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1

1-Dimensional simulation of thermal annealing in a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel wall section  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to provide experimental heat transfer boundary condition and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section thermal response data that can be used to benchmark computer codes that simulate thermal annealing of RPVS. This specific protect was designed to provide the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) with experimental data that could be used to support the development of a thermal annealing model. A secondary benefit is to provide additional experimental data (e.g., thermal response of concrete reactor cavity wall) that could be of use in an annealing demonstration project. The setup comprised a heater assembly, a 1.2 in {times} 1.2 m {times} 17.1 cm thick [4 ft {times} 4 ft {times} 6.75 in] section of an RPV (A533B ferritic steel with stainless steel cladding), a mockup of the {open_quotes}mirror{close_quotes} insulation between the RPV and the concrete reactor cavity wall, and a 25.4 cm [10 in] thick concrete wall, 2.1 in {times} 2.1 in [10 ft {times} 10 ft] square. Experiments were performed at temperature heat-up/cooldown rates of 7, 14, and 28{degrees}C/hr [12.5, 25, and 50{degrees}F/hr] as measured on the heated face. A peak temperature of 454{degrees}C [850{degrees}F] was maintained on the heated face until the concrete wall temperature reached equilibrium. Results are most representative of those RPV locations where the heat transfer would be 1-dimensional. Temperature was measured at multiple locations on the heated and unheated faces of the RPV section and the concrete wall. Incident heat flux was measured on the heated face, and absorbed heat flux estimates were generated from temperature measurements and an inverse heat conduction code. Through-wall temperature differences, concrete wall temperature response, heat flux absorbed into the RPV surface and incident on the surface are presented. All of these data are useful to modelers developing codes to simulate RPV annealing.

Nakos, J.T.; Rosinski, S.T.; Acton, R.U.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

High pressure storage vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a composite pressure vessel with a liner having a polar boss and a blind boss a shell is formed around the liner via one or more filament wrappings continuously disposed around at least a substantial portion of the liner assembly combined the liner and filament wrapping have a support profile. To reduce susceptible to rupture a locally disposed filament fiber is added.

Liu, Qiang

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

3

Pressure Vessel Burst Program: Automated hazard analysis for pressure vessels  

SciTech Connect

The design, development, and use of a Windows based software tool, PVHAZARD, for pressure vessel hazard analysis is presented. The program draws on previous efforts in pressure vessel research and results of a Pressure Vessel Burst Test Study. Prior papers on the Pressure Vessel Burst Test Study have been presented to the ASME, AIAA, JANNAF, NASA Pressure Systems Seminar, and to a DOD Explosives Safety Board subcommittee meeting. Development and validation is described for simplified blast (overpressure/impulse) and fragment (velocity and travel distance) hazard models. The use of PVHAZARD in making structural damage and personnel injury estimates is discussed. Efforts in-progress are reviewed including the addition of two-dimensional and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) hydrodynamic code analyses to supplement the simplified models, and the ability to assess barrier designs for protection from fragmentation.

Langley, D.R. [Aerospace Corp., Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States); Chrostowski, J.D. [ACTA Inc., Torrance, CA (United States); Goldstein, S. [Aerospace Corp., El Segundo, CA (United States); Cain, M. [General Physics Corp., Titusville, FL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Particle Sizing using Passive Ultrasonic Measurement of Vessel Wall Vibrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particle Sizing using Passive Ultrasonic Measurement of Vessel Wall Vibrations Gillian Carson for particle sizing using an ultrasonic transducer to measure vessel wall vibrations and 1 #12;considers in a stirred vessel, its subse- quent impact with the vessel wall, and the resulting flexural vibrations

Mottram, Nigel

5

International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Tsinghua University in Beijing co-hosted the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 2729, 2010 in Beijing, China. High pressure...

6

Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

Mitlitsky, Fred (1125 Canton Ave., Livermore, CA 94550); Myers, Blake (4650 Almond Cir., Livermore, CA 94550); Magnotta, Frank (1206 Bacon Way, Lafayette, CA 94549)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lightweight, low permeability liner is described for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using tori spherical or near tori spherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film sealed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life. 19 figs.

Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Magnotta, F.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

8

International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings Proceedings from the forum, which took...

9

Boron determinations in pressure vessel steels  

SciTech Connect

Several studies have suggested that low-energy neutrons contribute to reactor pressure vessel (PV) embrittlement through interactions with boron impurities in the steel. Until now, the available information on boron contents in pressure vessel steels has been based on nominal concentrations or estimates provided by the materials manufacturers. To help resolve the question of boron contribution to PV steel embrittlement, samples of 38 different PV steels were analyzed by high-sensitivity gas mass spectrometry for their helium and boron contents. The boron contents were determined by measuring the increase in helium content in each material as a result of additional thermal neutron exposure. The results of these analyses showed natural boron contents that ranged from 0.23 to 5.11 wt. ppm in the various alloys.

Oliver, B.M. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.; McElroy, W.N. [Consultants and Technology Services, Richland, WA (United States); Kellogg, L.S. [Battelle-Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Farrar, H. IV

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Forum Agenda: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Agenda for the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum held Sept. 27-29, 2010, in Beijing, China

11

Design and dimensioning of pressure vessel for a marine substation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis presents the mechanical design and dimensioning of a pressure vessel, which is to be used as housing for a marine substation in (more)

Eriksson, Lars

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

Johnson, R.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Engineering Technology; Lipinski, R.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Reactor Pressure Vessel Head Packaging & Disposal  

SciTech Connect

Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Head replacements have come to the forefront due to erosion/corrosion and wastage problems resulting from the susceptibility of the RPV Head alloy steel material to water/boric acid corrosion from reactor coolant leakage through the various RPV Head penetrations. A case in point is the recent Davis-Besse RPV Head project, where detailed inspections in early 2002 revealed significant wastage of head material adjacent to one of the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) nozzles. In lieu of making ASME weld repairs to the damaged head, Davis-Besse made the decision to replace the RPV Head. The decision was made on the basis that the required weld repair would be too extensive and almost impractical. This paper presents the packaging, transport, and disposal considerations for the damaged Davis-Besse RPV Head. It addresses the requirements necessary to meet Davis Besse needs, as well as the regulatory criteria, for shipping and burial of the head. It focuses on the radiological characterization, shipping/disposal package design, site preparation and packaging, and the transportation and emergency response plans that were developed for the Davis-Besse RPV Head project.

Wheeler, D. M.; Posivak, E.; Freitag, A.; Geddes, B.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

14

Tokamak reactor first wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Neutron shielding panels for reactor pressure vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a nuclear reactor neutron panels varying in thickness in the circumferential direction are disposed at spaced circumferential locations around the reactor core so that the greatest radial thickness is at the point of highest fluence with lesser thicknesses at adjacent locations where the fluence level is lower. The neutron panels are disposed between the core barrel and the interior of the reactor vessel to maintain radiation exposure to the vessel within acceptable limits.

Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

16

Experiment Hazard Class 5.3 High Pressure Vessels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 High Pressure Vessels 3 High Pressure Vessels Applicability This hazard classification applies to working with pressure vessels and systems. Other hazard classifications and associated controls may apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls are catergorized as medium risk experiments. Experiments involving new equipment, processes or materials, or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk experiments. Hazard Control Plan Verification Statements Engineered Controls - The establishment of applicable controls in accordance with the (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) ASME Boiler and Pressure Code, ASME B.31 Piping Code and applicable federal, state, and local codes. Verify vessel is stampled with ASME Code Symbol or allowable

17

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from

18

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations, which govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants, require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including

19

Forum Agenda: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FORUM AGENDA FORUM AGENDA U.S. Department of Energy and Tsinghua University International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum Tsinghua University Beijing, PRC September 27 - 29, 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Tsinghua University in Beijing co-hosted the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 - 29, 2010 in Beijing, China. High pressure vessel experts gathered to share lessons learned from CNG and hydrogen vehicle deployments, and to identify R&D needs to aid the global harmonization of regulations, codes and standards to enable the successful deployment of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Forum Objectives: * Address and share data and information on specific technical topics discussed at the workshop in

20

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort that works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operation of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Beryllium pressure vessels for creep tests in magnetic fusion energy  

SciTech Connect

Beryllium has interesting applications in magnetic fusion experimental machines and future power-producing fusion reactors. Chief among the properties of beryllium that make these applications possible is its ability to act as a neutron multiplier, thereby increasing the tritium breeding ability of energy conversion blankets. Another property, the behavior of beryllium in a 14-MeV neutron environment, has not been fully investigated, nor has the creep behavior of beryllium been studied in an energetic neutron flux at thermodynamically interesting temperatures. This small beryllium pressure vessel could be charged with gas to test pressures around 3, 000 psi to produce stress in the metal of 15,000 to 20,000 psi. Such stress levels are typical of those that might be reached in fusion blanket applications of beryllium. After contacting R. Powell at HEDL about including some of the pressure vessels in future test programs, we sent one sample pressure vessel with a pressurizing tube attached (Fig. 1) for burst tests so the quality of the diffusion bond joints could be evaluated. The gas used was helium. Unfortunately, budget restrictions did not permit us to proceed in the creep test program. The purpose of this engineering note is to document the lessons learned to date, including photographs of the test pressure vessel that show the tooling necessary to satisfactorily produce the diffusion bonds. This document can serve as a starting point for those engineers who resume this task when funds become available.

Neef, W.S.

1990-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

22

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations that govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including pressurized thermal shock (PTS) in pressurized water reactors (PWR). In the irradiated condition, however, the fracture toughness of the RPV may be severely

23

Field measurement of lateral earth pressures on retaining walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The measured pressures are compared with the computed Coulomb and Rankine pressures for the active case. The measured pressures on the cantilever wall are in close agreement with the theoretical pressures on the upper half of the wall, but the measured... Pressure Variance with Time and Temperature. INTRODUCTION Present Status of the Question -- The latera1 earth pressure theories developed by Coulomb in 1776 and Rankine in 1S57 are known as the classical earth pressure theories (5)*. The basic equation...

Riggins, Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from 40y to 80y implies a doubling of the neutron exposure for the RPV. Thus,

25

Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database  

SciTech Connect

Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Lightweight pressure vessels and unitized regenerative fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

Energy storage systems have been designed using lightweight pressure vessels with unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs). The vessels provide a means of storing reactant gases required for URFCs; they use lightweight bladder liners that act as inflatable mandrels for composite overwrap and provide a permeation barrier. URFC systems have been designed for zero emission vehicles (ZEVs); they are cost competitive with primary FC powered vehicles that operate on H/air with capacitors or batteries for power peaking and regenerative braking. URFCs are capable of regenerative braking via electrolysis and power peaking using low volume/low pressure accumulated oxygen for supercharging the power stack. URFC ZEVs can be safely and rapidly (<5 min.) refueled using home electrolysis units. Reversible operation of cell membrane catalyst is feasible without significant degradation. Such systems would have a rechargeable specific energy > 400 Wh/kg.

Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Weisberg, A.H.

1996-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

27

RIS-M-2186 INTERPRETATIOM OF STRAIN HBASUREMEMTS ON NUCLEAR PRESSURE VESSELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure loadings of the vessel seen to be the reason in other regions. INIS-descriptors; BUR TYPE REACTORS

28

Fast neutron fluxes in pressure vessels using Monte Carlo methods  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of calculating the fast neutron flux in the pressure vessel of a pressurized water reactor by Monte Carlo methods. Neutron reactions reduce the ductility of the steel and thus limit the useful life of this important reactor component. This work was performed for Virginia Power (VEPCO). VIM is a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code which provides a versatile geometrical capability and a neutron physics data base closely representing the EDNF/B-IV data from which it was derived.

Edlund, M.C.; Thomas, J.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

GRR/Section 6-HI-e - Boiler Pressure Vessel Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-HI-e - Boiler Pressure Vessel Permit GRR/Section 6-HI-e - Boiler Pressure Vessel Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-HI-e - Boiler Pressure Vessel Permit 06HIGBoilerPressureVesselPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Health Division Regulations & Policies Boiler and Pressure Vessel Regulations Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06HIGBoilerPressureVesselPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Boiler/Pressure Vessel Permit

30

Field measurements of earth pressure on a cantilever retaining wall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The measurements were made before and after backfilling for a duration of 385 days. The effects of a clay surcharge were studied. The total thrust of the measured lateral earth pressures was com- pared to total thrust determined from a Culmann graphical... to bearing pressures calculated by conventional methods. The measured bearing pressures compared reasonably well with the calculated pressures. Wall movement data indicated that the wall tilted or rotated toward the backfill during sand backfilling...

Schulze, Larry Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessel Repair Welds  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of reactor pressure vessels. This work indicates that the large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the repair ends. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using high sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing, validation by other nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, and complemented by destructive testing.

Schuster, George J.; Doctor, Steven R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Gamma ray-induced embrittlement of pressure vessel alloys  

SciTech Connect

High-energy gamma rays emitted from the core of a nuclear reactor produce displacement damage in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The contribution of gamma damage to RPV embrittlement has in the past been largely ignored. However, in certain reactor designs the gamma flux at the RPV is sufficiently large that its contribution to displacement damage can be substantial. For example, gamma rays have been implicated in the accelerated RPV embrittlement observed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In the present study, mechanical property changes induced by 10-MeV electron irradiation of a model Fe alloy and an RPV alloy of interest to the HFIR were examined. Mini-tensile specimens were irradiated with high-energy electrons to reproduce damage characteristic of the Compton recoil-electrons induced by gamma bombardment. Substantial increases in yield and ultimate stress were observed in the alloys after irradiation to doses up to 5.3x10{sup {minus}3} dpa at temperatures ({approximately}50{degrees}C) characteristic of the HFIR pressure vessel. These measured increases were similar to those previously obtained following neutron irradiation, despite the highly disparate nature of the damage generated during electron and neutron irradiation.

Alexander, D.E.; Rehn, L.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Farrell, K.; Stoller, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

ASTM Standards for Reactor Dosimetry and Pressure Vessel Surveillance  

SciTech Connect

The ASTM standards provide guidance and instruction on how to field and interpret reactor dosimetry. They provide a roadmap towards understanding the current ''state-of-the-art'' in reactor dosimetry, as reflected by the technical community. The consensus basis to the ASTM standards assures the user of an unbiased presentation of technical procedures and interpretations of the measurements. Some insight into the types of standards and the way in which they are organized can assist one in using them in an expeditious manner. Two example are presented to help orient new users to the breadth and interrelationship between the ASTM nuclear metrology standards. One example involves the testing of a new ''widget'' to verify the radiation hardness. The second example involves quantifying the radiation damage at a pressure vessel critical weld location through surveillance dosimetry and calculation.

GRIFFIN, PATRICK J.

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

34

High-pressure Storage Vessels for Hydrogen, Natural Gas and Hydrogen-Natural Gas Blends  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 29, 2010, in Beijing, China.

35

High-pressure Storage Vessels for Hydrogen, Natural Gas andHydrogen...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Gas and Blends - Materials Testing and Design Requirements for Hydrogen Components and Tanks International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings Hydrogen...

36

Technical Forum Participants at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Photo of the Technical Forum Participants at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum, which was held on September 2729, 2010, in Beijing, China.

37

Creep of A508/533 Pressure Vessel Steel  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT Evaluation of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels has been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design studies. These design studies have generally focused on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Initially, three candidate materials were identified by this process: conventional light water reactor (LWR) RPV steels A508 and A533, 2Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and Grade 91 steel. The low strength of 2Cr-1Mo at elevated temperature has eliminated this steel from serious consideration as the VHTR RPV candidate material. Discussions with the very few vendors that can potentially produce large forgings for nuclear pressure vessels indicate a strong preference for conventional LWR steels. This preference is based in part on extensive experience with forging these steels for nuclear components. It is also based on the inability to cast large ingots of the Grade 91 steel due to segregation during ingot solidification, thus restricting the possible mass of forging components and increasing the amount of welding required for completion of the RPV. Grade 91 steel is also prone to weld cracking and must be post-weld heat treated to ensure adequate high-temperature strength. There are also questions about the ability to produce, and very importantly, verify the through thickness properties of thick sections of Grade 91 material. The availability of large components, ease of fabrication, and nuclear service experience with the A508 and A533 steels strongly favor their use in the RPV for the VHTR. Lowering the gas outlet temperature for the VHTR to 750C from 950 to 1000C, proposed in early concept studies, further strengthens the justification for this material selection. This steel is allowed in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear service up to 371C (700F); certain excursions above that temperature are allowed by Code Case N-499-2 (now incorporated as an appendix to Section III Division 5 of the Code). This Code Case was developed with a rather sparse data set and focused primarily on rolled plate material (A533 specification). Confirmatory tests of creep behavior of both A508 and A533 are described here that are designed to extend the database in order to build higher confidence in ensuring the structural integrity of the VHTR RPV during off-normal conditions. A number of creep-rupture tests were carried out at temperatures above the 371C (700F) Code limit; longer term tests designed to evaluate minimum creep behavior are ongoing. A limited amount of rupture testing was also carried out on welded material. All of the rupture data from the current experiments is compared to historical values from the testing carried out to develop Code Case N-499-2. It is shown that the A508/533 basemetal tested here fits well with the rupture behavior reported from the historical testing. The presence of weldments significantly reduces the time to rupture. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize and record the experimental results in a single document.

Richard Wright

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Protective interior wall and attach8ing means for a fusion reactor vacuum vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of connected plates mounted on the inside wall of the vacuum vessel of a magnetic confinement reactor in order to provide a protective surface for energy deposition inside the vessel. All fasteners are concealed and protected beneath the plates, while the plates themselves share common mounting points. The entire array is installed with torqued nuts on threaded studs; provision also exists for thermal expansion by mounting each plate with two of its four mounts captured in an oversize grooved spool. A spool-washer mounting hardware allows one edge of a protective plate to be torqued while the other side remains loose, by simply inverting the spool-washer hardware.

Phelps, Richard D. (Greeley, CO); Upham, Gerald A. (Valley Center, CA); Anderson, Paul M. (San Diego, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES  

SciTech Connect

In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP) Conferences. This work is also relevant to the ongoing efforts of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, Section XI, Working Group on Operating Plant Criteria (WGOPC) efforts to incorporate nozzle fracture mechanics solutions into a revision to ASME B&PV Code, Section XI, Nonmandatory Appendix G.

Walter, Matthew [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.; Yin, Shengjun [ORNL; Stevens, Gary [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Sommerville, Daniel [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.; Palm, Nathan [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA; Heinecke, Carol [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

An investigation of temperature measurement methods in nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel annealing  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to provide an assessment of several methods by which the temperature of a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel (RPV) could be measured during an annealing process. This project was a coordinated effort between DOE`s Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology; DOE`s Light Water Reactor Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories; and the Electric Power Research Institute`s Non- Destructive Evaluation Center. Ball- thermocouple probes similar to those described in NUREG/CR-5760, spring-loaded, metal- sheathed thermocouple probes, and 1778 air- suspended thermocouples were investigated in experiments that heated a section of an RPV wall to simulate a thermal annealing treatment. A parametric study of ball material, emissivity, thermal conductivity, and thermocouple function locations was conducted. Also investigated was a sheathed thermocouple failure mode known as shunting (electrical breakdown of insulation separating the thermocouple wires). Large errors were found between the temperature as measured by the probes and the true RPV wall temperature during heat-up and cool-down. At the annealing soak temperature, in this case 454{degrees}C [850`F], all sensors measured the same temperature within about {plus_minus}5% (23.6{degrees}C [42.5{degrees}F]). Because of these errors, actual RPV wall heating and cooling rates differed from those prescribed (by up to 29%). Shunting does not appear to be a problem under these conditions. The large temperature measurement errors led to the development of a thermal model that predicts the RPV wall temperature from the temperature of a ball- probe. Comparisons between the model and the experimental data for ball-probes indicate that the model could be a useful tool in predicting the actual RPV temperature based on the indicated ball- probe temperature. The model does not predict the temperature as well for the spring-loaded and air suspended probes.

Acton, R.U.; Gill, W.; Sais, D.J.; Schulze, D.H.; Nakos, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

U.S. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities: 2010 International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 2729, 2010, in Beijing, China.

42

Lightweight cryogenic-compatible pressure vessels for vehicular...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

insulator surrounding the inner pressure container in the evacuated space to inhibit heat transfer. Additionally, vacuum loss from fuel permeation is substantially inhibited...

43

Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR (pressurized-water-reactor) plants  

SciTech Connect

Recent pressure-vessel surveillance data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) indicate an embrittlement fluence-rate effect that is applicable to the evaluation of the integrity of light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel supports. A preliminary evaluation using the HFIR data indicated increases in the nil ductility transition temperature at 32 effective full-power years (EFPY) of 100 to 130/degree/C for pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) vessel supports located in the cavity at midheight of the core. This result indicated a potential problem with regard to life expectancy. However, an accurate assessment required a detailed, specific-plant, fracture-mechanics analysis. After a survey and cursory evaluation of all LWR plants, two PWR plants that appeared to have a potential problem were selected. Results of the analyses indicate minimum critical flaw sizes small enough to be of concern before 32 EFPY. 24 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Forum Agenda: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

workshop in Washington, D.C. including testing and certification of Type 3 and Type 4 tanks, pressure relief device testing and validation, tank inspection, and end-of-life...

45

Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

46

New retaining wall design criteria based on lateral earth pressure measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. , 72 1X LIST OF FIGURES Figures Page Condition of Active Rankine State, Cantilever Wall . . 3 Cross Section of Cantilever Wall Location of Earth Pressure Cells, Cantilever Wall Movement Measurement Scheme, Cantilever Wall. 12 Measured Lateral... INTRODUCTION Earth Pressure Theories -- The principles of limiting equilibrium mechanics are used to desiqn earth retaining structures. In this approach the pressures that would exist at a failure condition are predicted from Coulomb or Rankine (13...

Wright, William Vincent

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fast neutron fluence of yonggwang nuclear unit 1 reactor pressure vessel  

SciTech Connect

The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 50, Appendix H, requires that the neutron dosimetry be present to monitor the reactor vessel throughout plant life. The Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry System has been installed for Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 1 after complete withdrawal of all six in-vessel surveillance capsules. This system has been installed in the reactor cavity annulus in order to measure the fast neutron spectrum coming out through the reactor pressure vessel. Cycle specific neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain the energy dependent neutron flux throughout the reactor geometry including dosimetry positions. Comparisons between calculations and measurements were performed for the reaction rates of each dosimetry sensors and results show good agreements. (authors)

Yoo, C.; Km, B.; Chang, K.; Leeand, S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 150 Dukjin-dong, Yuseung-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J. [Chungnam National Univ., 220 Gung-dong, Yuseung-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Proceedings of PVP2007 2007 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of PVP2007 2007 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Conference July 22-26, 2007 either to fatigue or environmentally-assisted cracking exacerbated by residual stresses introduced during can have significant effects on the susceptibility of a material to degradation mechanisms

Cambridge, University of

49

Structural integrity assessment of type 201LN stainless steel cryogenic pressure vessels  

SciTech Connect

The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Committee approved the Code Case 2123 in 1992 which allows the use of Type 201LN stainless steel in the construction of ASME Section VIII, Division 1 and Division 2 pressure vessels for -320{degrees}F applications. Type 201LN stainless steel is a nitrogen strengthened modified version of ASTM A240, Type 201 stainless steel with a restricted chemistry. The Code allowable design stresses for Type 201LN for Division 1 vessels are approximately 27% higher than Type 304 stainless steel and equal to that of the 5 Ni and 9 Ni steels. This paper discusses the important features of the Code Case 2123 and the structural integrity assessment of Type 201LN stainless steel cryogenic vessels. Tensile, Charpy-V-notch and fracture properties have been obtained on several heats of this steel including weldments. A linear-elastic fracture mechanics analysis has been conducted to assess the expected fracture mode and the fracture-critical crack sizes. The results have been compared with Type 304 stainless steel, 5 Ni and 9 Ni steel vessels.

Rana, M.D.; Zawierucha, R. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

An evaluation of life extension of the HFIR pressure vessel. Supplement 1  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary analyses were performed in 1994 to determine the remaining useful life of the HFIR pressure vessel. The estimated total permissible life was {approximately} 50 EFPY (100 MW). More recently, the analyses have been updated, including a more precise treatment of uncertainties in the calculation of the hydrostatic-proof-test conditions and also including the contribution of gammas to the radiation-induced reduction in fracture toughness. These and other refinements had essentially no effect on the predicted useful life of the vessel or on the specified hydrostatic proof-test conditions.

Cheverton, R.D.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A methodology for determining fabrication flaws in a reactor pressure vessel  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a program with the major objective of estimating the rate of occurrence of fabrication flaws in US light-water reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). In this study, RPV mate4rial was examined using the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique for Ultrasonic Testing (SAFT-UT) to detect and characterize flaws created during fabrication. The inspection data obtained in this program has been analyzed to address the rates of flaw occurrence.

Schuster, G.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Simonen, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

File:06HIGBoilerPressureVesselPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HIGBoilerPressureVesselPermit.pdf HIGBoilerPressureVesselPermit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:06HIGBoilerPressureVesselPermit.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 47 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:08, 24 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 09:08, 24 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (47 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 12:32, 23 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:32, 23 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (47 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 16:30, 24 July 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 16:30, 24 July 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (44 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs)

53

Laboratory feasibility study of fusion vessel inner wall chemical analysis by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is nowadays a well established tool for qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative analyses of surfaces, with micro-destructive characteristics and capabilities for stratigraphy. LIBS is an appealing technique compared with many other types of elemental analysis thanks to the set up versatility facilitating non-invasive and remote analyses, as well as suitability to diagnostics in harsh environments. In this work, LIBS capabilities were used for the determination of the atomic composition of multilayered samples simulating the tiles of plasma facing components in the next generation fusion machines such as ITER. A new experimental setup was designed and realized in order to optimize the characteristics of an LIBS system working at low pressure and remotely, as it should be for an in situ system to be applied in monitoring the erosion and redeposition phenomena occurring on the inner walls of a fusion device. The effects of time delay and laser fluence on LIBS sensitivity at reduced pressure were examined, looking for operational conditions suitable to analytical applications. The quantitative analysis of some atomic species in the superficial layer has been carried out using a Calibration Free (CF) approach in the time window where Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) was assumed for an LIBS analysis.

Salvatore Almaviva; Luisa Caneve; Francesco Colao; Roberta Fantoni; Giorgio Maddaluno

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Elastic properties and pressure-induced phase transitions of single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elastic properties and pressure-induced phase transitions of single-walled carbon nanotubes S-walled carbon nanotubes under hydrostatic pressure by first-princi- ples calculations. The circular tubes of carbon nanotubes has been studied with a variety of experimental techniques. Most of these studies seemed

Nabben, Reinhard

55

Field measurements of lateral earth pressures on a pre-cast panel retaining wall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Wall Description Instrumentation Installation of Pressure Cells and Transducers Backfilling Procedure Properties of the Backfill Material Placement of Clay Backfill DATA COLLECTION Earth Pressure Cell Measurements Force Transducer... Analysis of Backfill Material 2 Lateral Earth Pressures Measured by Pressure Cells (Psi) . . . . . . . . . . . - . ~ . ~ 3 Maximum Deviation From Zero Gage Reading and Temperature Relationship. . . . 4 Forces Measured by Force Transducers (Kips) 5...

Prescott, David Monroe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution In Repairs to Reactor Pressure Vessel and Piping Welds  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a generalized fabrication flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in U.S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This report describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. The relevance of construction records is established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. An analysis of these records shows there was a significant change in repair frequency over the years when these components were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using optimized-access, high-sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing. Flaw characterizations are then validated by other nondestructive evaluation techniques and complemented by destructive testing.

GJ Schuster, FA Simonen, SR Doctor

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Structural integrity assessment of carbon and low-alloy steel pressure vessels using a simplified fracture mechanics procedure  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a simplified fracture analysis procedure which was developed by Pellini to quantify fracture critical-crack sizes and crack-arrest temperatures of carbon and low-alloy steel pressure vessels. Fracture analysis diagrams have been developed using the simplified analysis procedure for various grades of carbon and low-alloy steels used in the construction of ASME, Section VIII, Division 1 pressure vessels. Structural integrity assessments have been conducted from the analysis diagrams.

Rana, M.D. (Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Protective interior wall and attaching means for a fusion reactor vacuum vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The wall basically consists of an array of small rectangular plates attached to the existing walls with threaded fasteners. The protective wall effectively conceals and protects all mounting hardware beneath the plate array, while providing a substantial surface area that will absorb plasma energy.

Phelps, R.D.; Upham, G.A.; Anderson, P.M.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Integrity management of a HIC-damaged pipeline and refinery pressure vessel through hydrogen permeation measurements  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen permeation measurements were used in the successful operation of a sour gas pipeline subsequent to a hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) failure in September 1992. Two joints of HIC-resistant pipe were used to repair the failed section and adjacent cut-outs. The pipeline has been operated for five years with no further instances of HIC failure. Hydrogen permeation monitoring was chosen as an integrity management tool because no techniques are currently available to inspect for HIC damage in a pipeline this size. Self-powered electrochemical devices installed on the pipeline were employed to monitor and control the effectiveness of a batch inhibition program in maintaining diffusing hydrogen atom concentrations below the laboratory-measured threshold for initiation of HIC damage. Permeation monitoring of a HIC-damaged refinery pressure vessel indicated very high hydrogen atom flux, despite attempts to inhibit corrosion with ammonium polysulfide injection. In this instance it was decided that replacement of the vessel was necessary.

Hay, M.G.; Rider, D.W. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Pressure vessels and piping codes and standards: Volume 2. PVP-Volume 339  

SciTech Connect

The role of Codes and Standards for pressure vessels and piping has increased significantly over the past decade. More and more, developments in Codes and Standards are accommodating the increasing sophistication of analysis methods, the need to address post-construction and operating plant issues, and the efficiencies that may be gained by focusing codes and standards on the areas that present the greatest risk. Codes and Standards for new construction also have had to accommodate greater challenges and more extreme environments imposed by more escalating requirements on piping and pressure vessel design and fabrication. This volume has focused on these challenges faced by Codes and Standards development. The topics in this volume include: (1) International Code Developments; (2) Seismic Developments in Codes and Standards; (3) Fabrication, Repairs, and Installation Issues Relating to Codes and Standards; (4) Application of Risk Based Criteria to In-Service Inspections; (5) Risk Based Codes and Standards; (6) The Code--Then and Now; (7) Reactor Water Fatigue: Fitness for Service; and (8) Two ASME Pressure Technology Code Issues: Post-Construction Codes and Metrication. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers in this volume.

Esselman, T.C. [ed.] [Altran Corp., Boston, MA (United States); Balkey, K. [ed.] [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Chao, K.K.N. [ed.] [Consumers Power Co., Jackson, MI (United States); Gosselin, S. [ed.] [Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC (United States); Hollinger, G. [ed.] [Babcock and Wilcox, Barberton, OH (United States); Lubin, B.T. [ed.] [ABB Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States); Mohktarain, K. [ed.] [CB and I Technical Services, Plainfield, IL (United States); O`Donnell, W. [ed.] [O`Donnell Consulting Engineers, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rao, K.R. [ed.] [Entergy Operations, Inc, Jackson, MI (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

BWR In-Core Monitor Housing Replacement Under Dry Condition of Reactor Pressure Vessel  

SciTech Connect

A new method of In-Core Monitor Housing replacement has been successfully applied to Tokai Unit 2 (BWR with 1100 MWe) in April of 2001. It was designed to replace a housing under dry condition of reactor pressure vessel (RPV): this enabled the elimination of water filled-up and drained processes during the replacement procedure resulting in the reduction of implementation schedule. To realize the dry condition, the radiation shields were placed in the RPV and the hollow guide pipe (GP) was adopted to transfer the apparatuses from the top to the bottom work area. (authors)

Tatsuo Ishida; Shoji Yamamoto; Fujitoshi Eguchi [Japan Atomic Power Company (Japan); Motomasa Fuse; Kouichi Kurosawa; Sadato Shimizu; Minoru Masuda [Hitachi Ltd. (Japan); Shinya Fujii; Junji Tanaka [General Electric International Inc. (Japan); Jacobson, Bryce A. [General Electric Company (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Seismic Earth Pressure Development in Sheet Pile Retaining Walls: A Numerical Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of retaining walls requires the complete knowledge of the earth pressure distribution behind the wall. Due to the complex soil-structure effect, the estimation of earth pressure is not an easy task; even in the static case. The problem becomes even more complex for the dynamic (i.e., seismic) analysis and design of retaining walls. Several earth pressure models have been developed over the years to integrate the dynamic earth pressure with the static earth pressure and to improve the design of retaining wall in seismic regions. Among all the models, MononobeOkabe (M-O) method is commonly used to estimate the magnitude of seismic earth pressures in retaining walls and is adopted in design practices around the world (e.g., EuroCode and Australian Standards). However, the M-O method has several drawbacks and does not provide reliable estimate of the earth pressure in many instances. This study investigates the accuracy of the M-O method to predict the dynamic earth pressure in sheet pile wall. A 2D pl...

Rajeev, P; Sivakugan, N

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Measurement of wall pressure fluctuations in the presence of vibrations induced by a turbulent flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A systematic study of the methods of measuring wall pressure fluctuations against a background of intense vibrations is carried out. The method of separating the turbulent signal from noise on the basis of mon...

E. B. Kudashev

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Wall-pressure and PIV analysis for microbubble drag reduction investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

friction reductions were observed when the microbubbles were injected. Several measurements of wall-pressure were taken at various Reynolds numbers that ranged from 300 up to 6154. No significant drag reduction was observed for flows in the laminar range...

Dominguez Ontiveros, Elvis Efren

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Experimental measurement and analysis of wall pressure distribution for a 50% eccentric whirling annular seal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, whirl ratios ranging between ? 0.5 were tested. From the collected data a detailed analysis of wall pressures along the seal surface is performed following the technique described by Winslow (1994) and Robic (1999)....

Suryanarayanan, Arun

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Raman spectroscopy on single and multi-walled nanotubes under high pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dependence of the high-energy Raman modes in single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes was measuredRaman spectroscopy on single and multi-walled nanotubes under high pressure C. Thomsen, S. Reich, H properties of carbon nanotubes have become of scienti c interest since it was recognized that the low atomic

Nabben, Reinhard

67

Manufacturing Cost Analysis of Novel Steel/Concrete Composite Vessel for Stationary Storage of High-Pressure Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

A novel, low-cost, high-pressure, steel/concrete composite vessel (SCCV) technology for stationary storage of compressed gaseous hydrogen (CGH2) is currently under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) sponsored by DOE s Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program. The SCCV technology uses commodity materials including structural steels and concretes for achieving cost, durability and safety requirements. In particular, the hydrogen embrittlement of high-strength low-alloy steels, a major safety and durability issue for current industry-standard pressure vessel technology, is mitigated through the use of a unique layered steel shell structure. This report presents the cost analysis results of the novel SCCV technology. A high-fidelity cost analysis tool is developed, based on a detailed, bottom-up approach which takes into account the material and labor costs involved in each of the vessel manufacturing steps. A thorough cost study is performed to understand the SCCV cost as a function of the key vessel design parameters, including hydrogen pressure, vessel dimensions, and load-carrying ratio. The major conclusions include: The SCCV technology can meet the technical/cost targets set forth by DOE s FCT Program for FY2015 and FY2020 for all three pressure levels (i.e., 160, 430 and 860 bar) relevant to the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure. Further vessel cost reduction can benefit from the development of advanced vessel fabrication technologies such as the highly automated friction stir welding (FSW). The ORNL-patented multi-layer, multi-pass FSW can not only reduce the amount of labor needed for assembling and welding the layered steel vessel, but also make it possible to use even higher strength steels for further cost reductions and improvement of vessel structural integrity. It is noted the cost analysis results demonstrate the significant cost advantage attainable by the SCCV technology for different pressure levels when compared to the industry-standard pressure vessel technology. The real-world performance data of SCCV under actual operating conditions is imperative for this new technology to be adopted by the hydrogen industry for stationary storage of CGH2. Therefore, the key technology development effort in FY13 and subsequent years will be focused on the fabrication and testing of SCCV mock-ups. The static loading and fatigue data will be generated in rigorous testing of these mock-ups. Successful tests are crucial to enabling the near-term impact of the developed storage technology on the CGH2 storage market, a critical component of the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure. In particular, the SCCV has high potential for widespread deployment in hydrogen fueling stations.

Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Impinging radial and inline jets: A comparison with regard to heat transfer, wall pressure distribution, and pressure loss  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat transfer and wall pressure distribution on a plane surface generated by single impinging inline or radial jets are studied experimentally. The pressure drop of inline and radial jet nozzles is measured. The effects of flow exit angle, nozzle to surface distance, and exit velocity on heat transfer, wall pressure distribution, and pressure drop are discussed. Heat transfer results show that radial jets with flow exit angles of +45+60 generate up to 60% higher local and up to 50% higher global Nusselt numbers compared with inline jets of the same volumetric flow rate and exit velocity. Measured wall pressure distributions are presented in terms of pressure coefficients. The total force exerted by radial jets on a plane surface is lower than that exerted by inline jets. Radial jets with negative flow exit angles can generate small lifting forces. Results of pressure drop measurements are presented in terms of resistance coefficients, which allow an estimation of the necessary additional fan power if radial jet nozzles instead of inline jet nozzles are employed. For radial jet nozzles with flow exit angles of +45 ? ? ? +60 the rise of fan energy costs is negligible compared with the rise of heat/mass transfer. Radial jet nozzles have a high potential for application, particularly when very high drying rates or small jet forces on the impingement surface or both are required.

F. Peper; W. Leiner; M. Fiebig

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Consequence evaluation of radiation embrittlement of Trojan reactor pressure vessel supports  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a consequence evaluation to address safety concerns raised by the radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports for the Trojan nuclear power plant. The study comprises a structural evaluation and an effects evaluation and assumes that all four reactor vessel supports have completely lost the load carrying capability. By demonstrating that the ASME code requirements governing Level D service limits are satisfied, the structural evaluation concludes that the Trojan reactor coolant loop (RCL) piping is capable of transferring loads to the steam generator (SG) supports and the reactor coolant pump (RCP) supports. A subsequent design margins to accommodate additional loads transferred to them through the RCL piping. The effects evaluation, employing a systems analysis approach, investigates initiating events and the reliability of the engineered safeguard systems as the RPV is subject to movements caused by the RPV support failure. The evaluation identifies a number of areas of additional safety concerns, but further investigation of the above safety concerns, however, concludes that a hypothetical failure of the Trojan RPV supports due to radiation embrittlement will not result in consequences of significant safety concerns.

Lu, S.C.; Sommer, S.C.; Johnson, G.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Lambert, H.E. (FTA Associates, Oakland, CA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Research and Development Roadmaps for Nondestructive Evaluation of Cables, Concrete, Reactor Pressure Vessels, and Piping Fatique  

SciTech Connect

To address these research needs, the MAaD Pathway supported a series of workshops in the summer of 2012 for the purpose of developing R&D roadmaps for enhancing the use of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) technologies and methodologies for detecting aging and degradation of materials and predicting the remaining useful life. The workshops were conducted to assess requirements and technical gaps related to applications of NDE for cables, concrete, reactor pressure vessels (RPV), and piping fatigue for extended reactor life. An overview of the outcomes of the workshops is presented here. Details of the workshop outcomes and proposed R&D also are available in the R&D roadmap documents cited in the bibliography and are available on the LWRS Program website (http://www.inl.gov/lwrs).

Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL] [ORNL; Bakhtiari, Sasan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL] [ORNL; Simmons, Kevin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Coble, Jamie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Brenchley, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Meyer, Ryan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

ORNL/TM-2012/380 Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2/380 2/380 Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program September 2012 Prepared by Cyrus Smith Randy Nanstad Robert Odette Dwight Clayton Katie Matlack Pradeep Ramuhalli Glenn Light DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900

72

Heat transfer and pressure drop in square duct with two opposite repeated rib-roughened walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEAT TRANSFER AND PRESSURE DROP IN SQUARE DUCT WITH TWO OPPOSITE REPEATED RIB-ROUGHENED WALLS A Thesis CHIANG-KUO LEI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering HEAT TRANSFER AND PRESSURE DROP IN SQUARE DUCT WITH TWO OPPOSITE REPEATED RIB-ROUGHENED WALLS A Thesis by CHIANG-KUO LEI Approved as to style and content by: , ~p= jd~. = e-C in Han...

Lei, Chiang-Kuo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

73

Effects of 50/degree/C surveillance and test reactor irradiations on ferritic pressure vessel steel embrittlement  

SciTech Connect

The results of surveillance tests on the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory revealed that a greater than expected embrittlement had taken place after about 17.5 effective full-power years of operation and an operational assessment program was undertaken to fully evaluate the vessel condition and recommend conditions under which operation could be resumed. A research program was undertaken that included irradiating specimens in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Specimens of the A212 grade B vessel shell material were included, along with specimens from a nozzle qualification weld and a submerged-arc weld fabricated at ORNL to reproduce the vessel seam weld. The results of the surveillance program and the materials research program performed in support of the evaluation of the HFIR pressure vessel are presented and show the welds to be more radiation resistant than the A212B. Results of irradiated tensile and annealing experiments are described as well as a discussion of mechanisms which may be responsible for enhanced hardening at low damage rates. 20 refs., 22 figs., 5 tabs.

Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Corwin, W.R.; Odette, G.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Diameters of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Depending on Helium Gas Pressure in an Arc Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diameters of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Depending on Helium Gas Pressure in an Arc Discharge ... So far, relatively large quantities of SWNTs have been produced by using Y?Ni and Fe?Ni catalysts for the electric arc discharge method28-30 and by using a Co?Ni catalyst for the pulsed laser ablation method. ... The electric current of the arc discharge also affected the yield of SWNTs though its effect was not as serious as the helium pressure. ...

Yahachi Saito; Yoshihiko Tani; Atsuo Kasuya

2000-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

75

Waalbot: An Agile Small-Scale Wall Climbing Robot Utilizing Pressure Sensitive Adhesives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and grasping robots cannot climb smooth surfaces like glass or painted structures. To avoid the drawbacksWaalbot: An Agile Small-Scale Wall Climbing Robot Utilizing Pressure Sensitive Adhesives Michael P robot able to navigate on smooth surfaces of any orientation, including vertical and inverted surfaces

Sitti, Metin

76

Dynamic pressure and shear stress measurements on the stator wall of whirling annular seals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic pressure and shear stress measurements on the stator wall of whirling annular seals are presented. Two flow conditions (Re=12,000 & 24,000), two seal speeds (Ta=3,300 & 6,600) and three eccentricity ratios (0, 10, & 50% of the clearance...

Winslow, Robert Bradley

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Experimental measurement of phase averaged wall-pressure distributions for a 25% eccentric whirling annular seal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Instantaneous wall-pressure data were recorded for a 25% eccentric whirling annular seal for rotor speeds of 1800RPM and 3600RPM, axial Reynolds numbers of 24000 and 12000, and whirl ratios of 0.1-1.0 following the procedure set forth by Winslow...

Cusano, Domenic

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

D0 Silicon Upgrade: Gas Helium Storage Tank Pressure Vessel Engineering Note  

SciTech Connect

This is to certify that Beaird Industries, Inc. has done a white metal blast per SSPC-SP5 as required per specifications on the vessel internal. Following the blast, a black light inspection was performed by Beaird Quality Control personnel to assure that all debris, grease, etc. was removed and interior was clean prior to closing vessel for helium test.

Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

1996-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

80

Prediction of failure behavior of a welded pressure vessel containing flaws during a hydrogen-charged burst test  

SciTech Connect

An industry-government collaborative program was carried out with an aim to promoting the acceptance of fracture mechanics based fitness-for-service assessment methodology for a service-damaged pressure vessel. A collaborative round robin exercise was carried out to predict the fracture behavior of a vessel containing hydrogen damage, fabrication related lack-of-fusion defects, an artificially induced fatigue crack and a localized thinned area. The fracture assessment procedures used include the US ASME Material Property Council`s PREFIS Program based on the British Standard (BS) Published Document (PD) 6493, ASME Section XI and The Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) R6 approach; The welding Institute (TWI) CRACKWISE program (based on BS PD6493 Level 2 approach), a variant of the R6 approach, J-tearing instability approaches, various J-estimation schemes, LEFM approach and simplified stress analysis. Assessments were compared with the results obtained from a hydrogen charged burst test of the vessel. Predictions, based on the J-tearing approach, compared well with the actual burst test results. Actual burst pressure was about five times the operating pressure.

Bhuyan, G.S. [Powertech Labs. Inc., Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Sperling, E.J. [Amoco Corp., Naperville, IL (United States); Shen, G. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Metals Technology Labs.; Yin, H. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Farmers Branch, TX (United States); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Prediction of failure behavior of a welded pressure vessel containing flaws during a hydrogen-charged burst test  

SciTech Connect

An industry-government collaborative program was carried out with an aim to promoting the acceptance of fracture mechanics-based fitness-for-service assessment methodology for a service-damaged pressure vessel. A collaborative round robin exercise was carried out to predict the fracture behavior of a vessel containing hydrogen damage, fabrication-related lack-of-fusion defects, an artificially induced fatigue crack, and a localized thinned area. The fracture assessment procedures used include the US ASME Material Property Council`s PREFIS Program based on the British Standard (BS) Published Document (PD) 6493, ASME Section XI and The Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) R6 approach, The Welding Institute (TWI) CRACKWISE program (based on BS PD6493 Level 2 approach), a variant of the R6 approach, J-tearing instability approaches, various J-estimation schemes, LEFM approach, and simplified stress analysis. Assessments were compared with the results obtained from a hydrogen-charged burst test of the vessel. Predictions, based on the J-tearing approach, compared well with the actual burst test results. Actual burst pressure was about five times the operating pressure.

Bhuyan, G.S. [Powertech Labs Inc., Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Sperling, E.J. [BP-Amoco, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Shen, G. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Metals Technology Labs.; Yin, H. [Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Coating application and evaluation for heavy wall thickness, temperature and pressure pipeline  

SciTech Connect

A Venezuelan oil company is developing a project for high pressure gas injection for oil recovery. This project has a compression plant to increase the gas pressure from 1,200 to 9,000 psi. Due to the high gas pressure (9,000 psi) and high temperature (90 C), a carbon steel API 5L-X60 with 2.5 in thickness pipe has been selected. The gas is transported from the compression plant to the injection well. This type of pipeline is unique in the world and in the authors` knowledge no one has applied and evaluated external coating for this combination of heavy wall thickness, pressure and temperature pipeline. Dual fusion bonded epoxy was selected as main coating, combined with high temperature sleeves for the joints. Several parameters were considered in the selection of the coating: high temperature, wall thickness, application condition, heat during the welding process and coating performance in the lab. The large amount of heat accumulated during the application, due to the thick wall, requires a modification of coating application parameters, as well as the cooling condition. The evaluation of the coating was performed with a specially designed test for high temperatures. The laboratory results (impact resistance, degree of curing, cathodic disbonding, adhesion and hot water immersion) indicate that the application condition used was good to obtain a product under specification.

Rodriguez, V.; Perozo, E.; Alvarez, E. [Intevep, S.A., Caracas (Venezuela). Tecnologia de Materiales

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Wind Pressure Resistance of Walls with Exterior Rigid Foam: Structural Performance Testing and Development of Design Specifications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Pressure Resistance of Wind Pressure Resistance of Walls with Exterior Rigid Foam: Structural Performance Testing and Development of Design Specifications Building America Stakeholder Meeting February 2012 2 Gaps and Barriers  Wind pressure resistance of multi- layered walls with exterior rigid foam * Performance characteristics * Capacity * Limitations * Design method * Design specification 3 Market Implications  Walls with exterior rigid foam  2012 IECC - Climate Zones 3 and higher  Wall systems:  Claddings and their attachments  Interior finishes  Air sealing, air barriers  Cavity insulation 4 Research Tasks  Laboratory Testing of Wall Assemblies under dynamic wind pressures at the NAHB Research Center  NAHB/DOE/ACC  Laboratory Testing of a One-story House in IBHS Wind Tunnel Facility

84

Evaluation on the Feasibility of Using Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density/Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock  

SciTech Connect

This technical letter report provides the status of an assessment undertaken by PNNL at the request of the NRC to verify the capability of periodic ASME-required volumetric examinations of reactor vessels to characterize the density and distribution of flaws of interest for applying 50.61a on a plant-by-plant basis. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (50.61), "Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events," establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. Recently, the NRC completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed and promulgated an alternate PTS rule, 50.61a, that can be implemented by PWR licensees. The 50.61a rule differs from 50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants.

Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

85

Three-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport calculations of neutron fluxes for beginning-of-cycle at several pressure vessel surveillance positions in the high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to determine improved thermal, epithermal, and fast fluxes and several responses at mechanical test surveillance location keys 2, 4, 5, and 7 of the pressure vessel of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for the beginning of the fuel cycle. The purpose of the research was to provide essential flux data in support of radiation embrittlement studies of the pressure vessel shell and beam tubes at some of the important locations.

Pace, J.V. III; Slater, C.O.; Smith, M.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Characterization of Gas?Liquid Flows in Stirred Vessels Using Pressure and Torque Fluctuations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas?liquid flows in a stirred vessel exhibit different flow regimes and demonstrate complex interaction of transport processes with varying spatio-temporal scales. The knowledge of key space and time scales of fluid dynamics is important for designing and ...

A. R. Khopkar; S. S. Panaskar; A. B. Pandit; V. V. Ranade

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

87

Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Teactor Pressure Vessels  

SciTech Connect

A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions. Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process. Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens. Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds. Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life . Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates. Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses. Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage. Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength. Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads. Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

Potirniche, Gabriel; Barlow, Fred D.; Charit, Indrajit; Rink, Karl

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

88

Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR plants  

SciTech Connect

Recent data from the HFIR vessel surveillance program indicate a substantial radiation embrittlement rate effect at low irradiation temperatures (/approximately/120/degree/F) for A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II, and corresponding welds. PWR vessel supports are fabricated of similar materials and are subjected to the same low temperatures and fast neutron fluxes (10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 9/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s, E > 1.0 MeV) as those in the HFIR vessel. Thus, the embrittlement rate of these structures may be greater than previously anticipated. A study sponsored by the NRC is under way at ORNL to determine the impact of the rate effect on PWR vessel-support life expectancy. The scope includes the interpretation and application of the HFIR data, a survey of all light-water-reactor vessel support designs, and a structural and fracture-mechanics analysis of the supports for two specific PWR plants of particular interest with regard to a potential for support failure as a result of propagation of flaws. Calculations performed thus far indicate best-estimate critical flaw sizes, corresponding to 32 EFPY, of /approximately/0.2 in. for one plant and /approximately/0.4 in. for the other. These flaw sizes are small enough to be of concern. However, it appears that low-cycle fatigue is not a viable mechanism for creation of flaws of this size, and thus, presumably, such flaws would have to exist at the time of fabrication. 59 refs., 128 figs., 49 tabs.

Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Application of Computational Physics: Blood Vessel Constrictions and Medical Infuses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of computation in many fields are growing fast in last two decades. Increasing on computation performance helps researchers to understand natural phenomena in many fields of science and technology including in life sciences. Computational fluid dynamic is one of numerical methods which is very popular used to describe those phenomena. In this paper we propose moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) and molecular dynamics (MD) to describe different phenomena in blood vessel. The effect of increasing the blood pressure on vessel wall will be calculate using MD methods, while the two fluid blending dynamics will be discussed using MPS. Result from the first phenomenon shows that around 80% of constriction on blood vessel make blood vessel increase and will start to leak on vessel wall, while from the second phenomenon the result shows the visualization of two fluids mixture (drugs and blood) influenced by ratio of drugs debit to blood debit. Keywords: molecular dynamic, blood vessel, fluid dynamic, movin...

Suprijadi,; Subekti, Petrus; Viridi, Sparisoma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The DOS 1 neutron dosimetry experiment at the HB-4-A key 7 surveillance site on the HFIR pressure vessel  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive neutron dosimetry experiment was made at one of the prime surveillance sites at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel to aid radiation embrittlement studies of the vessel and to benchmark neutron transport calculations. The thermal neutron flux at the key 7, position 5 site was found, from measurements of radioactivation of four cobalt wires and four silver wires, to be 2.4 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1}. The thermal flux derived from two helium accumulation monitors was 2.3 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}{sup {minus}1}. The thermal flux estimated by neutron transport calculations was 3.7 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. The fast flux, >1 MeV, determined from two nickel activation wires, was 1.5 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1}, in keeping with values obtained earlier from stainless steel surveillance monitors and with a computed value of 1.2 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}{sup {minus}1}. The fast fluxes given by two reaction-product-type monitors, neptunium-237 and beryllium, were 2.6 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s {sup {minus}1} and 2.2 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Follow-up experiments indicate that these latter high values of fast flux are reproducible but are false; they are due to the creation of greater levels of reaction products by photonuclear events induced by an exceptionally high ratio of gamma flux to fast neutron flux at the vessel.

Farrell, K.; Kam, F.B.; Baldwin, C.A. [and others

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Safety Evaluation Report: Development of Improved Composite Pressure Vessels for Hydrogen Storage, Lincoln Composites, Lincoln, NE, May 25, 2010  

SciTech Connect

Lincoln Composites operates a facility for designing, testing, and manufacturing composite pressure vessels. Lincoln Composites also has a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to develop composite tanks for high-pressure hydrogen storage. The initial stage of this project involves testing the permeation of high-pressure hydrogen through polymer liners. The company recently moved and is constructing a dedicated research/testing laboratory at their new location. In the meantime, permeation tests are being performed in a corner of a large manufacturing facility. The safety review team visited the Lincoln Composites site on May 25, 2010. The project team presented an overview of the company and project and took the safety review team on a tour of the facility. The safety review team saw the entire process of winding a carbon fiber/resin tank on a liner, installing the boss and valves, and curing and painting the tank. The review team also saw the new laboratory that is being built for the DOE project and the temporary arrangement for the hydrogen permeation tests.

Fort, III, William C.; Kallman, Richard A.; Maes, Miguel; Skolnik, Edward G.; Weiner, Steven C.

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

93

Development of Improved Composite Pressure Vessels for Hydrogen Storage - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Norman Newhouse (Primary Contact), Jon Knudsen, John Makinson Lincoln Composites, Inc. 5117 NW 40 th Street Lincoln, NE 68524 Phone: (402) 470-5035 Email: nnewhouse@lincolncomposites.com DOE Managers HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-09GO19004 Project Start Date: February 1, 2009 Project End Date: June 30, 2014 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Improve the performance characteristics, including * weight, volumetric efficiency, and cost, of composite pressure vessels used to contain hydrogen in adsorbants. Evaluate design, materials, or manufacturing process *

94

Effect of temperature on the fracture toughness in the nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel (SA508-3)  

SciTech Connect

The elastic-plastic fracture toughness J{sub IC} of the Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (SA508-3) which has high toughness was obtained at three temperatures (room temperature, {minus}20 C, 200 C) using a 1/2 CT specimen. Especially the two methods recommended in ASTM and JSME were compared. It was found that difficulty exists in obtaining J{sub IC} by ASTM R-curve method, while JSME R-curve method yielded good results. The stretched zone width method gave slightly larger J{sub IC} values than those by the R-curve method for SA508-3 steel and the blunting line was not affected by the test temperatures. The relation between SZW and J, SZW and J/E and SZW and J/{sigma}{sub ys} before initiation of a stable crack growth in the fracture toughness test at three temperatures is described.

Oh, S.W.; Lim, M.B. [Dong-A Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, H.K. [Dong-Eui Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

In-service Inspection Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density and Size Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements  

SciTech Connect

Pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events are system transients in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in which there is a rapid operating temperature cool-down that results in cold vessel temperatures with or without repressurization of the vessel. The rapid cooling of the inside surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) causes thermal stresses that can combine with stresses caused by high pressure. The aggregate effect of these stresses is an increase in the potential for fracture if a pre-existing flaw is present in a material susceptible to brittle failure. The ferritic, low alloy steel of the reactor vessel beltline adjacent to the core, where neutron radiation gradually embrittles the material over the lifetime of the plant, can be susceptible to brittle fracture. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (50.61), Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events, adopted on July 23, 1985, establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed a rule, 50.61a, published on January 4, 2010, entitled Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events (75 FR 13). Use of the new rule by licensees is optional. The 50.61a rule differs from 50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants. These analyses are intended to determine if the actual flaw density and size distribution in the licensees reactor vessel beltline welds are bounded by the flaw density and size distribution values used in the PTS technical basis. Under a contract with the NRC, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been working on a program to assess the ability of current inservice inspection (ISI)-ultrasonic testing (UT) techniques, as qualified through ASME Code, Appendix VIII, Supplements 4 and 6, to detect small fabrication or inservice-induced flaws located in RPV welds and adjacent base materials. As part of this effort, the investigators have pursued an evaluation, based on the available information, of the capability of UT to provide flaw density/distribution inputs for making RPV weld assessments in accordance with 50.61a. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of data from the 1993 Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, Unit 3, Spirit of Appendix VIII reactor vessel examination, a comparison of the flaw density/distribution from this data with the distribution in 50.61a, possible reasons for differences, and plans and recommendations for further work in this area.

Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.; Norris, Wallace

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

96

Anticavitation protection of pressure outlets through regulation of velocities in wall layer of the flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. The tests showed that an installation forming a continuous low-velocity flow along a wall comprising a solid ...

P. R. Khlopenkov; G. A. Chepaikin

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Modular Inspection System for a Complete IN-Service Examination of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel, Including Beltline Region  

SciTech Connect

Final Report for a DOE Phase II Contract Describing the design and fabrication of a reactor inspection modular rover prototype for reactor vessel inspection.

David H. Bothell

2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

Progress in evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination reliability for inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and characterize fabrication flaws in reactor pressure vessels  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a review of the work conducted under two programs. One (NDE Reliability Program) is a multi-year program addressing the reliability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for the inservice inspection (ISI) of light water reactor components. This program examines the reliability of current NDE, the effectiveness of evolving technologies, and provides assessments and recommendations to ensure that the NDE is applied at the right time, in the right place with sufficient effectiveness that defects of importance to structural integrity will be reliably detected and accurately characterized. The second program (Characterizing Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessels) is assembling a data base to quantify the distribution of fabrication flaws that exist in US nuclear reactor pressure vessels with respect to density, size, type, and location. These programs will be discussed as two separate sections in this report. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Doctor, S.R.; Bowey, R.E.; Good, M.S.; Friley, J.R.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Taylor, T.T.; Heasler, P.G.; Andersen, E.S.; Diaz, A.A.; Greenwood, M.S.; Hockey, R.L.; Schuster, G.J.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Seismic Earth Pressures on Retaining Structures and Basement Walls in Cohesionless Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? H) Normalized Dynamic Earth Pressure ( ? AE / ? H) Time(H=1 Time(sec) Figure A.64. Total earth pressure time series38 ii 3.7.3. Earth Pressure

Geraili Mikola, Roozbeh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fracture resistance of welded thick-walled high-pressure vessels in power plants. Report No. 1. Statistical analysis of defects and fracture resistance of vessel materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. Given the current technology for making and constructing 440- and 1000-MW power plants, the limiting defect s...

I. V. Gorynin; V. A. Ignatov; Yu. I. Zvezdin; B. T. Timofeev

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A scattered-light three-dimensional photoelastic stress analysis of a thick-walled pressure vessel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maintain temperature by turning off the heating elements when the temperature exceeds the preset value. This indicated that an exothermic reaction had taken place in the casting, which raised the temperature of the oven. The exothermic reaction was prob... mixture being high enough to sustain an exothermic reaction when placed in the oven. This casting was cured along with the others, but was not used for parts of the model that would undergo anal- ysis. An important secondary nb)ective of the research...

Lednicky, Edward Frank

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Seismic Earth Pressures on Retaining Structures and Basement Walls in Cohesionless Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

50 4.4. Seismic Behavior of Retaining Wall-BackfillWhitman, R. V. (1999). Seismic analysis and design of rigidBalkema, Rotterdam. Building Seismic Safety Council. (2010).

Geraili Mikola, Roozbeh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Effects of Hyperbaric Pressure on a Deep-Sea Archaebacterium in Stainless Steel and Glass-Lined Vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...syringe and the pressure generator provides ballast to...turn of the pressure generator. As with gas sam...these experiments, water was used as the pressurizing...microorganisms from water and sediment samples...subsequent incuba- tion at atmospheric pressure. In our experiments...

Chad M. Nelson; Michael R. Schuppenhauer; Douglas S. Clark

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Impact of an apparent radiation embrittlement rate on the life expectancy of PWR (pressurized-water-reactor) vessel supports  

SciTech Connect

Recent data from the HFIR vessel surveillance program indicate a substantial radiation embrittlement rate effect at low irradiation temperatures (/approximately/120/degree/F) for A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II and corresponding welds. PWR vessel supports are fabricated of similar materials and are subjected to the same low temperatures and fast neutron fluxes (10/sup 8/ /minus/ 10/sup 9/ n/cm/sup 2//center dot/s, E > 1.0 MeV) as those in the HFIR vessel. Thus, the embrittlement rate of these structures may be greater than previously anticipated. A study sponsored by the NRC is under way at ORNL to determine the impact of the rate effect on PWR vessel support life expectancy. The scope includes the interpretation and application of the HFIR data, a survey of all LWR vessel support designs, and a structural and fracture-mechanics analysis of the supports for two specific PWR plants of particular interest with regard to a potential for support failure as a result of propagation of flaws. Calculations performed for one of the plants indicate best-estimate critical flaw size corresponding to 32 EFPY, of /approximately/0.4 in. It appears that low-cycle fatigue is not a viable mechanism for creation of flaws of this size. Thus, presumably such flaws would have to exist at the time of fabrication. 19 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Measurements of earth pressures for the design modification of cantilever retaining walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

positioning the key just aft of center toward 32 the heel of the foundation as shown in Fig. 6. Stabili~t Considerations. ? Traditionally, the soil fill above the toe of TSDHPT retaining walls has been seeded and maintained just as any other grassy area... positioning the key just aft of center toward 32 the heel of the foundation as shown in Fig. 6. Stabili~t Considerations. ? Traditionally, the soil fill above the toe of TSDHPT retaining walls has been seeded and maintained just as any other grassy area...

Prikryl, William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

Modeling and simulation of a high pressure hydrogen storage tank with Dynamic Wall.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen storage is one of the divisions of hydrogen powered vehicles technology. To increase performances of high pressure hydrogen storage tanks, a multilayered design is (more)

Cumalioglu, Ilgaz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Modeling and simulation of a high pressure hydrogen storage tank with dynamic wall.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen storage is one of the divisions of hydrogen powered vehicles technology. To increase performances of high pressure hydrogen storage tanks, a multilayered design is (more)

Cumalioglu, Ilgaz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Very long single- and few-walled boron nitride nanotubes via the pressurized vapor/condenser method  

SciTech Connect

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are desired for their exceptional mechanical, electronic, thermal, structural, textural, optical, and quantum properties. A new method for producing long, small-diameter, single- and few-walled, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in macroscopic quantities is reported. The pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) method produces, without catalysts, highly crystalline, very long, small-diameter, BNNTs. Palm-sized, cotton-like masses of BNNT raw material were grown by this technique and spun directly into centimeters-long yarn. Nanotube lengths were observed to be 100 times that of those grown by the most closely related method. Self-assembly and growth models for these long BNNTs are discussed.

Michael W. Smith, Kevin Jordan, Cheol Park, Jae-Woo Kim, Peter Lillehei, Roy Crooks, Joycelyn Harrison

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Device for automating in vitro characterization of lymphatic vessel function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 22 Figure 14 exhibits the relationship between peak pressure and Emax for the three vessels. As peak pressure increases, Emax increases monotonically for vessel 3. Vessel 3 exhibits a linear relationship (R2=0.92). The trend is less apparent.... 22 Figure 14 exhibits the relationship between peak pressure and Emax for the three vessels. As peak pressure increases, Emax increases monotonically for vessel 3. Vessel 3 exhibits a linear relationship (R2=0.92). The trend is less apparent...

Rajagopalan, Shruti

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

110

Failure Analysis, Permeation, and Toughness of Glass Fiber Composite Pressure Vessels for Inexpensive Delivery of Cold Hydrogen - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Andrew Weisberg (Primary Contact), Salvador Aceves Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) P.O. Box 808, L-792 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: (925) 422-0864 Email: saceves@llnl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: Spencer Composites Corporation (SCC), Sacramento, CA Project Start Date: October, 2004 Project End Date: October, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Optimize hydrogen delivery by tube trailer * Develop materials and manufacturing for low- * temperature hydrogen delivery Quantify performance and economics of delivery * pressure vessels Technical Barriers This project addresses the following technical barriers

111

Review of industry efforts to manage pressurized water reactor feedwater nozzle, piping, and feedring cracking and wall thinning  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a review of nuclear industry efforts to manage thermal fatigue, flow-accelerated corrosion, and water hammer damage to pressurized water reactor (PWR) feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. The review includes an evaluation of design modifications, operating procedure changes, augmented inspection and monitoring programs, and mitigation, repair and replacement activities. Four actions were taken: (a) review of field experience to identify trends of operating events, (b) review of technical literature, (c) visits to PWR plants and a PWR vendor, and (d) solicitation of information from 8 other countries. Assessment of field experience is that licensees have apparently taken sufficient action to minimize feedwater nozzle cracking caused by thermal fatigue and wall thinning of J-tubes and feedwater piping. Specific industry actions to minimize the wall-thinning in feedrings and thermal sleeves were not found, but visual inspection and necessary repairs are being performed. Assessment of field experience indicates that licensees have taken sufficient action to minimize steam generator water hammer in both top-feed and preheat steam generators. Industry efforts to minimize multiple check valve failures that have allowed backflow of steam from a steam generator and have played a major role in several steam generator water hammer events were not evaluated. A major finding of this review is that analysis, inspection, monitoring, mitigation, and replacement techniques have been developed for managing thermal fatigue and flow-accelerated corrosion damage to feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. Adequate training and appropriate applications of these techniques would ensure effective management of this damage.

Shah, V.N.; Ware, A.G.; Porter, A.M.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Phonon spectrum and interaction between nanotubes in single-walled carbon nanotube bundles at high pressures and temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes at temperatures up to 730 K and pressures up to 7 GPa have been measured. The behavior of phonon modes and the interaction between nanotubes in bundles have been studied. It has been found that the temperature shift of the vibrational G mode is completely reversible, whereas the temperature shift of radial breathing modes is partially irreversible and the softening of the modes and narrowing of phonon bands are observed. The temperature shift and softening of radial breathing modes are also observed when samples are irradiated by laser radiation with a power density of 6.5 kW/mm{sup 2}. The dependence of the relative frequency {Omega}/{Omega}{sub 0} for G{sup +} and G{sup -} phonon modes on the relative change A{sub 0}/A in the triangular lattice constant of bundles of nanotubes calculated using the thermal expansion coefficient and compressibility coefficient of nanotube bundles shows that the temperature shift of the G mode is determined by the softening of the C-C bond in nanotubes. An increase in the equilibrium distances between nanotubes at the breaking of random covalent C-C bonds between nanotubes in bundles of nanotubes is in my opinion the main reason for the softening of the radial breathing modes.

Meletov, K. P., E-mail: mele@issp.ac.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Review of the International Atomic Energy Agency International database on reactor pressure vessel materials and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory embrittlement data base  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has supported neutron radiation effects information exchange through meetings and conferences since the mid-1960s. Through an International Working Group on Reliability of Reactor Pressure Components, information exchange and research activities were fostered through the Coordinated Research Program (CRP) sponsored by the IAEA. The final CRP meeting was held in November 1993, where it was recommended that the IAEA coordinate the development of an International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (IDRPVM) as the first step in generating an International Database on Aging Management. The purpose of this study was to provide special technical assistance to the NRC in monitoring and evaluating the IAEA activities in developing the IAEA IDRPVM, and to compare the IDRPVM with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) and provide recommendations for improving the PR-EDB. A first test version of the IDRPVM was distributed at the First Meeting of Liaison Officers to the IAEA IDRPVM, in November 1996. No power reactor surveillance data were included in this version; the testing data were mainly from CRP Phase III data. Therefore, because of insufficient data and a lack of power reactor surveillance data received from the IAEA IDRPVM, the comparison is made based only on the structure of the IDRPVM. In general, the IDRPVM and the EDB have very similar data structure and data format. One anticipates that because the IDRPVM data will be collected from so many different sources, quality assurance of the data will be a difficult task. The consistency of experimental test results will be an important issue. A very wide spectrum of material characteristics of RPV steels and irradiation environments exists among the various countries. Hence the development of embrittlement prediction models will be a formidable task. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Rheology and microstructural evolution in pressure-driven flow of a magnetorheological fluid with strong particle-wall interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interaction between magnetorheological (MR) fluid particles and the walls of the device that retain the field-responsive fluid is critical as this interaction provides the means for coupling the physical device to the ...

Ocalan, Murat

115

Evaluation of in-vessel corium retention through external reactor vessel cooling for integral reactor  

SciTech Connect

In-vessel corium retention through external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) for a small integral reactor has been evaluated to determine the thermal margin for the prevention of a reactor vessel failure. A thermal load analysis from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel wall in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel has been performed to determine the heat flux distribution. The critical heat flux (CHF) on the outer reactor vessel wall has been determined to fix the maximum heat removal rate through the external coolant between the outer reactor vessel and the insulation of the reactor vessel. Finally, the thermal margin has been evaluated by comparison of the thermal load with the maximum heat removal rate of the CHF on the outer reactor vessel wall. The maximum heat flux from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel is estimated at approximately 0.25 MW/m{sup 2} in the metallic layer because of the focusing effect. The CHF of the outer reactor vessel is approximately 1.1 MW/m{sup 2} because of a two phase natural circulation mass flow. Since the thermal margin for the IVR-ERVC is sufficient, the reactor vessel integrity is maintained during a severe accident of a small integral reactor. (authors)

Park, R. J.; Lee, J. R.; Kim, S. B.; Jin, Y.; Kim, H. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

High-Pressure Tube Trailers and Tanks  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

bending stress: continuous fiber vessels and vessels made of replicants Conformable tanks require internal stiffeners (ribs) to efficiently support the pressure and minimize...

117

Neutron Assay System for Confinement Vessel Disposition  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1-inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the CVs. The Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) was developed to measure the amount of special nuclear material (SNM) in CVs before and after cleanout. Prior to cleanout, the system will be used to perform a verification measurement of each vessel. After cleanout, the system will be used to perform safeguards-quality assays of {le}100-g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a vessel for safeguards termination. The CVAS has been tested and calibrated in preparation for verification and safeguards measurements.

Frame, Katherine C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourne, Mark M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crooks, William J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miko, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, Jose I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vigil, Georgiana M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

118

Final report for confinement vessel analysis. Task 2, Safety vessel impact analyses  

SciTech Connect

This report describes two sets of finite element analyses performed under Task 2 of the Confinement Vessel Analysis Program. In each set of analyses, a charge is assumed to have detonated inside the confinement vessel, causing the confinement vessel to fail in either of two ways; locally around the weld line of a nozzle, or catastrophically into two hemispheres. High pressure gases from the internal detonation pressurize the inside of the safety vessel and accelerate the fractured nozzle or hemisphere into the safety vessel. The first set of analyses examines the structural integrity of the safety vessel when impacted by the fractured nozzle. The objective of these calculations is to determine if the high strength bolt heads attached to the nozzle penetrate or fracture the lower strength safety vessel, thus allowing gaseous detonation products to escape to the atmosphere. The two dimensional analyses predict partial penetration of the safety vessel beneath the tip of the penetrator. The analyses also predict maximum principal strains in the safety vessel which exceed the measured ultimate strain of steel. The second set of analyses examines the containment capability of the safety vessel closure when impacted by half a confinement vessel (hemisphere). The predicted response is the formation of a 0.6-inch gap, caused by relative sliding and separation between the two halves of the safety vessel. Additional analyses with closure designs that prevent the gap formation are recommended.

Murray, Y.D. [APTEK, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

1994-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

119

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Hydrogen International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications

120

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

122

Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

123

R&D of Large Stationary Hydrogen/CNG/HCNG Storage Vessels | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks Status and Progress in Research, Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen-Compressed...

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - abnormal blood vessels Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Summary: ) the blood vessels, which also helps to lower blood pressure. Commonly used brand names in the United States... to treat high blood pressure, heart disease and...

125

A Review of Proposed Upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Potential Impacts to Reactor Vessel Integrity  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was scheduled in October 2000 to implement design upgrades that include the enlargement of the HB-2 and HB-4 beam tubes. Higher dose rates and higher radiation embrittlement rates were predicted for the two beam-tube nozzles and surrounding vessel areas. ORNL had performed calculations for the upgraded design to show that vessel integrity would be maintained at acceptable levels. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was requested by the U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters (DOE/HQ) to perform an independent peer review of the ORNL evaluations. PNNL concluded that the calculated probabilities of failure for the HFIR vessel during hydrostatic tests and for operational conditions as estimated by ORNL are an acceptable basis for selecting pressures and test intervals for hydrostatic tests and for justifying continued operation of the vessel. While there were some uncertainties in the embrittlement predictions, the ongoing efforts at ORNL to measure fluence levels at critical locations of the vessel wall and to test materials from surveillance capsules should be effective in dealing with embrittlement uncertainties. It was recommended that ORNL continue to update their fracture mechanics calculations to reflect methods and data from ongoing research for commercial nuclear power plants. Such programs should provide improved data for vessel fracture mechanics calculations.

Simonen, Fredric A.

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Coal gasification vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vessel system (10) comprises an outer shell (14) of carbon fibers held in a binder, a coolant circulation mechanism (16) and control mechanism (42) and an inner shell (46) comprised of a refractory material and is of light weight and capable of withstanding the extreme temperature and pressure environment of, for example, a coal gasification process. The control mechanism (42) can be computer controlled and can be used to monitor and modulate the coolant which is provided through the circulation mechanism (16) for cooling and protecting the carbon fiber and outer shell (14). The control mechanism (42) is also used to locate any isolated hot spots which may occur through the local disintegration of the inner refractory shell (46).

Loo, Billy W. (Oakland, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

EDS V25 containment vessel explosive qualification test report.  

SciTech Connect

The V25 containment vessel was procured by the Project Manager, Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) as a replacement vessel for use on the P2 Explosive Destruction Systems. It is the first EDS vessel to be fabricated under Code Case 2564 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which provides rules for the design of impulsively loaded vessels. The explosive rating for the vessel based on the Code Case is nine (9) pounds TNT-equivalent for up to 637 detonations. This limit is an increase from the 4.8 pounds TNT-equivalency rating for previous vessels. This report describes the explosive qualification tests that were performed in the vessel as part of the process for qualifying the vessel for explosive use. The tests consisted of a 11.25 pound TNT equivalent bare charge detonation followed by a 9 pound TNT equivalent detonation.

Rudolphi, John Joseph

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Reactor Vessel and Reactor Vessel Internals Segmentation at Zion Nuclear Power Station - 13230  

SciTech Connect

Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS) is a dual-unit Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant located on the Lake Michigan shoreline, in the city of Zion, Illinois approximately 64 km (40 miles) north of Chicago, Illinois and 67 km (42 miles) south of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Each PWR is of the Westinghouse design and had a generation capacity of 1040 MW. Exelon Corporation operated both reactors with the first unit starting production of power in 1973 and the second unit coming on line in 1974. The operation of both reactors ceased in 1996/1997. In 2010 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the transfer of Exelon Corporation's license to ZionSolutions, the Long Term Stewardship subsidiary of EnergySolutions responsible for the decommissioning of ZNPS. In October 2010, ZionSolutions awarded Siempelkamp Nuclear Services, Inc. (SNS) the contract to plan, segment, remove, and package both reactor vessels and their respective internals. This presentation discusses the tools employed by SNS to remove and segment the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) and Reactor Vessels (RV) and conveys the recent progress. SNS's mechanical segmentation tooling includes the C-HORCE (Circumferential Hydraulically Operated Cutting Equipment), BMT (Bolt Milling Tool), FaST (Former Attachment Severing Tool) and the VRS (Volume Reduction Station). Thermal segmentation of the reactor vessels will be accomplished using an Oxygen- Propane cutting system. The tools for internals segmentation were designed by SNS using their experience from other successful reactor and large component decommissioning and demolition (D and D) projects in the US. All of the designs allow for the mechanical segmentation of the internals remotely in the water-filled reactor cavities. The C-HORCE is designed to saw seven circumferential cuts through the Core Barrel and Thermal Shield walls with individual thicknesses up to 100 mm (4 inches). The BMT is designed to remove the bolts that fasten the Baffle Plates to the Baffle Former Plates. The FaST is designed to remove the Baffle Former Plates from the Core Barrel. The VRS further volume reduces segmented components using multiple configurations of the 38i and horizontal reciprocating saws. After the successful removal and volume reduction of the Internals, the RV will be segmented using a 'First in the US' thermal cutting process through a co-operative effort with Siempelkamp NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH using their experience at the Stade NPP and Karlsruhe in Germany. SNS mobilized in the fall of 2011 to commence execution of the project in order to complete the RVI segmentation, removal and packaging activities for the first unit (Unit 2) by end of the 2012/beginning 2013 and then mobilize to the second unit, Unit 1. Parallel to the completion of the segmentation of the reactor vessel internals at Unit 1, SNS will segment the Unit 2 pressure vessel and at completion move to Unit 1. (authors)

Cooke, Conrad; Spann, Holger [Siempelkamp Nuclear Services: 5229 Sunset Blvd., (Suite M), West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)] [Siempelkamp Nuclear Services: 5229 Sunset Blvd., (Suite M), West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

Holmes, Michael Jerome (Thompson, ND); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh (Allentown, PA)

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

130

HFIR vessel probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis  

SciTech Connect

The life of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel is limited by a radiation induced reduction in the material`s fracture toughness. Hydrostatic proof testing and probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses are being used to meet the intent of the ASME Code, while extending the life of the vessel well beyond its original design value. The most recent probabilistic evaluation is more precise and accounts for the effects of gamma as well as neutron radiation embrittlement. This analysis confirms the earlier estimates of a permissible vessel lifetime of at least 50 EFPY (100 MW).

Cheverton, R.D. [Delta-21 Resources, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dickson, T.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Confinement Vessel Assay System: Calibration and Certification Report  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1 to 2 inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the vessels. The Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) was developed to measure the amount of SNM in CVs before and after cleanout. Prior to cleanout, the system will be used to perform a verification measurement of each vessel. After cleanout, the system will be used to perform safeguards-quality assays of {le} 100-g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a vessel for safeguards termination. The system was calibrated in three different mass regions (low, medium, and high) to cover the entire plutonium mass range that will be assayed. The low mass calibration and medium mass calibration were verified for material positioned in the center of an empty vessel. The systematic uncertainty due to position bias was estimated using an MCNPX model to simulate the response of the system to material localized at various points along the inner surface of the vessel. The background component due to cosmic ray spallation was determined by performing measurements of an empty vessel and comparing to measurements in the same location with no vessel present. The CVAS has been tested and calibrated in preparation for verification and safeguards measurements of CVs before and after cleanout.

Frame, Katherine C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourne, Mark M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crooks, William J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gomez, Cipriano [Retired CMR-OPS: OPERATIONS; Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miko, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vigil, Georgiana M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - arch vessel transposition Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the effect of applying local vacuum pressure on the temperatures of the epidermis and small vessels during... of skin and blood vessels with different diameters (10-60 mm) at...

133

Cryogenic Pressure Vessels: Progress and Plans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presented at the R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen Storage Technologies Workshops on February 14 and 15, 2011.

134

Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010Beijing, P.R. China September 27, 2010 Bonfire Tests of High...

135

Device for inspecting vessel surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable, remotely-controlled inspection crawler for use along the walls of tanks, vessels, piping and the like. The crawler can be configured to use a vacuum chamber for supporting itself on the inspected surface by suction or a plurality of magnetic wheels for moving the crawler along the inspected surface. The crawler is adapted to be equipped with an ultrasonic probe for mapping the structural integrity or other characteristics of the surface being inspected. Navigation of the crawler is achieved by triangulation techniques between a signal transmitter on the crawler and a pair of microphones attached to a fixed, remote location, such as the crawler's deployment unit. The necessary communications are established between the crawler and computers external to the inspection environment for position control and storage and/or monitoring of data acquisition.

Appel, D. Keith (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Impacts of reducing shipboard NOx? and SOx? emissions on vessel performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The international maritime community has been experiencing tremendous pressures from environmental organizations to reduce the emissions footprint of their vessels. In the last decade, air emissions, including nitrogen ...

Caputo, Ronald J., Jr. (Ronald Joseph)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Reactor vessel support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Holley, John C. (McKeesport, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Tow Vessel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vessel Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTowVessel&oldid596390" Category: Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type...

139

Pressure testing of torispherical heads  

SciTech Connect

Two vessels fabricated from SA516-70 steel with 6% knuckle radius torispherical heads were tested under internal pressure to failure. The D/t ratios of Vessel 1 and Vessel 2 were 238 and 185 respectively. The calculated maximum allowable working pressures of Vessel 1 and 2 heads using the ASME Section 8, Div. 1 rules and measured dimensions were 85 and 110 psi, respectively. Vessel 1 failed at a nozzle weld in the cylindrical shell at 700 psi pressure. Neither buckling nor any other objectionable deformation of the head was observed at a theoretical double-elastic-slope collapse pressure of 241 and a calculated buckling pressure of 270 psi. Buckles were observed developing slowly after 600 psi pressure, and a total of 22 buckles were observed after the test, having the maximum amplitude of 0.15 inch. Vessel 2 failed at the edge of the longitudinal weld of the cylindrical shell at 1,080 psi pressure. Neither buckling nor any other objectionable deformation of the head was observed up to the final pressure, which exceeded the theoretical double-elastic-slope collapse and calculated buckling pressures of 274 psi and 342 psi, respectively.

Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.; Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel. 5 figures.

Ekeroth, D.E.; Orr, R.

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel.

Ekeroth, Douglas E. (Delmont, PA); Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Reconnecting broken blood vessels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reconnecting broken blood vessels Reconnecting broken blood vessels Name: Catherine A Kraft Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: While watching the television program "Chicago Hope" the other day, I watched a doctor sew someone's ear back on using an elaborate microscope. I was wondering if a surgeon is required to reconnect all the broken blood vessels, and how you would accomplish this? Thanks for your time! Replies: I'm not a surgeon, but I think the answer to your question is "no." The blood will flow across the wound (out the end of one blood vessel and into the end of another), although not efficiently. I believe they sometimes use leeches sucking on the end of the reconnected part to help induce flow of blood in the right direction through the area. You probably do need to put the ends of the major vessels near each other, so the distribution of blood flow is reasonably like it was before the injury, and so the vessels can eventually reconnect. But probably the microscope is used mostly to be sure the various layers of muscle, connective tissue, and fat are connected together correctly.

143

Reactor vessel annealing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for annealing a vessel (14) in situ by heating the vessel (14) to a defined temperature, composed of: an electrically operated heater assembly (10) insertable into the vessel (14) for heating the vessel (14) to the defined temperature; temperature monitoring components positioned relative to the heater assembly (10) for monitoring the temperature of the vessel (14); a controllable electric power supply unit (32-60) for supplying electric power required by the heater assembly (10); a control unit (80-86) for controlling the power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60); a first vehicle (2) containing the power supply unit (32-60); a second vehicle (4) containing the control unit (80-86); power conductors (18,22) connectable between the power supply unit (32-60) and the heater unit (10) for delivering the power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60) to the heater assembly (10); signal conductors (20,24) connectable between the temperature monitoring components and the control unit (80-86) for delivering temperature indicating signals from the temperature monitoring components to the control unit (80-86); and control conductors (8) connectable between the control unit (80-86) and the power supply unit (32-60) for delivering to the power supply unit (32-60) control signals for controlling the level of power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60) to the heater assembly (10).

Miller, Phillip E. (Greensburg, PA); Katz, Leonoard R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Nath, Raymond J. (Murrysville, PA); Blaushild, Ronald M. (Export, PA); Tatch, Michael D. (Randolph, NJ); Kordalski, Frank J. (White Oak, PA); Wykstra, Donald T. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kavalkovich, William M. (Monroeville, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.4 Pressure Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRESSURE SAFETY PRESSURE SAFETY 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the contractor's implementation of programs to ensure the integrity of pressure vessels and minimize risks from failure of vessels to the public and to workers. Facility Representatives will examine the installed configuration of pressure vessels, observe pressure testing and review documentation associated with maintenance or repair of pressure vessels. In performing the surveillance, Facility Representatives will examine implementation of applicable DOE requirements and best practices. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.4, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards 2.2 DOE 5483.1A, Occupational Safety and Health Programs

145

Standard guide for mutual inductance bridge applications for wall thickness determinations in boiler tubing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide describes a procedure for obtaining relative wall thickness indications in ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic steels using the mutual inductance bridge method. The procedure is intended for use with instruments capable of inducing two substantially identical magnetic fields and noting the change in inductance resulting from differing amounts of steel. It is used to distinguish acceptable wall thickness conditions from those which could place tubular vessels or piping at risk of bursting under high temperature and pressure conditions. 1.2 This guide is intended to satisfy two general needs for users of industrial Mutual Inductance Bridge (MIB) equipment: (1) the need for a tutorial guide addressing the general principles of Mutual Inductance Bridges as they apply to industrial piping; and (2) the need for a consistent set of MIB performance parameter definitions, including how these performance parameters relate to MIB system specifications. Potential users and buyers, as well as experienced M...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Pressure Build?Up in LNG and LH2 Vehicular Cryogenic Storage Tanks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of LNG and LH2 as fuels in heavy duty vehicles is increasing steadily because cryogenic liquids provides superior volumetric and gravimetric energy densities compared to other means of on?board storage. Although several sizes and types of tanks exist a typical vehicular storage tank has a volume of ?400 liters (?100 gallons). The pressure in the ullage space of a tank freshly filled is usually ?0.25 MPa but may vary during use from ?0.25 MPa (?20 psig) to ?0.92 MPa (?120 psig). Cryogenic vehicular tanks are typically dual?walled stainless steel vessels with vacuum and superinsulation isolation between the inner and outer vessel walls. The heat leaks into such tanks are measured as a percentage boil?off per day. For a storage tank of vehicular size range the boil?off may be ? 1 % day depending upon the cryogen and the quality of the tank. The corresponding heat leak into the cryogenic liquid vaporizes a certain amount of liquid that in turn increases the pressure in the tank which in turn significantly influences the properties of the cryogens. We have used a novel approach to calculate the increase in pressure of LNG and LH2 in a closed cryogenic vessel with a fixed heat leak as a function of time using real equations of state for the properties of the cryogens. The method and results for the time it takes for a freshly filled tank to increase in pressure from the filling pressure of ?0.25 MPa to a venting pressure of ?1.73 MPa are presented.

J. A. Barclay; A. M. Rowe; M. A. Barclay

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Usage Codes Vessel name  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Vessel name Int'l radio call sign (IRCS) Generator Other: Max hoisting Sonar Power (Kw) KHz: KHz: VMS Usage Y / N GPS: Internal / external KHz: KHz: Ratio Accuracy (m Incinerator: Burned on board: Net sensors Hull mounted / towed Wired / wireless Y / N Y / N Usage Manufacturer

149

NETL: News Release - Ocean Research Vessel Returns with Undersea 'Treasure'  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23, 2002 23, 2002 Ocean Research Vessel Returns with Undersea 'Treasure' of Methane Hydrates Largest Amount of Marine Hydrate Core Ever Recovered - The R/V JOIDES Resolution - The R/V JOIDES Resolution VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA - An internationally funded ocean research vessel has returned to port after a two-month expedition off the Oregon coast, bringing with it the largest amount of marine methane hydrate core samples ever recovered for scientific study. The R/V JOIDES Resolution, the world's largest scientific drillship, docked at Victoria, British Columbia earlier this month and began offloading pressure vessels containing methane hydrates recovered 50 miles offshore of Oregon from an area known as Hydrate Ridge. The pressure vessels, each six feet long and four inches in diameter, will

150

HEART AND BLOOD VESSELS CARDIOVASCULARCARDIOVASCULAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEART AND BLOOD VESSELS CARDIOVASCULARCARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEMSYSTEM SYSTEM COMPONENTS · Heart pumps blood though blood vessels where exchanges can take place with the interstitial fluid (between cells) · Heart and blood vessels regulate blood flow according to the needs of the body

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

151

Method and apparatus for determining pressure-induced frequency-shifts in shock-compressed materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and an apparatus for conducting coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy in shock-compressed materials are disclosed. The apparatus includes a sample vessel having an optically transparent wall and an opposing optically reflective wall. Two coherent laser beams, a pump beam and a broadband Stokes beam, are directed through the window and focused on a portion of the sample. In the preferred embodiment, a projectile is fired from a high-pressure gas gun to impact the outside of the reflective wall, generating a planar shock wave which travels through the sample toward the window. The pump and Stokes beams result in the emission from the shock-compressed sample of a coherent anti-Stokes beam, which is emitted toward the approaching reflective wall of the vessel and reflected back through the window. The anti-Stokes beam is folded into a spectrometer for frequency analysis. The results of such analysis are useful for determining chemical and physical phenomena which occur during the shock-compression of the sample.

Moore, D.S.; Schmidt, S.C.

1983-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

152

Method and apparatus for determining pressure-induced frequency-shifts in shock-compressed materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and an apparatus for conducting coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy in shock-compressed materials are disclosed. The apparatus includes a sample vessel having an optically transparent wall and an opposing optically reflective wall. Two coherent laser beams, a pump beam and a broadband Stokes beam, are directed through the window and focused on a portion of the sample. In the preferred embodiment, a projectile is fired from a high-pressure gas gun to impact the outside of the reflective wall, generating a planar shock wave which travels through the sample toward the window. The pump and Stokes beams result in the emission from the shock-compressed sample of a coherent anti-Stokes beam, which is emitted toward the approaching reflective wall of the vessel and reflected back through the window. The anti-Stokes beam is folded into a spectrometer for frequency analysis. The results of such analysis are useful for determining chemical and physical phenomena which occur during the shock-compression of the sample.

Moore, David S. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Stephen C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

DHCVIM: A direct heating containment vessel interactions module  

SciTech Connect

Models for prediction of direct containment heating phenomena as implemented in the DHCVIM computer module are described. The models were designed to treat thermal, chemical and hydrodynamic processes in the three regions of the Sandia National Laboratory Surtsey DCH test facility: the melt generator, cavity and vessel. The fundamental balance equations, along with constitutive relations are described. A combination of Eulerian treatment for the gas phase and Lagrangian treatment for the droplet phase is used in the modeling. Comparisons of calculations and DCH-1 test results are presented. Reasonable agreement is demonstrated for the vessel pressure rise, melt generator pressure decay and particle size distribution.

Ginsberg, T.; Tutu, N.K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion of a large and thick walled vessel for a defect by computed tomography is provided. A collimated source of radiation is placed adjacent one side of the wall portion and an array of detectors for the radiation is placed on the other side adjacent the source. The radiation from the source passing through the wall portion is then detected with the detectors over a limited angle, dependent upon the curvature of the wall of the vessel, to obtain a dataset. The source and array are then coordinately moved relative to the wall portion in steps and a further dataset is obtained at each step. The plurality of datasets obtained over the limited angle is then processed to produce a tomogram of the wall portion to determine the presence of a defect therein. In a preferred embodiment, the curved wall portion has a center of curvature so that the source and the array are positioned at each step along a respective arc curved about the center. If desired, the detector array and source can be reoriented relative to a new wall portion and an inspection of the new wall portion can be easily obtained. Further, the source and detector array can be indexed in a direction perpendicular to a plane including the limited angle in a plurality of steps so that by repeating the detecting and moving steps at each index step, a three dimensional image can be created of the wall portion.

Fong, James T. (Bethel Park, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

High-Pressure Tube Trailers and Tanks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berry Berry Salvador M. Aceves Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (925) 422-0864 saceves@LLNL.GOV DOE Delivery Tech Team Presentation Chicago, Illinois February 8, 2005 Inexpensive delivery of compressed hydrogen with ambient temperature or cryogenic compatible vessels * Pressure vessel research at LLNL Conformable (continuous fiber and replicants) Cryo-compressed * Overview of delivery options * The thermodynamics of compressed and cryo-compressed hydrogen storage * Proposed analysis activities * Conclusions Outline We are investigating two techniques for reduced bending stress: continuous fiber vessels and vessels made of replicants Conformable tanks require internal stiffeners (ribs) to efficiently support the pressure and minimize bending stresses Spherical and cylindrical tanks

156

The Symmetry Properties of the Flow in a Nuclear Reactor Vessel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The turbulent flow in a Pressurized Water Reactor vessel is modeled in a small scale experiment. Careful observations and flow control experiments, driven by considerations of symmetry, show that this flow of ...

Pierre Albarde

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

R&D of Large Stationary Hydrogen/CNG/HCNG Storage Vessels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

hydrogen accelerates crack propagation rate of the material and leads to brittle fracture. International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010Beijing, P.R. China R&D...

158

Research on hydrogen environment fatigue test system and correlative fatigue test of hydrogen storage vessel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 70MPa hydrogen environment fatigue test system has been designed and applied in the manufacture of a hydrogen storage vessel. Key equipment is the 80MPa flat steel ribbon wound high pressure hydrogen storage ve...

Rong Li ? ?; Chuan-xiang Zheng ???

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Wall to Wall Optimal Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The calculus of variations is employed to find steady divergence-free velocity fields that maximize transport of a tracer between two parallel walls held at fixed concentration for one of two constraints on flow strength: a fixed value of the kinetic energy or a fixed value of the enstrophy. The optimizing flows consist of an array of (convection) cells of a particular aspect ratio Gamma. We solve the nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations analytically for weak flows and numerically (and via matched asymptotic analysis in the fixed energy case) for strong flows. We report the results in terms of the Nusselt number Nu, a dimensionless measure of the tracer transport, as a function of the Peclet number Pe, a dimensionless measure of the energy or enstrophy of the flow. For both constraints the maximum transport Nu_{MAX}(Pe) is realized in cells of decreasing aspect ratio Gamma_{opt}(Pe) as Pe increases. For the fixed energy problem, Nu_{MAX} \\sim Pe and Gamma_{opt} \\sim Pe^{-1/2}, while for the fixed enstrophy scenario, Nu_{MAX} \\sim Pe^{10/17} and Gamma_{opt} \\sim Pe^{-0.36}. We also interpret our results in the context of certain buoyancy-driven Rayleigh-Benard convection problems that satisfy one of the two intensity constraints, enabling us to investigate how the transport scalings compare with upper bounds on Nu expressed as a function of the Rayleigh number \\Ra. For steady convection in porous media, corresponding to the fixed energy problem, we find Nu_{MAX} \\sim \\Ra and Gamma_{opt} \\sim Ra^{-1/2}$, while for steady convection in a pure fluid layer between free-slip isothermal walls, corresponding to fixed enstrophy transport, Nu_{MAX} \\sim Ra^{5/12} and Gamma_{opt} \\sim Ra^{-1/4}.

Pedram Hassanzadeh; Gregory P. Chini; Charles R. Doering

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

CRAD, Pressurized Systems and Cryogens Assessment Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Assure personnel health and safety through regularly scheduled inspections and maintenance on pressure vessels and equipment, compressed gases and gas cylinders, vacuum equipment and systems, hydraulics, and cryogenic materials and systems.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The construction of the Browns Bay Vessel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES. 10 19 The Site. National Historic Sites Service Excavation and Raising of the Vessel Vessel on Display. The Vessel in 1985. 19 20 27 28 Method of Recording III THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE VESSEL 31 36 The Keel 36 The Stem... A flat-bottomed boat being built. 17 9 Forelocked eye-bolts from the midship beam of the Browne Bay Vessel 21 10 Broad arrow stamped in an eye-bolt from the Browns Bay Vessel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 11 Pulley...

Amer, Christopher Francis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

162

Reactor vessel support system. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, M.P.; Holley, J.C.

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

163

E-Print Network 3.0 - axi-symmetric exit pressures Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

driven by the imposed high pressure at the top and the lower exit pressure. The inner tube provides... 1 Paper submitted to ASME 2008 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping ... Source:...

164

Predicting Stenosis in Blood Vessels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of plaque Plaque is made up of cholesterol, calcium, and other blood components that stick to the vessel-flow loop is function of degree of stenosis, even at low degrees of stenosis So, stenosis may be detected

Petta, Jason

165

Achieve Continuous Injection of Solid Fuels into Advanced Combustion System Pressures  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the development of a mechanical rotary-disk feeder, known as the Stamet Posimetric High Pressure Solids Feeder System, to demonstrate feeding of dry granular coal continuously and controllably into pressurized environments of up to 70 kg/cm2 (1,000 psi). This is the Phase III of the ongoing program. Earlier Phases 1 and II successfully demonstrated feeding into pressures up to 35 kg/cm{sup 2} (500 psi). The final report for those phases was submitted in April 2005. Based on the previous work done in Phases I & II using Powder River Basin coal provided by the PSDF facility in Wilsonville, AL, a Phase III feeder system was designed and built to accomplish the target of feeding the coal into a pressure of 70 kg/cm2 (1,000 psi) and to be capable of feed rates of up to 550 kilograms (1,200lbs) per hour. The drive motor system from Phase II was retained for use on Phase III since projected performance calculations indicated it should be capable of driving the Phase III pump to the target levels. The pump & motor system was installed in a custom built test rig comprising an inlet vessel containing an active live-wall hopper mounted on weigh cells in a support frame, transition into the pump inlet, transition from pump outlet and a receiver vessel containing a receiver drum supported on weigh cells. All pressure containment on the rig was rated to105 kg/cm{sup 2} (1,500psi) to accommodate the final pressure requirement of a proposed Phase IV of the program. A screw conveyor and batch hopper were added to transfer coal at atmospheric pressure from the shop floor up into the test rig to enable continuous feeding up to the capacity of the receiving vessel. Control & monitoring systems were up-rated from the Phase II system to cover the additional features incorporated in the Phase III rig, and provide closer control and expanded monitoring of the entire system. A program of testing and modification was carried out in Stamet's facility in CA, culminating in the first successful feeding of coal into the Phase III target of 70 kg/cm{sup 2} (1,000 psi) gas pressure in March 2007. Subsequently, repeated runs at pressure were achieved, and comparison of the data with Phase II results when adjusted for scale differences showed further power reductions of 40% had been achieved from the final Phase II pressure runs. The general design layout of a commercial-scale unit was conducted, and preliminary cost estimates made.

Derek L. Aldred; Timothy Saunders

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Wall surveyor project report  

SciTech Connect

A report is made on the demonstration of a first-generation Wall Surveyor that is capable of surveying the interior and thickness of a stone, brick, or cement wall. LLNL`s Micropower Impulse Radar is used, based on emitting and detecting very low amplitude and short microwave impulses (MIR rangefinder). Six test walls were used. While the demonstrator MIR Wall Surveyor is not fieldable yet, it has successfully scanned the test walls and produced real-time images identifying the walls. It is planned to optimize and package the evaluation wall surveyor into a hand held unit.

Mullenhoff, D.J.; Johnston, B.C.; Azevedo, S.G.

1996-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

167

Acrolein generation stimulates hypercontraction in isolated human blood vessels  

SciTech Connect

Increased risk of vasospasm, a spontaneous hyperconstriction, is associated with atherosclerosis, cigarette smoking, and hypertension-all conditions involving oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and inflammation. To test the role of the lipid peroxidation- and inflammation-derived aldehyde, acrolein, in human vasospasm, we developed an ex vivo model using human coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) blood vessels and a demonstrated acrolein precursor, allylamine. Allylamine induces hypercontraction in isolated rat coronary artery in a semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activity (SSAO) dependent manner. Isolated human CABG blood vessels (internal mammary artery, radial artery, saphenous vein) were used to determine: (1) vessel responses and sensitivity to acrolein, allylamine, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure (1 {mu}M-1 mM), (2) SSAO dependence of allylamine-induced effects using SSAO inhibitors (semicarbazide, 1 mM; MDL 72274-E, active isomer; MDL 72274-Z, inactive isomer; 100 {mu}M), (3) the vasoactive effects of two other SSAO amine substrates, benzylamine and methylamine, and (4) the contribution of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} to hypercontraction. Acrolein or allylamine but not H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, benzylamine, or methylamine stimulated spontaneous and pharmacologically intractable hypercontraction in CABG blood vessels that was similar to clinical vasospasm. Allylamine-induced hypercontraction and blood vessel SSAO activity were abolished by pretreatment with semicarbazide or MDL 72274-E but not by MDL 72274-Z. Allylamine-induced hypercontraction also was significantly attenuated in Ca{sup 2+}-free buffer. In isolated aorta of spontaneously hypertensive rat, allylamine-induced an SSAO-dependent contraction and enhanced norepinephrine sensitivity but not in Sprague-Dawley rat aorta. We conclude that acrolein generation in the blood vessel wall increases human susceptibility to vasospasm, an event that is enhanced in hypertension.

Conklin, D.J. [Institute of Molecular Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States) and Department of Biology, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Eau Claire, WI 54701 (United States)]. E-mail: dj.conklin@louisville.edu; Bhatnagar, A. [Institute of Molecular Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Cowley, H.R. [Department of Biology, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Eau Claire, WI 54701 (United States); Johnson, G.H. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Luther Hospital/Midelfort Clinic, Eau Claire, WI 54702 (United States); Wiechmann, R.J. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Luther Hospital/Midelfort Clinic, Eau Claire, WI 54702 (United States); Sayre, L.M. [Department of Chemistry, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Trent, M.B. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX 77555-0609 (United States); Boor, P.J. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX 77555-0609 (United States)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Effect of elasticity of wall on diffusion in nano channel  

SciTech Connect

Confining walls of nano channel are taken to be elastic to study their effect on the diffusion coefficient of fluid flowing through the channel. The wall is elastic to the extent that it responses to molecular pressure exerted by fluid. The model to study diffusion is based on microscopic considerations. Results obtained for fluid confining to 20 atomic diameter width contrasted with results obtained by considering rigid and smooth wall. The effect of roughness of wall on diffusion can be compensated by the elastic property of wall.

Tankeshwar, K., E-mail: tankesh@pu.ac.in [Computer Centre, Panjab University Chandigarh,- 160014 (India); Srivastava, Sunita [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Disruption of Vessel-Spanning Bubbles with Sloped Fins in Flat-Bottom and 2:1 Elliptical-Bottom Vessels  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive sludge was generated in the K-East Basin and K-West Basin fuel storage pools at the Hanford Site while irradiated uranium metal fuel elements from the N Reactor were being stored and packaged. The fuel has been removed from the K Basins, and currently, the sludge resides in the KW Basin in large underwater Engineered Containers. The first phase to the Sludge Treatment Project being led by CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is to retrieve and load the sludge into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and transport the sludge to T Plant for interim storage. The STSCs will be stored inside T Plant cells that are equipped with secondary containment and leak-detection systems. The sludge is composed of a variety of particulate materials and water, including a fraction of reactive uranium metal particles that are a source of hydrogen gas. If a situation occurs where the reactive uranium metal particles settle out at the bottom of a container, previous studies have shown that a vessel-spanning gas layer above the uranium metal particles can develop and can push the overlying layer of sludge upward. The major concern, in addition to the general concern associated with the retention and release of a flammable gas such as hydrogen, is that if a vessel-spanning bubble (VSB) forms in an STSC, it may drive the overlying sludge material to the vents at the top of the container. Then it may be released from the container into the cells secondary containment system at T Plant. A previous study demonstrated that sloped walls on vessels, both cylindrical coned-shaped vessels and rectangular vessels with rounded ends, provided an effective approach for disrupting a VSB by creating a release path for gas as a VSB began to rise. Based on the success of sloped-wall vessels, a similar concept is investigated here where a sloped fin is placed inside the vessel to create a release path for gas. A key potential advantage of using a sloped fin compared to a vessel with a sloped wall is that a small fin decreases the volume of a vessel available for sludge storage by a very small fraction compared to a cone-shaped vessel. The purpose of this study is to quantify the capability of sloped fins to disrupt VSBs and to conduct sufficient tests to estimate the performance of fins in full-scale STSCs. Experiments were conducted with a range of fin shapes to determine what slope and width were sufficient to disrupt VSBs. Additional tests were conducted to demonstrate how the fin performance scales with the sludge layer thickness and the sludge strength, density, and vessel diameter based on the gravity yield parameter, which is a dimensionless ratio of the force necessary to yield the sludge to its weight.( ) Further experiments evaluated the difference between vessels with flat and 2:1 elliptical bottoms and a number of different simulants, including the KW container sludge simulant (complete), which was developed to match actual K-Basin sludge. Testing was conducted in 5-in., 10-in., and 23-in.-diameter vessels to quantify how fin performance is impacted by the size of the test vessel. The most significant results for these scale-up tests are the trend in how behavior changes with vessel size and the results from the 23-in. vessel. The key objective in evaluating fin performance is to determine the conditions that minimize the volume of a VSB when disruption occurs because this reduces the potential for material inside the STSC from being released through vents.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Chun, Jaehun; Russell, Renee L.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Mastor, Michael M.

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

171

International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

experts presented information and data on testing and certification of storage tanks for compressed hydrogen, CNG, and HCNG fuels. 1 Specific objectives of the Forum were...

172

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of one or more NDE techniques that can assist in the determination of current RPV fracture toughness as well as in prediction of fracture toughness with further aging of the...

173

Achieve Continuous Injection of Solid Fuels into Advanced Combustion System Pressures  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the development of a mechanical rotary-disk feeder, known as the Stamet Posimetric High Pressure Solids Feeder System, to feed dry granular coal continuously and controllably into pressurized environments of up to 35 kg/cm{sup 2} (500 psi). This was to be accomplished in two phases. The first task was to review materials handling experience in pressurized operations as it related to the target pressures for this project, and review existing coal preparation processes and specifications currently used in advanced combustion systems. Samples of existing fuel materials were obtained and tested to evaluate flow, sealing and friction properties. This provided input data for use in the design of the Stamet Feeders for the project, and ensured that the material specification used met the requirements of advanced combustion & gasification systems. Ultimately, Powder River Basin coal provided by the PSDF facility in Wilsonville, AL was used as the basis for the feeder design and test program. Based on the material property information, a Phase 1 feeder system was designed and built to accomplish feeding the coal to an intermediate pressure up to 21 kg/cm{sup 2} (300 psi) at feed rates of approximately 100 kilograms (220lbs) per hour. The pump & motor system was installed in a custom built test rig comprising an inlet vessel containing an active live-wall hopper mounted in a support frame, transition into the pump inlet, transition from pump outlet and a receiver vessel containing a receiver drum supported on weigh cells. All pressure containment on the rig was rated for the final pressure requirement of 35 kg/cm{sup 2} (500psi). A program of testing and modification was carried out in Stamet's facility in CA, culminating in successful feeding of coal into the Phase 1 target of 21 kg/cm{sup 2} (300psi) gas pressure in December 2003. Further testing was carried out at CQ Inc's facility in PA, providing longer run times and experience of handling and feeding the coal in winter conditions. Based on the data developed through the testing of the Phase I unit, a Phase II system was designed for feeding coal into pressures of up to 35 kg/cm{sup 2} (500 psi). A further program of testing and modification was then carried out in Stamet's facility, with the target pressure being achieved in January 2005. Repeated runs at pressure were achieved, and optimization of the machine resulted in power reductions of 60% from the first successful pressure runs. General design layout of a commercial-scale unit was conducted, and preliminary cost estimates for a commercial unit obtained.

Derek L. Aldred; Timothy Saunders

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Modelling of Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) is envisioned in ITER to clean the wall from impurities, to control the wall isotopic ratio and the hydrogen recycling in the presence of the toroidal magnetic field. Various experiments and modelling are advancing to consolidate this technique. In this contribution the modeling of ICWC is presented, which can be divided in two parts: plasma description and plasma wall interaction. Firstly a 0D plasma model, based on a set of energy and particle balance equations for Maxwellian Hydrogen and Helium species, is presented. The model takes into account elementary collision processes, coupled RF power, particle confinement, wall recycling, and active gas injection and pumping. The RF plasma production process is based mainly on electron collisional ionization. The dependency of the plasma parameters, the Hydrogen and Helium partial pressures and neutral or ionic fluxes on pressure and RF power are quantitatively in good agreement with those obtained experimentally on TORE SUPRA. Secondly an extension of the 0D model including the description of the wall interaction is presented and compared to TORE SUPRA multi-pulse ICWC discharges.

Douai, D.; Wauters, T.; Wuenderlich, D.; Bremond, S.; Lombard, G.; Mollard, P.; Pegourie, B. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Lyssoivan, A. [LPP-ERM/KMS, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Marchuk, O. [IEK-4, FZ Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Van Oost, G. [Ghent University, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

175

Cryogenic vessel for a superconducting  

SciTech Connect

A method is described of providing turbocharger compressor outlet pressure to a turbocharger actuator comprising the steps of: forming a circumferential fluid passageway between the compressor housing and an annular ring disposed around the compressor housing; exposing the circumferential fluid passageway to compressor housing pressure; and exposing the turbocharger actuator to the pressure in the circumferential fluid passageway.

Mc Inerney, C.E.

1987-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Pressurized reactor system and a method of operating the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for operating a pressurized reactor system in order to precisely control the temperature within a pressure vessel in order to minimize condensation of corrosive materials from gases on the surfaces of the pressure vessel or contained circulating fluidized bed reactor, and to prevent the temperature of the components from reaching a detrimentally high level, while at the same time allowing quick heating of the pressure vessel interior volume during start-up. Superatmospheric pressure gas is introduced from the first conduit into the fluidized bed reactor and heat derived reactions such as combustion and gassification are maintained in the reactor. Gas is exhausted from the reactor and pressure vessel through a second conduit. Gas is circulated from one part of the inside volume to another to control the temperature of the inside volume, such as by passing the gas through an exterior conduit which has a heat exchanger, control valve, blower and compressor associated therewith, or by causing natural convection flow of circulating gas within one or more generally vertically extending gas passages entirely within the pressure vessel (and containing heat exchangers, flow rate control valves, or the like therein). Preferably, inert gas is provided as a circulating gas, and the inert gas may also be used in emergency shut-down situations. In emergency shut-down reaction gas being supplied to the reactor is cut off, while inert gas from the interior gas volume of the pressure vessel is introduced into the reactor.

Isaksson, Juhani M. (Karhula, FI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Pressurized reactor system and a method of operating the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for operating a pressurized reactor system in order to precisely control the temperature within a pressure vessel in order to minimize condensation of corrosive materials from gases on the surfaces of the pressure vessel or contained circulating fluidized bed reactor, and to prevent the temperature of the components from reaching a detrimentally high level, while at the same time allowing quick heating of the pressure vessel interior volume during start-up. Super-atmospheric pressure gas is introduced from the first conduit into the fluidized bed reactor and heat derived reactions such as combustion and gasification are maintained in the reactor. Gas is exhausted from the reactor and pressure vessel through a second conduit. Gas is circulated from one part of the inside volume to another to control the temperature of the inside volume, such as by passing the gas through an exterior conduit which has a heat exchanger, control valve, blower and compressor associated therewith, or by causing natural convection flow of circulating gas within one or more generally vertically extending gas passages entirely within the pressure vessel (and containing heat exchangers, flow rate control valves, or the like therein). Preferably, inert gas is provided as a circulating gas, and the inert gas may also be used in emergency shut-down situations. In emergency shut-down reaction gas being supplied to the reactor is cut off, while inert gas from the interior gas volume of the pressure vessel is introduced into the reactor. 2 figs.

Isaksson, J.M.

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

178

Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

Maniscalco, James A. (Danville, CA); Meier, Wayne R. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Master external pressure charts  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a method to develop master external pressure charts from which individual external pressure charts for each material specification may be derived. The master external charts can represent a grouping of materials with similar chemical composition, similar stress-strain curves but produced to different strength levels. External pressure charts are used by various Sections of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel and Piping Codes to design various components such as cylinders, sphered, formed heads, tubes, piping, rings and other components, subjected to external pressure or axial compression loads. These charts are pseudo stress-strain curves for groups of materials with similar stress-strain shapes. The traditional approach was originally developed in the 1940`s and is a graphical approach where slopes to the strain curves are drawn graphically from which pseudo-strain levels are calculated. The new method presented in this paper develops mathematical relationships for the material stress-strain curves and the external pressure charts. The method has the ability to calculate stress-strain curves from existing external pressure charts. The relationships are a function of temperature, the modulus of elasticity, yield strength, and two empirical material constants. In this approach, conservative assumptions used to assign materials to lower bound external pressure charts can be removed. This increases the buckling strength capability of many materials in the Code, providing economic benefits while maintaining the margin of safety specified by the Code criteria. The method can also reduce the number of material charts needed in the Code and provides for the capability to extend the existing pressure charts to higher design temperatures. The new method is shown to contain a number of improvements over the traditional approach and is presently under consideration by appropriate ASME Code committees.

Michalopoulos, E. [Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co., CT (United States). Codes and Standards Dept.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Liquid Wall Chambers  

SciTech Connect

The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

Meier, W R

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Development of Tritium Storage and Transport Vessels  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to develop tritium storage and transport vessels for industrial applications. Prototype tritium storage and transport vessels were designed and manufactured. Uranium and zirconium/cobalt (ZrCo) metals were selected for the storage materials. The prototype transport container for the vessel was designed on the basis of Type B transportation package standards. The transport container was composed of a steel drum, inner packing materials, and a storage vessel. A second refinement cap was installed on the prototype vessel to protect the valves on the 100 kCi vessel. The vessel is stored in a steel drum packed with a thermal barrier and a shock absorber. Structural, thermal, shielding, and confinement analyses have to be performed for this container based on Type B requirements. (authors)

Paek, S.; Lee, M.; Kim, K.R.; Ahn, D.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, K.M.; Shon, S.H. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Inexpensive Delivery of Compressed Hydrogen with Advanced Vessel Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

delivery of compressed hydrogen delivery of compressed hydrogen with advanced vessel technology Gene Berry Andrew Weisberg Salvador M. Aceves Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (925) 422-0864 saceves@LLNL.GOV DOE and FreedomCar & Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Delivery and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop Washington, DC January 25, 2006 LLNL is developing innovative concepts for efficient containment of hydrogen in light duty vehicles concepts may offer advantages for hydrogen delivery Conformable containers efficiently use available space in the vehicle. We are pursuing multiple approaches to conformability High Strength insulated pressure vessels extend LH 2 dormancy 10x, eliminate boiloff, and enable efficiencies of flexible refueling (compressed/cryogenic H 2 /(L)H 2 ) The PVT properties of H

183

Assessment of typical BWR (boiling water reactor) vessel configurations and examination coverage  

SciTech Connect

Even though boiling water reactors (BWRs) are not susceptible to the kind of incident known as pressurized thermal shock that must be considered in the design and operation of pressurized water reactors, BWR reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) have experienced higher than expected embrittlement caused by fast neutron irradiation. This has required the vessel to be at a higher temperature than originally projected before the plant can be taken to power operation. In addition, many BWR plants have received exemption from the 10-year volumetric nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of the vessel as required by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B PV) Code Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components,'' because NDE access is severely restricted. Since many RPV welds have not been examined after being placed in service and the potential for service-induced flaws exists, regulatory authorities are looking closely at examination relief requests. BWR reactor vessel examination coverage is typically limited by plant design. Most BWR plants were designed when inservice examination codes were in the early stages of development, and very little consideration was give to designing for NDE access. Consequently, there is restricted access for many areas of the RPV. Since an increase in examination requirements has been placed in ASME B PV Code Section XI in these areas, efforts have begun on a thorough analysis of the vessel weld volumes examined during inservice examination and an evaluation of possibility expanding the RPV examination coverage. Because of these concerns, an investigation of the accessibility of the reactor vessel for NDE was performed to define the present status and to determine the improvements in coverage that can be accomplished in the near future. 7 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Walker, S.M. (EPRI Nondestructive Evaluation Center, Charlotte, NC (USA)); Feige, E.J.; Ingamells, J.R. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA)); Calhoun, G.L.; Davis, J.; Kapoor, A. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Tsinghua University in Beijing co-hosted the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27-29, 2010 in Beijing, China. High pressure vessel experts gathered to share lessons learned from compressed natural gas (CNG) and hydrogen vehicle deployments, and to identify R&D needs to aid the global harmonization of regulations, codes and standards to enable the successful deployment of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The forum also included additional discussion resulting from the DOE and U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) co-sponsored International Workshop on Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels held on December 10-11, 2009 in Washington, D.C.

185

Plastic instabilities in statically and dynamically loaded spherical vessels  

SciTech Connect

Significant changes were made in design limits for pressurized vessels in the 2007 version of the ASME Code (Section VIII, Div. 3) and 2008 and 2009 Addenda. There is now a local damage-mechanics based strain-exhaustion limit as well as the well-known global plastic collapse limit. Moreover, Code Case 2564 (Section VIII, Div. 3) has recently been approved to address impulsively loaded vessels. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate the plastic collapse limit as it applies to dynamically loaded spherical vessels. Plastic instabilities that could potentially develop in spherical shells under symmetric loading conditions are examined for a variety of plastic constitutive relations. First, a literature survey of both static and dynamic instabilities associated with spherical shells is presented. Then, a general plastic instability condition for spherical shells subjected to displacement controlled and impulsive loading is given. This instability condition is evaluated for six plastic and visco-plastic constitutive relations. The role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability point is investigated. Calculations for statically and dynamically loaded spherical shells are presented, illustrating the formation of instabilities as well as the role of imperfections. Conclusions of this work are that there are two fundamental types of instabilities associated with failure of spherical shells. In the case of impulsively loaded vessels, where the pulse duration is short compared to the fundamental period of the structure, one instability type is found not to occur in the absence of static internal pressure. Moreover, it is found that the specific role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability strain depends on the form of the constitutive relation assumed.

Duffey, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Development of Larger Diameter High Pressure CNG Cylinder Manufactured by Piercing and Drawing for Natural Gas Vehicle  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 29, 2010, in Beijing, China.

187

Great Wall Starbucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

along the Great Wall. When you think about it, it's not a bad marketing strategy: the Wall is high, the stairs relentless; what better than an espresso to energize you for the steep climb up? On second thought, make that a double. #ceas #china #tsutsui...

Hacker, Randi; Gatewood, Tyler; Tsutsui, William

2006-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

188

detonation pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

detonation pressure ? Detonationsdruck m [Er ist dem Quadrat der Detonationsgeschwindigkeit und der Sprengstoffdichte proportional

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel Overseeing Organization Maine Maritime Academy Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Vessel Depth(m) 15.2 Water Type Saltwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Tug: 73 ft (2)16V-92 Detroits Barge: 43 ft by 230ft Research Vessel Friendship: 40 foot vessel w/ 6 cylinder Cummins diesel engine and A-Frame crane Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 5.1 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Full onbard Navigation, GPS, marine radar and depth plotter; standard PC onboard can be configured as needed for data acquisition needs

190

IWTU Construction Workers Set Largest Process Vessel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IWTU Construction Workers Set Largest Process Vessel IWTU Construction Workers Set Largest Process Vessel Click on image to enlarge Construction of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) took a major step forward on Sept. 2, 2009 as crews lifted into place the largest of the six process vessels that will be used to treat radioactive liquid waste stored at the site. The IWTU will use a steam reforming process to solidify the waste for eventual shipment out of Idaho. The vessel and its skid, or framework, were constructed at Premier Technologies in Blackfoot. (Premier is the main small business partner for CH2M-WG Idaho (CWI), the contractor for DOE's Idaho Cleanup Project.) The Carbon Reduction Reformer vessel and skid weigh approximately 60 tons (120,000 lbs.). Because of the weight of the vessel and the location of the

191

Pressure &Pressure & TemperatureTemperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer to measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature

California at Santa Cruz, University of

192

Nuvera fuel cells for Fincantieri marine vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

US-based Nuvera Fuel Cells is working with Italian shipbuilder Fincantieri on a programme to power luxury marine vessels with advanced hydrogen PEM fuel cell technology.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Pressure Safety Program Implementation at ORNL  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility that is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC. In February 2006, DOE promulgated worker safety and health regulations to govern contractor activities at DOE sites. These regulations, which are provided in 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, establish requirements for worker safety and health program that reduce or prevent occupational injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing DOE contractors and their workers with safe and healthful workplaces at DOE sites. The regulations state that contractors must achieve compliance no later than May 25, 2007. According to 10 CFR 851, Subpart C, Specific Program Requirements, contractors must have a structured approach to their worker safety and health programs that at a minimum includes provisions for pressure safety. In implementing the structured approach for pressure safety, contractors must establish safety policies and procedures to ensure that pressure systems are designed, fabricated, tested, inspected, maintained, repaired, and operated by trained, qualified personnel in accordance with applicable sound engineering principles. In addition, contractors must ensure that all pressure vessels, boilers, air receivers, and supporting piping systems conform to (1) applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (2004) Sections I through XII, including applicable code cases; (2) applicable ASME B31 piping codes; and (3) the strictest applicable state and local codes. When national consensus codes are not applicable because of pressure range, vessel geometry, use of special materials, etc., contractors must implement measures to provide equivalent protection and ensure a level of safety greater than or equal to the level of protection afforded by the ASME or applicable state or local codes. This report documents the work performed to address legacy pressure vessel deficiencies and comply with pressure safety requirements in 10 CFR 851. It also describes actions taken to develop and implement ORNLs Pressure Safety Program.

Lower, Mark [ORNL; Etheridge, Tom [ORNL; Oland, C. Barry [XCEL Engineering, Inc.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

V1.6 Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to develop an innovative manufacturing process for Type IV high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels, with the intent to significantly lower manufacturing costs. Part of the development is to integrate the features of high precision AFP and commercial FW. Evaluation of an alternative fiber to replace a portion of the baseline fiber will help to reduce costs further.

Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick; Nelson, Karl M.; johnson, Brice A.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Ruiz, Antonio; Adams, Jesse

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Unitised Curtain Walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unitised curtain walling was developed to overcome the problems associated with the installation of stick systems (see Chapter 7) and to reduce the on-site installation time. It consists of large panels, usual...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Foam vessel for cryogenic fluid storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cryogenic storage and separator vessels made of polyolefin foams are disclosed, as are methods of storing and separating cryogenic fluids and fluid mixtures using these vessels. In one embodiment, the polyolefin foams may be cross-linked, closed-cell polyethylene foams with a density of from about 2 pounds per cubic foot to a density of about 4 pounds per cubic foot.

Spear, Jonathan D (San Francisco, CA)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

197

Research on the Hydraulic Characteristics of a 600MW Supercritical Pressure CFB Boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water wall design is a key technology of supercritical pressure CFB boiler. On account of the low heat ... be applied in the water wall of supercritical CFB boilers. An experimental research on the flow ... Harbi...

D. Yang; J. Pan; Q. C. Bi; Y. J. Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Radiation embrittlement of PWR vessel supports  

SciTech Connect

Several studies pertaining to radiation damage of PWR vessel supports were conducted between 1978 and 1987. During this period, apparently there was no reason to believe that low-temperature (<100/degree/C) MTR embrittlement data were not appropriate for evaluating embrittlement of PWR vessel supports. However, late in 1986, data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) vessel surveillance program indicated that the embrittlement rates of the several HFIR vessel materials (A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II) were substantially greater than anticipated on the basis of MTR data. Further evaluation of the HFIR data suggested that a fluence-rate effect was responsible for the apparent discrepancy, and shortly thereafter it became apparent that this rate effect was applicable to the evaluation of LWR vessel supports. As a result, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested that the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) evaluate the impact of the apparent embrittlement rate effect on the integrity of light-water-reactor (LWR) vessel supports. The purpose of the study was to provide an indication of whether the integrity of reactor vessel supports is likely to be challenged by radiation-induced embrittlement. The scope of the evaluation included correlation of the HFIR data for application to the evaluation of LWR vessel supports; a survey and cursory evaluation of all US LWR vessel support designs, selection of two plants for specific-plant evaluation, and a specific-plant evaluation of both plants to determine critical flaw sizes for their vessel supports. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Cheverton, R.D.; Robinson, G.C.; Pennell, W.E.; Nanstad, R.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent vessel sign Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

three-dimensional (3-D) data, which are vessel voxel projection probability, vessel detection... probability, false vessel probability, and vessel-tissue contrast-to-noise ratio...

200

Thermal wake/vessel detection technique  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A computer-automated method for detecting a vessel in water based on an image of a portion of Earth includes generating a thermal anomaly mask. The thermal anomaly mask flags each pixel of the image initially deemed to be a wake pixel based on a comparison of a thermal value of each pixel against other thermal values of other pixels localized about each pixel. Contiguous pixels flagged by the thermal anomaly mask are grouped into pixel clusters. A shape of each of the pixel clusters is analyzed to determine whether each of the pixel clusters represents a possible vessel detection event. The possible vessel detection events are represented visually within the image.

Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nandy, Prabal (Albuquerque, NM); Post, Brian N (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

BNL | Joseph S. Wall  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joseph S. Wall Joseph S. Wall Emeritus Research Interests Mass mapping of unstained biological molecules with the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), particularly assemblies of complexes from subunits of known size and shape. Examples include: Alzheimer's filaments, viral capsids, annelid hemoglobins, hemocyanins, proteases, chaperonins, microtubule proteins, prions and various nucleic acid-protein complexes. Another research area is instrument development involving design and construction of an instrument for low-temperture, energy loss spectroscopy, and elemental mapping at low dose. This is being used to map phosphorus in nucleic acid-protein complexes, phosphorylated proteins and phospholipid structures. He also is director of the Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope STEM

202

Thermal Analysis to Calculate the Vessel Temperature and Stress in Alcator C-Mod Due to the Divertor Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

Alcator C-Mod is planning an upgrade to its outer divertor. The upgrade is intended to correct the existing outer divertor alignment with the plasma, and to operate at elevated temperatures. Higher temperature operation will allow study of edge physics behavior at reactor relevant temperatures. The outer divertor and tiles will be capable of operating at 600oC. Longer pulse length, together with the plasma and RF heat of 9MW, and the inclusion of heater elements within the outer divertor produces radiative energy which makes the sustained operation much more difficult than before. An ANSYS model based on ref. 1 was built for the global thermal analysis of C-Mod. It models the radiative surfaces inside the vessel and between the components, and also includes plasma energy deposition. Different geometries have been simulated and compared. Results show that steady state operation with the divertor at 600oC is possible with no damage to major vessel internal components. The differential temperature between inner divertor structure, or "girdle" and inner vessel wall is ~70oC. This differential temperature is limited by the capacity of the studs that hold the inner divertor backing plates to the vessel wall. At a 70oC temperature differential the stress on the studs is within allowable limits. The thermal model was then used for a stress pass to quantify vessel shell stresses where thermal gradients are significant.

Han Zhang, Peter H. Titus, Robert Ellis, Soren Harrison and Rui Vieira

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

203

Detonation limits in rough walled tubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present paper reports the results of a study of detonation limits in rough tubes. Detonation velocity is measured by photodiodes and ionization probes spaced at 10cm intervals along the length of the tube. Short lengths of smoked foils inserted into the core of the rough tube is used to register the structure of the detonation wave. Pressure transducers are also used to obtain the pressure profile. The results indicate that in rough tubes, the detonation velocity is generally much lower than the corresponding values for smooth tubes. The velocity decreases slowly at first and then more rapidly as the limit is approached. The velocity variation is generally continuous and at the limits, the failure velocity is of the order of about 0.4 V CJ for all cases. The detonation limits in rough tubes are found to be wider than for a smooth tube. This indicates that the turbulence generated by the wall roughness facilitates the propagation of the detonation and extends the limits. Smoked foil records show that in the core of the rough tube the detonation front has a cellular structure corresponding to the usual cellular structure due to instability of the detonation. Thus the intrinsic unstable cellular structure is quite robust and retains its global characteristics in spite of the large perturbations generated by the rough wall. The detonation in the core of the rough tube goes from multi-headed to single headed as the limit is approached. Past the single headed spin, the low velocity detonation has no cellular structure but consists of interacting weak transverse waves from the rough wall. The averaged pressure of the low velocity detonation front corresponds to about the constant volume explosion pressure, in accord with the velocity of the low velocity detonation.

Amanda Starr; John H.S. Lee; Hoi Dick Ng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Modelling of a coke oven heating wall M. Landreau, D. Isler, Centre de Pyrolyse de Marienau (CPM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - Modelling of a coke oven heating wall M. Landreau, D. Isler, Centre de Pyrolyse de Marienau with thermomechanical modelling of a coke oven heating wall. The objective is to define the safe limits of coke oven of walls, roof and larry car, pre-stresses (anchoring system), lateral pressure due to coal pushing A 3D

Boyer, Edmond

205

Non-contact gas turbine blade vibration monitoring using internal pressure and casing response measurements.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis addresses the non-contact measurement of rotor blade vibrations in gas turbines. Specifically, use is made of internal casing wall pressure, and external casing (more)

Forbes, Gareth Llewellyn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Applications of toroids in high-pressure NMR spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Toroid detectors have distinct NMR sensitivity and imaging advantages. The magnetic field lines are nearly completely contained within the active volume element of a toroid. This results in high NMR signal sensitivity. In addition, the toroid detector may be placed next to the metallic walls of a containment vessel with minimal signal loss due to magnetic coupling with the metal container. Thus, the toroid detector is ideal for static high pressure or continuous flow monitoring systems. Toroid NMR detectors have been used to follow the hydroformylation of olefins in supercritical fluids under industrial process conditions. Supercritical fluids are potentially ideal media for conducting catalytic reactions that involve gaseous reactants, including H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2}. The presence of a single homogeneous reaction phase eliminates the gas-liquid mixing problem of alternative two-phase systems, which can limit process rates and adversely affect hydroformylation product selectivities. A second advantage of toroid NMR detectors is that they exhibit a well-defined gradient in the rf field. This magnetic field gradient can be used for NMR imaging applications. Distance resolutions of 20 {mu} have been obtained.

Klingler, R.J.; Rathke, J.W.; Woelk, K. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Final Vitrification Melter And Vessels Evaluation Documentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE has prepared final evaluations and made waste incidental to reprocessing determinations for the vitrification melter and feed vessels (the concentrator feed makeup tank and the melter feed hold...

208

Subcooled Boiling Near a Heated Wall  

SciTech Connect

Experimental measurements of void fraction, bubble frequency, and velocity are obtained in subcooled R-134a flowing over a heated flat plate near an unheated wall and compared to analytical predictions. The measurements were obtained for a fixed system pressure and mass flow rate (P = 2.4 MPa and w = 106 kg/hr) at various inlet liquid temperatures. During the experiments, electrical power was applied at a constant rate to one side of the test section. The local void fraction data, acquired with a hot-film anemometer probe, showed the existence of a significant peak near the heated wall and a smaller secondary peak near the unheated wall for the larger inlet subcoolings. Local vapor velocity data, taken with the hot-film probe and a laser Doppler velocimeter, showed broad maxima near the centerline between the heated and unheated plates. Significant temperature gradients near the heated wall were observed for large inlet subcooling. Bubble size data, inferred from measurements of void fraction, bubble frequency and vapor velocity, when combined with the measured bubble chord length distributions illustrate the transition from pure three dimensional spherical to two-dimensional planar bubble flow, the latter being initiated when the bubbles fill the gap between the plates. These various two-phase flow measurements were used for development of a multidimensional, four-field calculational method; comparisons of the data to the calculations show reasonable agreement.

T.A. Trabold; C.C. Maneri; P.F. Vassallo; D.M. Considine

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

209

Osmotic Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Whetham in which he attempts to consign actual experimental work on osmotic pressure to the humble rle of showing how far the assumptions made in so-called thermodynamical proofs can be ... actual osmotic processes, and that the experimental work on osmotic pressure does not play that humble rle to which Mr. Whetham would consign it. ...

LOUIS KAHLENBERG

1906-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

210

ASME post construction pressure technology codes  

SciTech Connect

The need to continue to operate pressurized equipment and other facilities in a safe, reliable and cost effective manner has led to the development of many new approaches to in-service inspection, flaw evaluation, and repair. Interest on the part of users, regulatory authorities and others in standardizing these approaches has led to the formation of a new ASME Main Committee on Post Construction under the Board on Pressure Technology Codes and Standards, and a new Division of the Pressure Vessel Research Council on Continued Operation of Equipment. This paper provides a brief overview of these activities.

Sims, J.R. [Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Florham Park, NJ (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Single-Walle 4. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications, carbon nanotube research is ac- tively being pursued in diverse areas including energy storage105 Single-Walle 4. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Sebastien Nanot, Nicholas A. Thompson, Ji Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are hol- low, long cylinders with extremely large aspect ratios

Kono, Junichiro

212

Pressurized Items and Cryogens Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pressurized Systems and Cryogens Pressurized Systems and Cryogens Performance Objective: Assure personnel health and safety through regularly scheduled inspections and maintenance on pressure vessels and equipment, compressed gases and gas cylinders, vacuum equipment and systems, hydraulics, and cryogenic materials and systems. Performance Criteria: BN inspects, operates and safely stores unmodified compressed-gas or liquid cylinders approved by the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the appropriate regulators. BN inspects, operates and maintains refrigeration systems that comply with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes, and applicable Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI) standards. BN inspects, operates and maintains pressure systems that operate at an

213

Stick-System Curtain Walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Curtain walls can be divided in two main types according to the system of fabrication and installation: stick systems and unitised panels. The traditional curtain-wall construction is the stick system, where m...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Scaling analysis for a reactor vessel mixing test  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse AP600 advanced pressurized water reactor design uses a gravity-forced safety injection system with two nozzles in the reactor vessel downcomer. In the event of a severe overcooling transient such as a steam-line break, this system delivers boron to the core to offset positive reactivity introduced by the negative moderator defect. To determine if the system design is capable of successfully terminating this type of reactivity transient, a test of the system has been initiated. The test will utilize a 1:9 scale model of the reactor vessel and cold legs. The coolant will be modeled with air, while the safety injection fluid will be simulated with a dense gas. To determine the necessary parameters for this model, a scaling analysis was performed. The continuity, diffusion, and axial Navier-Stokes equations for the injected fluid were converted into dimensionless form. A Boussinesq formulation for turbulent viscosity was applied in these equations. This procedure identified the Richardson, mixing Reynolds, diffusion Fourier, and Euler numbers as dimensionless groups of interest. Order-of-magnitude evaluation was used to determine that the Richardson and mixing Reynolds numbers were the most significant parameters to match for a similar experiment.

Radcliff, T.D.; Parsons, J.R.; Johnson, W.S. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Ekeroth, D.E. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Thermal Behavior of SST-1 Vacuum Vessel and Plasma Facing Components during Baking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For plasma physics experiment, the baking of vacuum vessel (VV) as well as plasma facing components (PFC) of Steady-state Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) is very essential. SST-1 vacuum vessel consists of ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible sixteen sectors in which U-shaped baking channels are embedded on inner surfaces of each of them. Similarly, \\{PFCs\\} are comprised of modular graphite diverters and movable graphite based limiters and stainless steel (SS 304L) tubes are brazed on the back plate of PFC for baking. Baking of SST-1 vacuum vessel and plasma facing components are carried out using nitrogen gas heating and supply system. SST-1 main vacuum vessel is baked at 150C by circulating hot nitrogen gas at 250C at 4.5bar gauge (g) pressure through these U-shaped channels. The plasma facing components (PFC) are baked at 250C or more in the similar fashion by passing hot nitrogen gas through these SS brazed tubes. Thermal analysis shows that the temperature of 150C at the vacuum vessel is achieved within ten hours if hot nitrogen gas is passed at the ramp rate of 50C/h while thermal shields are maintained at 85K. It is also observed that the baking of either of them at a given temperature could be possible through radiation if one of them is maintained at desired temperature. The vacuum vessel at room temperature could be baked to 150C due to radiation from PFC after 40hours when PFC alone is baked at 150C. The mass flow rate required to bake SST-1 vacuum vessel at 150C is 1.074kg/s while that for raising \\{PFCs\\} temperature to 150C is 0.57kg/s. The mass flow rate required to bake \\{PFCs\\} at 250C is 0.80kg/s.

Ziauddin Khan; Yuvakiran Paravastu; Subrata Pradhan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Negative pressure characteristics of an evaporating meniscus at nanoscale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study aims at understanding the characteristics of negative liquid pressures at the nanoscale using molecular dynamics simulation. A nano-meniscus is formed by placing liquid argon on a platinum wall between two ...

Maroo, Shalabh C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Earth pressures and deformations in civil infrastructure in expansive soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation includes the three major parts of the study: volume change, and lateral earth pressure due to suction change in expansive clay soils, and design of civil infrastructure drilled pier, retaining wall and pavement in expansive soils...

Hong, Gyeong Taek

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

218

Adaptive Wall Technology The five by six by twenty-five foot long  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be altered by electric- motor driven screw jacks. Static pressure measurements are made on the walls declined to flow Ink Drop Test on 1:4 Scale Automobile #12;Wind Tunnel Testing of Keck Telescope Enclosure Straight, 70 Lucas Adaptive Wind Tunnel (Specifications) Upper Wall Displacement 1.2 sq ft automobile model

219

Linear chain tensioning of moored production vessels  

SciTech Connect

Part 1 of this two-part series discussed the worldwide floating production vessel (FPV) market and evolution of the linear puller concept. The three principal types of chain jack systems - hollow ram, single and twin cylinders - were introduced. And advantages of this relatively new form of passive mooring were outlined. This concluding article covers applications of linear chain pullers on various vessels, including use on an example 35,000-t North Sea semi-submersible. Chain wear and how linear pullers avoid wear associated with windlass-type systems are discussed, along with the optimization possible through use of a swiveling chain fair-lead latch (SCFL).

Peters, B. (Bardex Corp., London (United Kingdom))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Near-infrared spectroscopy for the measurement of glucose in an integrated rotating wall vessel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

culture media cannot fulfill these requirements. Therefore a near-infrared spectroscopy system is proposed that can potentially perform the required measurements on-line and without any interaction with the cell culture media. Two types of solutions...

Galvan, Mark

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Covering Walls With Fabrics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the glue a dull surface to adhere to. Fill any gouges or nail holes with patching plaster and sand smooth after they have dried thoroughly. Minor ripples can be covered with spackling compound, a plaster-like substance that is spread thinly... during dry weather and in a well-ventilated room. Cut each panel 3 inches longer than the ceiling height. Match and cut sufficient fabric widths to cover completely one wall at a time. Start with Corner I nstall the first fabric panel so...

Anonymous,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Domain walls in SU(5)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the grand unified SU(5) model with a small or vanishing cubic term in the adjoint scalar field in the potential. This gives the model an approximate or exact Z2 symmetry whose breaking leads to domain walls. The simplest domain wall has the structure of a kink across which the Higgs field changes sign (??-?) and inside which the full SU(5) is restored. The kink is shown to be perturbatively unstable for all parameters. We then construct a domain wall solution that is lighter than the kink and show it to be perturbatively stable for a range of parameters. The symmetry in the core of this domain wall is smaller than that outside. The interactions of the domain wall with magnetic monopoles are discussed and it is shown that magnetic monopoles with certain internal space orientations relative to the wall pass through the domain wall. Magnetic monopoles in other relative internal space orientations are likely to be swept away on collision with the domain walls, suggesting a scenario where the domain walls might act like optical polarization filters, allowing certain monopole polarizations to pass through but not others. As SU(5) domain walls will also be formed at small values of the cubic coupling, this leads to a very complicated picture of the evolution of defects after the grand unified phase transition.

Levon Pogosian and Tanmay Vachaspati

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

Saltstone Osmotic Pressure  

SciTech Connect

Recent research into the moisture retention properties of saltstone suggest that osmotic pressure may play a potentially significant role in contaminant transport (Dixon et al., 2009 and Dixon, 2011). The Savannah River Remediation Closure and Disposal Assessments Group requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a literature search on osmotic potential as it relates to contaminant transport and to develop a conceptual model of saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. This report presents the findings of the literature review and presents a conceptual model for saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. The task was requested through Task Technical Request HLW-SSF-TTR-2013-0004. Simulated saltstone typically has very low permeability (Dixon et al. 2008) and pore water that contains a large concentration of dissolved salts (Flach and Smith 2013). Pore water in simulated saltstone has a high salt concentration relative to pore water in concrete and groundwater. This contrast in salt concentration can generate high osmotic pressures if simulated saltstone has the properties of a semipermeable membrane. Estimates of osmotic pressure using results from the analysis of pore water collected from simulated saltstone show that an osmotic pressure up to 2790 psig could be generated within the saltstone. Most semi-permeable materials are non-ideal and have an osmotic efficiency <1 and as a result actual osmotic pressures are less than theoretical pressures. Observations from laboratory tests of simulated saltstone indicate that it may exhibit the behavior of a semi-permeable membrane. After several weeks of back pressure saturation in a flexible wall permeameter (FWP) the membrane containing a simulated saltstone sample appeared to have bubbles underneath it. Upon removal from the FWP the specimen was examined and it was determined that the bubbles were due to liquid that had accumulated between the membrane and the sample. One possible explanation for the accumulation of solution between the membrane and sample is the development of osmotic pressure within the sample. Osmotic pressure will affect fluid flow and contaminant transport and may result in the changes to the internal structure of the semi-permeable material. B?nard et al. 2008 reported swelling of wet cured Portland cement mortars containing salts of NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}x12H {sub 2}O, and K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} when exposed to a dilute solution. Typically hydraulic head is considered the only driving force for groundwater in groundwater models. If a low permeability material containing a concentrated salt solution is present in the hydrogeologic sequence large osmotic pressures may develop and lead to misinterpretation of groundwater flow and solute transport. The osmotic pressure in the semi-permeable material can significantly impact groundwater flow in the vicinity of the semi-permeable material. One possible outcome is that groundwater will flow into the semi-permeable material resulting in hydrologic containment within the membrane. Additionally, hyperfiltration can occur within semi-permeable materials when water moves through a membrane into the more concentrated solution and dissolved constituents are retained in the lower concentration solution. Groundwater flow and transport equations that incorporate chemical gradients (osmosis) have been developed. These equations are referred to as coupled flow equations. Currently groundwater modeling to assess the performance of saltstone waste forms is conducted using the PORFLOW groundwater flow and transport model. PORFLOW does not include coupled flow from chemico-osmotic gradients and therefore numerical simulation of the effect of coupled flow on contaminant transport in and around saltstone cannot be assessed. Most natural semi-permeable membranes are non-ideal membranes and do not restrict all movement of solutes and as a result theoretical osmotic potential is not realized. Osmotic efficiency is a parameter in the coupled flow equation that accounts for the

Nichols, Ralph L.; Dixon, Kenneth L.

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

224

Ensemble Classification System Applied for Retinal Vessel Segmentation on Child Images Containing Various Vessel Profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a new supervised method for segmentation of blood vessels in retinal images of multi ethnic school children. This method uses an ensemble classification system of boot strapped decision tr...

M. M. Fraz; P. Remagnino; A. Hoppe; B. Uyyanonvara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Domain Walls in Gapped Graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic properties of a particular class of domain walls in gapped graphene are investigated. We show that they can support midgap states which are localized in the vicinity of the domain wall and propagate along its length. With a finite density of domain walls, these states can alter the electronic properties of gapped graphene significantly. If the midgap band is partially filled, the domain wall can behave like a one-dimensional metal embedded in a semiconductor and could potentially be used as a single-channel quantum wire.

G. W. Semenoff; V. Semenoff; Fei Zhou

2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

226

Pressure, temperature, and dissolved gas dependence of dielectric breakdown in water.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been shown experimentally that the optical breakdown strength of water is a pressure dependent quantity growing with increasing pressure. The dependence of the breakdown strength on temperature and dissolved gas concentration over a larger range of pressures will be observed. Using a custom fabricated pressure vessel and high?power Nd:YAG laser breakdown events will be generated and observed over a range of pressures from 0 to 25 kpsi. Observations of breakdown events will be made using a high?speed photodetector located behind the pressure vessels optical windows. Dissolved gas concentration will be controlled and varied using a custom water preparation system over a range from waters vapor pressure (?20 torr) to atmospheric pressure.Temperature will be monitored using a thermocouple attached to the pressure vessel and the temperature dependence will be measured over a range from 20 to 35 C. A comparison between current single detector methods and previous imaging methods of using breakdown to determine absolute pressure will then be made. [Work supported by Impulse Devices Inc.

Jonathan Sukovich; R. Glynn Holt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Effective hydrogen storage in single-wall carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrogen-storage behavior of single-wall carbon nanotubes was studied using molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio electronic calculations. Hydrogen atoms with kinetic energy of 1625 eV were observed to penetrate into and be trapped inside the tube. Consecutively injected H atoms form hydrogen molecules, and gradually condense to become liquid hydrogen in the tube. The density of injected hydrogen in the tube and the pressure on the wall of the nanotube induced by the stored hydrogen molecules were evaluated at room temperature.

Yuchen Ma; Yueyuan Xia; Mingwen Zhao; Ruijin Wang; Liangmo Mei

2001-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

228

Oven wall panel construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

Ellison, Kenneth (20 Avondale Cres., Markham, CA); Whike, Alan S. (R.R. #1, Caledon East, both of Ontario, CA)

1980-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

229

Study Reveals Challenges and Opportunities Related to Vessels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Study Reveals Challenges and Opportunities Related to Vessels for U.S. Offshore Wind Study Reveals Challenges and Opportunities Related to Vessels for U.S. Offshore Wind October 1,...

230

Liquid metal systems development: reactor vessel support structure evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Results of an evaluation of support structures for the reactor vessel are reported. The U ring, box ring, integral ring, tee ring and tangential beam supports were investigated. The U ring is the recommended vessel support structure configuration.

McEdwards, J.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Microsoft PowerPoint - Mod 10a - Vessel System - final.ppt [Compatibil...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(for residual heat removal) * Heat exchanger vessels insulated (to minimize parasitic heat loss) 6 Outline * Vessel System functions and requirements Vessel System functions...

232

Pressure transducer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output.

Anderson, Thomas T. (Downers Grove, IL); Roop, Conard J. (Lockport, IL); Schmidt, Kenneth J. (Midlothian, IL); Gunchin, Elmer R. (Lockport, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Blood vessel segmentation methodologies in retinal images - A survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Retinal vessel segmentation algorithms are a fundamental component of automatic retinal disease screening systems. This work examines the blood vessel segmentation methodologies in two dimensional retinal images acquired from a fundus camera and a survey ... Keywords: Blood vessel segmentation, Image segmentation, Medical imaging, Retinal images, Retinopathy, Survey

M. M. Fraz; P. Remagnino; A. Hoppe; B. Uyyanonvara; A. R. Rudnicka; C. G. Owen; S. A. Barman

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Ship-owners' decisions to outsource vessel management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of domiciliation, number of vessels). In addition, a specific country effect is identified for Greek shipEA 4272 Ship-owners' decisions to outsource vessel management Pierre Cariou* Francois-Charles Wolff,version1-17May2011 #12;Ship-owners' decisions to outsource vessel management Pierre CARIOU Corresponding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

235

TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Dynamics of strings between walls  

SciTech Connect

Configurations of vortex-strings stretched between or ending on domain walls were previously found to be 1/4 BPS states. Among zero modes of string positions, the center of mass of strings in each region between two adjacent domain walls is shown to be non-normalizable whereas the rests are normalizable. We study dynamics of vortex-strings stretched between separated domain walls by using two methods, the moduli space (geodesic) approximation of full 1/4 BPS states and the charged particle approximation for string endpoints in the wall effective action. In the first method we obtain the effective Lagrangian explicitly and find the 90 degree scattering for head-on collision. In the second method the domain wall effective action is assumed to be U(1){sup N} gauge theory, and we find a good agreement between two methods for well separated strings. This talk is based on the work [1].

Eto, Minoru [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Ohashi, Keisuke [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Mathematics, Tokyo Woman's Christian University, Tokyo 167-8585 (Japan)

2008-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

238

A framework for studying the effect of compliant surfaces on wall turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper extends the resolvent formulation proposed by McKeon & Sharma (2010) to consider turbulence-compliant wall interactions. Under this formulation, the turbulent velocity field is expressed as a linear superposition of propagating modes, identified via a gain-based decomposition of the Navier-Stokes equations. Compliant surfaces, modeled as a complex wall-admittance linking pressure and velocity, affect the gain and structure of these modes. With minimal computation, this framework accurately predicts the emergence of the quasi-2D propagating waves observed in recent direct numerical simulations. Further, the analysis also enables the rational design of compliant surfaces, with properties optimized to suppress flow structures energetic in wall turbulence. It is shown that walls with unphysical negative damping are required to interact favorably with modes resembling the energetic near-wall cycle, which could explain why previous studies have met with limited success. Positive-damping walls are eff...

Luhar, M; McKeon, B J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Investigation and analysis on ITER in-vessel coils raw-materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The ITER in-vessel coils (IVCs) consist of 27 coils edge localized modes (ELM) and 2 coils vertical stabilization (VS) which are all mounted on the vacuum vessel wall behind the shield modules. The \\{IVCs\\} design and manufacturing work is being conducted in between Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP) and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Because the position of ELM and VS coils is close and face to the plasma, the \\{IVCs\\} must undergo a severe environment, such as the high dose of radiation and high operation temperature, thus the conventional electrical insulation materials cannot be used. And the technology of Stainless Steel Jacketed Mineral Insulated Conductor (SSMIC) is deemed as the best choice to provide the necessary radiation resistance and compatibility strength in ITER's vacuum vessel. While mineral insulated conductor technology is not new, and is similar to the mineral insulated cable used in industrial. Some difficulties still need to be solved, such as searching for the proper raw-materials to make sure that the conductor have the properties of high current carrying capability, the necessary radiation resistance, the proper strength, at the same time, it must be come true in manufacture technology. This paper described the analysis of the materials for VS and ELM coil conductor.

Huan Jin; Yu Wu; Feng Long; Min Yu; Qiyang Han; Huajun Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Pressurized fluidized bed reactor and a method of operating the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

Isaksson, J.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Life cycle considerations in propulsion alternatives for fast vessels  

SciTech Connect

Fast vessels are being built and operated for a large range of passenger-carrying applications. Fast cargo-carrying vessels are being considered in a variety of sizes as well. A major decision in design and construction of these vessels is the propulsion system; this decision has major impacts on the operation economics as well as the operational capabilities of the vessels. Factors involved in consideration of propulsion alternatives for fast vessels are examined, with emphasis upon the total life cycle operating implications of these factors. A methodology for considering the factors is suggested, and an example is presented with results of the consideration tradeoffs.

Luck, D.L. [General Electric Co., Evendale, OH (United States). GE Marine and Industrial Engines

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Resuspension of wall deposits in spray dryers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wall deposition occurs in spray dryers when dried or partially dried particles contact and adhere to the walls during operation, thus reducing the yield of product collected. Wall deposits also present a product ...

M. J. Hanus; T. A. G. Langrish

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Heavy wall casing in C110 grade for sour service  

SciTech Connect

The recent developments of high pressure and sour wells in the North Sea area have increased the need for high strength H{sub 2}S resistant carbon steels. Steel chemistry and heat treatment solutions have been available to provide products suitable for use in these environments within the constraints of classic well design since the early 90`s but operators are now demanding higher strength and heavier wall products for HPHT wells. Well completion design teams are now specifying from OCTG suppliers C110 grade products in increasingly heavy wall and the challenge facing suppliers is to guarantee product integrity not only of these heavy wall casing but also the associated coupling stocks. This paper was aimed at evaluating the performances of thick walled C110 tubulars (up to 2in) for sour environments. Metallurgical characteristics (microstructure, structure, microhardness), mechanical properties (hardness, tensile, toughness), Sulfide Stress Cracking resistance (smooth tensile, DCB) have been investigated throughout the wall thickness. The C110 proprietary grade proved to be an excellent material for use as Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG) in typical North Sea environments with improved assessment of H2S corrosion resistance properties according to both NACE and EFC (European Federation of Corrosion) philosophies.

Linne, C.P.; Blanchard, F.; Puissochet, F. [Vallourec Research Center, Aulnoye Aymeries (France). Corrosion and Metallurgical Dept.; Orlans-Joliet, B.J.; Hamilton, R.S.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Method for forming a bladder for fluid storage vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

Mitlitsky, Fred (Livermore, CA); Myers, Blake (Livermore, CA); Magnotta, Frank (Lafayette, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Autonomous Radiation Monitoring of Small Vessels  

SciTech Connect

Small private vessels are one avenue by which nuclear materials may be smuggled across international borders. While one can contemplate using the terrestrial approach of radiation portal monitors on the navigable waterways that lead to many ports, these systems are ill-suited to the problem. They require vehicles to pass at slow speeds between two closely-spaced radiation sensors, relying on the uniformity of vehicle sizes to space the detectors, and on proximity to link an individual vehicle to its radiation signature. In contrast to roadways where lanes segregate vehicles, and motion is well controlled by inspection booths; channels, inlets, and rivers present chaotic traffic patterns populated by vessels of all sizes. We have developed a unique solution to this problem based on our portal-less portal monitor instrument that is designed to handle free-flowing traffic on roadways with up to five-traffic lanes. The instrument uses a combination of visible-light and gamma-ray imaging to acquire and link radiation images to individual vehicles. It was recently tested in a maritime setting. In this paper we present the instrument, how it functions, and the results of the recent tests.

Fabris, Lorenzo [ORNL; Hornback, Donald Eric [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) Vessel Relocated after 50 years.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Printer Friendly Printer Friendly Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) Vessel Relocated Engineering Test Reactor Vessel Pre-startup 1957 Click on image to enlarge. Image 1 of 5 Gantry jacks attached to ETR vessel. Initial lift starts. - Click on image to enlarge. Image 2 of 5 ETR vessel removed from substructure. Vessel lifted approximately 40 ft. - Click on image to enlarge. On Monday, September 24, 2007 the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) vessel was removed from its location and delivered to the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). The long history of the ETR began for this water-cooled reactor with its start up in 1957, after taking only 2 years to build. According to "Proving the Principles," by Susan M. Stacy: When the Engineering Test Reactor started up at the Test Reactor Area in

247

Webinar: Material Characterization of Storage Vessels for Fuel Cell Forklifts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Video recording of the webinar titled, Material Characterization of Storage Vessels for Fuel Cell Forklifts, originally presented on August 14, 2012.

248

A Xenon Condenser with a Remote Liquid Storage Vessel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the design and operation of a system for xenon liquefaction in which the condenser is separated from the liquid storage vessel. The condenser is cooled by a pulse tube cryocooler, while the vessel is cooled only by the liquid xenon itself. This arrangement facilitates liquid particle detector research by allowing easy access to the upper and lower flanges of the vessel. We find that an external xenon gas pump is useful for increasing the rate at which cooling power is delivered to the vessel, and we present measurements of the power and efficiency of the apparatus.

S. Slutsky; Y. -R. Yen; H. Breuer; A. Dobi; C. Hall; T. Langford; D. S. Leonard; L. J. Kaufman; V. Strickland; N. Voskanian

2009-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

249

Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

Grigorian, Leonid (Raymond, OH); Hornyak, Louis (Evergreen, CO); Dillon, Anne C (Boulder, CO); Heben, Michael J (Denver, CO)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

250

Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

251

Dynamics of strings between walls  

SciTech Connect

Configurations of vortex strings stretched between or ending on domain walls were previously found to be 1/4 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) states in N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories in 3+1 dimensions. Among zero modes of string positions, the center of mass of strings in each region between two adjacent domain walls is shown to be non-normalizable whereas the rests are normalizable. We study dynamics of vortex strings stretched between separated domain walls by using two methods, the moduli space (geodesic) approximation of full 1/4 BPS states and the charged particle approximation for string end points in the wall effective action. In the first method we explicitly obtain the effective Lagrangian in the strong coupling limit, which is written in terms of hypergeometric functions, and find the 90 deg. scattering for head-on collision. In the second method the domain wall effective action is assumed to be U(1){sup N} gauge theory, and we find a good agreement between two methods for well-separated strings.

Eto, Minoru [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Pisa Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Ohashi, Keisuke [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Mathematics, Tokyo Woman's Christian University, Tokyo 167-8585 (Japan)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Domain walls riding the wave.  

SciTech Connect

Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the ferromagnetic wire is the preferred method, as it combines manipulation and readout of the domain-wall state. The electrons that take part in the process of readout and manipulation of the domain-wall structure in the nanowire do so through the so-called spin transfer torque: When spin-polarized electrons in the ferromagnet nanowire pass through the domain wall they experience a nonuniform magnetization, and they try to align their spins with the local magnetic moments. The force that the electrons experience has a reaction force counterpart that 'pushes' the local magnetic moments, resulting in movement of the domain wall in the direction of the electron flow through the spin-transfer torque. The forces between the electrons and the local magnetic moments in the ferromagnet also create additional electrical resistance for the electrons passing through the domain wall. By measuring resistance across a segment of the nanowire, one determines if a domain wall is present; i.e., one can read the stored information. The interaction of the spin-polarized electrons with the domain wall in the ferromagnetic nanowire is not very efficient. Even for materials achieving high polarization of the free electrons, it is very difficult to move the magnetic domain wall. Several factors contribute to this problem, with imperfections of the ferromagnetic nanowire that cause domain-wall pinning being the dominant one. Permalloy nanowires, one of the best candidates for domain-wall-based memory and logic devices, require current densities of the order of 10{sup 8} A/cm{sup 2} in order to move a domain wall from a pinning well. Considering that this current has to pass through a relatively long wire, it is not very difficult to imagine that most of the energy will go to Joule heating. The efficiency of the process - the ratio of the energy converted to domain-wall motion to the total energy consumed - is comparable to that of an incandescent light bulb converting electricity to light. A step towards more efficient domain-wall-based memory devices is the advance of using alternating currents or curren

Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Relation between the coking-chamber height, the coking pressure, and the packing density of regular or partially briquetted coal batch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since coking coal is characterized by both elasticity and ductility in the plastic state, the coal charge of coke furnaces that contains a plastic layer exerts pressure (coking pressure) on the chamber walls. The...

L. V. Kopeliovich; V. I. Sukhorukov; V. I. Shvetsov

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Domain Walls, Triples and Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a construction of domain walls in string theory. The domain walls can bridge both Minkowski and AdS string vacua. A key ingredient in the construction are novel classical Yang-Mills configurations, including instantons, which interpolate between toroidal Yang-Mills vacua. Our construction provides a concrete framework for the study of inflating metrics in string theory. In some cases, the accelerating space-time comes with a holographic description. The general form of the holographic dual is a field theory with parameters that vary over space-time.

Travis Maxfield; Savdeep Sethi

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

255

Pressure History Measurement in a Microwave Beaming Thruster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a microwave beaming thruster with a 1?dimensional nozzle plasma and shock wave propagates in the nozzle absorbing microwave power. In this study pressure histories in the thruster are measured using pressure gauges. Measured pressure history at the thruster wall shows constant pressure during plasma propagation in the nozzle. The result of measurement of the propagating velocities of shock wave and plasma shows that both propagate in the same velocity. These result shows that thrust producing model of analogy of pulse detonation engine is successful for the 1D thruster.

Yasuhisa Oda; Masato Ushio; Kimiya Komurasaki; Koji Takahashi; Atsushi Kasugai; Keishi Sakamoto

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Liquid Walls Innovative Concepts for First Walls and Blankets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rrr ?= V r J r PV r B r 1P 2P g r + - V r #12;Liquid Wall Options Thickness · Thin (~ 2cm with existing technology · Size of plasma devices and power plants can be substantially reduced High Poloidal

Abdou, Mohamed

257

Coronary artery wall imaging in mice using osmium tetroxide and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)  

SciTech Connect

The high spatial resolution of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is ideal for 3D imaging of coronary arteries in intact mouse heart specimens. Previously, micro-CT of mouse heart specimens utilized intravascular contrast agents that hardened within the vessel lumen and allowed a vascular cast to be made. However, for mouse coronary artery disease models, it is highly desirable to image coronary artery walls and highlight plaques. For this purpose, we describe an ex vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT imaging technique based on tissue staining with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) solution. As a tissue-staining contrast agent, OsO{sub 4} is retained in the vessel wall and surrounding tissue during the fixation process and cleared from the vessel lumens. Its high X-ray attenuation makes the artery wall visible in CT. Additionally, since OsO{sub 4} preferentially binds to lipids, it highlights lipid deposition in the artery wall. We performed micro-CT of heart specimens of 5- to 25-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type mice and 5- to 13-week-old apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE{sup -/-}) mice at 10 {mu}m resolution. The results show that walls of coronary arteries as small as 45 {mu}m in diameter are visible using a table-top micro-CT scanner. Similar image clarity was achieved with 1/2000th the scan time using a synchrotron CT scanner. In 13-week-old apoE mice, lipid-rich plaques are visible in the aorta. Our study shows that the combination of OsO{sub 4} and micro-CT permits the visualization of the coronary artery wall in intact mouse hearts.

Pai, Vinay M.; Kozlowski, Megan; Donahue, Danielle; Miller, Elishiah; Xiao, Xianghui; Chen, Marcus Y.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Connelly, Patricia; Jeffries, Kenneth; Wen, Han (NIH)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

258

Stability analysis of a borehole wall during horizontal directional drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, numerical simulation strategies are proposed and numerical analyses are performed to investigate the stability of a borehole wall during horizontal directional drilling in loose sand with an emphasis on the role of the filter cake in borehole stability. Two computational scenarios, one in the absence of a filter cake and one with the presence of a filter cake in a borehole wall, are investigated by considering both deep and shallow borehole situations. In the case where no filter cake is formed, the soildrilling fluid interaction analysis shows that the effective pressure on soil particles will quickly decrease to zero even at a low drilling fluid pressure because of the rapid drainage of the drilling fluids into the loose sands. This conforms to the classical liquefaction criterion, indicating that static (flow) liquefaction-based soil crumbling and sloughing will occur even at a very low drilling fluid pressure if an effective filter cake is not formed. Soils permeability effect on pore pressure and the transition to a steady flow are also studied. In the second scenario in which a filter cake is formed, the hydraulic fracture failures around the bores are investigated, which are caused by the expansion of the yielding zones. The yield zone sizes and critical drilling fluid pressures at the moment of hydraulic fracturing failure are calculated from the finite element analyses and the closed-form solution, which is based on classical plasticity theories. The critical fluid pressures from the finite element analyses and the closed-form solutions are very close, but there is a large discrepancy between the yield zone sizes.

X. Wang; R.L. Sterling

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Core Vessel Insert Handling Robot for the Spallation Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

The Spallation Neutron Source provides the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams for scientific research and industrial development. Its eighteen neutron beam lines will eventually support up to twenty-four simultaneous experiments. Each beam line consists of various optical components which guide the neutrons to a particular instrument. The optical components nearest the neutron moderators are the core vessel inserts. Located approximately 9 m below the high bay floor, these inserts are bolted to the core vessel chamber and are part of the vacuum boundary. They are in a highly radioactive environment and must periodically be replaced. During initial SNS construction, four of the beam lines received Core Vessel Insert plugs rather than functional inserts. Remote replacement of the first Core Vessel Insert plug was recently completed using several pieces of custom-designed tooling, including a highly complicated Core Vessel Insert Robot. The design of this tool are discussed.

Graves, Van B [ORNL; Dayton, Michael J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor salt deposition studies  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has teamed with Foster Wheeler Development Corp. and GenCorp, Aerojet to develop and evaluate a new supercritical water oxidation reactor design using a transpiring wall liner. In the design, pure water is injected through small pores in the liner wall to form a protective boundary layer that inhibits salt deposition and corrosion, effects that interfere with system performance. The concept was tested at Sandia on a laboratory-scale transpiring wall reactor that is a 1/4 scale model of a prototype plant being designed for the Army to destroy colored smoke and dye at Pine Bluff Arsenal in Arkansas. During the tests, a single-phase pressurized solution of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) was heated to supercritical conditions, causing the salt to precipitate out as a fine solid. On-line diagnostics and post-test observation allowed us to characterize reactor performance at different flow and temperature conditions. Tests with and without the protective boundary layer demonstrated that wall transpiration provides significant protection against salt deposition. Confirmation tests were run with one of the dyes that will be processed in the Pine Bluff facility. The experimental techniques, results, and conclusions are discussed.

Haroldsen, B.L.; Mills, B.E.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Brown, B.G. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

Michael W. Smith, Cheol Park, Meng Zheng, Changhong Ke ,In-Tae Bae, Kevin Jordan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Dynamics of biased domain walls and the devaluation mechanism  

SciTech Connect

We study the evolution of biased domain walls in the early universe. We explicitly discuss the roles played by the surface tension and volume pressure in the evolution of the walls, and quantify their effects by looking at the collapse of spherical wall solutions. We then apply our results to a particular mechanism, known as the devaluation scenario, in which the dynamics of biased domain walls was suggested as a possible solution to the cosmological constant problem. Our results indicate that devaluation will, in general, lead to values of the cosmological constant that differ by several orders of magnitude from the observationally inferred value, {rho}{sub vac}{sup 1/4}{approx}10{sup -3} eV. We also argue that the reasons behind this are not specific to a particular realization, and are expected to persist in any scenario of this kind, except if a low-energy cutoff on the spectra of vacuum energy densities, of the order of the critical density at the present time, is postulated. This implies that any such scenario will require a fine-tuning similar to the usual one.

Avelino, P. P.; Sousa, L. [Centro de Fisica do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica da Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Martins, C. J. A. P. [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas s/n, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Dynamics of Domain Wall Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networks or webs of domain walls are admitted in Abelian or non-Abelian gauge theory coupled to fundamental Higgs fields with complex masses. We examine the dynamics of the domain wall loops by using the moduli approximation and find a phase rotation induces a repulsive force which can be understood as a Noether charge of Q-solitons. Non-Abelian gauge theory allows different types of loops which can be deformed to each other by changing a modulus. This admits the moduli geometry like a sandglass made by gluing the tips of the two cigar-(cone-)like metrics of a single triangle loop. We conclude that the sizes of all loops tend to grow for a late time in general models with complex Higgs masses, while the sizes are stabilized at some values once triplet masses are introduced for the Higgs fields. We also show that the stationary motion on the moduli space of the domain wall webs represents 1/4 BPS Q-webs of walls.

Minoru Eto; Toshiaki Fujimori; Takayuki Nagashima; Muneto Nitta; Keisuke Ohashi; Norisuke Sakai

2007-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

264

Dynamics of domain wall networks  

SciTech Connect

Networks or webs of domain walls are admitted in Abelian or non-Abelian gauge theory coupled to fundamental Higgs fields with complex masses. We examine the dynamics of the domain wall loops by using the moduli approximation and find a phase rotation induces a repulsive force which can be understood as a Noether charge of Q-solitons. Non-Abelian gauge theory allows different types of loops which can be deformed to each other by changing a modulus. This admits the moduli geometry like a sandglass made by gluing the tips of the two cigar-(cone-)like metrics of a single triangle loop. We conclude that the sizes of all loops tend to grow for a late time in general models with complex Higgs masses, while the sizes are stabilized at some values once triplet masses are introduced for the Higgs fields. We also show that the stationary motion on the moduli space of the domain wall webs represents 1/4 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Q-webs of walls.

Eto, Minoru [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Pisa Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki; Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Ohashi, Keisuke [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Comparison of high pressure transient PVT measurements and model predictions. Part I.  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments consisting of vessel-to-vessel transfers of pressurized gas using Transient PVT methodology have been conducted to provide a data set for optimizing heat transfer correlations in high pressure flow systems. In rapid expansions such as these, the heat transfer conditions are neither adiabatic nor isothermal. Compressible flow tools exist, such as NETFLOW that can accurately calculate the pressure and other dynamical mechanical properties of such a system as a function of time. However to properly evaluate the mass that has transferred as a function of time these computational tools rely on heat transfer correlations that must be confirmed experimentally. In this work new data sets using helium gas are used to evaluate the accuracy of these correlations for receiver vessel sizes ranging from 0.090 L to 13 L and initial supply pressures ranging from 2 MPa to 40 MPa. The comparisons show that the correlations developed in the 1980s from sparse data sets perform well for the supply vessels but are not accurate for the receivers, particularly at early time during the transfers. This report focuses on the experiments used to obtain high quality data sets that can be used to validate computational models. Part II of this report discusses how these data were used to gain insight into the physics of gas transfer and to improve vessel heat transfer correlations. Network flow modeling and CFD modeling is also discussed.

Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.; Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

High Temperature Electrolysis Pressurized Experiment Design, Operation, and Results  

SciTech Connect

A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate planar cells with dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. It is also suitable for testing other cell and stack geometries including tubular cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. Pressurized operation of a ten-cell internally manifolded solid oxide electrolysis stack has been successfully demonstrated up 1.5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this report. Results of initial testing showed the expected increase in open-cell voltage associated with elevated pressure. However, stack performance in terms of area-specific resistance was enhanced at elevated pressure due to better gas diffusion through the porous electrodes of the cells. Some issues such as cracked cells and seals were encountered during testing. Full resolution of these issues will require additional testing to identify the optimum test configurations and protocols.

J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G.K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Research and Development Roadmaps for Nondestructive Evaluation of Cables, Concrete, Reactor Pressure Vessels, and Piping Fatigue  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation Pathway is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting long-term environmental degradation behavior of materials in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on systems, structures, and components is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e., service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enabled by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of systems, structures, and components degradation.

Clayton, Dwight A.; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Smith, Cyrus M.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Brenchley, David L.; Meyer, Ryan M.

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Pipeline and Pressure Vessel R&D under the Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program In Pennsylvania  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Began as rapid data generator for numerical modeling efforts, Cathodic charging applied to base, Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and weld metal

269

Pressure rise generated by the expansion of a local gas volume in a closed vessel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rise for partial combustion in closed spherically...ratios of specific heats that were unequal...temperature-dependent specific heats and equilibrium...velocity of three hydrocarbon-air mixtures...expression for partial combustion, Luijten et al...constant specific heats and constant burned...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Pressurizer with a mechanically attached surge nozzle thermal sleeve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal sleeve is mechanically attached to the bore of a surge nozzle of a pressurizer for the primary circuit of a pressurized water reactor steam generating system. The thermal sleeve is attached with a series of keys and slots which maintain the thermal sleeve centered in the nozzle while permitting thermal growth and restricting flow between the sleeve and the interior wall of the nozzle.

Wepfer, Robert M

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

271

Development of the Low-Pressure Hydride/Dehydride Process  

SciTech Connect

The low-pressure hydride/dehydride process was developed from the need to recover thin-film coatings of plutonium metal from the inner walls of an isotope separation chamber located at Los Alamos and to improve the safety operation of a hydride recovery process using hydrogen at a pressure of 0.7 atm at Rocky Flats. This process is now the heart of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) project.

Rueben L. Gutierrez

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Method for reducing pressure drop through filters, and filter exhibiting reduced pressure drop  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for generating and applying coatings to filters with porous material in order to reduce large pressure drop increases as material accumulates in a filter, as well as the filter exhibiting reduced and/or more uniform pressure drop. The filter can be a diesel particulate trap for removing particulate matter such as soot from the exhaust of a diesel engine. Porous material such as ash is loaded on the surface of the substrate or filter walls, such as by coating, depositing, distributing or layering the porous material along the channel walls of the filter in an amount effective for minimizing or preventing depth filtration during use of the filter. Efficient filtration at acceptable flow rates is achieved.

Sappok, Alexander; Wong, Victor

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

273

Stress analysis of aspherical coated particle with inner pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coated particles used in HTR fuel element sustain the inner pressure during irradiation as a pressure vessel. In actually the coated particle is not real spherical but with some asphericity, the stress distribution in the vessel is not uniform, coated layer in aspherical particle sustain more additional stress due to the asphericity. In this paper, the geometric shape distribution is summarized based on actual coated particle statistic. A mechanical analysis model is proposed for SiC layer by geometric combinations, and stress distribution of coated particle with a flat is calculated. The results show that the local maximum stress of aspherical particle increased two times than that of ideal spherical coated particle, which increase the failure probability under irradiation and high temperature.

Bing Liu; Lin Yang; Tongxiang Liang; Chunhe Tang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

PERFORMANCE OF A CONTAINMENT VESSEL CLOSURE FOR RADIOACTIVE GAS CONTENTS  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a summary of the design and testing of the containment vessel closure for the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP). This package is a replacement for a package that has been used to ship tritium in a variety of content configurations and forms since the early 1970s. The containment vessel closure incorporates features specifically designed for the containment of tritium when subjected to the normal and hypothetical conditions required of Type B radioactive material shipping Packages. The paper discusses functional performance of the containment vessel closure of the BTSP prototype packages and separate testing that evaluated the performance of the metallic C-Rings used in a mock BTSP closure.

Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

275

Nondestructive Technique Survey for Assessing Integrity of Composite Firing Vessel  

SciTech Connect

The repeated use and limited lifetime of a composite tiring vessel compel a need to survey techniques for monitoring the structural integrity of the vessel in order to determine when it should be retired. Various nondestructive techniques were researched and evaluated based on their applicability to the vessel. The methods were visual inspection, liquid penetrant testing, magnetic particle testing, surface mounted strain gauges, thermal inspection, acoustic emission, ultrasonic testing, radiography, eddy current testing, and embedded fiber optic sensors. It was determined that embedded fiber optic sensor is the most promising technique due to their ability to be embedded within layers of composites and their immunity to electromagnetic interference.

Tran, A.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Berth allocation considering fuel consumption and vessel emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a more elaborate model on berth allocation considering fuel consumption than before, and overcome the nonlinear complexity by casting it as a mixed integer second order cone programming model. Furthermore, we conduct the vessel emission (in sailing periods) calculation with the widely-used emission factors. Besides, vessel emissions in mooring periods are also analyzed through a post-optimization phase on waiting time. Experimental results demonstrate that the new berth allocation strategy, reflected by the proposed model, is competent to significantly reduce fuel consumption and vessel emissions, while simultaneously retaining the service level of the terminal.

Yuquan Du; Qiushuang Chen; Xiongwen Quan; Lei Long; Richard Y.K. Fung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel.

Powell, James G. (Clifton Park, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. 1 figures.

Powell, J.G.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

279

Processing and analysis techniques involving in-vessel material generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In at least one embodiment, the inventive technology relates to in-vessel generation of a material from a solution of interest as part of a processing and/or analysis operation. Preferred embodiments of the in-vessel material generation (e.g., in-vessel solid material generation) include precipitation; in certain embodiments, analysis and/or processing of the solution of interest may include dissolution of the material, perhaps as part of a successive dissolution protocol using solvents of increasing ability to dissolve. Applications include, but are by no means limited to estimation of a coking onset and solution (e.g., oil) fractionating.

Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

280

Processing and analysis techniques involving in-vessel material generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In at least one embodiment, the inventive technology relates to in-vessel generation of a material from a solution of interest as part of a processing and/or analysis operation. Preferred embodiments of the in-vessel material generation (e.g., in-vessel solid material generation) include precipitation; in certain embodiments, analysis and/or processing of the solution of interest may include dissolution of the material, perhaps as part of a successive dissolution protocol using solvents of increasing ability to dissolve. Applications include, but are by no means limited to estimation of a coking onset and solution (e.g., oil) fractionating.

Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY)

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Remarks on Liquid Wall Research Mohamed Abdou  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wall Research Advances the Science and Energy Goals of Fusion in a Perfect Fit · If we can make liquidRemarks on Liquid Wall Research Mohamed Abdou Professor Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering UCLA Note For recent presentations and papers on liquid wall research by the APEX team see website: http

Abdou, Mohamed

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - anca-associated small vessel Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health Vessel... of the Vessel Sanitation Program The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's ... Source: National...

283

Assessment of Vessel Requirements for the U.S. Offshore Wind...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Sector: Executive Summary Assessment of Vessel Requirements for the U.S. Offshore Wind Sector: Executive Summary Executive summary of the Assessment of Vessel Requirements for...

284

Simulation of Blunt Defect Behaviour in a Thin Walled Cylinder for the Development of Structural Health Monitoring Techniques for Pipeline Repairs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this chapter is to analyse numerically the effects of artificial notch defect size on a pressurised straight pipe (thin walled cylinder) subjected to limited testing pressures within an elastic w...

M. A. Murad; F. P. Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

High-Current Gas Discharge at Low Pressures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Probe measurements in a mercury-vapour arc tube (diameter 54 mm.) at pressures less than 10-3 mm. show that ... than 10-3 mm. show that at currents greater than 50 amp. the radial_electric field Es is negligible compared to the term w1H except close to the tube walls ...

P. C. THONEMANN; W. T. COWHIG

1950-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

Effect of temperature and pressure on the dynamics of nanoconfined propane  

SciTech Connect

We report the effect of temperature and pressure on the dynamical properties of propane confined in nanoporous silica aerogel studied using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). Our results demonstrate that the effect of a change in the pressure dominates over the effect of temperature variation on the dynamics of propane nano-confined in silica aerogel. At low pressures, most of the propane molecules are strongly bound to the pore walls, only a small fraction is mobile. As the pressure is increased, the fraction of mobile molecules increases. A change in the mechanism of motion, from continuous diffusion at low pressures to jump diffusion at higher pressures has also been observed.

Gautam, Siddharth, E-mail: gautam.25@osu.edu; Liu, Tingting, E-mail: gautam.25@osu.edu; Welch, Susan; Cole, David [School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 275 Mendenhall Laboratory, 125 S Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Rother, Gernot [Geochemistry and Interfacial Science Group, Chemical Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Jalarvo, Niina [Jlich Center for Neutron Sciences (JCNS-1), Forschungszentrum Jlich Outstation at Spallation Neutron Source(SNS), Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Mamontov, Eugene [Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

287

Toroid cavities as NMR detectors in high pressure probes  

SciTech Connect

A cylindrical toroid cavity has been developed for application as an NMR detector for high sensitivity and high resolution spectroscopy in metal vessel probes. Those probes are used for in situ investigations at high temperature and pressure. Since the transmitted r.f. field is completely confined within the torus, the cavity can be placed inside the pressurized system without magnetic coupling to the metal vessel. Resonance frequencies up to 400 MHz make the toroid cavity detector especially suited for use in {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F spectroscopy. Typically achieved static {sup 1}H linewidths, measured on CHCl{sub 3} using cavities in Be-Cu pressure vessels, are 2.0 Hz. On the basis of theoretical considerations that include the radial dependence of the r.f. field within cylindrical or circular toroid detectors, equations were evolved to predict the signal intensity as a function of the pulse width. The equations precisely describe the deviations from the sinusoidal approximation, which is generally used for signal intensities derived from Helmholtz or solenoid coils.

Woelk, K.; Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Index of /research/alcator/facility/Procedures/IN-VESSEL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IN-VESSEL ICO Name Last modified Size Description DIR Parent Directory - Checklist of tasks before closing up.old.pdf 17-Apr-2008 09:28 9.6K Checklist of tasks before...

289

Hydrodynamic evaluation of high-speed semi-SWATH vessels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-speed semi-displacement vessels have enjoyed rapid development and widespread use over the past 25 years. Concurrent with their growth as viable commercial and naval platforms, has been the advancement of three-dimensional ...

Guttenplan, Adam (Adam David)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Simple program calculates partial liquid volumes in vessels  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a simple calculator program which solves problems of partial liquid volumes for a variety of storage and process vessels, including inclined cylindrical vessels and those with conical heads. Engineers in the oil refining and chemical industries are often confronted with the problem of estimating partial liquid volumes in storage tanks or process vessels. Cistern, the calculator program presented here, allows fast and accurate resolution of problems for a wide range of vessels without user intervention, other than inputting the problem data. Running the program requires no mathematical skills. Cistern is written for Hewlett-Packard HP 41CV or HP 41CX programmable calculators (or HP 41C with extended memory modules).

Koch, P.

1992-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

291

Skyrmions from Instantons inside Domain Walls  

SciTech Connect

Some years ago, Atiyah and Manton described a method to construct approximate Skyrmion solutions from Yang-Mills instantons. Here we present a dynamical realization of this construction using domain walls in a five-dimensional gauge theory. The non-Abelian gauge symmetry is broken in each vacuum but restored in the core of the domain wall, allowing instantons to nestle inside the wall. We show that the world volume dynamics of the wall is given by the Skyrme model, including the four-derivative term, and the instantons appear as domain wall Skyrmions.

Eto, Minoru; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, 152-8551 (Japan); Tong, David [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

292

PressurePressure Indiana Coal Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TimeTime PressurePressure · Indiana Coal Characteristics · Indiana Coals for Coke · Coal Indiana Total Consumption Electricity 59,664 Coke 4,716 Industrial 3,493 Major Coal- red power plantsTransportation in Indiana · Coal Slurry Ponds Evaluation · Site Selection for Coal Gasification · Coal-To-Liquids Study, CTL

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

293

Reducing fishing vessel fuel consumption and NOX emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a growing concern with the impact of marine operations on the environment. This requires reducing fuel consumption and vessel pollution during operation. On-board computers and satellite communications will enable the operator to reduce fuel consumption and NOX emissions during vessel operations. This paper presents the results of a study on this problem and how such an on-board system could be implemented to reduce fuel consumption and engine NOX emissions.

Robert Latorre

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

High-pressure microhydraulic actuator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrokinetic ("EK") pumps convert electric to mechanical work when an electric field exerts a body force on ions in the Debye layer of a fluid in a packed bed, which then viscously drags the fluid. Porous silica and polymer monoliths (2.5-mm O.D., and 6-mm to 10-mm length) having a narrow pore size distribution have been developed that are capable of large pressure gradients (250-500 psi/mm) when large electric fields (1000-1500 V/cm) are applied. Flowrates up to 200 .mu.L/min and delivery pressures up to 1200 psi have been demonstrated. Forces up to 5 lb-force at 0.5 mm/s (12 mW) have been demonstrated with a battery-powered DC-DC converter. Hydraulic power of 17 mW (900 psi@ 180 uL/min) has been demonstrated with wall-powered high voltage supplies. The force and stroke delivered by an actuator utilizing an EK pump are shown to exceed the output of solenoids, stepper motors, and DC motors of similar size, despite the low thermodynamic efficiency.

Mosier, Bruce P. (San Francisco, CA) [San Francisco, CA; Crocker, Robert W. (Fremont, CA) [Fremont, CA; Patel, Kamlesh D. (Dublin, CA) [Dublin, CA

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

295

LNG Imports by Vessel into the U.S. Form | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vessel into the U.S. Form LNG Imports by Vessel into the U.S. Form Excel Version of LNG Imports by Vessel into the U.S. Form.xlsx PDF Version of LNG Imports by Vessel into the U.S....

296

The pressure exerted by adsorbing directed lattice paths and staircase polygons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A directed path in the vicinity of a hard wall exerts pressure on the wall because of loss of entropy. The pressure at a particular point may be estimated by estimating the loss of entropy if the point is excluded from the path. In this paper we determine asymptotic expressions for the pressure on the X-axis in models of adsorbing directed paths in the first quadrant. Our models show that the pressure vanishes in the limit of long paths in the desorbed phase, but there is a non-zero pressure in the adsorbed phase. We determine asymptotic approximations of the pressure for finite length Dyck paths and directed paths, as well as for a model of adsorbing staircase polygons with both ends grafted to the X-axis.

E. J. Janse van Rensburg; T. Prellberg

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

297

Design and fabrication of a MEMS-array pressure sensor system for passive underwater navigation inspired by the lateral line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An object within a fluid flow generates local pressure variations that are unique and characteristic to the object's shape and size. For example, a three-dimensional object or a wall-like obstacle obstructs flow and creates ...

Hou, Stephen Ming-Chang, 1981-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

299

Neutron Assay System for Con?nement Vessel Disposition  

SciTech Connect

Waste will be removed from confinement vessels remaining from 1970s-era experiments. Los Alamos has 9+ spherical confinement vessels remaining from experiments. Each vessel contains {approx} 500 lbs of radioactive debris such as actinide metals and oxides, metals, powdered silica, graphite, and wires and hardware. In order to dispose of the vessels, debris and contamination must be removed. Neutron assay system was designed to assay vessels before and after cleanout. System requirements are: (1) Modular and moveable; (2) Capable of detecting {approx}100g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a 2-inch thick steel sphere with 6 foot diameter; and (3) Capable of safeguards-quality assays. Initial design parameters arethe use of 4-atm {sup 3}He tubes with length of 6 feet, and {sup 3}He tubes embedded in polyethelene for moderation. This paper describes the calibration of the Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) and quantification of its uncertainties. Assay uncertainty depends on five factors: (1) Statistical uncertainty in the assay measurement; (2) Statistical uncertainty in the background measurement; (3) Statistical uncertainty in the isotopics determination - This should be much smaller than the other uncertainties; (4) Systematic uncertainty due to position bias; and (5) Systematic uncertainty due to fluctuations in cosmic ray spallation. This one can be virtually eliminated by performing the background measurement with an empty vessel - but that may not be possible. We used modeling and experiments to quantify the systematic uncertainties. The calibration assumes a uniform distribution of material, but reality will be different. MCNPX modeling was used to quantify the positional bias. The model was benchmarked to build confidence in its results. Material at top of vessel is 44% greater than amount assayed, according to singles. Material near 19-tube detector is 38% less than amount assayed, according to singles. Cosmic ray spallation contributes significantly to the background. Comparing rates with and without a vessel showed that spallation adds an average of 27.27 singles/s and 5.45 doubles/s to background. Errors in the background rates were estimated at 20%.

Frame, Katherine C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourne, Mark M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crooks, William J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miko, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, Jose I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vigil, Georgiana M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

300

Panelized wall system with foam core insulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

First wall for polarized fusion reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Depolarization mechanisms arising from the recycling of the polarized fuel at the limiter and the first-wall of a fusion reactor are greater than those mechanisms in the plasma. Rapid depolarization of the plasma is prevented by providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec.sup.-1.

Greenside, Henry S. (Cranbury, NJ); Budny, Robert V. (Princeton, NJ); Post, Jr., Douglass E. (Buttonwood, CT)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Pressure reducing regulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

303

Skyrmions from Instantons inside Domain Walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some years ago, Atiyah and Manton described a method to construct approximate Skyrmion solutions from Yang-Mills instantons. Here we present a dynamical realization of this construction using domain walls in a five-dimensional gauge theory. The non-abelian gauge symmetry is broken in each vacuum but restored in the core of the domain wall, allowing instantons to nestle inside the wall. We show that the worldvolume dynamics of the wall is given by the Skyrme model, including the four-derivative term, and the instantons appear as Skyrmions.

Minoru Eto; Muneto Nitta; Keisuke Ohashi; David Tong

2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

Modeling Drilled Shafts in MSE Block Walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS xii ABSTRACT xiii 1 INTRODUCTION 1 2 LITERATURE REVIEW 3 2.1 Physical Testing 3 2.1.1 MSE Wall Design (FHWA) 3 2.1.2 Design of Laterally Loaded Shafts 6 2.1.3 Design of Drilled Shafts Supporting Sound Walls 7 2.1.4 Topics Related to MSE... Wall Interaction with Bridges 8 2.1.5 Lateral Loading of Facing and Retained Soil 9 2.1.6 Physical Test Results 11 2.1.6.1 Construction and Instrumentation of Test Wall 12 2.1.6.2 Physical Testing and Results 17 2.2 Numerical Approaches 22 2...

Pierson, Matthew Charles

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Multiple moving wall dry coal extrusion pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pump for transporting particulate material includes a passageway defined on each side between an inlet and an outlet by a moving wall.

Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

306

First wall for polarized fusion reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A first-wall or first-wall coating for use in a fusion reactor having polarized fuel may be formed of a low-Z non-metallic material having slow spin relaxation, i.e., a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/. Materials having these properties include hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous semiconductors. A method for preventing the rapid depolarization of a polarized plasma in a fusion device may comprise the step of providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/.

Greenside, H.S.; Budny, R.V.; Post, D.E. Jr.

1985-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

307

Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) Power Down Exemption Request Regulations implementing the requirements for the vessel monitoring system (VMS) within the NMFS Northeast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) Power Down Exemption Request Regulations implementing consecutive hours. (2) A vessel with a valid multispecies limited access, scallop limited access or surfclam/ocean period of 30 consecutive days. Vessel owners or operators may sign out of the VMS program by first

308

SIMULATION AND MOCKUP OF SNS JET-FLOW TARGET WITH WALL JET FOR CAVITATION DAMAGE MITIGATION  

SciTech Connect

Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory induce cavitation damage on the stainless steel target container. The cavitation damage is thought to limit the lifetime of the target for power levels at and above 1 MW. Severe through-wall cavitation damage on an internal wall near the beam entrance window has been observed in spent-targets. Surprisingly though, there is very little damage on the walls that bound an annular mercury channel that wraps around the front and outside of the target. The mercury flow through this channel is characterized by smooth, attached streamlines. One theory to explain this lack of damage is that the uni-directional flow biases the direction of the collapsing cavitation bubble, reducing the impact pressure and subsequent damage. The theory has been reinforced by in-beam separate effects data. For this reason, a second-generation SNS mercury target has been designed with an internal wall jet configuration intended to protect the concave wall where damage has been observed. The wall jet mimics the annular flow channel streamlines, but since the jet is bounded on only one side, the momentum is gradually diffused by the bulk flow interactions as it progresses around the cicular path of the target nose. Numerical simulations of the flow through this jet-flow target have been completed, and a water loop has been assembled with a transparent test target in order to visualize and measure the flow field. This paper presents the wall jet simulation results, as well as early experimental data from the test loop.

Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Beetle Kill Wall at NREL  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

311

Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

312

Atmospheric-pressure gas breakdown from 2 to 100 MHz  

SciTech Connect

We report a detailed study of breakdown voltage of atmospheric-pressure helium gas between two parallel-plate electrodes from 2 to 100 MHz. Experimental data show that the breakdown voltage reduces initially with increasing frequency due to a diminishing contribution of drift-dominated electron wall loss and then begins to increase with increasing frequency. The latter is contrary to the current understanding that relies largely on the electron wall loss mechanism. Particle-in-cell simulation suggests that rapid oscillation of the applied voltage prevents electrons from reaching their maximum achievable kinetic energy, thus compromising the ionization efficiency and increasing the breakdown voltage.

Walsh, J. L.; Zhang, Y. T.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Pressurized Testing of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells  

SciTech Connect

A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate cell dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this paper.

J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Risk of collision between service vessels and offshore wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Offshore wind farms are growing in size and are situated farther and farther away from shore. The demand for service visits to transfer personnel and equipment to the wind turbines is increasing, and safe operation of the vessels is essential. Currently, collisions between service vessels and offshore wind turbines are paid little attention to in the offshore wind energy industry. This paper proposes a risk assessment framework for such collisions and investigates the magnitude of the collision risk and important risk-influencing factors. The paper concludes that collisions between turbines and service vessels even at low speed may cause structural damage to the turbines. There is a need for improved consideration of this kind of collision risk when designing offshore wind turbines and wind farms.

Lijuan Dai; Sren Ehlers; Marvin Rausand; Ingrid Bouwer Utne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A new design criterion based on pressure testing of torispherical heads  

SciTech Connect

Two vessels with torispherical heads were pressurized to destruction at the Praxair Tonawanda facility on September 12--13, 1994. The objective was to determine pressures at which observable or measurable indications of failure could be detected. Plastic limit pressures for the two heads were calculated at 190 and 240 psi, respectively. For Vessel 1, the only observable action was a slow formation of some waviness of the knuckle profile at approximately 600 psi. It lost pressure at 700 psi when a crack developed at a nozzle weld at the bottom of the shell. For Vessel 2, no indication of any sign of failure was observed until it burst at a pressure of 1,080 psi by a ductile fracture along the longitudinal weld of the shell. The main conclusion is that there is a problem in the application of the double elastic slope collapse criterion to torispherical heads. It was determined that when using this criterion a collapse pressure signaling excessive deformation cannot be determined with any certainty. Furthermore, the test data do not show anything at any of the calculated collapse pressures that suggests excessive deformation. Thus, the collapse pressures for torispherical heads cannot be confirmed by test. This leads to the inconsistency that if the collapse load is divided by a safety factor, say 1.5, to obtain an allowable pressure, the actual safety margin of the design is not known and may not be 1.5. For a material with sufficient ductility, the use of an estimated burst pressure appears preferable. A design criterion based on the membrane stress at the crown of a torispherical head reaching the ultimate tensile strength is proposed, which is simple, can be supported by theoretical arguments, and is shown to be conservative by current test results as well as by those of two previous test programs.

Kalnins, A. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics; Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Remarks on Liquid Wall Research Mohamed Abdou  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remarks on Liquid Wall Research Mohamed Abdou Professor Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering UCLA physicists and engineering scientists · Enhances synergism between IFE and MFE · Provides excellent disciplines. #12;Several "Ideas" Have Been Proposed for Liquid Walls Fluids 1) High-conductivity, low Pr

California at Los Angeles, University of

317

High temperature pressure gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Wall System Innovations: Familiar Materials, Better Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Wall System Innovation Vladimir Kochkin Joseph Wiehagen April 2013 Wall Innovation Metrics  High R (thermal and air barrier)  High Performance  Durable, structural  Build-able  Low transition risk to builders  50% Building America Goal  ≈ R25+ (CZ 4 and higher) 2 Background  Technologies for high-R walls have been proposed and used for over 25 years  But real market penetration is very low  Often the last EE measure implemented by builders (e.g. E*) 3 Background  High-R wall solutions have not achieved a broad level of standardization and commonality  A large set of methods and materials entered the market  Multiple and conflicting details  Wall characteristics are more critical = RISK 4 New Home Starts -

319

Control of linear modes in cylindrical resistive magnetohydrodynamics with a resistive wall, plasma rotation, and complex gain  

SciTech Connect

Feedback stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in a tokamak is studied in a cylindrical model with a resistive wall, plasma resistivity, viscosity, and toroidal rotation. The control is based on a linear combination of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field just inside the resistive wall. The feedback includes complex gain, for both the normal and for the tangential components, and it is known that the imaginary part of the feedback for the former is equivalent to plasma rotation [J. M. Finn and L. Chacon, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1866 (2004)]. The work includes (1) analysis with a reduced resistive MHD model for a tokamak with finite ? and with stepfunction current density and pressure profiles, and (2) computations with a full compressible visco-resistive MHD model with smooth decreasing profiles of current density and pressure. The equilibria are stable for ??=?0 and the marginal stability values ?{sub rp,rw}?wall; resistive plasma, ideal wall; ideal plasma, resistive wall; and ideal plasma, ideal wall) are computed for both models. The main results are: (a) imaginary gain with normal sensors or plasma rotation stabilizes below ?{sub rp,iw} because rotation suppresses the diffusion of flux from the plasma out through the wall and, more surprisingly, (b) rotation or imaginary gain with normal sensors destabilizes above ?{sub rp,iw} because it prevents the feedback flux from entering the plasma through the resistive wall to form a virtual wall. A method of using complex gain G{sub i} to optimize in the presence of rotation in this regime with ??>??{sub rp,iw} is presented. The effect of imaginary gain with tangential sensors is more complicated but essentially destabilizes above and below ?{sub rp,iw}.

Brennan, D. P. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Finn, J. M. [Applied Mathematics and Plasma Physics, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Usage Codes Observer code Vessel code Trip ID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Observer code Vessel code Trip ID Permit holder name/address Permit / N MMSI No. Y / N Present? Usage Water capacity (m3): Fuel capacity: m3 / tonnes Other: Other: Kw all that apply & note types of materials for each) Capacity: Usage Incinerator: Net mensuration Y / N

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Usage Codes Observer code Vessel code Trip ID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Sonar Observer code Vessel code Trip ID Additional Information KHz: RPM / Other _______________Global Registry ID:MMSI No. Permit expiration (dd-mm- yy): Y / N Present? Usage contact Diver / dive equipment Usage Manufacturer Hull mounted / towed Catch Y / N Other: Y / N Y / NOther

322

Thrust allocation with power management functionality on dynamically positioned vessels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

world-wide. The main benefits of diesel-electric propulsion and thrusters are reduced power consumptionThrust allocation with power management functionality on dynamically positioned vessels Aleksander to assist the power management system on dynamically positioned ships is proposed in this paper. Its main

Johansen, Tor Arne

323

Response of a vessel to waves at zero ship speed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response of a vessel to waves at zero ship speed: preliminary full scale experiments By: Kim Klaka of experiment were conducted ­ free roll decay tests and irregular wave tests. An inclining test was also with and without the mainsail hoisted, in very light winds. The irregular wave tests were conducted again in very

324

Sampling and Analysis Plan for PUREX canyon vessel flushing  

SciTech Connect

A sampling and analysis plan is necessary to provide direction for the sampling and analytical activities determined by the data quality objectives. This document defines the sampling and analysis necessary to support the deactivation of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility vessels that are regulated pursuant to Washington Administrative Code 173-303.

Villalobos, C.N.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The mechanism of coking pressure generation II: Effect of high volatile matter coking coal, semi-anthracite and coke breeze on coking pressure and contraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the most important aspects of the cokemaking process is to control and limit the coking pressure since excessive coking pressure can lead to operational problems and oven wall damage. Following on from a previous paper on plastic layer permeability we have studied the effect of contraction of semi-coke on coking pressure and the effect of organic additives on contraction. A link between contraction (or simulated contraction) outside the plastic layer and coking pressure was demonstrated. The interaction between this contraction, local bulk density around the plastic layer and the dependence of the permeability of the plastic layer on bulk density was discussed as possible mechanisms for the generation of coking pressure. The effect of blending either a high volatile matter coal or one of two semi-anthracites with low volatile matter, high coking pressure coals on the coking pressure of the binary blends has been explained using this mechanism.

Merrick Mahoney; Seiji Nomura; Koichi Fukuda; Kenji Kato; Anthony Le Bas; David R. Jenkins; Sid McGuire

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

High-pressure crystallography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The history and development of high-pressure crystallography are briefly described and examples of structural transformations in compressed compounds are given. The review is focused on the diamond-anvil cell, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, the principles of its operation and the impact it has had on high-pressure X-ray diffraction.

Katrusiak, A.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

327

PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

Michael A. Romano

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

High pressure feeder and method of operating to feed granular or fine materials  

SciTech Connect

A coal feed system to feed pulverized low rank coals containing up to 25 wt % moisture to gasifiers operating up to 1000 psig pressure is described. The system includes gas distributor and collector gas permeable pipes imbedded in the lock vessel. Different methods of operation of the feed system are disclosed to minimize feed problems associated with bridging and packing of the pulverized coal. The method of maintaining the feed system and feeder device exit pressures using gas addition or extraction with the pressure control device is also described.

Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, Wan Wang

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

FREE CONVECTIVE LAMINAR FLOW WITHIN THE TROMBE WALL CHANNEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LAMINAR FLOW WITHIN THE TROMBE WALL CHANNEL H. Akbarf andLAMINAR FLOW WITHIN THE TROMBE WALL CHANNEL H. Akbari andchannel surfaces of the Trombe wall has been investigated.

Akbari, H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

Lassila, David H. (Aptos, CA); Bonner, Brian P. (Livermore, CA)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

331

Effective Action of Domain Wall Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U(Nc) gauge theory with Nf fundamental scalars admits BPS junctions of domain walls. When the networks/webs of these walls contain loops, their size moduli give localized massless modes. We construct Kahler potential of their effective action. In the large size limit Kahler metric is well approximated by kinetic energy of walls and junctions, which is understood in terms of tropical geometry. Kahler potential can be expressed in terms of hypergeometric functions which are useful to understand small size behavior. Even when the loop shrinks, the metric is regular with positive curvature. Moduli space of a single triangle loop has a geometry between a cone and a cigar.

Minoru Eto; Toshiaki Fujimori; Takayuki Nagashima; Muneto Nitta; Keisuke Ohashi; Norisuke Sakai

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hydrogenation of single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towards the development of a useful mechanism for hydrogen storage, we have studied the hydrogenation of single-walled carbon nanotubes with atomic hydrogen using core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We find that atomic hydrogen creates C-H bonds with the carbon atoms in the nanotube walls and such C-H bonds can be com-pletely broken by heating to 600 oC. We demonstrate approximately 65+/-15 at % hydrogenation of carbon atoms in the single-walled carbon nanotubes which is equivalent to 5.1+/-1.2 weight % hydrogen capacity. We also show that the hydrogenation is a reversible process.

Anton Nikitin; Hirohito Ogasawara; David Mann; Reinhard Denecke; Zhiyong Zhang; Hongjie Dai; KJ Cho; Anders Nilsson

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

333

Active control of underground stresses through rock pressurization  

SciTech Connect

To significantly increase the stability of underground excavations while exploiting the full advantages of confined rock strength, methods must be developed to actively control the distribution of stresses near the excavation. This US Bureau of Mines study examines theoretical and practical aspects of rock pressurization, an active stress control concept that induces compressive stress in the wall rock through repeated hydraulic fracturing with a settable fluid. Numerical analyses performed by incorporating the rock pressurization concept into a variety of boundary-element models indicate that rock pressurization has the potential to improve underground excavation stability in three ways: (1) by relocating stress concentrations away from the weak opening surface to stronger, confined wall rock; (2) by inducing additional stresses in a biaxial stress field to reduce the difference between the principal stress components near the surface of the opening, and (3) by counteracting the tensile stresses induced in the rock around internally loaded openings. Practical aspects of the rock pressurization concept were investigated through a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments. The use of sulfur as a settable fluid for hydraulic fracturing was demonstrated, although problems related to sulfur viscosity suggest that other molten materials, such as wax, may be better suited to practical field application of the rock pressurization concept.

Vandergrift, T.L.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Limiter Lock Systems at TEXTOR: Flexible Tools for Plasma-Wall Investigation  

SciTech Connect

Limiter lock systems on the top and the bottom of the TEXTOR vessel are essential elements for experimental investigations of plasma-wall interaction in a tokamak. The lock systems are designed as user facilities that allow the insertion of wall elements (limiter) and tools for diagnostic (electrical probes, gas injection) without breaking the TEXTOR vacuum. The specially designed holder on top of the central carrier and a powerful vacuum pump system permit the exchange of components within {approx}1 h. Up to ten electrical signals, four thermocouples, and a gas supply can be connected at the holder interface. Between discharges, the inserted component can be positioned radially and turned with respect to the toroidal magnetic field. Additionally, the central carrier is electrically isolated to apply bias voltages and currents up to 1 kV and 1 kA, respectively.An important feature of the lock system is the good access for optical spectroscopic observation of the inserted components in the vicinity of the edge plasma. The whole spectrum from ultraviolet to infrared is covered by spectrometers and filters combined with cameras. Toroidally and poloidally resolved measurements are obtained from the view on top of the probes while the tangential poloidal view delivers radially and toroidally resolved information.A programmable logic controller (Simatic S5) that is operated inside the TEXTOR bunker and from remote locations outside the concrete wall drives all possible features of the lock system.

Schweer, B.; Brezinsek, S.; Esser, H.G.; Huber, A.; Mertens, Ph.; Musso, S.; Philipps, V.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Samm, U.; Sergienko, G.; Wienhold, P. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Application of a newly built semi-submersible vessel for transportation of a tension leg platform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transportation of tension leg platform (TLP) structures for a long distance ... been associated with the use of a heavy semi-transport vessel. The requirements of this type ... vessel-Hai Yang Shi You 278. This semi

Dagang Zhang; Weiying Sun; Zhixia Fan

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Symmetry of single-wall nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A review of the symmetry groups of the various single-wall nano- and microtubes considered in the literature (BN, GaN, MS2, C, BC3, BC2N) is presented.

Damnjanovic, M.

2001-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

337

Nonextensive statistical dynamics applied to wall turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply a formalism of nonextensive statistical mechanics to experimental wall turbulence data, for the first time to our knowledge. Wind tunnel data for velocity differences a streamwise distance $r$ apart are compared to the prediction from theory as developed by Beck. The simplest theory, in which all free parameters are removed, is found to reproduce statistics for the wall-normal velocity component remarkably well, even for $r$ well beyond the corresponding integral scale, while the corresponding description of the streamwise velocity fluctuations is reasonable at separations below the integral scale. A least-squares 2-parameter fit is performed, and the dependence of the optimum parameter values on wall separation and $r$ is analysed. Both parameters are found to be approximately independent of wall-separation in the logarithmic sub-layer.

Simen Ellingsen; Per-ge Krogstad

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

338

Beautify Your Windows and Glass Walls.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-utside? How do your dqkrie outside of your house? 2 IlnKY color affect , Coloor, De~kn and Tex When choosing draperies to har- monize with a room, consider the room, proportions, exposure, view, walls, floors, furnishings, accessories...

Tompkins, Charlotte

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

In situ Groundwater Remediation Using Treatment Walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of treatment wall technology for the clean up of contaminated ground-water resources has expanded in the past few...ex situ and other in situ ground-water remediation approaches is reduced operation a...

Radisav D. Vidic; Frederick G. Pohland

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

CLIMBING WALL POLICIES Open Bouldering Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Climb at your own risk. Supervised Climbing Rules: 1. All climbers must check in at the climbing wall a munter knot and/or a figure eight belay device are not acceptable ways to belay. 11. Shirts and close

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Axions from cosmic string and wall decay  

SciTech Connect

If inflation occurred with a reheat temperature > T{sub PQ}, axions from the decay of global axion strings and domain walls would make an important contribution to the cosmological energy density, comparable to that from vacuum misalignment. Several groups have numerically studied the evolution of axion strings and walls in the past, however substantial uncertainties remain in their contribution to the present density {Omega}{sub a,string+wall} {approx} 1-100 (f{sub a}/10{sup 12} GeV){sup 7/6}, where f{sub a} is the axion decay constant. I will describe the numerical methods used in our simulations and show results for several string and wall configurations.

Hagmann, C A

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

342

Domain walls with non-Abelian clouds  

SciTech Connect

Domain walls in U(N) gauge theories, coupled to Higgs scalar fields with degenerate masses, are shown to possess normalizable non-Abelian Nambu-Goldstone (NG) modes, which we call non-Abelian clouds. We construct the moduli space metric and its Kaehler potential of the effective field theory on the domain walls by focusing on two models: a U(1) gauge theory with several charged Higgs fields, and a U(N) gauge theory with 2N Higgs fields in the fundamental representation. We find that non-Abelian clouds spread between two domain walls and that their rotation induces a long-range repulsive force, in contrast to a U(1) mode in models with fully nondegenerate masses which gives a short-range force. We also construct a bound state of dyonic domain walls by introducing the imaginary part of the Higgs masses. In the latter model we find that when all walls coincide, SU(N){sub L}xSU(N){sub R}xU(1) symmetry is broken down to SU(N){sub V}, and U(N){sub A} NG modes and the same number of quasi-NG modes are localized on the wall. When n walls separate, off-diagonal elements of U(n) NG modes have wave functions spreading between two separated walls (non-Abelian clouds), whereas some quasi-NG modes turn to NG bosons as a result of further symmetry breaking U(n){sub V}{yields}U(1){sub V}{sup n}. In the case of 4+1-dimensional bulk, we can dualize the effective theory to the supersymmetric Freedman-Townsend model of non-Abelian 2-form fields.

Eto, Minoru [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Pisa Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fujimori, Toshiaki; Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Ohashi, Keisuke [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Electric and Magnetic Walls on Dielectric Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sufficient conditions of the existence of electric or magnetic walls on dielectric interfaces are given for a multizone uniform dielectric waveguiding system. If one of two adjacent dielectric zones supports a TEM field distribution while the other supports a TM (TE) field distribution, then the common dielectric interface behaves as an electric (magnetic) wall, that is, the electric (magnetic) field line is perpendicular to the interface while the magnetic (electric) field line is parallel to the interface.

Changbiao Wang

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

344

INTOR impurity control and first wall system  

SciTech Connect

The highlights of the recent INTOR effort on examining the key issues of the impurity control/first wall system are summarized. The emphasis of the work was an integrated study of the edge-region physics, plasma-wall interaction, materials, engineering and magnetic considerations associated with the poloidal divertor and pump limiter. The development of limiter and divertor collector plate designs with an acceptable lifetime was a major part of the work.

Abdou, M.A.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

LNG Exports by Vessel out of the U.S. Form | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

out of the U.S. Form LNG Exports by Vessel out of the U.S. Form Excel Version of LNG Exports by Vessel out of the U.S. Form.xlsx PDF Version of LNG Exports by Vessel out of the...

346

LNG Exports by Vessel in ISO Containers out of the U.S. Form...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vessel in ISO Containers out of the U.S. Form LNG Exports by Vessel in ISO Containers out of the U.S. Form Excel Version of LNG Exports by Vessel in ISO Container out of the U.S....

347

Berth and quay-crane allocation problem considering fuel consumption and emissions from vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Resolving the berth and quay-crane allocation problem improves the efficiency of seaside operations by optimally allocating berthing spaces and quay cranes to vessels, typically by considering a vessels sailing speed and arrival time at a port as constant parameters, while ignoring the impact of arrival times on fuel consumption and emissions when sailing. This work applied a novel nonlinear multi-objective mixed-integer programming model that considered a vessels fuel consumption and emissions, and then transformed this model into a second-order mixed-integer cone programming model to solve the problems computational intractability. Furthermore, the impact of number of allocated quay cranes on port operational cost, and a vessels fuel consumption and emissions was analyzed. Additionally, a vessels emissions while moored are also calculated based on wait time. Experimental results demonstrate that the new berth and quay-crane allocation strategy with a vessels arrival time as a decision variable can significantly improve vessels fuel consumption and emissions, the air quality around ports and utilization of berths and quay cranes without reducing service quality.

Qing-Mi Hu; Zhi-Hua Hu; Yuquan Du

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Flow patterns and cleaning behaviour of stationary horizontal liquid jets impinging on angled walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION Liquid jets are widely used to remove surface soiling or fouling layers when cleaning process equipment. Their use for cleaning the internals of tanks and other vessels is increasing in the food, pharmaceutical and fine chemicals sectors... L holding tank through a control valve and pressure gauge before discharging through the nozzle. The stainless steel piping had an i.d. of 4 mm, with removable nozzles of throat diameter dN = 1 mm, 2 mm or 3 mm. The internal convergence angles...

Wang, Tao; Davidson, John F.; Wilson, D. Ian

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

350

High pressure counterflow CHF.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a report of the experimental results of a program in countercurrent flow critical heat flux. These experiments were performed with Freon 113 at 200 psia in order to model a high pressure water system. An internally ...

Walkush, Joseph Patrick

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nonlinear optomechanical pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A transparent material exhibits ultra-fast optical nonlinearity and is subject to optical pressure if irradiated by a laser beam. However, the effect of nonlinearity on optical pressure is often overlooked, even if a nonlinear optical pressure may be potentially employed in many applications, as optical manipulation, biophysics, cavity optomechanics, quantum optics, optical tractors, and is relevant in fundamental problems as the Abraham-Minkoswky dilemma, or the Casimir effect. Here we show that an ultra-fast nonlinear polarization gives indeed a contribution to the optical pressure that also is negative in certain spectral ranges; the theoretical analysis is confirmed by first-principles simulations. An order of magnitude estimate shows that the effect can be observable by measuring the deflection of a membrane made by graphene.

Claudio Conti; Robert Boyd

2014-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

352

Solution of the Boussinesq equation using evolutionary vessels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we present a solution of the Boussinesq equation. The derived formulas include solitons, Schwartz class solutions and solutions, possessing singularities on a closed set Z of the (x,t) domain, obtained from the zeros of the tau function. The idea for solving the Boussinesq equation is identical to the (unified) idea of solving the KdV and the evolutionary NLS equations: we use a theory of evolutionary vessels. But a more powerful theory of non-symmetric evolutionary vessels is presented, inserting flexibility into the construction and allowing to deal with complex-valued solutions. A powerful scattering theory of Deift-Tomei-Trubowitz for a three dimensional operator, which is used to solve the Boussinesq equation, fits into our setting only in a particular case. On the other hand, we create a much wider class of solutions of the Boussinesq equation with singularities on a closed set $Z$.

Andrey Melnikov

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

353

IMPACT OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISSOLUTION ON VESSEL CORROSION  

SciTech Connect

Different nuclear materials require different processing conditions. In order to maximize the dissolver vessel lifetime, corrosion testing was conducted for a range of chemistries and temperature used in fuel dissolution. Compositional ranges of elements regularly in the dissolver were evaluated for corrosion of 304L, the material of construction. Corrosion rates of AISI Type 304 stainless steel coupons, both welded and non-welded coupons, were calculated from measured weight losses and post-test concentrations of soluble Fe, Cr and Ni.

Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.; Clifton, B.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Pressure Relief Devices for High-Pressure Gaseous Storage Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Relief Devices for High-Pressure Gaseous Storage Systems: Applicability to Hydrogen Technology A. Kostival, C. Rivkin, W. Buttner, and R. Burgess National Renewable Energy...

355

Potential market for LNG-fueled marine vessels in the United States ; Potential market for liquefied natural gas fueled marine vessels in the United States .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The growing global concern over ship emissions in recent years has driven policy change at the international level toward more stringent vessel emissions standards. The (more)

Brett, Bridget C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Energy performance of fishing vessels and potential savings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Commercial fishing is heavily fuel dependant. The increase in the fuel price, together with the stock decline, occupational risks of fishing, the possibilities of finding a different future for new generations, are some of the reasons that have made fishing arrive at its survival limits, in many parts of Europe. This contribution aims at providing shipowners and researcher with the experience of undertaking energy audits, to reduce the fuel bill of fishing vessels. In order to do so, 3 fishing vessels were assessed comprehensively, for 20102012, to determine their energy consumption flow. The results indicate that energy consumption depends upon: (a) the structure and size of the vessel; (b) the engine conditions and use patterns; (c) the fishing gears used; (d) the fishing and trip patterns; (e) the distance to the fishing ground; (f) target species and their migration routes; and (g) the traditions onboard. Likewise, no generalisation can be made regarding the way energy is consumed by onboard equipment/machinery when different fishing gears are compared. Energy audits will need to be site-specific and to include sufficient data to obtain representative results; these are likely to be more than in land-based industries, due to the peculiarities of this sector.

Oihane C. Basurko; Gorka Gabia; Zigor Uriondo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Flammability Characteristics of Hydrogen and Its Mixtures with Light Hydrocarbons at Atmospheric and Sub-atmospheric Pressures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydrogen and each hydrocarbon were determined experimentally at room temperature (20C) and initial pressures ranging from 1.0 atm to 0.1 atm. The experiments were conducted in a closed cylindrical stainless steel vessel with upward flame propagation...

Le, Thuy Minh Hai

2013-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

358

Identification of Novel Cell Wall Components  

SciTech Connect

Our DOE Biosciences-funded work focused on the fungal cell wall and morphogenesis. We are especially interested in how new cell wall material is targeted to appropriate areas for polar (asymmetric) growth. Polar growth is the only way that filamentous fungi explore the environment to find suitable substrates to degrade. Work funded by this grant has resulted in a total of twenty peer-reviewed publications. In work funded by this grant, we identified nine Aspergillus nidulans temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants that fail to send out a germ tube and show a swollen cell phenotype at restrictive temperature, the swo mutants. In other organisms, a swollen cell phenotype is often associated with misdirected growth or weakened cell walls. Our work shows that several of the A. nidulans swo mutants have defects in the establishment and maintenance of polarity. Cloning of several swo genes by complementation also showed that secondary modification of proteins seems is important in polarity. We also investigated cell wall biosynthesis and branching based on leads in literature from other organisms and found that branching and nuclear division are tied and that the cell wall reorganizes during development. In our most recent work we have focused on gene expression during the shift from isotropic to polar growth. Surprisingly we found that genes previously thought to be involved only in spore formation are important in early vegetative growth as well.

Michelle Momany

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

359

Effect of pressure gradient on the drag reduction performance of two and three dimensional riblets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integral Parameters . 4. 2 Law of the Wall Profiles 4. 3 Pressure Gradient Parameters 4. 4 Preston Tube Measurements 4. 5 Roughness Function 4. 6 Growth of the Internal Layer 4. 7 Turbulence Measurements 4. 7. 1 Turbulence intensity 4. 7. 2 Third.... 4 Spectra for favorable pressure gradient 4. 8. 5 Roughness effects on the bursting process V CONCLUSION . REFERENCES APPENDIX A APPENDIX B 50 50 51 94 134 175 177 180 183 . . 185 VITA . . 210 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Proportions...

Hall, Aaron Chenault

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Propagation of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume  

SciTech Connect

The ''plasma bullet'' behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma plumes has recently attracted significant interest. In this paper, a specially designed plasma jet device is used to study this phenomenon. It is found that a helium primary plasma can propagate through the wall of a dielectric tube and keep propagating inside the dielectric tube (secondary plasma). High-speed photographs show that the primary plasma disappears before the secondary plasma starts to propagate. Both plumes propagate at a hypersonic speed. Detailed studies on the dynamics of the plasma plumes show that the local electric field induced by the charges on the surface of the dielectric tube plays an important role in the ignition of the secondary plasma. This indicates that the propagation of the plasma plumes may be attributed to the local electric field induced by the charges in the bulletlike plasma volume.

Lu, X.; Xiong, Q.; Xiong, Z.; Hu, J.; Zhou, F.; Gong, W.; Xian, Y.; Zou, C.; Tang, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y. [College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

WallBots: Interactive Wall-Crawling Robots In the Hands of Public Artists and Political Activists  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WallBots: Interactive Wall-Crawling Robots In the Hands of Public Artists and Political Activists present WallBots- autonomous, wall-crawling robots as a research probe for public expression across a wide, street art INTRODUCTION "People look at an oil painting and admire the use of brushstrokes to convey

Paulos, Eric

362

An experimental study of external reactor vessel cooling strategy on the critical heat flux using the graphene oxide nano-fluid  

SciTech Connect

External reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) for in-vessel retention (IVR) of corium as a key severe accident management strategy can be achieved by flooding the reactor cavity during a severe accident. In this accident mitigation strategy, the decay heat removal capability depends on whether the imposed heat flux exceeds critical heat flux (CHF). To provide sufficient cooling for high-power reactors such as APR1400, there have been some R and D efforts to use the reactor vessel with micro-porous coating and nano-fluids boiling-induced coating. The dispersion stability of graphene-oxide nano-fluid in the chemical conditions of flooding water that includes boric acid, lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and tri-sodium phosphate (TSP) was checked in terms of surface charge or zeta potential before the CHF experiments. Results showed that graphene-oxide nano-fluids were very stable under ERVC environment. The critical heat flux (CHF) on the reactor vessel external wall was measured using the small scale two-dimensional slide test section. The radius of the curvature is 0.1 m. The dimension of each part in the facility simulated the APR-1400. The heater was designed to produce the different heat flux. The magnitude of heat flux follows the one of the APR-1400 when the severe accident occurred. All tests were conducted under inlet subcooling 10 K. Graphene-oxide nano-fluids (concentration: 10 -4 V%) enhanced CHF limits up to about 20% at mass flux 50 kg/m{sup 2}s and 100 kg/m{sup 2}s in comparison with the results of the distilled water at same test condition. (authors)

Park, S. D.; Lee, S. W.; Kang, S.; Kim, S. M.; Seo, H.; Bang, I. C. [Ulsan National Inst. of Science and Technology UNIST, 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulasn Metropolitan City 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

living walls | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

14 14 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142229614 Varnish cache server living walls Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind

364

Effective action of domain wall networks  

SciTech Connect

U(N{sub C}) gauge theory with N{sub F} fundamental scalars admits BPS junctions of domain walls. When the networks/webs of these walls contain loops, their size moduli give localized massless modes. We construct Kaehler potential of their effective action. In the large size limit Kaehler metric is well approximated by kinetic energy of walls and junctions, which is understood in terms of tropical geometry. Kaehler potential can be expressed in terms of hypergeometric functions that are useful to understand small size behavior. Even when the loop shrinks, the metric is regular with positive curvature. Moduli space of a single triangle loop has a geometry between a cone and a cigar.

Eto, Minoru [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, Komaba 3-8-1, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki; Ohashi, Keisuke; Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

Salzer, L.J.; Bergren, D.A.

1987-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

366

Thermodynamics of free Domain Wall fermions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studying various thermodynamic quantities for the free domain wall fermions for both finite and infinite fifth dimensional extent N_5, we find that the lattice corrections are minimum for $N_T\\geq10$ for both energy density and susceptibility, for its irrelevant parameter M in the range 1.45-1.50. The correction terms are, however, quite large for small lattice sizes of $N_T\\leq8$. We propose modifications of the domain wall operator, as well as the overlap operator, to reduce the finite cut-off effects to within 10% of the continuum results of the thermodynamic quantities for the currently used N_T=6-8 lattices. Incorporating chemical potential, we show that \\mu^2 divergences are absent for a large class of such domain wall fermion actions although the chiral symmetry is broken for $\\mu\

R. V. Gavai; Sayantan Sharma

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

Living Walls | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Living Walls Living Walls Home > Groups > Buildings Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more energy from the utility grid than it produces using renewable energy resources, such as solar, wind, or geothermal installations (and sometimes these renewable energy resources actually feed energy back to the utility grid). Architects

368

Analysis of overflow-induced sloshing coupled with oscillation of elastic wall  

SciTech Connect

In the liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), a thin-wall weir is installed inside the main reactor vessel to form a circulation loop of cold sodium for the protection of the main vessel from the hot coolant sodium. Under such conditions, there is a possibility of overflow-induced vibration of the weir coupled with sloshing of the coolant once observed in the French Demonstration LMFBR Super Phenix (SPx). Therefore it is very important for the safety assessment of LMFBR to study the mechanism and conditions for the occurrence of this sloshing-vibration instability. Numerical simulation of 2D experiment on overflow-induced fluid-structure interaction instability was carried out using physical component boundary fitted coordinate (PCBFC) method. Numerical stability of free surface was never violated even though it is under the influence of both oscillation of structure and hitting of overflow at the fluid surface. The computation showed the occurrence scope of instability similar to the experiment. By computations with modified initial and boundary conditions, physical explanation of the occurrence conditions of this instability was given.

Lu, D.; Kondo, Shunsuke [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science; Takizawa, Akihiko [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Yokohama (Japan). Nuclear Power R and D Center

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Cell Wall Recipe: A Lesson on Biofuels  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

Students will investigate how changes in the DNA sequence that codes for cell wall formation can have a favorable outcome in producing plants that have higher levels of cellulose than the parent plant. The cellulose yield is most important in the production of ethanol: the greater the amount of cellulose within the cell wall, the greater the amount of ethanol that can be produced. To engage students, the first part of this lesson has students participating in a discovery activity where they will extract DNA from wheat germ.

370

A cog-like vessel from the Netherlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE NETHERLANDS A Thesis by ALEYDIS MARIA P. A. VAN DE MOORTEL Submitted to the Graduate Col 1 ege of Texas AB, M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS December 1987 Major Sub. iect: Anthropology ABSTRACT... A Cog-Like Vessel From the Netherlands. (December 1987) Aleydis Maria P. A. Van de Moortel, B. A. , Katholfeke Unlversfteit Leuven Chairman of Advisory Committee: J. Richard SteFfy The meticulous excavation of a small, well-preserved shipwreck...

Van de Moortel, Aleydis Maria P. A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Reference Handbook: Pressure detectors  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand pressure detection. Upon completion of this handbook you should be able to do the following: Define pressure in terms of force and area. Describe the basic operating principles of the U-Tube Manometer. Demonstrate proper techniques for reading Manometers. Describe the basic operating principles of the three types of Bourdon Tubes. Explain the difference between diaphragm. and bellows-type pressure measurement devices. This handbook is designed for use by experienced Rocky Flats operators to reinforce and improve their current knowledge level, and by entry-level operators to ensure that they possess a minimum level of fundamental knowledge. Pressure Detectors is applicable to many job classifications and can be used as a reference for classroom work or for self-study. Although this reference handbook is by no means all-encompassing, you will gain enough information about this subject area to assist you in contributing to the safe operations of Rocky Flats Plant.

Not Available

1990-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

372

High pressure water pyrolysis of coal to evaluate the role of pressure on hydrocarbon generation and source rock maturation at high maturities under geological conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigates the effect of water pressure on hydrocarbon generation and source rock maturation at high maturities for a perhydrous Tertiary Arctic coal, Svalbard. Using a 25ml Hastalloy vessel, the coal was pyrolysed under low water pressure (230300bar) and high water pressure (500, 700 and 900bar) conditions between 380C and 420C for 24h. At 380C and 420C, gas yields were not affected by pressure up to 700bar, but were reduced slightly at 900bar. At 380C, the expelled oil yield was highest at 230bar, but reduced significantly at 900bar. At 420C cracking of expelled oil to gas was retarded at 700 and 900bar. As well as direct cracking of the coal, the main source of gas generation at high pressure at both 380C and 420C is from bitumen trapped in the coal, indicating that this is a key mechanism in high pressure geological basins. Vitrinite reflectance (VR) was reduced by 0.16 %Ro at 380C and by 0.27 %Ro at 420C at 900bar compared to the low pressure runs, indicating that source rock maturation will be more retarded at higher maturities in high pressure geological basins.

Clement N. Uguna; Andrew D. Carr; Colin E. Snape; Will Meredith

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Cooling and Trapping Atoms Atoms are slowed and cooled by radiation pressure from laser light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling and Trapping Atoms Atoms are slowed and cooled by radiation pressure from laser light and then trapped in a bottle whose "walls" are magnetic fields. Cooled atoms are ideal for exploring basic. research has traditionally been the study of the intrinsic prop erties of isolated atoms. In the early part

Johannesson, Henrik

374

On Two-Phase Relative Permeability and Capillary Pressure of Rough-Walled Rock Fractures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Single Rock Joints", Licentiate Thesis, Lulea Universityof Technology, Lulea, Sweden. Heiba, A. A. , Sahimi, M. ,

Pruess ed, K.; Tsang, Y.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Hot wire production of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus (210) for producing a multi-wall carbon nanotube (213) may comprise a process chamber (216), a furnace (217) operatively associated with the process chamber (216), and at least one filament (218) positioned within the process chamber (216). At least one power supply (220) operatively associated with the at least one filament (218) heats the at least one filament (218) to a process temperature. A gaseous carbon precursor material (214) operatively associated with the process chamber (216) provides carbon for forming the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213). A metal catalyst material (224) operatively associated with the process (216) catalyzes the formation of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213).

Dillon, Anne C. (Boulder, CO); Mahan, Archie H. (Golden, CO); Alleman, Jeffrey L. (Lakewood, CO)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

376

THE CHINESE WALL LATTICE Ravi Sandhu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

security policy for confidentiality · Mixture of free choice (discretionary) and mandatory of interest class #12;4 CHINESE WALL EXAMPLE BANKS OIL COMPANIESBANKS OIL COMPANIES A B X Y #12;5 READ ACCESS BREWER-NASH SIMPLE SECURITY S can read O only if · O is in the same company dataset as· O is in the same

Sandhu, Ravi

377

Symmetry groups of single-wall nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An approach to the determination of the symmetry groups of structural analogs of single-wall carbon nanotubes using ideas in color symmetry theory is described. The line group structures of the symmetry groups of BN, BC3, BCN and BC2N nanotubes are identified. An extension of the method to address nanotubes with non-hexagonal symmetry is also presented.

De Las Pe?as, M.L.A.N.

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

378

Annual Report Diana H. Wall, Director  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Student Sustainability Center more than doubled its student engagement, and our pre-college Summer2013-2014 Annual Report #12;Diana H. Wall, Director CSU is at the forefront of sustainability if such systems are to endure, and developing the expertise that is needed to shape a sustainable future

379

Wall Precursor Effects in Gaseous Detonation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... and 5 mm long, were used in an investigation of electrical phenomena in stoichiometric oxyhydrogen detonations produced in a 4 m long stainless steel tube of hexagonal cross-section. The ... , which was insulated from the tube wall, recorded the time of arrival of the detonation plasma at the plane of observation. Only when both the probes and insulating surfaces ...

M. C. CAVENOR

1970-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

380

Design of wetted wall bioaerosol concentration cyclones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................... 24 Aerosol-to-aerosol collection efficiency.................................................... 24 Wetting pattern on the impacting wall ? effect of an atomizer.................. 24..................................................................................... 67 Figure 3.4. Cold temperature experiemental setup ........................................................... 68 Figure 3.5. Preliminary heating system for the 1250 L/min cyclone and thermo-couple locations...

Seo, Youngjin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Electromagnetic acoustic transducers for wall thickness applications in the petrochemical industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) are now becoming widely used in the field for example for boiler tube wall thickness surveys in Power Generation plant. In general EMATs work efficiently on steel components with a surface oxide layer where the oxides can be residual mill scale from the steel manufacturing process due to in-service growth in boilers or chemical processing plant. Very often these oxides have rough surfaces and have to be removed prior to conventional ultrasonic inspection. This can be both time consuming and costly in addition the removal of the protective oxide layer accelerates the future wall lose rate of the pipe or vessel. As well as the Power Generation application EMATs can also be used for ultrasonic inspection of petrochemical tubulars without having to remove oxides giving the same associated benefits. This paper presents results obtained from laboratory trials of EMAT thickness monitoring of petrochemical plant pipe samples and real EMAT surveys carried out on-site on refinery plant. In parallel with the practical application of EMATs we are studying the underlying physics of operation with the aim of predicting the EMAT performance for steels with and without oxide layers.

C. Edwards; S. Dixon; A. Widdowson; S. B. Palmer

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

Morris, D.E.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

383

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL. Source NREL Date Released Unknown Date Updated March 10th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords DOE humidity irrandiance NREL NWTC pressure temperature turbulence wind wind direction wind speed Data text/plain icon Raw data (8/24/2001 - 3/10/2011) (txt, 681 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Field IDs for above .txt file (xls, 69.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Scientists and Technicians are notified real-time via email of instruments outside the above min/max or delta comparisons (http://www.nrel.gov/midc/nwtc_m2/) Data have not been reviewed for accuracy or completeness; disclaimer available (http://www.nrel.gov/disclaimer.html).

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - allantochorial placental vessels Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

do not sustain flow. In this paper we develop the first multiscale model... and tissue scale dynamics of multiple cell populations. Simulations show that vessel pruning, due to...

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - axicell vacuum vessel Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Theory Department Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 34 LET: a cold neutron chopper spectrometer on ISIS TS2 Summary: Jaws Vacuum Vessel...

387

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic vessel control Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a complete copy of the USCG Abstract of Title For an undocumented vessel Source: NOAA Marine Fisheries Review Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 15 Revision: 100609...

388

E-Print Network 3.0 - active in-vessel coils Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EXPERIMENT SYSTEM INTEGRATION * Summary: requirements in an arrangement that allows remote maintenance of in-vessel components and hands-on maintenance... to expose the core...

389

Pressure and temperature drawdown well testing: similarities and differences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temperature and pressure are the most frequently observed physical parameters in boreholes. The same differential diffusivity equation describes the transient flow of incompressible fluid in porous media and heat conduction in solids. The similarities and differences in the techniques of pressure and temperature well testing are discussed. It is shown that the mathematical model of pressure well tests based on the presentation of the borehole as an infinitely long linear source with a constant fluid flow rate in an infinite-acting homogeneous reservoir cannot be used in temperature well testing. A new technique has been developed for the determination of the formation thermal conductivity, initial temperature, skin factor and contact thermal resistance. It is assumed that the volumetric heat capacity of formations is known and the instantaneous heater's wall temperature and time data are available for a cylindrical probe with a constant heat flow rate placed in a borehole. A semi-analytical equation is used to approximate the dimensionless wall temperature of the heater. A simulated example is presented to demonstrate the data processing procedure.

L V Eppelbaum; I M Kutasov

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

1 Copyright 2010 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME 2010 Pressure Vessels & Piping Division / K-PVP Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of characteristics TMM = transfer matrix method #12;2 Copyright © 2010 by ASME WATERHAMMER EQUATIONS Classical waterhammer theory [2-4] adequately describes the low-frequency vibration of elastic liquid columns in fully

Tijsseling, A.S.

391

SAFT and TOFDA Comparative Study of Two Defect Sizing Techniques on a Reactor Pressure Vessel Mock-up  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Defect sizing is required for a quantitative assessment of the quality and reliability of safety relevant components and materials using ultrasonic non-destructive testing. The SAFT (Synthetic Aperture Focussing

Jens Prager; Jessica Kitze; Ccile Acheroy

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

UF{sub 6} pressure excursions during cylinder heating  

SciTech Connect

As liquid UF{sub 6} inside a cylinder changes from a liquid to a solid, it forms a porous solid which occupies approximately the same volume as that of the liquid before cooling. Simultaneously as the liquid cools, UF{sub 6} vapor in the cylinder ullage above the liquid desublimes on the upper region of the inner cylinder wall. This solid is a dense, glass-like material which can accumulate to a significant thickness. The thickness of the solid coating on the upper cylinder wall and directly behind the cylinder valve area will vary depending on the conditions during the cooling stage. The amount of time lapsed between UF{sub 6} solidification and UF{sub 6} liquefaction can also affect the UF{sub 6} coating. This is due to the daily ambient heat cycle causing the coating to sublime from the cylinder wall to cooler areas, thus decreasing the thickness. Structural weakening of the dense UF{sub 6} layer also occurs due to cylinder transport vibration and thermal expansion. During cylinder heating, the UF{sub 6} nearest the cylinder wall will liquefy first. As the solid coating behind the cylinder valve begins to liquefy, it results in increased pressure depending upon the available volume for expansion. At the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) during the liquefaction of the UF{sub 6} in cylinders in the UF{sub 6} feed and sampling autoclaves, this pressure increase has resulted in the activation of the systems rupture discs which are rated at 100 pounds per square inch differential.

Brown, P.G. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

TBU-0061- In the Matter of Misti Wall  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Misti Wall (the complainant or Wall), appeals the dismissal of her complaint of retaliation filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. As...

394

Double Diffusion in Enclosure Bounded by Massive and Volatilizing Walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-10), are considered. Other governing parameters are maintained constant (Rayleigh number, Prandtl number, Lewis number and width ratio of massive wall to enclosure). The conjugate heat transfer of the thick wall and indoor airflow and the enhanced heat transfer...

Liu, D.; Tang, G.; Zhao, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Helium Pumping Wall for a Liquid Lithium Tokamak Richard Majeski...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Helium Pumping Wall for a Liquid Lithium Tokamak Richard Majeski This invention is designed to be a subsystem of a device, a tokamak with walls or plasma facing components of...

396

After Exodus : re-occupation of the metropolitan wall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The title "Exodus alludes to a restricted exclave encircled by a forbidding wall -- effect, a prison on the scale of a metropolis, and one in which people sought refuge voluntarily. Over the past forty years, similar walls ...

Allison, Jordan Lloyd Norman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pin passageway extending through the assembly.

Oakley, David J. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

High-Pressure Hydrogen Tanks  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation on High-Pressure Hydrogen Tanks for the DOE Hydrogen Delivery High-Pressure Tanks and Analysis Project Review Meeting held February 8-9, 2005 at Argonne National Laboratory

399

Kiteships, sailing vessels pulled and powered with a kite  

SciTech Connect

Current windpower technology and future petroleum supply scenarios make it likely that it will become desirable to consider sailing vessels again for the merchant marine. For the wind-powered propulsion it seems possible to use tethered kites, instead of the traditional combination of masts and booms supporting a system of sails. This may be both safer and more cost-effective. The authors are on boat No. 2 in an R and D program aimed at this large scale application, and the present paper represents a progress report. Boat No. 1 was used to achieve speed and power, achieving a speed of 33 knots (over 60 km per hour), and sailing speeds at times of twice the wind velocity. Boat No. 2 will not be used for speed, but for the development of kite deployment and retrieval techniques, with kites of up to 300 sq ft (28 sq m) in surface area.

Winter, F. de; Swenson, R.B.; Culp, D.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Reading the Cosmic Writing on the Wall  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reading the Cosmic Reading the Cosmic Writing on the Wall Reading the Cosmic Writing on the Wall NERSC Key to Planck's Revision of Universal Recipe March 21, 2013 Contact: Margie Wylie, mwylie@lbl.gov, + 1 510 486 7421 map800-600.jpg This map shows the oldest light in our universe, as detected with the greatest precision yet by the Planck mission. The ancient light, called the cosmic microwave background, was imprinted on the sky when the universe was 370,000 years old. (Image credit: ESA and the Planck Collaboration) Thanks to a supersensitive space telescope and some sophisticated supercomputing, scientists from the international Planck collaboration have made the closest reading yet of the most ancient story in our universe: the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Today, the team released preliminary results based on the Planck

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Gravitational infall in the hard wall model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An infalling shell in the hard wall model provides a simple holographic model for energy injection in a confining gauge theory. Depending on its parameters, a scalar shell either collapses into a large black brane, or scatters between the hard wall and the anti-de Sitter boundary. In the scattering regime, we find numerical solutions that keep oscillating for as long as we have followed their evolution, and we provide an analytic argument that shows that a black brane can never be formed. This provides examples of states in infinite-volume field theory that never thermalize. We find that the field theory expectation value of a scalar operator keeps oscillating, with an amplitude that undergoes modulation.

B. Craps; E. J. Lindgren; A. Taliotis; J. Vanhoof; H. Zhang

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Enhanced dielectric-wall linear accelerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is enhanced by a high-voltage, fast e-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface. 6 figs.

Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Kirbie, H.C.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

403

Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3936801°, -79.7861577° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3936801,"lon":-79.7861577,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

404

Manipulation and Imaging of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Manipulation and Imaging of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with an Atomic Force Microscope** By Henk W. C. Postma, Allard Sellmeijer, and Cees Dekker* Carbon nanotubes[1] have attracted-walled nanotubes,[3±5] the prototype single-walled tubes are much more difficult to study since their diameter

405

Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBXM 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBX­M 1 Leonid E. Zakharov, Princeton University; OUTLINE 1. Mini­conference on Lithium walls and low recycling regime. 2. PBX­M Capabilities. 3. Motivation "Lithium covered walls and low recycling regimes in toka­ maks". APS meeting, October 23­27, 2000, Quebec

Zakharov, Leonid E.

406

Brick Walls and AdS/CFT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the relationship between the bulk-boundary correspondence in Rehren's algebraic holography (and in other 'fixed-background' approaches to holography) and in mainstream 'Maldacena AdS/CFT'. Especially, we contrast the understanding of black-hole entropy from the viewpoint of QFT in curved spacetime -- in the framework of 't Hooft's 'brick wall' model -- with the understanding based on Maldacena AdS/CFT. We show that the brick-wall modification of a Klein Gordon field in the Hartle-Hawking-Israel state on 1+2-Schwarzschild AdS (BTZ) has a well-defined boundary limit with the same temperature and entropy as the brick-wall-modified bulk theory. One of our main purposes is to point out a close connection, for general AdS/CFT situations, between the puzzle raised by Arnsdorf and Smolin regarding the relationship between Rehren's algebraic holography and mainstream AdS/CFT and the puzzle embodied in the 'correspondence principle' proposed by Mukohyama and Israel in their work on the brick-wall approach to black hole entropy. Working on the assumption that similar results will hold for bulk QFT other than the Klein Gordon field and for Schwarzschild AdS in other dimensions, and recalling the first author's proposed resolution to the Mukohyama-Israel puzzle based on his 'matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis', we argue that, in Maldacena AdS/CFT, the algebra of the boundary CFT is isomorphic only to a proper subalgebra of the bulk algebra, albeit (at non-zero temperature) the (GNS) Hilbert spaces of bulk and boundary theories are still the 'same' -- the total bulk state being pure, while the boundary state is mixed (thermal). We also argue from the finiteness of its boundary (and hence, on our assumptions, also bulk) entropy at finite temperature, that the Rehren dual of the Maldacena boundary CFT cannot itself be a QFT and must, instead, presumably be something like a string theory.

Bernard S. Kay; L. Ortiz

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

407

Conserved currents for Mobius Domain Wall Fermions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive the exactly conserved vector, and almost conserved axial currents for rational approximations to the overlap operator with a general Mobius kernel. The approach maintains manifest Hermiticity, and allows matrix elements of the currents to be constructed at no extra cost after solution of the usual 5d system of equations, similar to the original approach of Furman and Shamir for domain wall Fermions.

P. A. Boyle

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

408

1993 NEC 1) (Single-Walled Carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MWNT (Vapor-grown carbon fiber, VGCF)33) 10001300 34) SWNT CCVD Smalley 15) CO SWNT SWNT 1993 NEC 1) (Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes, SWNTs) 1(a) 1nm µm µm SWNTs 2) (MWNTs) 1(c 29,30,35-41) SWNT , MgO Fe/Co, Ni/Co, Mo/Co nm SWNT VGCF Fe(CO)5 SWNT Ethanol tank Hot

Maruyama, Shigeo

409

The analysis of cracks in high-pressure piping and their effects on strength and lifetime of construction components at the Ignalina nuclear plant  

SciTech Connect

A number of cracks and damages of other sorts have been identified in the high-pressure parts at the Ignalina Nuclear Plant. They are caused by inadequate production- and repair technologies, as well as by thermal, chemical and mechanical processes of their performance. Several techniques are available as predictions of cracks and other defects of pressurized vessels. The choice of an experimental technique should be based on the level of its agreement with the actual processes.

Aleev, A.; Petkevicius, K.; Senkus, V. [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Resumming the pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The convergence properties of the resummed thermal perturbation series for the thermodynamic pressure are investigated by comparison with the exact results obtained in large-N phi^4 theory and possibilities for improvements are discussed. By going beyond conventional resummed perturbation theory, renormalization has to be carried out nonperturbatively yet consistently. This is exemplified in large-N phi^4_4 and in a special large-N \\phi^3_6 model that mimics QED in the limit of large flavour number.

Anton Rebhan

1998-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

411

Phenomenology of Wall Bounded Newtonian Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a simple analytic model for wall-bounded turbulence, containing only four adjustable parameters. Two of these parameters characterize the viscous dissipation of the components of the Reynolds stress-tensor and other two parameters characterize their nonlinear relaxation. The model offers an analytic description of the profiles of the mean velocity and the correlation functions of velocity fluctuations in the entire boundary region, from the viscous sub-layer, through the buffer layer and further into the log-layer. As a first approximation, we employ the traditional return-to-isotropy hypothesis, which yields a very simple distribution of the turbulent kinetic energy between the velocity components in the log-layer: the streamwise component contains a half of the total energy whereas the wall-normal and the cross-stream components contain a quarter each. In addition, the model predicts a very simple relation between the von-K\\'arm\\'an slope $\\kappa $ and the turbulent velocity in the log-law region $v^+$ (in wall units): $v^+=6 \\kappa$. These predictions are in excellent agreement with DNS data and with recent laboratory experiments.

Victor S. L'vov; Anna Pomyalov; Itamar Procaccia; Sergej S. Zilitinkevich

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

412

Modification of turbulent structure in channel flows by microbubble injection close to the wall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mass production N Total number of realizations N T Number of velocity fields P Turbulent energy production P Pressure Q a Air flow rate Q w Water flow rate R(s) Autocorrelation of I(X) R b Bubble radius Re Reynolds number Re... through the porous section Re x Reynolds number based on the free stream velocity and distance x viii R ij (?r) Two-point correlation coefficient R ij (?t) Autocorrelation coefficient s Riblet spacing s + Riblet spacing in wall units S ij...

Gutierrez Torres, Claudia del Carmen

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Study Reveals Challenges and Opportunities Related to Vessels for U.S. Offshore Wind  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The installation of offshore wind farms requires a highly specialized fleet of vessels--but no such fleet currently exists in the United States. As part of a broader DOE initiative to accelerate the growth of the U.S. offshore wind industry, energy research group Douglas-Westwood identified national vessel requirements under several offshore wind industry growth scenarios.

414

Productivity and Profitability of South Carolina Shrimp Vessels, 1971-75  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hI' the transformed fuel consumption variahle (the hest pruxr for I'essel utilization). shuI Productivity and Profitability of South Carolina Shrimp Vessels, 1971-75 T M JONES, J W. HUBBARD with overcapi- talization are possible. A BSTRACT-This stud\\' uses data [rom a 45-vessel sample 0/ South Caro

415

Berth and quay-crane allocation problem considering fuel consumption and emissions from vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resolving the berth and quay-crane allocation problem improves the efficiency of seaside operations by optimally allocating berthing spaces and quay cranes to vessels, typically by considering a vessel's sailing speed and arrival time at a port as constant ... Keywords: Berth and quay crane allocation problem, Emission, Fuel consumption, Nonlinear optimization, Second-order cone programming

Qing-Mi Hu, Zhi-Hua Hu, Yuquan Du

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Combustor oscillation pressure stabilizer  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the objective of the present invention, the active control of unsteady combustion induced oscillations in a combustion chamber fired by a suitable fuel and oxidizer mixture, such as a hydrocarbon fuel and air mixture, is provided by restructuring and moving the position of the main flame front and thereby increasing the transport time and displacing the pressure wave further away from the in-phase relationship with the periodic heat release. The restructuring and repositioning of the main flame are achieved by utilizing a pilot flame which is pulsed at a predetermined frequency corresponding to less than about one-half the frequency of the combustion oscillation frequency with the duration of each pulse being sufficient to produce adequate secondary thermal energy to restructure the main flame and thereby decouple the heat release from the acoustic coupling so as to lead to a reduction in the dynamic pressure amplitude. The pulsating pilot flame produces a relatively small and intermittently existing flame front in the combustion zone that is separate from the oscillating main flame front but which provides the thermal energy necessary to effectively reposition the location of the oscillating main flame front out of the region in the combustion zone where the acoustic coupling can occur with the main flame and thereby effectively altering the oscillation-causing phase relationship with the heat of combustion.

Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.T.J.; Robey, E.; Cully, S.R.; Addis, R.E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Influence of the permeability of the coal plastic layer on coking pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ten coals of different rank and coking pressure characteristics were chosen in order to study the time of occurrence of the phenomena that take place during the coking of a coal and the way they affect the generation of dangerous coking pressures. Parameters derived from thermoplastic, thermogravimetric and permeability tests were studied together with semicoke contraction and the coking pressure generated by the coals in a movable wall oven. It was found that for safe coals, the maximum evolution of volatile matter occurs near the temperature of maximum fluidity. The position of the maximum rate of volatile matter evolution with respect to the zone of low permeability varies depending on the coking pressure characteristics of the coals. In addition, the relationship between the period of low permeability to the resolidification temperature may serve to indicate the degree of dangerousness of a coal. The fissure pattern of the semicoke was found to be related to the coking pressure and semicoke contraction.

M.D. Casal; E. Daz-Faes; R. Alvarez; M.A. Dez; C. Barriocanal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A Study of the Filling of Wall Cavities With Retrofit Wall Insulation.  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Power Marketing Agency, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), conducted a retrofit wall insulation study to determine the effects of various obstructions within a wall cavity, where voids are likely to occur, and preferred filling methods and material types. The insulation test structure was composed of four 8-foot /times/ 12-foot walls, and was built using standard construction practices. The inside walls were clear plastic glazing, instead of gypsum board, to enable viewing of the filling process. A total of eight tests were performed: four cellulose, two rockwool, and two fiberglass. One- and two-hole filling methods were observed. All insulations were found to perform in the same basic manner with all experiencing the same problem areas. Common installer problems were empty spaces at the tops of cavities and missed cavities, especially above headers. Wiring and lath and plaster consistently caused reduced insulation densities in cavities. The problems with wiring, lath and plaster, and other features in the wall cavities were avoided with the use of a filler tube. The filler tube also provided a more consistent fill along the length of the entire cavity. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Flores, Joseph A.; Grill, Alan R.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Marine Casualty and Pollution Database - Vessel Events for 2002 to 2010 |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vessel Events for 2002 to 2010 Vessel Events for 2002 to 2010 Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean » Data Marine Casualty and Pollution Database - Vessel Events for 2002 to 2010 Dataset Summary Description The Marine Casualty and Pollution Data files provide details about marine casualty and pollution incidents investigated by Coast Guard Offices throughout the United States. The database can be used to analyze marine accidents and pollution incidents by a variety of factors including vessel or facility type, injuries, fatalities, pollutant details, location, and date. The data collection period began in 1982 for marine casualties and 1973 for polluting incidents, and is ongoing. Documentation includes entity and attribute descriptions along with suggested solutions to general marine pollution, vessel casualty, and personnel injury and death questions.

420

Numerical analysis of wall shear patterns on the external wall of an API 5L X42 natural gas pipe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Natural gas pipeline is designed and constructed according to stringent international codes and standards, thus it hardly to rupture or leaks. However, erosive water jet from leaked water pipeline is able to erode the pipe surfaces and lead to its failure. Due to complications in understanding the subsurface hydrodynamics of buried pipe condition, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is commonly used to predict its characteristics to provide multifaceted overview of the erosion phenomenon. In this study, CFD simulation of multiple water leakage surface of 0.05m diameter at 9atm water pipeline pressure was performed with separation distance of 0.05m, using standard kepsilon model (SKE) of turbulent model. Simulation results were obtained using discrete random walk to determine the instantaneous fluid velocity. It was found that different region of water shear and sand shear on natural gas pipelines was formed due to the strikes of erosive slurry at different angles. The CFD simulation results showed that sand was the primary cause of the natural gas pipe wall shear, causing cutting and deformation region on the surface of gas pipe. The erosion pattern of the three ruptured holes from the incident sites had a similar trend with those from simulated CFD results of water jetting source at angles of 45, 60, and 75.

R. Mohsin; Z.A. Majid; F.L. Tan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Stabilizing System Pressure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System Pressure This tip sheet summarizes three methods used to stabilize compressed air system pressure: adequate primary and secondary storage, PressureFlow Controllers (P...

422

Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project The Department of Energy is currently conducting research into highly energy efficient wall systems. Walls with high R-values are better insulators, and their development can help buildings come closer to having zero net energy consumption. Project Description This project seeks to develop a commercially viable wall system up to R-40 through integration of vacuum technology with the exterior insulated façade system (EIFS). Dow Corning will develop a wall system configuration of expanded polystyrene vacuum isolation panels that can be specified for R-values of 20, 30, and 40. This project also aims to develop a unitized protection system of vacuum isolation panels and to validate current code

423

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Wednesday, 29 July 2009 00:00 Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

424

Domain Walls and Vortices in Chiral Symmetry Breaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study domain walls and vortices in chiral symmetry breaking in a QCD-like theory with N flavors in the chiral limit. If the axial anomaly is absent, there exist stable Abelian axial vortices winding around the spontaneously broken U(1)_A symmetry and non-Abelian axial vortices winding around both the U(1)_A and non-Abelian SU(N) chiral symmetries. In the presence of the axial anomaly term, metastable domain walls are present and Abelian axial vortices must be attached by N domain walls, forming domain wall junctions. We show that a domain wall junction decays into N non-Abelian vortices attached by domain walls, implying its metastability. We also show that domain walls decay through the quantum tunneling by creating a hole bounded by a closed non-Abelian vortex.

Minoru Eto; Yuji Hirono; Muneto Nitta

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

425

Moisture Management of High-R Walls (Fact Sheet), Building America...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

wall with ccSPF cavity insulation Double stud wall with cellulose insulation and polyethylene vapor retarder Double stud wall with cellulose and 2 in. of ccSPF Double stud wall...

426

Investigation of a porous-wall compact diffuser for chemical lasers  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of a novel concept for chemical laser diffusers was conducted at Rocketdyne. This experimental program involved testing a porous-wall, compact diffuser for HF/DH chemical laser systems that utilize a chemical pump system. The concept feasibility was successfully demonstrated in a cold-flow test apparatus with a 93 percent normal shock pressure recovery achieved in a flow length of two nozzle height distances. The design concept uses boundary layer bleed to stabilize a normal shock wave in the supersonic section of the laser diffuser. This suggests that the supersonic section (which in the past required length-to-height ratios greater than 10) could be reduced in length to a short bleed zone necessary to remove the laminar boundary layer by suction. The suction could be provided by a compartmentalized chemical pump designed with a separate, low-pressure section to pump less than 10 percent of the total laser effluents.

Davis, J.A.; Morr, G.F.; Moon, L.F.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fracture Analysis of Vessels Oak Ridge FAVOR, v06.1, Computer Code: Theory and Implementation of Algorithms, Methods, and Correlations  

SciTech Connect

The current regulations to insure that nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) maintain their structural integrity when subjected to transients such as pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events were derived from computational models developed in the early-to-mid 1980s. Since that time, advancements and refinements in relevant technologies that impact RPV integrity assessment have led to an effort by the NRC to re-evaluate its PTS regulations. Updated computational methodologies have been developed through interactions between experts in the relevant disciplines of thermal hydraulics, probabilistic risk assessment, materials embrittlement, fracture mechanics, and inspection (flaw characterization). Contributors to the development of these methodologies include the NRC staff, their contractors, and representatives from the nuclear industry. These updated methodologies have been integrated into the Fracture Analysis of Vessels Oak Ridge (FAVOR, v06.1) computer code developed for the NRC by the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The FAVOR, v04.1, code represents the baseline NRC-selected applications tool for re-assessing the current PTS regulations. This report is intended to document the technical bases for the assumptions, algorithms, methods, and correlations employed in the development of the FAVOR, v06.1, code.

Williams, P. T. [ORNL; Dickson, T. L. [ORNL; Yin, S. [ORNL

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Theoretical collapse pressures for two pressurized torispherical heads  

SciTech Connect

In order to determine the pressures at which real torispherical heads fail upon a single application of pressure, two heads were pressurized in recent Praxair tests, and displacements and strains were recorded at various locations. In this paper, theoretical results for the two test heads are presented in the form of curves of pressure versus crown deflections, using the available geometry and material parameters. From these curves, limit and collapse pressures are calculated, using procedures permitted by the ASME B and PV Code Section 8/Div.2. These pressures are shown to vary widely, depending on the method and model used to calculate them. The effect of no stress relief on the behavior of the Praxair test heads is also evaluated and found to be of no significance for neither the objectives of the tests nor the objectives of this paper. The results of this paper are submitted as an enhancement to the experimental results recorded during the Praxair tests.

Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Cradle and pressure grippers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gripper that is designed to incorporate the functions of gripping, supporting and pressure tongs into one device. The gripper has two opposing finger sections with interlocking fingers that incline and taper to form a wedge. The interlocking fingers are vertically off-set so that the opposing finger sections may close together allowing the inclined, tapered tips of the fingers to extend beyond the plane defined by the opposing finger section's engagement surface. The range of motion defined by the interlocking relationship of the finger sections allows the gripper to grab, lift and support objects of varying size and shape. The gripper has one stationary and one moveable finger section. Power is provided to the moveable finger section by an actuating device enabling the gripper to close around an object to be lifted. A lifting bail is attached to the gripper and is supported by a crane that provides vertical lift.

Muniak, John E. (New York, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Trade Off Under Low-Carbon Economy: Ocean Shipping Vessel Speed, Carbon Emission or Shipowners Profit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The total fuel consumption per vessel per voyage equals to the sum of fuel consumed by both main engine and auxiliary engine, so the equation represents the fuel consumption per vessel per round voyage is as foll...

Gang Li; Huan Xu; Wei Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Investigation of downward facing critical heat flux with water-based nanofluids for In-Vessel Retention applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-Vessel Retention ("IVR") is a severe accident management strategy that is power limiting to the Westinghouse AP1000 due to critical heat flux ("CHF") at the outer surface of the reactor vessel. Increasing the CHF level ...

DeWitt, Gregory L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) vessel architecture is linked to chilling and salinity tolerance in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

architecture may influence mangrove chilling and salinity tolerance. We surveyed populations of A. germinans throughout the Gulf to determine if vessel architecture was linked to field environmental conditions. We measured vessel density, hydraulically weighted...

Madrid, Eric N.; Armitage, Anna R.; Lopez-Portillo, Jorge

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

433

Melting Instantons, Domain Walls, and Large N  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monte Carlo studies of $CP^{N-1}$ sigma models have shown that the structure of topological charge in these models undergoes a sharp transition at $N=N_c\\approx 4$. For $NN_c$ it is dominated by extended, thin, 1-dimensionally coherent membranes of topological charge, which can be interpreted as domain walls between discrete quasi-stable vacua. These vacua differ by a unit of background electric flux. The transition can be identified as the delocalization of topological charge, or "instanton melting," a phenomenon first suggested by Witten to resolve the conflict between instantons and large $N$ behavior. Implications for $QCD$ are discussed.

H. B. Thacker

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

434

Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

Stathopoulos, Dimitrios (Glenmont, NY); Xu, Liming (Greenville, SC); Lewis, Doyle C. (Greer, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

CDIAC Atmospheric Pressure Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Atmospheric Pressure CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Pressure Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; through 1990 Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of sea-level pressure Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; some through most recent month

436

Steam Oxidation at High Pressure  

SciTech Connect

A first high pressure test was completed: 293 hr at 267 bar and 670{degrees}C; A parallel 1 bar test was done for comparison; Mass gains were higher for all alloys at 267 bar than at 1 bar; Longer term exposures, over a range of temperatures and pressures, are planned to provide information as to the commercial implications of pressure effects; The planned tests are at a higher combination of temperatures and pressures than in the existing literature. A comparison was made with longer-term literature data: The short term exposures are largely consistent with the longer-term corrosion literature; Ferritic steels--no consistent pressure effect; Austenitic steels--fine grain alloys less able to maintain protective chromia scale as pressure increases; Ni-base alloys--more mass gains above 105 bar than below. Not based on many data points.

Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL; Carney, Casey [URS

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

437

Performance of reduced wall EPR insulated medium voltage power cables. Pat 1: Electrical characteristics  

SciTech Connect

Paper insulated lead covered cables (PILC) have had a long and successful heritage. After almost 100 years, this design of cable is still in operation and continues to be manufactured. However, utilities are now looking for a reliable replacement for PILC cables. This is due to two primary reasons: (1) difficulty in installing and maintaining this type of cable and (2) increasing pressure to replace these cables due to environmental concerns. To date diameter limitations of conventional extruded dielectric cables has impeded their replacement in existing PILC conduits. This paper describes a study for the evaluation for reliably reducing the insulation thickness to achieve a lower diameter cable to effectively replace PILC cable in existing conduits. Part 1 of the investigation reviews the theory of insulation wall determination and the test program carried out to evaluate electrical performance of reduced wall EPR cables. Additionally, cable design concepts and constructions are discussed. In Part 2 the mechanical performance on conventional and reduced wall EPR insulated cables are evaluated. This is reported in a separate paper.

Cinquemani, P.L.; Wen, Y.; Kuchta, F.L.; Doench, C. [Pirelli Cable Corp., Lexington, SC (United States)] [Pirelli Cable Corp., Lexington, SC (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Flame-wall interaction simulation in a turbulent channel flow  

SciTech Connect

The interaction between turbulent premixed flames and channel walls is studied. Combustion is represented by a simple irreversible reaction with a large activation temperature. A low heat release assumption is used, but feedback to the flowfield can be allowed through viscosity changes. The effect of wall distance on local and global flame structure is investigated. Quenching distances and maximum wall heat fluxed computed in laminar cases are compared to DNS results. It is found that quenching distances decrease and maximum heat fluxes increase relative to laminar flame values, scaling with the turbulent strain rate. It is shown that these effects are due to large coherent structures which push flame elements towards the wall. The effect of wall strain in flame-wall interaction is studied in a stagnation line flow; this is used to explain the DNS results. The effects of the flame on the flow through viscosity changes is studied. It is also shown that remarkable flame events are produced by flame interaction with a horseshoe vortex: burned gases are pushed towards the wall at high speed and induce quenching and high wall heat flux while fresh gases are expelled from the wall region and form finger-like structures. Effects of the wall on flame surface density are investigated.

Bruneaux, G.; Akselvoll, K.; Poinsot, T.; Ferziger, J.H.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Neutron scattering at high pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neutron scattering spectra at pressures up to 30 kilobar in the temperature range 3004 K have been obtained with a compact clamped type apparatus. The pressure cell geometry by allowing the detection of neutronsscattered in a plane makes it compatible with operation on crystal spectrometers both for elastic and inelastic scattering. The instrument is light (4.5 kg) and easy to move. An external diameter of 68 mm makes the pressure cell adaptable to standard cryostats or furnaces.

D. Bloch; J. Paureau; J. Voiron; G. Parisot

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Chem. Phys. Lett. in press Cold wall CVD generation of single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-furnace [3] and arc-discharge [4] methods, several techniques employing the CVD approach [5-13] have been Catalytic CVD generation of high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) without use of an electric without resort to an electric furnace or a hot filament is proposed. All one needs is a vacuum chamber

Maruyama, Shigeo

442

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

443

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

444

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

445

Webs of domain walls in supersymmetric gauge theories  

SciTech Connect

Webs of domain walls are constructed as 1/4 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) states in d=4, N=2 supersymmetric U(N{sub C}) gauge theories with N{sub F} hypermultiplets in the fundamental representation. Webs of walls can contain any numbers of external legs and loops like (p,q) string/5-brane webs. We find the moduli space M of a 1/4 BPS equation for wall webs to be the complex Grassmann manifold. When moduli spaces of 1/2 BPS states (parallel walls) and the vacua are removed from M, the noncompact moduli space of genuine 1/4 BPS wall webs is obtained. All the solutions are obtained explicitly and exactly in the strong gauge coupling limit. In the case of Abelian gauge theory, we work out the correspondence between configurations of wall web and the moduli space CP{sup N{}sub F}{sup -1}.

Eto, Minoru; Isozumi, Youichi; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Schumacher, Ray F. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

447

En-Vac Robotic Wall Scabbler. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL)demonstrated an En-Vac Robotic Wall Scabbler from Japan to remove contaminated paint and concrete up to five times faster than workers using a hand-held scabbling/grinding tool. The Robotic Wall Scabbler uses abrasive steel grit to blast metal and concrete surfaces and it moves along the wall and adheres to the surface using vacuum suction. The Robotic Wall Scabbling unit includes the robot, grit recycling unit, debris filtration system, vacuum system, and remote control station. It scabbles concrete at depths up to 1/8-inch per pass. The demonstration was conducted on the walls of the Decontamination Shop of Test Area North which is contaminated with polychlorobiphenyls, lead, and radionuclides. Besides production rate, other benefits of the robotic wall scabbler include reduced radiation dose to workers and no airborne contamination.

None

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

449

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

450

D-brane Configurations for Domain Walls and Their Webs  

SciTech Connect

Supersymmetric U(NC) gauge theory with NF massive hypermultiplets in the fundamental representation admits various BPS solitons like domain walls and their webs. In the first part we show as a review of the previous paper that domain walls are realized as kinky fractional D3-branes interpolating between separated D7-branes. In the second part we discuss brane configurations for domain wall webs. This is a contribution to the conference based on the talk given by MN.

Eto, Minoru; Isozumi, Youichi; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ohta, Kazutoshi [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Oakland, CA); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Schoeniger, Luke (Pittsford, NY)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Self-assembling functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scale synthesis of carbon nanotubes." Nature, Vol.358, 220-Ropes of Metallic Carbon Nanotubes." Science, Vol.273(5274),of single- wall carbon nanotubes. Process, product, and

Gao, Yan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Stud Walls With Continuous Exterior Insulation for Factory Built...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

density, fairly simple window and door framing details can be used. Easily installed plastic sill flashing is an added benefit. STUD WALLS WITH FOAM- CONTROL NAILBRACE AFM's...

454

Concept for Reducing Hall Thruster Chamber Wall Erosion with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concept for Reducing Hall Thruster Chamber Wall Erosion with Lithium Vapor Shielding. Hall thrusters have been established as a compact and reliable means for satellite...

455

Security Walls, LLC, January 14-18, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assistance Washington, DC 20585 Security Walls, LLC DOE-VPP Onsite Review January 2013 Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes that true excellence can be...

456

Imaging cell wall architecture in single Zinnia elegans tracheary elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indicated a loss of lignin and a modest loss of otherTEs accumulate lignin in their secondary walls and undergohemicelluloses, and also lignin, a complex aromatic polymer

Lacayo, Catherine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding of Single-Walled Carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Epoxy Composites Ning (SWNT)-polymer composites have been fabricated to evaluate the electromagnetic interference (EMI

Gao, Hongjun

458

Fracture of welded aluminum thin-walled structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive methodology was developed in the thesis for damage prediction of welded aluminum thin-walled structures, which includes material modeling, calibration, numerical simulation and experimental verification. ...

Zheng, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Seismic design, testing and analysis of reinforced concrete wall buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Priestley M.J.N. (1992). Seismic Design of Reinforced2007). Displacement Based Seismic Design of Structures.318-99 Provisions for Seismic Design of Structural Walls.

Panagiotou, Marios

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Wall and laser spot motion in cylindrical hohlraums  

SciTech Connect

Wall and laser spot motion measurements in empty, propane-filled and plastic (CH)-lined gold coated cylindrical hohlraums were performed on the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Wall motion was measured using axial two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging and laser spot motion was perpendicularly observed through a thinned wall using streaked hard x-ray imaging. Experimental results and 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that while empty targets exhibit on-axis plasma collision, CH-lined and propane-filled targets inhibit wall expansion, corroborated with perpendicular streaked imaging showing a slower motion of laser spots.

Huser, G.; Courtois, C.; Monteil, M.-C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walled pressure vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Self-assembling functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single-walled carbon nanotubes Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arescale synthesis of carbon nanotubes." Nature, Vol.358, 220-Ropes of Metallic Carbon Nanotubes." Science, Vol.273(5274),

Gao, Yan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Structural Investigation of Methane Hydrate Sediments by Microfocus X-ray Computed Tomography Technique under High-Pressure Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of natural gas hydrate sediments was observed by microfocus X-ray computed tomography (CT). A newly developed high-pressure vessel for the microfocus X-ray CT system was applied to observe the sediments at a temperature above 273 K and under high-pressure conditions. The obtained two-dimensional CT images clearly showed the spatial distribution of the free-gas pore, sand particles, water, and hydrates. These results demonstrated that microfocus X-ray CT can be effective for studying natural gas hydrate sediment samples.

Shigeki Jin; Jiro Nagao; Satoshi Takeya; Yusuke Jin; Junko Hayashi; Yasushi Kamata; Takao Ebinuma; Hideo Narita

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

High-Pressure Hydrogen Tanks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 8 February 8 th , 2005 Mark J. Warner, P.E. Principal Engineer Quantum Technologies, Inc. Irvine, CA Low Cost, High Efficiency, Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage High Pressure Hydrogen Storage This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. 70 MPa Composite Tanks Vent Line Ports Defueling Port (optional) Fill Port Filter Check Valve Vehicle Interface Bracket with Stone Shield In Tank Regulator with Solenoid Lock-off Pressure Relief Device Manual Valve Compressed Hydrogen Storage System In-Tank Regulator Pressure Sensor (not visible here) Pressure Relief Device (thermal) In Tank Gas Temperature Sensor Carbon Composite Shell (structural) Impact Resistant Outer Shell (damage resistant) Gas Outlet Solenoid Foam Dome (impact protection)

464

NETL: Pressure Swing Absorption Device  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage Project No.: DE-FE0001323 New Jersey Institute of Technology is developing an advanced pressure swing absorption-based (PSAB) device via laboratory-based experiments. The device will be used to accomplish a cyclic process to process low temperature post-shift-reactor synthesis gas resulting from the gasification process into purified hydrogen at high pressure for use by the combustion turbine of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant. The overall goal of the proposed work is to develop an advanced PSAB device and cyclic process for use in a coal-fired IGCC plant to produce purified hydrogen at high pressure and a highly purified CO2 stream suitable for use or sequestration.

465

Fundamentals of high pressure adsorption  

SciTech Connect

High-pressure adsorption attracts research interests following the world's attention to alternative fuels, and it exerts essential effect on the study of hydrogen/methane storage and the development of novel materials addressing to the storage. However, theoretical puzzles in high-pressure adsorption hindered the progress of application studies. Therefore, the present paper addresses the major theoretical problems that challenged researchers: i.e., how to model the isotherms with maximum observed in high-pressure adsorption; what is the adsorption mechanism at high pressures; how do we determine the quantity of absolute adsorption based on experimental data. Ideology and methods to tackle these problems are elucidated, which lead to new insights into the nature of high-pressure adsorption and progress in application studies, for example, in modeling multicomponent adsorption, hydrogen storage, natural gas storage, and coalbed methane enrichment, was achieved.

Zhou, Y.P.; Zhou, L. [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China). High Pressure Adsorption Laboratory

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

atmospheric pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description (Abstract):Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords atmospheric pressure climate NASA SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 46 MiB)

467

Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Vessel (Dollars...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Vessel (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013...

468

Anatomic study of the external pudenal vessels to the anterior scrotal region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?The aim of this study was to examine the anatomy of the external pudendal vessels as they supply the anterior scrotal region. Twenty cadavers were dissected and a catheter was used to inject India ink into th...

M. Castro; E. Brenda; A. Marques; M. D. Pereira

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Assessment of Vessel Requirements for the U.S. Offshore Wind Sector  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report that investigates the anticipated demand for various vessel types associated with offshore wind development in the United States through 2030 and assesses related market barriers and mitigating policy options.

470

Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, and Wave Modeling in Stented Vessels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arterial hypertension (PAH), to identify the hemodynamic attributes which could be altered to ameliorate the progression of these diseases. We then simulated blood flow through five, simple finite element vessel models to determine the effects of stents...

Peters, Andrew

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

471

Flame structure of wall-impinging diesel fuel sprays injected by group-hole nozzles  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an investigation of the flame structure of wall-impinging diesel sprays injected by group-hole nozzles in a constant-volume combustion vessel at experimental conditions typical of a diesel engine. The particular emphasis was on the effect of the included angle between two orifices (0-15 deg. in current study) on the flame structure and combustion characteristics under various simulated engine load conditions. The laser absorption scattering (LAS) technique was applied to analyze the spray and mixture properties. Direct flame imaging and OH chemiluminescence imaging were utilized to quantify the ignition delay, flame geometrical parameters, and OH chemiluminescence intensity. The images show that the asymmetric flame structure emerges in wall-impinging group-hole nozzle sprays as larger included angle and higher engine load conditions are applied, which is consistent with the spray shape observed by LAS. Compared to the base nozzle, group-hole nozzles with large included angles yield higher overall OH chemiluminescence intensity, wider flame area, and greater proportion of high OH intensity, implying the better fuel/air mixing and improved combustion characteristics. The advantages of group-hole nozzle are more pronounced under high load conditions. Based on the results, the feasibility of group-hole nozzle for practical direct injection diesel engines is also discussed. It is concluded that the asymmetric flame structure of a group-hole nozzle spray is favorable to reduce soot formation over wide engine loads. However, the hole configuration of the group-hole nozzle should be carefully considered so as to achieve proper air utilization in the combustion chamber. Stoichiometric diesel combustion is another promising application of group-hole nozzle. (author)

Gao, Jian; Moon, Seoksu; Nishida, Keiya; Matsumoto, Yuhei [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, University of Hiroshima, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8527 (Japan); Zhang, Yuyin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Tokyo, 101-8457 (Japan)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

First operation with the JET International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like wall  

SciTech Connect

To consolidate International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) design choices and prepare for its operation, Joint European Torus (JET) has implemented ITER's plasma facing materials, namely, Be for the main wall and W in the divertor. In addition, protection systems, diagnostics, and the vertical stability control were upgraded and the heating capability of the neutral beams was increased to over 30 MW. First results confirm the expected benefits and the limitations of all metal plasma facing components (PFCs) but also yield understanding of operational issues directly relating to ITER. H-retention is lower by at least a factor of 10 in all operational scenarios compared to that with C PFCs. The lower C content (? factor 10) has led to much lower radiation during the plasma burn-through phase eliminating breakdown failures. Similarly, the intrinsic radiation observed during disruptions is very low, leading to high power loads and to a slow current quench. Massive gas injection using a D{sub 2}/Ar mixture restores levels of radiation and vessel forces similar to those of mitigated disruptions with the C wall. Dedicated L-H transition experiments indicate a 30% power threshold reduction, a distinct minimum density, and a pronounced shape dependence. The L-mode density limit was found to be up to 30% higher than for C allowing stable detached divertor operation over a larger density range. Stable H-modes as well as the hybrid scenario could be re-established only when using gas puff levels of a few 10{sup 21} es{sup ?1}. On average, the confinement is lower with the new PFCs, but nevertheless, H factors up to 1 (H-Mode) and 1.3 (at ?{sub N}?3, hybrids) have been achieved with W concentrations well below the maximum acceptable level.

Neu, R. [EFDA-CSU, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany) [EFDA-CSU, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Arnoux, G.; Beurskens, M.; Challis, C.; Giroud, C.; Lomas, P.; Maddison, G.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Meigs, A.; Rimini, F. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V.; Dux, R.; Hobirk, J.; Lang, P.; Maggi, C.; Ptterich, T.; Sertoli, M.; Sieglin, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [IEK-4, Association EURATOM/Forschungszentrum Jlich GmbH, Jlich 52425 (Germany)] [IEK-4, Association EURATOM/Forschungszentrum Jlich GmbH, Jlich 52425 (Germany); and others

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages  

SciTech Connect

An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded pressure drop with heat transfer is much higher than that without heat transfer. The magnitude of this effect depends markedly on the average surface temperature and, to a lesser extent, on the geometric characteristics of the enhanced surfaces. When the pressure drop data are reduced as values of the Fanning friction factor(f), the results are about the same with and without heat transfer for turbulent flow, with moderate differences in the laminar and transition regions.

Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded