Sample records for walla basin spring

  1. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Umatilla County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin.

  2. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin.

  3. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screens Evaluations, 2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Mickie; Abernethy, Scott; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated Gardena Farms, Little Walla Walla, and Garden City/Lowden II Phase II fish screen facilities and provided underwater videography beneath a leaking rubber dam in the Walla Walla River basin in 2006. Evaluations of the fish screen facilities took place in early May 2006, when juvenile salmonids are generally outmigrating. At the Gardena Farms site, extended high river levels caused accumulations of debris and sediment in the forebay. This debris covered parts of the bottom drum seals, which could lead to early deterioration of the seals and drum screen. Approach velocities were excessive at the upstream corners of most of the drums, leading to 14% of the total approach velocities exceeding 0.4 feet per second (ft/s). Consequently, the approach velocities did not meet National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) design criteria guidelines for juvenile fish screens. The Little Walla Walla site was found to be in good condition, with all approach, sweep, and bypass velocities within NMFS criteria. Sediment buildup was minor and did not affect the effectiveness of the screens. At Garden City/Lowden II, 94% of approach velocities met NMFS criteria of 0.4 ft/s at any time. Sweep velocities increased toward the fish ladder. The air-burst mechanism appears to keep large debris off the screens, although it does not prevent algae and periphyton from growing on the screen face, especially near the bottom of the screens. In August 2006, the Gardena Farm Irrigation District personnel requested that we look for a leak beneath the inflatable rubber dam at the Garden City/Lowden II site that was preventing water movement through the fish ladder. Using our underwater video equipment, we were able to find a gap in the sheet piling beneath the dam. Erosion of the riverbed was occurring around this gap, allowing water and cobbles to move beneath the dam. The construction engineers and irrigation district staff were able to use the video footage to resolve the problem within a couple weeks. We had hoped to also evaluate the effectiveness of modifications to louvers behind the Nursery Bridge screens when flows were higher than 350 cubic feet per second, (cfs) but were unable to do so. Based on the one measurement made in early 2006 after the modified louvers were set, it appears the modified louvers may help reduce approach velocities. The auxiliary supply water system gates also control water through the screens. Evaluating the effect of different combinations of gate and louver positions on approach velocities through the screens may help identify optimum settings for both at different river discharges.

  4. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkman, Jed (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002 and 2003, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts on private properties in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of this effort is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. The CTUIR has currently enrolled nine properties into this program: two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and four properties on the mainstem Walla Walla River. Major accomplishments during the reporting period include the following: (1) Secured approximately $229,000 in project cost share; (2) Purchase of 46 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River to be protected perpetually for native fish and wildlife; (3) Developed three new 15 year conservation easements with private landowners; (4) Installed 3000 feet of weed barrier tarp with new plantings within project area on the mainstem Walla Walla River; (5) Expanded easement area on Couse Creek to include an additional 0.5 miles of stream corridor and 32 acres of upland habitat; (6) Restored 12 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River and 32 acres on Couse Creek to native perennial grasses; and (7) Installed 50,000+ new native plants/cuttings within project areas.

  5. The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project : Progress Report, 1999-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contor, Craig R.; Sexton, Amy D.

    2003-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME) was funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P. L. 96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME). Chapter One provides an overview of the entire report and how the objectives of each statement of work from 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 contract years are organized and reported. Chapter One also provides background information relevant to the aquatic resources of the Walla Walla River Basin. Objectives are outlined below for the statements of work for the 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 contract years. The same objectives were sometimes given different numbers in different years. Because this document is a synthesis of four years of reporting, we gave objectives letter designations and listed the objective number associated with the statement of work for each year. Some objectives were in all four work statements, while other objectives were in only one or two work statements. Each objective is discussed in a chapter. The chapter that reports activities and findings of each objective are listed with the objective below. Because data is often interrelated, aspects of some findings may be reported or discussed in more than one chapter. Specifics related to tasks, approaches, methods, results and discussion are addressed in the individual chapters.

  6. Assessment of Salmonids and their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, Glen Wesley; Trump, Jeremy; Karl, David

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about the decline of native salmon and trout populations have increased among natural resource managers and the public in recent years. As a result, a multitude of initiatives have been implemented at the local, state, and federal government levels. These initiatives include management plans and actions intended to protect and restore salmonid fishes and their habitats. In 1998 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), as ''Threatened'', for the Walla Walla River and its tributaries. Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were listed as ''Threatened'' in 1999 for the mid-Columbia River and its tributaries. These ESA listings emphasize the need for information about these threatened salmonid populations and their habitats. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is entrusted with ''the preservation, protection, and perpetuation of fish and wildlife....[and to] maximize public recreational or commercial opportunities without impairing the supply of fish and wildlife (WAC 77.12.010).'' In consideration of this mandate, the WDFW submitted a proposal in December 1997 to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a study to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. The primary purposes of this project are to collect baseline biological and habitat data, to identify major data gaps, and to draw conclusions whenever possible. The study reported herein details the findings of the 2001 field season (March to November, 2001).

  7. Evaluation of Fish Passage Sites in the Walla Walla River Basin, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the Hofer Dam fish screen and provided technical assistance at two other fish passage sites as requested by the Bonneville Power Administration, the Walla Walla Watershed Council, or the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Evaluation of new sites such as Hofer Dam focuses on their design, construction, operation, and maintenance to determine if they effectively provide juvenile salmonids with safe passage through irrigation diversions. There were two requests for technical assistance in 2008. In the first, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation requested an evaluation of the Nursery Bridge fish screens associated with the fish ladder on the east side of the Walla Walla River. One set of brushes that clean the screens was broken for an extended period. Underwater videography and water velocity measurements were used to determine there were no potential adverse effects on juvenile salmonids when the west set of screens was clean enough to pass water normally. A second request, received from the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Walla Walla Watershed Council, asked for evaluation of water velocities through relatively new head gates above and adjacent to the Eastside Ditch fish screens on the Walla Walla River. Water moving through the head gates and not taken for irrigation is diverted to provide water for the Nursery Bridge fish ladder on the east side of the river. Elevations used in the design of the head gates were incorrect, causing excessive flow through the head gates that closely approached or exceeded the maximum swimming burst speed of juvenile salmonids. Hofer Dam was evaluated in June 2008. PNNL researchers found that conditions at Hofer Dam will not cause impingement or entrainment of juvenile salmonids but may provide habitat for predators and lack strong sweeping flows to encourage juvenile salmonid passage downstream. Further evaluation of velocities at the Eastside Ditch and wasteway gates should occur as changes are made to compensate for the design problems. These evaluations will help determine whether further changes are required. Hofer Dam also should be evaluated again under more normal operating conditions when the river levels are typical of those when fish are emigrating and the metal plate is not affecting flows.

  8. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Umatilla

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartmentDepartment ofDepartment488:PatricioStatement |

  9. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1990's, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and initiating trap and haul efforts. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2002-2003 project year, there were 545 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 29 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 1 adult and 1 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway adult trap between January 1 and June 23, 2003. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported 21 adult spring chinook from Ringold Springs Hatchery and 281 from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. Of these, 290 were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

  10. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2003-2004 project year, there were 379 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 36 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 108 adult and 3 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 21, 2003, and June 30, 2004. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by the WWBNPME project in order to radio tag spring chinook adults. A total of 2 adult summer steelhead, 4 bull trout, and 23 adult spring chinook were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the trapping operations between May 6 and May 23, 2004. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported adult spring chinook from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. A total of 239 spring chinook were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

  11. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2004-2005 project year, there were 590 adult summer steelhead, 31 summer steelhead kelts (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 70 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 80 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 13, 2004, and June 16, 2005. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by ODFW in order to enumerate fish passage. Of the total, 143 adult summer steelhead and 15 summer steelhead kelts were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the video efforts between February 4 and May 23, 2005. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year.

  12. Microsoft Word - XX 13 Public scoping Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook HatcherySES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625Data Show Filtration8, 2011HanfordWoody4633515

  13. Microsoft Word - Walla_Walla_hydroproject_CX.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - TEP-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Columbia Rural Electric Association Walla Walla Hydroelectric Project Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.1...

  14. 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report for BPA Grant Exp Restore Walla Walla River Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bower, Bob [WWBWC (Walla Walla Basin Watershed Council)

    2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    WWBWC and its partners have been working on a wide variety of conservation and aquifer recharge related activities including: monitoring groundwater and surface water conditions, creating a geospatial database for the Walla Walla River valley (project focal area), expanding aquifer recharge testing at the HBDIC site and conducting an extensive outreach/education program by which to share the information, ideas and potential solutions to our current water management issues in this basin. This report is an outline of those activities and is accompanied by individual program-component (attached as appendices) reports for the areas that BPA is assisting to fund these on-the-ground projects along with the innovative research and monitoring being done to further aquifer recharge as a water management tool for the Pacific Northwest.

  15. Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Brophy br Model br Moeck br Beardsmore br Type br Volume br Geothermal br Region Mean br Reservoir br Temp br Mean br Capacity Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin...

  16. Walla Walla Subbasin DRAFT Aquatic RM&E Plan Prepared by: CTUIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as an interim set of guidelines that will assure a systematic approach to directing and funding RME. Further as a reliable measure of habitat and population response to recovery actions taken in the Walla Walla subbasin

  17. EIS-0495: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0495: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring...

  18. FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  19. Regional geologic characterization of the Second Bone Spring Sandstone, Delaware basin, Lea and Eddy Counties, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downing, Amanda Beth

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bone Spring Formation is a series of interbedded siliciclastics and carbonates that were deposited in the Delaware basin during the Leonardian (Early Permian). It consists of the First, Second and Third Carbonate and the First, Second and Third...

  20. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Wayne

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. Spawning ground surveys for spring (stream-type) Chinook salmon were conducted in four main spawning areas (Mainstem, Middle Fork, North Fork, and Granite Creek System) and seven minor spawning areas (South Fork, Camas Creek, Desolation Creek, Trail Creek, Deardorff Creek, Clear Creek, and Big Creek) in the John Day River basin during August and September of 2005. Census surveys included 298.2 river kilometers (88.2 rkm within index, 192.4 rkm additional within census, and 17.6 rkm within random survey areas) of spawning habitat. We observed 902 redds and 701 carcasses including 227 redds in the Mainstem, 178 redds in the Middle Fork, 420 redds in the North Fork, 62 redds in the Granite Creek System, and 15 redds in Desolation Creek. Age composition of carcasses sampled for the entire basin was 1.6% age 3, 91.2% age 4, and 7.1% age 5. The sex ratio was 57.4% female and 42.6% male. Significantly more females than males were observed in the Granite Creek System. During 2005, 82.3% of female carcasses sampled had released all of their eggs. Significantly more pre-spawn mortalities were observed in Granite Creek. Nine (1.3%) of 701 carcasses were of hatchery origin. Of 298 carcasses examined, 4.0% were positive for the presence of lesions. A significantly higher incidence of gill lesions was found in the Granite Creek System when compared to the rest of the basin. Of 114 kidney samples tested, two (1.8%) had clinical BKD levels. Both infected fish were age-4 females in the Middle Fork. All samples tested for IHNV were negative. To estimate spring Chinook and summer steelhead smolt-to-adult survival (SAR) we PIT tagged 5,138 juvenile Chinook and 4,913 steelhead during the spring of 2005. We estimated that 130,144 (95% CL's 97,133-168,409) Chinook emigrated from the upper John Day subbasin past our seining area in the Mainstem John Day River (river kilometers 274-296) between February 4 and June 16, 2005. We also estimated that 32,601 (95% CL's 29,651 and 36,264) Chinook and 47,921 (95% CL's 35,025 and 67,366) steelhead migrated past our Mainstem rotary screw trap at river kilometer (rkm) 326 between October 4, 2004 and July 6, 2005. We estimated that 20,193 (95% CL's 17,699 and 22,983) Chinook and 28,980 (95% CL's 19,914 and 43,705) steelhead migrated past our Middle Fork trap (rkm 24) between October 6, 2004 and June 17, 2005. Seventy three percent of PIT tagged steelhead migrants were age-2 fish, 13.8% were age-3, 12.7% were age-2, and 0.3% were age 4. Spring Chinook SAR for the 2002 brood year was estimated at 2.5% (100 returns of 4,000 PIT tagged smolts). Preliminary steelhead SAR (excluding 2-ocean fish) for the 2004 tagging year was estimated at 1.61% (60 returns of 3,732 PIT-tagged migrants).

  1. Spring temperatures in the Sagehen Basin, Sierra Nevada, CA: implications for heat flow and groundwater circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    on groundwater flow depths within the basin. An analytical model based on these constraints indicates@berkeley.edu. Tel: +1 510 642 2288. Fax: +1 510 643 9980. Geofluids (2009) 9, 195­207 INTRODUCTION Groundwater and groundwater circulation MARIA BRUMM, CHI-YUEN WANG AND MICHAEL MANGA Earth and Planetary Science, University

  2. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; James, Brenda B.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2002 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Hatchery reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  3. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

  4. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: FY 1999 Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Shawn W.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects implemented included installation of infiltration galleries, permanent diversions, pumping stations, and irrigation efficiency upgrades. Project costs in 1999 totaled $284,514.00 with a total amount of $141,628.00 (50%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

  5. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

  6. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional six watershed conservation projects funded by the BPA. The types of projects include permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2000 totaled $533,196.00 with a total amount of $354,932.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration and the remainder coming from other sources such as the BOR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

  7. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2005-2006 Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Terra Lang; Wilson, Wayne H.; Ruzycki, James R. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations, however, remain depressed relative to historic levels. Between the completion of the life history and natural escapement study in 1984 and the start of this project in 1998, spring Chinook spawning surveys did not provide adequate information to assess age structure, progeny-to-parent production values, smolt-to-adult survival (SAR), or natural spawning escapement. Further, only very limited information is available for steelhead life history, escapement, and productivity measures in the John Day subbasin. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival have also been implemented in the basin and are in need of effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed background information for developing context for project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts. To meet the data needs as index stocks, to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects, and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival, sufficient annual estimates of spawner escapement, age structure, SAR, egg-to-smolt survival, smolt-per-redd ratio, and freshwater habitat use are essential. We have begun to meet this need through spawning ground surveys initiated for spring Chinook salmon in 1998 and smolt PIT-tagging efforts initiated in 1999. Additional sampling and analyses to meet these goals include an estimate of smolt abundance and SAR rates, and an updated measure of the freshwater distribution of critical life stages. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the high level of emphasis the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Subbasin Summaries, NMFS, and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds have placed on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. By implementing the proposed program we have been able to address many of the goals for population status monitoring, such as defining areas currently used by spring Chinook for holding and spawning habitats and determining range expansion or contraction of summer rearing and spawning populations. The BiOp describes these goals as defining population growth rates (adult monitoring), detecting changes in those growth rates or relative abundance in a reasonable time (adult/juvenile monitoring), estimating juvenile abundance and survival rates (juvenile/smolt monitoring), and identifying stage-specific survival (adult-to-smolt, smolt-to-adult).

  8. Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River Basins of North-Central

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    ................................................................................................... 37 Appendix C. Ecosystem Service Valuation Studies Focused on North Florida1 Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River: Mark Long) #12;2 Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee

  9. Modeling vertical beta-diversity in tropical butterfly communities Thomas R. Walla, Steinar Engen, Philip J. DeVries and Russell Lande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devries, Philip J.

    Modeling vertical beta-diversity in tropical butterfly communities Thomas R. Walla, Steinar Engen vertical beta- diversity in tropical butterfly communities. Á/ Oikos 107: 610Á/618. We present a novel of structure present. Beta-diversity (MacArthur

  10. Identifying origins of and pathways for spring waters in a semiarid basin using He, Sr, and C isotopes: Cuatrocinegas Basin, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banner, Jay L.

    isotopes: Cuatrociénegas Basin, Mexico B.D. Wolaver1,*, L.J. Crossey2,*, K.E. Karlstrom2,*, J.L. Banner3 and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, MSCO3-2040, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, USA 3 Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University

  11. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Brenda B.; Pearsons, Todd N.; McMichael, Geoffrey A. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Select ecological interactions and spring chinook salmon residual/precocial abundance were monitored in 1998 as part of the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's supplementation monitoring program. Monitoring these variables is part of an effort to help evaluate the factors that contribute to, or limit supplementation success. The ecological interactions that were monitored were prey consumption, competition for food, and competition for space. The abundance of spring chinook salmon life-history forms that have the potential to be influenced by supplementation and that have important ecological and genetic roles were monitored (residuals and precocials). Residual spring chinook salmon do not migrate to the ocean during the normal emigration period and continue to rear in freshwater. Precocials are those salmon that precocially mature in freshwater. The purpose of sampling during 1998 was to collect baseline data one year prior to the release of hatchery spring chinook salmon which occurred during the spring of 1999. All sampling that the authors report on here was conducted in upper Yakima River during summer and fall 1998. The stomach fullness of juvenile spring chinook salmon during the summer and fall averaged 12%. The food competition index suggested that mountain whitefish (0.59), rainbow trout (0.55), and redside shiner (0.55) were competing for food with spring chinook salmon. The space competition index suggested that rainbow trout (0.31) and redside shiner (0.39) were competing for space with spring chinook salmon but mountain whitefish (0.05) were not. Age-0 spring chinook salmon selected a fairly narrow range of microhabitat parameters in the summer and fall relative to what was available. Mean focal depths and velocities for age 0 spring chinook salmon during the summer were 0.5 m {+-} 0.2 m and 0.26 m/s {+-} 0.19 m/s, and during the fall 0.5 m {+-} 0.2 m and 0.24 m/s {+-} 0.18 m/s. Among potential competitors, age 1+ rainbow trout exhibited the greatest degree of microhabitat overlap with spring chinook salmon. Abundance of naturally occurring spring chinook salmon residuals (age 1+ during the summer) was low (< 0.007/m), representing less than 2% of the naturally produced spring chinook salmon (age 0+ and age 1+ during the summer). Abundance of naturally occurring spring chinook salmon that complete their life cycle in freshwater was high relative to anadromous adults. The authors observed an average of 9.5 precocially mature spring chinook salmon on redds with anadromous adults. In addition, 87% of the redds with anadromous adults present also had precocial males attending. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  12. EIS-0265-SA-67: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Watershed Management Program - Install Fish Screens to Protect ESA Listed Steelhead and Bull Trout in the Walla Walla Basin

  13. Monitoring and Evaluation of Supplemented Spring Chinook Salmon and Life Histories of Wild Summer Steelhead in the Grande Ronde Basin, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boe, Stephen J.; Crump, Carrie A.; Weldert, Rey L. [Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the ninth annual report for a multi-year project designed to monitor and evaluate supplementation of endemic spring Chinook salmon in Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River. These two streams historically supported anadromous fish populations that provided significant tribal and non-tribal fisheries, but in recent years, have experienced severe declines in abundance. Conventional and captive broodstock supplementation methods are being used to restore these spring Chinook salmon populations. Spring Chinook salmon populations in Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River, and other streams in the Snake River Basin have experienced severe declines in abundance over the past two decades (Nehlsen et al. 1991). A supplementation program was initiated in Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River, incorporating the use of both captive and conventional broodstock methods, in order to prevent extinction in the short term and eventually rebuild populations. The captive broodstock component of the program (BPA Project 199801001) uses natural-origin parr collected by seining and reared to maturity at facilities near Seattle, Washington (Manchester Marine Laboratory) and Hood River, Oregon (Bonneville Hatchery). Spawning occurs at Bonneville Hatchery, and resulting progeny are reared in hatcheries. Shortly before outmigration in the spring, juveniles are transferred to acclimation facilities. After an acclimation period of about 2-4 weeks, volitional release begins. Any juveniles remaining after the volitional release period are forced out. The conventional broodstock component uses returning adults collected at traps near the spawning areas, transported to Lookingglass Hatchery near Elgin, Oregon, held, and later spawned. The resulting progeny are reared, acclimated, and released similar to the captive broodstock component. All progeny released receive one or more marks including a fin (adipose) clip, codedwire tag, PIT tag, or visual implant elastomer tag. The numbers of adults used for conventional broodstock are determined by an agreement among comanagers (Zimmerman and Patterson 2002). Activities for this project focus on two life stages of spring Chinook salmon: juveniles during the migration from freshwater to the ocean and adults during prespawning migration through the end of spawning. Life history, production, and genetics are monitored and used to evaluate program effectiveness.

  14. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocious Male Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); James, Brenda B. (Cascade Aquatics, Ellensburg, WA)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003; Pearsons et al. 2004). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Topics of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocious male salmon monitoring (abundance); (4) performance of growth modulation in reducing precocious males during spawning; (5) incidence of predation by residualized chinook salmon; and (6) benefits of salmon carcasses to juvenile salmonids. This report is organized into six chapters to represent these topics of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2004 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003; 2004). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  15. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 5 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L.; James, Brenda B. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2003 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  16. U-Th-Pb systematics in hot springs on the east Pacific rise at 2'/sup 0/N and Guaymas Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.H.; Wasserburg, G.J.; von Damm, K.L.; Edmond, J.M.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concentrations and isotopic compositions of U, Th and Pb were determined in hydrothermal fluids from 21/sup 0/N, East Pacific Rise and Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California. The purest hydrothermal end members (96%) have 0.06-0.18 ppb U, < 0.1-4.3 ppt Th and 40-67 ppb Pb. Several samples show a /sup 234/U enrichment relative to the equilibrium value. This indicates that U was quantitatively removed from seawater and deposited to the crust during the hydrothermal circulation. The 21/sup 0/N fluids with intermediate Mg content show that U and Mg are coherently removed from seawater, but Pb is not, during mixing of the hot hydrothermal fluid and cold ambient seawater. Both the end-member and intermediate hydrothermal fluids at 21/sup 0/N have similar Pb isotope compositions and limited ranges in /sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb (18.444-18.503), /sup 207/Pb//sup 204/Pb (15.471-15.514), and /sup 208/Pb//sup 204/Pb (37l.832-37.966). These ratios are within the range of values of MORB and are distinctly less radiogenic than the ambient seawater. This means that a significant amount of Pb was removed from the basalts by the hot springs. In contrast, Th does not appear to be significantly removed from the basalts. Some of this Pb was incorporated into the metalliferous sediments in a wide area straddling the EPR. The Pb isotopic composition of a hydrothermal sample from the Guaymas Basin is more radiogenic than at 21/sup 0/N and resembles that of sediments from the Gulf of California. This is consistent with the uptake of Pb from heated sediments having a substantial component of the volcanogenic detritus.

  17. atacama basin northern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tucker 2007-02-02 44 BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: of selected Tertiary coal beds...

  18. Reservoir Character of the Avalon Shale (Bone Spring Formation) of the Delaware Basin, West Texas and Southeast New Mexico: Effect of Carbonate-rich Sediment Gravity Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stolz, Dustin

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediment gravity flows (SGFs) can distribute large quantities of shelfal or slope carbonates into deeper basinal settings, forming complex heterogeneous deposits. Such deposits may have a negative or positive impact on ...

  19. Walla Walla Subbasin WDFW March 2004 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    portions of Northeast Oregon and western Idaho). Subbasin Land Ownership Palouse Lower Snake Tucannon

  20. Walla Walla Subbasin Plan May 2004 Version

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Tim Bailey, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Kevin Blakely Department of Fish and Wildlife Del Groat, United States Department of Agriculture-Forest Service Gary James

  1. ASSESSMENT OF LIVESTOCK WINTERING AREAS IN BRIDGE CREEK BASIN, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;ASSESSMENT OF LIVESTOCK WINTERING AREAS IN BRIDGE CREEK BASIN, 1996 DOE FRAP 1996-03 Prepared-96.............................................. 22 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Bridge Creek basin livestock wintering area back assessment, 1996 quality in the Bridge Creek basin are assessed. These sites had been inspected in the winter and spring

  2. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project: Short Project Overview of Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation in the Upper Yakima Basin; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, David E.; Bosch, William J.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is on schedule to ascertain whether new artificial production techniques can be used to increase harvest and natural production of spring Chinook salmon while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the fish population being supplemented and keeping adverse genetic and ecological interactions with non-target species or stocks within acceptable limits. The Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) collected its first spring chinook brood stock in 1997, released its first fish in 1999, and age-4 adults have been returning since 2001. In these initial years of CESRF operation, recruitment of hatchery origin fish has exceeded that of fish spawning in the natural environment, but early indications are that hatchery origin fish are not as successful at spawning in the natural environment as natural origin fish when competition is relatively high. When competition is reduced, hatchery fish produced similar numbers of progeny as their wild counterparts. Most demographic variables are similar between natural and hatchery origin fish, however hatchery origin fish were smaller-at-age than natural origin fish. Long-term fitness of the target population is being evaluated by a large-scale test of domestication. Slight changes in predation vulnerability and competitive dominance, caused by domestication, were documented. Distribution of spawners has increased as a result of acclimation site location and salmon homing fidelity. Semi-natural rearing and predator avoidance training have not resulted in significant increases in survival of hatchery fish. However, growth manipulations in the hatchery appear to be reducing the number of precocious males produced by the YKFP and consequently increasing the number of migrants. Genetic impacts to non-target populations appear to be low because of the low stray rates of YKFP fish. Ecological impacts to valued non-target taxa were within containment objectives or impacts that were outside of containment objectives were not caused by supplementation activities. Some fish and bird piscivores have been estimated to consume large numbers of salmonids in the Yakima Basin. Natural production of Chinook salmon in the upper Yakima Basin appears to be density dependent under current conditions and may constrain the benefits of supplementation. However, such constraints (if they exist) could be countered by YKFP habitat actions that have resulted in: the protection of over 900 acres of prime floodplain habitat, reconnection and screening of over 15 miles of tributary habitat, substantial water savings through irrigation improvements, and restoration of over 80 acres of floodplain and side channels. Harvest opportunities for tribal and non-tribal fishers have also been enhanced, but are variable among years. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until further data is collected and analyses completed. Nonetheless, the YKFP has produced significant findings, and produced methodologies that can be used to evaluate and improve supplementation. A summary table of topical area performance is presented.

  3. Survey of Selected Seeps and Springs within the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Committee of the Colorado Division of Wildlife Wetlands Program was helpful in recommending high quality with a Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Gunnison County (Rocchio et al. 2003). A total of 74. Factors affecting the quality of the seeps and springs in the Gunnison Basin include spring development

  4. Ft. Carson Army Base, Colorado Springs, Colorado | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Colorado. It was the first Federal facility to install a "solar wall"-a solar ventilation air preheating system. The solar wall heats Ft. Carson's new high-bay aviation...

  5. Salida Hot Springs (Poncha Spring) Space Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salida Hot Springs (Poncha Spring) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Salida Hot Springs (Poncha Spring) Space Heating Low...

  6. Draft Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Plan May 28, 2004 Literature Cited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Umatilla Basin project, Oregon, planning report- final environmental impact statement. Pacific Northwest. Adams Ladies Club (1993-1994) History of Adams Volume I, II and IV. Walla Walla, Washington: Inland

  7. Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring and Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achord, Stephen; Marsh, Douglas M.; Kamikawa, Daniel J. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Division, Seattle, WA)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We PIT tagged wild spring and summer chinook salmon parr in the Snake River Basin in 1991, and subsequently monitored these fish during their smolt migration through Lower Granite, Little Goose, and McNary Dams during spring and summer 1992. This report details our findings.

  8. EIS-0330: Wallula Power Project, Walla Walla County, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6) conversion facilities, at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky.

  9. Walla Walla County, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide Permit webpage JumpWaikane,(Redirected from

  10. Basin analysis in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leighton, M.W. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Haney, D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (USA)); Hester, N. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 1989, the Illinois State Geological Survey and the Indiana and Kentucky Geological surveys formed the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC) for the purpose of advancing the geologic understanding of the Illinois basin and of developing basin-wide studies for the assessment and wise development of the Illinois basin energy, mineral, and water resources. Cooperative efforts include work on the AAPG Interior Cratonic Sag Basin volume, Springfield coal study, Paducah CUSMAP study in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, Illinois Basin Cross Section Project, Geologic Society of America Coal Division field trip and workshop on Lower Pennsylvanian geology, workshops in basin analysis, and the Tri-State Committee on correlations in the Pennsylvanian System of the Illinois Basin. A network of 16 regional surface to basement cross sections portraying the structural and stratigraphic framework of the total sedimentary section of the entire basin is in preparation. Based on more than 140 of the deepest wells with wireline logs, the sections will show formation boundaries and gross lithofacies of the entire stratigraphic column. A set of basin-wide maps shows structure, thickness, and coal quality of the economically important Springfield coal seam. These maps were generated from recently joined computerized databases of the three member surveys of IBC. A unified stratigraphic nomenclature of the Pennsylvanian System is being developed, including seven new members and seven new formation names. The goal is to simplify, standardize, and gradually improve the stratigraphic terminology to be used in the Illinois basin.

  11. Thermal Springs of Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witcher, J.C.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An updated list of Arizona springs judged to be carrying anomalous heat. Possible heat sources are briefly outlined. (MHR)

  12. Joshua Smith Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    Stormwater Utilities in Georgia Joshua Smith Spring 2006 #12;The UGA Land Use Clinic provides in Georgia Author: Joshua Smith Editor: Jamie Baker Roskie University of Georgia Land Use Clinic Spring 2006....................................................................................................10 #12;#12;1Stormwater Utilities in Georgia Stormwater Utilities in Georgia Joshua Smith Spring 2006

  13. WELDON SPRING FORMER ARMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1959 for the Army Reserve as the Weldon Spring Training Area. Contaminated areas are spread throughoutWELDON SPRING FORMER ARMY ORDNANCE WORKS MISSOURI EPA ID# MO5210021288 EPA Region 7 10/13/2011 City: 35 miles west of St. Louis County: St. Charles County Other Names: Weldon Springs National Guard

  14. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important To use a topographic map To delineate

  15. Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasserman, Larry

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study develops data to present management alternatives for Yakima River spring chinook. The first objective is to determine the distribution, abundance and survival of wild Yakima River spring chinook. Naturally produced populations will be studied to determine if these runs can be sustained in the face of present harvest and environmental conditions. This information will be gathered through spawning ground surveys, counting of adults at Prosser and Roza fish ladders, and through monitoring the tribal dipnet fishery. Concurrent studies will examine potential habitat limitations within the basin. Presently, survival to emergence studies, in conjunction with substrate quality analysis is being undertaken. Water temperature is monitored throughout the basin, and seining takes place monthly to evaluate distribution and abundance. The outcome of this phase of the investigation is to determine an effective manner for introducing hatchery stocks that minimize the impacts on the wild population. The second objective of this study is to determine relative effectiveness of different methods of hatchery supplementation.

  16. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  17. STUDENT PULSE Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SF STATE STUDENT PULSE SURVEY Spring 2013 Academic Planning and Development Academic Institutional Research (air.sfsu.edu) March 2013 #12;SF State Student Pulse Survey, Spring 2013 Page 1 Table of Contents is most effective. 79% of all respondents reported spending most of their time in class listening while

  18. CHEMISTRY 450 Spring, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    CHEMISTRY 450 Spring, 2009 Gautam Bhattacharyya, 363 Hunter Labs, phone: 656-1356 gautamb. This course does NOT have a separate laboratory meeting time. Course Goals CH 450 is the Chemistry Capstone to change. #12;CH 450 Spring, 2009 -2- Course Outline (Tentative) Journal due dates are designated each week

  19. Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, David E.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose was to evaluate enhancement methodologies that can be used to rebuild runs of spring chinook salmon in the Yakima River basin. The objectives were to: (1) determine the abundance, distribution and survival of naturally produced fry and smolts in the Yakima River; (2) evaluate different methods of fry and smolt supplementation into the natural rearing environment while maintaining as much as possible the gentic integrity of naturally produced stocks; (3) locate and define areas in the watershed which may be used for the rearing of spring chinook; (4) define strategies for enhancing natural production of spring chinook in the Yakima River; and (5) determine physical and biological limitations for production within the system.

  20. Geothermal resources of the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinckley, B.S.; Heasler, H.P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geothermal resources of the Wind River Basin were investigated. Oil-well bottom-hole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data have been interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. Basic thermal data, which includes the background thermal gradient and the highest recorded temperature and corresponding depth for each basin, is tabulated. Background heat flow in the Wind River Basin is generally insufficient to produce high conductive gradients. Only where hydrologic systems re-distribute heat through mass movement of water will high temperatures occur at shallow depths. Aquifers which may have the confinement and structural characteristics necessary to create such geothermal systems are the Lance/Fort Union, Mesa Verde, Frontier, Muddy, Cloverly, Sundance, Nugget, Park City, Tensleep, Amsden, Madison, Bighorn, and Flathead Formations. Of these the Tensleep Sandstone and Madison Limestone are the most attractive in terms of both productivity and water quality. Most of the identified geothermal anomalies in the Wind River Basin occur along complex structures in the southwest and south. The most attractive geothermal prospects identified are anomalous Areas 2 and 3 north of Lander, Sweetwater Station Springs west of Jeffrey City, and the thermal springs southwest of Dubois. Even in these areas, it is unlikely temperatures in excess of 130 to 150/sup 0/F can be developed. 16 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  1. Geothermal fluid genesis in the Great Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.K.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early theories concerning geothermal recharge in the Great Basin implied recharge was by recent precipitation. Physical, chemical, and isotopic differences between thermal and non-thermal fluids and global paleoclimatic indicators suggest that recharge occurred during the late Pleistocene. Polar region isotopic studies demonstrate that a depletion in stable light-isotopes of precipitation existed during the late Pleistocene due to the colder, wetter climate. Isotopic analysis of calcite veins and packrat midden megafossils confirm the depletion event occurred in the Great Basin. Isotopic analysis of non-thermal springs is utilized as a proxy for local recent precipitation. Contoured plots of deuterium concentrations from non-thermal and thermal water show a regional, systematic variation. Subtracting contoured plots of non-thermal water from plots of thermal water reveals that thermal waters on a regional scale are generally isotopically more depleted. Isolated areas where thermal water is more enriched than non-thermal water correspond to locations of pluvial Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, suggesting isotopically enriched lake water contributed to fluid recharge. These anomalous waters also contain high concentrations of sodium chloride, boron, and other dissolved species suggestive of evaporative enrichment. Carbon-age date and isotopic data from Great Basin thermal waters correlate with the polar paleoclimate studies. Recharge occurred along range bounding faults. 151 refs., 62 figs., 15 tabs.

  2. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  3. Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE Jump to: navigation, search40Georgia:SL JumpAREGAbout

  4. FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GF FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By R.M. Flores,1 A.M. Ochs,2 and L.R. Bader1 in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1625-A 1 U.S. Geological Survey 2 Consultant, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 1999

  5. Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forum Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York Spring 2013...

  6. FUPWG Spring 2010 Providence: Washington Update | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Spring 2010 Providence: Washington Update FUPWG Spring 2010 Providence: Washington Update Presentation covers an update on Washington and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal...

  7. Spring-powered actuator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magill, R. J.; Gaiger, D. J.; Simkins, N.

    1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A spring-powered actuator especially for operating devices such as fire and/or smoke dampers, doors, hatches, vents, traps, valves and other devices having components which are movable between at least two positions. The spring-powered actuator of the invention comprises a longitudinally-displaceable re-wind screw which is rotatable to recharge the spring of the actuator, and a tilting element on the screw which is mounted for tilting movement with respect to the screw axis to allow longitudinal movement of the re-wind screw so as to permit rapid and reliable release of energy stored in the spring. When used in a combination fire and smoke damper, it thus opens or closes the blades of the latter.

  8. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  9. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  10. Spring 2014 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meeting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Spring 2014 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meeting, Minnesota Spring 2014 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meeting, Minnesota NTSF 2014 Meeting Agenda...

  11. Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography West of Death Valley California...

  12. Geology, exploration status of Uruguay's sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goso, C.; Santa Ana, H. de (Administracion Nacional de Combustibles, Alcohol y Portland (Uruguay))

    1994-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This article attempts to present the geological characteristics and tectonic and sedimentary evolution of Uruguayan basins and the extent to which they have been explored. Uruguay is on the Atlantic coast of South America. The country covers about 318,000 sq km, including offshore and onshore territories corresponding to more than 65% of the various sedimentary basins. Four basins underlie the country: the Norte basin, the Santa Lucia basin, the offshore Punta del Este basin, and the offshore-onshore Pelotas-Merin basin. The Norte basin is a Paleozoic basin while the others are Mesozoic basins. Each basin has been explored to a different extent, as this paper explains.

  13. Learning From Real Springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassichis, William

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    extension using the model potential energy and equating the energy with the body at rest at y 0 with the energy at Yrriax 01W has Cl 2ky+ Vrnax + (2 ? I1IIU!Jrnar (6) with the solution rn1q?3 / m1q? 2 /3S / (35 - Yrna k2V k2 (i) Thus the effect... to the bottorri involves such a force. W. Bassichis, ?Don?t Panic? (OR Publishing, New York 2005) 6 Figure Captions Fig.1. For the ideaL massless spring Hooke?s Law holds and IF! = rng = ky,,,. with m the mass of the object hung from the spring. Because...

  14. Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, David E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The smelt outmigration was monitored at wapatox on the Naches River and Prosser on the lower Yakima. The spring outmigration at Wapatox was estimated to be 16,141 smolts. The 1987 spring outmigration of wild spring chinook from the Yakima Basin was estimated to be 251,975 smolts at Prosser. The survival from egg to smelt was calculated using the 1985 redd counts and the 1987 smolt outmigration at Prosser. The estimated survival was 4.16%, which gives a mean egg to smolt survival over four years of 6.32%. In 1987 a total of 3,683 adult and 335 jack spring chinook salmon returning to the Yakima River were counted at Prosser fish ladder. This gives a total of 4,018 salmon returning to Prosser Dam. The median dates of passage were May 12 and May 16 for adults and jacks respectively. An additional 372 fish were estimated to have been caught in the Yakima River subsistence dipnet fishery below Horn Rapids and Prosser Dams. Therefore, total return to the Yakima system was 4,390 spring chinook salmon. Spring chinook were counted at Roza Dam from May 1 to September 30, 1987. Passage at Roza Dam was 1,610 adult and 67 jack spring chinook for a total of 1,677 wild fish. The median dates of passage at Roza Dam were May 29 and May 26 for spring chinook adults and jacks respectively. The smolt to adult (S{sub sa}) survival was calculated based on the 1983 smelt outmigration estimated at Prosser and the 1984 return of jacks (3 year old fish) the 1985 return of four year old adults, and the 1986 return of five year old fish to the Yakima River. It was estimated that 6,012 wild three, four, and five year old fish returned from an estimated smolt outmigration of 135,548 fish in 1983. This gives an estimated survival from smolt to adult of 4.4%. The smolt to adult survival for the 1984 smolt outmigration was 5.3% with 423 jacks returning in 1985, 5,163 four year old adults returning in 1986, and 983 five year old fish returning in 1987 fran an estimated 123,732 smolts in 1984. Spring chinook adults from fourteen different hatchery release groups were recovered in 1987. A total of 211 coded wire tags were recovered and these were expanded to an estimated 253 returning hatchery fish in 1987. Nine of these fish were jacks.

  15. Engineering Momentum spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stormo, Gary

    Energy Research and Development Center to expand our global reach in solar energy research. We want you Innovators #12;spring 2013 > Engineering Momentum 1 mythbusters' tory belleci and grant imahara in graham on energy and the environment (see page 26), and last year, we joined a $125 million U.S.-India Joint Clean

  16. SPRING 2007 METRICSMECHANICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Teng

    OF ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. Department Works Globally to Share Knowledge & Expertise IN THIS ISSUE: 2SPRING 2007 METRICSMECHANICAL ENGINEERING A. JAMES CLARK SCHOOL of ENGINEERING www.enme.umd.edu A NEWSLETTER FOR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AT THE A. JAMES CLARK SCHOOL

  17. President's Council Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    , knowledge economy, globalization and funding University to prepare students and county for the world Academic Co-operation Industrial and Societal Application 2. Rising Economies and Changing Global Balance Spring 2008 Rising Economies and Changing Global Balance What Todai Should Do with Other Rising

  18. Spring 2014 Thermodynamics -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Spring 2014 Thermodynamics - 1 Consider an insulated (adiabatic) piston and cylinder arrangement. Confirm this statement using the second law of thermodynamics. (b) (20) She now wants to calculate the work done by the air on the piston by using the first law of thermodynamics. Do this. Draw a T

  19. Air Pollution Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATS 555 Air Pollution Spring 2010 T Th 11:00 ­ 12:15, NESB 101 Instructor: Prof. Sonia Kreidenweis an understanding of types and sources of air pollution. 2. Examine concentrations of air pollutants and their effects on health and welfare. Review regulations governing air pollution. 3. Examine the meteorological

  20. technologytoday Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    technologytoday Spring 2003 Volume 2 Issue 1 http://home.ray.com/rayeng HIGHLIGHTING RAYTHEON An essential element of every system RAYTHEON Processing Technology An essential element of every system RAYTHEON Processing Technology #12;In this issue of technology today, we are highlighting processing

  1. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    the operations and supply chain strategy. This survey course in operations management introduces students1 MGSC 395 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Spring 2008 Course Syllabus Instructor: Professor Anand Nair Class MATERIALS Required Text Books Textbook: Krajewski, Lee, Ritzman, Larry, and Malhotra, Manoj. Operations

  2. Spring 2013 Prof. Kummerow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the distribution as well as radiative effects of water vapor, clouds and precipitation, current observational for personal library: Liou, K.N., 1992: Radiation and Cloud Processes in the Atmosphere: Theory, ObservationsATS 753 Spring 2013 Prof. Kummerow Simple inspection of the global energy budget reveals

  3. Sandy Springs, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasinSandusky, Ohio: EnergySprings, Georgia:

  4. Cenozoic basin development in Hispaniola

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, P.; Burke, K.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four distinct generations of Cenozoic basins have developed in Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic) as a result of collisional or strike-slip interactions between the North America and Caribbean plates. First generation basins formed when the north-facing Hispaniola arc collided with the Bahama platform in the middle Eocene; because of large post-Eocene vertical movements, these basins are preserved locally in widely separated areas but contain several kilometers of arc and ophiolite-derived clastic marine sediments, probably deposited in thrust-loaded, flexure-type basins. Second generation basins, of which only one is exposed at the surface, formed during west-northwesterly strike-slip displacement of southern Cuba and northern Hispaniola relative to central Hispaniola during the middle to late Oligocene; deposition occurred along a 5-km (3-mi) wide fault-angle depression and consisted of about 2 km (1 mi) of submarine fan deposits. Third generation basins developed during post-Oligocene convergent strike-slip displacement across a restraining bend formed in central Hispaniola; the southern 2 basins are fairly symmetrical, thrust-bounded ramp valleys, and the third is an asymmetrical fault-angle basin. Fourth generation basins are pull-aparts formed during post-Miocene divergent strike-slip motion along a fault zone across southern Hispaniola. As in other Caribbean areas, good source rocks are present in all generations of basins, but suitable reservoir rocks are scarce. Proven reservoirs are late Neogene shallow marine and fluvial sandstones in third generation basins.

  5. Experto Universitario Java Sesin 1: Spring core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    Enterprise Spring 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computacin e IA Spring core Puntos a tratar 2 #12;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computacin e IA;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computacin e IA Spring core

  6. Syllabus Math 553, Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Syllabus Math 553, Spring 2013. Meeting time and place : MWF 12.30-1.20, REC 113. Instructor: Saugata Basu. Office: Math 742 email: sbasu@math.purdue.

  7. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaszuba, John P. [University of Wyoming; Sims, Kenneth W.W. [University of Wyoming; Pluda, Allison R.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  8. Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New Mexico The Spring 2015 meeting of the National Transportation Stakeholders Forum will be held on May 12-14, 2015...

  9. Algal Biofuels Strategy Workshop - Spring Event | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Algal Biofuels Strategy Workshop - Spring Event Algal Biofuels Strategy Workshop - Spring Event The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's...

  10. Why Springs Are Valuable Natural springs are important aquatic resources.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    source of clean, high-quality groundwater that flows at a relatively constant rate and temperature hot weather and droughts. Spring streams and riparian lands provide critical water, food, refuge. Because springs are dependable, they are an increasingly valuable supply of water for people and wildlife

  11. Origin of the springs of Costa Verde beach in Lima Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rojas, Ruben; Mamani, Enoc; Maguina, Jose; Montoya, Eduardo; Baltuano, Oscar; Bedregal, Patricia; Coria, Lucy; Guerra, Alcides; Justo, Santiago; Churasacari, Tania

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper tries to determine the origin of springs on the Costa Verde beach, located in the district of Barranco, Miraflores and Magdalena, province of Lima, Peru. These springs emerge near the shoreline, from the lower layers of a 80 meter high cliff. They have survived the process of urbanization of agricultural land, started in the early 70, which decreased the water table aquifer of Lima, and wiped the water leaks from the cliffs. To identify the source of the springs, isotopic, physical, chemical and bacteriological analysis was carried out for samples from five springs. The isotopic concentrations in waters from Costa Verde springs are depleted compared to those obtained for Lima aquifer waters, which is recharged by infiltration of the Rimac River. The measured values of those concentrations suggest that water from the Costa Verde springs should come from a direct recharge in the upper and middle basin, due to infiltration of rainfall or the river at an altitude of about 3600 m. Conductivity and tempe...

  12. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  13. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  14. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-67)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA is proposing to provide cost share for a program that will protect ESA-listed salmonid species in the Walla Walla River Basin through the installation of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) approved fish screens on up to 197 irrigation diversions in the basin. ESA-listed steelhead and bull trout are presently at risk in the Walla Walla Basin as the result of a combination of factors that primarily involve insufficient flow, extensive habitat degradation, and mortality from surface water diversions. Unscreened or improperly screened diversions can damage fish scaling and induce stress, both of which can be lethal. They are also known to cause migration delays and increased predation; impinge fish against screen surfaces; or, in cases where screen mesh size is too large, allow juvenile fish to be drawn directly into functioning irrigation systems resulting in direct mortality. The goal of this project is to eliminate imminent mortality risks to ESA-listed fish arising from inadequate irrigation diversions in the Walla Walla Basin by upgrading screens to current state and federal juvenile fish screen standards. This Supplement Analysis covers only those screen upgrades and/or installations that will meet the NMFS no effect standard (NMFS, January 16, 2001). All other screen upgrades and/or installations in the Walla Walla River Basin associated with this project will require additional NEPA analysis and documentation prior to implementation.

  15. Sediment infill within rift basins: Facies distribution and effects of deformation: Examples from the Kenya and Tanganyika Rifts, East Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiercelin, J.J.; Lezzar, K.E. (Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France)); Richert, J.P. (Elf Aquitaine, Pau (France))

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil is known from lacustrine basins of the east African rift. The geology of such basins is complex and different depending on location in the eastern and western branches. The western branch has little volcanism, leading to long-lived basins, such as Lake Tanganyika, whereas a large quantity of volcanics results in the eastern branch characterized by ephemeral basins, as the Baringo-Bogoria basin in Kenya. The Baringo-Bogoria basin is a north-south half graben formed in the middle Pleistocene and presently occupied by the hypersaline Lake Bogoria and the freshwater Lake Baringo. Lake Bogoria is fed by hot springs and ephemeral streams controlled by grid faults bounding the basin to the west. The sedimentary fill is formed by cycles of organic oozes having a good petroleum potential and evaporites. On the other hand, and as a consequence of the grid faults, Lake Baringo is fed by permanent streams bringing into the basin large quantities of terrigenous sediments. Lake Tanganyika is a meromictic lake 1470 m deep and 700 km long, of middle Miocene age. It is subdivided into seven asymmetric half grabens separated by transverse ridges. The sedimentary fill is thick and formed by organic oozes having a very good petroleum potential. In contrast to Bogoria, the lateral distribution of organic matter is characterized by considerable heterogeneity due to the existence of structural blocks or to redepositional processes.

  16. SPRING ISD CATEE 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Windsor, J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPRING ISD CATEE 2014 ESL-KT-14-11-05 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Benchmarking results ESL-KT-14-11-05 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Annual energy...,871,387 2011-2012 $8,088,599 savings $3,615,835 2012-2013 $7,418,636 savings $4,285,798 2013-2014 $7,393,010 savings $4,311,424 Total savings over last 5 years $16,855,588 ESL-KT-14-11-05 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas...

  17. Idaho_HotSprings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |Hot Springs Site #0104 Latitude: N. 43 deg.

  18. Greater Green River basin well-site selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frohne, K.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Boswell, R. [EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent estimates of the natural gas resources of Cretaceous low-permeability reservoirs of the Greater Green River basin indicate that as much as 5000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas may be in place (Law and others 1989). Of this total, Law and others (1989) attributed approximately 80 percent to the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and Lewis Shale. Unfortunately, present economic conditions render the drilling of many vertical wells unprofitable. Consequently, a three-well demonstration program, jointly sponsored by the US DOE/METC and the Gas Research Institute, was designed to test the profitability of this resource using state-of-the-art directional drilling and completion techniques. DOE/METC studied the geologic and engineering characteristics of ``tight`` gas reservoirs in the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basin in order to identify specific locations that displayed the greatest potential for a successful field demonstration. This area encompasses the Rocks Springs Uplift, Wamsutter Arch, and the Washakie and Red Desert (or Great Divide) basins of southwestern Wyoming. The work was divided into three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a regional geologic reconnaissance of 14 gas-producing areas encompassing 98 separate gas fields. In Phase 2, the top four areas were analyzed in greater detail, and the area containing the most favorable conditions was selected for the identification of specific test sites. In Phase 3, target horizons were selected for each project area, and specific placement locations were selected and prioritized.

  19. Spring 2006 CS 649 1 Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    % reliability Rapid propagation Eventual consistency Scalability (network size and density) #12;Deluge Protocol Overview Spring 2006 CS 649 5 #12;Deluge Protocol Overview Spring 2006 CS 649 6 #12;Deluge Protocol Overview Spring 2006 CS 649 7 #12;Deluge Protocol Overview Spring 2006 CS 649 8 #12;Deluge

  20. MA 15400 ONLINE Spring 2015 Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delworth, Timothy J

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 15400 ONLINE Spring 2015 Syllabus. TEXTBOOK. COURSE WEBSITE. RECORDED LESSONS. HOMEWORK. QUIZZES. EXAMS. CALCULATORS.

  1. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  2. RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Caldwell

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

  3. Greater Green River Basin Production Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Lim, F.H.; Calogero, D.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) of Wyoming has produced abundant oil and gas out of multiple reservoirs for over 60 years, and large quantities of gas remain untapped in tight gas sandstone reservoirs. Even though GGRB production has been established in formations from the Paleozoic to the Tertiary, recent activity has focused on several Cretaceous reservoirs. Two of these formations, the Ahnond and the Frontier Formations, have been classified as tight sands and are prolific producers in the GGRB. The formations typically naturally fractured and have been exploited using conventional well technology. In most cases, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed when completing these wells to to increase gas production rates to economic levels. The objectives of the GGRB production improvement project were to apply the concept of horizontal and directional drilling to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift and to compare production improvements by drilling, completing, and testing vertical, horizontal and directionally-drilled wellbores at a common site.

  4. A preliminary investigation of the structure of southern Yucca Flat, Massachusetts Mountain, and CP basin, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, based on geophysical modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geoffrey A. Phelps; Leigh Justet; Barry C. Moring, and Carter W. Roberts

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    New gravity and magnetic data collected in the vicinity of Massachusetts Mountain and CP basin (Nevada Test Site, NV) provides a more complex view of the structural relationships present in the vicinity of CP basin than previous geologic models, helps define the position and extent of structures in southern Yucca Flat and CP basin, and better constrains the configuration of the basement structure separating CP basin and Frenchman Flat. The density and gravity modeling indicates that CP basin is a shallow, oval-shaped basin which trends north-northeast and contains ~800 m of basin-filling rocks and sediment at its deepest point in the northeast. CP basin is separated from the deeper Frenchman Flat basin by a subsurface ridge that may represent a Tertiary erosion surface at the top of the Paleozoic strata. The magnetic modeling indicates that the Cane Spring fault appears to merge with faults in northwest Massachusetts Mountain, rather than cut through to Yucca Flat basin and that the basin is downed-dropped relative to Massachusetts Mountain. The magnetic modeling indicates volcanic units within Yucca Flat basin are down-dropped on the west and supports the interpretations of Phelps and KcKee (1999). The magnetic data indicate that the only faults that appear to be through-going from Yucca Flat into either Frenchman Flat or CP basin are the faults that bound the CP hogback. In general, the north-trending faults present along the length of Yucca Flat bend, merge, and disappear before reaching CP hogback and Massachusetts Mountain or French Peak.

  5. Algal Biofuels Strategy Spring Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Algal Biofuels Strategy Spring Workshop Algal Biofuels Strategy Spring Workshop Algal Biofuels Strategy Spring Workshop Agenda algaeworkshopagenda.pdf More Documents &...

  6. alkaline thermal spring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: and Laplace transforms. Fundamentals of AC power, coupled inductors (transformers), and two-port networks Spring break Apr. 04 Spring breakApr. 04 Spring break...

  7. area weldon spring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: and Laplace transforms. Fundamentals of AC power, coupled inductors (transformers), and two-port networks Spring break Apr. 04 Spring breakApr. 04 Spring break...

  8. adult male spring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: and Laplace transforms. Fundamentals of AC power, coupled inductors (transformers), and two-port networks Spring break Apr. 04 Spring breakApr. 04 Spring break...

  9. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKelvey, Thomas E. (Solana Beach, CA); Guarnieri, Joseph J. (San Diego, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  10. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKelvey, T.E.; Guarnieri, J.J.

    1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  11. K-Basins design guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roe, N.R.; Mills, W.C.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the design guidelines is to enable SNF and K Basin personnel to complete fuel and sludge removal, and basin water mitigation by providing engineering guidance for equipment design for the fuel basin, facility modifications (upgrades), remote tools, and new processes. It is not intended to be a purchase order reference for vendors. The document identifies materials, methods, and components that work at K Basins; it also Provides design input and a technical review process to facilitate project interfaces with operations in K Basins. This document is intended to compliment other engineering documentation used at K Basins and throughout the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. Significant provisions, which are incorporated, include portions of the following: General Design Criteria (DOE 1989), Standard Engineering Practices (WHC-CM-6-1), Engineering Practices Guidelines (WHC 1994b), Hanford Plant Standards (DOE-RL 1989), Safety Analysis Manual (WHC-CM-4-46), and Radiological Design Guide (WHC 1994f). Documents (requirements) essential to the engineering design projects at K Basins are referenced in the guidelines.

  12. Operational Performance of Sedimentation Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bleything, Matthew D.

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and sludge pumps and clog pipes. (Lee, 2007) Composition of grit varies widely, with moisture content ranging from 13 to 63 percent, and volatile content ranging from 1 to 56 percent. The specific gravity of clean grit particles may be as high as 2... for unobstructed flow of the inlet water into the basin when the basin was almost full to capacity with sediment. The outlet of the sediment basin is an oil/water separator. This is for oil leaks and spills from the plant island. The design called...

  13. MATH 265 Spring 2013 Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHING-JUI LAI

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    MATH 265 Spring 2013 Syllabus. Instructor. Office Hour MWF 10:30-11:30 am at MATH 850. Sessions. MA 26500 141-UNIV 019 TR 13:30 14:45 (39/42)...

  14. MATH 262 Spring 2015 Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHING-JUI LAI

    2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    MATH 262 Spring 2015 Syllabus. Instructor. Office Hour MW 16:30-18:00 am at MATH 850. Sessions MA 26200 081-UNIV 003 TR 15:00 16:15 (CRN=64359).

  15. Homework # 3 UCLA, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Francis F.

    Homework # 3 ChE234 UCLA, Spring 2004 Chemical Engineering Principles of Plasma Processing UCLA valve is installed to control the pressure of the reactor. The conductance of the throttle valve

  16. UAA Leadership Honors Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    UAA Leadership Honors Spring 2015 Purpose UAA Leadership Honors are awarded to individuals upon graduation to recognize and honor their leadership. Leadership activities and involvement must promote individual and collective growth

  17. Advanced Policy Practice Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    Advanced Policy Practice Spring 2014 SW 548-001 Instructor course that focuses on the theory and evidence-based skill sets of policy analysis, development, implementation, and change. The course focuses on policy

  18. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  19. DRAFT Walla Walla Subbasin Aquatic RM&E Plan 1 Developed by: WDFW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This plan will therefore, serve as an interim set of guidelines that will assure a systematic approach should provide data of known quality (accuracy and precision) - Validate EDT model as a reliable measure

  20. Microsoft Word - CX-WallaWalla-Pendleton-Upgrade_FY14_WEB.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPRPasco SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Greg Wilfong Lineman Foreman III - TFPF-PASCO Proposed Action: Line upgrade on Bonneville Power...

  1. ECOLOGY AND PRODUCTION OF JUVENILE SPRING CHINOOK SALMON, ONCORHYNCHUS TSHAWYTSCHA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), of the spring race in Happy :Valley Reservoir, a eutrophic impoundment located on the Warm Springs Indian

  2. Oil springs and flat top anticlines, Carbon County Wyoming: An unusual fold pair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackstone, D.L. Jr. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil Springs Anticline, northwest of Medicine Bow, Wyoming, and located at the northeast corner of the Hanna Basin, lies near the junction of the Freezeout Hills Anticline, the Shirley thrust fault and the Flat Top Anticline. The surface fold as defined by the outcrop of the Wall Creek Sandstone Member of the Frontier Formation is disharmonic to deeper structure at the level of the Jurassic Sundance Formation. The fold is wedged between two major folds and is the result of a space problem between larger structural elements. The controlling Flat Top Anticline is an excellent example of a fold controlled by a well constrained fault in the Precambrian crystalline basement. The basement is bowed upward and outward to the northwest in the hanging wall of the Flat Top Anticline. The purpose of this paper is to describe the geologic structure of the Oil Springs and Flat Top anticlines and their relationship to the Freezeout Hills and the Hanna Basin. Commercial production of petroleum and natural gas occurs on the west flank of the Laramie-Cooper Lake Basin as far north as the northeast corner of the Hanna Basin. Stone reviewed the producing formations in the Laramie and eastern Hanna basins and noted that 11 commercial accumulations of petroleum and natural gas are directly related to anticlinal structures. Production derived from the Permian-Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone in this region has a special geologic framework. Fields that produce from the Tensleep Sandstone are well defined anticlines bounded by faults or fault systems, a situation also reported by Biggs and Espach, Blackstone and in the Wyoming Geological Association Symposium. The Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in these faulted anticlines are in juxtaposition to potential source rocks of either Jurassic or Cretaceous age in the footwalls of the faults. 17 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2007 Spring 2007 Biology 111 Take Home Exam #3 BioEnergetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2007 1 Spring 2007 Biology 111 Take Home Exam #3 BioEnergetics

  4. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2008 Spring 2008 Biology 111 Take Home Exam #3 BioEnergetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2008 1 Spring 2008 Biology 111 Take Home Exam #3 BioEnergetics

  5. CMPE 185 Spring 1998 Syllabus 1 Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karplus, Kevin

    CMPE 185 Spring 1998 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and timeKresge 327, MWF 12;2 Syllabus CMPE 185 Spring 1998 participation in discussions (both in class

  6. Spring 2006 CS 649 1 Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    Terzis http://hinrg.cs.jhu.edu/wsn06/ #12;Outline Spring 2006 CS 649 2 (Simple) Radio Power loss models Reality (More) Radio Power loss models #12;Motivation Spring 2006 CS 649 3 Communication between nodes

  7. Mechanical energy storage in carbon nanotube springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Frances Ann

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy storage in mechanical springs made of carbon nanotubes is a promising new technology. Springs made of dense, ordered arrays of carbon nanotubes have the potential to surpass both the energy density of electrochemical ...

  8. Spring 2014 Composite Data Products: Backup Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Saur, G.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes 30 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Spring 2014 for fuel cell backup power systems.

  9. Motor gasoline assessment, Spring 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The springs of 1996 and 1997 provide an excellent example of contrasting gasoline market dynamics. In spring 1996, tightening crude oil markets pushed up gasoline prices sharply, adding to the normal seasonal gasoline price increases; however, in spring 1997, crude oil markets loosened and crude oil prices fell, bringing gasoline prices down. This pattern was followed throughout the country except in California. As a result of its unique reformulated gasoline, California prices began to vary significantly from the rest of the country in 1996 and continued to exhibit distinct variations in 1997. In addition to the price contrasts between 1996 and 1997, changes occurred in the way in which gasoline markets were supplied. Low stocks, high refinery utilizations, and high imports persisted through 1996 into summer 1997, but these factors seem to have had little impact on gasoline price spreads relative to average spread.

  10. Fuel storage basin seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanjilal, S.K.; Winkel, B.V.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105-KE and 105-KW Fuel Storage Basins were constructed more than 35 years ago as repositories for irradiated fuel from the K East and K West Reactors. Currently, the basins contain irradiated fuel from the N Reactor. To continue to use the basins as desired, seismic adequacy in accordance with current US Department of Energy facility requirements must be demonstrated. The 105-KE and 105-KW Basins are reinforced concrete, belowground reservoirs with a 16-ft water depth. The entire water retention boundary, which currently includes a portion of the adjacent reactor buildings, must be qualified for the Hanford Site design basis earthquake. The reactor building interface joints are sealed against leakage with rubber water stops. Demonstration of the seismic adequacy of these interface joints was initially identified as a key issue in the seismic qualification effort. The issue of water leakage through seismicly induced cracks was also investigated. This issue, coupled with the relatively complex geometry of the basins, dictated a need for three-dimensional modeling. A three-dimensional soil/structure interaction model was developed with the SASSI computer code. The development of three-dimensional models of the interfacing structures using the ANSYS code was also found to be necessary. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Spring Cleaning | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Site EnvironmentalEnergySafelyVirtual Toolkit Spring 2015 Virtual Toolkit VirtualSpring

  12. Magnetotelluric models of the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wannamaker, P.E.; Ward, S.H.; Hohmann, G.W.; Sill, W.R.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Roosevelt Hot Springs (RHS) thermal area, which includes a hotwater-dominated fracture zone prospect, near the eastern margin of the Basin-Range tectonic province, conceivably possesses a whole family of resistivity structures that includes the following: deep hot brine reservoirs, deep-seated partially molten heat sources in the crust or upper mantle that drive the convective system, near-surface hydrothermal alteration zones, wet sedimentary fill in valleys, and a regional, apparently one-dimensional resistivity profile of the crust and upper mantle. This complex resistivity makeup, particular to RHS but probably similar to that at other geothermal areas in the Great Basin, must be treated as being fully three-dimensional (3-D). In an attempt to understand these structures, broadband (10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -2/ Hz) tensor magnetotelluric (MT) data were obtained including apparent resistivities (rho/sub a/), impedance phases (phi) and vertical magnetic field transfer functions for 93 sites in the vicinity of this resource area.

  13. Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states...

  14. Basin width control of faulting in the Naryn Basin, south central Kyrgyzstan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bookhagen, Bodo

    Basin width control of faulting in the Naryn Basin, south central Kyrgyzstan Joseph K. Goode,1 the controls on this intramontane basin deformation, we study the Naryn Basin of south central Kyrgyzstan central Kyrgyzstan, Tectonics, 30, TC6009, doi:10.1029/2011TC002910. 1. Introduction [2] Deformation

  15. The Climate of the South Platte Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Climate of the South Platte Basin Colorado Climate Center http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu #12;Key Features of the Climate of the South Platte Basin #12;Temperature Cold winters Hot summers #12;Precipitation Monthly Average Precipitation for Selected Sites in the South Platte Basin 0.00 0

  16. Geological Modeling of Dahomey and Liberian Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gbadamosi, Hakeem B.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to study two Basins of the Gulf of Guinea (GoG), namely the Dahomey and the Liberian Basins. These Basins are located in the northern part of the GoG, where oil and gas exploration has significantly increased...

  17. Supplementary information on K-Basin sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAKENAS, B.J.

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three previous documents in this series have been published covering the analysis of: K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludge, K East Basin Canister Sludge, and K West Basin Canister Sludge. Since their publication, additional data have been acquired and analyses performed. It is the purpose of this volume to summarize the additional insights gained in the interim time period.

  18. Spring 2014 Organization Development & Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Spring 2014 Organization Development & Training Catalog University of Central Florida Office of Organization Development & Training 3280 Progress Drive Orlando, FL 32826-2912 (407) 823-0440 February 7, 2014 Volume 2, Number 3 The current Catalog is published at http://www.hr.ucf.edu/web/training

  19. DEAN'S LIST Spring Semester 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    . Campbell, Eric B. Cascketta, Eric C. Grantham, Jack D. Gross, Glendon Marston Grusenmeyer, Christopher RDEAN'S LIST Spring Semester 2010 Chai, Jun Christopher, Joseph Thomas Chu, Clayton N. Chu, Wesley D. Bloom, John Tyler Bond-Choquette, Claire Marie Bradford, Jonathan W. Brown, Thomas C. Bruns, Jared M

  20. Spring 2005 by Misti Richardson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Spring 2005 by Misti Richardson What do Croatia, distance delivery programs, and students in Croatia. He spent six months in Croatia as a 2004-2005 Fulbright Scholar, has made numerous trips in the European coun- try is due to the potential to develop a study-abroad program for MSU students in Croatia

  1. SPRING 2014 wind energy's impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    SPRING 2014 wind energy's impact on birds, bats......... 2-3 school news........... 4-5 alumni news measurable benefits reaped by the use of wind energy. But, it is a fact: all energy sources, alternative Interactions with Offshore Wind Energy Facilities," involves the design, deployment and testing

  2. Spring 2014 Heat Transfer -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Spring 2014 1 Heat Transfer - 1 Consider a cylindrical nuclear fuel rod of length L and diameter df the fuel rod, and the volumetric generation rate is known to vary sinusoidally with distance along the rod to exist between the surface of the rod and the water. Axial conduction can be neglected in rod and fluid

  3. SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS 2013 SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    -free Substrates" 11:05 AM Southwest Catalysis Society Excellence in Applied Catalysis Award James "Jerry" SpiveySOUTHWEST CATALYSIS SOCIETY 2013 SPRING SYMPOSIUM Friday, April 26, 2013 Grand Hall of the Ley registration fee is $50, which includes North American Catalysis Society and SWCS yearly membership dues, along

  4. SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS 2012 SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) "Catalysis to Meet the Energy Challenge" 11:00 AM Southwest Catalysis Society Excellence in Applied CatalysisSOUTHWEST CATALYSIS SOCIETY 2012 SPRING SYMPOSIUM April 20, 2012 Duncan Hall - McMurtry Auditorium registration fee is $50, which includes North American Catalysis Society and SWCS yearly membership dues, along

  5. UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Spring Quarter 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    -class virtual library designed for the digital era Subgoal 1: Develop a compelling "virtual library" experienceUC DAVIS UNIVERSITY LIBRARY TOWN HALL Spring Quarter 2013 June 11, 2013 UC Davis University Library, including the Q&A portion June 11, 2013 UC Davis University Library Town Hall 2 #12;Overview Strategic Plan

  6. Highlights of Spring 2011 Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    Highlights of Spring 2011 Environmental Politics and Policy Political and International Relations Theory Spotlight: The Middle East Beltway Politics and American Ideals Issues in International Our Planet Emma Huvos Political Science Class of 2013 The American Dream: One Size Fits All Maxi

  7. Chemistry Department Colloquium: Spring, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Chemistry Department Colloquium: Spring, 2012 Friday, March 16; 3:30 Seminar Hall (room 1315 Chemistry) Lost in Translation: How Regulators Use Science and How Scientists Can Help Bridge Gaps Stephanie to combine her Chemistry background with a legal education to improve the use of science in environmental

  8. Mesoscale Dynamics Spring Semester 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birner, Thomas

    ATS 735 Mesoscale Dynamics (3 cr) Spring Semester 2012 Instructor: Richard H. Johnson, Room ATS 305: There are no required texts. The recent book Mesoscale Meteorology in Midlatitudes by Markowski and Richardson covers with mesoscale-related research. A set of notes will be made available for the course, although we will not cover

  9. Mesoscale Modeling Spring Semester 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATS730 Mesoscale Modeling Spring Semester 2014 Meeting Times: T/TH: 9-10:15am Room: ATS 101 is to present the development of the basic equations used in mesoscale models, as well as the various methods than on actual simulations of mesoscale phenomena or the evaluation of specific mesoscale models

  10. Mesoscale Dynamics Spring Semester 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATS 735 Mesoscale Dynamics (3 cr) Spring Semester 2014 Instructor: Richard H. Johnson, Room ATS 305: There are no required texts. The recent book Mesoscale Meteorology in Midlatitudes by Markowski and Richardson covers with mesoscale-related research. A set of notes will be made available for the course, although we will not cover

  11. Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; 1992-1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of the Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project from September 30, 1992 to September 29, 1993. Examinations of historical flow and water temperature records and current physical habitat, indicate that the streams in the Umatilla River Basin vary in condition from extremely poor to good. Reduced flows and high water temperatures prevented salmonid production in the lower Umatilla River below river mile 75 during the summer and early fall. This was also true in the lower reaches of many tributaries. Isolated springs provided limited refuges in the mid Umatilla River and lower Meacham Creek. Suitable habitat for salmonids was found in the upper reaches of the mainstem and tributaries.

  12. Bull Trout Distribution and Abundance in the Waters on and Bordering the Warm Springs Reservation : 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brun, Christopher V.; Dodson, Rebekah

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The range of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Deschutes River basin has decreased from historic levels due to many factors including dam construction, habitat degradation, brook trout introduction and eradication efforts. While the bull trout population appears to be healthy in the Metolius River-Lake Billy Chinook system they have been largely extirpated from the upper Deschutes River (Buchanan et al. 1997). Little was known about bull trout in the lower Deschutes basin until BPA funded project No.9405400 began during 1998. In this progress report we describe the findings to date from this multi-year study aimed at determining the life history, habitat needs and limiting factors of bull trout in the lower Deschutes subbasin. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) relative abundance has been assessed in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek since 1999. In the Warm Springs R. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .003 fish/m{sup 2} and .001 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. These densities were the lowest recorded in the Warm Springs River during the period of study. In Shitike Cr. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .025 fish/m{sup 2} and .01 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. The utility of using index reaches to monitor trends in juvenile bull trout and brook trout relative abundance in the Warm Springs R. has been assessed since 1999. During 2002 the mean relative densities of juvenile bull trout within the 2.4 km study area was higher than what was observed in four index reaches. However, the mean relative densities of brook trout was slightly higher in the index reaches than what was observed in the 2.4 km study area. Habitat use by both juvenile bull trout and brook trout was determined in the Warm Springs R. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout were most abundant in pools and glides. However pools and glides comprised less than 20% of the available habitat in the study area during 2002. Multiple-pass spawning ground surveys were conducted during late August through October in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. during 2002. One-hundred and thirteen (113) redds were enumerated in the Warm Springs R. and 204 redds were found in Shitike Cr. The number of redds enumerated in both the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. were the most redds observed since surveys began in 1998. Spatial and temporal distribution in spawning within the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. is discussed. Juvenile emigration has been monitored in Shitike Creek since 1996. A total of 312 juveniles were estimated to have emigrated from Shitike Cr. during the spring, 2002. Adult escapement was monitored in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. Thirty adults were recorded at the Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery weir during 2002. This was the highest number of spawning adults recorded to date. A weir equipped with an underwater video camera near the spawning grounds was operated in the Warm Springs R. Thirty-one adults were recorded at the weir in day counts. The adult trap in Shitike Cr. was unsuccessful in capturing adult bull trout during 2002 due to damage from a spring high water event. Thermographs were placed throughout Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. to monitor water temperatures during bull trout migration, holding and spawning/rearing periods. During 1999-2002 water temperatures ranged from 11.8-15.4 C near the mouths during adult migration; 11.4-14.6 C during pre-spawning holding; and 6.5-8.4 C during adult spawning and juvenile rearing.

  13. Genetic classification of petroleum basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demaison, G.; Huizinga, B.J.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rather than relying on a descriptive geologic approach, this genetic classification is based on the universal laws that control processes of petroleum formation, migration, and entrapment. Petroleum basins or systems are defined as dynamic petroleum-generating and concentrating physico-chemical systems functioning on a geologic space and time scale. A petroleum system results from the combination of a generative subsystem (or hydrocarbon kitchen), essentially controlled by chemical processes, and a migration-entrapment subsystem, controlled by physical processes. The generative subsystem provides a certain supply of petroleum to the basin during a given geologic time span. The migration-entrapment subsystem receives petroleum and distributes it in a manner that can lead either to dispersion and loss or to concentration of the regional charge into economic accumulations. The authors classification scheme for petroleum basins rests on a simple working nomenclature consisting of the following qualifiers: (1) charge factor: undercharged, normally charged, or supercharged, (2) migration drainage factor: vertically drained or laterally drained, and (3) entrapment factor: low impedance or high impedance. Examples chosen from an extensive roster of documented petroleum basins are reviewed to explain the proposed classification.

  14. Mississippian facies relationships, eastern Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, H.W. (Oryx Energy, Inc., Midland, TX (United States)); Forgotson, J.M. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mississippian strata in the eastern Anadarko basin record a gradual deepening of the basin. Late and post-Mississippian tectonism (Wichita and Arbuckle orogenies) fragmented the single large basin into the series of paired basins and uplifts recognized in the southern half of Oklahoma today. Lower Mississippian isopach and facies trends (Sycamore and Caney Formations) indicate that basinal strike in the study area (southeastern Anadarko basin) was predominantly east-west. Depositional environment interpretations made for Lower Mississippian strata suggest that the basin was partially sediment starved and exhibited a low shelf-to-basin gradient. Upper Mississippian isopach and facies trends suggest that basinal strike within the study area shifted from dominantly east-west to dominantly northwest-southeast due to Late Mississippian and Early Pennsylvanian uplift along the Nemaha ridge. Within the study area, the Chester Formation, composed of gray to dove-gray shales with interbedded limestones deposited on a carbonate shelf, thins depositionally into the basin and is thinnest at its facies boundary with the Springer Group and the upper portion of the Caney Formation. As basin subsidence rates accelerated, the southern edge of the Chester carbonate shelf was progressively drowned, causing a backstepping of the Chester Formation calcareous shale and carbonate facies. Springer Group sands and black shales transgressed northward over the drowned Chester Formation shelf.

  15. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Final Siting Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Montgomery

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  16. THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

    2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

  17. Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) - Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs : Annual Report For Fiscal Year, October 2007 September 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerstenberger, Ryan [Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation

    2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report describes work performed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) portion of the Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project (HRPP) during the 2008 fiscal year. A total of 64,736 hatchery winter steelhead, 12,108 hatchery summer steelhead, and 68,426 hatchery spring Chinook salmon smolts were acclimated and released in the Hood River basin during the spring. The HRPP exceeded program goals for a release of and 50,000 winter steelhead but fell short of the steelhead release goals of 30,000 summer steelhead and 75,000 spring Chinook in 2008. Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) tags were implanted in 6,652 hatchery winter steelhead, and 1,196 hatchery summer steelhead, to compare migratory attributes and survival rates of hatchery fish released into the Hood River. Water temperatures were recorded at six locations within the Hood River subbasin to monitor for compliance with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality water quality standards. A preseason spring Chinook salmon adult run forecast was generated, which predicted an abundant return adequate to meet escapement goal and brood stock needs. As a result the tribal and sport fisheries were opened. A tribal creel was conducted from May 22 to July 18 during which an estimated 172 spring Chinook were harvested. One hundred sixteen Spring Chinook salmon redds were observed and 72 carcasses were inspected on 19.4 miles of spawning grounds throughout the Hood River Basin during 2008. Annual salvage operations were completed in two irrigation canals resulting in the liberation of 1,641 fish back to the Hood River.

  18. Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010 TA: En-Jui Lee (http://www.gg.uwyo.edu/ggstudent/elee8/site - An Indispensible Tool in Hazard Planning 3 26/1; 27/1 Lab 2: Geologic Maps - Mapping the Hazards 4 2/2; 3/2 Lab 3: Population - People at Risk 5 9/2; 10/2 Lab 4: Plate Tectonics - Locating Geologic Hazards 6 16/2; 17/2 Lab 5

  19. Spring 2014 Heat Transfer -2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Spring 2014 Heat Transfer - 2 A thin electronic chip is in the shape of a square wafer, b = 1 cm surface of the chip with a heat transfer coefficient of h = 100 W/m2 -K. Assume the chip has a uniform per side with a mass of m = 0.3 grams and specific heat of C = 103 J/kg-K. The chip is mounted

  20. Silurian of Illinois basin - a carbonate ramp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, G.W.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Silurian of the Illinois basin has classically been defined as a shelf-basin sequence. According to the shelf-basin model, the Illinois basin is a deep-water basin in the extreme southern part (southern Illinois-Tennessee), with a slope in the south (Illinois-Indiana) and a shelf extending from central Illinois and Indiana northeast to the Michigan basin. Reef buildups are in a continuous trend along the shelf break. However, the author proposes that the silurian of the Illinois basin represents a carbonate ramp. The down-ramp position is located in southern Illinois and grades into deeper water environments south of Illinois. In this environment, reef buildups would form in the late Alexandrian of early St. Clair, and would begin in the down-ramp position. Therefore, using the new model, reef buildups are expected throughout the basin, rather than being confined to an imaginary shelf break. This model would facilitate exploration in southern Illinois, Indiana, and western Kentucky for reefal hydrocarbon deposits. A ramp model is indicated for the Illinois basin because: (1) the basin lacks a shelf-slope break; (2) the facies sequence is compatible with a ramp environment and incompatible with a shelf-slope environment; (3) discontinuous reef trends are typical of a ramp environment; and (4) facies changes and slope are gradual, extending over hundreds of miles as expected in a ramp environment. Modern carbonate models border on ocean basins. However, the Illinois basin is a cratonic basin, which may have affected the depositional environments. How much that environment differed from present-day models is unknown.

  1. Spring Term 2010 Assessment Report Page 1 Spring Term 2010: Assessment of the Learning Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, David

    focused on the student learning experience, particularly the teaching methods employed in #12;Spring Term carries many aspects with it, but our main focus has always been on our central learning objectiveSpring Term 2010 Assessment Report Page 1 Spring Term 2010: Assessment of the Learning Outcomes

  2. Spring Fever Alfalfa The Pitfalls of Spring Seeding Alfalfa in West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Spring Fever Alfalfa The Pitfalls of Spring Seeding Alfalfa in West Texas Calvin Trostle producers are thinking about planting in the spring which is not recommended in West Texas for several, Extension Agronomy, Texas A&MLubbock, (806) 746-6101, c-trostle@tamu.edu Updated February 2003 I have

  3. Athletic Training Coordinator Hometown: Colorado Springs, CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    WHO WE ARE Gaby Bell Athletic Training Coordinator Hometown: Colorado Springs, CO Certifications Athletic Training Graduate Assistant Jonathan Hodapp Student Athletic Trainer Mike Carlson Student Athletic

  4. Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring, NV Conducting a 3D Converted Shear Wave Project to Reduce Exploration Risk at Wister, CA Crump Geyser: High Precision...

  5. Go Global Newsletter, Winter/Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global & International Studies

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HARRIS was named last Spring as an Aspen Institute Scholarby the prestigious Aspen Institute. Thisin connection with the Aspen Institute Executive Seminar,

  6. Brushless Motor Controller Report Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    Brushless Motor Controller Report Spring 2010 May 15, 2010 Brian Clementi MAE of 2010 322 Bogert ...................................................................................................... 5 A. Motor Description...................................................................................................... 5 B. The Motor Controller Board

  7. Colorado Springs Utilities- Energy Efficient Builder Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Colorado Springs Utilities (CSU) Energy Efficient Builder Program offers an incentive to builders who construct ENERGY STAR qualified homes within the CSU service area. The incentive range...

  8. CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

  9. Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from Oil andor Gas Wells Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal...

  10. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

  11. Steamboat Villa Hot Springs Spa Space Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Villa Hot Springs Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Steamboat Villa Hot Springs Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  12. Broadwater Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Broadwater Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature...

  13. Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Space Heating Low...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for...

  14. Jackson Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  15. Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs Ranch Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  16. Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low...

  17. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

  18. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Roberts, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

  19. A study of spring rates of dynamically loaded helical springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitwell, Franklin Carroll

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    95. 0 95. 0 95. 0 41 Table 9. Dimensionless Values Run Numbers Inclusive F2/F. l Y2/YI Key for Figure 14 1 ? 12 13 -24 25 ? 36 3. 48 2. 63 3. 39 3. 72 2. 74 3. 39 37 - 48 49 ? 60 61- 72 12. 00 8. 98 5. 81 12. 00 8. 72 5. 58... Y2 Yl FIGURE 14. GRAPH Of VALUES FROM TABLE 9 FOR ALL SPRINGS EXCEPT NO. 6 44 55 54 / / / t 52 51 50 49 48 F2 Ibf 47 45 44 43 / / I / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / q/ G / Q&l qP/ / / / / i...

  20. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2008 Spring 2008 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #3 BioEnergetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2008 1 Spring 2008 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #3 BioEnergetics

  1. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2007 Spring 2007 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #3 BioEnergetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2007 1 Spring 2007 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #3 BioEnergetics

  2. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  3. Spring 2006 CS 649 1 Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    Energy efficiency Scalability & Self- configuration Fairness not important Message-level Latency Trade for energy Adaptivity Adaptivity #12;MAC and Its Classification Spring 2006 CS 649 4 · Medium Access Control Attributes Spring 2006 CS 649 5 · Collision avoidance · Basic task of a MAC protocol · Energy efficiency

  4. RMI 357e spring 2013 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    RMI 357e spring 2013 1 Risk Management R M 357e Professor: Christopher McClellan Office: CBA 3 thomaspjacob@utexas.edu Syllabus spring 2013 Textbook Risk Management for Enterprises and Individuals, v.1://students.flatworldknowledge.com/course/1112649 Risk Management: 357E. Risk Management - Upper-Division Course Principles of risk management

  5. PAID INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES SPRING AND SUMMER 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    PAID INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES SPRING AND SUMMER 2014 ABOUT THE PROGRAM: The Virginia Space Grant colleges are offering the Commonwealth STEM Industry Internship Program (CSIIP). CSIIP is a free resource for finding paid spring, summer, and fall internships. CSIIP provides an online system where undergraduate

  6. Spanish & Portuguese -Teaching Assistants Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Spanish & Portuguese - Teaching Assistants Spring 2014 Abreu-Gonzlez, Kallie ........................................................................................ 2-3128 Spanish 102 Head TA pananth@wisc.edu 770 Van Hise Hall Office Hours: 9:55 10:55 MR Teach 383 VH #12;Spanish & Portuguese - Teaching Assistants Spring 2014 Beltrn, Edith

  7. Geothermal Energy in Iceland Spring 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    Geothermal Energy in Iceland Kaeo Ahu CEE 491 Spring 2009 Final Presentation #12;HISTORY Creating the availability of geothermal resources #12;HISTORY & BACKGROUND Iceland's first settlers used geothermal springs for bathing, cooking & laundering Iceland's capital named Reykjavik or "Smokey Bay" after

  8. Diabetes Experience Spring 2014 Interprofessional Diabetes Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Diabetes Experience Spring 2014 Interprofessional Diabetes Experience Phar 6226/Nurs 5011 Spring the opportunity to learn in-depth knowledge of diabetes mellitus through active, hands-on learning experience of living with diabetes, in which they will give "insulin" injections and check blood glucoses

  9. Spring Already? | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Site EnvironmentalEnergySafelyVirtual Toolkit Spring 2015 Virtual Toolkit Virtual

  10. Spring Valley | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCity Corp JumpsourceSouthlake,AeHJump to:SpringValley

  11. Idaho_LavaHotSprings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |Hot Springs Site #0104 Latitude: N. Lava

  12. Timing and Tectonic implications of basin inversion in the Nam Con Son Basin and adjacent areas, southern South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Christopher Charles

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nam Con Son (NCS) Basin, located offshore of SE Vietnam, is one of several Tertiary rift basins that formed during initial Eocene(?)-Oligocene rifting. Following cessation of rifting at the end of Oligocene time, these basins were subjected...

  13. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele; Berggren, Thomas J.; Filardo, Margaret (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The runoff volumes in 2002 were near average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (80%) and The Dalles Dam (97%). The year 2002 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that were less than the seasonal Biological Opinion (Opinion) flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam for both the spring and summer period. The seasonal flow objectives for Priest Rapids and McNary dams were exceeded for the spring period, but at McNary Dam summer flow objectives were not met. While seasonal flow objectives were exceeded for the spring at McNary Dam, the 2002 season illustrated that Biological Opinion management to seasonal flow targets can result in conditions where a major portion of the juvenile fish migration migrates in conditions that are less than the flow objectives. The delay in runoff due to cool weather conditions and the inability of reservoirs to augment flows by drafting lower than the flood control elevations, resulted in flows less than the Opinion objectives until May 22, 2002. By this time approximately 73% of the yearling chinook and 56% of steelhead had already passed the project. For the most part, spill in 2002 was managed below the gas waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. The exception was at Lower Monumental Dam where no Biological Opinion spill occurred due to the need to conduct repairs in the stilling basin. Survival estimates obtained for PIT tagged juveniles were similar in range to those observed prior to 2001. A multi-year analysis of juvenile survival and the factors that affect it was conducted in 2002. A water transit time and flow relation was demonstrated for spring migrating chinook and steelhead of Snake River and Mid Columbia River origin. Returning numbers of adults observed at Bonneville Dam declined for spring chinook, steelhead and coho, while summer and fall chinook numbers increased. However, all numbers were far greater than observed in the past ten years averaged together. In 2002, about 87 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, Tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This represents an increase over the past season, when only 71 million juvenile fish were released into the same area.

  14. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

  15. area sichuan basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area has been extensively unknown authors 59 outside the Pachitea River Basin, Peru CiteSeer Summary: At a superficial look, the Pachitea river basin gives the impression...

  16. area tarim basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area has been extensively unknown authors 65 outside the Pachitea River Basin, Peru CiteSeer Summary: At a superficial look, the Pachitea river basin gives the impression...

  17. area groundwater basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    concerning aspects of petroleum geochemistry in the basin, especially in determining source rock(s) in the western part of this basin. It has been speculated that Ngimbang...

  18. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  19. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  20. Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume I Kootenai River (Overview, Report and Appendices).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

  1. urricane activity in the Atlantic basin increased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with levels in the 1970s and 1980s. For example, the accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index in the Atlantic of disturbances. Bottom: annual number (AugOct) of North Atlantic basin hurricanes (19802005). See figures 2, is a crucial question for the future outlook of hurricane activity in the basin. It is difficult to distinguish

  2. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Council to serve as a comprehensive planning agency for energy policy and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish and wildlife issues and involve Energy, Fish, Wildlife: The State of the Columbia River Basin, 2013

  3. 6, 839877, 2006 Mexico City basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    emitters of air pollutants leading to negative health effects and environmental degradation. The rate altitude basin with air pollutant concentrations above the health limits most days of the year. A mesoscale-dimensional wind patterns in25 the basin and found that the sea-breeze transports the polluted air mass up the moun

  4. Oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roohi, M.; Aburawi, R.M. [Waha Oil Co., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sirte Basin is an asymmetrical cratonic basin, situated in the north-central part of Libya. It covers an area of over 350,000km{sup 2} and is one of the most prolific oil-producing basins in the world. Sirte Basin is divided into large NW-SE trending sub-parallel platforms and troughs bounded by deep seated syndepositional normal faults. A very unique combination of thick sediments with rich source rocks in the troughs vs. thinner sediments with prolific reservoir rocks on the platforms accounts for the productivity of the basin. Analysis of oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin will certainly help to discover the remaining reserves, and this can only be achieved if the important parameter of structural configuration of the basin at the time of oil migration is known. The present paper is an attempt to analyse the time of oil migration, to define the structural picture of the 4 Basin during the time of migration and to delineate the most probable connecting routes between the hydrocarbon kitchens and the oil fields.

  5. Sedimentary basins of the late Mesozoic extensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    17 Sedimentary basins of the late Mesozoic extensional domain of China and Mongolia S.A. Graham,* T Mongolia was extended during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. As noted by various authors (Li et al in southern Mongolia (Lamb and Badarch, 1997), a crushed late Paleozoic flysch basin along the ChinaMongolia

  6. Geology of Alabama's Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Holmes, J.W.; Shepard, B.K.

    1983-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama continues to be an exciting area for oil and gas exploration. Several potential pay zones and a variety of petroleum traps in the basin resulted in a large number of successful test wells, helping to make the basin one of the more attractive areas for continued exploration in the US. The Upper Mississippian sandstone reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin are the primary exploration targets, with the Carter and Lewis sandstones being the most prolific producers. These sanstones exhibit considerable lateral and vertical variability and no apparent regional trends for porosity and permeability development. Determining the depositional environments of the Carter and Lewis sandstones should enhance petroleum exploration in the basin by helping to identify reservoir geometry, areal extent, and quality. To date, the Carter sandstones has produced more than 700,000 bbl of oil and 100 billion CR of gas; the Lewis sandstone, over 5000 bbl of oil and 12 billion CF of gas.

  7. VENTURA BASIN LOS ANGELES BASIN CENTRAL COASTAL BASIN W Y T

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE. Great Basin Oil and Gas Fields 2004VENTURA

  8. A study of spring rates of dynamically loaded helical springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitwell, Franklin Carroll

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in 'Table 7, the curves in Figure 15 are of doubtful accuracy Table 2. Test Results for Spring No. Run No. lbf 5. 8 5. 8 5. 8 5. 8 5. 8 1d lbf lbf 5. 8 5. 8 5. 8 5. 8 5. 8 F2' lbf 36. 4 36. 4 36. 4 36. 4 36. 4 '2d lbf F2 lbf 36. 4... 33. 2 23. 5 0. 184 0. 184 0. 184 0. 184 0. 172 0. 684 0. 684 0. 684 0. 684 0. 472 25. 0 28. 6 33. 0 39. 9 0 47. 3 47. 3 47. 3 47. 3 48. 5 Table 2 (Cont. ) Run No. 1 1d 1 2 2ti 2 1 Y2 f k lbf lbf lbf lbf lbf lbf in . in. cps 1...

  9. Spring/dimple instrument tube restraint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeMario, E.E.; Lawson, C.N.

    1993-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel assembly for a pressurized water nuclear reactor has a spring and dimple structure formed in a non-radioactive insert tube placed in the top of a sensor receiving instrumentation tube thimble disposed in the fuel assembly and attached at a top nozzle, a bottom nozzle, and intermediate grids. The instrumentation tube thimble is open at the top, where the sensor or its connection extends through the cooling water for coupling to a sensor signal processor. The spring and dimple insert tube is mounted within the instrumentation tube thimble and extends downwardly adjacent the top. The springs and dimples restrain the sensor and its connections against lateral displacement causing impact with the instrumentation tube thimble due to the strong axial flow of cooling water. The instrumentation tube has a stainless steel outer sleeve and a zirconium alloy inner sleeve below the insert tube adjacent the top. The insert tube is relatively non-radioactivated inconel alloy. The opposed springs and dimples are formed on diametrically opposite inner walls of the insert tube, the springs being formed as spaced axial cuts in the insert tube, with a web of the insert tube between the cuts bowed radially inwardly for forming the spring, and the dimples being formed as radially inward protrusions opposed to the springs. 7 figures.

  10. (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-02): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Franklin- Riverview; Taylor Flats Tap; Walla Walla-Pendleton; and McNary-Slatt Transmission lines. Location: All ROWs are located in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by:...

  11. EA-1173: Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplemental Program (Preliminary), Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund a program designed to prevent the extinction and begin the recovery...

  12. Executive summary: Weldon Spring Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1992. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has been prepared to provide information about the public safety and environmental protection programs conducted by the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project. The Weldon Spring site is located in southern St. Charles County, Missouri, approximately 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The site consists of two main areas, the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and raffinate pits and the Weldon Spring Quarry. The objectives of the Site Environmental Report are to present a summary of data from the environmental monitoring program, to characterize trends and environmental conditions at the site, and to confirm compliance with environmental and health protection standards and requirements. The report also presents the status of remedial activities and the results of monitoring these activities to assess their impacts on the public and environment. The scope of the environmental monitoring program at the Weldon Spring site has changed since it was initiated. Previously, the program focused on investigations of the extent and level of contaminants in the groundwater, surface waters, buildings, and air at the site. In 1992, the level of remedial activities required monitoring for potential impacts of those activities, particularly on surface water runoff and airborne effluents. This report includes monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological sampling activities. These data include estimates of dose to the public from the Weldon Spring site; estimates of effluent releases; and trends in groundwater contaminant levels. Also, applicable compliance requirements, quality assurance programs, and special studies conducted in 1992 to support environmental protection programs are reviewed.

  13. Mid-Continent basin: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J.R.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the largest unevaluated basins in the Mid-Continent is the Salina basin in Kansas and its extension into eastern Nebraska. The purpose of this study is to update all older data, reconstruct new maps, and reappraise the potential for further exploration. The last comprehensive publications on the area were in 1948 and 1956. The Salina basin includes 12,700 mi/sup 2/ (33,000 km/sup 2/) in north-central Kansas, and approximately 7000 mi/sup 2/ (18,000 km/sup 2/) in east-central Nebraska. The basin is delineated by the zero isopach of Mississippian rocks bordering the basin. The Central Kansas uplift borders the basin on the southwest and Nemaha ridge on the east; the southern limit is an ill-defined saddle in the vicinity of T17S. Boundaries of the Nebraska basin are less well defined, but the axis of the basin trends directly north from the Kansas border along the boundary of Ts10 and 11W, to 41/sup 0/N lat., and then bifurcates to the northwest toward the Siouxiana arch and northeast for an unknown distance. Conventional structure maps have been constructed on several horizons, and a series of cross sections depicts anomalous structures. Recent gravity, magnetic, and seismic reflection profiling also provide information on basement tectonics which may influence structures in the younger sediments. Basement depth ranges from 600 ft (180 m) on the northeast Nemaha ridge boundary of the basin, to a depth of 4750 ft (1450 m) or -3000 ft (-915 m) below sea-level datum in Jewell County; therefore, there may be an approximate total of 10,000 mi/sup 3/ (42,000 km/sup 3/ of sediments for future exploration.

  14. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  15. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  16. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  17. Aragonite crusts and pisolites beneath dolomitic tepees, Lake MacLeod evaporate basin, Western Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handford, C.R.; Kendall, A.C.; Dunham, J.B.; Logan, B.W.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research currently being conducted by the Sedimentology and Marine Geology Group, under Brian W. Logan at the University of Western Australia, has recently concentrated on Lake MacLeod, a 2000 km/sup 2/ (770 mi/sup 2/) coastal salina on the western coast of Australia. This work has shown that this evaporite basin, which is 3 to 4 m (10 to 13 ft) below sea level, is separated from the Indian Ocean by a topographic barrier, but seawater under hydrostatic head, seeps freely through the barrier and discharges from several vents and springs in a carbonate mud flat at the north end of the basin. From there, seawater flows slowly across the basin, evaporating and depositing carbonate, gypsum, and ephemeral halite. About 10 to 12 m (33 to 39 ft) of evaporites have been deposited in the past 5300 years. In July 1982, the authors visited the carbonate mud flats and discovered abundant aragonite pisolites and botryoidal-mammillary crusts of fibrous aragonite cement beneath lily-pad tepee slabs of cemented protodolomite. Thick aragonite crusts cover both the undersides of lily-pad slabs and the lithified floors of tepees. Crusts covering the floors are more botryoidal and consist of both aragonite nubs and mounds (0.2 to 2.5 cm, 0.08 to 1 in., in diameter), and a few scattered, loose pisolites, several millimeters in diameter. The manner in which crusts, pisolites, and tepees occur at Lake MacLeod raises the possibility that they and their ancient counterparts from the Permian basin share a common origin. Perhaps Permian pisolites and aragonite crusts formed beneath cemented slabs of peritidal sediments in tepees bathed by marine water which seeped across exposed portions of the shelf crest.

  18. Term: Spring 2013 University of Pittsburgh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    Term: Spring 2013 1 University of Pittsburgh HOUSING/DINING SERVICES CONTRACT This Housing/Dining Services Contract (this "Contract") is made by and between the University of Pittsburgh

  19. Term: Spring 2012 University of Pittsburgh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    Term: Spring 2012 1 University of Pittsburgh HOUSING/DINING SERVICES CONTRACT This Housing/Dining Services Contract (this "Contract") is made by and between the University of Pittsburgh

  20. Spring 2013 Composite Data Products - Backup Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.; Post, M.; Peters, M.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes 21 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Spring 2013 for fuel cell backup power systems.

  1. CNR GRADUATION SURVEY RESULTS Spring, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes o Local 229 o New Belgium Brewing Company o Newmont Mining Company o Pason Systems 86 Productions 72% are employed or attending grad school vs. 76% Spring, 2004 #12;Range Ecology: No range

  2. SP.778 Toy Product Design, Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudrowitz, Barry M. (Barry Matthew)

    Toy Product Design is a MIT Public Service Center learning design course offered in the Spring semester. This course is an introduction to the product design process with a focus on designing for play and entertainment. ...

  3. amagazineforalumniandfriendsoftheinstituteoftechnology|spring/summer2008 ENVIRONMENTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    amagazineforalumniandfriendsoftheinstituteoftechnology|spring/summer2008 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT making their mark in the workforce >> Student solar competitions begin to heat up >> #12;InventErmit PAttison Environmental Impact 16 Institute of Technology faculty are working to solve today

  4. 2012 Spring Issue Page The Critical Path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    and spring have continued our string of extremely busy seasons. The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite K integration and is proceeding through environmental test. It has had some late bumps in the road but the team

  5. BE 780: Brain Machine Interfaces Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    BE 780: Brain Machine Interfaces Spring 2013 Instructor: Jason Ritt the readings for an assigned class. Homework 30% Mid-semester Report 30, code, or files of any kind. Reports and final projects must

  6. Insights into Spring 2008 Gasoline Prices

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasoline prices rose rapidly in spring 2007 due a variety of factors, including refinery outages and lower than expected imports. This report explores those factors and looks at the implications for 2008.

  7. The Cultivar, Spring/Summer 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Martha

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    awareness of foods carbon footprint, or a desire to knowabout, such as their carbon footprint and global warm-part of a campuss carbon footprint. With the Spring 2008

  8. ME 872 -Finite Element Methods Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Alejandro

    Element Method: Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element Analysis (Dover Civil and Mechanical Engineering problems Special topics: Lagrange multipliers, adaptive finite elements, sensitivity analysis, nonlinearME 872 - Finite Element Methods Spring 2014 Catalog Description: Theory and application

  9. Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 230 Spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    cycles Refrigeration and heat pump systems Final Exam (Date and time TBA) Suggested Reading Chapter 1Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 230 Spring 2012 Thermodynamics Course Syllabus Date Week 1 (1

  10. Fiscal Year 1997 (Summer 1996-Spring 1997)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willson, Stephen J.

    Fiscal Year 1997 (Summer 1996-Spring 1997) A total of 517 students studied abroad; an additional 62) N Am: 36 (10) #12;Oceania: 39 (1) S Am: 100 (2) July, 1997 #12;

  11. Optical spring effect in nanoelectromechanical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Feng; Zhou, Guangya, E-mail: mpezgy@nus.edu.sg; Du, Yu; Chau, Fook Siong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Deng, Jie [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology, and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we report a hybrid system consisting of nano-optical and nano-mechanical springs, in which the optical spring effect works to adjust the mechanical frequency of a nanoelectromechanical systems resonator. Nano-scale folded beams are fabricated as the mechanical springs and double-coupled one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities are used to pump the optical spring. The dynamic characteristics of this hybrid system are measured and analyzed at both low and high input optical powers. This study leads the physical phenomenon of optomechanics in complex nano-opto-electro-mechanical systems (NOEMS) and could benefit the future applications of NOEMS in chip-level communication and sensing.

  12. Colorado Springs Utilities- Renewable Energy Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through its Renewable Energy Rebate Program, Colorado Springs Utilities (CSU) offers a rebate to customers who install grid-connected solar-electric (PV) systems, wind systems, and solar water...

  13. MATH 373 Spring 2014 Test 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    jeffb_000

    2014-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    MATH 373. Spring 2014. Test 1. February 18, 2013. 1. Amar wants to accumulate 1 million (1,000,000) by the time that he is 50 years old. Amar is currently 20...

  14. Death of a carbonate basin: The Niagara-Salina transition in the Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leibold, A.W.; Howell, P.D. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The A-O Carbonate in the Michigan basin comprises a sequence of laminated calcite/anhydrite layers intercalated with bedded halite at the transition between normal marine Niagaran carbonates and lower Salina Group evaporites. The carbonate/anhydrite interbeds represent freshing events during initial evaporative concentration of the Michigan basin. Recent drilling in the Michigan basin delineates two distinct regions of A-O Carbonate development: a 5 to 10 m thick sequence of six 'laminites' found throughout most of the western and northern basin and a 10 to 25 m thick sequence in the southeastern basin containing both thicker 'laminates' and thicker salt interbeds. Additionally, potash deposits of the overlying A-1 evaporite unit are restricted to the northern and western basin regions. The distribution of evaporite facies in these two regions is adequately explained by a source of basin recharge in the southeast-perhaps the 'Clinton Inlet' of earlier workers. This situation suggest either that: (1) the source of basin recharge is alternately supplying preconcentrated brine and more normal marine water, or (2) that the basin received at least two distinct sources of water during A-O deposition.

  15. Assessment of undiscovered carboniferous coal-bed gas resources of the Appalachian Basin and Black Warrior Basin Provinces, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milici, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

    2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed methane (CBM) occurs in coal beds of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) age in the Appalachian basin, which extends almost continuously from New York to Alabama. In general, the basin includes three structural subbasins: the Dunkard basin in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and northern West Virginia; the Pocahontas basin in southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia; and the Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi. For assessment purposes, the Appalachian basin was divided into two assessment provinces: the Appalachian Basin Province from New York to Alabama, and the Black Warrior Basin Province in Alabama and Mississippi. By far, most of the coalbed methane produced in the entire Appalachian basin has come from the Black Warrior Basin Province. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

  17. September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK at BINGHAMTON research programs in geochemistry, sedimentary geology, or Earth surface processes with the potential the position, visit the Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies website (www.geology

  18. River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Catawba/Wateree and Yadkin/Pee Dee River Basins Advisory Commissions are permanent public bodies jointly established by North and South Carolina. The commissions are responsible for assessing...

  19. Flathead Basin Commission Act of 1983 (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes the Flathead Basin Commission, the purpose of which is to protect the Flathead Lake aquatic environment, its waters, and surrounding lands and natural resources. The Commission...

  20. Petroleum potential of the Libyan sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammuda, O.S.; Sbeta, A.M.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrary to prevailing opinion, all Libyan sedimentary basins and the Al-Jabal Al-Akhdar platform contain prolific petroleum accumulations with very high prospectivity. A systematic review of the types of traps and pays in this central part of the southern Mediterranean province reveals great variability in reservoir and source rock characteristics. The reservoir rocks are of almost all geologic ages. The thick source rock sequences also vary in nature and organic content. The organic-rich facies have accumulated in intracratonic and passive margin basins or in marginal seas. Most of the oil discovered thus far in these basins is found in large structural traps. Future discoveries of stratigraphic traps or small structural traps will require intensified efforts and detailed studies using up-to-date multidisciplinary techniques in sedimentary tectonics, biostratigraphic facies analysis, and geochemical prospecting in order to develop a better understanding of these basins, thus improving their prospectivity.

  1. K-Basins S/RIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D.J.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is a list of the Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES{ampersand}H) and Safeguards and Security (SAS) standards/requirements applicable to the K Basins facility.

  2. The Uinta Basin Case Robert J. Bayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Overburden Tailings Oil Shale Mining Open Pit Underground Ex situ extraction Ex situ thermal conversion EIS for Oil Sands and Oil Shale Ongoing concerns with Basin-wide air quality Wildlife and wildlife

  3. K-Basins S/RIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D.J.

    1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standards/Requirements Identification Document(S/RID) is a list of the Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) and Safeguards and Security (SAS) standards/requirements applicable to the K Basins facility

  4. Late devonian carbon isotope stratigraphy and sea level fluctuations, Canning Basin, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, N P; Sumner, Dawn Y.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reef, Canning Basin, Western Australia. Palaeontology 43,the Canning Basin, Western Australia. In: Loucks, R.G. ,Canning Basin, Western Australia. Ph.D Thesis, University of

  5. Cross-shaped torsional spring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Matthew M. (Boston, MA); Pratt, Gill A. (Lexington, MA)

    1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section.

  6. Cross-shaped torsional spring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, M.M.; Pratt, G.A.

    1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section. 30 figs.

  7. Weldon Spring historical dose estimate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meshkov, N.; Benioff, P.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to determine the estimated radiation doses that individuals in five nearby population groups and the general population in the surrounding area may have received as a consequence of activities at a uranium processing plant in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The study is retrospective and encompasses plant operations (1957-1966), cleanup (1967-1969), and maintenance (1969-1982). The dose estimates for members of the nearby population groups are as follows. Of the three periods considered, the largest doses to the general population in the surrounding area would have occurred during the plant operations period (1957-1966). Dose estimates for the cleanup (1967-1969) and maintenance (1969-1982) periods are negligible in comparison. Based on the monitoring data, if there was a person residing continually in a dwelling 1.2 km (0.75 mi) north of the plant, this person is estimated to have received an average of about 96 mrem/yr (ranging from 50 to 160 mrem/yr) above background during plant operations, whereas the dose to a nearby resident during later years is estimated to have been about 0.4 mrem/yr during cleanup and about 0.2 mrem/yr during the maintenance period. These values may be compared with the background dose in Missouri of 120 mrem/yr.

  8. Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy, sedimentology, and foreland basin evolution: Black Warrior basin, Alabama and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, R.A.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy and sedimentology in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi indicate deposition in an evolving foreland basin flanking the Appalachian-Ouachita fold-thrust belt. The strata reflect specific responses to foreland basin subsidence, orogenic activity, sediment supply, and dispersal systems. Definition of the regional stratigraphy of the clastic wedge provides for interpretation of the foreland basin subsidence history by enabling quantitative reconstruction of regional compaction and subsidence profiles. Comparison of the interpreted subsidence history with model profiles of foreland basin subsidence (predicted from loading and flexure of continental lithosphere) allows evaluation of mechanical models in terms of observed clastic-wedge sedimentology and stratigraphy. Mechanical modeling of foreland basin subsidence predicts formation of a flexural bulge that migrates cratonward ahead of the subsiding foreland basin during loading. In the Black Warrior basin, local stratigraphic thins, pinch-outs, and areas of marine-reworked sediments suggest migration of the flexural bulge. Comparison of flexural bulge migration with thermal maturation history allows evaluation of timing of stratigraphic trapping mechanisms with respect to onset of hydrocarbon generation.

  9. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Project - ODFW, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Scott

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Core activities of the Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Supplementation Program (GRESCSP) are funded through the authority of the Lower Snake River Fish and Wildlife Compensation Plan (LSRCP). The LSRCP program was approved by the Water Resources Development Act of 1976, PL 94-587, Section 102, 94th Congress substantially in accordance with the Special Report, LSRCP, June 1975 on file with the Chief of Engineers. The LSRCP was prepared and submitted in compliance with the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act of 1958, PL 85-624, 85th Congress, August 12, 1958 to mitigate for the losses of fish and wildlife caused by the construction of dams on lower Snake River. The GRESCSP is an artificial propagation program that was initiated by Bonneville Power Administrations Fish and Wildlife program in the mid 1990's. The intent of this program was to change the mitigation aspect of the LSRCP program (harvest mitigation) to an integrated supplementation program; inasmuch as, hatchery produced fish could be experimentally used as a recovery tool and fish surplus to mitigation would be available for in-place and in-kind harvest. Fish production is still authorized by the LSRCP with the original mitigation return goal of 5,860 adult spring Chinook to the project area. The GRESCSP was developed with two primary components: (1) conventional broodstock (projects 199800702; 199800703; 199800704) and (2) captive brood (projects 199801001; 199801006). The GRESCSP relies on cooperative M&E efforts from the LSRCP including setting aside the Wenaha and Minam tributaries as natural production reserves components used for reference streams. The GRESCSP, coordinated with federal and tribal partners, identifies production levels for both propagation components and weir management strategies for each of the three supplemented tributary areas within the Grande Ronde Sub-basin. The three supplemented areas are Catherine Creek, Lostine River, and upper Grande Ronde River. Lookingglass Creek, an extirpated area, will be stocked (smolts and adults) with Catherine Creek origin salmon to initiate natural production in unseeded habitat, and to initiate future harvest opportunities. The current production levels have been incorporated into the U.S. v. Oregon Interim Management Agreement. The purpose of this contract is to integrate Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) efforts with the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) program utilizing Lookingglass Hatchery as the primary rearing facility. BPA constructed an adult holding and spawning structure on the hatchery grounds; however, maintenance of this infrastructure was discontinued due to funding limitation and transferred to the LSRCP program in 2007. These integrated efforts focus on holding and spawning adults, rearing juveniles, fish health, and monitoring natural production (Redd counts) for Catherine Creek, Lostine River, and Upper Grande Ronde stocks.

  10. Greater Green River Basin production improvement project, Phase 1: Site characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Krystinik, L.F.; Mead, R.H.; Poe, S.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several tight, naturally-fractured, gas-productive formations in the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) in Wyoming have been exploited using conventional vertical well technology. Typically, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed in completing these wells to increase gas production rates to economic levels. However, with the maturation of horizontal drilling technology hydraulic fracture treatments may not be the most effective method for improving gas production from these tight reservoirs. Two of the most prolific tight gas reservoirs in the Green River Basin, the Frontier and the Mesaverde, are candidates for the application of horizontal well completion technology. The objective of the proposed project is to apply the DOE`s technical concept to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift. Previous industry attempts to produce in commercial quantities from the Second Frontier Formation have been hampered by lack of understanding of both the in-situ natural fracture system and lack of adequate stimulation treatments. The proposed technical approach involves drilling a vertical characterization well to the Second Frontier Formation at a depth of approximately 16,000 ft. from a site located about 18 miles northwest of Rock Springs, Wyoming. Logging, coring, and well testing information from the vertical well will be used to design a hydraulic fracturing treatment and to assess the resulting production performance. Data from the vertical drilling phase will be used to design a 2,500 to 3,000-ft lateral wellbore which will be kicked off from the vertical hole and extend into the blanket marine sandstone bench of the Second Frontier Formation. The trajectory of this wellbore will be designed to intersect the maximum number of natural fractures to maximize production rates. Production testing of the resulting completion will provide an assessment of reserve potential related to horizontal lateral completions.

  11. The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty [Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

    2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The UBNPMEP is coordinated with two Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) research projects that also monitor and evaluate the success of the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. This project deals with the natural production component of the plan, and the ODFW projects evaluate hatchery operations (project No. 1990-005-00, Umatilla Hatchery M & E) and smolt outmigration (project No. 1989-024-01, Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River). Collectively these three projects monitor and evaluate natural and hatchery salmonid production in the Umatilla River Basin. The need for natural production monitoring has been identified in multiple planning documents including Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Volume I, 5b-13 (CRITFC 1996), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), the Umatilla Basin Annual Operation Plan, the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (CTUIR & ODFW 2001), the Subbasin Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 2004), and the Comprehensive Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 2006). Natural production monitoring and evaluation is also consistent with Section III, Basinwide Provisions, Strategy 9 of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, NPCC 2004). The Umatilla Basin M&E plan developed along with efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), and enhance summer steelhead (O. mykiss). The need for restoration began with agricultural development in the early 1900's that extirpated salmon and reduced steelhead runs (Bureau of Reclamation, BOR 1988). The most notable development was the construction and operation of Three Mile Falls Dam (TMD) and other irrigation projects which dewatered the Umatilla River during salmon migrations. CTUIR and ODFW developed the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan to restore fisheries to the basin. The plan was completed in 1990 and included the following objectives which were updated in 1999: (1) Establish hatchery and natural runs of Chinook and coho salmon. (2) Enhance existing summer steelhead populations through a hatchery program. (3) Provide sustainable tribal and non-tribal harvest of salmon and steelhead. (4) Maintain the genetic characteristics of salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. (5) Increase annual returns to Three Mile Falls Dam to 31,500 adult salmon and steelhead. In the past the M&E project conducted long-term monitoring activities as well as two and three-year projects that address special needs for adaptive management. Examples of these projects include adult passage evaluations, habitat assessment surveys (Contor et al. 1995, Contor et al. 1996, Contor et al. 1997, Contor et al. 1998), and genetic monitoring (Currens & Schreck 1995, Narum et al. 2004). The project's goal is to provide quality information to managers and researchers working to restore anadromous salmonids to the Umatilla River Basin. The status of completion of each of BPA's standardized work element was reported in 'Pisces'(March 2008) and is summarized.

  12. Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Captive Broodstock Rearing and Research, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAuley, W. Carlin; Maynard, Desmond J. (National Marine Fishereis Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1995, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) established captive broodstock programs to aid in the recovery of Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). These programs were intended to provide safety nets for Salmon and Grande Ronde River Basins spring/summer chinook salmon stocks. They also provide a basis of examining the efficacy of captive rearing and captive breeding programs as tools for recovering listed salmonid populations. In years when no or few naturally produced fish return from the sea, captive fish and their progeny can be used to maintain populations in these two Snake River Basin tributaries. The NMFS facility at Manchester, WA, provides the crucial seawater environment needed to culture anadromous salmonids during the marine phase of their life cycle. At the Manchester Research Station, the fish are cultured in 6.1m diameter circular tanks housed in a fully enclosed and secure building. The tanks are supplied with seawater that has been processed to eliminate most marine pathogens. The fish are fed a commercially prepared diet and held at densities and loading rates designed to maximize fish quality. When fish begin to mature, they are transferred to ODFW or IDFG freshwater facilities in Oregon and Idaho for final maturation. The states then release the mature fish (Idaho) or their progeny (Oregon) back into their native Snake River tributary waters in restoration efforts. In FY 2002, NMFS cultured 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, and 2000 broodyear fish at its Manchester Facility. This report addresses program activities from September 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002.

  13. Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Captive Broodstock Rearing and Research, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maynard, Desmond J.; McAuley, W. Carlin (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Resource Enhancement and Utilization, Seattle, WA)

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1995, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) established captive broodstock programs to aid in the recovery of Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). These programs are intended to provide safety nets for Salmon and Grande Ronde River Basins spring/summer chinook salmon stocks. They also provide a basis of examining the efficacy of captive rearing and captive breeding programs as tools for recovering listed salmonid populations. In years when no or few naturally produced fish return from the sea, captive fish and their progeny can be used to maintain populations in these two Snake River Basin tributaries. The NMFS facility at Manchester, WA provides the crucial seawater environment needed to culture anadromous salmonids during the marine phase of their life cycle. At the Manchester Research Station, the fish are cultured in 6.1m diameter circular tanks housed in a fully enclosed and secure building. The tanks are supplied with seawater that has been processed to eliminate most marine pathogens. The fish are fed a commercially prepared diet and held at densities and loading rates intended to maximize fish quality. When fish begin to mature, they are transferred to ODFW or IDFG freshwater facilities in Oregon and Idaho for final maturation. The states then release the mature fish (Idaho) or their progeny (Oregon) back into their native Snake River tributary waters in restoration efforts. In FY 2003, NMFS cultured 1998, 1999, 2000, and 2001 broodyear fish at its Manchester Facility. This report addresses program activities from September 1, 2002 to August 31, 2003.

  14. Armored spring-core superconducting cable and method of construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter M. (611 Montclair, College Station, TX 77840); Soika, Rainer H. (1 Hensel, #X4C, College Station, TX 77840)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) is provided. The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may include a spring-core (20), at least one superconducting strand (24) wound onto the spring-core (20), and an armored shell (22) that encases the superconducting strands (24). The spring-core (20) is generally a perforated tube that allows purge gases and cryogenic liquids to be circulated through the armored superconducting cable (12), as well as managing the internal stresses within the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12). The armored shell (22) manages the external stresses of the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) to protect the fragile superconducting strands (24). The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may also include a conductive jacket (34) formed outwardly of the armored shell (22).

  15. 2009 Spring Tuesday Seminar Series Sponsored by UPGG and IGSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    2009 Spring Tuesday Seminar Series Sponsored by UPGG and IGSP 12:30pm Room 147 Nanaline Duke 01: Ashley Chi) #12;2009 Spring Tuesday Seminar Series (cont.) Sponsored by UPGG and IGSP 12:30pm Room 147

  16. adult spring chinook: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is replaced by a quantum source. Rai, Amit 2008-01-01 171 Learning From Real Springs Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: Many springs do not obey Hooke's Law because they...

  17. CMPE 185 Spring 1998 Syllabus 1 1 Administrative details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karplus, Kevin

    CMPE 185 Spring 1998 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and time Kresge 327, MWF of the quarter, and 10% on in­class work, Karplus & Larrabee Info 1 #12; 2 Syllabus CMPE 185 Spring 1998

  18. Nonlinear springs with applications to flow regulation valves and mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, David Calvin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the application of nonlinear springs for fluid flow control valves where geometric constraints, or fabrication technologies, limit the use of available solutions. Types of existing nonlinear springs ...

  19. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Phillips, 2004)...

  20. Cuttings Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity...

  1. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995)...

  2. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995) Exploration...

  3. Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources- Pearl Hot Spring, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring, NV presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  4. Pressure Temperature Log At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Pressure Temperature Log At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Faulder, 1991) Exploration Activity...

  5. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Trainer, 1974)...

  6. Structural and stratigraphic evolution of Shira Mountains, central Ucayali Basin, Peru?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez Alvarez, Jaime Orlando

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ucayali Basin is a Peruvian sub-Andean basin that initially formed during the extensive tectonics of the Early Paleozoic. Originally, the Ucayali Basin was part of a larger basin that extended east of the current ...

  7. Modified Streamflows 1990 Level of Irrigation : Missouri, Colorado, Peace and Slave River Basin, 1928-1989.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company; United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data for monthly mean streamflows adjusted for storage change, evaporation, and irrigation, for the years 1928-1990, for the Colorado River Basin, the Missouri River Basin, the Peace River Basin, and the Slave River Basin.

  8. Geochemical Prospecting of Hydrocarbons in Frontier Basins of India* By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Kumar; D. J. Patil; G. Kalpana; C. Vishnu Vardhan

    India has 26 sedimentary basins with a basinal area of approximately 1.8x 10 6 km 2 (excluding deep waters), out of which seven are producing basins and two have proven potential. Exploration efforts in other basins, called frontier basins are in progress. These basins are characterized by varied geology, age, tectonics, and depositional environments. Hydrocarbon shows in many of these basins are known, and in few basins oil and gas have flowed in commercial /non-commercial quantities. Within the framework of India Hydrocarbon Vision 2025 and New Exploration Licensing Policy, there is a continuous increase in area under active exploration. The asset management concept with multi-disciplinary teams has created a demand for synergic application of risk-reduction technologies, including surface geochemical surveys. National Geophysical Research Institute (NGRI), Hyderabad, India has initiated/planned surface geochemical surveys composed of gas chromatographic and carbon isotopic analyses in few of the frontier basins of India. The adsorbed soil gas data in one of the basins (Saurashtra basin, Gujarat) has shown varied concentrations of CH4 to C4H10. The C1 concentration varies between 3 to 766 ppb and ??C2+, 1 to 543 ppb. This basin has thin soil cover and the Mesozoic sediments (probable source rocks) are overlain by thick cover of Deccan Traps. The scope and perspective of geochemical surveys in frontier basins of India are presented here.

  9. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Spring Chinook Master Plan, Technical Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashe, Becky L.; Concannon, Kathleen; Johnson, David B.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spring chinook salmon populations in the Imnaha and Grande Ronde rivers are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and are at high risk of extirpation. The Nez Perce Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, are co-managers of conservation/restoration programs for Imnaha and Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon that use hatchery supplementation and conventional and captive broodstock techniques. The immediate goal of these programs is to prevent extirpation and provide the potential for restoration once factors limiting production are addressed. These programs redirect production occurring under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) from mitigation to conservation and restoration. Both the Imnaha and Grande Ronde conservation/restoration programs are described in ESA Section 10 permit applications and the co-managers refer to the fish production from these programs as the Currently Permitted Program (CPP). Recently, co-managers have determined that it is impossible to produce the CPP at Lookingglass Hatchery, the LSRCP facility intended for production, and that without additional facilities, production must be cut from these conservation programs. Development of new facilities for these programs through the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program is considered a new production initiative by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) and requires a master plan. The master plan provides the NPPC, program proponents and others with the information they need to make sound decisions about whether the proposed facilities to restore salmon populations should move forward to design. This master plan describes alternatives considered to meet the facility needs of the CPP so the conservation program can be fully implemented. Co-managers considered three alternatives: modify Lookingglass Hatchery; use existing facilities elsewhere in the Basin; and use new facilities in conjunct ion with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. Each alternative was evaluated based on criteria developed for rearing fish for a conservation program. After this review, the Nez Perce Tribe determined the only alternative that meets the needs of the program is the alternative to use new facilities in conjunction with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. This is the Proposed Alternative. The Proposed Alternative would require: Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Imnaha River and modifications of the existing Gumboot facility to accommodate the Imnaha component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Lostine River to accommodate the Lostine component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; and Modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery to accommodate the Upper Grande Ronde and Catherine Creek components of the Lookingglass Hatchery production. After an extensive screening process of potential sites, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes the Marks Ranch site on the Imnaha River and the Lundquist site on the Lostine River for new facilities. Conceptual design and cost estimates of the proposed facilities are contained in this master plan. The proposed facilities on the Imnaha and Lostine rivers would be managed in conjunction with the existing adult collection and juvenile acclimation/release facilities. Because this master plan has evolved into an endeavor undertaken primarily by the Nez Perce Tribe, the focus of the document is on actions within the Imnaha and Lostine watersheds where the Nez Perce Tribe have specific co-management responsibilities. Nevertheless, modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery could make it possible to provide a quality rearing environment for the remainder of the CPP. The Nez Perce Tribe will assist co-managers in further evaluating facility needs and providing other components of the NPPC master planning process to develop a solution for the entire CPP. Although the fish production for the conservation programs is already authorized and not at issue in this master pla

  10. West Virginia Business & Economic Review, Spring 2010 1 West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia Business & Economic Review, Spring 2010 1 West Virginia Business & Economic Bureau 18 Spring 2010 #12;West Virginia Business & Economic Review, Spring 2010 West Virginia Economy Hits Bottom In 2010 Excerpt From the West Virginia Economic Outlook 2010 by George W. Hammond, Associate

  11. Torsion Spring Oscillator with Dry Friction Eugene Butikov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butikov, Eugene

    at investigation of free oscillations of a torsion spring pendulum damped by dry (Coulomb) friction. An idealizedTorsion Spring Oscillator with Dry Friction Manual Eugene Butikov Annotation. The manual includes as a prerequisite for the virtual lab "Torsion Spring Oscillator with Dry Friction." The manual includes also a set

  12. Dating The Pinto Occupation at Rogers Ridge: A Fossil Spring Site in the Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, Dennis L

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tiefort Basin, Fort Irwin, California. Salinas, CA: CoyoteBasin, Fort Irwin, California, by Dennis L. Jenkins, Appendix F. Salinas,

  13. Tectonic Evolution of the Contaya Arch Ucyali Basin, Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro Zelasco, Luis

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Contaya arch is an elongated topographic high that divides the Huallaga, Maranon and Ucayali basins in the Peruvian Amazonian plain. Its position well into the foreland basin and well inland from the main Andean thrust ...

  14. active single basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsidence histories of the Aquitaine Basin (Fig.8c) record a minor ac- celeration in subsidence. The shortening of the Australian plate adjacent to the basin is small (from 2...

  15. annapolis basin area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    geology of the Bengal Basin in relation to the regional tectonic framework and basin-fill history Geosciences Websites Summary: ; and this was followed by an increase in the...

  16. annecy basin eastern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsidence histories of the Aquitaine Basin (Fig.8c) record a minor ac- celeration in subsidence. The shortening of the Australian plate adjacent to the basin is small (from 2...

  17. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2...

  18. Tectonic Evolution of the Contaya Arch Ucyali Basin, Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro Zelasco, Luis

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Contaya arch is an elongated topographic high that divides the Huallaga, Maranon and Ucayali basins in the Peruvian Amazonian plain. Its position well into the foreland basin and well inland from the main Andean thrust belt has proven...

  19. Improved Basin Analog System to Characterize Unconventional Gas Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wenyan 1983-

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , the BASIN software is combined with PRISE in the UGRA system to estimate unconventional resource potential in frontier basins. The PRISE software contains information about the resources (conventional gas, conventional oil, shale gas, coalbed methane...

  20. K West basin isolation barrier leak rate test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehurst, R.; McCracken, K.; Papenfuss, J.N.

    1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the procedure for performing the acceptance test on the two isolation barriers being installed in K West basin. This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals.

  1. Evolution of extensional basins and basin and range topography west of Death Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodges, K. V.; McKenna, L. W.; Stock, J.; Knapp, J.; Page, L.; Sternlof, K.; Silverberg, D.; Wust, G.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TECTONICS, VOL. 8, NO. 3, PAGES 453-467, JUNE 1989 EVOLUTION OF EXTENSIONAL BASINS AND BASIN AND RANGE TOPOGRAPHY WEST OF DEATH VALLEY, CALIFORNIA K.V. Hodges, L.W. McKenna, J. Stock , J. Knapp, L. Page, K. Sternlof, D. Silverberg, G. Wrist 2... of the extensional riders in this area indicates that the sole fault dips less than 15NW beneath the Nova Formation [Hodges et al., 1989]. Detailed mapping of the structurally lowest portions of the Nova Basin south of Panamint Butte (Figure 2; K.V. Hodges...

  2. Simplified vibratory characterization of alluvial basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semblat, Jean-Franois; Duval, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the analysis of seismic wave amplification, modal methods are interesting tools to study the modal properties of geological structures. Modal approaches mainly lead to information on such parameters as fundamental frequencies and eigenmodes of alluvial basins. For a specific alluvial deposit in Nice (France), a simplified modal approach involving the Rayleigh method is considered. This approach assumes a set of admissible shape functions for the eigenmodes and allows a fast estimation of the fundamental frequency of the basin. The agreement between modal numerical results and experimental ones is satisfactory. The simplified modal method then appears as an efficient mean for the global vibratory characterization of geological structures towards resonance.

  3. Atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Humphreys, M.; Smosna, R.A.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This regional study of gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin has four main objectives: to organize all of the -as reservoirs in the Appalachian basin into unique plays based on common age, lithology, trap type and other geologic similarities; to write, illustrate and publish an atlas of major gas plays; to prepare and submit a digital data base of geologic, engineering and reservoir parameters for each gas field; and technology transfer to the oil and gas industry during the preparation of the atlas and data base.

  4. NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

  5. Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

    Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway A. SOUCHE*, M. DABROWSKI AND T. B. ANDERSEN Physics of Geological Processes (PGP), University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway basins of western Norway are examples of supradetachment basins that formed in the hanging wall

  6. Exploring Geophyte Use in the Northern Great Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Wild Onion & Balsamroot Gambel Oak Pinyon Pine Salina Wild Rye Sunflower Seed Great Basin Rye IndianExploring Geophyte Use in the Northern Great Basin: nutrient content, handling costs, effects of human settlement, subsistence, and sociopolitical change in Basin/Plateau #12;Problems Geophytes

  7. Spring 2012 Mobile Learning Scholars Assessment Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    is an immersive semester of exploration focused on leveraging mobile learning strategies to achieve course goals and on student learning. During the Spring 2012 semester, two cohorts of faculty were supported. Each faculty of the experience was assessed in the following ways: a) students enrolled in these mLearning courses were surveyed

  8. Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Spring 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Spring 2009 Future of Forestry in the Pacific Northwest May, College of Forest Resources Session 1: The Future of Forestry in the Pacific Northwest "The Future of Forestry in the Pacific Northwest" Bruce Bare "Markets Happen: The value of diversifying markets" Ivan

  9. DEAN'S LIST HONORABLE MENTION Spring Semester 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    DEAN'S LIST HONORABLE MENTION Spring Semester 2010 Brown, Skyler Joseph Budinoff, Hannah D. Buzimkic, Ena Campbell, Jesse Alexander Campbell, Jonathan A. Carlotto, Colleen R. Carvallo, Francisco Cureton, David Wayne Davis, Trent Wilford Davis, Wyatt Joseph DeRosa, Sean Edward Dettmer, Lance D. Dixit

  10. Revised Spring 2008 NIH Public Access Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised Spring 2008 NIH Public Access Policy Notice Number: NOT-OD-08-033 - (See Notice NOT-OD-08-161 (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008), the NIH voluntary Public Access Policy (NOT-OD-05-022) is now mandatory shall implement the public access policy in a manner consistent with copyright law. Specifics 1. The NIH

  11. ECE 6050 ADVANCED MICROPROCESSOR APPLICATIONS SPRING 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grantner, Janos L.

    ECE 6050 ADVANCED MICROPROCESSOR APPLICATIONS SPRING 2012 Instructor: Dr. Janos Grantner Office The objective of this course is to survey current microprocessors and to discuss various aspects of memory and in microprocessor/microcontroller systems design. Though some software topics will also be covered, the primary

  12. Internship Administration (Policy effective Spring 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Internship Administration (Policy effective Spring 2013) The purpose of this policy is to provide or repository for both non-credit and credit bearing internships. Employers and organizations wishing to post an internship opportunity have the option to contact the Career Center and indicate their interest in a Siena

  13. GIS Analysis GIS 6116 -Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    ). Geospatial Analysis (4th ed.). Leicester: Matador. Available online at httpGIS Analysis GIS 6116 - Spring 2015 School of Forest Resources and Conservation Geomatics Program _______________________________________________________________________________________ 1 GIS 6116 (GIS Analysis) INSTRUCTORS: Dr. Hartwig Henry Hochmair (FLREC Fort Lauderdale) Dr. Amr

  14. Quantitative Methods of Policy Analysis Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    ENVS 5120 Quantitative Methods of Policy Analysis Spring 2013 Lecture: M/W 5:00-6:15pm Class. Some of these practical skill sets include: basic research design, cost-benefit analysis, risk and skill sets that are commonly used in the professional world of policymaking and policy analysis. Some

  15. Power Systems Analysis ELEN4511 Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavaei, Javad

    Power Systems Analysis ELEN4511 Spring 2013 Project Paper: Communication Systems and Standards along the power grid. The grid comprised solely of electro- mechanical systems that could of communication systems on the power grid enables devices to communicate more efficiently, and also allows

  16. EEL 6591: Wireless Networks Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latchman, Haniph A.

    EEL 6591: Wireless Networks Spring 2014 Instructor: Professor Yuguang "Michael" Fang Contact: 435-Hall, 2002. References: 1. Broadband Wireless Multimedia Networks by Benny Bing, John Wiley, 2013. 2. Wireless and Mobile Network Architecture by Yi-Bing Lin and Imrich Chlamtac, John Wiley & Sons, 2000. 3

  17. Soil and Water Conservation Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of agricultural soil drainage on them. Define water harvesting and give examples. #12;2 Basic Course1 SWS 4233 Soil and Water Conservation 3 Credits Spring 2014 Instructor Susan Curry scurry resources: soil and water. Topics discussed include: Soil/water resources, historical erosions and sediment

  18. Soil and Water Conservation Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    on them. Define water harvesting and give examples. #12;Basic Course Requirements: 1. Exams consistSWS 4233 Soil and Water Conservation Spring 2014 Instructor Susan Curry scurry@ufl.edu 352 most valuable and most mistreated resources: soil and water. Topics discussed include: Soil/water

  19. Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist ­ Spring 2006 Computer Science Courses Course Gr. Sem. Comments CSE 113 Foundations of Computer Science I CSE 114 Computer Science I [prerequisite: CSE 110] CSE 213 Foundations of Computer Science II CSE 214 Computer Science II CSE 219 Computer Science

  20. 2012 WOMEN'S SOCCER Spring/Summer Clinics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    2012 WOMEN'S SOCCER Spring/Summer Clinics This clinic is designed for high school student. At the end of the clinic, our hope is that you will have gained technical and tactical awareness that is essential to play college soccer. The ultimate goal of the clinic is that you will gain a better

  1. OkanoganRiver SpringChinookSalmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency/Operator: Watershed and Region: Date Submitted: Date Last Updated: NOTE Chinook Above Wells Dam Table 3. Tribal Incidental Take Thresholds for ESA-Listed 44 Upper Columbia River Steelhead Table 4. Tribal & Recreational Incidental Take Thresholds 45 for Unmarked Spring Chinook Table 5

  2. SPRING 2013 OU/SPC CAREER EXPERIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPRING 2013 OU/SPC CAREER EXPERIENCE PROGRAM The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) and the OU School will spend between 8-10 hrs per week at the SPC working on a research project related to U.S. severe weather through this program. The student will also have the opportunity to spend time in the SPC operations area

  3. SPRING 2012 OU/SPC CAREER EXPERIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPRING 2012 OU/SPC CAREER EXPERIENCE PROGRAM The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) and the OU School will spend between 8-10 hrs per week at the SPC working on a research project related to U.S. severe weather through this program. The student will also will have the opportunity to spend several days in the SPC

  4. Neutrinoless Double Phys 135c Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golwala, Sunil

    Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Phys 135c Spring 2007 Michael Mendenhall #12;Theory Overview #12 beta decays #12;neutrinoless double beta decays n e- p beta decay e #12;neutrinoless double beta decays n e- p beta decay e n e- p n e- p double beta decay e e #12;neutrinoless double beta decays n e- p

  5. Falconer Natural History 2010* Spring Lecture Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsley, Braddock K.

    is in the process of evaluating potential environmental impacts of horizontal drilling and high-volume hydraulic of the potential adverse impacts identified in a draft supplemental generic environmental impact statementFalconer Natural History 2010* Spring Lecture Series Sponsored by the Atmospheric Sciences Research

  6. Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Tutors Spring 2012 (All arrangements are solely between.axelrod@mail.utexas.edu Organic Chemistry Chris Bates chrismbates@gmail.com General Chemistry Lecture/Lab Organic Chemistry Amy Bonaparte abonaparte@mail.utexas.edu General and Organic Chemistry Shelly Casciato slcasciato

  7. Chemistry 106X -Spring 2011 General Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    Chemistry 106X - Spring 2011 General Chemistry Instructor: Christopher Iceman Class: MWF 1 and can be purchased in the UAF bookstore or elsewhere: Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed for Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. (1 or 2 semester) TurningPoint Technologies ResponseCard RF

  8. DEAN'S LIST HONORABLE MENTION Spring Semester 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    DEAN'S LIST HONORABLE MENTION Spring Semester 2014 Congratulations to these students for earning Joseph Ding, Yawei Dow, Luz M. Dzul Karnain, Ahmad Ariff Eddy, Steven Kyle Edwards, Corey Taylor Ellis Emelien Hailwood, Michael Dean Hall, Peter W. Hatch, Brent Lane Haubert, Ian A. Hernandez, Luis Leonardo

  9. OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY VOLUME 32 SPRING 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Kim

    OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY LAW REVIEW VOLUME 32 SPRING 2007 SPEECH NUMBER 1 UNPOPULAR PRIVACY numbers for their clients;2 (3) decisional intrusions, * This speech was given at Oklahoma City University as the Quinlain Lecture at the Oklahoma City University School of Law. 1. See, e.g., Plaxico v. Michael, 735 So. 2

  10. CNR GRADUATION SURVEY RESULTS Spring, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management (19 graduates): 5 are looking for work 1 is taking time off 1 is planning to attend grad schoolCNR GRADUATION SURVEY RESULTS Spring, 2000 Received 131 completed surveys at graduation in May are looking for work 0 are taking time off 0 are planning to attend grad school 4 have found employment

  11. Introduction to Statistical Linear Models Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of multivariate data and in the language of matrices and vectors. Broad introduction to MATLAB/Octave, R (SSyllabus Introduction to Statistical Linear Models 960:577:01 Spring 2005 Instructor: Farid Statistical Analysis" Fifth edition, Prentice Hall, 2002. Other sources may be required and will be posted

  12. PY313: Modern Physics Spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    PY313: Modern Physics Spring 2012 Instructor and Class Information Instructor: Prof. Peter A. Zink: Physics 313 will examine the development of modern physics leading up to and including quantum mechanics for producing well-organized and clearly written engineering reports. Required Textbooks Modern Physics

  13. METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2011 Instructor Dr. Kelvin K. Droegemeier Office: Three, 1:00 2:30 pm Required Text Markowski, P. and Y. Richardson: Mesoscale Meteorology in Midlatitudes and physical analysis techniques to mesoscale phenomena. Topics include definition of the term "mesoscale

  14. ATS 641: Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATS 641: Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2014 TR, 1:00-2:50 PM, ATS Room 101 Course Description and Prerequisites This course will cover the theory and application of mesoscale meteorology, and how mesoscale, students will be able to: Describe the basic theories describing mesoscale weather phenomena Understand

  15. METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2013 Instructor Dr. Kelvin K. Droegemeier (kkd Text Markowski, P. and Y. Richardson: Mesoscale Meteorology in Midlatitudes. Wiley-Blackwell, 430pp to mesoscale phenomena. Topics include definition of the term "mesoscale," radar principles and interpretation

  16. ECE 2100 Circuit Analysis Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Damon A.

    ECE 2100 Circuit Analysis Spring 2011 Exam #1 NAME analysis. #12; 2011 Damon A. Miller Schematics drawn using LTspice IV (linear.com). Some problems might Schematics drawn using LTspice IV (linear.com). Some problems might be adapted from the course text

  17. Math 566: Axiomatic Set Theory Spring 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basic Set Theory Definition (Axiom of Choice (AC)). If F is a family of non-empty sets, then thereMath 566: Axiomatic Set Theory Spring 2009 Professor: Simon Thomas Note-taker: Jay Williams #12;Contents 1 Basic Set Theory 3 1.1 The ordinals

  18. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  19. Basin analog approach answers characterization challenges of unconventional gas potential in frontier basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Kalwant

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To continue increasing the energy supply to meet global demand in the coming decades, the energy industry needs creative thinking that leads to the development of new energy sources. Unconventional gas resources, especially those in frontier basins...

  20. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the second in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2003. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2002) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. Each chapter of this report deals with monitoring phenotypic and demographic traits of Yakima River basin spring chinook comparing hatchery and wild returns in 2002; the second year of adult hatchery returns. The first chapter deals specifically with adult traits of American River, Naches basin (excluding the American River), and upper Yakima River spring chinook, excluding gametes. The second chapter examines the gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish. In the third chapter, we describe work begun initially in 2002 to characterize and compare redds of naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River.

  1. Basin Approach to Address Bacterial Impairments in Basins 15, 16, and 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Brown, M.; Hein, K.; Skow, K.; Engling, A.; Wagner, K.; Berthold, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), the population throughout the Matagorda Bay watershed are generally rural with dispersed cities. In Basin 15 the two major cities are El Campo and Palacios with a total basin population of 58,682. This produces a population density of approximately 61... between 2010 and 2050 with the exception of Lavaca and Fayette counties. The cities of Palacios, El Campo, Flatonia, Schulenburg, Shiner, Hallettsville, Yoakum, Edna, Victoria, and Port Lavaca, all located within the Matagorda Bay watershed...

  2. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ventilation rate'' of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  3. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ``ventilation rate`` of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  4. Summary status of K Basins sludge characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, R.B.

    1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of activities are underway as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project (SNFP) related to the processing and disposing of sludge in the 105-K Basins (K Basins). Efforts to rigorously define data requirements for these activities are being made using the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process. Summaries of current sludge characterization data are required to both help support this DQO process and to allow continued progress with on-going engineering activities (e.g., evaluations of disposal alternatives). This document provides the status of K Basins sludge characterization data currently available to the Nuclear Fuel Evaluations group. This group is tasked by the SNFP to help develop and maintain the characterization baseline for the K Basins. The specific objectives of this document are to: (1) provide a current summary (and set of references) of sludge characterization data for use by SNFP initiatives, to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort and to support on-going initiatives; (2) submit these data to an open forum for review and comment, and identify additional sources of significant data that may be available; (3) provide a summary of current data to use as part of the basis to develop requirements for additional sludge characterization data through the DQO process; (4) provide an overview of the intended activities that will be used to develop and maintain the sludge characterization baseline.

  5. Introduction THE PALEOPROTEROZOIC Thelon basin, Northwest Territo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiatt, Eric E.

    Geological Evolution and Exploration Geochemistry of the Boomerang Lake Unconformity-type Uranium Prospect a prospective target for uranium exploration. The potential of the western Thelon basin at Boomerang Lake, remains underexplored for uncon- formity-related uranium deposits despite geological similari- ties

  6. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage characteristics for management purposes and also travel time and survival analyses. These analyses showed consistent significant relationships between flow and spill percent versus survival for Steelhead in each reach analyzed. These results point to the importance of maintain high flows and spill for steelhead survival through the hydrosystem. A significant relation between either travel time or spill percent and survival for yearling Chinook was found. Given the high correlation between the variables it is not surprising that only one is retained in these models. Again the findings show the importance of flows and spill in spring Chinook survival through the hydrosystem. Survival trends in the Lower Snake River have been steadily declining for in-river migrants over the past several years with two notable exceptions. The lowest survivals were measured in 2001 when low flows and very little or no spill was provided led to poor migration conditions. Also survival increased in 2003 when Biological Opinion spill was provided despite moderate to low flows. Reach survivals in 2004 in the Snake River were the second lowest following 2001. Sub-yearling survival in the mid-Columbia in 2004 between Rock Island and McNary Dam were very low compared to other recent years. The general run-at-large migration timing of sub-yearling fall Chinook in the Snake River has changed with the increasing releases of hatchery supplementation production in the Snake River.

  7. Optimal Conventional and Semi-Natural Treatments for the Upper Yakima Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Treatment Definitions and Descriptions and Biological Specifications for Facility Design, 1995-1999 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hager, Robert C. (Hatchery Operations Consulting); Costello, Ronald J. (Mobrand Biometrics, Inc., Vashon Island, WA)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Yakima Fisheries Project facilities (Cle Elum Hatchery and acclimation satellites) which provide the mechanism to conduct state-of-the-art research for addressing questions about spring chinook supplementation strategies. The definition, descriptions, and specifications for the Yakima spring chinook supplementation program permit evaluation of alternative fish culture techniques that should yield improved methods and procedures to produce wild-like fish with higher survival that can be used to rebuild depleted spring chinook stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The definition and description of three experimental treatments, Optimal Conventional (OCT), Semi-Natural (SNT), Limited Semi-Natural (LSNT), and the biological specifications for facilities have been completed for the upper Yakima spring chinook salmon stock of the Yakima Fisheries Project. The task was performed by the Biological Specifications Work Group (BSWG) represented by Yakama Indian Nation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, and Bonneville Power Administration. The control and experimental variables of the experimental treatments (OCT, SNT, and LSNT) are described in sufficient detail to assure that the fish culture facilities will be designed and operated as a production scale laboratory to produce and test supplemented upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Product specifications of the treatment groups are proposed to serve as the generic templates for developing greater specificity for measurements of product attributes. These product specifications will be used to monitor and evaluate treatment effects, with respect to the biological response variables (post release survival, long-term fitness, reproductive success and ecological interactions).

  8. Rotational hysteresis of exchange-spring magnets.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, J.S.; Bader, S.D.; Kaper, H.; Leaf, G.K.; Shull, R.D.; Shapiro, A.J.; Gornakov, V.S.; Nikitenko, V.I.; Platt, C.L.; Berkowitz, A.E.; David, S.; Fullerton, E.E.

    2002-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We highlight our experimental studies and micromagnetic simulations of the rotational hysteresis in exchange-spring magnets. Magneto-optical imaging and torque magnetometry measurements for SmCo/Fe exchange-spring films with uniaxial in-plane anisotropy show that the magnetization rotation created in the magnetically soft Fe layer by a rotating magnetic field is hysteretic. The rotational hysteresis is due to the reversal of the chirality of the spin spiral structure. Micromagnetic simulations reveal two reversal modes of the chirality, one at low fields due to an in-plane untwisting of the spiral, and the other, at high fields, due to an out-of-plane fanning of the spiral.

  9. Spring structure for a thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Daniel T. (La Jolla, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  10. Spring structure for a thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, D.T.

    1992-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs. 7 figs.

  11. Wrap spring clutch syringe ram and frit mixer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Frank B.

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A wrap spring clutch syringe ram pushes at least one syringe with virtually instantaneous starting and stopping, and with constant motion at a defined velocity during the intervening push. The wrap spring clutch syringe ram includes an electric motor, a computer, a flywheel, a wrap spring clutch, a precision lead screw, a slide platform, and syringe reservoirs, a mixing chamber, and a reaction incubation tube. The electric motor drives a flywheel and the wrap spring clutch couples the precision lead screw to the flywheel when a computer enables a solenoid of the wrap spring clutch. The precision lead screw drives a precision slide which causes syringes to supply a portion of solution into the mixing chamber and the incubation tube. The wrap spring clutch syringe ram is designed to enable the quantitative study of solution phase chemical and biochemical reactions, particularly those reactions that occur on the subsecond time scale.

  12. Spring 07 for web.qxp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPRING NEWS ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER O f f i c e o f F o s s i l E n e r g y T N M T R A P E D O F E N E R G Y E T A T S D E T I N U S O F A M E R I C A E GEOLOGIC...

  13. Journal of Undergraduate Research, Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .................................................................................................................................. 20 Eric Rivera An analysis of electromyography as an input method for resilient and affordable systems: human-computer interfacing using the bodys electrical activity ............................................ 30 Seth Polsley Man of Tomorrow: a...Summer 2013 Spring 2014 The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status...

  14. Dose reduction improvements in storage basins of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Fan-Hsiung F.

    1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent nuclear fuel in storage basins at the Hanford Site has corroded and contaminated basin water, which has leaked into the soil; the fuel also had deposited a layer of radioactive sludge on basin floors. The SNF is to be removed from the basins to protect the nearby Columbia River. Because the radiation level is high, measures have been taken to reduce the background dose rate to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) to prevent radiation doses from becoming the limiting factor for removal of the SW in the basins to long-term dry storage. All activities of the SNF Project require application of ALARA principles for the workers. On the basis of these principles dose reduction improvements have been made by first identifying radiological sources. Principal radiological sources in the basin are basin walls, basin water, recirculation piping and equipment. Dose reduction activities focus on cleaning and coating basin walls to permit raising the water level, hydrolasing piping, and placing lead plates. In addition, the transfer bay floor will be refinished to make decontamination easier and reduce worker exposures in the radiation field. The background dose rates in the basin will be estimated before each task commences and after it is completed; these dose reduction data will provide the basis for cost benefit analysis.

  15. N Springs expedited response action proposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since signing the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) in 1989, the parties to the agreement have recognized the need to modify the approach to conducting investigations, studies, and cleanup actions at Hanford. To implement this approach, the parties have jointly developed the Hanford Past-Practice Strategy. The strategy defines a non-time-critical expedited response action (ERA) as a response action ``needed to abate a threat to human health or welfare or the environment where sufficient time exists for formal planning prior to initiation of response. In accordance with the past-practice strategy, DOE proposes to conduct an ERA at the N Springs, located in the Hanford 100 N Area, to substantially reduce the strontium-90 transport into the river through the groundwater pathway. The purpose of this ERA proposal is to provide sufficient information to select a preferred alternative at N Springs. The nature of an ERA requires that alternatives developed for the ERA be field ready; therefore, all the technologies proposed for the ERA should be capable of addressing the circumstances at N Springs. A comparison of these alternatives is made based on protectiveness, cost, technical feasibility, and institutional considerations to arrive at a preferred alternative. Following the selection of an alternative, a design phase will be conducted; the design phase will include a detailed look at design parameters, performance specifications, and costs of the selected alternative. Testing will be conducted as required to generate design data.

  16. Prof. Alexandru Suciu MTH 1230 LINEAR ALGEBRA Spring 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prof. Alexandru Suciu MTH 1230 LINEAR ALGEBRA Spring 2001 EXAM 4 1. 12 pts (a) Compute the area 4 Spring 2001 2. 7 points Let A and B be two 5 ? 5 matrices, with det A = 0 and det B = -3. (a, with eigenvalues -7 and 3, respectively. #12;MTH 1230 Exam 4 Spring 2001 4. 12 points A 4 ? 4 matrix A has

  17. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Wstern Utah hot springs: Antelope, Fish (Deadman), Fish (Wilson), Twin Peak, Cudahy, Laverkin, Grantsville, Crystal Prison,...

  18. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  19. Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  20. Trace Element Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  1. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  2. Tectonic & Structural Controls of Great Basin Geothermal Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring, NV...

  3. FUPWG Spring 2010 Meeting South Dakota: Washington Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers an update on Washington given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zacharakis, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zacharakis,...

  5. Spring 2001 Vol. 2, No. 2 ii Colorado Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Climate Spring 2001 Vol. 2, No. 2 #12;ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents Frost: Nature ...................................................................................................................................... 9 January 2001 .......................................................................................................................................................... 9 February 2001

  6. Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration: Spring 2008 Results; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Garbak, J.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference paper presented at the 2008 National Hydrogen Association Meeting that describes the spring, 2008 results of the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project.

  7. Sulphur Springs Valley EC- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sulphur Springs Valley Electric Cooperative (SSVEC) is a Touchstone Energy Cooperative. SSVEC offers the Member Loan Program to residential customers to improve the energy efficiency of eligible...

  8. Sulphur Springs Valley EC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sulphur Springs Valley Electric Cooperative (SSVEC) is a Touchstone Energy Cooperative. SSVEC's residential rebate program offers a $500 rebate for the installation of 15 SEER or higher electric...

  9. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date 1987 - 1995 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A modification of the...

  10. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Wilt & Haar, 1986)...

  11. Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capuano. 1980. Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah. In: Transactions. GRC Annual Meeting; 09091980; Salt Lake City, UT. Salt...

  12. Static Temperature Survey At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Benoit Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding...

  13. Geothermal Literature Review At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

  14. Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  15. Geologic map of the Sulphur Springs Area, Valles Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Goff,J. N. Gardner. Geologic map of the Sulphur Springs Area, Valles Caldera Geothermal System, New Mexico. Map. Place of publication not provided. Los Alamos National...

  16. Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples...

  17. ORISE: Applications being accepted for 2015 spring term of DOE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    being accepted for 2015 spring term of DOE's Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program at ORNL Students have the opportunity to perform research alongside...

  18. Colorado Springs Utilities- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Colorado Springs Utilities (CSU) Business Energy and Water Efficiency Rebate Program offers a variety of incentives to business customers who upgrade evaporative cooling, HVAC, irrigation,...

  19. Agricultural Business Curriculum (BS) (effective Spring Quarter 2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    Agricultural Business Curriculum (BS) (effective Spring Quarter 2011) Freshman year Animal Science 111............................................3 Agricultural Business 230 Sophomore Year Accounting 201...................................................3 Agricultural Business 220

  20. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Colorado School of Mines and Imperial College London, 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Neal...

  1. arctic spring site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siciliano 2010-01-01 116 UC EAP Application Deadlines Remaining Programs for Spring 15 Engineering Websites Summary: -SITE: ITALYSPAIN (MadridRome, European Transformations)...

  2. Math 13700 Mathematics for Elementary Education I Spring 2010 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rroames

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 22, 2010 ... Mathematics for Elementary Education I. Spring 2010. Coordinator: Renee Roames MATH 808 ph: 494-1929 email: rroames@purdue.edu.

  3. Math 13700 Mathematics for Elementary Education I Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    User

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematics for Elementary Education I. Spring 2015. Coordinator: Renee Figueroa. MATH 808 ph: 494-1929 email: rfigueroa@purdue.edu. Course web page:...

  4. aatb spring meeting: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    distributions. Ch 11, 13Math 130 Elementary Statistics with Computers Spring 2009 Syllabus CLASS MEETS MWF 2:10-3:00 in MDH. Sampling Distributions Binomial distribution....

  5. Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995) Exploration...

  6. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1981 - 1981 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration...

  7. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002)...

  8. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sasada & Goff, 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

  9. Walley's Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Walley's Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Walley's...

  10. Warner Springs Ranch Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warner Springs Ranch Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Warner...

  11. Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  12. Hot Springs National Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hot Springs National Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  13. Fairmont Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute of Technology's Geo-Heat Center1 Fairmont Hot Springs Resort is a Space Heating low temperature direct use geothermal facility in Fairmont, Montana. This article is...

  14. Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  15. Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  16. Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  17. Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alteration, and Fluid Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology,...

  18. Geologic Setting of the Central Alaskan Hot Springs Belt: Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sustainable Energy Production Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Thesis: Geologic Setting of the Central Alaskan Hot Springs Belt: Implications for...

  19. analysis indian springs: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the most commonENGINEERING 12 SPRING 2008 PHYSICAL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS LABORATORY 1: TRANSFORMERS Objectives or counterclockwise). In the following discussion the subscript 1 will...

  20. alkaline spring system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the most commonENGINEERING 12 SPRING 2008 PHYSICAL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS LABORATORY 1: TRANSFORMERS Objectives or counterclockwise). In the following discussion the subscript 1 will...

  1. Flow Test At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Musgrave, Et Al., 1989)...

  2. ,"Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","L...

  3. Soil Sampling At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ringrose...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ringrose & Pearl, 1981) Exploration...

  4. Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves...

  5. Hydrogeologic investigation of Coso Hot Springs, Inyo County...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for chemical analysis; determination of the local Coso Hot Springs and regional groundwater hydrology, including consideration of recharge, discharge, movement, and water...

  6. Interpretation of Water Sample Analysis, Waunita Hot Spring Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    R. H. Carpenter (Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy). 1981. Interpretation of Water Sample Analysis, Waunita Hot Spring Project,...

  7. Colorado Springs Utilities- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Colorado Springs Utilities offers a variety of energy and water efficiency incentives to its residential customers through the Residential Rebate Program. Rebates are offered for single and multi...

  8. Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson & Dellechaie, 1976)...

  9. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration...

  10. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1993 - 1994 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown...

  11. Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho...

  12. Paleomagnetic Measurements At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    London, 2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Paleomagnetic Measurements At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (London, 2011)...

  13. annual spring water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    living in vehicle Escher, Christine 9 CE475 WATER QUALITY ANALYSIS SPRING 2009 Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: 1 CE475 - WATER QUALITY...

  14. Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more a plate tectonic framework for the his- tory of the Michigan basin. INTRODUCTION The Michigan basin of the Michigan basin has led to numerous proposals for basin subsidence mechanisms, including thermal contraction

  15. WSSRAP chemical plant geotechnical investigations for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared for the United states Department of Energy (DOE) Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) by the Project Management Contractor (PMC), which consists of MK-Ferguson Company (MKF) and Morrison Knudsen Corporation Environmental Services Group (MKES) with Jacobs Engineering Group (JEG) as MKF's predesignated subcontractor. This report presents the results of site geotechnical investigations conducted by the PMC in the vicinity of the Weldon Spring chemical plant and raffinate pits (WSCP/RP) and in potential on-site and off-site clayey material borrow sources. The WSCP/RP is the proposed disposal cell (DC) site. 39 refs., 24 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. Hydrocarbon habitat of the west Netherlands basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jager, J. (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Assen (Netherlands)); Doyle, M. (Petroleum Development Oman, Muscat (Oman)); Grantham, P. (KSEPL/Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Mabillard, J. (Shell Nigeria, Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex West Netherlands Basin contains oil and gas in Triassic and Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous clastic reservoir sequences. The understanding has always been that the Carboniferous coal measures have generated only gas and the Jurassic marine Posidonia Shale only oil. However, detailed geochemical analyses show that both source rocks have generated oil and gas. Geochemical fingerprinting established a correlation of the hydrocarbons with the main source rocks. The occurrence of these different hydrocarbons is consistent with migration routes. Map-based charge modeling shows that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred prior to the Late Cretaceous inversion of the West Netherlands Basin. However, along the southwest flank of the basin and in lows between the inversion highs, significant charge continued during the Tertiary. Biodegradation of oils in Jurassic and Cretaceous reservoirs occurred during the earliest Tertiary, but only in reservoirs that were at that time at temperatures of less then 70 to 80[degrees]C, where bacteria could survive. This study shows that also in a mature hydrocarbon province an integrated hydrocarbon habitat study with modern analyses and state-of-the-art technology can lead to a much improved understanding of the distribution of oil and gas in the subsurface. The results of this study will allow a better risk assessment for remaining prospects, and an improved prediction of the type of trapped hydrocarbons in terms of gas, oil, and biodegraded oil.

  17. Exploration trends of the Sirte Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aburawi, R.M. [Waha Oil Co., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wave of intense exploration activity in the Sirte Basin began after the discovery of oil in 1958, and an enormous quantity of hydrocarbon was found in less than ten years. The oil discovery rate has been gradually declining since its peak in the 1960`s, and it is now becoming increasingly difficult and more expensive to find a new reserve. This paper is an attempt to discuss briefly the past exploration cycle, to indicate the present position and to predict the future trend of our activities in the Sirte Basin. The past exploration activities in the Sirte Basin were concentrated along the particular geological trends where the possibilities of finding more reserves are now drastically reduced. Therefore, for the future healthy exploration activities, new ideas are needed to bring about some new favourable areas under further investigation. A new cycle of exploration success will emerge if our exploratory efforts are purposely directed towards the stratigraphic, stratrigraphic/structural traps and subtle type traps, along the migrational pathways and deep plays in the potential oil generative areas.

  18. Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to compare dam passage survival, at two spill treatment levels, of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during spring 2010. The two treatments were 30% and 40% spill out of total project discharge. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. However, by agreement among the stakeholders, this study was not an official BiOp compliance test because the long-term passage measures at John Day Dam have yet to be finalized and another year of spill-treatment testing was desired.

  19. Onset of basin development in the Black Warrior Basin: Evidence from echinoderm biostratigraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, J.A. (West Georgia Coll., Carrollton, GA (United States). Dept. of Geology); Maples, C.G. (Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many echinoderm taxa have limited temporal ranges and are potentially significant regional index fossils. Echinoderm endemism and size have limited the utility of echinoderms in biostratigraphy, but in particular situations, echinoderm biostratigraphy has provided the key to timing of geological events. One example is the timing of the onset of basin development in the Black Warrior Basin (BWB), a major Carboniferous foreland basin in Alabama and Mississippi. Physical stratigraphy indicates that basinal development in the BWB began some time during or after deposition of the Tuscumbia Limestone (TL). The TL was deposited on a broad carbonate platform on the southern passive margin of North America. In the BWB, the TL is overlain by the Pride Mountain Formation (PMF), which is a mixed siliciclastic/carbonate unit that prograded into the basin from the west. Northeast of the BWB, on the Warrior platform, the TL is Monteagle Limestone and the PMF have been difficult owing to the lack of biostratigraphic acuity in rocks of this age, which has resulted in mistaken time stratigraphic relationships between the units. The authors have collected echinoderms in the basal limestones in the PMF, which indicates a Gasperian age for all but the lowest 30 cm of the PMF. The Genevievian apparently was a time of nondeposition in the BWB because this lowermost 30 cm of PMF is temporally equivalent to tens of meters of carbonates rocks in the Monteagle Limestone on the Warrior platform. Therefore, the onset of foreland basin development in the BWB can be constrained to early during the Genevievian Stage.

  20. K basins interim remedial action health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAY, P.T.

    1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The K Basins Interim Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan addresses the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as they apply to the CERCLA work that will take place at the K East and K West Basins. The provisions of this plan become effective on the date the US Environmental Protection Agency issues the Record of Decision for the K Basins Interim Remedial Action, currently planned in late August 1999.

  1. Water Clarity Simulant for K East Basin Filtration Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a simulant formulation intended to mimic the behavior of the suspended solids in the K East (KE) Basin fuel storage pool. The simulant will be used to evaluate alternative filtration apparatus to improve Basin water clarity and to possibly replace the existing sandfilter. The simulant was formulated based on the simulant objectives, the key identified parameters important to filtration, the composition and character of the KE Basin suspended sludge particles, and consideration of properties of surrogate materials.

  2. NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

  3. INTEGRATED BASIN ANALYSIS OF THE MARCELLUS FORMATION IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slingerland, Rudy

    . of the Appalachian Basin requires accurate knowledge of their sedimentological, geochemical, and geomechanical performance is to first quantitatively relate gas content and geomechanical and petrophysical rock

  4. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

  5. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

  6. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. W. Pritchett...

  7. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

  8. atlantic basin etude: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rifian Corridor Utrecht, Universiteit 7 Prediction of Seasonal Atlantic Basin Accumulated Cyclone Energy from 1 July PHILIP J. KLOTZBACH Geosciences Websites Summary: Prediction of...

  9. analogs permian basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Reservoir-analog Modeling of Upper Miocene Shallow-water and Deep-water Carbonate Deposits: Agua Amarga Basin, Southeast Spain. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  10. athabasca basin western: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Von P. 9 Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway Geosciences Websites Summary: . DABROWSKI AND T. B. ANDERSEN Physics of Geological...

  11. appalachian basin exploration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary...

  12. athabasca basin canada: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (more) Stewart, Paul C. 2015-01-01 2 The Dispersion of Radon Above Deeply Buried Uranium Ore: Millennium Deposit, Athabasca Basin, SK , K Hattori1 Geosciences Websites...

  13. alluvial basin numerical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boyer, Edmond 487 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic...

  14. artesian basins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 181 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic...

  15. anoxic basin mariager: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boyer, Edmond 215 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic...

  16. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  17. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  18. Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, John

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final technical report for the Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project, outlining the technical aspects of the User Group System.

  19. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    August 2012 Review of Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Found Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack Operations This report provides the results of an independent oversight...

  20. appalachian basin gas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the Danis A. Wiloso; Eddy A. Subroto; Eddy Hermanto 2009-01-01 102 Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Canyon sandstones, Central Midland Basin, Texas Texas...

  1. Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  2. Numerical Modeling of Transient Basin and Range Extensional Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    behavior of basin and range extensionalgeothermal systems, and particularly, the evolution ofthe system temperature with time. Each modelconsists of two mountain ranges (1 km...

  3. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  4. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  5. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of A Tectonic Geomorphology Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Great Basin, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeographic...

  6. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  7. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  8. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of A Tectonic Geomorphology Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Great Basin, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeographic...

  9. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana (fig. PQ-1) is considered to be "clean coal." For the location

  10. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional...

  11. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional...

  12. M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

  13. M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

  14. Cold test data for equipment acceptance into 105-KE Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Packer, M.J.

    1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides acceptance testing of equipment to be installed in the 105-KE Basin for pumping sludge to support the discharge chute barrier doors installation.

  15. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

  16. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

  17. ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

  18. Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Abstract Utilizing commercial mine blasts and local earthquakes, as well as a dense...

  19. GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

  20. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to provide a comprehensive geologic analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  1. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to provide a comprehensive geologic analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  2. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    1997-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to provide a comprehensive geologic analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  3. Western gas sands project. Quarterly basin activities report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing operations in the four primary study areas of the WESP for this period. Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Piceance Basin, and Uinta Basin. (DLC)

  4. Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing activities in the four primary study areas of the WGSP: Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Uinta Basin, and Piceance Basin. (DLC)

  5. SPRING SEMESTER GENERAL FACULTY MEETING March 5, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    MINUTES SPRING SEMESTER GENERAL FACULTY MEETING March 5, 2001 The Spring General Faculty meeting was convened by President Grube on March 5, 2001, at 4:00 p.m., in the Russell Union Ballroom. The agenda was approved as distributed. The minutes of the November 9, 2001, meeting which were distributed on January 3

  6. BREAK HOUSING HALLS NOTICE FOR SPRING SEMESTER HOUSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    BREAK HOUSING HALLS NOTICE FOR SPRING SEMESTER HOUSING BRETT | LEWIS | PRINCE | CASHIN NORTH AREA APARTMENTS #12;If you are cancelling your Break Housing assignment for the spring semester, you have two will receive a $100 refund of the Break Housing fee to your fall Bursar account. 2. If you remain beyond 6:00pm

  7. Preliminary geothermal investigations at Manley Hot Springs, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    East, J.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manley Hot Springs is one of several hot springs which form a belt extending from the Seward Peninsula to east-central Alaska. All of the hot springs are low-temperature, water-dominated geothermal systems, having formed as the result of circulation of meteoric water along deepseated fractures near or within granitic intrusives. Shallow, thermally disturbed ground at Manley Hot Springs constitutes an area of 1.2 km by 0.6 km along the lower slopes of Bean Ridge on the north side of the Tanana Valley. This area includes 32 springs and seeps and one warm (29.1/sup 0/C) well. The hottest springs range in temperature from 61/sup 0/ to 47/sup 0/C and are presently utilized for space heating and irrigation. This study was designed to characterize the geothermal system present at Manley Hot Springs and delineate likely sites for geothermal drilling. Several surveys were conducted over a grid system which included shallow ground temperature, helium soil gas, mercury soil and resistivity surveys. In addition, a reconnaissance ground temperature survey and water chemistry sampling program was undertaken. The preliminary results, including some preliminary water chemistry, show that shallow hydrothermal activity can be delineated by many of the surveys. Three localities are targeted as likely geothermal well sites, and a model is proposed for the geothermal system at Manley Hot Springs.

  8. RMI 357e spring 2012 Introduction to Risk Management & Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    RMI 357e spring 2012 1 Introduction to Risk Management & Insurance R M 357e Professor: Olga Trofimova Olga.trofimova@utexas.edu Syllabus spring 2012 Textbook Principles of Risk Management Management: 357E. Introduction to Risk Management - Upper-Division Course Principles of risk management

  9. ABET Course Syllabus Spring 2011 EC402 Control Systems Elective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Schedule: LEC: 4 hrs/week (MW 4-6), LAB: (TBA) Textbooks: "Modern Control Systems", 12 th edition, by DorfABET Course Syllabus Spring 2011 EC402 Control Systems Elective Spring 2011 Catalog Data-Hurwitz, root-locus, Bode, and Nyquist techniques. Design and compensation of feedback control systems. Course

  10. Chemistry climate model simulations of1 spring Antarctic ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Chemistry climate model simulations of1 spring Antarctic ozone 1234567 89A64BC7DEF72B4 19B34EE3293C climate model simulations of spring Antarctic ozone John Austin,1,2 H. Struthers,3 J. Scinocca,4 D. A) and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change A1b Scenario. The simulations of the Antarctic ozone hole are compared

  11. Course Enrollment by College -Census West Lafayette -Spring 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    Course Enrollment by College - Census West Lafayette - Spring 2009 Freeze Date: Jan 28, 2009 Enrollment by College - Census West Lafayette - Spring 2009 Freeze Date: Jan 28, 2009 College Enrollment 01 & Meat Mrkt 6 2 15 4 8 35 AGEC42200 Technical Price Anly 6 2 15 3 8 34 AGEC42600 Mkt Mgt Agr Bus 3 7 23 4

  12. Course Enrollment by College -Census West Lafayette -Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Course Enrollment by College - Census West Lafayette - Spring 2011 Freeze Date: Jan 25, 2011 Enrollment by College - Census West Lafayette - Spring 2011 Freeze Date: Jan 25, 2011 College Enrollment 01 & Meat Mrkt 1 4 13 6 17 41 AGEC42200 Technical Price Anly 1 3 10 4 16 34 AGEC42400 Finan Mgt Agr Bus 9 27

  13. Course Enrollment by College -Census West Lafayette -Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    Course Enrollment by College - Census West Lafayette - Spring 2010 Freeze Date: Jan 26, 2010 by College - Census West Lafayette - Spring 2010 Freeze Date: Jan 26, 2010 College Enrollment 01 02 03 04 05 7 3 16 13 21 63 AGEC41200 Farm Business Mgmt 3 8 11 AGEC42100 Livestock & Meat Mrkt 1 1 3 15 7 15 42

  14. CSCI 480 Computer Graphics, Spring 2011 Administrative Matters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    CSCI 480 Computer Graphics, Spring 2011 Administrative Matters Spring 2011, Mon and Wed, 10 24 Transformations Ch 4 Wed Jan 26 Viewing and Projection Ch 5 Mon Jan 31 Hierarchical Modeling Ch 10, Publisher: Addison Wesley, ISBN: 9780321535863 Dave Shreiner: OpenGL Programming Guide: The Official Guide

  15. FOR341 Timber Harvesting and Forest Roads Spring 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    FOR341 Timber Harvesting and Forest Roads Spring 2009 Instructor: Beth Dodson Office: FOR 201A Text: Water Quality BMPs (Best Management Practices) for Montana Forests Other readings as assigned (available in class folder: R:\\Classes\\Spring2009\\FOR341) Course Description: An overview of harvesting

  16. IN A CUREUF HEALTH CANCER CENTER NEWS SPRING 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    care and research for the Southeast's most comprehensive academic health center. In each issue, weIN A CUREUF HEALTH CANCER CENTER NEWS Believe SPRING 2014 PAGE6 #12;www.cancer.ufl.eduBelieve in a Cure//Spring 20142 Believe in a Cure is the newsletter for the UF Health Cancer Center, home to cancer

  17. 1. Williams Shop 15 Spring St., 413-458-3605

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    Spring St., 413-458-8321 8. Nature's Closet 61 Spring St., 413-458-7909 9. Sweets and Beans Confieserie & Vines Beer Garden & Brasserie 16 Water St., 413-884-1372 31. Amy's Cottage 24 Water St., 413-458-4305 32. Water Street Books 26 Water St., 413-458-8072 33. In Touch Massage & Day Spa 84 Water St., 413

  18. ENVS 340: Topics in Pollution: Gulf Oil Spill Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVS 340: Topics in Pollution: Gulf Oil Spill Spring 2011 ENVS 340 Topics in Pollution: Gulf Oil Oil Spill based on scientific research. Our report is due ~May 8. Our first goal is to determine with their instructors as soon as possible to discuss their needs. #12;ENVS 340/BIOL 378: Topics in Pollution Spring 2011

  19. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - Spring 1994 UAV IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization DiversityPolarizationgovCampaignsSmall Particles ingovCampaignsSpring

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - Spring Cloud IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization DiversityPolarizationgovCampaignsSmall ParticlesSCM IOPgovCampaignsSpring

  2. Summary of the Spring 2004 ASA Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14TableConference |6:Welcome to the of the Spring

  3. Wilbur Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJumpGoogleAreaMapUtilityRateEntryHelperVideoVimeoWilbur Springs

  4. Okpilak Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and Gas CompanyOklahoma/WindOkpilak Springs

  5. Granite Springs Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County,Texas: EnergyOhio:GeothermalSprings

  6. Spring, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,Southeast ColoradoOhio: EnergyIndiana:New York: EnergySpring,

  7. SpringWorks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,Southeast ColoradoOhio: EnergyIndiana:New York:SpringWorks Jump

  8. Spring Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCity Corp JumpsourceSouthlake,AeHJump to:Spring Canyon

  9. Silver Spring Networks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AGShandongShirkeSichuanSilicon RecyclingSilver Spring

  10. Geothermal resource assessment of Idaho Springs, Colorado. Resource series 16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Repplier, F.N.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Located in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains approximately 30 miles west of Denver, in the community of Idaho Springs, are a series of thermal springs and wells. The temperature of these waters ranges from a low of 68/sup 0/F (20/sup 0/C) to a high of 127/sup 0/F (53/sup 0/C). To define the hydrothermal conditions of the Idaho Springs region in 1980, an investigation consisting of electrical geophysical surveys, soil mercury geochemical surveys, and reconnaissance geological and hydrogeological investigations was made. Due to topographic and cultural restrictions, the investigation was limited to the immediate area surrounding the thermal springs at the Indian Springs Resort. The bedrock of the region is faulted and fractured metamorphosed Precambrian gneisses and schists, locally intruded by Tertiary age plutons and dikes. The investigation showed that the thermal waters most likely are fault controlled and the thermal area does not have a large areal extent.

  11. Sandstone-carbonate cycles in Tensleep Formation, eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittersbacher, D.J.; Wheeler, D.M.; Horne, J.C.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Outcrop and core study of the Tensleep Formation in the eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin has revealed cyclic deposits of eolian sandstone and marine carbonate. These cycles, several meters to tens of meters thick, represent the rise and fall of sea level on the Wyoming shelf during Pennsylvanian and Early Permian time. Falling sea level was marked by development of a sharp scour surface at the base of each cycle and progradation of eolian dunes over an exposed, shallow carbonate shelf. Subsequent sea level rise resulted in the reworking of eolian sand through wave activity and burrowing organisms. Subtidal carbonates overlies the reworked eolian sands and are sandy at the base, grading upward into fossiliferous dolomite mudstones to wackestones. The sharp scour surface, normally present directly on the subtidal carbonates, indicates that erosion eliminated any regressive marine deposits by deflation to the ground-water table during shoreline progradation or by deflation related to abrupt drop in sea level. Relative sea level changes on the low-relief Wyoming shelf affected large areas during Tensleep deposition. This resulted in widespread sandstone-carbonate cycles that provide the basis for regional correlations of the Tensleep Formation throughout the eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin.

  12. 8 River Basin Closure and Institutional Change in Mexico's LermaChapala Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    for irrigation expansion, and the drilling of new wells and the construction of new dams has been prohibited. Moreover, water pollution is serious, with significant wastewater reuse for irrigation within the basin. Lastly, water is being transferred from agriculture to the urban and industrial sectors, without due

  13. Famennian microbial reef facies, Napier and Oscar Ranges, Canning Basin, western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, N P; Sumner, Dawn Y.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geol. Rundsch. , Western Australia: Geologic Maps of theof the Canning basin, Western Australia. West. Aust. Geol.the Canning Basin, Western Australia. In: Stromatolites (Ed.

  14. National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants application for approval to stabilize the 105N Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces-to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin is a reinforced unlined concrete structure 150 feet long, 50 feet wide, and 24 feet deep. The basin is segregated into seven areas sharing a common pool of water; the Discharge/Viewing (``D``) Pit, the fuel segregation pit (including a water tunnel that connects the ``D`` pit and segregation pit), two storage basins designated as North Basin and South Basin, two cask load-out pits, and a fuel examination area. The North Basin floor is entirely covered and the South Basin is partly covered by a modular array of cubicles formed by boron concrete posts and boron concrete panels.

  15. San Juan Basin EC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasin EC Jump to: navigation, search NEPA

  16. Sediment Basin Flume | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAir Jump to:ScottsSearchSt. Louis, MissouriBasin

  17. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat Basin Geothermal

  18. Denver Basin Map | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: Energy ResourcesDenair,DennisDenver Basin Map

  19. Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achond, Stephen; Hockersmith, Eric E.; Sandford, Benjamin P. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA)

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the 2002 results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior of wild spring/summer chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin. The report also discusses trends in the cumulative data collected for this project from Oregon and Idaho streams since 1989. The project was initiated after detection data from passive-integrated-transponder tags (PIT tags) had shown distinct differences in migration patterns between wild and hatchery fish for three consecutive years. National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) investigators first observed these differences in 1989. The data originated from tagging and interrogation operations begun in 1988 to evaluate smolt transportation for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In 1991, the Bonneville Power Administration began a cooperative effort with NMFS to expand tagging and interrogation of wild fish. Project goals were to characterize the outmigration timing of these fish, to determine whether consistent migration patterns would emerge, and to investigate the influence of environmental factors on the timing and distribution of these migrations. In 1992, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) began an independent program of PIT tagging wild chinook salmon parr in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River Basins in northeast Oregon. Since then, ODFW has reported all tagging, detection, and timing information on fish from these streams. However, with ODFW concurrence, NMFS will continue to report arrival timing of these fish at Lower Granite Dam.

  20. Genetic stratigraphic sequence analysis in terrestrial aggrading basin: sequence stratigraphy of Narrabeen Group, Sydney basin, Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, S.A.; Galloway, W.E.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of event/sequence stratigraphy concepts over the past 15 years has been one of the most significant contributions to systematic stratigraphic analyses of sedimentary basins. Most of these approaches, however, have not been applied to terrestrial aggradational settings but rather were developed in marginal basin settings where progradational and transgressive units are important components of the sequence framework. The principal objective of sequence definition is the identification of genetic stratigraphic units that share a common paleogeographic, climatic, and tectonic origin. Thus, the basic premise of sequence stratigraphy should be useful in the delineation of the depositional framework for any basin. Criteria were devised to identify three genetic stratigraphic sequences within the Triassic Narrabeen Group of the Sydney basin, an aggrading basin with a terrestrial fill. Individual sequences were chosen to emphasize significant changes in tectonic and climatic conditions, as reflected in the distinguishing characteristics of depositional style, sediment composition, and paleodrainage trends. The Munmorah sequence is characterized by lithic sandstone deposits of an extensive alluvial plain sourced by the New England foldbelt to the northeast. The overlying Bulgo sequence is distinguished by changes in sediment transport direction, lithology, and depositional style. The western Lachlan foldbelt emerged as a source of a quartz-rich braid-plain system. The Bald Hill sequence lies above the Bulgo and consists of sandstones and kaolinitic claystones that were deposited in extensive, highly oxidized alluvial plains that were dissected by numerous small streams. The distinctive mineralogy and depositional style of the Bald Hill deposits suggest climatic and tectonic changes in the Lachlan foldbelt source area.

  1. Structural evolution and petroleum productivity of the Baltic basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulmishek, G.F. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Baltic basin is an oval depression located in the western part of the Russian craton; it occupies the eastern Baltic Sea and adjacent onshore areas. The basin contains more than 5,000 m of sedimentary rocks ranging from latest Proterozoic to Tertiary in age. These rocks consist of four tectonostratigraphic sequences deposited during major tectonic episodes of basin evolution. Principal unconformities separate the sequences. The basin is underlain by a rift probably filled with Upper Proterozoic rocks. Vendian and Lower Cambrian rocks (Baikalian sequence) form two northeast-trending depressions. The principal stage of the basin development was during deposition of a thick Middle Cambrian-Lower Devonian (Caledonian) sequence. This stage was terminated by the most intense deformations in the basin history. The Middle Devonian-Carboniferous (Hercynian) and Permian-Tertiary (Kimmerian-Alpine) tectonic and depositional cycles only slightly modified the basin geometry and left intact the main structural framework of underlying rocks. The petroleum productivity of the basin is related to the Caledonian tectonostratigraphic sequence that contains both source rocks and reservoirs. However, maturation of source rocks, migration of oil, and formation of fields took place mostly during deposition of the Hercynian sequence.

  2. Analysis of Ignition Testing on K-West Basin Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Abrefah; F.H. Huang; W.M. Gerry; W.J. Gray; S.C. Marschman; T.A. Thornton

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 2100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) discharged from the N-Reactor have been stored underwater at the K-Basins in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The spent fuel has been stored in the K-East Basin since 1975 and in the K-West Basin since 1981. Some of the SNF elements in these basins have corroded because of various breaches in the Zircaloy cladding that occurred during fuel discharge operations and/or subsequent handling and storage in the basins. Consequently, radioactive material in the fuel has been released into the basin water, and water has leaked from the K-East Basin into the soil below. To protect the Columbia River, which is only 380 m from the basins, the SNF is scheduled to be removed and transported for interim dry storage in the 200 East Area, in the central portion of the Site. However, before being shipped, the corroded fuel elements will be loaded into Multi-Canister OverPacks and conditioned. The conditioning process will be selected based on the Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) (WHC 1995), which was prepared on the basis of the dry storage concept developed by the Independent Technical Assessment (ITA) team (ITA 1994).

  3. Oil and gas shows in the Salina basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, K.D.; Lambert, M.; Berendsen, P.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents data from drillers' records and other information on the Salina basin wells in north-central Kansas. A listing that includes well name, operator, location, completion date, depth intervals, and formation name for each well is included. A map showing oil and gas fields in the surrounding area and wells drilled within the basin is offered.

  4. Economic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    of Petroleum Evaluation Engineers (SPEE) parameters for evaluating Resource Plays 53 Appendix C: Detailed Play to traditional economic impacts, this report includes a petroleum engineering-based analysis that providesEconomic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry #12;The Economic Impact of the Permian Basin's Oil

  5. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    20.69 19.60 -5.3% 74.23 26.4% 4,845 31.9% 97.7% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan 13.74 16.13 17.4% 99.82 16.2% 840 32.1% 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New...

  6. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    19.73 19.64 -0.4% 81.15 24.2% 4,650 24.8% 99.3% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan W 14.02 W 76.22 18.4% 713 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W...

  7. PALEOZOIC TRACE FOSSILS FROM THE KUFRA BASIN, LIBYA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    PALEOZOIC TRACE FOSSILS FROM THE KUFRA BASIN, LIBYA BRIAN R. TURNER AND MICHAEL J. BENTONPaleozoicsuccessionin the southeastern part ofthe Kufra Basin, Libya, comprises a sequence of sedimentary facies up to 250 m thick THEK u m BASINin southeast Libya (Figure 1)occupiesan area of about 400,000km2and is filled

  8. Seismic stratigraphy and structure of the Progreso Basin, Ecuador

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyes Arroyo, Patricio

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , but magnetic data indicate that basement is about 10 lun deep in the progress Basin and about 3 km deep in neighboring Santa Elena Basin. AKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank the Instituto Oceanogra fico de la Armada del Ecuador for providing funding of my...

  9. Paleogeographic and paleotectonic development of Laramide basins of SW Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstrand, P.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial Laramide-style deformation in SW Utah began in latest Cretaceous (late Campanian or Maastrichtian) time during deposition of the conglomeratic Canaan Peak Formation (TKcp) which thins onto a broad arch located on the northern Paunsaugunt Plateau (Paunsaugunt upwarp). This NNE-SSW trending upward affected sediment dispersal patterns during the early Paleocene and was the southern basin margin for braided fluvial sediments of the Grand Castle Formation (Tgc). These sediments were shed SE, from the inactive Sevier highlands, as far east as the Table Cliff Plateau. Laramide deformation increased during the late( ) Paleocene, after deposition of the Tgc, with the formation of at least two closed basins. During the late( ) Paleocene, the Johns Valley and Upper Valley anticlines, and Circle Cliff Uplift developed with sediment being shed to the SE, E, and SW into the Pine Hollow basin. During initial development of the Pine Hollow basin, the underlying TKcp and Tgc were reworked into the basal Pine Hollow Formation. Small alluvial fans bounded the basin, grading laterally into low-energy fluvial, playa mudflat, and ephemeral lacustrine environments. The basal Claron Formation represents a broad, closed basin that initially developed during the later Paleocene to the SW of the Pine Hollow basin. The Claron basin was bordered by low relief uplands, fluvial floodplains, and calcrete paleosols to the north and moderate relief uplands to the west and east. Shallow lacustrine deposition occurred to the south. Lacustrine onlap of Laramide structures by middle Eocene suggests cessation of Laramide deformation by this time.

  10. Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins Francisco Cabo Katrin cause environmental damage in the donor basin. The recipient faces a trade-off between paying the price of the irrigated soil, or demand for water for highly productive activities like tourism), then the existence

  11. Sol Duc Hot Springs feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sol Duc Springs is located in the Olympic National Park in western Washington state. Since the turn of the century, the area has served as a resort, offering hot mineral baths, lodge and overnight cabin accommodations. The Park Service, in conjunction with the concessionaire, is in the process of renovating the existing facilities, most of which are approximately 50 years old. The present renovation work consists of removing all of the existing cabins and replacing them with 36 new units. In addition, a new hot pool is planned to replace the existing one. This report explores the possibility of a more efficient use of the geothermal resource to accompany other planned improvements. It is important to note that the system outlined is based upon the resource development as it exists currently. That is, the geothermal source is considered to be: the two existing wells and the hot springs currently in use. In addition, every effort has been made to accommodate the priorities for utilization as set forth by the Park Service.

  12. Population Structure of Columbia River Basin Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, Technical Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, E.L.; National Science Foundation (U.S.)

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The population structure of chinook salmon and steelhead trout is presented as an assimilation of the life history forms that have evolved in synchrony with diverse and complex environments over their Pacific range. As poikilotherms, temperature is described as the overwhelming environmental influence that determines what life history options occur and where they are distributed. The different populations represent ecological types referred to as spring-, summer-, fall, and winter-run segments, as well as stream- and ocean-type, or stream- and ocean-maturing life history forms. However, they are more correctly described as a continuum of forms that fall along a temporal cline related to incubation and rearing temperatures that determine spawn timing and juvenile residence patterns. Once new habitats are colonized, members of the founding populations spread through adaptive evolution to assume complementary life history strategies. The related population units are collectively referred to as a metapopulation, and members most closely associated within common temporal and geographic boundaries are designated as first-order metapopulations. Population structure of chinook salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin, therefore, is the reflection of the genetic composition of the founding source or sources within the respective region, shaped by the environment, principally temperature, that defines life history evolutionary strategy to maximize fitness under the conditions delineated. The complexity of structure rests with the diversity of opportunities over the elevations that exist within the Basin. Consistent with natural selection, rather than simply attempting to preserve populations, the challenge is to provide opportunities to expand their range to new or restored habitat that can accommodate genetic adaptation as directional environmental changes are elaborated. Artificial propagation can have a critical role in this process, and the emphasis must be placed on promoting the ability for anadromous salmonids to respond to change by assuring that the genetic diversity to facilitate such responses is present. The key in developing an effective recovery program for chinook salmon and steelhead is to recognize that multiple life history forms associated with temperature characterize the species in the Columbia Basin, and recovery measures taken must address the biological requirements of the population unit within the environmental template identified. Unless such measures are given first and highest priority, establishment of biologically self-sustaining populations will be restrained.

  13. Flexural interpretation of Mississippian stratigraphy in the Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ettensohn, F.R. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Science); Pashin, J.C. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpretation of Mississippian rocks in the Black Warrior basin and adjacent parts of the Appalachian basin using basic viscoelastic flexural models suggests that this sequence of rocks is largely a response to deformational loading and relaxation accompany early phases of Ouachita orogeny. A Kinderhook-Valmeyer unconformity atop the Maury Shale apparently represents an initial tectophase of Ouachita orogeny too distant to affect the basin otherwise. However, a Valmeyer-Chesterian unconformity atop the Tuscumbia, along which the Genevievian Stage is absent or condensed, indicates that a second Ouachita tectophase had become localized along the southwest part of alabama promontory, close enough to generate the Black Warrior foreland basin, fill it with a flexural sequence of sediments, and alter sedimentation patterns in nearby parts of the Appalachian basin.

  14. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for the 105N Basin Stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coenenberg, E.T. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations.

  15. Exploratory shaft conceptual design report: Paradox Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report summarizes the conceptualized design for an exploratory shaft facility at a representative site in the Paradox Basin located in the southeastern part of Utah. Conceptualized designs for other possible locations (Permian Basin in Texas and Gulf Interior Region salt domes in Louisiana and Mississippi) are summarized in separate reports. The purpose of the exploratory shaft facility is to provide access to the reference repository horizon to permit in situ testing of the salt. The in-situ testing is necessary to verify repository salt design parameters, evaluate isotropy and homogeneity of the salt, and provide a demonstration of the constructability and confirmation of the design to gain access to the repository. The fundamental purpose of this conceptual design report is to assure the feasibility of the exploratory shaft project and to develop a reliable cost estimate and realistic schedule. Because a site has not been selected and site-specific subsurface data are not available, it has been necessary to make certain assumptions in order to develop a conceptual design for an exploratory shaft facility in salt. As more definitive information becomes available to support the design process, adjustments in the projected schedule and estimated costs will be required.

  16. Exploratory shaft conceptual design report: Permian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report summarizes the conceptualized design for an exploratory shaft facility at a representative site in the Permian Basin locatd in the western part of Texas. Conceptualized designs for other possible locations (Paradox Basin in Utah and Gulf Interior Region salt domes in Louisiana and Mississippi) are summarized in separate reports. The purpose of the exploratory shaft facility is to provide access to the reference repository horizon to permit in situ testing of the salt. The in situ testing is necessary to verify repository salt design parameters, evaluate isotropy and homogeneity of the salt, and provide a demonstration of the constructability and confirmation of the design to gain access to the repository. The fundamental purpose of this conceptual design report is to assure the feasibility of the exploratory shaft project and to develop a reliable cost estimate and realistic schedule. Because a site has not been selected and site-specific subsurface data are not available, it has been necessary to make certain assumptions in order to develop a conceptual design for an exploratory shaft facility in salt. As more definitive information becomes available to support the design process, adjustments in the projected schedule and estimated costs will be required.

  17. Tectonic setting and origin of the Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, W.A.; Whiting, B.M. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin has a triangular outline that is framed by the Ouachita thrust belt on the southwest, the Appalachian thrust belt on the southeast, and the North American craton on the north. The stratigraphy of the Black Warrior basin includes two distinct parts: a Cambrian-Mississippian passive-margin carbonate-shelf succession, and a Mississippian-Pennsylvanian clastic succession, the lower (Mississippian) part of which grades northeastward into a carbonate-shelf facies. The provenance and dispersal system of the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian clastic deposits have been interpreted in four different ways, each of which has significantly different implications for origin of the basin: (1) Ouachita orogenic source and northeastward prograding; (2) Alabama Appalachian orogenic source and northwestward prograding; (3) Georgia-tennessee Appalachian orogenic source and westward prograding; and (4) cratonic source and southward prograding. Subsidence history determined from calculations of decompacted thickness indicates that (1) the Black Warrior basin is an orogenic foreland basin related primarily to the Ouachita thrust load on the southwest; (2) later emplacement of the Alabama Appalachian thrust belt modified the southeastern side of the Ouachita-related Black Warrior foreland basin; and (3) a separate foreland basin, representing the southern end of the Appalachian foreland basin, formed in response to the Georgia-Tennessee Appalachian thrust load. The previously used criteria do not necessarily support a unique interpretation, but synthesizing these data with subsidence history leads to the conclusion that the Black Warrior basin is a tectonically driven, orogenic foreland basin dominated by Ouachita thrusting and modified by Appalachian thrusting.

  18. Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowan, Gerald D.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Acclimation of 109,101 spring chinook salmon and 19,977 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1992. At Minthorn, 47,458 summer steelhead were acclimated and released. Control groups of spring chinook salmon were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Acclimation studies with summer steelhead were not conducted in 1992. A total of 237 unmarked adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from October 18, 1991 through April 24, 1992 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 476,871 green eggs were taken from 86 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 211 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:1 spawning ratio, a total of 195,637 green eggs were taken from 58 females. They were also transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Cell culture assays for replicating agents, including IHNV virus, on all spawned fish were negative. One of 60 summer steelhead tested positive for EIBS virus, while all fall chinook tested we re negative for inclusions. One of 73 summer steelhead sampled for BKD had a high level of antigen, while all others had very low or negative antigen levels. All fall chinook tested had low or negative antigen levels. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1992. The progress of outmigration for juvenile releases was monitored at the Westland Canal fish trapping facility by CTUIR and ODFW personnel. Coho and spring chinook yearlings were released in mid-March at Umatilla rivermile (RM) 56 and 60. The peak outmigration period past Westland (RM 27) was mid-April to early May, approximately four to seven weeks after release. Groups of summer steelhead were released from Minthorn (RM 63) and Bonifer (RM 81) in late March and into Meacham Creek near Bonifer in late April. The peak outmigration period past Westland for all groups appeared to be the first two to three weeks in May. Spring chinook yearlings released in mid-April from Bonifer and at Umatilla RM 89, migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period past Westland appeared to be within a week or two after release. Fall and spring chinook subyearlings released in mid-May at RM 42 and 60, respectively, also migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period was within days after release. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla River releases to the ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries. Total estimated summer steelhead survival have ranged from 0.03 to 0.61% for releases in which recovery information is complete. Coho survival rates have ranged from 0.15 to 4.14%, and spring chinook yearling survival rates from spring releases have ranged from 0.72 to 0.74%. Survival rates of fall chinook yearlings have ranged from 0.08 to 3.01%, while fall chinook subyearling survival rates have ranged from 0.25 to 0.87% for spring released groups.

  19. Exchange-Spring Magnets: Nanocomposite Exchange-Spring Magnets for Motor and Generator Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: ANL will develop a cost-effective exchange-spring magnet to use in the electric motors of wind generators and EVs that uses no rare earth materials. This ANL exchange-spring magnet combines a hard magnetic outer shell with a soft magnetic inner corecoupling these together increases the performance (energy density and operating temperature). The hard and soft magnet composite particles would be created at the molecular level, followed by consolidation in a magnetic field. This process allows the particles to be oriented to maximize the magnetic properties of low-cost and abundant metals, eliminating the need for expensive imported rare earths. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate this new type of magnet in a prototype electric motor.

  20. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook and Juvenile-to-Adult PIT-tag Retention; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the first in an anticipated series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2001 and March 31, 2002. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons.