcement technique that includes steel wire and polymer spacers that is intended to facilitate a faster and stronger wall construction. Since the construction method for an Arquin-designed wall is different from current wall construction practices, finite element computer analyses were performed to estimate the ability of the wall to withstand a hypothetical dynamic load, similar to that of a blast from a nearby explosion. The response of the Arquin wall was compared to the response of an idealized standard masonry wall exposed to the same dynamic load. Results from the simulations show that the Arquin wall deformed less than the idealized standard wall under such loading conditions. As part of a different effort, Sandia National Laboratories also looked at the relative static response of the Arquin wall, results that are summarized in a separate SAND Report.

  9. 99 Bottles of beer on the wall 99 Bottles of beer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    99 Bottles of beer on the wall 99 Bottles of beer Take one down and pass it around 98 Bottles of beer on the wall 98 Bottles of beer on the wall 98 Bottles of beer Take one down and pass it around 97 Bottles of beer on the wall 97 Bottles of beer on the wall 97 Bottles of beer Take one down and pass

  10. A determination of thermal surface resistance of interior walls in intermittently heated buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomson, John Edmund

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?I. 0' ILDlUG G(, NDITION"' G C . ;DIIIOIID ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 ~ ou&Xs' Y ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ LIT?'"w&FUIm CIT''D ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ M LIST 07 FIOUBES 1, I Model wall with smooth surfaoe 8 ~ II tlodel wall with painted surfaoe... ~ ~ C 5. III Lfodel wall faoing interior and exterior room walls ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ \\ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Page 4. IV Looation of heater with respeot to the mode 1 wall e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 21 5. Graph I iiverage unit surfaoe oonduotanoe fox smooth surfaoe...

  11. Quantum Fusion of Strings (Flux Tubes) and Domain Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider formation of composite strings and domain walls as a result of fusion of two elementary objects (elementary strings in the first case and elementary walls in the second) located at a distance from each other. The tension of the composite object T_2 is assumed to be less than twice the tension of the elementary object T_1, so that bound states are possible. If in the initial state the distance d between the fusing strings or walls is much larger than their thickness and satisfies the conditions T_1 d^2 >> 1 (in the string case) and T_1 d^3 >> 1 (in the wall case), the problem can be fully solved quasiclassically. The fusion probability is determined by the first, "under the barrier" stage of the process. We find the bounce configuration and its extremal action S_B. In the wall problem e^{-S_B} gives the fusion probability per unit time per unit area. In the string case, due to a logarithmic infrared divergence, the problem is well formulated only for finite-length strings. The fusion probability per unit time can be found in the limit in which the string length is much larger than the distance between two merging strings.

  12. A new route for energy efficiency diagnosis and potential analysis of energy consumption from air-conditioning system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma,R.J.; Yu,N.Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 A new route for energy efficiency diagnosis and potential analysis of energy consumption from air-conditioning system Rong-Jiang Ma Nan-Yang Yu PhD candidate Professor School of Mechanical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong... in buildings is to save energy without compromising comfort, health and productivity levels. In other words, the idea is to consume less energy while providing equal or improved building services, that is, being more energy efficient (Pérez-Lombard et al...

  13. Studies of Resistive Wall Heating at JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Rui; Benson, Stephen V.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the JLAB FEL is under CW operation, it had been observed that temperature rises over the wiggler vacuum chamber, presumably as the result of the power deposition on the resistive wall of the wiggler chamber. Previous analyses have been done on the resistive wall impedance for various cases, such as DC, AC, and anomalous skin effects*. Here we report an investigation on the beam kinetic energy losses for each of these cases. This study includes the non-ultrarelativistic effect on resistive wall loss, for both round pipe and parallel plates. We will present the comparison of our results with the measured data obtained during CW operation of the JLAB FEL. Other possible factors contributing to the measured heating will also be discussed.

  14. Crossed-ratchet effects and domain wall geometrical pinning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Marconi; A. B. Kolton; J. A. Capitan; J. A. Cuesta; A. Perez-Junquera; M. Velez; J. I. Martin; J. M. R. Parrondo

    2010-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The motion of a domain wall in a two dimensional medium is studied taking into account the internal elastic degrees of freedom of the wall and geometrical pinning produced both by holes and sample boundaries. This study is used to analyze the geometrical conditions needed for optimizing crossed ratchet effects in periodic rectangular arrays of asymmetric holes, recently observed experimentally in patterned ferromagnetic films. Geometrical calculations and numerical simulations have been used to obtain the anisotropic critical fields for depinning flat and kinked walls in rectangular arrays of triangles. The aim is to show with a generic elastic model for interfaces how to build a rectifier able to display crossed ratchet effects or effective potential landscapes for controlling the motion of interfaces or invasion fronts.

  15. Simulations of Alpha Wall Load in ITER. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsson, Johan

    2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The partially DOE funded International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will produce massive amounts of energetic charged alpha particles, which are imperfectly confined by a strong magnetic field. The wall of the experiment is designed to withstand an estimated wall load from these fusion alpha particles, but the accuracy of this estimate needs to be improved to avoid potentially catastrophic surprises when the experiment becomes operational. We have added a more accurate, gyro-dynamic model of particle motion to the existing drift-dynamic model in the DELTA5D simulation software used for the project. We have also added the ability to load a detailed engineering model of the wall and use it in the simulations.

  16. Photovoltaic modules integrated with a metal curtain wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshino, M.; Nakada, N.; Mori, T.; Yamagishi, K.; Yoshida, S. [YKK Corp., Kurobe, Toyama (Japan); Higashi, Y.; Shirasawa, K. [KYOCERA Corp., Yohkaichi, Shiga (Japan)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated photovoltaic system for buildings has many advantages. To realize building integration of photovoltaics, the authors have initially designed a PV module integrated with a metal curtain wall. PV modules are installed as spandrel panels and consist of long and slender PV sub-modules. These sub-modules have an encapsulated structure consisting of: glass, EVA, solar cells, EVA, aluminum base plate. The authors also present initial PV performance data from the experimental wall. In this wall, almost the same maximum P{sub max} of 64 W/m{sup 2} was obtained and the module temperature was approximately 10 C lower compared with conventional superstrate-type PV modules which have 1.3 times the solar cells of this module. Moreover, aesthetic requirements for this module are discussed in this paper.

  17. Wall Adhesion and Constitutive Modelling of Strong Colloidal Gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel R. Lester; Richard Buscall; Anthony D. Stickland; Peter J. Scales

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Wall adhesion effects during batch sedimentation of strongly flocculated colloidal gels are commonly assumed to be negligible. In this study in-situ measurements of colloidal gel rheology and solids volume fraction distribution suggest the contrary, where significant wall adhesion effects are observed in a 110mm diameter settling column. We develop and validate a mathematical model for the equilibrium stress state in the presence of wall adhesion under both viscoplastic and viscoelastic constitutive models. These formulations highlight fundamental issues regarding the constitutive modeling of colloidal gels, specifically the relative utility and validity of viscoplastic and viscoelastic rheological models under arbitrary tensorial loadings. The developed model is validated against experimental data, which points toward a novel method to estimate the shear and compressive yield strength of strongly flocculated colloidal gels from a series of equilibrium solids volume fraction profiles over various column widths.

  18. Microstructure of thin-wall ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Druschitz, A.P. (Intermet Corp., Lynchburg, VA)

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The automotive industry is seeking to replace current car parts made of aluminum and iron castings with thin wall (down to 2 mm) iron castings to reduce the cost and weight of automobiles. The mechanical properties of thin wall ductile iron castings are affected strongly by the thickness of the castings. The thinner castings cool at a faster rate, and microstructural features that form during solidification, and subsequently, transform in the solid state, are strongly dependent on a geometrical parameter related to the ratio of surface area-to-volume of the casting. As this ratio becomes larger, castings cool faster. As a result, the nodule count on the observation plane of the specimens increases dramatically (>2000 nodules/mm2 in most specimens), i.e. as the thickness of castings decreases. Also, the matrix of the thin walled ductile iron castings becomes more ferritic as the ratio of surface area-to-volume decreases.

  19. Curriculum Vitae -Wenge Jiang Personal Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and insoluble skeleton organic matrix) in the deposition of CaCO3; the effects of ocean acidification on coral calcification and phase transformation of CaCO3 in biology. In doctoral period: Study the adsorption

  20. 08/2014 Page 1 HONGXING JIANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Yu

    or lamp sockets without power conversion and address the key issue of compatibility of LEDs with AC power, Inc. (3N) and AC-LED Lighting, L.L.C. 3N develops proprietary next-generation photonic devices portfolio of micro-LED based single-chip AC-LEDs that can be plugged directly into standard power outlets

  1. TRACKING DYNAMIC BOUNDARIES BY EVOLVING Tingting Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingting Jiang

    range of applications. An example in image processing is the analysis of image sequences taken might track the boundary of a forest fire. Other applications include tracking spills of oil or poisonous gas, or clouds and weather patterns. In this dissertation, the author describes a new tracking

  2. Jie Jiang | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as Ready for(SC) Jetting into the

  3. Wei Jiang | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRuralthe emergency response2NetWeekly

  4. Penetration of the LCLS Injector Shield Wall at Sector 20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, D

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Penetrations through the LCLS injector shield wall are needed for the alignment of the accelerator, a diagnostic laser beam and utilities, and are shown in figure 1. The 1-inch diameter LCLS injector beam tube is blocked by the PPS stopper when the injector side of the wall is occupied. The two 3-inch diameter penetrations above and to the left of the beam tube are used by Precision Alignment and will be open only during installation of the injector beamline. Additional 3-inch diameter penetrations are for laser beams which will be used for electron beam diagnostics. These will not be plugged when the injector occupied. Other penetrations for the RF waveguide and other utilities are approximately 13-inch from the floor and as such are far from the line-of-sight of any radiation sources. The waveguide and utility penetrations pass only through the thicker wall as shown in the figure. The principal issue is with the two laser penetrations, since these will be open when the linac is operating and people are in the LCLS injector area. A principal concern is radiation streaming through the penetrations due to direct line-of sight of the PEP-2 lines. To answer this, fans of rays were traced through the 3-inch diameter laser penetrations as shown in Figures 2 and 3. Figure 2 gives the top view of the shield walls, the main linac and PEP-2 lines, and the ray-fans. The fans appear to originate between the walls since their angular envelope is defined by the greatest angle possible when rays are just on the 3-inch diameter at the inner most and outermost wall surfaces. The crossovers of all possible rays lie half way between these two surfaces. As the end-on view of Figure 3 clearly shows, there is no direct line-of-sight through the laser penetrations of the PEP-2 or linac beamlines.

  5. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Y. S., E-mail: ypark@pppl.gov; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York 10027 (United States); Bak, J. G.; Lee, S. G.; Oh, Y. K. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)] [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable ?{sub N} close to the ideal with-wall limit, ?{sub N}{sup wall}, with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n?=?1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at ?{sub N} up to 86% of ?{sub N}{sup wall} but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of ?{sub N}{sup wall} without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade.

  6. Stability of winding cosmic wall lattices with X type junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandon Carter

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This work confirms the stability of a class of domain wall lattice models that can produce accelerated cosmological expansion, with pressure to density ratio $w=-1/3$ at early times, and with $w=-2/3$ at late times when the lattice scale becomes large compared to the wall thickness. For walls of tension $T_{I}$, the relevant X type junctions could be unstable (for a sufficiently acute intersection angle $\\alpha$) against separation into a pair of Y type junctions joined by a compound wall, only if the tension $T_{II}$ of the latter were less than $2T_{I}$ (and for an approximately right-angled intersection if it were less that $\\sqrt{2} T_{I}$) which can not occur in the class considered here. In an extensive category of multicomponent scalar field models of forced harmonic (linear or non-linear) type it is shown how the relevant tension -- which is the same as the surface energy density $U$ of the wall -- can be calculated as the minimum (geodesic) distance between the relevant vacuum states as measured on the space of field values $\\Phi^i$ using a positive definite (Riemannian) energy metric $dU^2=\\tilde G_{ij} d\\Phi^i d\\Phi^j$ that is obtained from the usual kinetic metric (which is flat for a model with ordinary linear kinetic part) by application of a conformal factor proportional to the relevant potential function $V$. For suitably periodic potential functions there will be corresponding periodic configurations -- with parallel walls characterised by incrementation of a winding number -- in which the condition for stability of large scale bunching modes is shown to be satisfied automatically. It is suggested that such a configuration -- with a lattice lengthscale comparable to intergalactic separation distances -- might have been produced by a late stage of cosmological inflation.

  7. Earth melter with rubble walls and method of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Chris C. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an improvement to the earth melter described and claimed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,443,618. The improvement is the use of rubble for retaining walls. More specifically, the retaining walls rest on ground level and extend above ground level piling rubble around a melt zone. A portion of the melter may be below grade wherein sidewalls are formed by the relatively undisturbed native soil or rock, and the rubble may be used as a backfill liner for the below grade sidewalls.

  8. Avoiding the dangers of a soft-wall singularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damien P. George; Marieke Postma

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We critically analyse the nature of the infrared singularity in Randall-Sundrum soft-wall models, where the extra dimension is dynamically compactified by the formation of a curvature singularity. Due to the Israel junction conditions, this singularity can only be shielded by a time-independent black-hole horizon if there is ghost matter on the UV brane. For this construction the spectrum of 4D states is shown to be similar to the original soft-wall case. We point out, however, that no such shielding is needed, as the singularity satisfies unitary boundary conditions.

  9. Saffron Crocus and Yellow Garments in Aegean Wall-Painting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehak, Paul

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rehak - Colours Conf. Sep 9-11, 2001 - 1 "Saffron Crocus and Yellow Garments in Aegean Wall-Painting" PAUL REHAK DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS Abstract: The discovery of well-preserved frescoes at Akrotiri on Thera has vastly... in the Pompe of Ptolemy II). word count: 250 Rehak - Colours Conf. Sep 9-11, 2001 - 2 "Saffron Crocus and Yellow Garments in Aegean Wall-Painting" PAUL REHAK Text: INTRODUCTION In most human societies, both ancient to modern, color in costume serves...

  10. Domain Wall Formation In The Post-Inflationary Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Lalak; S. Thomas

    1993-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the evolution of the probability distribution $\\pp (\\chi ,\\chib, \\t)$, associated with an inhomogeneous light scalar field $\\chi$ in the Robertson-Walker Universe, where the inhomogeneities are produced by quantum fluctuations during an earlier inflationary epoch. For a specific choice of scalar potential which occurs in models of so called late-time phase transitions in which domain walls are produced, $\\pp$ is shown to evolve from a Gaussian to a non-Gaussian distribution. The structure of the latter justifies the recent use of 3-dimensional percolation theory to describe the initial distribution of domain walls in these models.

  11. Behavior of a full scale tieback wall in sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Moonkyung

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEHAVIOR OP A PULL SCALE TIEBACK WALL IN SAND A Thesis by MOONKYUNG CHUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major... Subject: Civil Engineering BEHAUIOR OF A FULL SCALE TIEBACR WALL IN SAND A Thesis MOONKYUNG CHUNG Approved as to style and content by ean-Louis Briaud hair of Committee) Derek V. Morris (Member) Christo her C. Mathewson (Member) Jam T. P. ao...

  12. Vacuum Insulator Development for the Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J R; Blackfield, D; Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Hawkins, S; Kendig, M; Poole, B; Sanders, D M; Krogh, M; Managan, J E

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are developing a new type of accelerator, known as a Dielectric Wall Accelerator, in which compact pulse forming lines directly apply an accelerating field to the beam through an insulating vacuum boundary. The electrical strength of this insulator may define the maximum gradient achievable in these machines. To increase the system gradient, we are using 'High Gradient Insulators' composed of alternating layers of dielectric and metal for the vacuum insulator. In this paper, we present our recent results from experiment and simulation, including the first test of a High Gradient Insulator in a functioning Dielectric Wall Accelerator cell.

  13. Method of controlling the side wall thickness of a turbine nozzle segment for improved cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and a vane extending therebetween. Each band has a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band has an inturned flange defining with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The outer surface of the side wall is provided with a step prior to welding the cover to the side wall. A thermal barrier coating is applied in the step and, after the cover is welded to the side wall, the side wall is finally machined to a controlled thickness removing all, some or none of the coating.

  14. Heat transfer and friction in a square channel with one-wall or two-wall rib turbulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jie Joy

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAT TRANSFER AND FRICTION IN A SQUARE CHANNEL WITH ONE-WAIL OR TWO-WAII RIB TURBULATORS A Thesis by JIE JOY HUANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8rM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of Commit tee) D. Rhode (Member) . A. Hassan (Member) I W. Bradley (Head of Department) December 1991 ABSTRACT Heat Transfer and Friction in a Square Channel with One-Wall or Two-Wall Rib Turbulators. (December 1991) Jie Joy Huang, B. S...

  15. Faster motion of double 360° domain walls system induced by spin-polarized current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, Q. Y.; Mu, C. P.; Zheng, Q.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, Q. F.; Wang, J. B., E-mail: wangjb@lzu.edu.cn [Institute of Applied Magnetics, Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated a double 360° domain walls system in two parallel nanowires. Two domain walls are coupled to each other via magnetostatic interaction. When a spin-polarized current is applied to only one nanowire or both nanowires with the same direction, the two domain walls propagate along nanowires together. The critical velocity of such system is obviously higher than that of a single 360° domain wall. The interaction between the two domain walls can be modeled as two bodies that connected by a spring, and we analyzed the coupling characteritics of the double 360° domain walls at last.

  16. Between Facebook and JPMorgan, Wall St. woes By PALLAVI GOGOI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Between Facebook and JPMorgan, Wall St. woes mount By PALLAVI GOGOI The Associated Press Updated: 5 public offering of Facebook stock last week, which was fumbled by the banks that managed the deal against Facebook and Morgan Stanley, the bank that shepherded the IPO, over reports that it withheld

  17. Magnetic Wall Climbing Robot for Thin Surfaces with Specific Obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Magnetic Wall Climbing Robot for Thin Surfaces with Specific Obstacles W. Fischer¹, F. Tâche high magnetic forces The main optimization criterion for this robot was to design it as light@ethz.ch Summary. This paper describes a novel solution to a mobile climbing robot on mag- netic wheels, designed

  18. Characterization of Solution-Processed Double-Walled Carbon Nanotube/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ounaies, Zoubeida

    ductility was retained.[4] Po¨tschke et al. reported a significant increase in the conductivity and the dielectric constant of a polycarbonate composite by adding multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs).[5 it is conductive, was calculated to be 1.0 wt.-% for the MWNTs. Ounaies Full Paper Dispersion of CNTs in polymers

  19. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, T.G.; Thacker, L.H.; Fine, H.A.

    1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An instrument is described for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets, the packets having a wall sufficiently thin that it can be deformed by the application of an external vacuum to small area thereof. The instrument has a detector head for placement against the deformable wall of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector. An abrupt change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the vacuum applied through the head to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum reference plate is placed beneath the packet to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface of the packet. A packet production line model is also described. 3 figures.

  20. arterial wall dynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wall dynamics First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Viscoelastic Models for Passive Arterial...

  1. Observational Constraints on Varying-alpha Domain Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. P. Avelino; L. Sousa

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the possibility that current hints of a spatial variation of the fine structure constant at high redshift could be due to a biased domain wall network described by a scalar field non-minimally coupled to the electromagnetic field. We show that in order to be cause of the reported spatial variation of the fine structure constant without being in conflict with the observed anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background, the characteristic scale of the network would have to be of the order of the Hubble radius and the fractional contribution of the domain wall network to the energy density of the Universe would need to be in the range $10^{-10} temperature distribution of the cosmic microwave background detected by Planck and WMAP and provide a significant contribution to the excess B-mode polarisation power detected by BICEP2. Since the domain wall contribution to the cosmic energy budget only becomes important at late times, domain wall networks cannot play a significant role as a seed for large scale structure formation and primary cosmic microwave background anisotropies.

  2. Liquid Wall Science in other Scientific Pursuits and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    /sheet/ribbon/sphere casting, flood/jet soldering, ocean waves, hull design, ocean/river hydraulic engineering, surfing, liquid, wetted-wall absorbers/chemical reactor, condensers, vertical tube evaporator, film cooling of turbine vortices; ·Low Joule and Viscous dissipation; ·Insignificant effect on the hydraulic drag. 2-D turbulence

  3. Vector dark domain wall solitons in a fiber ring laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Zhang; D. Y. Tang; L. M. Zhao; R. J. Knize

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe a novel type of vector dark soliton in a fiber ring laser. The vector dark soliton consists of stable localized structures separating the two orthogonal linear polarization eigenstates of the laser emission and is visible only when the total laser emission is measured. Moreover, polarization domain splitting and moving polarization domain walls (PDWs) were also experimentally observed.

  4. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straessle, R.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de, E-mail: nico.derooij@epfl.ch [Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems Laboratory (SAMLAB), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL, 2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G., E-mail: gaetano.mileti@unine.ch [Laboratoire Temps-Fréquence (LTF), Institut de Physique, Université de Neuchâtel, 2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140?°C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  5. Energy-momentum balance in particle - domain wall perforating collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Gal'tsov; E. Yu. Melkumova; P. A. Spirin

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the energy-momentum balance in the perforating collision of a point particle with an infinitely thin planar domain wall within the linearized gravity in arbitrary dimensions. Since the metric of the wall increases with distance, the wall and the particle are never free, and their energy-momentum balance involves not only the instantaneous kinetic momenta, but also the non-local contribution of gravitational stresses. However, careful analysis shows that the stresses can be unambiguously divided between the colliding objects leading to definition of the gravitationally dressed momenta. These take into account for gravity in the same way as the potential energy does in the non-relativistic theory, but our treatment is fully relativistic. Another unusual feature of our problem is the non-vanishing flux of the total energy-momentum tensor through the lateral surface of the world tube. In this case the zero divergence of the energy-momentum tensor does not imply conservation of the total momentum defined as the integral over the space-like section of the tube. But one can still define the conservation low infinitesimally, passing to time derivatives of the momenta. Using this definition we establish the momentum balance in terms of the dressed particle and wall momenta.

  6. Thermal instability caused by plasma-wall interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marenkov, E. D. [National Research Nuclear University Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Krasheninnikov, S. I. [University of California (United States); Pisarev, A. A.; Tsvetkov, I. V. [National Research Nuclear University Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional model describing recycling of hydrogen isotopes in fusion reactors is proposed. The dispersion relation for thermal instability caused by plasma-wall interaction is derived, and conditions under which it develops are determined. It is shown analytically and numerically that this instability can develop under typical tokamak conditions.

  7. accelerator wall materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accelerator wall materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Summary of SLAC'S SEY...

  8. Functionalized Few-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Mechanical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jie

    Functionalized Few-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Mechanical Reinforcement of Polymeric Composites Ye the application of such materials as reinforcing fillers in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)- based composites. The results-polymer composites has remained elusive. In this study, free-standing carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/polymer composite films

  9. The height and range of watermelons without wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Feierl

    2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the weak limit of the distribution of the random variables "height" and "range" on the set of p-watermelons without wall restriction as the number of steps tends to infinity. Additionally, we provide asymptotics for the moments of the random variable "height".

  10. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN); Fine, H. Alan (Lexington, KY)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An instrument for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets 12, the packets 12 having a wall 14 that it can be deformed by the application of an external dynamic vacuum to an area thereof. The instrument has a detector head 18 for placement against the deformable wall 14 of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall 14, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe 20. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector 26. A change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the dynamic vacuum applied through the head be to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet 12. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum plate 44 is placed beneath the packet 12 to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface 16 of the packet. A vacuum can be applied to a recess in this vacuum plate, the value of which can be used to calibrate the vacuum transducer in the detector head.

  11. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, Thomas G. (117 Oklahoma Ave., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Thacker, Louis H. (3727 Frostwood Rd., Knoxville, TN 37921); Fine, H. Alan (949 Wishbone Cir., Lexington, KY 40502)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An instrument for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets 12, the packets 12 having a wall 14 sufficiently thin that it can be deformed by the application of an external vacuum to small area thereof. The instrument has a detector head 18 for placement against the deformable wall 14 of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall 14, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe 20. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector 26. An abrupt change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the vacuum applied through the head 18 to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum Within the packet 12. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum reference plate 44 is placed beneath the packet 12 to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface 16 of the packet. A packet production line model is also described.

  12. SpinybotII: Climbing Hard Walls with Compliant Microspines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    of these approaches is suitable for porous and typically dusty exterior surfaces such as brick, concrete, stucco, hard vertical surfaces including concrete, brick, stucco and masonry without using suction or adhesives demonstrated on brick and concrete walls [11] with considerable success. However, this approach consumes

  13. Heat exchanger with leak detecting double wall tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieberbach, George (Tampa, FL); Bongaards, Donald J. (Seminole, FL); Lohmeier, Alfred (Tampa, FL); Duke, James M. (St. Petersburg, all of, FL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A straight shell and tube heat exchanger utilizing double wall tubes and three tubesheets to ensure separation of the primary and secondary fluid and reliable leak detection of a leak in either the primary or the secondary fluids to further ensure that there is no mixing of the two fluids.

  14. Quantum rotation of hydrogen in single-wall carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildirim, Taner

    be widely used as an energy carrier. Current hydrogen storage technologies, in partic- ular, are inadequate Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction It is desirable to develop hydrogen-based energyQuantum rotation of hydrogen in single-wall carbon nanotubes C.M. Brown a,b , T. Yildirim b , D

  15. Spring Flicks 2008 Winners Audience Award, Winner: THIN WALLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Spring Flicks 2008 Winners Audience Award, Winner: THIN WALLS Audience Award, First Runner-Up: HIStory Audience Award Second Runner-up: PASSENGER SEAT Jury Award, Best Short Winner: PASSENGER SEAT Jury Award, Best Director, Winner: Jerry and Mike Thompson, PASSENGER SEAT Jury Award, Best Director, First

  16. Early Recognition of Lung's Air Sacs Wall Collapsing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Early Recognition of Lung's Air Sacs Wall Collapsing M. EMAM, J-F RENAUD de la Faverie, N. GHARBI discusses the possibility of applying a non- liner analysis approach on air density distribution within lung airways tree at any level of branching1. Computed Tomography (CT) 2 source images of the lung

  17. Vibrational properties of double-walled carbon J. Maultzsch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    , University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, 11001 Belgrade, Serbia Abstract. We study the vibrational properties, the change in phonon frequencies due to the wall interaction is larger for the high-energy optical phonon. Total energy per carbon atom after relaxation of the atomic positions. Etot eV/atom radius Å Etot e

  18. Modeling of Spherical Torus Plasmas for Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Kaita; S. Jardin; B. Jones; C. Kessel; R. Majeski; J. Spaleta; R. Woolley; L. Zakharo; B. Nelson; M. Ulrickson

    2002-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid metal walls have the potential to solve first-wall problems for fusion reactors, such as heat load and erosion of dry walls, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. In the near term, such walls can serve as the basis for schemes to stabilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. Furthermore, the low recycling characteristics of lithium walls can be used for particle control. Liquid lithium experiments have already begun in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U). Plasmas limited with a toroidally localized limiter have been investigated, and experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter are in progress. A liquid surface module (LSM) has been proposed for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In this larger ST, plasma currents are in excess of 1 MA and a typical discharge radius is about 68 cm. The primary motivation for the LSM is particle control, and options for mounting it on the horizontal midplane or in the divertor region are under consideration. A key consideration is the magnitude of the eddy currents at the location of a liquid lithium surface. During plasma start up and disruptions, the force due to such currents and the magnetic field can force a conducting liquid off of the surface behind it. The Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) has been used to estimate the magnitude of this effect. This program is a two dimensional, time dependent, free boundary simulation code that solves the MHD equations for an axisymmetric toroidal plasma. From calculations that match actual ST equilibria, the eddy current densities can be determined at the locations of the liquid lithium. Initial results have shown that the effects could be significant, and ways of explicitly treating toroidally local structures are under investigation.

  19. Gas mixing in the wall layer of a CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterneus, J.; Johnsson, F. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Conversion

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracer-gas measurements were carried out in the transport zone of a 12 MW CFB boiler with special emphasis on the wall-layer flow. Helium (He) was used as tracer gas and a mass spectrometer was used to determine the He-concentrations. The primary gas velocity, U{sub 0}, was 1.2, 2.6 and 4.3 m/s (no secondary air) and the bed material was silica sand with an average particle diameter of 0.32 mm. Tracer gas was injected at different distances from one of the furnace walls and sampled above and below the injection level. In the wall layer, tracer-gas concentrations were detected above (C{sub above}) as well as below (C{sub below}) the injection height for all operating conditions, i.e., the gas flows both up and down from the injection point. The data show that the net flow of tracer gas in the wall layer depends on the operating conditions, and the concentration ratio of the down- and up-flowing gas, {psi} = C{sub below}/C{sub above}, decreases with increased gas velocity ({psi} > 1 for U{sub 0} = 1.2 m/s, {psi} {approx} 1 for U{sub 0} = 2.6 m/s and {psi} < 1 for U{sub 0} = 4.3 m/s). There exists a gas exchange between the core region and the wall-layer. A plug flow model applied to the core region gives a radial dispersion coefficient, D{sub r}, in the range of 0.015--0.025 m{sup 2}/s which is higher than the D{sub r} values reported in literature which are below 0.01 m{sup 2}/x. However, the latter values were obtained in tall and narrow risers.

  20. Domain wall mobility in nanowires: transverse versus vortex walls R. Wieser, U. Nowak and K. D. Usadel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usadel, K. D.

    Arrays of magnetic nanowires are possible candidates for patterned magnetic storage media [1, 2]. For these nanowires and also for other future magneto­electronic devices the understanding of domain wall motion and mobility is important for the controlled switching of the nanostructure. In a recent experiment

  1. Importance of Wall Collisions for Particle-Particle Detachment in Dry Powder Inhalers, and Advanced Wall Collision Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    for the normal force developed by Thornton and coworkers2 ; and · Coulomb's law of friction. From the simulationImportance of Wall Collisions for Particle-Particle Detachment in Dry Powder Inhalers, and Advanced Fractions generated inside Dry Powder Inhalers, by analysing detachment of drug particles from carrier

  2. Current-driven Domain Wall Dynamics And Its Electric Signature In Ferromagnetic Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yang

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study current-induced domain wall dynamics in a thin ferromagnetic nanowire. We derive the effective equations of domain wall motion, which depend on the wire geometry and material parameters. We describe the procedure to determine...

  3. Infiltration Heat Recovery in Building Walls: Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigations Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-51324 Infiltration Heat Recovery in Building Walls: Computational Fluid Dynamics leading to partial recovery of heat conducted through the wall. The Infiltration Heat Recovery (IHR) factor was introduced to quantify the heat recovery and correct the conventional calculations

  4. Identification of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes Controlling Biomass Characteristics and Yield in Rice (Oryza Sativa)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Zhaohua PEng [Mississippi State University; Ronald, Palmela [UC-Davis; Wang, Guo-Liang [The Ohio State University

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This project aims to identify the regulatory genes of rice cell wall synthesis pathways using a cell wall removal and regeneration system. We completed the gene expression profiling studies following the time course from cell wall removal to cell wall regeneration in rice suspension cells. We also completed, total proteome, nuclear subproteome and histone modification studies following the course from cell wall removal and cell wall regeneration process. A large number of differentially expressed regulatory genes and proteins were identified. Meanwhile, we generated RNAi and over-expression transgenic rice for 45 genes with at least 10 independent transgenic lines for each gene. In addition, we ordered T-DNA and transposon insertion mutants for 60 genes from Korea, Japan, and France and characterized the mutants. Overall, we have mutants and transgenic lines for over 90 genes, exceeded our proposed goal of generating mutants for 50 genes. Interesting Discoveries a) Cell wall re-synthesis in protoplasts may involve a novel cell wall synthesis mechanism. The synthesis of the primary cell wall is initiated in late cytokinesis with further modification during cell expansion. Phragmoplast plays an essential role in cell wall synthesis. It services as a scaffold for building the cell plate and formation of a new cell wall. Only one phragmoplast and one new cell wall is produced for each dividing cell. When the cell wall was removed enzymatically, we found that cell wall re-synthesis started from multiple locations simultaneously, suggesting that a novel mechanism is involved in cell wall re-synthesis. This observation raised many interesting questions, such as how the starting sites of cell wall synthesis are determined, whether phragmoplast and cell plate like structures are involved in cell wall re-synthesis, and more importantly whether the same set of enzymes and apparatus are used in cell wall re-synthesis as during cytokinesis. Given that many known cell wall synthesis pathway genes are induced by removal of cell wall, some cell wall synthesis apparatus must be shared in both cases. The cell wall re-synthesis mechanism may have broad application because our preliminary assay indicates that the cell wall characteristics are highly different from those produced during cytokinesis. A thorough understanding on the regulation of cell wall re-synthesis may lead to improvement of cell wall characteristics. b) Removal of cell wall results in chromatin decondensation Another interesting observation was that removal of cell wall was associated with substantial chromatin change. Our DNA DAPI stain, chromatin MNase digestion, histone modification proteomics, protein differential expression analysis, and DNA oligo array studies all supported that substantial chromatin change was associated with removal of cell wall treatment. It is still under investigation if the chromatin change is associated with activation of cell wall synthesis genes, in which chromatin remodeling is required. Another possibility is that the cell wall is required for stabilizing the chromatin structure in plant cells. Given that spindle fiber is directly connected with both chromatin structure and cell wall synthesis, it is possible that there is an intrinsic connection between cell wall and chromatin.

  5. Analytical Modeling of Wood Frame Shear Walls Subjected to Vertical Load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyendinh, Hai

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    referred to as Analytical Model of wood frame SHEar walls subjected to Vertical load (AMSHEV) is based on the kinematic behavior of wood frame shear walls and captures significant characteristics observed from experimental testing through appropriate...

  6. The Analysis of Dynamic Thermal Performance of Insulated Wall and Building Cooling Energy Consumption in Guangzhou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, L.; Li, X.; Li, L.; Gao, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ST. The simulation predictions indicate that reductions in the cooling load and maximum cooling demand are obtained when the insulation is added in the wall, but the potential of energy saving is quite limited when the wall only is insulated....

  7. Modeling the Impact of Agricultural Terrace Walls on Spatial Patterns of Erosion and Landscape Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaubius, Jennifer

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling the Impact of Agricultural Terrace Walls on Spatial Patterns of Erosion and Landscape Evolution Jennifer Glaubius Department of Geography University of Kansas Research Objectives 2 1. Implement terrace walls within a landscape evolution...

  8. Material Characterization and Design Recommendations for Mechanically Stabilized Earth Retaining Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dantal, Vishal

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its appearance in 1970s, mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) walls have become a majority among all types of retaining walls due to their economics and satisfactory performance. The Texas Department of Transportation has primarily adopted...

  9. Massively Parallel Spectral Element Large Eddy Simulation of a Turbulent Channel Using Wall Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabau, Joshua I

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wall-bounded turbulent flows are prevalent in engineering and industrial applications. Walls greatly affect turbulent characteristics in many ways including production and propagation of turbulent stresses. While computational fluid dynamics can...

  10. Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Titanium Dioxide Nanobelts with Cell-Specific Transcriptomic Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon...

  11. Analytical Modeling of Cyclic Shear - Flexure Interaction in Reinforced Concrete Structural Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolozvari, Kristijan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the wall lateral strength, followed by in- plane buckling ofand buckling of longitudinal reinforcement at the north wall boundary causing the laterallateral instability of the boundary zone (out-of-plane buckling)

  12. Apparatus for impingement cooling a side wall adjacent an undercut region of a turbine nozzle segment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and vanes therebetween. Each band includes a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. Slots are formed through the inturned flange along the nozzle side wall. A plate having through-apertures extending between opposite edges thereof is disposed in each slot, the slots and plates being angled such that the cooling medium exiting the apertures in the second cavity lie close to the side wall for focusing and targeting cooling medium onto the side wall.

  13. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 115210 (2011) Spin torque and charge resistance of ferromagnetic semiconductor 2 and domain walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatte, Michael E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transport across the domain wall is possible, such as for magnetic semiconductor domain walls (whose walls model of a magnetic semiconductor, whose electronic structure is described with a Stoner model and whose

  14. Effects of Framing on the Thermal Performance of Wood and Steel-Framed Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosny, J.; Yarbrough, D. W.; Childs, P.; Mohiuddin, S. A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the consequences of installation imperfections in cavity insulation on thermal performance are analyzed. The results of the study demonstrated significant sensitivity in some configurations of residential walls to the framing factor and insulation installation... imperfections. Keywords R-value, Framing Factor, Cavity Insulation, Framing Effect Coefficient, Steel Frame walls, Wood-frame walls TERMINOLOGY OF THE WHOLE WALL R-VALUE PROCEDURE USED IN THIS PAPER The following list of thermal performance...

  15. Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dillon, Anne C.; Heben, Michael J.; Gennett, Thomas; Parilla, Philip A.

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof. The metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes may be produced according to one embodiment of the invention by combining single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material and metal in a solution, and mixing the solution to incorporate at least a portion of the metal with the single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material. Other embodiments may comprise sputter deposition, evaporation, and other mixing techniques.

  16. Behavior of Laterally Loaded Shafts Constructed Behind the Face of a Mechanically Stabilized Earth Block Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierson, Matthew Charles

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    for all the failure mechanisms of conventional retaining walls. In addition, MSE walls must be designed for modes of failure unique to MSE walls. Failure of an MSE wall can occur several ways: sliding of layers, pullout of the reinforcement, elongation... lagging and panels, and wrapped sheets of geosynthetics? (FHWA, 1996). Most MSE systems use either a galvanized or epoxy coated steel reinforcement, or synthetic reinforcement like high density polyethylene (HDPE), polypropylene, or polyester yarn...

  17. Comment on “Velocity boundary conditions at a tokamak resistive wall” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 032506 (2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakharov, Leonid E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Li, Xujing [Institute of Computational Mathematics and Scientific/Engineering Computing, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper gives the derivation of the MHD boundary condition for the plasma flow to the wall during disruptions.

  18. Computational studies of the effect of wall temperature on hypersonic shock-induced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the infrared thermography images. Reinartz et al [2] focussed upon assessment of the role of wall temperature

  19. One-loop fluctuation-dissipation formula for bubble-wall velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, P. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1993-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The limiting bubble-wall velocity during a first-order electroweak phase transition is of interest in scenarios for electroweak baryogenesis. Khlebnikov has recently proposed an interesting method for computing this velocity based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. I demonstrate that at one-loop order this method is identical to simple, earlier techniques for computing the wall velocity based on computing the friction from particles reflecting off or transmitting through the wall in the ideal gas ( thin-wall'') limit.

  20. Sustainable wall construction and exterior insulation retrofit technology process and structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vohra, Arun (Bethesda, MD)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-cost process for exterior wall insulation retrofit, or new wall construction by stacking layers of fabric tube filled with insulating material against a wall and covering them with mesh and stucco provides a durable structure with good insulating value.

  1. Appendix D-1 Abutment--A concrete wall that supports the end of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    motion in wall- bounded turbulent flows and particle deposition onto solid walls were performed to accumulate near the wall region and mix more efficiently along the longitudinal direction, while particles and then drifted back to the main stream, which is called particle resuspension. Yao et.al. [7] also investigated

  2. STABILIZATION OF KINK INSTABILITIES BY EDDY CURRENTS IN A SEGMENTED WALL AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    STABILIZATION OF KINK INSTABILITIES BY EDDY CURRENTS IN A SEGMENTED WALL AND COMPARISON WITH IDEAL and measured equi- librium wall eddy currents. The stability analysis of these equilibria predicts patterns of instability induced eddy currents for a model wall that is continuous and perfectly conducting

  3. A UNIFIED MODEL FOR ION DEPOSITION AND THERMOMECHANICAL RESPONSE IN DRY WALL LASER IFE CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    . INTRODUCTION In order to permit the design of an economically viable IFE power plant, we require a chamber wall reach the wall. These threats, consisting of x- rays, ions, and neutrons, can lead to wall failure associated with the IFE threats. In some cases, these inertial effects lead to stress waves that can lead

  4. Dry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    assessment of dry chamber wall based on ion and photon spectra from a new direct-drive target proposed by NRLDry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition Lifetime is a key issue for the IFE dry chamber wall configuration. Past studies, such as SOMBRERO

  5. Dry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    provided a more detailed assessment of dry chamber wall based on ion and photon spectra from a new direct much faster than the ions and would reach the chamber wall within about 20 ns in the case without protective gas. The ions take longer to reach the chamber wall. As an example, a simple estimate of the ion

  6. Protective interior wall and attaching means for a fusion reactor vacuum vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, R.D.; Upham, G.A.; Anderson, P.M.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wall basically consists of an array of small rectangular plates attached to the existing walls with threaded fasteners. The protective wall effectively conceals and protects all mounting hardware beneath the plate array, while providing a substantial surface area that will absorb plasma energy.

  7. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to reduce climate change as photosynthesis-mediated carbon sequestration and carbonation serve to reduce sequestration and carbonation. Moreover the increase in the wall's thermal resistance with wall thickness atmospheric carbon dioxide. A sensitivity analysis is performed on three criteria: wall thickness, renewal

  8. Propagating and reflecting of spin wave in permalloy nanostrip with 360° domain wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Senfu; Mu, Congpu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Zheng, Qi; Liu, Xianyin; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang, E-mail: liuqf@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the interaction between propagating spin wave (or magnonic) and a 360° domain wall in a nanostrip. It is found that propagating spin wave can drive a 360° domain wall motion, and the velocity and direction are closely related to the transmission coefficient of the spin wave of the domain wall. When the spin wave passes through the domain wall completely, the 360° domain wall moves toward the spin wave source. When the spin wave is reflected by the domain wall, the 360° domain wall moves along the spin wave propagation direction. Moreover, when the frequency of the spin wave is coincident with that of the 360° domain wall normal mode, the 360° domain wall velocity will be resonantly enhanced no matter which direction the 360 DW moves along. On the other hand, when the spin wave is reflected from the moving 360° domain wall, we observed the Doppler effect clearly. After passing through a 360° domain wall, the phase of the spin wave is changed, and the phase shift is related to the frequency. Nevertheless, phase shift could be manipulated by the number of 360° domain walls that spin wave passing through.

  9. On Lithium Wall and Performance of Magnetic Fusion Device S. I. Krasheninnikov1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    On Lithium Wall and Performance of Magnetic Fusion Device S. I. Krasheninnikov1 , L. E. Zakharov2 It is shown that lithium walls resulting in zero recycling conditions at the edge of magnetic fusion device strong impact of fully absorbing lithium walls on the performance of magnetic fusion devices have been

  10. Accepted Manuscript A wall heat transfer correlation for the baffled-rotary kilns with secondary air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Accepted Manuscript A wall heat transfer correlation for the baffled-rotary kilns with secondary Date: 22 January 2014 Please cite this article as: L.G. Lauredan, H. Florian, D. Jean, A wall heat;1 A wall heat transfer correlation for the baffled- rotary kilns with secondary air flow and recycled

  11. Flowfield and wall pressure characteristics downstream of a boundary layer suction device.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinney, Charles E.

    Flowfield and wall pressure characteristics downstream of a boundary layer suction device. Meagan A-dimensional slit can significantly reduce the fluctuating wall pressure immediately downstream of the suction slit momentum regions of the flow with the wall at the downstream edge of the suction slit. The third region

  12. Four-wall turbine airfoil with thermal strain control for reduced cycle fatigue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cambell, Christian X

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine airfoil (20B) with a thermal expansion control mechanism that increases the airfoil camber (60, 61) under operational heating. The airfoil has four-wall geometry, including pressure side outer and inner walls (26, 28B), and suction side outer and inner walls (32, 34B). It has near-wall cooling channels (31F, 31A, 33F, 33A) between the outer and inner walls. A cooling fluid flow pattern (50C, 50W, 50H) in the airfoil causes the pressure side inner wall (28B) to increase in curvature under operational heating. The pressure side inner wall (28B) is thicker than walls (26, 34B) that oppose it in camber deformation, so it dominates them in collaboration with the suction side outer wall (32), and the airfoil camber increases. This reduces and relocates a maximum stress area (47) from the suction side outer wall (32) to the suction side inner wall (34B, 72) and the pressure side outer wall (26).

  13. Lung and alveolar wall elastic and hysteretic behavior in rats: effects of in vivo elastase treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    Lung and alveolar wall elastic and hysteretic behavior in rats: effects of in vivo elastase P. Ingenito, and Be´la Suki. Lung and alveolar wall elastic and hysteretic behavior in rats: effects behavior of the alveolar walls and the macroscopic mechanical properties of the whole lung in an in vivo

  14. Steel Plate Shear Walls From Research to Codification Jeffrey W. Berman1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    of steel plate shear wall(s) (SPSW) design as these systems can be an attractive option for lateral load, the design limit state for SPSW was considered to be out-of-plane buckling of the infill panel. To prevent buckling, engineers designed steel walls with heavily stiffened infill plates that were not economically

  15. Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Doerner; R. Kaita; R. Majeski; S. Luckhardt; et al

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance in reactor design, since it could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls. Sputtering and erosion tests are currently underway in the PISCES device at the University of California at San Diego (UCSD). To complement this effort, plasma interaction questions in a toroidal plasma geometry will be addressed by a proposed new groundbreaking experiment in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical torus (ST). The CDX-U plasma is intensely heated and well diagnosed, and an extensive liquid lithium plasma-facing surface will be used for the first time with a toroidal plasma. Since CDX-U is a small ST, only approximately1 liter or less of lithium is required to produce a toroidal liquid lithium limiter target, leading to a quick and cost-effective experiment.

  16. A new closing method for wall flow diesel particulate filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stobbe, P.; Petersen, H.G.; Sorenson, S.C.; Hoej, J.W.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method has been developed to close the ends of a wall flow filter used for removing particulate matter from diesel engine exhaust. In this method, the ends of the honeycomb structure are capped by deforming and closing the ends of the channel walls between the extrusion and firing stages of production. The method increases the amount of filtration area per filter volume for a given cell geometry compared to the traditional plugging method, since the entire length of the honeycomb channels is used for filtration purposes. In addition, use of the capping method has a beneficial effect on the pressure loss characteristics of a filter with a given filtration area. These benefits are illustrated through experimental results.

  17. Mesoporous organosilica nanotubes containing a chelating ligand in their walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiao; Goto, Yasutomo; Maegawa, Yoshifumi; Inagaki, Shinji, E-mail: inagaki@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp [Toyota Central R and D Laboratories, Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST)/ACT-C, Nagakute, Aichi, 480-1192 (Japan); Ohsuna, Tetsu [Toyota Central R and D Laboratories, Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the synthesis of organosilica nanotubes containing 2,2?-bipyridine chelating ligands within their walls, employing a single-micelle-templating method. These nanotubes have an average pore diameter of 7.8 nm and lengths of several hundred nanometers. UV-vis absorption spectra and scanning transmission electron microscopy observations of immobilized nanotubes with an iridium complex on the bipyridine ligands showed that the 2,2?-bipyridine groups were homogeneously distributed in the benzene-silica walls. The iridium complex, thus, immobilized on the nanotubes exhibited efficient catalytic activity for water oxidation using Ce{sup 4+}, due to the ready access of reactants to the active sites in the nanotubes.

  18. Finite element analyses for seismic shear wall international standard problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two identical reinforced concrete (RC) shear walls, which consist of web, flanges and massive top and bottom slabs, were tested up to ultimate failure under earthquake motions at the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation`s (NUPEC) Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory, Japan. NUPEC provided the dynamic test results to the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) for use as an International Standard Problem (ISP). The shear walls were intended to be part of a typical reactor building. One of the major objectives of the Seismic Shear Wall ISP (SSWISP) was to evaluate various seismic analysis methods for concrete structures used for design and seismic margin assessment. It also offered a unique opportunity to assess the state-of-the-art in nonlinear dynamic analysis of reinforced concrete shear wall structures under severe earthquake loadings. As a participant of the SSWISP workshops, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) performed finite element analyses under the sponsorship of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). Three types of analysis were performed, i.e., monotonic static (push-over), cyclic static and dynamic analyses. Additional monotonic static analyses were performed by two consultants, F. Vecchio of the University of Toronto (UT) and F. Filippou of the University of California at Berkeley (UCB). The analysis results by BNL and the consultants were presented during the second workshop in Yokohama, Japan in 1996. A total of 55 analyses were presented during the workshop by 30 participants from 11 different countries. The major findings on the presented analysis methods, as well as engineering insights regarding the applicability and reliability of the FEM codes are described in detail in this report. 16 refs., 60 figs., 16 tabs.

  19. Performance limits of fusion first-wall structural materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D. L.; Majumdar, S.; Billone, M.; Mattas, R. F.

    1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Key features of fusion energy relate primarily to potential advantages associated with safety and environmental considerations and the near endless supply of fuel. However, it is generally concluded that high performance fusion power systems will be required in order to be economically competitive with other energy options. As in most energy systems, structural materials operating limits pose a primary constraint to the performance of fusion power systems. It is also recognized that for the case of fusion power, the first-wall/blanket system will have a dominant impact on both the economic and safety/environmental attractiveness of fusion energy. The first-wall blanket structure is particularly critical since it must maintain high integrity at relatively high temperatures during exposure to high radiation levels, high surface heat fluxes, and significant primary stresses. The performance limits of the first-wall/blanket structure will be dependent on the structural material properties, the coolant/breeder system, and the specific design configuration. Key factors associated with high performance structural materials include (1) high temperature operation, (2) a large operating temperature window, and (3) a long operating lifetime. High temperature operation is necessary to provide for high power conversion efficiency. As discussed later, low-pressure coolant systems provide significant advantages. A large operating temperature window is necessary to accommodate high surface heating and high power density. The operating temperature range for the structure must include the temperature gradient through the first wall and the coolant system AT required for efficient energy conversion. This later requirement is dependent on the coolant/breeder operating temperature limits. A long operating lifetime of the structure is important to improve system availability and to minimize waste disposition.

  20. A Helical Coolant Channel Design for the Solid Wall Blanket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mogahed, E.A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A helical coolant channel scheme is proposed for the APEX solid wall blanket module. The self-coolant breeder in this system is FLIBE (LiF)2(BeF2). The structural material is the nanocomposited alloy 12YWT. The neutron multiplier used in the current design is either stationary or slow moving liquid lead. The purpose of this study is to design a blanket that can handle a high wall loading (5 MW/m{sup 2}). In the mean time the design provides means to attain the maximum possible blanket outlet temperature and meet all engineering limits on temperature of structural material and liquids. An important issue for such a design is to optimize the system for minimum pressure loss. For advanced ferritic steel (12YWT) an upper temperature limit of 800 deg. C is expected, and a limit of 700 deg. C at the steel/FLIBE interface is recommended.The blanket module is composed of two main continuous routes. The first route is three helical rectangular channels side-by-side that surround a central box. The helical channels are fed from the bottom and exit at the top to feed the central channels in the central box. The coolant helical channels have a cross sectional area with a length of about 10 cm and a width that changes according to the position around the central box. For instance: the width of the coolant channels facing the plasma is the narrowest while it is the widest in the back (farthest from the plasma).In this design the coolant runs around the central box for only 5 turns to cover the total height of the first wall (6.8 m). The design is optimized with the FW channel width as a parameter with the heat transfer requirements at the first wall as the constraints.

  1. Production of single-walled carbon nanotube grids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a nanotube grid includes placing a plurality of catalyst nanoparticles on a grid framework, contacting the catalyst nanoparticles with a gas mixture that includes hydrogen and a carbon source in a reaction chamber, forming an activated gas from the gas mixture, heating the grid framework and activated gas, and controlling a growth time to generate a single-wall carbon nanotube array radially about the grid framework. A filter membrane may be produced by this method.

  2. Characterization of double walled carbon nanotubes-polyvinylidene fluoride nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almasri, Atheer Mohammad

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARACTERIZATION OF DOUBLE WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES- POLYVINYLIDENE FLUORIDE NANOCOMPOSITES A Thesis by ATHEER MOHAMMAD ALMASRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... MOHAMMAD ALMASRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Zoubeida Ounaies...

  3. Investigation of the Wall Effect in the long Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nevirkovets, I.P.; Rudenko, E.M. (Inst. of Metal Physics of the Ukrainian Academy of Science, Kiev 252142 (SU))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the long Josephson junctions with edge current injection and shortened control line studied experimentally. It is found that the wall effect is connected with the blockade of vortices entry into the junction by control current, as well as with the existence of the energy barrier for the vortices at the boundary between a projection region and the remainder part of the junction. The significant enhancement of supercurrent due to the blockade was found.

  4. Analysis of ultra-narrow ferromagnetic domain walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Catherine; Paul, David

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    New materials with high magnetic anisotropy will have domains separated by ultra-narrow ferromagnetic walls with widths on the order of a few unit cells, approaching the limit where the elastic continuum approximation often used in micromagnetic simulations is accurate. The limits of this approximation are explored, and the static and dynamic interactions with intrinsic crystalline defects and external driving #12;elds are modeled. The results developed here will be important when considering the stability of ultra-high-density storage media.

  5. Methanation in catalyst-sprayed tube wall reactors: a review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennline, H. W.; Schehl, R. R.; Haynes, W. P.; Forney, A. J.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and operation of catalyst-sprayed tube wall reactors for methanation are discussed. Reactor tubes were either coated on the inner surface or on the outer surface with a Raney nickel catalyst. A liquid coolant, which was opposite the catalyst-reactant gas-side, removed the heat of methanation. Catalyst performance, reactor operating conditions, spent catalyst analyses, and other results are presented for five PDU tests.

  6. Vortex energy and 360 Neel walls in thinfilm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .Ignat@math.u-psud.fr) Courant Institute, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA (e-mail: knuepfer@cims.nyu.edu) 1 #12Vortex energy and 360 ­N´eel walls in thin­film micromagnetics Radu Ignat , Hans Kn¨upfer October-section. The model is based on the following energy functional: E2d (m) = Z B2 |m|2 dx + | ln | 2 Z R2 ||-1

  7. Quantum reflection and Liouville transformations from wells to walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Dufour; Romain Guérout; Astrid Lambrecht; Serge Reynaud

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Liouville transformations map in a rigorous manner one Schr\\"odinger equation into another, with a changed scattering potential. They are used here to transform quantum reflection of an atom on an attractive well into reflection of the atom on a repulsive wall. While the scattering properties are preserved, the corresponding semiclassical descriptions are completely different. A quantitative evaluation of quantum reflection probabilities is deduced from this method.

  8. Double Diffusion in Enclosure Bounded by Massive and Volatilizing Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, D.; Tang, G.; Zhao, F.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity and IAQ Vol.I-6-5 Double Diffusion in Enclosure Bounded by Massive and Volatilizing Walls Di Liu Guangfa Tang Fuyun Zhao Doctoral Professor.... INTRODUCTION It has become evident that building products are major contributors to the pollution of the indoor air environment with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) [1]. The indoor airflow and temperature distributions also have influence on the emission...

  9. Vortex energy and 360 Neel wall in thinfilm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignat, Radu

    .Ignat@math.u-psud.fr) Courant Institute, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA (e-mail: knuepfer@cims.nyu.edu) 1 #12Vortex energy and 360 ­N´eel wall in thin­film micromagnetics Radu Ignat , Hans Kn¨upfer October-section. The model is based on the following energy functional: E2d (m) = Z B2 |m|2 dx + | ln | 2 Z R2 ||-1

  10. ORNL facilities for testing first-wall components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, C.C.; Becraft, W.R.; Gardner, W.L.; Haselton, H.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Menon, M.M.; Stirling, W.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future long-impulse magnetic fusion devices will have operating characteristics similar to those described in the design studies of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX), the Fusion Engineering Device (FED), and the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). Their first-wall components (pumped limiters, divertor plates, and rf waveguide launchers with Faraday shields) will be subjected to intense bombardment by energetic particles exhausted from the plasma, including fusion products. These particles are expected to have particle energies of approx.100 eV, particle fluxes of approx.10/sup 18/ cm/sup -2/.s/sup -1/, and heat fluxes of approx.1 kW/cm/sup 2/ CW to approx.100 kW/cm/sup 2/ transient. No components are available to simultaneously handle these particle and heat fluxes, survive the resulting sputtering erosion, and remove exhaust gas without degrading plasma quality. Critical issues for research and development of first-wall components have been identified in the INTOR Activity. Test facilities are needed to qualify candidate materials and develop components. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), existing neutral beam and wave heating test facilities can be modified to simulate first-wall environments with heat fluxes up to 30 kW/cm/sup 2/, particle fluxes of approx.10/sup 18/ cm/sup -2/.s/sup -1/, and pulse lengths up to 30 s, within test volumes up to approx.100 L. The characteristics of these test facilities are described, with particular attention to the areas of particle flux, heat flux, particle energy, pulse length, and duty cycle, and the potential applications of these facilities for first-wall component development are discussed.

  11. Lyapunov stability of flowing magnetohydrodynamic plasmas surrounded by resistive walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tasso, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Throumoulopoulos, G. N. [Association Euratom-Hellenic Republic, Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, GR 451 10 Ioannina (Greece)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A general stability condition for plasma-vacuum systems with resistive walls is derived by using the Frieman Rotenberg Lagrangian stability formulation [Rev. Mod. Phys. 32, 898 (1960)]. It is shown that the Lyapunov stability limit for external modes does not depend upon the gyroscopic term but upon the sign of the perturbed potential energy only. In the absence of dissipation in the plasma such as viscosity, it is expected that the flow cannot stabilize the system.

  12. Counter-ions at single charged wall: Sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladislav Samaj

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For inhomogeneous classical Coulomb fluids in thermal equilibrium, like the jellium or the two-component Coulomb gas, there exists a variety of exact sum rules which relate the particle one-body and two-body densities. The necessary condition for these sum rules is that the Coulomb fluid possesses good screening properties, i.e. the particle correlation functions or the averaged charge inhomogeneity, say close to a wall, exhibit a short-range (usually exponential) decay. In this work, we study equilibrium statistical mechanics of an electric double layer with counter-ions only, i.e. a globally neutral system of equally charged point-like particles in the vicinity of a plain hard wall carrying a fixed uniform surface charge density of opposite sign. At large distances from the wall, the one-body and two-body counter-ion densities go to zero slowly according to the inverse-power law. In spite of the absence of screening, all known sum rules are shown to hold for two exactly solvable cases of the present system: in the weak-coupling Poisson-Boltzmann limit (in any spatial dimension larger than one) and at a special free-fermion coupling constant in two dimensions. This fact indicates an extended validity of the sum rules and provides a consistency check for reasonable theoretical approaches.

  13. Three-component borehole wall-locking seismic detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A seismic detector for boreholes is described that has an accelerometer sensor block for sensing vibrations in geologic formations of the earth. The density of the seismic detector is approximately matched to the density of the formations in which the detector is utilized. A simple compass is used to orient the seismic detector. A large surface area shoe having a radius approximately equal to the radius of the borehole in which the seismic detector is located may be pushed against the side of the borehole by actuating cylinders contained in the seismic detector. Hydraulic drive of the cylinders is provided external to the detector. By using the large surface area wall-locking shoe, force holding the seismic detector in place is distributed over a larger area of the borehole wall thereby eliminating concentrated stresses. Borehole wall-locking forces up to ten times the weight of the seismic detector can be applied thereby ensuring maximum detection frequency response up to 2,000 hertz using accelerometer sensors in a triaxial array within the seismic detector.

  14. Generalised elastic nets Miguel A. Carreira-Perpi~nan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carreira-Perpiñán, Miguel Á.

    for combinatorial optimisation and has been applied, among other problems, to biological modelling. It has an energy the elastic net model to an arbitrary quadratic tension term, e.g. derived from a discretised differential, and show that the model is sensitive to the choice of finite difference scheme that represents

  15. Shantou Dan Nan Wind Power Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector: WindRiegotecSeaScape EnergyCDM Service

  16. X-ray imaging of extended magnetic domain walls in Ni80Fe20 wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, S.; Fry, P. W.; Allwood, D. A.; Bryan, M. T.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Schrefl, T.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy to image magnetization configurations in 700 nm wide Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} planar wires attached to 'nucleation' pads Domain walls were observed to inject only across half of the wire width but extend to several micrometers in length. Magnetostatic interactions with adjacent wires caused further unusual domain wall behavior. Micromagnetic modeling suggests the extended walls have Neel-like structure along their length and indicates weaker exchange coupling than is often assumed. These observations explain previous measurements of domain wall injection and demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in larger nanowires cannot always be considered as localized entities.

  17. Pinning induced by inter-domain wall interactions in planar magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayward, T.J.; Bryan, M.T.; Fry, P.W.; Fundi, P.M.; Gibbs, M.R.J.; Allwood, D.A.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated pinning potentials created by inter-domain wall magnetostatic interactions in planar magnetic nanowires. We show that these potentials can take the form of an energy barrier or an energy well depending on the walls' relative monopole moments, and that the applied magnetic fields required to overcome these potentials are significant. Both transverse and vortex wall pairs are investigated and it is found that transverse walls interact more strongly due to dipolar coupling between their magnetization structures. Simple analytical models which allow the effects of inter-domain wall interactions to be estimated are also presented.

  18. Apparatus and methods for impingement cooling of a side wall of a turbine nozzle segment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and a vane therebetween. Each band includes a nozzle wall, a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and the nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The impingement plate has a turned flange welded to the inturned flange. A backing plate overlies the turned flange and aligned apertures are formed through the backing plate and turned flange to direct and focus cooling flow onto the side wall of the nozzle segment.

  19. PIV flow measurements for heat transfer characterization in two-pass square channels with smooth and 90 ribbed walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihm, IconKenneth David

    -pass square channel with a smooth wall and a 90° rib-roughened wall. Detailed averaged velocity distributions enhancements for both smooth and ribbed wall two-pass square channels. The rib-induced flow turbulence distribution in two-pass square channels with smooth and 90° ribbed walls. Han and Zhang [3] studied the effect

  20. Experimental study of a fiber absorber-suppressor modified Trombe wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhury, D; Birkebak, R C

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study has been conducted to ascertain the effects of introducing fiber bed absorbers on Trombe wall passive solar collectors. Two identical, Trombe wall passive solar units were constructed that incorporate the basic components of masonry collector-storage walls: glazings, masonry and thermal insulation. Both units were extensively instrumented with thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Ambient temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and insolation are also measured. In the first part of the study the two Trombe wall units were tested with a single glass cover. The thermal performance of both units was found to be virtually identical. In the second part of the study a single cover Trombe wall unit was compared with a double cover unit and the latter was found to have higher air gap and masonry wall temperatures and heat fluxes. In the final phase of the experiment, an absorbing, scattering and emitting fiberglass-like material was placed in the air gap of the single gazed wall. Tests were conducted to compare the solar-thermal performance, heat loss and gain characteristics between the units with and without the fiber absorber-suppressor. This experiment showed that the fiber bed served to decouple the wall at night from its exterior environment and to reduce the heat losses. The modified Trombe wall with the fiber absorber-suppressor out-performed the double glazed Trombe wall system by approximately ten percent gain in useable thermal energy. Also, the fiber bed eliminates one glazing thereby reducing system cost as well.

  1. Modeling Left Ventricle Wall Motion Using Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alenezy, Mohammed D.

    2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    can be calculated as M = ?nullN 2 tanh( ?nullB 0 2kT ) (2.3) In a biological sample that contains about 1mL of water, there are about 10 22 hydrogen nuclei, and at the room... population that is frequently in need of quality tomographic images for the assessment of congenital heart defects. MRI can characterize myocardial function through the use of cine MRI and tagged MRI. The latter provides a means to assess wall motion...

  2. Wall conditioning experiments on TFTR using impurity pellet injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, J.D.; Mansfield, D.K.; Bell, M.G. [and others

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes experiments intended to optimize the limiter conditioning for TFTR supershots. It is shown that deposition of thin layers of lithium on the limiters by impurity pellet injection changes the plasma-wall interaction and improves supershot performance. Series of up to ten Ohmic plasmas each with two lithium pellets were useful in preconditioning the limiter. Generally, plasma performance increased with the amount of lithium deposited up to the maximal amount which could be deposited. Experiments were performed with different materials being deposited (carbon, boron and lithium) and with different methods of deposition.

  3. SSI response of a typical shear wall structure. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.J.; Schewe, E.C.; Maslenikov, O.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Simplified Methods project of the US NRC-funded Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has as its goal the development of a methodology to perform routine seismic probabilistic risk assessments of commercial nuclear power plants. The study reported here develops calibration factors to relate best estimate response to design values accounting for approximations and simplifications in SSI analysis procedures. Nineteen cases were analyzed and in-structure response compared. The structure of interest was a typical shear wall structure. 6 references, 44 figures, 22 tables.

  4. LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Zakharov

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

  5. Operating and maintenance benefits of automated oven wall temperature measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leuchtmann, K.P. [Thyssen Still Otto Anlagentechnik GmbH, Bochum (Germany); Hinz, D.; Bergbau, D. [Ruhrkohle Bergbau AG, Bottrop (Germany). Prosper Coking Plant; Platts, M. [Thyssen Still Otto Technical Services, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For a very long time and regardless of all shortcomings associated with it, the manual measurement of the heating flue temperature has been the only method of monitoring the temperature prevailing in a coke oven battery and discovering weak points in the heating system. In the course of the last few years a number of automated temperature measuring systems have been developed that are intended to replace or supplement the manual heating flue measurement system. These measuring systems and their advantages/disadvantages are briefly described in this paper. Additionally, operational experience gathered with the oven chamber wall temperature measuring system is discussed in detail.

  6. Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtilityInformation Waiver of PreferentialWall Lake

  7. Characterizing the Plasma of the Resistive Wall Machine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of the Rotating Wall Machine by David A.

  8. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic

  9. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in

  10. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic Domain-Wall Depinning inStochastic

  11. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic Domain-Wall Depinning

  12. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic Domain-Wall DepinningStochastic

  13. City of Wall Lake, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformation Smyrna Beach,Stuart, Iowa (UtilityCity ofCityCityWall Lake,

  14. BiFeO3 Domain Wall Energies and Structures: A Combined Experimental and Density Functional Theory+U Study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yi; Nelson, Chris; Melville, Alexander; Winchester, Benjamin; Shang, Shunli; Liu, Zi-Kui; Schlom, Darrell G.; Pan, Xiaoqing; Chen, Long-Qing

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determined the atomic structures and energies of 109°, 180°, and 71° domain walls in BiFeO3, combining density functional theory+U calculations and aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy images. We find a substantial Bi sublattice shift and a rather uniform Fe sublattice across the walls. The calculated wall energies (?) follow the sequence ?109 180 71 for the 109°, 180°, and 71° walls. We attribute the high 71° wall energy to an opposite tilting rotation of the oxygen octahedra and the low 109° wall energy to the opposite twisting rotation of the oxygen octahedra across the domain walls.

  15. Evaluation of integrated wall systems incorporating electrochromic windows [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sbar, Neil L.

    2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Billions of dollars are spent annually in the U.S. on energy lost through the use of inefficient windows. Even wall systems with advanced static glazings and moveable shading devices are not optimal because they can't effectively respond to changing solar conditions. Electrochromic (EC) smart windows can dynamically control the amount of solar light and heat entering a building. The energy saving performance of fully dynamic wall systems containing EC windows was compared with that of static systems using the DOE 2.1E building simulation program. Total costs for different scenarios were computed. SAGE demonstrated the capability to produce double pane EC windows in which the transmittance repeatedly varied between 2-58%. Relative impact of EC glazings in buildings compared to static is 10-20% energy savings across all climatic regions investigated. Significant life cycle cost savings are predicted for SAGE's EC windows when compared to conventional solar control windows over an estimated product lifetime of 20 years.

  16. Proton decay matrix elements with domain-wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Aoki; C. Dawson; J. Noaki; A. Soni

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Hadronic matrix elements of operators relevant to nucleon decay in grand unified theories are calculated numerically using lattice QCD. In this context, the domain-wall fermion formulation, combined with non-perturbative renormalization, is used for the first time. These techniques bring reduction of a large fraction of the systematic error from the finite lattice spacing. Our main effort is devoted to a calculation performed in the quenched approximation, where the direct calculation of the nucleon to pseudoscalar matrix elements, as well as the indirect estimate of them from the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements, are performed. First results, using two flavors of dynamical domain-wall quarks for the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements are also presented to address the systematic error of quenching, which appears to be small compared to the other errors. Our results suggest that the representative value for the low energy constants from the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements are given as |alpha| simeq |beta| simeq 0.01 GeV^3. For a more reliable estimate of the physical low energy matrix elements, it is better to use the relevant form factors calculated in the direct method. The direct method tends to give smaller value of the form factors, compared to the indirect one, thus enhancing the proton life-time; indeed for the pi^0 final state the difference between the two methods is quite appreciable.

  17. Mechanical properties of thin-wall ductile iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrems, Karol K.; Dogan, Omer N.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Druschitz, A.P. (Intermet Corp., Lynchburg, VA)

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of cast iron in automotive applications in this era of increasing fuel efficiency requires the ability to cast very thin sections (2-7 mm). Although thin-wall iron castings have been produced, difficulty arises in predicting the mechanical properties of these castings because mechanical behavior is closely related to thickness, which in turn is a direct consequence of the section cooling rate. Experiments relating casting thickness with ultimate tensile strength, elongation, reduction in area, and hardness were performed. An inverse relationship was found between ultimate tensile strength and thickness. Elongation was found to depend only on the thickness of the sample and approached zero as the thickness of the sample decreased below 1.5 mm. Percent reduction in area was found to depend linearly on thickness. Although average hardness also correlated with the inverse of thickness, it was not found to be a useful measure of ultimate tensile strength. The results of this study show that cooling rate of the thin wall casting very much affects the mechanical properties.

  18. Giant adsorption of microswimmers: duality of shape asymmetry and wall curvature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wysocki, Adam; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of shape asymmetry of microswimmers on their adsorption capacity at confining channel walls is studied by a simple dumbbell model. For a shape polarity of a forward-swimming cone, like the stroke-averaged shape of a sperm, extremely long wall retention times are found, caused by a non-vanishing component of the propulsion force pointing steadily into the wall, which grows exponentially with the self-propulsion velocity and the shape asymmetry. A direct duality relation between shape asymmetry and wall curvature is proposed and verified. Our results are relevant for the design microswimmer with controlled wall-adhesion properties. In addition, we confirm that pressure in active systems is strongly sensitive to the details of the particle-wall interactions.

  19. Post-cast EDM method for reducing the thickness of a turbine nozzle wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Raymond Joseph (Duanesburg, NY); Bojappa, Parvangada Ganapathy (Schenectady, NY); Kirkpatrick, Francis Lawrence (Galway, NY); Schotsch, Margaret Jones (Clifton Park, NY); Rajan, Rajiv (Guilderland, NY); Wei, Bin (Mechanicville, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A post-cast EDM process is used to remove material from the interior surface of a nozzle vane cavity of a turbine. A thin electrode is passed through the cavity between opposite ends of the nozzle vane and displaced along the interior nozzle wall to remove the material along a predetermined path, thus reducing the thickness of the wall between the cavity and the external surface of the nozzle. In another form, an EDM process employing a profile as an electrode is disposed in the cavity and advanced against the wall to remove material from the wall until the final wall thickness is achieved, with the interior wall surface being complementary to the profile surface.

  20. Local wall heat flux/temperature meter for convective flow and method of utilizing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Ronald D.; Ekhlassi, Ali; Cofie, Penrose

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    According to one embodiment of the invention, a method includes providing a conduit having a fluid flowing therethrough, disposing a plurality of temperature measurement devices inside a wall of the conduit, positioning at least some of the temperature measurement devices proximate an inside surface of the wall of the conduit, positioning at least some of the temperature measurement devices at different radial positions at the same circumferential location within the wall, measuring a plurality of temperatures of the wall with respective ones of the temperature measurement devices to obtain a three-dimensional temperature topology of the wall, determining the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of the conduit, and determining a multi-dimensional thermal characteristic of the inside surface of the wall of the conduit based on extrapolation of the three-dimensional temperature topology and the temperature dependent thermal conductivities.

  1. On gas desorption from the tokamak first wall during edge localized modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marenkov, E. D., E-mail: edmarenkov@gmail.com [National Nuclear Research University Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I. [University of California, San Diego (United States)] [University of California, San Diego (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of gas desorption from the tokamak first wall on the pedestal recovery in the H-mode after an edge-localized-mode burst is considered. Results of FACE code simulations of hydrogen desorption from a beryllium wall are presented. It is found that the wall has a significant effect on plasma processes only at sufficiently low temperatures (of about 400 K), which agrees with qualitative estimates obtained earlier in the zero-dimensional approximation.

  2. New retaining wall design criteria based on lateral earth pressure measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, William Vincent

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on full scale retaining walls. The first year ( 3 ) was devoted to selecting earth pressure cells which would provide both accuracy and long term reliability. Nine cell types were considered. Four types were field tested. Two types, Terra Tec... and Geonor, were selected for installa- tion in the cantilever test wall during the second year ( 4 ) of the study. Terra Tec cells were selected for installation in the precast panel wall during the third year ( 7 ) of the study. The instrumenta- tion...

  3. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic Vortices Print Soft magnetic, micron-sized thin-film structures with magnetic vortices are intriguing systems...

  4. Qualitative Reliability Issues for In-Vessel Solid and Liquid Wall Fusion Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles; Nygren, R. E.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a study of the qualitative aspects of plasma facing component (PFC) reliability for actively cooled solid wall and liquid wall concepts for magnetic fusion reactor vessels. These two designs have been analyzed for component failure modes. The most important results of that study are given here. A brief discussion of reliability growth in design is included to illustrate how solid wall designs have begun as workable designs and have evolved over time to become more optimized designs with better longevity. The increase in tolerable heat fluxes shows the improvement. Liquid walls could also have reliability growth if the designs had similar development efforts.

  5. Go No-Go Decision: Pure, Undoped, Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This document provides information about the go/no-go decision on pure, undoped single walled carbon nanotubes for vehicular hydrogen storage.

  6. Experimental damage-gas flow correlations for cyclically loaded reinforced concrete walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soppe, Travis E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of work focused on testing reinforced concrete panels underof work focused on testing reinforced concrete panels underfocuses on testing nine reinforced concrete wall panels

  7. Method and apparatus for determining diameter and wall thickness of minute hollow spherical shells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinman, D.A.

    1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for determining diameter and wall thickness of hollow microspheres or shells wherein terminal velocities of shells traveling in fluid-filled conduits of differing diameters are measured. A wall-effect factor is determined as a ratio of the terminal velocities, and shell outside diameter may then be ascertained as a predetermined empirical function of wall-effect factor. For shells of known outside diameter, wall thickness may then be ascertained as a predetermined empirical function of terminal velocity in either conduit.

  8. Plant cell walls throughout evolution: towards a molecular understanding of their design principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Auer, Manfred

    2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout their life, plants typically remain in one location utilizing sunlight for the synthesis of carbohydrates, which serve as their sole source of energy as well as building blocks of a protective extracellular matrix, called the cell wall. During the course of evolution, plants have repeatedly adapted to their respective niche,which is reflected in the changes of their body plan and the specific design of cell walls. Cell walls not only changed throughout evolution but also are constantly remodelled and reconstructed during the development of an individual plant, and in response to environmental stress or pathogen attacks. Carbohydrate-rich cell walls display complex designs, which together with the presence of phenolic polymers constitutes a barrier for microbes, fungi, and animals. Throughout evolution microbes have co-evolved strategies for efficient breakdown of cell walls. Our current understanding of cell walls and their evolutionary changes are limited as our knowledge is mainly derived from biochemical and genetic studies, complemented by a few targeted yet very informative imaging studies. Comprehensive plant cell wall models will aid in the re-design of plant cell walls for the purpose of commercially viable lignocellulosic biofuel production as well as for the timber, textile, and paper industries. Such knowledge will also be of great interest in the context of agriculture and to plant biologists in general. It is expected that detailed plant cell wall models will require integrated correlative multimodal, multiscale imaging and modelling approaches, which are currently underway.

  9. Calculation of heat flux through a wall containing a cavity: comparison of several models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Tunstall, J.N.; Childs, K.W.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the calculation of the heat transfer through the standard stud wall structure of a residential building. The wall cavity contains no insulation. Results from five test cases are presented. The first four represent progressively more complicated approximations to the heat transfer through and within a hollow wall structure. The fifth adds the model components necessary to severely inhibit the radiative energy transport across the empty cavity. Flow within the wall cavity is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy conservation equation for an ideal gas using an improvement to the Implicit-Compressible Eulerian (ICE) algorithm of Harlow and Amsden. An algorithm is described to efficiently couple the fluid flow calculations to the radiation-conduction model for the solid portions of the system. Results indicate that conduction through still plates contributes less than 2% of the total heat transferred through a composite wall. All of the other elements (conduction through wall board, sheathing, and siding; convection from siding and wallboard to ambients; and radiation across the wall cavity) are required to accurately predict the heat transfer through a wall. Addition of a foil liner on one inner surface of the wall cavity reduces the total heat transferred by almost 50%.

  10. Hybrid Simulation of the Seismic Response of Squat Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whyte, Catherine Alexandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ACI Symposium on Reinforced Concrete Structures in SeismicStudies of Reinforced Concrete Walled Bents under Static2009. Update to ASCE/SEI 41 Concrete Provisions, PEER Report

  11. Experimental damage-gas flow correlations for cyclically loaded reinforced concrete walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soppe, Travis E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vessels. ” Cement and Concrete research, 32, XTRACT (2007).of air permeability in a concrete shear wall subjected tocharacteristics in cracked concrete. ” Nuclear Engineering

  12. aligned single-walled carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Printed Multilayer Superstructures of Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Materials Science Websites Summary: Printed Multilayer Superstructures of Aligned...

  13. acid multi-walled carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES Materials Science Websites Summary: SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF...

  14. acid-treated multi-walled carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES Materials Science Websites Summary: SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF...

  15. Development of building-integrated PV modules using color solar cells for various exterior walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikawa, N.; Kanai, M.; Hide, I. [Daido Hoxan Inc. (Japan). Chitose Labs.] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have been developing building-material-integrated PV modules used as exterior walls of building using color solar cells with an emphasis on design. Mainly the authors developed four types of modules, glass curtain walls, precast-concrete (PC)-incorporated-type, slanted wall-type and renovation-type modules. They constructed the demonstration test facilities of those modules and evaluated the performance of building-material-integrated modules for various types of exterior walls. No problems were observed at an outdoor demonstration test facility. The authors confirmed the color and shape of those modules can be harmonized with the design of the building.

  16. Glass-coating and cleaning system to prevent carbon deposition on coke oven walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahira, Takuya; Ando, Takeshi; Kasaoka, Shizuki; Yamauchi, Yutaka [Kawasaki Steel Corp., Mizushima, Kurashiki (Japan). Mizushima Works

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The new technology for protecting the coking chamber bricks from damage by hard-pushing is described. The technology consists of the glass coating on the wall bricks and a wall cleaner to blow deposited carbon. For the glass coating, a specially developed glaze is sprayed onto the wall bricks by a spraying device developed to completely spray one coking chamber in a few minutes. The wall cleaner is installed on a pusher ram in the facility to automatically blow air at a sonic speed during coke pushing. The life of the glazed layer is estimated to be over two years.

  17. Investigation of dominant spin wave modes by domain walls collision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramu, M.; Purnama, I.; Goolaup, S.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Lew, W. S., E-mail: wensiang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Spin wave emission due to field-driven domain wall (DW) collision has been investigated numerically and analytically in permalloy nanowires. The spin wave modes generated are diagonally symmetric with respect to the collision point. The non-propagating mode has the highest amplitude along the middle of the width. The frequency of this mode is strongly correlated to the nanowire geometrical dimensions and is independent of the strength of applied field within the range of 0.1?mT to 1?mT. For nanowire with film thickness below 5?nm, a second spin wave harmonic mode is observed. The decay coefficient of the spin wave power suggests that the DWs in a memory device should be at least 300?nm apart for them to be free of interference from the spin waves.

  18. Turbulent patterns in wall-bounded flows: a Turing instability?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manneville, Paul

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In their way to/from turbulence, plane wall-bounded flows display an interesting transitional regime where laminar and turbulent oblique bands alternate, the origin of which is still mysterious. In line with Barkley's recent work about the pipe flow transition involving reaction-diffusion concepts, we consider plane Couette flow in the same perspective and transform Waleffe's classical four-variable model of self-sustaining process into a reaction-diffusion model. We show that, upon fulfillment of a condition on the relative diffusivities of its variables, the featureless turbulent regime becomes unstable against patterning as the result of a Turing instability. A reduced two-variable model helps us to delineate the appropriate region of parameter space. An {\\it intrinsic} status is therefore given to the pattern's wavelength for the first time. Virtues and limitations of the model are discussed, calling for a microscopic support of the phenomenological approach.

  19. Resistive Wall Heating of the Undulator in High Repetition Rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiang, J; Corlett, J; Emma, P; Wu, J

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In next generation high repetition rate FELs, beam energy loss due to resistive wall wakefields will produce significant amount of heat. The heat load for a superconducting undulator (operating at low temperature), must be removed and will be expensive to remove. In this paper, we study this effect in an undulator proposed for a Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) at LBNL. We benchmark our calculations with measurements at the LCLS and carry out detailed parameter studies using beam from a start-to-end simulation. Our preliminarym results suggest that the heat load in the undulator is about 2 W/m or lower with an aperture size of 6 mm for nominal NGLS preliminary design parameters.

  20. Microstructure of thin-wall ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Step plate castings with section thicknesses of 1.5 mm to 6 mm and individual (single) castings with section thicknesses of 2 mm to 6 mm were produced using a ductile iron chemistry. Microstructures of these thin wall ductal iron castings were characterized quantitatively using an image analyzer. Matrix structure (amount of pearlite, ferrite, and massive carbides) and graphite structure (volume fraction, nodule size, nodule content, and nodularity) were investigated as a function of section thickness. Pearlite content, nodule count, and nodularity increased with decreasing section thickness, whereas the nodule size decreased. Nodule content exceeded 2000 nodules per mm{sup 2} at the thinnest sections. Statistical analysis was performed to investigate the effect of casting parameters on the microstructure.

  1. Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Gupta, Gautam; Duque, Juan G.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; DeFriend Obrey, Kimberly A.

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity was observed when the suspension of DOC-wrapped SWNTs were exposed to the TMOS vapors, but about a 50% decrease in the emission signal was observed from the SDS-wrapped SWNTs nanotubes. The decrease in emission was minimal by buffering the SDS/SWNT suspension prior to forming the composite. Fluorescent xerogels were prepared by adding glycerol to the SWNT suspensions prior to TMOS vapor exposure, followed by drying the gels. Fluorescent aerogels were prepared by replacing water in the gels with methanol and then exposing them to supercritical fluid drying conditions. The aerogels can be used for gas sensing.

  2. Flows and mixing in channels with misaligned superhydrophobic walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkaya, Tatiana V; Zhou, Jiajia; Schmid, Friederike; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aligned superhydrophobic surfaces with the same texture orientation reduce drag in the channel and generate secondary flows transverse to the direction of the applied pressure gradient. Here we show that a transverse shear, superimposed with the conventional Poiseuille and slip-driven plug flows, can be easily generated by using superhydrophobic channels with misaligned textured surfaces. We propose a general theoretical approach to quantify this transverse flow by introducing the concept of an effective shear tensor. To illustrate its use, we present approximate theoretical solutions and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations for striped superhydrophobic channels. Our results demonstrate that the transverse shear leads to complex flow patterns on the length scale of the texture period, which leads to a new mechanism of a passive mixing at low Reynolds number. This vertical mixing occurs at the texture period scale and does not require the contribution of side walls. Our results provide a basis for design ...

  3. Terahertz inline wall thickness monitoring system for plastic pipe extrusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauck, J., E-mail: j.hauck@skz.de, E-mail: d.stich@skz.de, E-mail: p.heidemeyer@skz.de, E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de, E-mail: t.hochrein@skz.de; Stich, D., E-mail: j.hauck@skz.de, E-mail: d.stich@skz.de, E-mail: p.heidemeyer@skz.de, E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de, E-mail: t.hochrein@skz.de; Heidemeyer, P., E-mail: j.hauck@skz.de, E-mail: d.stich@skz.de, E-mail: p.heidemeyer@skz.de, E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de, E-mail: t.hochrein@skz.de; Bastian, M., E-mail: j.hauck@skz.de, E-mail: d.stich@skz.de, E-mail: p.heidemeyer@skz.de, E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de, E-mail: t.hochrein@skz.de; Hochrein, T., E-mail: j.hauck@skz.de, E-mail: d.stich@skz.de, E-mail: p.heidemeyer@skz.de, E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de, E-mail: t.hochrein@skz.de [SKZ - German Plastics Center, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional and commercially available inline wall thickness monitoring systems for pipe extrusion are usually based on ultrasonic or x-ray technology. Disadvantages of ultrasonic systems are the usual need of water as a coupling media and the high damping in thick walled or foamed pipes. For x-ray systems special safety requirements have to be taken into account because of the ionizing radiation. The terahertz (THz) technology offers a novel approach to solve these problems. THz waves have many properties which are suitable for the non-destructive testing of plastics. The absorption of electrical isolators is typically very low and the radiation is non-ionizing in comparison to x-rays. Through the electromagnetic origin of the THz waves they can be used for contact free measurements. Foams show a much lower absorption in contrast to acoustic waves. The developed system uses THz pulses which are generated by stimulating photoconductive switches with femtosecond laser pulses. The time of flight of THz pulses can be determined with a resolution in the magnitude of several ten femtoseconds. Hence the thickness of an object like plastic pipes can be determined with a high accuracy by measuring the time delay between two reflections on materials interfaces e.g. at the pipe's inner and outer surface, similar to the ultrasonic technique. Knowing the refractive index of the sample the absolute layer thickness from the transit time difference can be calculated easily. This method in principle also allows the measurement of multilayer systems and the characterization of foamed pipes.

  4. Center for Applications of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resasco, Daniel E

    2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities conducted under a Congressional Direction project whose goal was to develop applications for Single-walled carbon nanotubes, under the Carbon Nanotube Technology Center (CANTEC), a multi-investigator program that capitalizes on OU’s advantageous position of having available high quality carbon nanotubes. During the first phase of CANTEC, 11 faculty members and their students from the College of Engineering developed applications for carbon nanotubes by applying their expertise in a number of areas: Catalysis, Reaction Engineering, Nanotube synthesis, Surfactants, Colloid Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Spectroscopy, Tissue Engineering, Biosensors, Biochemical Engineering, Cell Biology, Thermal Transport, Composite Materials, Protein synthesis and purification, Molecular Modeling, Computational Simulations. In particular, during this phase, the different research groups involved in CANTEC made advances in the tailoring of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) of controlled diameter and chirality by Modifying Reaction Conditions and the Nature of the catalyst; developed kinetic models that quantitatively describe the SWNT growth, created vertically oriented forests of SWNT by varying the density of metal nanoparticles catalyst particles, and developed novel nanostructured SWNT towers that exhibit superhydrophobic behavior. They also developed molecular simulations of the growth of Metal Nanoparticles on the surface of SWNT, which may have applications in the field of fuell cells. In the area of biomedical applications, CANTEC researchers fabricated SWNT Biosensors by a novel electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition method, which may have an impact in the control of diabetes. They also functionalized SWNT with proteins that retained the protein’s biological activity and also retained the near-infrared light absorbance, which finds applications in the treatment of cancer.

  5. Apparatus and methods for impingement cooling of an undercut region adjacent a side wall of a turbine nozzle segment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands. Each band includes a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The inturned flange has a plurality of apertures for directing cooling steam to cool the side wall between adjacent nozzle segments.

  6. Tools of the Trade: The Socio-Technology of Arbitrage in a Wall Street Trading Room

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Tools of the Trade: The Socio-Technology of Arbitrage in a Wall Street Trading Room Daniel Beunza at the Santa Fe Institute. #12;2 Tools of the Trade: The Socio-Technology of Arbitrage in a Wall Street Trading of trading in the era of quantitative finance. To do so, we conduct an ethnography of arbitrage, the trading

  7. Active vapor split control for dividing-wall columns Journal: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    @ntnu.no Abstract Dividing-wall distillation columns offer large potential energy savings over conventional column column Introduction Dividing-wall distillation columns such as Petlyuk arrangements and the Kaibel column vapor fraction Purities (mol %): 97.6 % (D), 97.3 % (S); 99.6 % (B) Stages: 40 in prefractionator and 80

  8. Active Vapor Split Control for Dividing-Wall Columns Deeptanshu Dwivedi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    , Norway ABSTRACT: Dividing-wall distillation columns offer large potential energy savings over the energy requirements. INTRODUCTION Dividing-wall distillation columns such as Petlyuk arrangements, where the vapor fraction or degree of subcooling in the feed is varied to achieve optimum operation.13

  9. UC Davis Student Housing, a division of Student Affairs WALL, CAMPBELL, and POTTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    UC Davis Student Housing, a division of Student Affairs WALL, CAMPBELL, and POTTER RESIDENCE HALLS 2010 · Architect: Mogavero-Notestine · Contractor: Brown Construction · 155,000 gross square feet · Total project cost: $35 million Housing 592 students, the new Wall, Campbell and Potter residence halls

  10. DIAGNOSIS OF INSULATED BUILDING WALLS USING PASSIVE INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY AND NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DIAGNOSIS OF INSULATED BUILDING WALLS USING PASSIVE INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY AND NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS This work presents the thermal monitoring of a multi-layered wall of a restored building (PANISSE platform parameters. Then they are compared with thermocouple measurements and numerical simulations. KEYWORDS

  11. Dividing wall columns for heterogeneous azeotropic distillation Quang-Khoa Le1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Dividing wall columns for heterogeneous azeotropic distillation Quang-Khoa Le1 , Ivar J. Halvorsen2 of this work is to implement heterogeneous azeotropic distillation schemes in a dividing wall column (DWC distillation, Petlyuk arrangement, energy saving. 1. Introduction Distillation is one of the most energy

  12. Supplementary Information for Field Ionization of Cold Atoms Near the Wall of a Single Carbon Nanotube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hau, Lene Vestergaard

    1 Supplementary Information for Field Ionization of Cold Atoms Near the Wall of a Single Carbon with suspended nanotubes. Single-walled carbon nanotubes, suspended across 10-m gaps, are grown on silicon chips is applied with clip connections to the pads. The electrode design was optimized with numerical modelling

  13. Cell Wall Chemotyping for Functional Applications of PyrolysisGas Chromatography / Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cell Wall Chemotyping for Functional Genomics Applications of Pyrolysis­Gas Chromatography / Mass, Umeå 2012 #12;Cell Wall Chemotyping for Functional Genomics Applications of Pyrolysis.4.1 The Basic Tool-set 27 1.5 Wood Formation and Functional Genomics 31 2 Objectives 33 3 Methodological

  14. Gas Sensing Mechanism of Gold Nanoparticles Decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gas Sensing Mechanism of Gold Nanoparticles Decorated Single- Walled Carbon Nanotubes Syed Mubeen towards different gas analytes, however the sensing mechanism was not clearly elucidated. The detailed demonstration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as highly sensitive gas sensors [1], there have been

  15. Neutron irradiation effects on domain wall mobility and reversibility in lead zirconate titanate thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Paulo J.

    changes.1 Damage accumulates when fast neutrons undergo scattering collisions with atomic nuclei resultingNeutron irradiation effects on domain wall mobility and reversibility in lead zirconate titanate://scitation.aip.org/termsconditions. Downloaded to ] IP: 146.6.84.63 On: Wed, 23 Oct 2013 17:34:29 #12;Neutron irradiation effects on domain wall

  16. Integration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on to CMOS Circuitry with Parylene-C Encapsulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokmeci, Mehmet

    Integration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on to CMOS Circuitry with Parylene-C Encapsulation heterogeneous integration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) with CMOS integrated circuits using die the successful integration of carbon nanotubes with the CMOS circuitry. This paper lays the foundation

  17. QUASI-STATIC CYCLIC TESTS ON U-SHAPED REINFORCED CONCRETE WALLS SUBJECTED TO DIAGONAL LOADING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    1 QUASI-STATIC CYCLIC TESTS ON U-SHAPED REINFORCED CONCRETE WALLS SUBJECTED TO DIAGONAL LOADING Raluca CONSTANTIN1 and Katrin BEYER2 ABSTRACT This article presents the test setup of two quasi-static cyclic tests on U-shaped walls under horizontal diagonal loading recently performed at EPF Lausanne

  18. Regulation of Singlet Oxygen Generation Using Single-Walled Carbon Zhiwen Tang,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Weihong

    Regulation of Singlet Oxygen Generation Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Zhi Zhu, Zhiwen Tang of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan UniVersity, Changsha 410082, P. R. China Received April 20, 2008DNA aptamer, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for controllable singlet oxygen (1 O2) generation. 1 O

  19. Plasma-wall transition in weakly coUisional G. Manfredi* and S. Devaux^

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Plasma-wall transition in weakly coUisional plasmas G. Manfredi* and S. Devaux^ *Institut de Abstract. This paper reviews some theoretical and computational aspects of plasma-wall interac- tions model, and are subsequently tested with kinetic simulations. The various regions com- posing the plasma

  20. Synergy between Liquid Walls and Tokamak Physics Performance APEX Interim Report November, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Synergy between Liquid Walls and Tokamak Physics Performance APEX Interim Report November, 1999 15-1 CHAPTER 15: SYNERGISM BETWEEN LIQUID METAL WALLS, TOKAMAK PHYSICS PERFORMANCE, AND REACTOR ATTRACTIVENESS and Tokamak Physics Performance APEX Interim Report November, 1999 15-2 15. SYNERGISM BETWEEN LIQUID METAL

  1. Micro-engineered first wall tungsten armor for high average power laser fusion energy systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    Micro-engineered first wall tungsten armor for high average power laser fusion energy systems is developing an inertial fusion energy demonstration power reactor with a solid first wall chamber. The first is a coordinated effort to develop laser inertial fusion energy [1]. The first stage of the HAPL program

  2. ablated first-wall materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ablated first-wall materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Tungsten as first wall...

  3. Environmental effect on the exciton transition energy of single wall carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Environmental effect on the exciton transition energy of single wall carbon nanotubes Riichiro The optical transition energy of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are frequently used for assigning (n and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Depending on the surrounding materials of SWNTs, the transition energy is shifted up

  4. A Study of Heat Transfer in a Composite Wall Collector System with Porous Absorber 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, heat transfer and flow in a composite solar wall with porous absorber has been studied. The unsteady numerical simulation is employed to analyze the performance of the flow and temperature field in the composite solar wall. The excess...

  5. Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) Produced by CO Disproportionation on Co-Mo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resasco, Daniel

    Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) Produced by CO Disproportionation on Co Received November 15, 2001. Revised Manuscript Received February 6, 2002 The disproportionation of CO over Co-Mo/SiO2 catalysts with low Co/Mo ratios results in a high selectivity to single-walled carbon

  6. Water transport inside a single-walled carbon nanotube driven by temperature gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Water transport inside a single-walled carbon nanotube driven by temperature gradient J. Shiomi mass transport of a water cluster inside a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) with the diameter of about 1.4 nm. The influence of the non-equilibrium thermal environment on the confined water cluster has

  7. Phase diagram of magnetic domain walls in spin valve nano-stripes N. Rougemaille,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Phase diagram of magnetic domain walls in spin valve nano-stripes N. Rougemaille,1 V. Uhlí,2, 1 O walls in Co/Cu/Py spin valve nano-stripes (Py: Permalloy), in which the Co layer is mostly single domain Magneto- Resistance. These stacking are called spin valve for a metal spacer layer, and pseudo spin valve

  8. A Study of Heat Transfer in a Composite Wall Collector System with Porous Absorber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, heat transfer and flow in a composite solar wall with porous absorber has been studied. The unsteady numerical simulation is employed to analyze the performance of the flow and temperature field in the composite solar wall. The excess...

  9. Inhibition of aortic wall calcification in bioprosthetic heart valves by ethanol pretreatment: Biochemical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zand, Robert

    pretreatment almost com- pletely extracted both phospholipids and cholesterol from the aortic wall; despite of BPHV aortic wall and this effect may be due in part to lipid extraction and protein structure changes and associ- ated minerals in the BPHV tissues. This calcific degen- eration is usually followed by stenosis

  10. Computational modeling of thermal conductivity of single walled carbon nanotube polymer composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    was developed to study the thermal conductivity of single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composites1 Computational modeling of thermal conductivity of single walled carbon nanotube polymer resistance on effective conductivity of composites were quantified. The present model is a useful tool

  11. Condensation potential in high thermal performance walls. Hot, humid summer climate. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwood, G.E.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To observe actual moisture patterns and the potential for condensation due to long periods of air conditioning in a hot, humid climate, a test structure was constructed near Gulfport, Mississippi, for exposure of eight types of insulated wall panels at controlled indoor conditions and typical outdoor weather conditions. Panels were instrumented with moisture sensors and tested without (Phase 1) and with (Phase 2) penetrations (electrical outlets) in the indoor surface. There was no sustained condensation in any of the walls during either winter season. One type of high thermal performance wall had sustained condensation during both summers, but the wall dried out as the weather became cooler, and moisture content of framing never exceeded 17 percent. Low-permeance sheathing appeared to provide resistance to the buildup of moisture during summer in walls with high overall R values. Penetrating the walls with electrical outlets resulted in slightly higher moisture levels in all of the walls throughout the year. This paper should be useful to building designers, builders, and building code officials in establishing vapor retarder requirements for walls.

  12. Copyright 2008 by ASME1 Hemodynamic parameters such as time averaged wall shear stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papaharilaou, Yannis

    adjacent to the walls in order to capture the steep gradients in the oscillating boundary layer (TAWSS), wall shear stress temporal gradient (WSSTG) and Oscillatory Shear Index (OSI) have previously and outflow boundary conditions were obtained by MR phase contrast velocity mapping at the limits of the TOF

  13. Temperature distribution in an oscillatory flow with a sinusoidal wall temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    generated by an oscillatory boundary layer flow in the presence of a wall with a sinusoidal temperatureTemperature distribution in an oscillatory flow with a sinusoidal wall temperature Eduardo Ramos a that in all cases, the long-time, time averaged heat transfer from the boundary to the fluid is zero. Ó 2004

  14. Field Emission Properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with a Variety of Emitter-Morphologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 Field Emission Properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with a Variety of Emitter@chemsys.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp Field emission properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which have been prepared through. Protrusive bundles at the top surface of samples act selectively as emission sites. The number of emission

  15. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as a multimodal-thermoacoustic and photoacoustic-contrast agent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes as a multimodal- thermoacoustic and photoacoustic-contrast agent thermoacoustic and photoacoustic tomography. In comparison to deionized water, single-walled carbon nanotubes ex- hibited more than twofold signal enhancement for thermoacoustic to- mography at 3 GHz. In comparison

  16. Heat Transfer in Buildings: Application to Solar Air Collector and Trombe Wall Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    11 Heat Transfer in Buildings: Application to Solar Air Collector and Trombe Wall Design H. Boyer applications are finally discussed. One concerns the modeling of a flat plate air collector and the second focuses on the modeling of Trombe solar walls. In each case, detailed modeling of heat transfer allows

  17. A model of water streaking down a wall David A. Benson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Hill, 1976; Glass et al., 1989a; Selker et al., 1992]. A wave-like (kinematic) model using Rich- ardsA model of water streaking down a wall David A. Benson Division of Hydrologic Sciences, Desert aperture fracture. A digital photograph of the wall suggests that the vertical distribution of water

  18. Magnetic shielding of walls from the unmagnetized ion beam in a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate by numerical simulations and experiments that the unmagnetized ion beam formed in a Hall thruster can be controlled by an applied magnetic field in a manner that reduces by 2-3 orders of magnitude deleterious ion bombardment of the containing walls. The suppression of wall erosion in Hall thrusters to such low levels has remained elusive for decades.

  19. Confining multiple polymers between sticky walls: a directed walk model of two polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rechnitzer, Andrew

    Confining multiple polymers between sticky walls: a directed walk model of two polymers Thomas Wong 30, 2014 Abstract We study a model of two polymers confined to a slit with sticky walls. More on the square lattice. We compare the infinite slit limit, in which the length of the polymer (thermodynamic

  20. Interior Duct Wall Pressure Downstream of a Low-Speed Scott C. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, Juan J.

    Interior Duct Wall Pressure Downstream of a Low-Speed Rotor Scott C. Morris , David B. Stephens The region downstream of a ducted rotor has been experimentally investigated in terms of its wake the description of the flow field and wall pressure in the region downstream of the rotor. Measurements involving

  1. Atomic Layer Deposition on Suspended Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) on single-walled carbon nanotubesAtomic Layer Deposition on Suspended Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes via Gas-Phase Noncovalent, 2005; Revised Manuscript Received February 6, 2006 ABSTRACT Alternating exposures of nitrogen dioxide

  2. Photovoltaic device using single wall carbon nanotubes and method of fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Li, Zhongrui

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic device and methods for forming the same. In one embodiment, the photovoltaic device has a silicon substrate, and a film comprising a plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes disposed on the silicon substrate, wherein the plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes forms a plurality of heterojunctions with the silicon in the substrate.

  3. Automated Heart Wall Motion Abnormality Detection From Ultrasound Images using Bayesian Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosales, Rómer E.

    Automated Heart Wall Motion Abnormality Detection From Ultrasound Images using Bayesian Networks± . maleeha.qazi@siemens.com , glenn.fung@siemens.com Abstract Coronary Heart Disease can be diagnosed by mea- suring and scoring regional motion of the heart wall in ultrasound images of the left ventricle (LV

  4. Effects of winglets to augment tube wall heat transfer in louvered fin heat exchangers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thole, Karen A.

    Effects of winglets to augment tube wall heat transfer in louvered fin heat exchangers Paul A transfer along the tube wall of the compact heat exchanger through the use of winglets placed of attack, aspect ratio, direction, and shape, were all evaluated based on heat transfer augmentation

  5. The critical importance of materials and plasma-wall interactions studies B. Lipschultz, D. Whyte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The critical importance of materials and plasma-wall interactions studies B. Lipschultz, D. Whyte panels), the gaps are much larger in the areas of materials and plasma wall interactions than in the core physics. Here we focus on the requirements for materials at "zero dpa", i.e. even before response

  6. SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Alexandre

    of the Electrochemical Society - Cold Cathodes II) We present three-dimensional simulations of transport and fieldSIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES Alexandre- emission properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. The structure considered for the transport properties

  7. Method and apparatus for detecting irregularities on or in the wall of a vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowling, Michael Keith (Blackborough Cullompton, GB)

    2000-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of detecting irregularities on or in the wall of a vessel by detecting localized spatial temperature differentials on the wall surface, comprising scanning the vessel surface with a thermal imaging camera and recording the position of the or each region for which the thermal image from the camera is indicative of such a temperature differential across the region. The spatial temperature differential may be formed by bacterial growth on the vessel surface; alternatively, it may be the result of defects in the vessel wall such as thin regions or pin holes or cracks. The detection of leaks through the vessel wall may be enhanced by applying a pressure differential or a temperature differential across the vessel wall; the testing for leaks may be performed with the vessel full or empty, and from the inside or the outside.

  8. Support pedestals for interconnecting a cover and nozzle band wall in a gas turbine nozzle segment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Simpsonville, SC); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC); Webbon, Waylon Willard (Greenville, SC); Bagepalli, Radhakrishna (Schenectady, NY); Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Kellock, Iain Robertson (Simpsonville, SC)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner band portions. Each band portion includes a nozzle wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through the apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. Structural pedestals interconnect the cover and nozzle wall and pass through holes in the impingement plate to reduce localized stress otherwise resulting from a difference in pressure within the chamber of the nozzle segment and the hot gas path and the fixed turbine casing surrounding the nozzle stage. The pedestals may be cast or welded to the cover and nozzle wall.

  9. Repair and retrofit of a modern high-rise curtain wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinstein, J.S.; Del Rosso, A.L.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study has revealed that metal and glass exterior curtain walls constructed between the late 1960's and early 1980's can perform poorly and become very ineffective in preventing water infiltration. One such high-rise commercial office building demonstrates that wall performance against water infiltration is compromised due to cyclic wind loads, poor performance of gaskets and sealed joints and poor performance of fasteners and welds used to connect aluminum wall components. Failures and restoration methods at sealant joints and mechanical connections of the curtain wall are illustrated at eight major joint conditions. Methods and approaches used to restore weather resistance and structural integrity are discussed. Use of structural and non-structural silicone sealants as well as unique methods of mechanical anchorage are highlighted. Criteria driving the restoration design are presented, including: minimal disturbance to tenants, no disturbance of asbestos materials, a pleasing visual solution and providing for future long-term wall performance.

  10. Effect of electron temperature anisotropy on near-wall conductivity in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Fengkui, E-mail: fengkuizhang@163.com, E-mail: yudaren@hit.edu.cn; Kong, Lingyi; Zhang, Xueyi; Li, Wei [College of Aerospace and Civil Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Yu, Daren, E-mail: fengkuizhang@163.com, E-mail: yudaren@hit.edu.cn [College of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron velocity distribution in Hall thrusters is anisotropic, which not only makes the sheath oscillate in time, but also causes the sheath to oscillate in space under the condition of low electron temperatures. The spatial oscillation sheath has a significant effect on near-wall transport current. In this Letter, the method of particle-in-cell (2D?+?3?V) was adopted to simulate the effect of anisotropic electron temperatures on near-wall conductivity in a Hall thruster. Results show that the electron-wall collision frequency is within the same order in magnitude for both anisotropic and isotropic electron temperatures. The near-wall transport current produced by collisions between the electrons and the walls is much smaller than experimental measurements. However, under the condition of anisotropic electron temperatures, the non-collision transport current produced by slow electrons which reflected by the spatial oscillation sheath is much larger and closes to measurements.

  11. Role of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition reactor wall conditions on radical and ion substrate fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sowa, Mark J., E-mail: msowa@ultratech.com [Ultratech/Cambridge NanoTech, 130 Turner Street, Building 2, Waltham, Massachusetts 02453 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Chamber wall conditions, such as wall temperature and film deposits, have long been known to influence plasma source performance on thin film processing equipment. Plasma physical characteristics depend on conductive/insulating properties of chamber walls. Radical fluxes depend on plasma characteristics as well as wall recombination rates, which can be wall material and temperature dependent. Variations in substrate delivery of plasma generated species (radicals, ions, etc.) impact the resulting etch or deposition process resulting in process drift. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition is known to depend strongly on substrate radical flux, but film properties can be influenced by other plasma generated phenomena, such as ion bombardment. In this paper, the chamber wall conditions on a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process are investigated. The downstream oxygen radical and ion fluxes from an inductively coupled plasma source are indirectly monitored in temperature controlled (25–190?°C) stainless steel and quartz reactors over a range of oxygen flow rates. Etch rates of a photoresist coated quartz crystal microbalance are used to study the oxygen radical flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Plasma density estimates from Langmuir probe ion saturation current measurements are used to study the ion flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Reactor temperature was not found to impact radical and ion fluxes substantially. Radical and ion fluxes were higher for quartz walls compared to stainless steel walls over all oxygen flow rates considered. The radical flux to ion flux ratio is likely to be a critical parameter for the deposition of consistent film properties. Reactor wall material, gas flow rate/pressure, and distance from the plasma source all impact the radical to ion flux ratio. These results indicate maintaining chamber wall conditions will be important for delivering consistent results from plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition systems.

  12. Jet-wall interaction effects on diesel combustion and soot formation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, Lyle M.; Lopez, J. Javier (Polytechnic University of Valencia)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of wall interaction on combustion and soot formation processes of a diesel fuel jet were investigated in an optically-accessible constant-volume combustion vessel at experimental conditions typical of a diesel engine. At identical ambient and injector conditions, soot processes were studied in free jets, plane wall jets, and 'confined' wall jets (a box-shaped geometry simulating secondary interaction with adjacent walls and jets in an engine). The investigation showed that soot levels are significantly lower in a plane wall jet compared to a free jet. At some operating conditions, sooting free jets become soot-free as plane wall jets. Possible mechanisms to explain the reduced or delayed soot formation upon wall interaction include an increased fuel-air mixing rate and a wall-jet-cooling effect. However, in a confined-jet configuration, there is an opposite trend in soot formation. Jet confinement causes combustion gases to be redirected towards the incoming jet, causing the lift-off length to shorten and soot to increase. This effect can be avoided by ending fuel injection prior to the time of significant interaction with redirected combustion gases. For a fixed confined-wall geometry, an increase in ambient gas density delays jet interaction, allowing longer injection durations with no increase in soot. Jet interaction with redirected combustion products may also be avoided using reduced ambient oxygen concentration because of an increased ignition delay. Although simplified geometries were employed, the identification of important mechanisms affecting soot formation after the time of wall interaction is expected to be useful for understanding these processes in more complex and realistic diesel engine geometries.

  13. Reflectivity Measurements for Copper and Aluminumin the Far Infrared and the Resistive Wall Impedance in the LCLS Undulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, K L F; Tu, J J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reflectivity Measurements for Copper and Aluminumin the Far Infrared and the Resistive Wall Impedance in the LCLS Undulator

  14. Coupling between JET Pedestal ne-Te and Outer Target Plate Recycling: Consequences for JET ITER-Like-Wall Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupling between JET Pedestal ne-Te and Outer Target Plate Recycling: Consequences for JET ITER-Like-Wall Operation

  15. Modification of the Carbon and Beryllium Walls in JET by Erosion, Redeposition and Deuterium Trapping after the 1991 Discharge Period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modification of the Carbon and Beryllium Walls in JET by Erosion, Redeposition and Deuterium Trapping after the 1991 Discharge Period

  16. ICRF Heating at JET: From Operations with a Metallic Wall to the Long Term Perspective of a DT Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICRF Heating at JET: From Operations with a Metallic Wall to the Long Term Perspective of a DT Campaign

  17. Response to “Comment on ‘Velocity boundary conditions at a tokamak resistive wall’” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 094701 (2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strauss, H. R., E-mail: hank@hrsfusion.com [HRS Fusion, West Orange, New Jersey 07052 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A response is given to “Comment on ‘Velocity boundary conditions at a tokamak resistive wall’?” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 094701 (2014)].

  18. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 63:15371547 (2010) Feasibility of In Vivo Measurement of Carotid Wall Shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvalho, João Luiz

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /vessel wall interface, using a method developed by Frayne and Rutt (Magn Reson Med 1995;34:378­ 387

  19. Determination of Tritium Profiles in Tiles from the First Wall of Fusion Machines and Development of Techniques for their Detritiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Determination of Tritium Profiles in Tiles from the First Wall of Fusion Machines and Development of Techniques for their Detritiation

  20. Proposal for the award of thin-walled precision aluminium alloy tubes for the Atlas Muon Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of thin-walled precision aluminium alloy tubes for the Atlas Muon Spectrometer

  1. Spin-polarized transport through domain wall in magnetized graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Khodas; I. A. Zaliznyak; D. E. Kharzeev

    2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomically thin two-dimensional layer of honeycomb crystalline carbon known as graphene is a promising system for electronics. It has a point-like Fermi surface, which is very sensitive to external potentials. In particular, Zeeman magnetic field parallel to the graphene layer splits electron bands and creates fully spin-polarized and geometrically congruent circular Fermi surfaces of particle and hole type. In the presence of electric field, particles and holes with opposite spins drift in opposite direction. These phenomena are likely to be of interest for developing graphene-based spintronic devices. A domain wall (DW) separating regions with opposite spin polarizations is a basic element of such a device. Here we consider a ballistic passage of spin-polarized charge carriers through DW in graphene. We also discuss the analogy between the generation of spin currents in graphene and in relativistic quark-gluon plasma, where the spin-polarized current is responsible for the phenomenon of charge separation studied recently at RHIC.

  2. Helium-Cooled Refractory Alloys First Wall and Blanket Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Nygren, R.E.; Baxi, C.B.; Fogarty, P.; Ghoniem, N.; Khater, H.; McCarthy, K.; Merrill, B.; Nelson, B.; Reis, E.E.; Sharafat, S.; Schleicher, R.; Sze, D.K.; Ulrickson, M.; Willms, S.; Youssef, M.; Zinkel, S.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the APEX program the He-cooled system design task is to evaluate and recommend high power density refractory alloy first wall and blanket designs and to recommend and initiate tests to address critical issues. We completed the preliminary design of a helium-cooled, W-5Re alloy, lithium breeder design and the results are reported in this paper. Many areas of the design were assessed, including material selection, helium impurity control, and mechanical, nuclear and thermal hydraulics design, and waste disposal, tritium and safety design. System study results show that at a closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) gross thermal efficiency of 57.5%, a superconducting coil tokamak reactor, with an aspect ratio of 4, and an output power of 2 GWe, can be projected to have a cost of electricity at 54.6 mill/kWh. Critical issues were identified and we plan to continue the design on some of the critical issues during the next phase of the APEX design study.

  3. Menu driven heat treatment control of thin walled bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Boro, PA); Booth, Jr., Russell R. (Elizabeth Twp., PA); Grimm, Noel P. (Monroeville, PA); Batenburg, Abram (Greensburg, PA); Thomas, Vaughn M. (Allison Park, PA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for controlling the heating of a thin-walled body according to a predetermined temperature program by means of electrically controllable heaters, comprising: disposing the heaters adjacent one surface of the body such that each heater is in facing relation with a respective zone of the surface; supplying heat-generating power to each heater and monitoring the temperature at each surface zone; and for each zone: deriving (16,18,20), on the basis of the temperature values obtained in the monitoring step, estimated temperature values of the surface at successive time intervals each having a first selected duration; generating (28), on the basis of the estimated temperature values derived in each time interval, representations of the temperature, THSIFUT, which each surface zone will have, based on the level of power presently supplied to each heater, at a future time which is separated from the present time interval by a second selected duration; determining (30) the difference between THSIFUT and the desired temperature, FUTREFTVZL, at the future time which is separated from the present time interval by the second selected duration; providing (52) a representation indicating the power level which sould be supplied to each heater in order to reduce the difference obtained in the determining step; and adjusting the power level supplied to each heater by the supplying step in response to the value of the representation provided in the providing step.

  4. Rheotaxis of spherical active particles near a planar wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. E. Uspal; M. N. Popescu; S. Dietrich; M. Tasinkevych

    2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    For active particles the interplay between the self-generated hydrodynamic flow and an external shear flow, especially near bounding surfaces, can result in a rich behavior of the particles not easily foreseen from the consideration of the active and external driving mechanisms in isolation. For instance, under certain conditions, the particles exhibit "rheotaxis," i.e., they align their direction of motion with the plane of shear spanned by the direction of the flow and the normal of the bounding surface and move with or against the flow. To date, studies of rheotaxis have focused on elongated particles (e.g., spermatozoa), for which rheotaxis can be understood intuitively in terms of a "weather vane" mechanism. Here we investigate the possibility that spherical active particles, for which the "weather vane" mechanism is excluded due to the symmetry of the shape, may nevertheless exhibit rheotaxis. Combining analytical and numerical calculations, we show that, for a broad class of spherical active particles, rheotactic behavior may emerge via a mechanism which involves "self-trapping" near a hard wall owing to the active propulsion of the particles, combined with their rotation, alignment, and "locking" of the direction of motion into the shear plane. In this state, the particles move solely up- or downstream at a steady height and orientation.

  5. Polymer Grafted Janus Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Priftis, Dimitrios [ORNL; Sakellariou, Georgios [ORNL; Baskaran, Durairaj [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mays, Jimmy [ORNL; Hadjichristidis, Nikos [University of Athens, Athens, Greece

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a novel and facile strategy to modify the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with two chemically different polymer brushes utilizing the grafting from technique. A [4 + 2] Diels Alder cycloaddition reaction was used to functionalize multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with two different precursor initiators, one for ring opening polymerization (ROP) and one for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The binary functionalized MWNTs were used for the simultaneous surface initiated polymerizations of different monomers resulting in polymer grafted MWNTs that can form Janus type structures under appropriate conditions. 1H NMR, FTIR and Raman spectra showed that the precursor initiators were successfully synthesized and covalently attached on the CNT surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that the grafted polymer content varies when different monomer ratios and polymerization times are used. The presence of an organic layer around the CNTs was observed through transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) proved that the glass transition (Tg) and melting (Tm) temperatures of the grafted polymers are affected by the presence of the CNTs, while circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated that the PLLA ahelix conformation remains intact.

  6. Resistive wall tearing mode generated finite net electromagnetic torque in a static plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, G. Z., E-mail: haogz@swip.ac.cn; Wang, A. K.; Xu, M.; Qu, H. P.; Peng, X. D.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, J. Q.; Qiu, X. M. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Post Office Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)] [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Post Office Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Y. Q. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The MARS-F code [Y. Q. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 3681 (2000)] is applied to numerically investigate the effect of the plasma pressure on the tearing mode stability as well as the tearing mode-induced electromagnetic torque, in the presence of a resistive wall. The tearing mode with a complex eigenvalue, resulted from the favorable averaged curvature effect [A. H. Glasser et al., Phys. Fluids 18, 875 (1975)], leads to a re-distribution of the electromagnetic torque with multiple peaking in the immediate vicinity of the resistive layer. The multiple peaking is often caused by the sound wave resonances. In the presence of a resistive wall surrounding the plasma, a rotating tearing mode can generate a finite net electromagnetic torque acting on the static plasma column. Meanwhile, an equal but opposite torque is generated in the resistive wall, thus conserving the total momentum of the whole plasma-wall system. The direction of the net torque on the plasma is always opposite to the real frequency of the mode, agreeing with the analytic result by Pustovitov [Nucl. Fusion 47, 1583 (2007)]. When the wall time is close to the oscillating time of the tearing mode, the finite net torque reaches its maximum. Without wall or with an ideal wall, no net torque on the static plasma is generated by the tearing mode. However, re-distribution of the torque density in the resistive layer still occurs.

  7. Thermal control system and method for a passive solar storage wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortega, Joseph K. E. (Westminister, CO)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a system and method for controlling the storing and elease of thermal energy from a thermal storage wall wherein said wall is capable of storing thermal energy from insolation of solar radiation. The system and method includes a device such as a plurality of louvers spaced a predetermined distance from the thermal wall for regulating the release of thermal energy from the thermal wall. This regulating device is made from a material which is substantially transparent to the incoming solar radiation so that when it is in any operative position, the thermal storage wall substantially receives all of the impacting solar radiation. The material in the regulating device is further capable of being substantially opaque to thermal energy so that when the device is substantially closed, thermal release of energy from the storage wall is substantially minimized. An adjustment device is interconnected with the regulating mechanism for selectively opening and closing it in order to regulate the release of thermal energy from the wall.

  8. The performance check between whole building thermal performance criteria and exterior wall measured clear wall R-value, thermal bridging, thermal mass, and airtightness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Buildings Technology Center; Kossecka, E. [Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Berrenberg, L. [American Polysteel Forms (United States)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the last IEA Annex 32 meeting it was proposed that the annex develop the links between level 1 (the whole building performance) and level 2 (the envelope system). This paper provides a case study of just that type of connection. An exterior wall mockup is hot box tested and modeled in the laboratory. Measurements of the steady state and dynamic behavior of this mockup are used as the basis to define the thermal bridging, thermal mass benefit and air tightness of the whole wall system. These level two performance characteristics are related to the whole building performance. They can be analyzed by a finite difference modeling of the wall assembly. An equivalent wall theory is used to convert three dimensional heat flow to one dimensional terms that capture thermal mass effects, which in turn are used in a common whole building simulation model. This paper illustrates a performance check between the thermal performance of a Massive ICF (Insulating Concrete Form) wall system mocked up (level 2) and Whole Building Performance criteria (level 1) such as total space heating and cooling loads (thermal comfort).

  9. IFE chamber dry wall materials response to pulsed X-rays and ions at power-plant level fluences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    IFE chamber dry wall materials response to pulsed X-rays and ions at power-plant level fluences T initiated to test IFE chamber wall materials response to X-rays on the Z facility, and to ions on RHEPP-1 a collaborative investigation of the response of candidate first-wall inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor chamber

  10. A Detailed Analysis of Guard-Heated Wall Shear Stress Sensors for Turbulent Flows Seyed Ali Ale Etrati Khosroshahi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    A Detailed Analysis of Guard-Heated Wall Shear Stress Sensors for Turbulent Flows by Seyed Ali Ale A Detailed Analysis of Guard-Heated Wall Shear Stress Sensors for Turbulent Flows by Seyed Ali Ale Etrati-dimensional analysis of the performance of multi-element guard-heated hot-film wall shear stress microsensors

  11. Modelling of a coke oven heating wall M. Landreau, D. Isler, Centre de Pyrolyse de Marienau (CPM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    - 1 - Modelling of a coke oven heating wall M. Landreau, D. Isler, Centre de Pyrolyse de Marienau with thermomechanical modelling of a coke oven heating wall. The objective is to define the safe limits of coke oven of walls, roof and larry car, pre-stresses (anchoring system), lateral pressure due to coal pushing A 3D

  12. Three-Dimensional Numerical Evaluation of Thermal Performance of Uninsulated Wall Assemblies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridouane, E. H.; Bianchi, M.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study describes a detailed three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics modeling to evaluate the thermal performance of uninsulated wall assemblies accounting for conduction through framing, convection, and radiation. The model allows for material properties variations with temperature. Parameters that were varied in the study include ambient outdoor temperature and cavity surface emissivity. Understanding the thermal performance of uninsulated wall cavities is essential for accurate prediction of energy use in residential buildings. The results can serve as input for building energy simulation tools for modeling the temperature dependent energy performance of homes with uninsulated walls.

  13. 2009 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Research Conference-August 2-7,2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debra Mohnen

    2009-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant cell walls are a complex cellular compartment essential for plant growth, development and response to biotic and abiotic stress and a major biological resource for meeting our future bioenergy and natural product needs. The goal of the 2009 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Research Conference is to summarize and critically evaluate the current level of understanding of the structure, synthesis and function of the whole plant extracellular matrix, including the polysaccharides, proteins, lignin and waxes that comprise the wall, and the enzymes and regulatory proteins that drive wall synthesis and modification. Innovative techniques to study how both primary and secondary wall polymers are formed and modified throughout plant growth will be emphasized, including rapid advances taking place in the use of anti-wall antibodies and carbohydrate binding proteins, comparative and evolutionary wall genomics, and the use of mutants and natural variants to understand and identify wall structure-function relationships. Discussions of essential research advances needed to push the field forward toward a systems biology approach will be highlighted. The meeting will include a commemorative lecture in honor of the career and accomplishments of the late Emeritus Professor Bruce A. Stone, a pioneer in wall research who contributed over 40 years of outstanding studies on plant cell wall structure, function, synthesis and remodeling including emphasis on plant cell wall beta-glucans and arabinogalactans. The dwindling supply of fossil fuels will not suffice to meet our future energy and industrial product needs. Plant biomass is the renewable resource that will fill a large part of the void left by vanishing fossil fuels. It is therefore critical that basic research scientists interact closely with industrial researchers to critically evaluate the current state of knowledge regarding how plant biomass, which is largely plant cell walls, is synthesized and utilized by the plant. A final goal of the meeting is to bring together academic, research center, and industrial scientists to identify the most crucial and fundamental basic research questions and directions that will supply the information needed to understand, modify and use plant biomass for human industrial and energy needs.

  14. Persistent conductive footprints of 109° domain walls in bismuth ferrite films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolichnov, I.; Iwanowska, M.; Colla, E.; Setter, N. [Ceramics Laboratory, EPFL-Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne 1015 (Switzerland); Ziegler, B.; Gaponenko, I.; Paruch, P. [DPMC-MaNEP, University of Geneva, 24 Quai Ernest Ansermet, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Huijben, M.; Rijnders, G. [Faculty of Science and Technology and MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using conductive and piezoforce microscopy, we reveal a complex picture of electronic transport at weakly conductive 109° domain walls in bismuth ferrite films. Even once initial ferroelectric stripe domains are changed/erased, persistent conductive paths signal the original domain wall position. The conduction at such domain wall “footprints” is activated by domain movement and decays rapidly with time, but can be re-activated by opposite polarity voltage. The observed phenomena represent true leakage conduction rather than merely displacement currents. We propose a scenario of hopping transport in combination with thermionic injection over interfacial barriers controlled by the ferroelectric polarization.

  15. Revisit of interfacial free energy of the hard sphere system near hard wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mingcheng Yang; Hongru Ma

    2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple Monte Carlo method to calculate the interfacial free energy between the substrate and the material. Using this method we investigate the interfacial free energys of the hard sphere fluid and solid phases near a smooth hard wall. According to the obtained interfacial free energys of the coexisting fluid and solid phases and the Young equation we are able to determine the contact angle with high accuracy, cos$\\theta$ = 1:010(31), which indicates that a smooth hard wall can be wetted completely by the hard sphere crystal at the interface between the wall and the hard sphere fluid.

  16. Characterizing low-frequency oscillation of Hall thrusters by dielectric wall temperature variation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ning, Guo [Science and Technology on Vacuum and Cryogenics Technology and Physics Laboratory, Lanzhou 730013 (China); Liqiu, Wei, E-mail: weiliqiu@gmail.com, E-mail: weiliqiu@hit.edu.cn; Yongjie, Ding [Harbin Institute of Technology, Mail Box 3047, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-frequency oscillation characteristics of a Hall thruster were investigated by varying the dielectric wall temperature. Experimental results indicate that increasing the dielectric wall temperature can result in an increase in the amplitude of low-frequency oscillation and a slight decrease in its frequency. Physical analysis revealed that this change is related to the secondary electron emissions at different dielectric wall temperatures. The evidence suggests that this technique can serve as an effective way for future studies to examine how secondary electron emissions affect a discharging thruster.

  17. Using pipe with corrugated walls for a sub-terahertz FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stupakov, Gennady

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been noted in the past, in the study of the wall-roughness impedance, that a metallic pipe with corrugated walls supports propagation of a high-frequency mode that is in resonance with a relativistic beam. This mode can be excited by a beam whose length is a fraction of the wavelength. In this paper, we study another option of excitation of the resonant mode in a metallic pipe with corrugated walls---via the mechanism of the free electron laser instability. This mechanism works if the bunch length is much longer than the wavelength of the radiation.

  18. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Wang, Z. R.; Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Manickam, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Spectrum—Kinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  19. 2012 PLANT CELL WALLS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, AUGUST 4-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Jocelyn

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The sub-theme of this year’s meeting, ‘Cell Wall Research in a Post-Genome World’, will be a consideration of the dramatic technological changes that have occurred in the three years since the previous cell wall Gordon Conference in the area of DNA sequencing. New technologies are providing additional perspectives of plant cell wall biology across a rapidly growing number of species, highlighting a myriad of architectures, compositions, and functions in both "conventional" and specialized cell walls. This meeting will focus on addressing the knowledge gaps and technical challenges raised by such diversity, as well as our need to understand the underlying processes for critical applications such as crop improvement and bioenergy resource development.

  20. Epoxy/Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Thin Films for Composites Reinforcement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Graham

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is mainly focused upon the preparation, processing and evaluation of mechanical and material properties of epoxy/single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) nanocomposite thin films. B-staged epoxy/SWCNT nanocomposite ...

  1. Lignin biosynthesis perturbations affect secondary cell wall composition and saccharification yield in Arabidopsis thaliana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Acker, Rebecca; Vanholme, Ruben; Storme, Véronique; Mortimer, Jennifer C; Dupree, Paul; Boerjan, Wout

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    be used for the production of liquid biofuels, such as bioethanol [2]. However, the enzymatic processing of plant biomass into fermentable sugars, called saccharifi- cation, is hampered by the complexity of the secondary cell wall structure...

  2. The giant low-density lipoproteins (LDL) accumulation in the multi-layer artery wall model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katarzyna Jesionek; Marcin Kostur

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The mathematical, four-layer model of the LDL transport across the arterial wall including the sensitivity of the transport coefficients to the wall shear stress (WSS) is studied. In that model the advection-diffusion equations in porous media are used to determine the LDL concentration profiles in each layer of the arterial wall. We demonstrate the effect of the giant accumulation of the LDL in the intima layer. This property turns out to be an interplay between the layered structure of the arterial wall and WSS sensitivity of the endothelium. Interestingly, we also show that the single-layer models with the same WSS sensitivity mechanism and corresponding parameters, obscure the accumulation phenomenon, which predicts the one order of magnitude larger LDL concentration.

  3. Experimental measurement and analysis of wall pressure distribution for a 50% eccentric whirling annular seal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suryanarayanan, Arun

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and labyrinth seals operating with 50% dynamic eccentricities and a whirl ratio of one. However, this alone does not provide a complete matrix of data for the conditions prevailing in the clearance zone. Additional information of mean and instantaneous wall...

  4. Effect of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the electromechanical properties of polyimide nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh, Sujay

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    , toughness, and electromechanical coupling. The broad goal of this thesis was to investigate potential electromechanical behavior in single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polyimide (PI) composites. The specific objective was to measure and characterize...

  5. Epoxy/Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Thin Films for Composites Reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Graham

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is mainly focused upon the preparation, processing and evaluation of mechanical and material properties of epoxy/single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) nanocomposite thin films. B-staged epoxy/SWCNT nanocomposite thin films at 50% of cure...

  6. In Situ Chemical Imaging of Plant Cell Walls Using CARS/SRS Microscopy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Y.; Liu, Y. S.; Saar, B. G.; Xie, X. S.; Chen, F.; Dixon, R. A.; Himmel, M. E.; Ding S. Y.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This poster demonstrates coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and stimulated Raman scattering of plant cell walls. It includes simultaneous chemical imaging of lignin and cellulose (corn stover) during acidic pretreatment.

  7. Theoretical and simulation tools for electron transfer and chain reactions in single walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Nitish

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are cylindrical sheets of graphene whose electronic structures and diameters are determined by their chiralities. Current synthetic methods produce batches of nanotubes containing a ...

  8. Resistive Wall Heating Due to Image Current on the Beam Chamber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    32012 Resistive Wall Heating Due to Image Current on the Beam Chamber For a Superconducting Undulator S.H. Kim, ASD MD Group 1. Introduction The image-current heating on the...

  9. Shape transition of unstrained flattest single-walled carbon nanotubes under pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mu, Weihua, E-mail: whmu@mit.edu, E-mail: muwh@itp.ac.cn [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2735 Beijing 100190 (China); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2735 Beijing 100190 (China); Cao, Jianshu, E-mail: jianshu@mit.edu [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), Singapore 138602 (Singapore); Ou-Yang, Zhong-can [State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2735 Beijing 100190 (China); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2735 Beijing 100190 (China); Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), Singapore 138602 (Singapore); Center for Advanced Study, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Single walled carbon nanotube's (SWCNT's) cross section can be flattened under hydrostatic pressure. One example is the cross section of a single walled carbon nanotube successively deforms from the original round shape to oval shape, then to peanut-like shape. At the transition point of reversible deformation between convex shape and concave shape, the side wall of nanotube is flattest. This flattest tube has many attractive properties. In the present work, an approximate approach is developed to determine the equilibrium shape of this unstrained flattest tube and the curvature distribution of this tube. Our results are in good agreement with recent numerical results, and can be applied to the study of pressure controlled electric properties of single walled carbon nanotubes. The present method can also be used to study other deformed inorganic and organic tube-like structures.

  10. Analysis of molten debris freezing and wall erosion during a severe RIA test. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Moore, R.L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional physical model was developed to study the transient freezing of the molten debris layer (a mixture of UO/sub 2/ fuel and zircaloy cladding) produced in a severe reactivity initiated accident in-pile test and deposited on the inner surface of the test shroud wall. The wall had a finite thickness and was cooled along its outer surface by coolant bypass flow. Analyzed are the effects of debris temperature, radiation cooling at the debris layer surface, zircaloy volume ratio within the debris, and initial wall temperature on the transient freezing of the debris layer and the potential melting of the wall. The governing equations of this two-component, simultaneous freezing and melting problem in a finite geometry were solved using a one-dimensional finite element code based on the method of weighted residuals.

  11. Performance of reduced wall EPR insulated medium voltage power cables. Part 2: Mechanical characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Y.; Cinquemani, P.L. [Pirelli Cable Corp., Lexington, SC (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the replacement of paper insulated lead covered cables (PILC) reduced insulation wall designs have been developed. They provide a reliable lower diameter cable design for installation in existing PILC conduits. Representing Part 2 of the investigation, this paper presents the results of mechanical testing conducted on both reduced and full wall EPR insulated cables. Both jacketed and non-jacketed cable designs have been subjected to mechanical pulling forces which greatly exceed recommended industry limitations, followed by electrical testing to ascertain cable performance. The results of this study conclude that reduced wall EPR insulated cables can safely withstand the same pulling forces as recommended for conventional walls and can be designed for installation under the same pulling limitations.

  12. STUDIES OF WALL FLAME QUENCHING AND HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS IN A MODEL SPARK IGNITION ENGINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishikawa, Nobuhiko

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Piston of an Internal Combustion Engine," In . J. Mech.Cylinder of an Internal Combustion Engine," SAE Paper No.Walls of an Internal Combustion Engine, Sixth Symposium (

  13. Research on Heat Resisting Character of Hollow Building Blocks in Energy Saving Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y.; He, J.; Gao, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By establishing a mathematical model with the finite difference method, the three-dimensional temperature fields of a new type of asymmetrical hollow building blocks in an energy saving wall are solved in this paper. The three forms of heat...

  14. Phase-Change Frame Walls (PCFWs) for Peak Demand Reduction, Load Shifting, Energy Conservation and Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medina, M.; Stewart, R.

    This paper presents results of side-by-side experimental testing of a technology, referred to as Phase Change Frame Wall (PCFW), whose primary purpose is to increase building thermal mass by the application of phase change materials (PCMs...

  15. Comparison of Dynamic Data Analysis Methods for Thermal Property Measurement of a Building Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, K.; Gong, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy usage in heating and air-conditioning a building is influenced by several factors. Among them is the building wall, whose production is affected by the planning, design and construction process. This process causes a certain deviation...

  16. Electric field control of domain wall propagation in Pt/Co/GdOx films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Uwe

    The influence of a gate voltage on domain wall (DW) propagation is investigated in ultrathin Pt/Co/gadolinium oxide (GdOx) films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The DW propagation field can be enhanced or retarded ...

  17. Turbulence suppression in channel flows by small amplitude transverse wall oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jovanovic, Mihailo

    and experimental investigations in channel,2­4 pipe,5­7 and boundary layer8­11 flows. In this paper, we model oscillatory wall motion or an oscillatory spanwise body force showed that a substantial drag reduction up

  18. Material Characterization and Design Recommendations for Mechanically Stabilized Earth Retaining Walls 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dantal, Vishal

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    recommendation with German code (EBGEO) for MSE walls. The outcome this research shows that, the friction angle (?) for the backfill materials used in Texas is higher than AASHTO recommended values for large particles size type backfills. From FLAC simulations...

  19. Nuclear physics in soft-wall AdS/QCD: deuteron electromagnetic form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutsche, Thomas; Schmidt, Ivan; Vega, Alfredo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a calculation of the deuteron electromagnetic form factors in a soft-wall AdS/QCD approach. The power scaling of the deuteron form factors is consistent with quark counting rules.

  20. Crash behavior of three dimensional thin-walled structures under combined loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Heung-Soo, 1971-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the weight efficient and crashworthy design of the structural body of a transportation system, a thorough understanding of crushing behavior of thin-walled structural members such as spot-welded sheet metal beams or ...

  1. Magnetic shielding of the channel walls in a Hall plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Grys, Kristi de; Mathers, Alex [Aerojet, Redmond, Washington 98052 (United States)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a qualification life test of a Hall thruster it was found that the erosion of the acceleration channel practically stopped after {approx}5600 h. Numerical simulations using a two-dimensional axisymmetric plasma solver with a magnetic field-aligned mesh reveal that when the channel receded from its early-in-life to its steady-state configuration the following changes occurred near the wall: (1) reduction of the electric field parallel to the wall that prohibited ions from acquiring significant impact kinetic energy before entering the sheath, (2) reduction of the potential fall in the sheath that further diminished the total energy ions gained before striking the material, and (3) reduction of the ion number density that decreased the flux of ions to the wall. All these changes, found to have been induced by the magnetic field, constituted collectively an effective shielding of the walls from any significant ion bombardment. Thus, we term this process in Hall thrusters 'magnetic shielding'.

  2. Rethinking walled residential compound in peripheral urban China : a guideline for boundary and size design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Na

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last two decades, with the high speed urbanization, walled residential compound as the typical housing development is being constructed on a large scale in peripheral areas of Chinese cities. Its self-enclosing ...

  3. Seismic Performance, Modeling, and Failure Assessment of Reinforced Concrete Shear Wall Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuna, Zeynep

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post- Tensioned Concrete Buildings,” PEER Report 2011/104,RC shear walls in high-rise buildings,” The Young ResearcherExtended 3D Analysis of Building Structures, Computers and

  4. Six Thousand Electrochemical Cycles of Double-Walled Silicon Nanotube Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, H

    2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite remarkable progress, lithium ion batteries still need higher energy density and better cycle life for consumer electronics, electric drive vehicles and large-scale renewable energy storage applications. Silicon has recently been explored as a promising anode material for high energy batteries; however, attaining long cycle life remains a significant challenge due to materials pulverization during cycling and an unstable solid-electrolyte interphase. Here, we report double-walled silicon nanotube electrodes that can cycle over 6000 times while retaining more than 85% of the initial capacity. This excellent performance is due to the unique double-walled structure in which the outer silicon oxide wall confines the inner silicon wall to expand only inward during lithiation, resulting in a stable solid-electrolyte interphase. This structural concept is general and could be extended to other battery materials that undergo large volume changes.

  5. Temperature dependent thermal conductivity increase of aqueous nanofluid with single walled carbon nanotube inclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 Temperature dependent thermal conductivity increase of aqueous nanofluid with single walled nanofluids, which we then thoroughly characterized by microscopic and spectroscopic methods. Electrical of the nanofluid was also found to increase with increasing temperature. Viscosity of the nanofluids showed

  6. Research on Heat Resisting Character of Hollow Building Blocks in Energy Saving Wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y.; He, J.; Gao, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By establishing a mathematical model with the finite difference method, the three-dimensional temperature fields of a new type of asymmetrical hollow building blocks in an energy saving wall are solved in this paper. The three forms of heat...

  7. Seismic Performance, Modeling, and Failure Assessment of Reinforced Concrete Shear Wall Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuna, Zeynep

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wall boundaries, rebar buckling and lateral instabilities atand crushing, rebar buckling and lateral instabilities atlateral strength loss in the +H1 direction occurs at approximately 0.9% drift due to concrete crushing and rebar buckling

  8. Dynamic measurement of heat loss coefficients through Trombe wall glazing systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Trombe wall presents a unique opportunity to measure the heat-loss coefficient through the glazing system because the wall itself can be used as a heat meter. Since the instantaneous heat flux through the outer wall surface can be determined, the heat loss coefficient at night can be calculated by dividing by the wall surface-to-ambient temperature difference. This technique has been used to determine heat-loss coefficients for Los Alamos test rooms during the winter of 1980-1981. Glazing systems studied include single and double glazing both with and without night insulation used in conjunction with a flat black paint, and both single and double glazing used in conjunction with a selective surface.

  9. Prediction of Chest Wall Toxicity From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephans, Kevin L., E-mail: stephak@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Robinson, Cliff G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Reddy, Chandana A.; Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine patient, tumor, and treatment factors related to the development of late chest wall toxicity after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: We reviewed a registry of 134 patients treated with lung SBRT to 60 Gy in 3 fractions who had greater than 1 year of clinical follow-up and no history of multiple treatments to the same lobe (n = 48). Patients were treated as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0236 without specific chest wall avoidance criteria. The chest wall was retrospectively contoured. Thirty-two lesions measured less than 3 cm, and sixteen measured 3 to 5 cm. The median planning target volume was 29 cm{sup 3}. Results: With a median follow-up of 18.8 months, 10 patients had late symptomatic chest wall toxicity (4 Grade 1 and 6 Grade 2) at a median of 8.8 months after SBRT. No patient characteristics (age, diabetes, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, or body mass index) were predictive for toxicity, whereas there was a trend for continued smoking (p = 0.066; odds ratio [OR], 4.4). Greatest single tumor dimension (p = 0.047; OR, 2.63) and planning target volume (p = 0.040; OR, 1.04) were correlated with toxicity, whereas distance from tumor edge to chest wall and gross tumor volume did not reach statistical significance. Volumes of chest wall receiving 30 Gy (V30) through 70 Gy (V70) were all highly significant, although this correlation weakened for V65 and V70 and maximum chest wall point dose only trended to significance (p = 0.06). On multivariate analysis, tumor volume was no longer correlated with toxicity and only V30 through V60 remained statistically significant. Conclusions: Tumor size and chest wall dosimetry are correlated to late chest wall toxicity. Only chest wall V30 through V60 remained significant on multivariate analysis. Restricting V30 to 30 cm{sup 3} or less and V60 to 3 cm{sup 3} or less should result in a 10% to 15% risk of late chest wall toxicity or lower.

  10. Process for forming a long gas turbine engine blade having a main wall with a thin portion near a tip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Christian X; Thomaidis, Dimitrios

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for forming an airfoil for a gas turbine engine involving: forming a casting of a gas turbine engine airfoil having a main wall and an interior cavity, the main wall having a wall thickness extending from an external surface of the outer wall to the interior cavity, an outer section of the main wall extending from a location between a base and a tip of the airfoil casting to the tip having a wall thickness greater than a final thickness. The process may further involve effecting movement, using a computer system, of a material removal apparatus and the casting relative to one another such that a layer of material is removed from the casting at one or more radial portions along the main wall of the casting.

  11. Evaluation of discontinuity stresses in thick walled cylindrical shells by means of an embedded polariscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cano, Narciso Ortiz

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF DISCONTINUITY STRESSES IN THICK WALLED CYLINDRICAL SHELLS BY MEANS OF AN EMBEDDED POLARISCOPE A Thesis By NARCISO ORTIZ CANO, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 196B Major Sub)ect: Aerospace Engineering EVALUATION OF DISCONTINUITY STRESSES IN THICK WALLED CYLINDRICAL SHELLS BY MEANS OF AN EMBEDDED POLARISCOPE A Thesis By NARCISO ORTIZ CANO, JR. Approved...

  12. Time Evolution of Temperature and Entropy of Various Collapsing Domain Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evan Halstead

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the time evolution of the temperature and entropy of gravitationally collapsing domain walls as seen by an asymptotic observer. In particular, we seek to understand how topology and the addition of a cosmological constant affect the gravitational collapse. Previous work has shown that the entropy of a spherically symmetric collapsing domain approaches a constant. In this paper, we reproduce these results, using both a fully quantum and a semi-classical approach, then we repeat the process for a de Sitter Schwarzschild domain wall (spherical with cosmological constant) and a (3+1) BTZ domain wall (cylindrical). We do this by coupling a scalar field to the background of the domain wall and analyzing the spectrum of radiation as a function of time. We find that the spectrum is quasi-thermal, with the degree of thermality increasing as the domain wall approaches the horizon. The thermal distribution allows for the determination of the temperature as a function of time, and we find that the late time temperature is very close to the Hawking temperature and that it also exhibits the proper scaling with the mass. From the temperature we find the entropy. Since the collapsing domain wall is what forms a black hole, we can compare the results to those of the standard entropy-area relation. We find that the entropy does in fact approach a constant that is close to the Hawking entropy. However, both the de Sitter Schwarzschild domain wall and the (3+1) BTZ domain wall show periods of decreasing entropy, which suggests that spontaneous collapse may be prevented.

  13. An investigation of the torsional stiffness of certain thin-walled triangular sections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Raymond Harold

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY A 8! M COLLEGE OF TEXAS AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TORSION', STIFFNESS OF CERTAIN THIN-WALLED TRIANGUIJIR SECTIONS Submitted to the Graduate School cf the kgricu1turel and Neohsnical Oollege of Texas in partial ful- fillment of ths... requirements for ths degree of Nectar of Science IAAF 1955 major Subject I Aeronautical Engineering AN LVfL~&ICATION OF THE TORSIONAL STIFFNESS OF CERTAIN THIN-WALLED TRIANGULAR SECTIONS A Thesis Raymond Harold Roberts Approved aa to Style and Content...

  14. Wall current closure effects on plasma and sheath fluctuations in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frias, Winston, E-mail: wpf274@mail.usask.ca; Smolyakov, Andrei I. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada); Kaganovich, Igor D.; Raitses, Yevgeny [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The excitation of negative energy, ion sound type modes driven by the E?×?B drift and the reactive/dissipative response of the wall sheath interface is analyzed for conditions typical in a Hall thruster. Such sheath impedance modes are sensitive to the dielectric properties of the thruster wall material, which therefore may have direct influence (other than via the secondary electron emission) on fluctuations and transport. Our results predict mode frequencies consistent with the frequencies of fluctuations observed experimentally.

  15. SPR salt wall leaching experiments in lab-scale vessel : data report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Stephen Walter; O'Hern, Timothy John; Hartenberger, Joel David

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During cavern leaching in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), injected raw water mixes with resident brine and eventually interacts with the cavern salt walls. This report provides a record of data acquired during a series of experiments designed to measure the leaching rate of salt walls in a labscale simulated cavern, as well as discussion of the data. These results should be of value to validate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models used to simulate leaching applications. Three experiments were run in the transparent 89-cm (35-inch) ID diameter vessel previously used for several related projects. Diagnostics included tracking the salt wall dissolution rate using ultrasonics, an underwater camera to view pre-installed markers, and pre- and post-test weighing and measuring salt blocks that comprise the walls. In addition, profiles of the local brine/water conductivity and temperature were acquired at three locations by traversing conductivity probes to map out the mixing of injected raw water with the surrounding brine. The data are generally as expected, with stronger dissolution when the salt walls were exposed to water with lower salt saturation, and overall reasonable wall shape profiles. However, there are significant block-to-block variations, even between neighboring salt blocks, so the averaged data are considered more useful for model validation. The remedial leach tests clearly showed that less mixing and longer exposure time to unsaturated water led to higher levels of salt wall dissolution. The data for all three tests showed a dividing line between upper and lower regions, roughly above and below the fresh water injection point, with higher salt wall dissolution in all cases, and stronger (for remedial leach cases) or weaker (for standard leach configuration) concentration gradients above the dividing line.

  16. Study on premixed combustion in cylindrical micro combustors: Transient flame behavior and wall heat flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Chou, S.K.; Huang, G.; Yang, W.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Li, Z.W. [SSLS, National University of Singapore, 5 Research Link, Singapore 117603 (Singapore)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The micro combustor is a key component of the micro thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system. Improving the wall temperature of the micro combustor is an effective way to elevate the system efficiency. An experimental study on the wall temperature and radiation heat flux of a series of cylindrical micro combustors (with a backward-facing step) was carried out. For the micro combustors with d = 2 mm, the regime of successful ignition (under the cold wall condition) was identified for different combustor lengths. Acoustic emission was detected for some cases and the emitted sound was recorded and analyzed. Under the steady-state condition, the effects of the combustor diameter (d), combustor length (L), flow velocity (u{sub 0}) and fuel-air equivalence ratio ({phi}) on the wall temperature distribution were investigated by measuring the detailed wall temperature profiles. In the case that the micro combustor is working as an emitter, the optimum efficiency was found at {phi} {approx} 0.8, independent of the combustor dimensions (d and L) and the flow velocity. Under the experimental conditions employed in the present study, the positions of the peak wall temperature were found to be about 8-11 mm and 4-6 mm from the step for the d = 3 mm and d = 2 mm micro combustors, respectively, which are 8-11 and 8-12 times of their respective step heights. This result suggests that the backward-facing step employed in the combustor design is effective in stabilizing the flame position. (author)

  17. Statistical analysis of the velocity and scalar fields in reacting turbulent wall-jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pouransari, Z; Johansson, A V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of local isotropy in a chemically reacting turbulent wall-jet flow is addressed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Different DNS databases with isothermal and exothermic reactions are examined. The chemical reaction and heat release effects on the turbulent velocity, passive scalar and reactive species fields are studied using their probability density functions (PDF) and higher order moments for velocities and scalar fields, as well as their gradients. With the aid of the anisotropy invariant maps for the Reynolds stress tensor the heat release effects on the anisotropy level at different wall-normal locations are evaluated and found to be most accentuated in the near-wall region. It is observed that the small-scale anisotropies are persistent both in the near-wall region and inside the jet flame. Two exothermic cases with different Damkohler number are examined and the comparison revealed that the Damkohler number effects are most dominant in the near-wall region, where the wall cooli...

  18. Statistical analysis of the velocity and scalar fields in reacting turbulent wall-jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Pouransari; L. Biferale; A. V. Johansson

    2015-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of local isotropy in a chemically reacting turbulent wall-jet flow is addressed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Different DNS databases with isothermal and exothermic reactions are examined. The chemical reaction and heat release effects on the turbulent velocity, passive scalar and reactive species fields are studied using their probability density functions (PDF) and higher order moments for velocities and scalar fields, as well as their gradients. With the aid of the anisotropy invariant maps for the Reynolds stress tensor the heat release effects on the anisotropy level at different wall-normal locations are evaluated and found to be most accentuated in the near-wall region. It is observed that the small-scale anisotropies are persistent both in the near-wall region and inside the jet flame. Two exothermic cases with different Damkohler number are examined and the comparison revealed that the Damkohler number effects are most dominant in the near-wall region, where the wall cooling effects are influential. In addition, with the aid of PDFs conditioned on the mixture fraction, the significance of the reactive scalar characteristics in the reaction zone is illustrated. We argue that the combined effects of strong intermittency and strong persistency of anisotropy at the small scales in the entire domain can affect mixing and ultimately the combustion characteristics of the reacting flow.

  19. Thermal Impact of Fasteners in High-Performance Wood-Framed Walls: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings are heavy consumers of energy, and residential building design is rapidly addressing topics to maximize energy conservation en route to net-zero energy consumption. Annual energy analysis of a building informs the choice among disparate energy measures, for cost, durability, occupant comfort, and whole-house energy use. Physics-based and empirical models of elements of a building are used in such analyses. High-performance wood-framed walls enable builders to construct homes that use much less than 40% of the energy consumed by similar homes built to minimum code. Modeling for these walls has considered physical features such as framing factor, insulation and framing properties, roughness and convective effects, and air leakage. The thermal effects of fasteners used to construct these walls have not been fully evaluated, even though their thermal conductivity is orders of magnitudes higher than that of other building materials. Drywall screws and siding nails are considered in this finite element thermal conductivity analysis of wall sections that represent wood-framed walls that are often used in high-performance homes. Nails and screws reduce even the best walls' insulating performance by approximately 3% and become increasingly significant as the framing factor increases.

  20. The significance of bolts in the thermal performance of curtain-wall frames for glazed facades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, B.; Finlayson, E.; Yazdanian, M.; Arasteh, D.K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Curtain walls are assemblies of glazings and metal frames that commonly form the exterior glass facades of commercial buildings. Evaluating the thermal performance of the bolts that hold curtain wall glazings in place is necessary to accurately rate the overall thermal performance of curtain walls. Using laboratory tests and computer simulations, the authors assessed the thermal performance of several different configurations of bolts and glazings. Curtain-wall samples were tested at an infrared thermography laboratory. Experimental results were compared to two-dimensional simulations approximating the thermal effect of the bolts using the parallel path and the isothermal planes calculation methods. It is concluded that stainless steel bolts minimally affect curtain-wall thermal performance ({approximately}18%) when spaced at least 230 mm apart, which is the industry standard. Performance is increasingly compromised when there is less than 230 mm between bolts or when steel bolts are used. The authors also show that the isothermal planes method of approximating curtain wall thermal performance can be used with two-dimensional heat transfer software typical of that used in the window industry to give conservative results for the thermal bridging effect caused by bolts.