Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Mold susceptibility of rapidly renewable materials used in wall construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1998, the United States Green Building Council, via the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards, has established the premiere set of guidelines for construction ethics from the standpoint of eco-friendliness and occupant safety and health in the U.S. and around the world. These guidelines are skyrocketing in use due in part to two reasons: increased awareness of a need for reducing, reusing, and recycling in order to save resources and natural areas for future generations; and, increased amount of time spent indoors in work places and homes. The LEED guidelines encourage sustainable and responsible use of land, water, energy, and materials, and promote a safe and healthy environment through use of innovative designs and technology. As part of the responsible use of materials, the LEED guidelines encourage the use of rapidly renewable materials such as cotton, straw, wool, and cork as insulation products. Although these products can be produced naturally and quickly from nature, they are also cellulose or carbohydrate based products. Cellulose and carbohydrate based materials are typically optimal food sources for mold in the presence of moisture, ironically destroying facilities and creating poor living and work environments. Samples of wool, cork, straw, and cotton--rapidly renewable materials used as exterior wall insulation products--were exposed to different moisture amounts in an encapsulated environment, representing the environment within a wall cavity when exposed to water from pipes, leaks, condensation and absorption, or from initial construction. The samples were monitored over time for mold growth. The data logged from the samples were analyzed to determine the degree of mold susceptibility of each material. In addition, samples with increased amounts of moisture were examined to determine increased promotion of mold growth. The results from this study showed that all of the above mentioned materials were highly susceptible to mold growth and that the moisture amount did not increase the rate of mold growth. Based on the data collected from this study, recommendations were made to review the current use of rapidly renewable and other cellulose and carbohydrate based materials in wall construction.

Cooper, Aaron McGill

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Oven wall panel construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

Ellison, Kenneth (20 Avondale Cres., Markham, CA); Whike, Alan S. (R.R. #1, Caledon East, both of Ontario, CA)

1980-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

3

Design and Construction of a Guarded Hot Box Facility for Evaluating the Thermal Performance of Building Wall Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this study was to design and build a guarded hot box to test the R-Value of building materials. The Riverside Energy Efficiency Laboratory is looking to expand their testing capabilities by including this service. Eventually, the laboratory will become energy star certified. A guarded hot box facility consists of two boxes maintained at specific temperatures and a guard box around each one that is maintained at the same temperature as the box it surrounds. The ASTM C1363 standard was used as guide for the construction and testing of sample specimen. This standard called for an air velocity profile uniform within 10 percent of the average. Velocity tests were performed with various different configurations to give a uniform velocity. Although the velocity did not meet standards, the configuration chosen included a piece of 1/4" pegboard placed 2" away from the top and the bottom of the inner box. By using the known overall heat added and removed from the system, as well as all the heat losses the heat transferred through the specimen and its R-Value can be calculated. The uncertainty of the R-Value and the accuracy of the testing facility gave conflicting results. Future experiments will use improved testing methods that include differential thermocouples to obtain better uncertainty for the R-Value calculations.

Mero, Claire Renee

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Method and apparatus for constructing an underground barrier wall structure  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for constructing a underground barrier wall structure using a jet grout injector subassembly comprising a pair of primary nozzles and a plurality of secondary nozzles, the secondary nozzles having a smaller diameter than the primary nozzles, for injecting grout in directions other than the primary direction, which creates a barrier wall panel having a substantially uniform wall thickess. This invention addresses the problem of the weak "bow-tie" shape that is formed during conventional jet injection when using only a pair of primary nozzles. The improvement is accomplished by using at least four secondary nozzles, of smaller diameter, located on both sides of the primary nozzles. These additional secondary nozzles spray grout or permeable reactive materials in other directions optimized to fill in the thin regions of the bow-tie shape. The result is a panel with increased strength and substantially uniform wall thickness.

Dwyer, Brian P. (Albuquerque, NM); Stewart, Willis E. (W. Richland, WA); Dwyer, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Sustainable wall construction and exterior insulation retrofit technology process and structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-cost process for exterior wall insulation retrofit, or new wall construction by stacking layers of fabric tube filled with insulating material against a wall and covering them with mesh and stucco provides a durable structure with good insulating value.

Vohra, Arun (Bethesda, MD)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Textural break foundation wall construction modules  

SciTech Connect

Below-grade, textural-break foundation wall structures are provided for inhibiting diffusion and advection of liquids and gases into and out from a surrounding hydrogeologic environment. The foundation wall structure includes a foundation wall having an interior and exterior surface and a porous medium disposed around a portion of the exterior surface. The structure further includes a modular barrier disposed around a portion of the porous medium. The modular barrier is substantially removable from the hydrogeologic environment.

Phillips, Steven J. (Kennewick, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Wall System Innovations: Familiar Materials, Better Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Wall System Innovation Vladimir Kochkin Joseph Wiehagen April 2013 Wall Innovation Metrics  High R (thermal and air barrier)  High Performance  Durable, structural  Build-able  Low transition risk to builders  50% Building America Goal  ≈ R25+ (CZ 4 and higher) 2 Background  Technologies for high-R walls have been proposed and used for over 25 years  But real market penetration is very low  Often the last EE measure implemented by builders (e.g. E*) 3 Background  High-R wall solutions have not achieved a broad level of standardization and commonality  A large set of methods and materials entered the market  Multiple and conflicting details  Wall characteristics are more critical = RISK 4 New Home Starts -

8

Fast Mix Table Construction for Material Discretization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effective hybrid Monte Carlo--deterministic implementation typically requires the approximation of a continuous geometry description with a discretized piecewise-constant material field. The inherent geometry discretization error can be reduced somewhat by using material mixing, where multiple materials inside a discrete mesh voxel are homogenized. Material mixing requires the construction of a ``mix table,'' which stores the volume fractions in every mixture so that multiple voxels with similar compositions can reference the same mixture. Mix table construction is a potentially expensive serial operation for large problems with many materials and voxels. We formulate an efficient algorithm to construct a sparse mix table in $O(\\text{number of voxels}\\times \\log \\text{number of mixtures})$ time. The new algorithm is implemented in ADVANTG and used to discretize continuous geometries onto a structured Cartesian grid. When applied to an end-of-life MCNP model of the High Flux Isotope Reactor with 270 distinct materials, the new method improves the material mixing time by a factor of 100 compared to a naive mix table implementation.

Johnson, Seth R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Coal gasification construction materials: an overview  

SciTech Connect

Materials performance test results are presented for two coal gasification processes, HYGAS SNG process, which converts any type of coal to substitute natural gas (SNG), and U-GAS fuel gas process, which converts coal to a low- or medium-heat value gas. A description of the pilot plant for each process and discussion of some experiences with materials and components used in plant construction is presented. Metals performance inside the gasifier reactors and in off-gas locations depended upon the character of the process. At moderate operating temperatures (427/sup 0/C), low-carbon steels are advisable. Very high-temperature environments may not only require use of exotic alloys, clads, and/or coatings but may also preclude extensive use of internal piping/valving in scale-up designs. Inconel 182, 600, and Monel 400 have all performed erratically in the plants; but in quench and purification sections, austenitic stainless steels performed well. 9 references. (BLM)

Arnold, J.M. (Inst. of Gas Tech., Chicago, IL); Laurens, R.M.; Danyluk, S.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Bibliography on Phase Change Materials in Construction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cell Using Light Wallboards Coupling Vacuum Isolation Panels and Phase ... of Phase Change Materials in Concrete," Solar Energy Materials and ...

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

11

Best Practices in Material Choice for Design and Construction of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Best Practices in Material Choice for Design and Construction of ... Optimum Condition of Vanadium Recovery from Power Plant Fly-ash with...

12

High-R Walls for New Construction Structural Performance: Wind Pressure Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical report is focused primarily on laboratory testing that evaluates wind pressure performance characteristics for wall systems constructed with exterior insulating sheathing. This research and test activity will help to facilitate the ongoing use of non-structural sheathing options and provide a more in-depth understanding of how wall system layers perform in response to high wind perturbations normal to the surface.

DeRenzis, A.; Kochkin, V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Materials in Nuclear Power Plant Construction - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

139th Annual Meeting & Exhibition. February 14 - 18, 2010, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, Washington USA. Materials in Nuclear Power. Plant ...

14

Construction of high embankment dam material flow equilibrium system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As high embankment dam engineering is often large-scale, how to achieve equilibrium of material flow is a critical factor affecting the construction progress of embankment dam engineering and an important approach to save resource and reduce construction ... Keywords: Embankment dam, Material flow equilibrium, Traffic network

Yan Zhang; Guo-Ping Xia

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

High-R Walls for New Construction Structural Performance: Integrated Rim Header Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two prominent approaches within the Building America Program to construct higher R-value walls have included use of larger dimension framing and exterior rigid foam insulation. These approaches have been met with some success; however for many production builders, where the cost of changing framing systems is expensive, the changes have been slow to be realized. In addition, recent building code changes have raised some performance issues for exterior sheathing and raised heel trusses, for example, that indicates a need for continued performance testing for wall systems.

DeRenzis, A.; Kochkin, V.; Wiehagen, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Plasma Facing Materials for the JET ITER-Like Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PFC and FW Materials Issues / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials, Part A: Fusion Technology

C. Thomser; V. Bailescu; S. Brezinsek; J. W. Coenen; H. Greuner; T. Hirai; J. Linke; C. P. Lungu; H. Maier; G. Matthews; Ph. Mertens; R. Neu; V. Philipps; V. Riccardo; M. Rubel; C. Ruset; A. Schmidt; I. Uytdenhouwen; Jet Efda Contributors

17

Summary of SLAC'S SEY Measurement On Flat Accelerator Wall Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electron cloud effect (ECE) causes beam instabilities in accelerator structures with intense positively charged bunched beams. Reduction of the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the beam pipe inner wall is effective in controlling cloud formation. We summarize SEY results obtained from flat TiN, TiZrV and Al surfaces carried out in a laboratory environment. SEY was measured after thermal conditioning, as well as after low energy, less than 300 eV, particle exposure.

F. Le Pimpec; R. E. Kirby; F. K. King; M. Pivi

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

18

Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity was observed when the suspension of DOC-wrapped SWNTs were exposed to the TMOS vapors, but about a 50% decrease in the emission signal was observed from the SDS-wrapped SWNTs nanotubes. The decrease in emission was minimal by buffering the SDS/SWNT suspension prior to forming the composite. Fluorescent xerogels were prepared by adding glycerol to the SWNT suspensions prior to TMOS vapor exposure, followed by drying the gels. Fluorescent aerogels were prepared by replacing water in the gels with methanol and then exposing them to supercritical fluid drying conditions. The aerogels can be used for gas sensing.

Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Gupta, Gautam; Duque, Juan G.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; DeFriend Obrey, Kimberly A.

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

19

ICE Manual of Construction Materials. Vol. II - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 10, 2010 ... Thomas Telford Limited, 40 Marsh Wall, London E14 9TP, U.K. 2009. ... and theory section, plus sections on Concrete, Asphalts and Masonry.

20

PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS, STABILITY AND MATERIALS INTERACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the construction of fusion reactor f i r s t walls andbreeding materials in fusion reactors. Basic information on

Morris, Jr., J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Preparation of Constructional Materials with Phosphate Tailings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impact of Materials Selection on the Sustainability of Wind Energy Improved Energy Efficiency and Environmental Benefits for Calcium Treatment in Steel.

22

Use of recycled materials in highway construction. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of this study were to examine: (1) the types of recycled materials that are appropriate and feasible as alternative paving materials, such as glass and tires; and (2) the types of recycled materials, such as mixed-plastics and compost, that can be utilized in all types of transportation applications other than pavements. Seven key products are investigated: (1) tires, (2) glass, (3) asphalt concrete, (4) fly ash, (5) compost, (6) mixed plastics, and (7) aluminum sign stock. Performance and cost data for rubber-asphalt pavements is documented for both in-state and nationwide applications. The national experience with the use of waste glass as an additive to asphalt concrete and its use in unbound base materials is also highlighted. Programs for experimental use of recycled materials are outlined. Recommendations for staffing and program changes to deal with recycling issues are also discussed.

Swearingen, D.L.; Jackson, N.C.; Anderson, K.W.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Experimental evaluation of phase change material building walls using small passive test boxes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Macroencapsulated PCM cemented within masonry building blocks can markedly increase the effectiveness of an equivalent volume of concrete for use as a mass wall for passive solar applications. Various hydrocarbons and hydrated salts were tested. The test procedure and results are presented and discussed. Of the PCM's tested, the most promising candidate material is calcium chloride hexahydrate. The best performing PCM blocks performed on a par with a massive masonry design. (WHK)

Collier, R.K.; Grimmer, D.P.

1979-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

24

Hybrid Wall Evaluation for Ten New Construction Homes in Wyandotte, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Wyandotte NSP2 project aims to build 20 new houses and retrofit 20 existing houses in Wyandotte, MI. This report will detail the design and construction of 10 new houses in the program. Wyandotte is part of a Michigan State Housing Development Authority-led consortium that is funded by HUD under the NSP2 program. The City of Wyandotte has also been awarded DOE EE&CBG funds that are being used to develop a district GSHP system to service the project. This draft report examines the energy efficiency recommendations for new construction at these homes.

Lukachco, A.; Grin, A.; Bergey, D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Method for producing fabrication material for constructing micrometer-scaled machines, fabrication material for micrometer-scaled machines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing fabrication material for use in the construction of nanometer-scaled machines is provided whereby similar protein molecules are isolated and manipulated at predetermined residue positions so as to facilitate noncovalent interaction, but without compromising the folding configuration or native structure of the original protein biomodules. A fabrication material is also provided consisting of biomodules systematically constructed and arranged at specific solution parameters.

Stevens, F.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Low cost materials of construction for biological processes: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The workshop was held, May 1993 in conjunction with the 15th Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals. The purpose of this workshop was to present information on the biomass to ethanol process in the context of materials selection and through presentation and discussion, identify promising avenues for future research. Six technical presentations were grouped into two sessions: process assessment and technology assessment. In the process assessment session, the group felt that the pretreatment area would require the most extensive materials research due the complex chemical, physical and thermal environment. Discussion centered around the possibility of metals being leached into the process stream and their effect on the fermentation mechanics. Linings were a strong option for pretreatment assuming the economics were favorable. Fermentation was considered an important area for research also, due to the unique complex of compounds and dual phases present. Erosion in feedstock handling equipment was identified as a minor concern. In the technology assessment session, methodologies in corrosion analysis were presented in addition to an overview of current coatings/linings technology. Widely practiced testing strategies, including ASTM methods, as well as novel procedures for micro-analysis of corrosion were discussed. Various coatings and linings, including polymers and ceramics, were introduced. The prevailing recommendations for testing included keeping the testing simple until the problem warranted a more detailed approach and developing standardized testing procedures to ensure the data was reproducible and applicable. The need to evaluate currently available materials such as coatings/linings, carbon/stainless steels, or fiberglass reinforced plastic was emphasized. It was agreed that economic evaluation of each material candidate must be an integral part of any research plan.

Not Available

1993-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

27

Integrated Materials and Construction Practices (IMCP) for Concrete Pavement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stainless steels: AlSl 302 8055 480 15.1 3.91 17.3 20.0 22.8 25.4 512 559 585 606 AlSl 304 1670 7900 477 14 and rubber pad -- -- -- 1.38 0.217 Tile (asphalt, linoleum, vinyl) -- -- -- 1.26 0.009 Masonry Materials.1 -- -- expanded shale, clay, or slate; 1600 0.79 0.84 -- expanded slags; cinders; 1280 0.54 0.84 -- pumice

28

Method of measuring material properties of rock in the wall of a borehole  

SciTech Connect

To measure the modulus of elasticity of the rock in the wall of a borehole, a plug is cut in the borehole wall. The plug, its base attached to the surrounding rock, acts as a short column in response to applied forces. A loading piston is applied to the top of the plug and compression of the plug is measured as load is increased. Measurement of piston load and plug longitudinal deformation are made to determine the elastic modulus of the plug material. Poisson's ratio can be determined by simultaneous measurements of longitudinal and lateral deformation of the plug in response to loading. To determine shear modulus, the top of the plug is twisted while measurements are taken of torsional deformation.

Overmier, D. K.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

29

Use of Phase Change Material in a Building Wall Assembly: A Case Study of Technical Potential in Two Climates  

SciTech Connect

Phase change material (PCM), placed in an exterior wall, alters the temperature profile within the wall and thus influences the heat transport through the wall. This may reduce the net energy transport through the wall via interactions with diurnal temperature swings in the external environment or reduce the electricity needed to meet the net load through the wall by shifting the time of the peak load to a time when the cooling system operates more efficiently. This study covers a broad range of parameters that can influence the effectiveness of such a merged thermal storage-thermal insulation system. These parameters included climate, PCM location within the wall, amount of PCM, midpoint of the PCM melting and freezing range relative to the indoor setpoint temperature, temperature range over which phase change occurs, and the wall orientation. Two climates are investigated using finite difference and optimization analyses: Phoenix and Baltimore, with two utility rate schedules. Although potential savings for a PCM with optimized properties were greater when the PCM was concentrated near the inside wall surface, other considerations described here lead to a recommendation for a full-thickness application. An examination of the temperature distribution within the walls also revealed the potential for this system to reduce the amount of energy transported through the wall framing. Finally, economic benefits can exceed energy savings when time-of-day utility rates are in effect, reflecting the value of peak load reductions for the utility grid.

Childs, Kenneth W [ORNL; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Potential Energy Savings Due to Phase Change Material in a Building Wall Assembly: An Examination of Two Climates  

SciTech Connect

Phase change material (PCM), placed in an exterior wall, alters the temperature profile within the wall and thus influences the heat transport through the wall. This may reduce the net energy transport through the wall via interactions with diurnal temperature swings in the external environment or reduce the electricity needed to meet the net load through the wall by shifting the time of the peak load to a time when the cooling system operates more efficiently. This study covers a broad range of parameters that can influence the effectiveness of such a merged thermal storage-thermal insulation system. These parameters included climate, PCM location within the wall, amount of PCM, midpoint of the PCM melting and freezing range relative to the indoor setpoint temperature, temperature range over which phase change occurs, and the wall orientation. Two climates are investigated using finite difference and optimization analyses: Phoenix and Baltimore, with two utility rate schedules. Although potential savings for a PCM with optimized properties were greater when the PCM was concentrated near the inside wall surface, other considerations described here lead to a recommendation for a full-thickness application. An examination of the temperature distribution within the walls also revealed the potential for this system to reduce the amount of energy transported through the wall framing. Finally, economic benefits can exceed energy savings when time-of-day utility rates are in effect, reflecting the value of peak load reductions for the utility grid.

Childs, Kenneth W [ORNL; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Mainstreaming straw as a construction material : understanding the future of bio-based architectural materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a current trend in design and construction towards the use of distinct prefabricated components in the production of buildings. There is also a growing awareness by architects and builders of the environmental ...

Carbone, Christopher M. (Christopher Martin), 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Low-Cost Ash-Derived Construction Materials: State-of-the-Art Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing technologies have been successfully applied in the manufacturing of construction materials that incorporate coal combustion byproducts. This report describes an extensive literature review on coal ash use in low-cost building materials, including information on technical and economic feasibility.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Study on Thermal Performance and Applicability of Energy-saving Wall Materials in Hot Summer and Cold Winter Zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hot summer and cold winter zone is a transition zone between the cold zone and hot zone, sweltering in summer and chilly in winter, of which climate is worse. In recent years, with people's raised requirements on indoor living environments, the energy consumption of buildings in hot summer and cold winter zone has been greatly increased. However, the thermal performance of walls in this zone is worse, and thus a mass of energy is wasted. This paper thoroughly analyzes and compares some energy-saving wall materials and thermal insulation systems used in projects in general, according to the climate in the zone combined with the design standard for the walls of residential buildings in the hot summer and cold winter zone. The results indicate that reasonably selecting the applicable wall materials and thermal insulation systems according to the local energy consumption characteristics could optimize resource utilization and have a positive effect on energy efficiency.

Ren, W.; Lan, M.; Hao, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

CONSTRUCTION OF WEB-ACCESSIBLE MATERIALS HANDBOOK FORGENERATION IV NUCLEAR REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a web-accessible materials handbook in support of the materials selection and structural design for the Generation IV nuclear reactors is being planned. Background of the reactor program is briefly introduced. Evolution of materials handbooks for nuclear reactors over years is reviewed in light of the trends brought forth by the rapid advancement in information technologies. The framework, major features, contents, and construction considerations of the web-accessible Gen IV Materials Handbook are discussed. Potential further developments and applications of the handbook are also elucidated.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATION OF SALTSTONE MIXER AUGER/PADDLES MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION FOR IMPROVED WEAR RESISTANCE  

SciTech Connect

Wear and corrosion testing were conducted to evaluate alternate materials of construction for the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles. These components have been degraded by wear from the slurry processed in the mixer. Material test options included PVD coatings (TiN, TiCN, and ZrN), weld overlays (Stellite 12 and Ultimet) and higher hardness steels and carbides (D2 and tungsten carbide). The corrosion testing demonstrated that the slurry is not detrimental to the current materials of construction or the new candidates. The ASTM G75 Miller wear test showed that the high hardness materials and the Stellite 12 weld overlay provide superior wear relative to the Astralloy and CF8M stainless steel, which are the current materials of construction, as well as the PVD coatings and Ultimet. The following recommendations are made for selecting new material options and improving the overall wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer components: A Stellite 12 weld overlay or higher hardness steel (with toughness equivalent to Astralloy) be used to improve the wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer paddles; other manufacturing specifications for the mixer need to be considered in this selection. The current use of the Stellite 12 weld overlay be evaluated so that coverage of the 316 auger can be optimized for improved wear resistance of the auger. The wear surfaces of the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles be evaluated so that laboratory data can be better correlated to actual service. The 2-inch Saltstone mixer prototype be used to verify material performance.

Mickalonis, J.; Torres, R.

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Economic impact of using nonmetallic materials in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of an exhaustive literature search and evaluation concerning the properties and economics of commercially available nonmetallic well casing and screens. These materials were studied in terms of their use in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Center for Coal-Derived Low Energy Materials for Sustainable Construction  

SciTech Connect

The overarching goal of this project was to create a sustained center to support the continued development of new products and industries that manufacture construction materials from coal combustion by-products or CCBs (e.g., cements, grouts, wallboard, masonry block, fillers, roofing materials, etc). Specific objectives includes the development of a research kiln and associated system and the formulation and production of high performance low-energy, low-CO2 emitting calcium sulfoaluminate (CAS) cement that utilize coal combustion byproducts as raw materials.

Jewell, Robert; Robl, Tom; Rathbone, Robert

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

38

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CARLISLE CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL, INC. (CARLISLE) FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CARLISLE CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL, INC. (CARLISLE) FOR AN CARLISLE CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL, INC. (CARLISLE) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE AWARD NO . DE-EE0005435 ; W(A) 20 ll-059 CARLISLE has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights of the United States of America in all subject inventions arising from its participation under the above referenced cooperative agreement entitled "High Efficiency Solar Integrated Roof Membrane Product." According to CARLISLE's petition, the project funded by the cooperative agreement is to assess and develop manufacturing technologies and equipment capable of producing low-cost, high-efficiency, flexible building-integrated PV (BIPV) solar cells on roofing membranes (thermoplastic olefin and ethylene-propylene-diene-monomer based materials). "Various

39

Use of plastic construction materials in small-scale fuel alcohol production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several general designs for small-scale fuel alcohol plants that have been published primarily use conventional materials of construction (steel, copper, etc.). A fuel alcohol plant owned by Dixie Fuels, Inc. Valley Park, Mississippi, and a farm-scale alcohol plant being developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority have incorporated plastic materials in several areas of their plants; results have been excellent in terms of reduced materials, labor, and operating costs. However, plastics were not used in the distillation step. This work investigated the suitability of small-scale distillation equipment made entirely or partially from plastics. A low-cost alcohol distillation system can be constructed using chlorinated poly(viny chloride) (CPVC) pipe or poly(vinly chloride) (PVC) plastic pipe for the column and heat-exchanger shells. Although pipe made from CPVC is preferred, schedule 80 PVC pipe can be used if external supports are used to provide rigidity. 3 figures, 1 table. (DP)

Lightsey, G.R.; Kadir, O.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Demand Side Energy Saving though Proper Construction Practices and Materials Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy consumed during the construction of buildings and structures, including the embodied energy of the concrete and other construction materials, represent a considerable percentage that may reach 40% of the total energy consumed during the whole service life of the structure. Reducing energy consumed in the construction practices along with reducing the embodied energy of concrete and building materials, therefore, are of major importance. Reducing concrete's embodied energy represents one of the major green features of buildings and an important tool to improve sustainability, save resources for coming generations and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, different methods to reduce concrete's embodied energy are discussed and their effect on demand side energy are assessed. Using local materials, pozzolanic blended cements, fillers, along with specifying 56 days strength in design are discussed and assessed. Proper mix design, quality control and proper architectural design also affect and reduce embodied energy. Improving durability, regular maintenance and scheduled repair are essential to increase the expected service life of buildings and hence reduce overall resources consumption and reduce energy. These effects are discussed and quantified. Construction practices also consume considerable amount of energy. The effect of transporting, conveying, pouring, finishing and curing concrete on energy consumption are also discussed.

El-Hawary, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The construction industry is comprised of a wide range of businesses involved in engineering standards, building design, and the construction of various types of materials and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal characteristics of buildings for insulation purposes, and to determine heating, cooling in engineering standards, building design, and the construction of various types of materials and structures-related impacts, such as high winds and flooding, influence the choice of site construction, building techniques

42

Economic impact of using nonmetallic materials in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four appendices are included. The first covers applications of low-temperature geothermal energy including industrial processes, agricultural and related processes, district heating and cooling, and miscellaneous. The second discusses hydrogeologic factors affecting the design and construction of low-temperature geothermal wells: water quality, withdrawal rate, water depth, water temperature, basic well designs, and hydrogeologic provinces. In the third appendix, properties of metallic and nonmetallic materials are described, including: specific gravity, mechanical strength properties, resistance to physical and biological attack, thermal properties of nonmetallics, fluid flow characteristics, corrosion resistance, scaling resistance, weathering resistance of nonmetallics, and hydrolysis resistance of nonmetallics. Finally, special considerations in the design and construction of low-temperature geothermal wells using nonmetallics materials are covered. These include; drilling methods, joining methods, methods of casing and screen installation, well cementing, and well development. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The temperature dependence of ultra-cold neutron wall losses in material bottles coated with deuterated polystryene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) from the LANSCE super-thermal deuterium source were used to fill an acrylic bottle coated with deuterated polystyrene. The bottle was constructed to minimize losses through the filling valve. The storage time was extracted from a series of measurements where the number of neutrons was counted after they were held in the bottle for durations varying from 60-1200 s. The data were collected at temperatures of 18, 40, 65, 105, and 295 K. The data has been analyzed in terms of the ratio of the imaginary to real part of the wall potential. The analysis considers the velocity dependence of the probability per bounce of wall loss. The implication of these measurements for the SNS electric dipole moment search will be presented.

Cooper, Martiin D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bagdasarova, Yelena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clayton, Steven M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Currie, Scott A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griffith, William C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ito, Takeyasu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makela, Mark F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, Cheistopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rahaman, Mohamad S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramsey, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rios, Raymond [IDAHO STATE UNIV.

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

44

Seismic behavior of geogrid reinforced slag wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flexible retaining structures are known with their high performance under earthquake loads. In geogrid reinforced walls the performance of the fill material and the interface of the fill and geogrid controls the performance. Geosynthetic reinforced walls in seismic regions must be safe against not only static forces but also seismic forces. The objective of this study is to determine the behavior of a geogrid reinforced slag wall during earthquake by using shaking table experiments. This study is composed of three stages. In the first stage the physical properties of the material to be used were determined. In the second part, a case history involving the use of slag from steel industry in the construction of geogrid reinforced wall is presented. In the third stage, the results of shaking table tests conducted using model geogrid wall with slag are given. From the results, it is seen that slag can be used as fill material for geogrid reinforced walls subjected to earthquake loads.

Edincliler, Ayse [Bogazici University, Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute, Department of Earthquake Engineering, Cengelkoey-Istanbul (Turkey); Baykal, Gokhan; Saygili, Altug [Bogazici University, Department of Civil Engineering, Bebek-Istanbul (Turkey)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

45

Proposal for Construction/Demonstration/Implementation of A Material Handling System  

SciTech Connect

Vortec Corporation, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) and DOE/Paducah propose to complete the technology demonstration and the implementation of the Material Handling System developed under Contract Number DE-AC21-92MC29120. The demonstration testing and operational implementation will be done at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The scope of work, schedule and cost for the activities are included in this proposal. A description of the facility to be constructed and tested is provided in Exhibit 1, attached. The USEC proposal for implementation at Paducah is presented in Exhibit 2, and the commitment letters from the site are included in Exhibit 3. Under our agreements with USEC, Bechtel Jacobs Corporation and DOE/Paducah, Vortec will be responsible for the construction of the demonstration facility as documented in the engineering design package submitted under Phase 4 of this contract on August 9, 2001. USEC will have responsibility for the demonstration testing and commercial implementation of the plant. The demonstration testing and initial commercial implementation of the technology will be achieved by means of a USEC work authorization task with the Bechtel Jacobs Corporation. The initial processing activities will include the processing of approximately 4,250 drums of LLW. Subsequent processing of LLW and TSCA/LLW will be done under a separate contract or work authorization task. To meet the schedule for commercial implementation, it is important that the execution of the Phase 4 project option for construction of the demonstration system be executed as soon as possible. The schedule we have presented herein assumes initiation of the construction phase by the end of September 2001. Vortec proposes to complete construction of the demonstration test system for an estimated cost of $3,254,422. This price is based on the design submitted to DOE/NETL under the Phase 4 engineering design deliverable (9 august 2001). The cost is subject to the assumptions and conditions identified in Section 6 of this proposal.

Jim Jnatt

2001-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

46

Test methods for selection of materials of construction for high-level radioactive waste vitrification. Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Candidate materials of construction were evaluated for a facility at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant to vitrify high-level radioactive waste. Limited operating experience was available under the corrosive conditions of the complex vitrification process. The objective of the testing program was to provide a high degree of assurance that equipment will meet or exceed design lifetimes. To meet this objective in reasonable time and minimum cost, a program was designed consisting of a combination of coupon immersion and electrochemical laboratory tests and pilot-scale tests. Stainless steels and nickel-based alloys were tested. Alloys that were most resistant to general and local attack contained nickel, molybdenum (>9%), and chromium (where Cr + Mo > 30%). Alloy C-276 was selected as the reference material for process equipment. Stellite 6 was selected for abrasive service in the presence of formic acid. Alloy 690 and ALLCORR were selected for specific applications.

Bickford, D F; Corbett, R A; Morrison, W S

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Alternate materials of construction for geothermal applications. Progress report No. 17, October--December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to determine if non-metallic materials such as polymers, concrete polymer composites, and refractory cements can be utilized as materials of construction in geothermal processes is in progress. To date, several high temperature polymer concrete systems have been formulated, laboratory and field tests performed in brine, flashing brine, and steam at temperatures up to 260/sup 0/C (500{sup 0}F), and economic studies started. Laboratory data for exposure times > 2 years are available. Results are also available from field exposures of up to 24 months in four geothermal environments. Good durability is indicated. Work at five of these sites is continuing and plans to initiate other tests are being implemented.

Steinberg, M.; Kukacka, L.E.

1978-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Stress Corrosion Cracking of Candidate Structural Materials in Simulated First-Wall/Aqueous Coolant Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Material and Tritium / Proceedings of the Ninth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Oak Brook, Illinois, October 7-11, 1990)

M. R. Fox; A. B. Hull; T. F. Kassner

49

CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS FOR THE HYDROFLUORINATOR OF THE FLUORIDE-VOLATILITY PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel elements clad with Zr or containing Zr as a diluent can be recovered by a fluoride-volatility process. The first step consists of hydrofluorination of the elements in a bath of molten fluoride salts using an HF sparge. In this case the two salt systems considered were NaF-ZrF/sub 4/ and NaF- LiF. Materials evaluated at Battelle for possible use in the construction of this hydrofluorinator include Inconel, A'' Nickel, copper, silver, Monel, Hastelloy B, Hastelloy W, INOR-1, and INOR-8. The metals were exposed to molten fluoride salts through which HF was bubbled continuously. The data indicate that the NaF-LiF systems are much more corrosive than the NaF-ZrF/sub 4/ system. The systems are most corrosive when the alkali fluoride component is high. An elevation in temperature increases the corrosion significantly as does an increase in the HF flow rate. Hydrogen in the HF flow stream retards the corrosion of the sodiumzirconium salts significantly, but appears to have less effect on the sodium -lithium systems. The areas at the interface of the liquid and vapor phases were most seriously damaged under the exposure conditions usually used. However, appreciable reduction in attack was experienced when zirconium was actually hydrofluorinated. INOR-8 was the most promising of the materials evaluated. (auth)

Miller, P.D.; Peterson, C.L.; Stewart, O.M.; Stephan, E.F.; Fink, F.W.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

FELIX: construction and testing of a facility to study electromagnetic effects for first wall, blanket, and shield systems  

SciTech Connect

An experimental test facility for the study of electromagnetic effects in the FWBS systems of fusion reactors has been constructed over the past 1-1/2 years at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). In a test volume of 0.76 m/sup 3/ a vertical pulsed 0.5 T dipole field (B < 50 T/s) is perpendicular to a 1 T solenoid field. Power supplies of 2.75 MW and 5.5 MW and a solid state switch rated 13 kV, 13.1 kA (170 MW) control the pulsed magnetic fields. The total stored energy in the coils is 2.13 MJ. The coils are designed for a future upgrade to 4 T or the solenoid and 1 T for the dipole field (a total of 23.7 MJ). This paper describes the design and construction features of the facility. These include the power supplies, the solid state switches, winding and impregnation of large dipole saddle coils, control of the magnetic forces, computer control of FELIX and of experimental data acquisition and analysis, and an initial experimental test setup to analyze the eddy current distribution in a flat disk.

Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Biggs, J.A.; Knott, M.J.; Lari, R.J.; McGhee, D.G.; Wehrle, R.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Tokamak reactor first wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

52

Passive solar construction handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. The unique design constraints presented in passive homes are introduced and many of the salient issues influencing design decisions are described briefly. Passive solar construction is described for each passive system type: direct gain, thermal storage wall, attached sunspace, thermal storage roof, and convective loop. For each system type, important design and construction issues are discussed and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type are presented. Construction details are given and construction and thermal performance information is given for the materials used in collector components, storage components, and control components. Included are glazing materials, framing systems, caulking and sealants, concrete masonry, concrete, brick, shading, reflectors, and insulators. The Load Collector Ratio method for estimating passive system performance is appended, and other analysis methods are briefly summarized. (LEW)

Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Materials development and field demonstration of high-recycled-content concrete for energy-efficient building construction  

SciTech Connect

The project developed high-recycled-content concrete material with balanced structural and thermal attributes for use in energy-efficient building construction. Recycled plastics, tire, wool, steel and concrete were used as replacement for coarse aggregates in concrete and masonry production. With recycled materials the specific heat and thermal conductivity of concrete could be tailored to enhance the energy-efficiency of concrete buildings. A comprehensive field project was implemented which confirmed the benefits of high-recycled-content concrete for energy-efficient building construction.

Ostowari, Ken; Nosson, Ali

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Accuracy of EGSnrc calculations at {sup 60}Co energies for the response of ion chambers configured with various wall materials and cavity dimensions  

SciTech Connect

In this investigation, five experimental data sets are used to evaluate the ability of the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to calculate the change in chamber response associated with changes in wall material and cavity dimension at {sup 60}Co energies. Calculations of the ratios of response per unit mass of air as a function of cavity volume for walls ranging from polystyrene to lead are generally within 1%-3% of experiments. A few exceptions, which are discussed, include 20%-30% discrepancies with experiments involving lead-walled chambers used by Attix et al. [J. Res. Natl. Bur. Stand. 60, 235-243 (1958)] and Cormack and Johns [Radiat. Res. 1, 133-157 (1954)], and 5% discrepancies for the graphite chamber of Attix et al. (relative to data for other wall materials). Simulations of the experiment by Whyte [Radiat. Res. 6, 371-379 (1957)], which varied cavity air pressure in a large cylindrical chamber, are generally within 0.5% (wall/electrode materials ranging from beryllium to copper). In all cases, the agreement between measurements and EGSnrc calculations is much better when the response as a function of cavity height or air pressure is considered for each wall material individually. High-precision measurements [Burns et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 52, 7125-7135 (2007)] of the response per unit mass as a function of cavity height for a graphite chamber are also accurately reproduced, and validate previous tests of the transport mechanics of EGSnrc. Based on the general agreement found in this work between corresponding experimental results and EGSnrc calculations it can be concluded that EGSnrc can reliably be used to calculate changes in response with changes in various wall materials and cavity dimensions at {sup 60}Co energies within a accuracy of a few percent or less.

La Russa, Daniel J.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Ottawa Carleton Institute of Physics, Carleton University Campus, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Verification and Validation of EnergyPlus Phase Change Material Model for Opaque Wall Assemblies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phase change materials (PCMs) represent a technology that may reduce peak loads and HVAC energy consumption in buildings. A few building energy simulation programs have the capability to simulate PCMs, but their accuracy has not been completely tested. This study shows the procedure used to verify and validate the PCM model in EnergyPlus using a similar approach as dictated by ASHRAE Standard 140, which consists of analytical verification, comparative testing, and empirical validation. This process was valuable, as two bugs were identified and fixed in the PCM model, and version 7.1 of EnergyPlus will have a validated PCM model. Preliminary results using whole-building energy analysis show that careful analysis should be done when designing PCMs in homes, as their thermal performance depends on several variables such as PCM properties and location in the building envelope.

Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Christensen, C.; Bianchi, M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Evaluation of Potential Human Health Inhalation Risks from Mercury in Building and Construction Materials Containing Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns have been raised regarding the potential public health risks from mercury that is associated with the use of coal combustion products in building materials and construction applications. This report presents the results of a risk assessment that evaluated mercury inhalation under several exposure scenarios, including concrete and wallboard in residential and classroom settings.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

57

UWM-CBU Concrete Materials Technology Series Program No. 71 Workshop on GREEN CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS USING COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MATERIALS USING COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS Center for By-Products Utilization NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION 3200 MATERIALS USING COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS Sponsored By UWM Center for By-Products Utilization, Milwaukee, WI We Energies, Milwaukee, WI Co-Sponsored By American Coal Ash Association Educational Foundation

Saldin, Dilano

58

Aggregates: Waste and recycled materials; new rapid evaluation technology. Soils, geology, and foundations; materials and construction. Transportation research record  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

;Contents: Engineering Properties of Shredded Tires in Lightweight Fill Applications; Using Recovered Glass as Construction Aggregate Feedstock; Utilization of Phosphogypsum-Based Slag Aggregate in Portland Cement Concrete Mixtures; Waste Foundry Sand in Asphalt Concrete; Toward Automating Size-Gradation Analysis of Mineral Aggregate; Evaluation of Fine Aggregate Angularity Using National Aggregate Association Flow Test; Siliceous Content Determination of Sands Using Automatic Image Analysis; and Methodology for Improvement of Oxide Residue Models for Estimation of Aggregate Performance Using Stoichiometric Analysis.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

TransWall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays, imagining modern buildings without glass is difficult, and glass walls can be found almost everywhere around us. Glass has been one of the most valued materials owing to its transparency. Glass walls' transparency in modern architecture involves ...

Heejeong Heo; Seungki Kim; Hyungkun Park; Jeeyong Chung; Geehyuk Lee; Woohun Lee

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Material worlds : [de]constructing the ethos of concrete in Mumbai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What can a building material tell us about a city? As the most widely used structural building material in the world, reinforced cement concrete shapes the urban form of several of our largest megacities Sao Paulo, Cairo, ...

Shah, Priyanka (Priyanka Dinesh)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Development of Digital Materials Database for Design and Construction of New Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To facilitate materials selection, structural design, and future maintenance of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems, an interactive, internet accessible materials property database, dubbed Gen IV Materials Handbook, has been under development with the support of the United States Department of Energy. The Handbook will provide an authoritative source of information on structural materials needed for the development of various Gen IV nuclear reactor systems along with powerful data analysis and management tools. In this paper, the background, history, framework, major features, contents, and development strategy of the Gen IV Materials Handbook are discussed. Current development status and future plans are also elucidated.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

A method of improving superconducting qualities of fabricated constructs by shock preprocessing of precursor materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock method of inducing flux-pinning defects in superconducting materials whose beneficial effects are maintained even after further processing. 6 figs.

Nellis, W.J.; Maple, M.B.

1989-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

LEACHING ASSESSMENT OF RED MUD AND PHOSPHOGYPSUM FOR BENEFICIAL USE AS CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Beneficial use involves the application of a secondary material from an industrial process, which otherwise may be considered a potentially hazardous waste, as a building (more)

Kirkland, Ryan Anderson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Passive-solar construction handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. Passive solar construction is covered according to system type, each system type discussion including a general discussion of the important design and construction issues which apply to the particular system and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type. The three basic types of passive solar systems discussed are direct gain, thermal storage wall, and attached sunspace. Thermal performance and construction information is presented for typical materials used in passive solar collector components, storage components, and control components. Appended are an overview of analysis methods and a technique for estimating performance. (LEW)

Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Wind tunnel simulation of wind effects and associated displacement hazards on flat surface construction materials such as plywood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accidents and hazards continue to plague the construction industry. One often overlooked hazard to workers is the potential for flying debris and materials during high winds. This research was designed to evaluate the wind velocity required to create such an airborne hazard with flat surface materials such as plywood. This research was developed to show select correlations between the wind velocity, lifting forces and the susceptibility to movement of large surface area flat sheets of construction material, specifically four feet by eight feet sheets of floordeck plywood weighing 107 pounds. It also examined and evaluated the correlation of a shape coefficient to movement of materials and wind velocities, so that calculations can be made to adequately predict the potential movement of these materials. This will allow construction supervisors to reasonably prepare for such anticipated conditions. The Texas A&M University low speed wind tunnel was used to place a ftffl-scale stack of plywood floor decking material with the air stream flowing over the stack until top sheet separated or lifted from the stack. Next, a half-scale model was placed in the test section of the tunnel with pressure ports attached to a high speed sampling transducer to measure the actual pressures at select velocities. This allowed for a correlation between the ftifl-scale data and the sampled data. Tests were performed for several front and side angles of the wind striking the edge surface of the materials. Velocities were used up to 60 miles per hour full-scale equivalent. The full-scale model achieved lift forces exceeding the material weight of 107 pounds at one orientation angle at a velocity just below 30 miles per hour. This was consistent with the half-scale test pressures for a similar orientation. Various orientations yielded different forces as was anticipated. From this information a pressure coefficient was developed which when applied with a safety factor allows for reasonable calculations to be made to determine potential hazards and adequately secure materials on any sites where large flat materials may be handled or stored.

Madeley, Jack T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Method of improving superconducting qualities of fabricated constructs by shock preprocessing of precursor materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of improving the physical properties of superconducting materials which comprises: a. applying a high strain rate deformation to said materi The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California, for the operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Nellis, William J. (Berkeley, CA); Maple, M. Brian (Del Mar, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Life cycle assessment of materials and construction in commercial structures : variability and limitations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment has become an important tool for determining the environmental impact of materials and products. It is also useful in analyzing the impact a structure has over the course of its life cycle. The ...

Hsu, Sophia Lisbeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The design of effective policies for the promotion of sustainable construction materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research explores the associated effects of policy tools employed to promote sustainable building materials. By comparing the original motivations and intended effects of these policies and their actual outcome, and ...

Kua, Harn Wei, 1971-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Wall Insulation; BTS Technology Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect

Properly sealed, moisture-protected, and insulated walls help increase comfort, reduce noise, and save on energy costs. This fact sheet addresses these topics plus advanced framing techniques, insulation types, wall sheathings, and steps for effective wall construction and insulation.

Southface Energy Institute; Tromly, K.

2000-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

70

Electrochemical construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell construction features a novel co-extruded plastic electrode in an interleaved construction with a novel integral separator-spacer. Also featured is a leak and impact resistant construction for preventing the spill of corrosive materials in the event of rupture.

Einstein, Harry (Springfield, NJ); Grimes, Patrick G. (Westfield, NJ)

1983-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

71

Materials Characterization Paper In Support of the Proposed Rulemaking Identification of Nonhazardous Secondary Materials That Are Solid Waste Construction and Demolition Materials Disaster Debris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

winter storms, generate large amounts of debris. This poses a challenge for public officials who must manage this debris in a manner that is as efficient and cost-effective as possible. The debris resulting from natural disasters often includes building materials, sediments, vegetative debris, personal property, and other materials (EPA 2008, p. 11). Generally, this material has not been discarded. Rather, it is the product of a natural disaster. 2. Annual Quantities of Disaster Debris Generated and Used (1) Sectors that generate Disaster Debris: Disaster debris may be generated by any sector affected by a natural disaster (e.g., households, businesses, government, etc.). (2) Quantities and prices of Disaster Debris generated:

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Characterization studies for the reuse of phosphogypsum as a raw material in the civil construction industry of Brazil  

SciTech Connect

NORM stands for 'naturally occurring radioactive material', which is a material that naturally contains one or more radionuclides, mainly, uranium, thorium and potassium-40, and their radioactive decay products, such as radium and radon. An example of this material is the Phosphogypsum (PG), which results from the processing of phosphate ore into phosphoric acid for fertilizer production. In order to support regulation of the reuse of phosphogypsum as a raw material of the Brazilian civil construction industry, a characterization study was performed. The physical and chemical properties of PG and natural gypsum were determinate by evaluating the results of thermal (DTA and TG), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser granulometric analyses. The radioactivity concentration of each sample was measured by gamma spectrometry analyses. The results of thermal analyses demonstrated that phosphogypsum must be treated (initially heated in an electrical oven at 60 deg. C for 24 hours, then sieved and heated again at 160 deg. C for one hour) to obtain the same mineralogical properties of the gypsum used in the civil construction industry. The X- ray fluorescence analysis showed that PG and natural gypsum are similar with both being composed mainly of S, O, Ca, P and small quantities of trace elements (Ce, Ti, La, Sr, Zr, and Pr). The main crystalline compounds found in PG samples were gypsita (CaSO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O) and in natural gypsum were bassanite (CaSO{sub 4}.0.5H{sub 2}O). The concentration of Ra-226, Ra-228 and Pb-210 present in PG samples was 467 Bq/kg, 224 Bq/kg and 395 Bq/kg, respectively. The levels of radioactivity in natural gypsum samples were much lower (around 3 Bq/kg). The same behavior was observed for the uranium and thorium content. The results of all the analyses showed that phosphogypsum can be a viable substitute for gypsum, after certain, beneficial processes. (authors)

Jacomino, V.M. [Development Center of Nuclear Technology, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Canut, M.; Magalhaes Gomes, A.; Yoshida, M.I. [Federal Univ. of Minas Geris, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Fields, D. [Roane State Community College, Mathematics and Sciences Div., Roane State Community College, Harriman, TN (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Thermal Performance of Uninsulated and Partially Filled Wall Cavities: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Low-rise, wood-framed homes are the most common type of residential structures in the United States. Wood wall construction supports roofs efficiently and provides a stable frame for attaching interior and exterior wall coverings. Wall cavities are prevalent and increase thermal resistance, particularly when they are filled with insulating material. This paper describes detailed computational fluid dynamics modeling to evaluate the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially filled wall cavities and accounts for conduction through framing, convection, and radiation. Parameters are ambient outdoor temperature, cavity surface emissivity, cavity aspect ratio, and insulation height. Understanding the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially insulated wall cavities is essential for conserving energy in residential buildings. The results can serve as input for building energy simulation tools such as DOE2 and EnergyPlus for modeling the temperature dependent energy performance of new and older homes with uninsulated or partially insulated walls.

Ridouane, E. H.; Bianchi, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Degradation of the materials of construction in Li-ion batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary current-collector materials being used in lithium-ion cells are susceptible to environmental degradation: aluminum to pitting corrosion and copper to environmentally assisted cracking. Pitting occurs at the highly oxidizing potentials associated with the positive-electrode charge condition. However, the pitting mechanism is more complex than that typically observed in aqueous systems in that the pits are filled with a mixed metal/oxide product and exist as mounds or nodules on the surface. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was shown to be an effective analytical tool for quantifying and verifying aluminum corrosion behavior. Two fluorocarbon-based coatings were shown to improve the resistance of Al to pitting attack. Detailed x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) surface analyses showed that there was very little difference in the films observed after simple immersion in either PC:DEC or EC:DMC electrolytes versus those following electrical cycling. Li and P are the predominant surface species. Finally, environmental cracking of copper can occur at or near the lithium potential and only if specific metallurgical conditions exist (work-hardening and large grain size).

Braithwaite, J.W.; Gonzales, A.; Lucero, S.J. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Construction R-value Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Construction R-value Calculator Construction R-value Calculator This online calculator calculates the R-value of a large number of common wall and roof constructions given a specified level of insulation. It uses the isothermal planes method to account for thermal bridging of framing material. Keywords R-value, thermal bridging Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required Basic understanding of construction details is required. Users Approximately 15,000 web hits per month, mainly from New Zealand. Audience Designers and architects, researchers, officials dealing with building regulations Input The user selects the appropriate wall and roof design details from a number of drop-down boxes and enters the R-value of the installed insulation product. Output The program displays the R-value achieved by the wall or roof construction

77

M13 virus/single-walled carbon nanotubes as a materials platform for energy devices and biomedical applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making nanocomposites from combinations of materials each with their own unique functional advantage can often solve issues that cannot be addressed when utilizing only one type of materials. Therefore, controlling ...

Yi, Hyunjung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Encapsulation of phase change materials in concrete masonry construction. Progress report No. 3, June 1978-September 1978. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory on Union Carbide Nuclear Division, ORNL contract number 19Y-14279V, Encapsulation of Phase Change Materials (PCM) in Concrete Masonry Construction, is summarized. Due to program termination, the report also constitutes the final report of the program. Thermal analysis of the system Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/.10H/sub 2/O has shown that after separation upon melting, the heat of fusion is considerably higher than Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.10H/sub 2/O. The system NaCO/sub 3/-K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O has been found to be unsuitable for PCM use. A eutectic in the MgCl/sub 2/-CaCl/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O is under consideration. It exhibits a high heat of fusion and low transition temperature range. Cylindrical shells have been cast using polymer concrete. The shells were subsequently filled with PCM and thermally cycled. No leaking of PCM occurred. Thermal measurements on PCM composite materials were continued.

Sansone, M J

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

Maniscalco, James A. (Danville, CA); Meier, Wayne R. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A Comparative Heat Transfer Examination of Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) With and Without Phase Change Materials (PCMs) Using a Dynamic Wall Simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main focus of this paper was to present data to advance the design of a previously developed thermally-enhanced structural insulated panel (SIP) that had been outfitted with phase change materials (PCMs) (Medina et al., 2008). To advance the development of the previous design, which had only been evaluated under full weather conditions, a set of well-controlled laboratory experiments was carried out. For this, a dynamic wall simulator was built, where a range of important parameters was evaluated. This was done through a comparative heat transfer examination of SIPs, with and without PCMs; where parameters, such as, foam core material of the SIP and material of the PCM holding containers (i.e., encapsulating pipes) were evaluated. Instantaneous heat transfer rates measurements are presented. The two parameters considered (i.e., foam material and pipe material) were found to have first order effects on the performance of PCM-enhanced SIPs. The PCM outfitted SIPs reduced the peak heat fluxes when compared to their own kind, but without PCM. The results indicate that SIPs with molded expanded polystyrene (EPS) cores would benefit more from the PCM enhancement than SIPs with urethane cores. PVC pipes as holding containers for the PCMs did not prove as efficient as metal pipes.

Medina, M.; Zhu, D.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Electrochemical assessment and service-life prediction of mechanically stabilized earth walls backfilled with crushed concrete and recycled asphalt pavement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) wall is a vertical grade separation that uses earth reinforcement extending laterally from the wall to take advantage of earth pressure to reduce the required design strength of the wall. MSE wall systems are often prefabricated to reduce construction time, thus improving constructability when compared with conventionally cast-in-place reinforced wall systems. However, there is a lack of knowledge for predicting the service-life of MSE retaining wall systems when recycled backfill materials such as Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP) and Crushed Concrete (CC) are used instead of Conventional Fill Material (CFM). The specific knowledge missing is how these recycled materials, when used as backfill in MSE wall systems, affects the corrosion rate of the reinforcing strips. This work addresses this knowledge gap by providing recommendations for MSE wall systems backfilled with CC or RAP, and provides a guide to predict the service-life based on corrosion rate test data obtained from embedding steel and galvanized-steel earth reinforcing strips embedded in MSE wall systems backfilled with CC, RAP, and CFM. Experimental data from samples emulating MSE wall systems with steel and galvanized-steel reinforcing strips embedded in CC and RAP were compared to samples with strips embedded in CFM. The results of the testing provide data and methodologies that may, depending on the environmental exposure conditions, justify the use of RAP and CC for the construction of MSE walls. If these backfill materials are obtained from the construction site, this could provide a significant cost savings during construction.

Esfeller, Michael Watts, Jr.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Quantifying improvements in the Engineering-Procurement-Construction (EPC) process from the implementation of information management strategies within materials management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Throughout all industries where material flow or handling is involved, employers have implemented various information management technologies with the following goals: 1) to reduce cost, time, and effort, 2) to improve productivity, 3) to streamline the process, 4) to improve product quality, and 5) to attain a competitive advantage. This study quantifies time and cost impacts on the Engineering Procurement-Construction (EPC) process due to the implementation of information management strategies within materials management related activities. The EPC process was schematically mapped and field data from both owner and contractor companies was collected to serve as the baseline condition. Twenty specific materials management related activities were modeled in detail and also loaded with associated field collected time and cost data. Process changes within these activities were analyzed through Monte Carlo simulation. These process changes were used to modify the baseline values for the EPC process and measure the overall impact. Throughout the previous five years, the activity time involved in an EPC project has decreased slightly (4% probability that a 0.584 unit change has occurred) while the greatest improvements occurred in project cost (8.7% probability that a 3.6135 unit change will occur) and schedule (7.2% probability that a 0.501 unit of change will occur). Information management strategies implemented within bulk commodities or standard engineered equipment had the greatest influence upon elapsed time (schedule), and activity time (total effort). Cost was influenced most heavily by the implementation of information management strategies within specialty engineered equipment and fabricated items. The probability that a 6,474 unit change will occur) while more gradual improvements are forecasted to occur in project cost (5.2"/o probability that 1.8395 unit change will occur) and schedule (16.9% probability that 1.7 units change will occur). Information management strategies implemented within bulk commodities will have the greatest influence upon elapsed time, while strategies implemented within fabricated items will have the greatest influence upon activity time and activity cost. Improvements within fabricated items also improve elapsed time significantly.

Toon, Jeffrey Lee

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Verification and Validation of EnergyPlus Conduction Finite Difference and Phase Change Material Models for Opaque Wall Assemblies  

SciTech Connect

Phase change materials (PCMs) represent a potential technology to reduce peak loads and HVAC energy consumption in buildings. There are few building energy simulation programs that have the capability to simulate PCM but their accuracy has not been completely tested. This report summarizes NREL efforts to develop diagnostic tests cases to obtain accurate energy simulations when PCMs are modeled in residential buildings.

Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Christensen, C.; Bianchi, M.; Booten, C.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Thermal Performance of Uninsulated and Partially Filled Wall Cavities  

SciTech Connect

Wall cavities are widely present in the construction of low rise homes since wood framing is the most common type of construction for residential buildings in the United States. The primary function of such wall construction is to provide a stable frame to which interior and exterior wall coverings can be attached and by which a roof can be supported. The existence of wall cavities increases the thermal resistance of the enclosure, particularly when they are filled with insulating material. Several design guides provide data for prediction of the thermal resistance of uninsulated wall cavities of varying internal geometries. However, U-value coefficients provided in these guides do not account for partially insulated cavities or for variations in aspect ratio. Whole building energy simulation tools, like DOE2 or Energy Plus, use simplified, 1-D characterization of building envelopes. For the most part, this characterization assumes a fixed thermal resistance over the range of temperatures experienced by the enclosure. In reality, the thermal resistance is dominated by convection and radiation and is a function of several parameters, including the temperatures and emissivities of the cavity surfaces and the aspect ratio of the cavity. This study describes detailed CFD modeling to evaluate the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially filled wall cavities accounting for conduction through framing, convection, and radiation. The resulting correlations can serve as input for DOE2 and Energy Plus modeling of older homes, where the walls are either uninsulated or partially insulated due to the settling of the insulating material. Parameters of the study are the ambient temperature outdoors, emissivity of the cavity surfaces, cavity aspect ratio, and height of the insulation level. The outcomes of this study provide: An understanding of the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially insulated wall cavities, which is an essential aspect of energy conservation in residential buildings. Accurate input for whole building simulations models like DOE2 and Energy Plus in various climate zones. Recommendations on retrofit measures.

Ridouane, E.H.; Bianchi, M. V. A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Bumper wall for plasma device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operation of a plasma device such as a reactor for controlled thermonuclear fusion is facilitated by an improved bumper wall enclosing the plasma to smooth the flow of energy from the plasma as the energy impinges upon the bumper wall. The bumper wall is flexible to withstand unequal and severe thermal shocks and it is readily replaced at less expense than the cost of replacing structural material in the first wall and blanket that surround it.

Coultas, Thomas A. (Hinsdale, IL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Advanced Materials in MML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Advanced Materials Characterization. Fusion Wall Development Research by Neutron Depth Profiling. < Previous 1 2 3 Next . ...

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

87

Sustainable Construction Materials and Technologies Y.-M. Chun, P. Claisse, T.R. Naik & E. Ganjian -Editors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

115 L. Guangcheng, L. Yunhua & X. Youjun #12;Ultra fine fly ash concrete 121 B.K.T. Kandie & E.A. Byars Achieving sustainable construction through use of fly ash in concrete ­ An Indian experience 131 M-reducing agent 147 K. Sasaki, M. Ishii,Y. Butou & K.Yuno The use of fly ash for enhancing durability

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

88

BNL | Joseph S. Wall  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joseph S. Wall Joseph S. Wall Emeritus Research Interests Mass mapping of unstained biological molecules with the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), particularly assemblies of complexes from subunits of known size and shape. Examples include: Alzheimer's filaments, viral capsids, annelid hemoglobins, hemocyanins, proteases, chaperonins, microtubule proteins, prions and various nucleic acid-protein complexes. Another research area is instrument development involving design and construction of an instrument for low-temperture, energy loss spectroscopy, and elemental mapping at low dose. This is being used to map phosphorus in nucleic acid-protein complexes, phosphorylated proteins and phospholipid structures. He also is director of the Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope STEM

89

Encapsulation of phase change materials in concrete masonry construction. Progress report No. 1, August 1977--February 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The improvement of thermal energy storage capacity of potential building materials by incorporation of phase change materials (PCM's) is being explored. Both inorganic salt hydrates and organic systems are potentially useful PCM's for encapsulation in concrete, polymer concrete, and/or polymer-impregnated concrete matrices. It is felt at this time that most PCM's melting at or above 40/sup 0/C can be encapsulated in large quantities in polymer concrete. Methods relating to the encapsulation of lower melting materials in various matrices are currently being studied.

Sansone, M J

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Experimental study of a fiber absorber-suppressor modified Trombe wall  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study has been conducted to ascertain the effects of introducing fiber bed absorbers on Trombe wall passive solar collectors. Two identical, Trombe wall passive solar units were constructed that incorporate the basic components of masonry collector-storage walls: glazings, masonry and thermal insulation. Both units were extensively instrumented with thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Ambient temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and insolation are also measured. In the first part of the study the two Trombe wall units were tested with a single glass cover. The thermal performance of both units was found to be virtually identical. In the second part of the study a single cover Trombe wall unit was compared with a double cover unit and the latter was found to have higher air gap and masonry wall temperatures and heat fluxes. In the final phase of the experiment, an absorbing, scattering and emitting fiberglass-like material was placed in the air gap of the single gazed wall. Tests were conducted to compare the solar-thermal performance, heat loss and gain characteristics between the units with and without the fiber absorber-suppressor. This experiment showed that the fiber bed served to decouple the wall at night from its exterior environment and to reduce the heat losses. The modified Trombe wall with the fiber absorber-suppressor out-performed the double glazed Trombe wall system by approximately ten percent gain in useable thermal energy. Also, the fiber bed eliminates one glazing thereby reducing system cost as well.

Choudhury, D; Birkebak, R C

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Materials Reliability Program: Testing and Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Plate Heat JRQ to Assess Through-Wall Attenua tion of Radiation Embrittlement (MRP-243)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The change in neutron energy spectrum through the wall of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) requires the use of an exposure parameter or metric for assessing radiation embrittlement. This report looks at experimental fracture toughness and Charpy V-notch (CVN) data generated in a special International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) experiment designed to simulate an RPV wall of 190 mm thickness. These experimental data are compared with the current exposure metric of displacements per atom (dpa) coupled with ...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

92

Materials Reliability Program: Testing and Evaluation of Two Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels Irradiated to Assess Through-Wall Attenu ation of Radiation Embrittlement (MRP-203)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The change in neutron energy spectrum through the wall of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) requires the use of an exposure parameter or metric for assessing radiation embrittlement. This report looks at experimental fracture toughness and Charpy V-notch data generated in a special International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) experiment designed to simulate an RPV wall of 180-mm thickness. These experimental data are compared with the current exposure metric of displacements per atom (dpa) coupled with an emb...

2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

93

Seismic Vulnerability and Performance Level of confined brick walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been an increase on the interest of Engineers and designers to use designing methods based on displacement and behavior (designing based on performance) Regarding to the importance of resisting structure design against dynamic loads such as earthquake, and inability to design according to prediction of nonlinear behavior element caused by nonlinear properties of constructional material.Economically speaking, easy carrying out and accessibility of masonry material have caused an enormous increase in masonry structures in villages, towns and cities. On the other hand, there is a necessity to study behavior and Seismic Vulnerability in these kinds of structures since Iran is located on the earthquake belt of Alpide.Different reasons such as environmental, economic, social, cultural and accessible constructional material have caused different kinds of constructional structures.In this study, some tied walls have been modeled with software and with relevant accelerator suitable with geology conditions under dynamic analysis to research on the Seismic Vulnerability and performance level of confined brick walls. Results from this analysis seem to be satisfactory after comparison of them with the values in Code ATC40, FEMA and standard 2800 of Iran.

Ghalehnovi, M.; Rahdar, H. A. [University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

94

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials and methods are available as supplementary materials on Science Online. 16. W. Benz, A. G. W. Cameron, H. J. Melosh, Icarus 81, 113 (1989). 17. S. L. Thompson, H. S. Lauson, Technical Rep. SC-RR-710714, Sandia Nat. Labs (1972). 18. H. J. Melosh, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 42, 2079 (2007). 19. S. Ida, R. M. Canup, G. R. Stewart, Nature 389, 353 (1997). 20. E. Kokubo, J. Makino, S. Ida, Icarus 148, 419 (2000). 21. M. M. M. Meier, A. Reufer, W. Benz, R. Wieler, Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society LXXIV, abstr. 5039 (2011). 22. C. B. Agnor, R. M. Canup, H. F. Levison, Icarus 142, 219 (1999). 23. D. P. O'Brien, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Icarus 184, 39 (2006). 24. R. M. Canup, Science 307, 546 (2005). 25. J. J. Salmon, R. M. Canup, Lunar Planet. Sci. XLIII, 2540 (2012). Acknowledgments: SPH simulation data are contained in tables S2 to S5 of the supplementary materials. Financial support

95

SUSTAINABLE CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particles, can offer the means to both remove and remediate waste. We support projects that aim to build

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

96

CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING TEST METHOD ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Constant Normal Force _____ 02/L57 ASTM D4644 Slake Durability of Shales and Similar Weak Rocks _____ 02/L58 ...

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

97

First wall for polarized fusion reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A first-wall or first-wall coating for use in a fusion reactor having polarized fuel may be formed of a low-Z non-metallic material having slow spin relaxation, i.e., a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/. Materials having these properties include hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous semiconductors. A method for preventing the rapid depolarization of a polarized plasma in a fusion device may comprise the step of providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/.

Greenside, H.S.; Budny, R.V.; Post, D.E. Jr.

1985-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

98

TEST-HOLE CONSTRUCTION FOR A NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Test-hole construction is described for a reactor which provides safe and ready access to the neutron flux region for specimen materials which are to be irradiated therein. An elongated tubular thimble adapted to be inserted in the access hole through the wall of the reactor is constructed of aluminum and is provided with a plurality of holes parallel to the axis of the thimble for conveying the test specimens into position for irradiation, and a conduit for the circulation of coolant. A laminated shield formed of alternate layers of steel and pressed wood fiber is disposed lengthwise of the thimble near the outer end thereof.

Ohlinger, L.A.; Seitz, F.; Young, G.J.

1959-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

99

Material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Li(Ni{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}Mn{sub 0.4})O{sub 2} was investigated to understand the effect of replacement of the cobalt by aluminum on the structural and electrochemical properties. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed, utilizing a novel in situ electrochemical cell, specifically designed for long-term X-ray experiments. The cell was cycled at a moderate rate through a typical Li-ion battery operating voltage range. (1.0-4.7 V) XAS measurements were performed at different states of charge (SOC) during cycling, at the Ni, Co, and the Mn edges, revealing details about the response of the cathode to Li insertion and extraction processes. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) region of the spectra revealed the changes of bond distance and coordination number of Ni, Co, and Mn absorbers as a function of the SOC of the material. The oxidation states of the transition metals in the system are Ni{sup 2+}, Co{sup 3+}, and Mn{sup 4+} in the as-made material (fully discharged), while during charging the Ni{sup 2+} is oxidized to Ni{sup 4+} through an intermediate stage of Ni{sup 3+}, Co{sup 3+} is oxidized toward Co{sup 4+}, and Mn was found to be electrochemically inactive and remained as Mn{sup 4+}. The EXAFS results during cycling show that the Ni-O changes the most, followed by Co-O, and Mn-O varies the least. These measurements on this cathode material confirmed that the material retains its symmetry and good structural short-range order leading to the superior cycling reported earlier.

Rumble, C.; Conry, T.E.; Doeff, Marca; Cairns, Elton J.; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Deb, Aniruddha

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

100

Thermal Impact of Fasteners in High-Performance Wood-Framed Walls: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are heavy consumers of energy, and residential building design is rapidly addressing topics to maximize energy conservation en route to net-zero energy consumption. Annual energy analysis of a building informs the choice among disparate energy measures, for cost, durability, occupant comfort, and whole-house energy use. Physics-based and empirical models of elements of a building are used in such analyses. High-performance wood-framed walls enable builders to construct homes that use much less than 40% of the energy consumed by similar homes built to minimum code. Modeling for these walls has considered physical features such as framing factor, insulation and framing properties, roughness and convective effects, and air leakage. The thermal effects of fasteners used to construct these walls have not been fully evaluated, even though their thermal conductivity is orders of magnitudes higher than that of other building materials. Drywall screws and siding nails are considered in this finite element thermal conductivity analysis of wall sections that represent wood-framed walls that are often used in high-performance homes. Nails and screws reduce even the best walls' insulating performance by approximately 3% and become increasingly significant as the framing factor increases.

Christensen, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Thermal Impact of Fasteners in High-Performance Wood-Framed Walls: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are heavy consumers of energy, and residential building design is rapidly addressing topics to maximize energy conservation en route to net-zero energy consumption. Annual energy analysis of a building informs the choice among disparate energy measures, for cost, durability, occupant comfort, and whole-house energy use. Physics-based and empirical models of elements of a building are used in such analyses. High-performance wood-framed walls enable builders to construct homes that use much less than 40% of the energy consumed by similar homes built to minimum code. Modeling for these walls has considered physical features such as framing factor, insulation and framing properties, roughness and convective effects, and air leakage. The thermal effects of fasteners used to construct these walls have not been fully evaluated, even though their thermal conductivity is orders of magnitudes higher than that of other building materials. Drywall screws and siding nails are considered in this finite element thermal conductivity analysis of wall sections that represent wood-framed walls that are often used in high-performance homes. Nails and screws reduce even the best walls' insulating performance by approximately 3% and become increasingly significant as the framing factor increases.

Christensen, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Method of remotely constructing a room  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The testing of nuclear devices of high explosive yield has required that cavities of relatively large size be provided at considerable distances below the surface of the earth for the pre-detonation emplacement of the device. The construction of an essentially watertight chamber or room in the cavity is generally required for the actual emplacement of the device. A method is described of constructing such a room deep within the earth by personnel at the surface. A dual wall bladder of a watertight, pliable fabric material is lowered down a shaft into a selected position. The bladder is filled with a concrete grout while a heavy fluid having essentially the same density as the grout is maintained on both sides of the bladder, to facilitate complete deployment of the bladder by the grout to form a room of desired configuration. (10 claims)

Michie, J.D.; De Hart, R.C.

1971-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

103

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

104

Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

Doru M. Stefanescu

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

105

Finite element analysis of the Arquin-designed CMU wall under a dynamic (blast) load.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arquin Corporation designed a CMU (concrete masonry unit) wall construction and reinforcement technique that includes steel wire and polymer spacers that is intended to facilitate a faster and stronger wall construction. Since the construction method for an Arquin-designed wall is different from current wall construction practices, finite element computer analyses were performed to estimate the ability of the wall to withstand a hypothetical dynamic load, similar to that of a blast from a nearby explosion. The response of the Arquin wall was compared to the response of an idealized standard masonry wall exposed to the same dynamic load. Results from the simulations show that the Arquin wall deformed less than the idealized standard wall under such loading conditions. As part of a different effort, Sandia National Laboratories also looked at the relative static response of the Arquin wall, results that are summarized in a separate SAND Report.

Lopez, Carlos; Petti, Jason P.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Residential Utility Core Wall System - ResCore  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes activities associated with the RESidential utility CORE wall system (ResCore) developed by students and faculty in the Department of Industrial Design at Auburn University between 1996 and 1998. These activities analyize three operational prototype units installed in Habitat for Humanity Houses. The paper contains two Parts: 1) analysis of the three operational prototype units, 2) exploration of alternative design solutions. ResCore is a manufactured construction component designed to expedite home building by decreasing the need for skilled labor at the work site. The unit concentrates untility elements into a wall unit(s), which is shipped to the construction site and installed in minimum time. The ResCore unit is intended to be built off-site in a manufacturing environment where the impact of vagaries of weather and work-crew coordination and scheduling are minimized. The controlled environment of the factory enhances efficient production of building components through material and labor throughput controls, enabling the production of components at a substantially reduced per-unit cost. The ResCore unit when compared to traditional "stick-built" utility wall components is in may ways analogous to the factory built roof truss compared to on-site "stick-Built" roof framing.

Boyd, G.; Lundell, C.; Wendt, R.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

First wall for polarized fusion reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Depolarization mechanisms arising from the recycling of the polarized fuel at the limiter and the first-wall of a fusion reactor are greater than those mechanisms in the plasma. Rapid depolarization of the plasma is prevented by providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec.sup.-1.

Greenside, Henry S. (Cranbury, NJ); Budny, Robert V. (Princeton, NJ); Post, Jr., Douglass E. (Buttonwood, CT)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Dynamic load test of Arquin-designed CMU wall.  

SciTech Connect

The Arquin Corporation has developed a new method of constructing CMU (concrete masonry unit) walls. This new method uses polymer spacers connected to steel wires that serve as reinforcing as well as a means of accurately placing the spacers so that the concrete block can be dry stacked. The hollows of the concrete block are then filled with grout. As part of a New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA), Sandia National Laboratories conducted a series of tests that dynamically loaded wall segments to compare the performance of walls constructed using the Arquin method to a more traditional method of constructing CMU walls. A total of four walls were built, two with traditional methods and two with the Arquin method. Two of the walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every third cell filled with grout. The remaining two walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every cell filled with grout. The walls were dynamically loaded with explosive forces. No significant difference was noted between the performance of the walls constructed by the Arquin method when compared to the walls constructed by the traditional method.

Jensen, Richard Pearson

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The logic behind thick, liquid-walled, fusion concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It may be possible to surround the region where fusion reactions are taking place with a neutronically thick liquid blanket which has penetrations that allow only a few tenths of a percent of the neutrons to leak out. Even these neutrons can be attenuated by adding an accurately placed liquid or solid near the target to shadow-shield the beam ports from line-of-sight neutrons. The logic of such designs are discussed and their evolution is described with examples applied to both magnetic and inertial fusion (HYLIFE-II). These designs with liquid protection are self healing when exposed to pulsed loading and have a number of advantages-over the usual designs with solid first walls. For example, the liquid-protected solid components will last the life of the plant, and therefore the capacity factor is estimated to be approximately 10% higher than for the non-liquid-walled blankets, because no blanket replacement shutdowns are required. The component replacement, operations, and maintenance costs might be half the usual value because no blanket change-out costs or accompanying facilities are required. These combined savings might lower the cost of electricity by 20%. Nuclear-grade construction should not be needed, largely because the liquid attenuates neutrons and results in less activation of materials. Upon decommissioning, the reactor materials should qualify for disposal by shallow burial even when constructed of ordinary 304 stainless steel. The need for a high-intensity 14-MeV neutron test facility to develop first-wall materials is avoided or greatly reduced, saving billions of development dollars. Flowing molten Li, the molten salt Flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}), and molten Li{sub l7}Pb{sub 83} have been considered. An advantage of molten salt is that it will not burn and has a low tritium solubility and therefore low tritium inventory.

Moir, R.W.

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Energy-conserving and passive-solar construction details  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diagrams are presented which show construction details for insulating foundations, walls, joists, roofs, and other components of energy-conserving residential and light commercial buildings; glazing systems; installing thermal mass; rock beds; and a passive hot air collector. The emphasis is on using commercially available building materials in new applications to minimize costs and maximize thermal design. The costs are given which are typical of what builders have incurred in different parts of the country. The thermal performance figures and comments are included. (LEW)

Taylor, R D

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fracture of welded aluminum thin-walled structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive methodology was developed in the thesis for damage prediction of welded aluminum thin-walled structures, which includes material modeling, calibration, numerical simulation and experimental verification. ...

Zheng, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Prismatic wall heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prismatic beam concentrator mounted at the top of two adjacent walls so as to receive a rectangular incipient beam of diffused sunlight and emit a vertical concentrated sheet beam through a cavity between the walls to a mirror which reflects the beam at right angles onto a radiant iron bar at the base of one wall, as a source of supplemental household heat.

Clegg, J. E.

1985-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

114

Wall System Innovations: Familiar Materials, Better Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation was delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Technical Update meeting on April 29-30, 2013, in Denver, Colorado.

115

EL Program: Sustainable Engineered Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... surface damage, electrical aging, and dispersion of ... power industry and utilities, construction and infrastructure materials specifiers ...

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

116

SO(10) domain-wall brane models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct domain-wall brane models based on the grand-unification group SO(10), generalising the SU(5) model of Davies, George and Volkas. Motivated by the Dvali-Shifman proposal for the dynamical localisation of gauge bosons, the SO(10) symmetry is spontaneously broken inside the wall. We present two scenarios: in the first, the unbroken subgroup inside the wall is SU(5) x U(1)X, and in the second it is the left-right symmetry group SU(3) x SU(2)L x SU(2)R x U(1)B-L. In both cases we demonstrate that the phenomenologically-correct fermion zero modes can be localised to the wall, and we briefly discuss how the symmetry-breaking dynamics may be extended to induce breaking to the standard model group with subsequent electroweak breaking. Dynamically localised gravity is realised through the type 2 Randall-Sundrum mechanism.

Jayne E. Thompson; Raymond R. Volkas

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

117

Inorganic Materials Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... experimental and computational materials science research. This work will help the US construction industry be competitive in advanced concrete ...

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

118

Construction proprietary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Construction a. The composite mirrors The mirror was made of a graphite #12;ber backing, coated An aerogel radiator can in principle pro- vide hadron separation throughout the full momentum range. However proton aerogel gas GeV mrad 0 50 100 150 200 250 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 track parameters Direct Ray Tracing

119

Detection of Cell Wall Chemical Variation in Zea Mays Mutants Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corn stover is regarded as the prime candidate feedstock material for commercial biomass conversion in the United States. Variations in chemical composition of Zea mays cell walls can affect biomass conversion process yields and economics. Mutant lines were constructed by activating a Mu transposon system. The cell wall chemical composition of 48 mutant families was characterized using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. NIR data were analyzed using a multivariate statistical analysis technique called Principal Component Analysis (PCA). PCA of the NIR data from 349 maize leaf samples reveals 57 individuals as outliers on one or more of six Principal Components (PCs) at the 95% confidence interval. Of these, 19 individuals from 16 families are outliers on either PC3 (9% of the variation) or PC6 (1% of the variation), the two PCs that contain information about cell wall polymers. Those individuals for which altered cell wall chemistry is confirmed with wet chemical analysis will then be subjected to fermentation analysis to determine whether or not biomass conversion process kinetics, yields and/or economics are significantly affected. Those mutants that provide indications for a decrease in process cost will be pursued further to identify the gene(s) responsible for the observed changes in cell wall composition and associated changes in process economics. These genes will eventually be incorporated into maize breeding programs directed at the development of a truly dual use crop.

Buyck, N.; Thomas, S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Hot wire production of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus (210) for producing a multi-wall carbon nanotube (213) may comprise a process chamber (216), a furnace (217) operatively associated with the process chamber (216), and at least one filament (218) positioned within the process chamber (216). At least one power supply (220) operatively associated with the at least one filament (218) heats the at least one filament (218) to a process temperature. A gaseous carbon precursor material (214) operatively associated with the process chamber (216) provides carbon for forming the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213). A metal catalyst material (224) operatively associated with the process (216) catalyzes the formation of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213).

Dillon, Anne C. (Boulder, CO); Mahan, Archie H. (Golden, CO); Alleman, Jeffrey L. (Lakewood, CO)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Domain walls riding the wave.  

SciTech Connect

Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the ferromagnetic wire is the preferred method, as it combines manipulation and readout of the domain-wall state. The electrons that take part in the process of readout and manipulation of the domain-wall structure in the nanowire do so through the so-called spin transfer torque: When spin-polarized electrons in the ferromagnet nanowire pass through the domain wall they experience a nonuniform magnetization, and they try to align their spins with the local magnetic moments. The force that the electrons experience has a reaction force counterpart that 'pushes' the local magnetic moments, resulting in movement of the domain wall in the direction of the electron flow through the spin-transfer torque. The forces between the electrons and the local magnetic moments in the ferromagnet also create additional electrical resistance for the electrons passing through the domain wall. By measuring resistance across a segment of the nanowire, one determines if a domain wall is present; i.e., one can read the stored information. The interaction of the spin-polarized electrons with the domain wall in the ferromagnetic nanowire is not very efficient. Even for materials achieving high polarization of the free electrons, it is very difficult to move the magnetic domain wall. Several factors contribute to this problem, with imperfections of the ferromagnetic nanowire that cause domain-wall pinning being the dominant one. Permalloy nanowires, one of the best candidates for domain-wall-based memory and logic devices, require current densities of the order of 10{sup 8} A/cm{sup 2} in order to move a domain wall from a pinning well. Considering that this current has to pass through a relatively long wire, it is not very difficult to imagine that most of the energy will go to Joule heating. The efficiency of the process - the ratio of the energy converted to domain-wall motion to the total energy consumed - is comparable to that of an incandescent light bulb converting electricity to light. A step towards more efficient domain-wall-based memory devices is the advance of using alternating currents or curren

Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Collector: storage wall systems  

SciTech Connect

Passive Trombe wall systems require massive masonry walls to minimize large temperature swings and movable night insulation to prevent excessive night heat losses. As a solar energy collection system, Trombe wall systems have low efficiencies because of the nature of the wall and, if auxiliary heat is needed, because of absorption of this heat. Separation of collector and storage functions markedly improves the efficiency. A simple fiberglass absorber can provide high efficiency while phase change storage provides a compact storage unit. The need for movable insulation is obviated.

Boardman, H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Materials Used in the Construction of a 2,272 Square-Foot Single-Family Home 13,837 board-feet of lumber 12 interior doors 13,118 square feet of sheathing 6 closet doors 19 tons of concrete 2 garage doors 3,206 square feet of exterior siding material 1 fireplace 3,103 square feet of roofing material 3 toilets, 2 bathtubs, 1 shower stall 3,061 square feet of insulation 3 bathroom sinks 6,050 square feet of interior wall material 15 kitchen cabinets, 5 other cabinets 2,335 square feet of interior ceiling material 1 kitchen sink 226 linear feet of ducting 1 range, 1 refrigerator, 1 dishwasher, 1 garbage disposal, 1 range hood 19 windows 1 washer, 1 dryer 4 exterior doors (3 hinged, 1 sliding) 1 heating and cooling system 2,269 square feet of flooring material Source(s):

124

Static load test of Arquin-designed CMU wall.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arquin Corporation has developed a new method of constructing CMU (concrete masonry unit) walls. This new method uses polymer spacers connected to steel wires that serve as reinforcing as well as means of accurately placing the spacers so that the concrete block can be dry stacked. The hollows of the concrete block used in constructing the wall are then filled with grout. As part of a New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBAP), Sandia National Laboratories conducted a series of tests that statically loaded wall segments to compare the Arquin method to a more traditional method of constructing CMU walls. A total of 12 tests were conducted, three with the Arquin method using a W5 reinforcing wire, three with the traditional method of construction using a number 3 rebar as reinforcing, three with the Arquin method using a W2 reinforcing wire, and three with the traditional construction method but without rebar. The results of the tests showed that the walls constructed with the Arquin method and with a W5 reinforcing wire withstood more load than any of the other three types of walls that were tested.

Jensen, Richard Pearson; Cherry, Jeffery L.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

SPIE 's 4TH Annual Symposium on Smart Structures and Materials, paper 3041 -38, Catamaran Resort Hotel, San Diego,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hotel, San Diego, CA, 2-6 March 97 LARGE-AMPLITUDE ROTARY INDUCED-STRAIN (LARIS) ACTUATOR PROOF-strain material stacks is proposed. The concept utilizes the theory of twist-warping coupling in thin-wall open-amplifier utilizing the warping-torsion coupling of an open tube, is a viable design option, of great constructive

Giurgiutiu, Victor

126

APCF Construction Schedule | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APCF APCF Past APCF Memoranda APCF, Construction Schedule This is a tentative schedule of the daily construction at APCF. For the preliminary two to three week look ahead schedule, please click the PDF calendar to the left. The potential for ground vibration is noted in the "Impact" column (None, Small, Moderate, High, Very High). Daily schedule for dates up to 01.17.2014 Day Activity Impact Monday - 08.05.13 Studs and Drywall None Ceiling Piping None Curtain Wall None Site Grading Low Tuesday - 08.06.13 Studs and Drywall None Ceiling Piping None Curtain Wall None Landscaping Low Wednesday - 08.07.13 Studs and Drywall None Ceiling Piping None Curtain Wall None Landscaping Low Thursday - 08.08.13 Studs and Drywall None Ceiling Piping None Curtain Wall None

127

PRE-CONSTRUCTION CHECKLIST  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

POST-AWARD MEETING AGENDA ITEMS POST-AWARD MEETING AGENDA ITEMS Safety & Environmental 2. Job site safety walk-down and supervisor orientation schedule. 3. Safety aspects of job evaluated, identified and workers informed. 4. Check worker licensing and certifications. 5. Burn Permit approval requirements. 6. OSHA health cards up-to-date as required by site. 7. Scaffolding inspections signed. 8. Check job-site for any confined spaces and insure compliance with entry. 9. Check to insure any underground utilities have been located and identified. 10. Check to insure any in-the-wall utilities have been located and identified. 11. Check to insure all hazardous materials either stored or as a part of the facility, have been located and identified. Site specific requirements for hazardous material handling identified.

128

Walls and Windows  

SciTech Connect

Energy travels in and out of a building through the walls and windows by means of conduction, convection, and radiation. The walls and windows, complex systems in themselves, are part of the overall building system. A wall system is composed of multiple layers that work in concert to provide shelter from the exterior weather. Wall systems vary in the degree to which they provide thermal resistance, moisture resistance, durability, and thermal storage. High tech windows are now available that can resist radiation heat transfer while still providing light and visibility. The combination of walls and windows within the building system can be adapted to meet a wide range of environmental conditions, recognizing that the best building envelope system for one climate may not be the first choice for another location.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Standing gravitational waves from domain walls  

SciTech Connect

We construct a plane symmetric, standing gravitational wave for a domain wall plus a massless scalar field. The scalar field can be associated with a fluid which has the properties of 'stiff' matter, i.e., matter in which the speed of sound equals the speed of light. Although domain walls are observationally ruled out in the present era, the solution has interesting features which might shed light on the character of exact nonlinear wave solutions to Einstein's equations. Additionally this solution may act as a template for higher dimensional 'brane-world' model standing waves.

Gogberashvili, Merab [Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, 6 Tamarashvili Street, Tbilisi 0177 (Georgia); Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze Avenue, Tbilisi 0128 (Georgia); California State University, Fresno, Physics Department, Fresno, California 93740-8031 (United States); Myrzakul, Shynaray [Department of General and Theoretical Physics, Gumilev Eurasian National University, Astana, 010008 (Kazakhstan); California State University, Fresno, Physics Department, Fresno, California 93740-8031 (United States); Singleton, Douglas [California State University, Fresno, Physics Department, Fresno, California 93740-8031 (United States); Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia, Moscow 117198 (Russian Federation)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

A two-fold interpenetrating 3D metal-organic framework material constructed from helical chains linked via 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz fragments  

SciTech Connect

A 3-connected dia-f-type metal-organic framework compound {l_brace}[Ag(L){sub 3/2}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} (1) has been synthesized by self-assembly of 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz (L=4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz=3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole) and Ag{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} under hydrothermal conditions. It crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I4{sub 1}/acd with a=21.406(4) A, b=21.406(4) A, c=36.298(8) A, Z=32. X-ray single-crystal diffraction reveals that 1 has a three-dimensional framework with an unprecedented alternate left- and right-handed helices structure, featuring a non-uniform two-fold interpenetrated (4.14{sup 2}) net. Photoluminescent investigation reveals that the title compound displays interesting emissions in a wide region, which shows that the title compound may be a good potential candidate as a photoelectric material. - Graphical abstract: A 3-connected dia-f-type metal-organic framework compound [Ag(4,4'-bpz){sub 3/2}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}] shows unprecedented alternating left- and right-handed helices structure, featuring a non-uniform two-fold interpenetrated (4.14{sup 2}) net.

Xie Yiming [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 35002 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Huaqiao University, the Key Laboratory for Functional Materials of Fujian Higher Education, Quanzhou, Fujian 362021 (China); Zhao Zhenguo; Wu Xiaoyuan; Zhang Qisheng; Chen Lijuan; Wang Fei; Chen Shanci [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 35002 (China); Lu Canzhong [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 35002 (China)], E-mail: czlu@fjirsm.ac.cn

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

PUMP CONSTRUCTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pump which utilizes the fluid being pumped through it as its lubricating fluid is described. This is achieved by means of an improved bearing construction in a pump of the enclosed or canned rotor type. At the outlet end of the pump, adjacent to an impeller mechanism, there is a bypass which conveys some of the pumped fluid to a chamber at the inlet end of the pump. After this chamber becomes full, the pumped fluid passes through fixed orifices in the top of the chamber and exerts a thrust on the inlet end of the pump rotor. Lubrication of the rotor shaft is accomplished by passing the pumped fluid through a bypass at the outlet end of the rotor shaft. This bypass conveys Pumped fluid to a cooling means and then to grooves on the surface of the rotor shait, thus lubricating the shaft.

Strickland, G.; Horn, F.L.; White, H.T.

1960-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls  

SciTech Connect

The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Moisture Management of High-R Walls (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

Not Available

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Installing Windows with Foam Sheathing on a Wood-Frame Wall  

SciTech Connect

Residential housing design continues to move toward the development of high-performance sustainable building systems. To be sustainable, a building must not only be efficient and durable but also economically viable. For these reasons, new methods of enclosure design have been examined that provide high thermal performance and long-term durability and also reduce material use (including waste), simplify or integrate systems and details, and potentially reduce overall initial costs of construction. One new idea relating to enclosure design is to use exterior foam insulating sheathing as the primary sheathing and drainage plane for the wall assembly. However, as with any building enclosure system, proper details for the management of water, vapor, and energy transfer is critical. Window systems need to be installed in such a way as to be consistent with principles of building science. Window installations also require an understanding of how to maintain the continuity of the drainage plane of the wall.

Not Available

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Texas Small Construction Site Notice | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Small Construction Site Notice Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Texas Small Construction Site Notice Details Activities (0)...

136

INTEGRATED ENERGY EFFICIENT WINDOW-WALL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The building industry faces the challenge of reducing energy use while simultaneously improving construction methods and marketability. This paper describes the first phase of a project to address these concerns by designing an Integrated Window Wall System (IWWS) that can be commercialized. This work builds on previous research conducted during the 1990's by Lawrence Berkeley national Laboratories (LBNL). During this phase, the objective was to identify appropriate technologies, problems and issues and develop a number of design concepts. Four design concepts were developed into prototypes and preliminary energy analyses were conducted Three of these concepts (the foam wall, steel wall, and stiffened plate designs) showed particular potential for meeting the project objectives and will be continued into a second phase where one or two of the systems will be brought closer to commercialization.

Michael Arney, Ph.D.

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 18 AND TANK 19 WALL SAMPLER PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect

A sampling tool was required to evaluate residual activity ({mu}Curies per square foot) on the inner wall surfaces of underground nuclear waste storage tanks. The tool was required to collect a small sample from the 3/8 inch thick tank walls. This paper documents the design, testing, and deployment of the remotely operated sampling device. The sampler provides material from a known surface area to estimate the overall surface contamination in the tank prior to closure. The sampler consisted of a sampler and mast assembly mast assembly, control system, and the sampler, or end effector, which is defined as the operating component of a robotic arm. The mast assembly consisted of a vertical 30 feet long, 3 inch by 3 inch, vertical steel mast and a cantilevered arm hinged at the bottom of the mast and lowered by cable to align the attached sampler to the wall. The sampler and mast assembly were raised and lowered through an opening in the tank tops, called a riser. The sampler is constructed of a mounting plate, a drill, springs to provide a drive force to the drill, a removable sampler head to collect the sample, a vacuum pump to draw the sample from the drill to a filter, and controls to operate the system. Once the sampler was positioned near the wall, electromagnets attached it to the wall, and the control system was operated to turn on the drill and vacuum to remove and collect a sample from the wall. Samples were collected on filters in removable sampler heads, which were readily transported for further laboratory testing.

Leishear, R.; Thaxton, D.; Minichan, R.; France, T.; Steeper, T.; Corbett, J.; Martin, B.; Vetsch, B.

2009-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

138

Phenomenological theory of a single domain wall in uniaxial trigonal ferroelectrics: Lithium niobate and lithium tantalate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phenomenological theory of a single domain wall in uniaxial trigonal ferroelectrics: Lithium niobate and lithium tantalate David A. Scrymgeour and Venkatraman Gopalan Department of Materials Science, lithium niobate and lithium tantalate. The contributions to the domain- wall energy from polarization

Gopalan, Venkatraman

139

Thermal performance of concrete masonry unit wall systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New materials, modern building wall technologies now available in the building marketplace, and unique, more accurate, methods of thermal analysis of wall systems create an opportunity to design and erect buildings where thermal envelopes that use masonry wall systems can be more efficient. Thermal performance of the six masonry wall systems is analyzed. Most existing masonry systems are modifications of technologies presented in this paper. Finite difference two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer modeling and unique methods of the clear wall and overall thermal analysis were used. In the design of thermally efficient masonry wall systems is t to know how effectively the insulation material is used and how the insulation shape and its location affect the wall thermal performance. Due to the incorrect shape of the insulation or structural components, hidden thermal shorts cause additional heat losses. In this study, the thermal analysis of the clear wall was enriched with the examination of the thermal properties of the wall details and the study of a quantity defined herein the Thermal Efficiency of the insulation material.

Kosny, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Application of phase change materials in passive solar systems. Final report, October 1, 1977-November 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A modular, hybrid passive solar energy collection and storage unit called the Thermal Wall Panel was designed and constructed. The Thermal Wall Panel uses the concept of energy storage in phase change materials combined with direct solar gain. Based on measurements, a Thermal Wall Panel with movable night-time insulation (R = 6.80) between the storage components and the outside can retain and deliver as heat an average of 45 percent of the sun's energy which falls on it during the day. Based on calculations, a 120 square foot wall can provide about 25 percent of the heating needs of a 1100 square foot house. Analysis indicates that when the Thermal Wall Panel (R = 6.00 nighttime insulation) is combined with other direct gain passive solar energy systems as large, south-facing windows, 56 percent of a home's heating needs can be provided. A Thermal Wall Panel can be installed into a typical home in the Mid-Atlantic Region for an incremental cost of from $6 to $8 per square foot beyond the cost of the normal wall and pay for itself in 5 to 9 years at 1978 energy costs. Also, the Thermal Wall Panel does not require any additional foundation support. A computer model has been developed for the Thermal Wall Panel which shows good agreement with predicted and measured performance.

Sliwkowski, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Explicit finite element analysis of lightly reinforced masonry shear walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Explicit finite element analysis (FEA) of masonry shear walls containing reinforcement at spacing between 800mm and 2000mm, referred to as wide spaced reinforced masonry (WSRM), are modelled using macroscopic material characteristics for the unreinforced ... Keywords: Characteristic length, Ductility, Explicit finite element method, Failure mode, Masonry shear walls: Reinforced masonry, Quasi-static modelling

M. Dhanasekar; W. Haider

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Characterization of Environmental and Construction Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2012 ... Mercury Oxidation and Capture over SCR Catalysts in Simulated Coal Combustion Flue Gas: Wei Gao1; Qingcai Liu1; Jian Yang1; Wenchang...

143

Construction Design anD Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

winds. Cost wise, hail losses in Colorado are 10 times greater than fire losses. Asphalt shingles site development for limited impact, low energy and water consumption, and the use of appropriate of cost effective strate- gies that increase the probability of a building surviving a wildland fire. 1

144

Accreditation Requirements for Construction Materials Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... D4435 Preparing Rock Core Specimens and Determining Tolerances D4543 Slake Durability of Shales and Weak Rocks D4644 ...

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

145

Thermal treatment wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Method of constructing an improved electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell construction features a novel co-extruded plastic electrode in an interleaved construction with a novel integral separator-spacer. Also featured is a leak and impact resistant construction for preventing the spill of corrosive materials in the event of rupture.

Grimes, Patrick G. (Westfield, NJ); Einstein, Harry (Springfield, NJ)

1984-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

147

Interimadvies inzake de mogelijke consequenties voor de nederlandse bevolking van het toepassen van afvalstoffen met een verhoogd gehalte aan radionucliden als bouwmateriaal (interim recommendation regarding the eventual consequences for the people of the Netherlands resulting from the use of waste products with an increased radionuclide content as construction materials)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report discusses the potential radiological consequences for the population of the Netherlands of using waste materials as building materials in housing construction. There is a growing need to use various waste products as building materials. Some of these substances, such as flyash and waste gypsum (in this case phosphogypsum), contain higher concentrations of radioactivity than the usual building materials. Unless these waste substances are re-used in some form or other, they will be direct dumped or discharged. A recommendation on an upper limit for the permissible level of radionuclides in building materials is urgently needed.

Not Available

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

148

Factors Associated With Chest Wall Toxicity After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate dose-volume relationships associated with a higher probability for developing chest wall toxicity (pain) after accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by using both single-lumen and multilumen brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Rib dose data were available for 89 patients treated with APBI and were correlated with the development of chest wall/rib pain at any point after treatment. Ribs were contoured on computed tomography planning scans, and rib dose-volume histograms (DVH) along with histograms for other structures were constructed. Rib DVH data for all patients were sampled at all volumes {>=}0.008 cubic centimeter (cc) (for maximum dose related to pain) and at volumes of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 cc for analysis. Rib pain was evaluated at each follow-up visit. Patient responses were marked as yes or no. No attempt was made to grade responses. Eighty-nine responses were available for this analysis. Results: Nineteen patients (21.3%) complained of transient chest wall/rib pain at any point in follow-up. Analysis showed a direct correlation between total dose received and volume of rib irradiated with the probability of developing rib/chest wall pain at any point after follow-up. The median maximum dose at volumes {>=}0.008 cc of rib in patients who experienced chest wall pain was 132% of the prescribed dose versus 95% of the prescribed dose in those patients who did not experience pain (p = 0.0035). Conclusions: Although the incidence of chest wall/rib pain is quite low with APBI brachytherapy, attempts should be made to keep the volume of rib irradiated at a minimum and the maximum dose received by the chest wall as low as reasonably achievable.

Brown, Sheree, E-mail: shereedst32@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, WellStar Kennestone Hospital, Marietta, Georgia (United States); Vicini, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Vanapalli, Jyotsna R.; Whitaker, Thomas J.; Pope, D. Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, WellStar Kennestone Hospital, Marietta, Georgia (United States); Lyden, Maureen [BioStat International, Inc., Tampa, Florida (United States); Bruggeman, Lisa; Haile, Kenneth L.; McLaughlin, Mark P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, WellStar Kennestone Hospital, Marietta, Georgia (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Construction Spending | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spending Spending BusinessUSA Data/Tools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov » Communities » BusinessUSA » Data Construction Spending Dataset Summary Description Construction Spending provides monthly estimates of the total dollar value of construction work done in the U.S. Construction Spending covers the dollar construction work done each month on new structures or improvements to existing structures for private and public sectors. Data estimates include the cost of labor and materials, cost of architectural and engineering work, overhead costs, interest and taxes paid during construction, and contractor's profits. Tags {construction,spending,value,"put in place",private,residential,nonresidential,public,state,local,federal,lodging,office,commercial,"health care",educational,religious,safety,amusement,recreation,transportation,communication,power,highway,street,sewage,waste,disposal,water,supply,conservation,development,manufacturing,structure,building,single-family,multifamily,housing,new,improvement,existing,sectors,cost," labor",materials,architectural,engineering,overhead,interest,taxes,contractor,profit}

150

A test program to determine the structural properties of unreinforced hollow clay tile masonry walls at the DOE Oak Ridge plants  

SciTech Connect

A recent Department of Energy (DOE) General Design Criteria'' has emphasized the importance of determining the adequacy and safety of both new and existing facilities to natural phenomenon hazards. Many of the buildings at the DOE Oak Ridge facilities are constructed with unreinforced masonry hollow clay tile infill walls -- in some cases these walls comprise a substantial part of the lateral force resistance for a building. In order to perform a realistic assessment of the strength of the buildings to seismic events it is important to accurately predict the behavior of these walls. Very little information is currently available on hollow clay tile masonry, its structural properties and behavior. As the in-situ condition of these walls throughout the plants is suspect due to their age and exposure to numerous chemicals, a test program was initiated at the Oak Ridge plants to obtain material properties for use in the natural phenomena hazards analysis. This paper presents the preliminary results of that testing program. The following tests on clay-tile walls, units, and panels were performed: (1) in-situ mortar bed shear strength, (2) compression strength, (3) splitting tensile strength, and (4) diagonal tension (shear) strength of panels which had been removed from existing walls. The testing program is ongoing, is being expanded, and will include not only in-plane tests, but out-of-plane bending testing as well. 11 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.

1989-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

151

SRNL POROUS WALL GLASS MICROSPHERES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a new medium for storage of hydrogen and other gases. This involves fabrication of thin, Porous Walled, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), with diameters generally in the range of 1 to several hundred microns. What is unique about the glass microballons is that porosity has been induced and controlled within the thin, one micron thick walls, on the scale of 10 to several thousand Angstroms. This porosity results in interesting properties including the ability to use these channels to fill the microballons with special absorbents and other materials, thus providing a contained environment even for reactive species. Gases can now enter the microspheres and be retained on the absorbents, resulting in solid-state and contained storage of even reactive species. Also, the porosity can be altered and controlled in various ways, and even used to filter mixed gas streams within a system. SRNL is involved in about a half dozen different programs involving these PW-HGMs and an overview of some of these activities and results emerging are presented.

Wicks, G; Leung Heung, L; Ray Schumacher, R

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physisorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics.

Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H. (Evanston, IL); Huang, Yin-Yan (Evanston, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are disclosed for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physical sorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics. 17 figs.

Sachtler, W.M.H.; Huang, Y.Y.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

Testing wall panels for earthquake response  

SciTech Connect

As part of the structural response research program being conducted for the Nevada Operations Office of ERDA a testing program for the investigation of nonstructural wall panels subjected to racking was developed and conducted. The objectives of the testing program were to determine thresholds for damage to partitions due to horizontal adjacent story displacement in high-rise buildings and to gather data that can be used to determine the influence of nonstructural partitions on the structural response of high-rise buildings. In general, the wall panels were constructed to represent typical partitions used in high-rise building construction. Some of the panels were used for special parameter studies or for comparisons with other test programs. A specially designed testing frame simulated cyclic lateral displacement, parallel to the plane of the wall panels, that might be experienced during the response of a building to strong winds or earthquake motion. Stiffness and strength characteristics, estimates of equivalent viscous damping, and damage threshold results were obtained. The data appear to give a good approximate evaluation of the performance of non-load-bearing partitions under cyclic loading. (LCL)

Freeman, S.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

Sexton, W.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK A271 ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS. First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability.

WONG, CPC; MALANG, S; NISHIO, S; RAFFRAY, R; SAGARA, S

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Handbook of energy use for building construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction industry accounts for over 11.14% of the total energy consumed in the US annually. This represents the equivalent energy value of 1 1/4 billion barrels of oil. Within the construction industry, new building construction accounts for 5.19% of national annual energy consumption. The remaining 5.95% is distributed among new nonbuilding construction (highways, ralroads, dams, bridges, etc.), building maintenance construction, and nonbuilding maintenance construction. The handbook focuses on new building construction; however, some information for the other parts of the construction industry is also included. The handbook provides building designers with information to determine the energy required for buildings construction and evaluates the energy required for alternative materials, assemblies, and methods. The handbook is also applicable to large-scale planning and policy determination in that it provides the means to estimate the energy required to carry out major building programs.

Stein, R.G.; Stein, C.; Buckley, M.; Green, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.3 Value of Construction and Research  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 Number of Construction Employees and Total Employees for Select Building Envolope Industries (Thousand Employees) Poured Concrete Foundation and Structure Contractors (NAICS 238110) -Total Employment -Construction/Extraction Occupations -Construction/Extraction % of Total Masonry Contractors (NAICS 238140) -Total Employment -Construction/Extraction Occupations -Construction/Extraction % of Total Roofing Contractors (NAICS 238160) -Total Employment -Construction/Extraction Occupations -Construction/Extraction % of Total Drywall and Insulation Contractors (NAICS 238310) -Total Employment -Construction/Extraction Occupations -Construction/Extraction % of Total Painting and Wall Covering Contractors (NAICS 238320) -Total Employment -Construction/Extraction Occupations

159

Application of phase-change materials in passive solar systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Institute of Energy Conversion of the University of Delaware has designed and constructed a modular, hybrid passive solar energy collection and storage unit called the Thermal Wall Panel. The Thermal Wall Panel uses the concept of energy storage in phase change materials combined with direct solar gain. In the winter of 1977-78, the Thermal Wall Panel was tested at Solar One, the Institute's solar house and laboratory. The key results and conclusions from this testing and analysis program include the following: (1) Based on measurements, a Thermal Wall Panel with movable nighttime insulation (R = 6.80) between the storage components and the outside can retain and deliver as heat an average of 45 percent of the sun's energy which falls on it during the day. (2) Based on calculations, a 120 square foot wall can provide about 25 percent of the heating needs of a 1100 square foot house. Analysis indicates that when the Thermal Wall Panel (R = 6.00 nighttime insulation) is combined with other direct gain passive solar energy systems as large, south-facing windows, 56 percent of a home's heating needs can be provided. (3) A Thermal Wall Panel can be installed into a typical home in the Mid-Atlantic Region for an incremental cost of from $6 to $8 per square foot beyond the cost of the normal wall and pay for itself in 5 to 9 years at 1978 energy costs. Also, the Thermal Wall Panel does not require any additional foundation support. (4) A computer model has been developed for the Thermal Wall Panel which shows good agreement with predicted and measured performance. Based on these results, it is recommended that full-scale testing of the system be initiated at multiple sites in the Mid-Atlantic Region.

Sliwkowski, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Wall conditions in ORMAK  

SciTech Connect

From surface effects in controlled thermonuclear fusion devices and reactors meeting; Argonne, Illnois, USA (10 Jan 1974). ORMAK is a diffuse toroidal pinch with typical plasma currents of 100 kA, electron temperatures of 800 eV, and ion temperatures of 300 eV. The walls of the plasma region are made of stainless steel coated with an intermediate layer of platinum 0.05 mu thick and an outer 1 to 2 mu layer of gold. Tests with an Ion Microprobe Mass Analyzer have shown that the platinum acts to decrease diffusion of impurities from the stalnless steel to the surface. Gold was chosen to inhibit the surface chemical adsorption of gases. Studies with a movable limiter indicate that electron energy is lost at the plasma edge mainly via line radiation and cooling on ions, while ions are lost from the plasma by charge exchange. Thus the walls are bombarded by energetic neutrals, line radiation and, in addition, bremsstrahlung x-rays. The flux of energetic neutrals is measured by a charge exchange analyzer. Wall bombardment by such neutrals should cause sputtering, and gold has been observed spectroscopically near the limiter, increasing with time during a shot, However, analysis of impurities coated on a window by the discharge indicated very little gold sputtering and re-deposition. To measure the sputterirg rate, a wall sample was coated with 105 A of radioactive gold and bombarded with neutrals from ORMAK during a day's run. No measurable sputtering was found within the counting statistics of the measurement, but surface carbon contamination of the sample prevented any final conclusions. (auth)

Colchin, R.J.; Berry, L.A.; Haste, G.R.; Kelley, G.G.; Lyon, J.F.; McNally, J.R.; Murakami, M.; Neidigh, R.V.; Simpkins, J.E.; Wing, W.R.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Sandwich Construction Solar Structural Facets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Silver/glass mirrors have excellent optical properties but need a method of support in order to be used in concentrating solar thermal systems. In collaboration with the Cummins dish/Stirling development program, they started investigating sandwich construction as a way to integrate silver/glass mirrors into solar optical elements. In sandwich construction, membranes such as sheet metal or plastic are bonded to the front and back of a core (like a sandwich). For solar optical elements, a glass mirror is bonded to one of the membranes. This type of construction has the advantages of a high strength-to-weight ratio, and reasonable material and manufacturing cost. The inherent stiffness of sandwich construction mirror panels also facilitates large panels. This can have cost advantages for both the amount of hardware required as well as reduced installation and alignment costs. In addition, by incorporating the panels into the support structure reductions in the amount of structural support required are potentially possible.

Diver, R. B.; Grossman, J.W.

1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

162

Vector-field domain walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We argue that spontaneous Lorentz violation may generally lead to metastable domain walls related to the simultaneous violation of some accompanying discrete symmetries. Remarkably, such domain-wall solutions exist for spacelike Lorentz violation and do not exist for the timelike violation. Because a preferred space direction is spontaneously induced, these domain walls have no planar symmetry and produce a peculiar static gravitational field at small distances, while their long-distance gravity appears the same as for regular scalar-field walls. Some possible applications of vector-field domain walls are briefly discussed.

Chkareuli, J. L. [E. Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, 0177 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); I. Chavchavadze State University, 0162 Tbilisi (Georgia); Kobakhidze, Archil [E. Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, 0177 Tbilisi (Georgia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Volkas, Raymond R. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Construction safety in DOE. Part 2, Students guide  

SciTech Connect

This report is the second part of a compilation of safety standards for construction activities on DOE facilities. This report covers the following areas: floor and wall openings; cranes, derricks, hoists, elevators, and conveyors; motor vehicles, mechanized equipment, and marine operations; excavations; concrete and masonry construction; steel erection; underground construction, caisson, cofferdams, and compressed air; demolition; blasting and the use of explosives; power transmission and distribution; rollover protective structures, overhead protection; and ladders.

Handwerk, E.C.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Tire shreds as lightweight retaining wall backfill: Active conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 4.88-m-high retaining wall test facility was constructed to test tire shreds as retaining wall backfill. The front wall of the facility could be rotated outward away from the fill and was instrumented to measure the horizontal stress. Measurement of movement within the backfill and settlement of the backfill surface during wall rotation allowed estimation of the pattern of movement within the fill. Tests were conducted with tire shreds from three suppliers. Moreover, horizontal stress at this rotation for tire shreds was about 35% less than the active stress expected for conventional granular backfill. Design parameters were developed using two procedures; the first used the coefficient of lateral earth pressure and the other was based on equivalent fluid pressure. The inclination of the sliding plane with respect to horizontal was estimated to range from 61{degree} to 70{degree} for the three types of shreds.

Tweedie, J.J. [State of Maine Dept. of Transportation, Augusta, ME (United States); Humphrey, D.N.; Sandford, T.C. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Improving Glass Walls Thermal Resistance In Air-Conditioned Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar radiation through an air conditioned building depends on what is called the building envelope. Building envelope consists of the surfaces that separate the inside from the building outdoors. Area, direction, and specifications of glass walls; as one of envelope surfaces; has an important impact on solar radiation. Design and construction of glass walls have significant effects on building comfort and energy consumption. This paper describes methods of improving glass walls thermal resistance in air conditioned buildings. Effect of glass wall radiation temperature on the indoor temperature distribution of building rooms is also investigated. Heat gain through various types of glass is discussed. Optimization and testing of these types are carried out theoretically and experimentally as well. A series of experiments on different types of glass with special strips is performed.

Galal, T.; Kulaib, A. M.; Alajmi, R.; Al-Ansary. A; Abuzaid, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Thick planar domain wall: its thin wall limit and dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a planar gravitating thick domain wall of the $\\lambda \\phi^4$ theory as a spacetime with finite thickness glued to two vacuum spacetimes on each side of it. Darmois junction conditions written on the boundaries of the thick wall with the embedding spacetimes reproduce the Israel junction condition across the wall in the limit of infinitesimal thickness. The thick planar domain wall located at a fixed position is then transformed to a new coordinate system in which its dynamics can be formulated. It is shown that the wall's core expands as if it were a thin wall. The thickness in the new coordinates is not constant anymore and its time dependence is given.

S. Ghassemi; S. Khakshournia; R. Mansouri

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

167

Performance of a selective-surface trombe wall in a small commercial building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and construction of a 100% passive solar building utilizing a clerestory and a trombe wall are described. The use of three selectively absorptive and emissive coverings on the trombe wall outer surface are investigated. One of the coverings and its laminating adhesive are tested for degradation after a year of exposure under normal operating conditions. Ambient temperature, room air temperature, trombe wall interior and exterior surface temperatures, and solar radiation are measured.

Judkoff, R.; Sokol, F.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Engineering the fusion reactor first wall  

SciTech Connect

Recently the National Academy of Engineering published a set of Grand Challenges in Engineering in which the second item listed was entitled 'Provide energy from fusion'. Clearly a key component of this challenge is the science and technology associated with creating and maintaining burning plasmas. This is being vigorously addressed with both magnetic and inertial approaches with various experiments such as ITER and NIF. Considerably less attention is being given to another key component of this challenge, namely engineering the first wall that will contain the burning plasma. This is a daunting problem requiring technologies and materials that can not only survive, but also perform multiple essential functions in this extreme environment. These functions are (1) shield the remainder of the device from radiation. (2) convert of neutron energy to useful heat and (3) breed and extract tritium to maintain the reactor fuel supply. The first wall must not contaminate the plasma with impurities. It must be infused with cooling to maintain acceptable temperatures on plasma facing and structural components. It must not degrade. It must avoid excessive build-up of tritium on surfaces, and, if surface deposits do form, must be receptive to cleaning techniques. All these functions and constraints must be met while being subjected to nuclear and thermal radiation, particle bombardment, high magnetic fields, thermal cycling and occasional impingement of plasma on the surface. And, operating in a nuclear environment, the first wall must be fully maintainable by remotely-operated manipulators. Elements of the first wall challenge have been studied since the 1970' s both in the US and internationally. Considerable foundational work has been performed on plasma facing materials and breeding blanket/shield modules. Work has included neutronics, materials fabrication and joining, fluid flow, tritium breeding, tritium recovery and containment, energy conversion, materials damage and magnetohydrodynamics. While work to date has been quite valuable, no blanket concept has been built and operated in anything approaching a realistic fusion reactor environment. Rather, work has been limited to isolated experiments on first wall components and paper studies. The need now is to complete necessary R&D on first wall components, assemble components into a practical design, and test the first wall in a realistic fusion environment. Besides supporting work, major prototype experiments could be performed in non-nuclear experiments, as part of the ITER project and as part of the Component Test Facility. The latter is under active consideration and is a proposed machine which would use a driven plasma to expose an entire first wall to a fusion environment. Key US contributors to first wall research have been UCLA, UCSD, U of Wisconsin, LANL, ORNL, PNNL, Argonne and Idaho National Lab. Current efforts have been coordinated by UCLA. It is recognized that when this work progresses to a larger scale, leadership from a national laboratory will be required. LANL is well-prepared to provide such leadership.

Wurden, Glen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Willms [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Rethinking walled residential compound in peripheral urban China : a guideline for boundary and size design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last two decades, with the high speed urbanization, walled residential compound as the typical housing development is being constructed on a large scale in peripheral areas of Chinese cities. Its self-enclosing ...

Sun, Na

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Chapter 6: Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Materials : Materials Material Selection Sustainable Building Materials System Integration Issues | Chapter 6 Material Selection Materials The use of durable, attractive, and environmentally responsible building materials is a key element of any high-performance building effort. The use of natural and healthy materials contributes to the well-being of the occupants and to a feeling of connection with the bounty of the natural world. Many construction materials have significant environ- mental impacts from pollutant releases, habitat destruc- tion, and depletion of natural resources. This can occur during extraction and acquisition of raw materials, pro- "Then I say the Earth belongs to duction and manufacturing processes, and transporta- tion. In addition, some construction materials can harm

171

NREL Evaluates Thermal Performance of Uninsulated Walls to Improve Accuracy of Building Energy Simulation Tools (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

NREL researchers discover ways to increase accuracy in building energy simulations tools to improve predictions of potential energy savings in homes. Uninsulated walls are typical in older U.S. homes where the wall cavities were not insulated during construction or where the insulating material has settled. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are investigating ways to more accurately calculate heat transfer through building enclosures to verify the benefit of energy efficiency upgrades that reduce energy use in older homes. In this study, scientists used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis to calculate the energy loss/gain through building walls and visualize different heat transfer regimes within the uninsulated cavities. The effects of ambient outdoor temperature, the radiative properties of building materials, insulation levels, and the temperature dependence of conduction through framing members were considered. The research showed that the temperature dependence of conduction through framing members dominated the differences between this study and previous results - an effect not accounted for in existing building energy simulation tools. The study provides correlations for the resistance of the uninsulated assemblies that can be implemented into building simulation tools to increase the accuracy of energy use estimates in older homes, which are currently over-predicted.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Delays in nuclear power plant construction. Volume II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report identifies barriers to shortening nuclear power plant construction schedules and recommends research efforts which should minimize or eliminate the identified barriers. The identified barriers include (1) Design and Construction Interfacing Problems; (2) Problems Relating to the Selection and Use of Permanent Materials and Construction Methods; (3) Construction Coordination and Communication Problems; and (4) Problems Associated with Manpower Availability and Productivity.

Mason, G.E.; Larew, R.E.; Borcherding, J.D.; Okes, S.R. Jr.; Rad, P.F.

1977-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

173

Thermal control system and method for a passive solar storage wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are provided for controlling the storing and release of thermal energy from a thermal storage wall wherein said wall is capable of storing thermal energy from insolation. The system and method includes a device such as a plurality of louvers spaced a predetermined distance from the thermal wall for regulating the release of thermal energy from the thermal wall. This regulating device is made from a material which is substantially transparent to the incoming solar radiation so that when it is in any operative position, the thermal storage wall substantially receives all of the impacting solar radiation. The material in the regulating device is further capable of being substantially opaque to thermal energy so that when the device is substantially closed, thermal release of energy from the storage wall is substantially minimized. An adjustment device is interconnected with the regulating mechanism for selectively opening and closing it in order to regulate the release of thermal energy from the wall.

Ortega, J.K.E.

1981-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

174

Advanced Wall Framing; BTS Technology Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect

Advanced framing techniques for home construction have been researched extensively and proven effective. Both builders and home owners can benefit from advanced framing. Advanced framing techniques create a structurally sound home that has lower material and labor costs than a conventionally framed house. This fact sheet describes advanced framing techniques, design considerations, and framing.

Southface Energy Institute; Tromly, K.

2000-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Permit Fees for Hazardous Waste Material Management (Connecticut...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Material Management (Connecticut) Permit Fees for Hazardous Waste Material Management (Connecticut) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government...

176

The design of a panelized roof system for residential construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cost of housing in the U.S. continues to rise faster than household income. Innovative building materials and construction technologies have the potential to reduce housing construction costs. One strategy to do this ...

Dentz, Jordan Lewis

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Spent fuel casks are constructed with thick walls of various metals. This cask is approximately 18-feet...

178

Design and construction of a demonstration residence utilizing natural thermal storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Brookhaven House is an energy conserving residence which demonstrates how thermal mass combined with solar energy can be used to reduce heating costs in a conventional single-family house. The purpose of the project was to develop a prototypical house design that could result in immediate energy savings by being an acceptable, attractive design to developers, builders, and home buyers. Investigations were limited to only materials and methods of construction that were considered presently available and of Natural Thermal Storage design. Natural thermal storage is simply the heat storage obtained through architectural application of massive building materials integrated into the living space and structure of a residence. The research work involved analyzing many buildable configurations of thermal mass and combining their potential benefit with a variety of energy sources. It has been concluded that relatively thin mass walls of masonry directly irradiated through a multiglazed south facing aperture can significantly reduce annual heating requirements.

Jones, R.F.; Ghaffari, H.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

NREL Evaluates the Thermal Performance of Uninsulated Walls to Improve the Accuracy of Building Energy Simulation Tools (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop models of uninsulated wall assemblies that help to improve the accuracy of building energy simulation tools when modeling potential energy savings in older homes. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed models for evaluating the thermal performance of walls in existing homes that will improve the accuracy of building energy simulation tools when predicting potential energy savings of existing homes. Uninsulated walls are typical in older homes where the wall cavities were not insulated during construction or where the insulating material has settled. Accurate calculation of heat transfer through building enclosures will help determine the benefit of energy efficiency upgrades in order to reduce energy consumption in older American homes. NREL performed detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis to quantify the energy loss/gain through the walls and to visualize different airflow regimes within the uninsulated cavities. The effects of ambient outdoor temperature, radiative properties of building materials, and insulation level were investigated. The study showed that multi-dimensional airflows occur in walls with uninsulated cavities and that the thermal resistance is a function of the outdoor temperature - an effect not accounted for in existing building energy simulation tools. The study quantified the difference between CFD prediction and the approach currently used in building energy simulation tools over a wide range of conditions. For example, researchers found that CFD predicted lower heating loads and slightly higher cooling loads. Implementation of CFD results into building energy simulation tools such as DOE2 and EnergyPlus will likely reduce the predicted heating load of homes. Researchers also determined that a small air gap in a partially insulated cavity can lead to a significant reduction in thermal resistance. For instance, a 4-in. tall air gap (Figure 1a) led to a 15% reduction in resistance. Similarly, a 2-ft tall air gap (Figure 1c) led to 54% reduction in thermal resistance. NREL researchers plan to extend this study to include additional wall configurations, and also to evaluate the performance of attic spaces with different insulation levels. NREL's objective is to address each potential issue that leads to inaccuracies in building energy simulation tools to improve the predictions.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

NREL Evaluates the Thermal Performance of Uninsulated Walls to Improve the Accuracy of Building Energy Simulation Tools (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop models of uninsulated wall assemblies that help to improve the accuracy of building energy simulation tools when modeling potential energy savings in older homes. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed models for evaluating the thermal performance of walls in existing homes that will improve the accuracy of building energy simulation tools when predicting potential energy savings of existing homes. Uninsulated walls are typical in older homes where the wall cavities were not insulated during construction or where the insulating material has settled. Accurate calculation of heat transfer through building enclosures will help determine the benefit of energy efficiency upgrades in order to reduce energy consumption in older American homes. NREL performed detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis to quantify the energy loss/gain through the walls and to visualize different airflow regimes within the uninsulated cavities. The effects of ambient outdoor temperature, radiative properties of building materials, and insulation level were investigated. The study showed that multi-dimensional airflows occur in walls with uninsulated cavities and that the thermal resistance is a function of the outdoor temperature - an effect not accounted for in existing building energy simulation tools. The study quantified the difference between CFD prediction and the approach currently used in building energy simulation tools over a wide range of conditions. For example, researchers found that CFD predicted lower heating loads and slightly higher cooling loads. Implementation of CFD results into building energy simulation tools such as DOE2 and EnergyPlus will likely reduce the predicted heating load of homes. Researchers also determined that a small air gap in a partially insulated cavity can lead to a significant reduction in thermal resistance. For instance, a 4-in. tall air gap (Figure 1a) led to a 15% reduction in resistance. Similarly, a 2-ft tall air gap (Figure 1c) led to 54% reduction in thermal resistance. NREL researchers plan to extend this study to include additional wall configurations, and also to evaluate the performance of attic spaces with different insulation levels. NREL's objective is to address each potential issue that leads to inaccuracies in building energy simulation tools to improve the predictions.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies  

SciTech Connect

The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Sustainable Steel Construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 3, 2008... House Gases, and Climate Change, Educational Resources. Spacer ... on the construction processnamely speed, prefabrication, safety,...

183

Construction and Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in building sector energy consumption by improving ... housing construction: improving energy efficiency and ... Reinforced Soil Bridge Pier Load Test ...

2000-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

Project Construction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Construction Project Construction Project Construction October 16, 2013 - 5:14pm Addthis Building Design Project Construction Commisioning Integrating renewable energy into Federal new construction or major renovations requires effective structuring of the construction team and project schedule. This overview discusses key construction team considerations for renewable energy as well as timing and expectations for the construction phase. The project construction phase begins after a project is completely designed and the construction documents (100%) have been issued. Construction team skills and experience with renewable energy technologies are crucial during construction, as is how the integration of renewable energy affects the project construction schedule. Construction Team

185

Interactions between Liquid-Wall Vapor and Edge Plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of liquid walls for fusion reactors could help solve problems associated with material erosion from high plasma heat-loads and neutronic activation of structures. A key issue analyzed here is the influx of impurity ions to the core plasma from the vapor of liquid side-walls. Numerical 2D transport simulations are performed for a slab geometry which approximates the edge region of a reactor-size tokamak. Both lithium vapor (from Li or SnLi walls) and fluorine vapor (from Flibe walls) are considered for hydrogen edge-plasmas in the high- and low-recycling regimes. It is found that the minimum influx is from lithium with a low-recycling hydrogen plasma, and the maximum influx occurs for fluorine with a high-recycling hydrogen plasma.

Rognlien, T D; Rensink, M E

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

186

EA-1704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

consists of the design, construction and operation of a biorefinery facility producing ethanol and other co-products from cellulosic materials utilizing a patented concentrated...

187

Colorado Construction Air Permit Application | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Colorado Construction Air Permit Application Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0)...

188

Texas Large Construction Site Notice for Primary Operators |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Texas Large Construction Site Notice for Primary Operators edit Details Activities (0)...

189

Texas Construction General Permit (TXR1500000) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Texas Construction General Permit (TXR1500000) edit Details Activities (0) Areas (0)...

190

Texas Large Construction Site Notice for Secondary Operators...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Texas Large Construction Site Notice for Secondary Operators edit Details Activities (0)...

191

EERE Roofus' Solar and Efficient Home: Walls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Walls Insulation Windows Activities Printable Version Walls Illustration of Roofus, a golden retriever, sitting in front of a wall. On cold nights, you use a blanket to keep you...

192

Security_Walls_VPP_Award  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security Force Recognized for Outstanding Safety CARLSBAD, N.M., May 10, 2013 - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded Security Walls, LLC, the Waste Isolation Pilot...

193

The HPC Brick Wall  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The eventual breakdown of Moores law, global warming and taxes seem to elicit much the same response: painful but inevitable. Future technologies promise solutions to keep life and progress as we know it continuing unchanged. New materials, manufacturing processes, more cores per chip, nanotechnology, quantum computing, optical computing all are lauded with promising new breakthroughs to sustain or exceed the performance increases projected by Moores Law. Similarly, carbon sequestration, more efficient cars, hydrogen, solar power, all promise solutions to human induced climate change. Sadly tax technology appears to be the exception, with no promising breakthroughs in the offing except perhaps greater efficiency in filing and auditing.

Farber, Rob

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Construction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Construction Construction In neighborhoods all across the country, the Energy Department's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is helping families and business owners make energy efficiency upgrades that are saving them money and improving the comfort of our buildings. Learn more about the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. In neighborhoods all across the country, the Energy Department's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is helping families and business owners make energy efficiency upgrades that are saving them money and improving the comfort of our buildings. Learn more about the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Learn about the energy-efficient construction projects that are saving businesses and communities money while creating jobs.

195

Construction of Channels (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Permission is required from the Natural Resources Commission is required for the construction or alteration of artificial channels or improved channels of natural watercourses that connect to any...

196

Commercial New Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Vermont offers support to encourage energy efficient design for new construction. Efficiency Vermont will provide support for new commercial buildings, including technical assistance at...

197

Pipeline Construction Guidelines (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This division of the Utility Regulatory Commission regulates the construction of any segment of an interstate pipeline on privately owned land in Indiana. The division has provisions for...

198

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent tc the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

1991-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

199

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Construction Local engineering.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management processes such as cost estimating, accelerated construction, contracting, risk impacts to accurately estimate their useful service life is very important. Information gathered through this process. Constructed Facilities Division tti.tamu.edu #12;Expertise & Equipment ExpErtisE & EquipmEnt Created in 2005

204

VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options.

C.R. Gorrell

1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

205

Chapter 8: Constructing the Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: : Constructing the Building Developing a Construction Plan Writing Effective Construction Documents Safeguarding Design Goals During Construction Protecting the Site Low-Impact Construction Processes Protecting Indoor Air Quality Managing Construction Waste LANL | Chapter 8 Constructing the Building Developing a Construction Plan A high-performance design is a great achievement, but it doesn't mean much if the building isn't then built as intended. Getting from design to a completed project happens in two stages: 1) development of construction documents and 2) actual construction. To successfully implement a sustainable design, the construction docu- ments must accurately convey the specifics that deter- mine building performance, and they have to set up

206

Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

207

Scanning Probe Techniques for Functional Materials: Optical Near ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antenna-enhanced Optoelectronics of Carbon Nanotubes: Achim Hartschuh1 ... Single-walled carbon nanotubes are remarkable quasi-1D materials that can be ...

208

Key Elements of and Materials Performance Targets for Highly Insulating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Elements of and Materials Performance Targets for Highly Insulating Key Elements of and Materials Performance Targets for Highly Insulating Window Frames Title Key Elements of and Materials Performance Targets for Highly Insulating Window Frames Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5099E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Gustavsen, Arlid, Steinar Grynning, Dariush K. Arasteh, Bjørn Petter Jelle, and Howdy Goudey Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 43 Issue 10 Pagination 2583-2594 Date Published 10/2011 Keywords Fenestration, heat transfer modeling, thermal performance, thermal transmittance, u-factor, window frames Abstract The thermal performance of windows is important for energy efficient buildings. Windows typically account for about 30-50 percent of the transmission losses though the building envelope, even if their area fraction of the envelope is far less. The reason for this can be found by comparing the thermal transmittance (U-factor) of windows to the U-factor of their opaque counterparts (wall, roof and floor constructions). In well insulated buildings the U-factor of walls, roofs an floors can be between 0.1-0.2 W/(m2K). The best windows have U-values of about 0.7-1.0. It is therefore obvious that the U-factor of windows needs to be reduced, even though looking at the whole energy balance for windows (i.e. solar gains minus transmission losses) makes the picture more complex.

209

Final Environmental Impact Statement to construct and operate a facility to receive, store, and dispose of 11e.(2) byproduct material near Clive, Utah (Docket No. 40-8989)  

SciTech Connect

A Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) related to the licensing of Envirocare of Utah, Inc.`s proposed disposal facility in Tooele county, Utah (Docket No. 40-8989) for byproduct material as defined in Section 11e.(2) of the Atomic Energy Act, as amended, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards. This statement describes and evaluates the purpose of and need for the proposed action, the alternatives considered, and the environmental consequences of the proposed action. The NRC has concluded that the proposed action evaluated under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and 10 CFR Part 51, is to permit the applicant to proceed with the project as described in this Statement.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Glazing and the Trombe wall  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Single, double and triple glazing are examined for use in passive solar Trombe walls and south facing windows. Net gains and losses are calculated employing regional weather data and annual contribution to heating load reduction is evaluated. The study concentrates on the reflectivity of each glass pane, including the dependence of reflectivity on the angle of incidence of the radiation, and resulting heat gains and losses. This facet of passive design heretofore has been inadequately treated as is shown to be significant. The marginal value of each additional pane is investigated with regard to heat gain, energy savings and total costs. Additionally, attention is given to the effects of Trombe wall energy storage.

Pouder, R W; Leigh, R W

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Construction Readiness RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The authorization to proceed with construction of a new facility is given at the CD-3 phase of the project management cycle, after completion of the final design. Between CD-3 and CD-4 stages of...

212

Spider Web Construction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spider Web Construction Name: Stephanie Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Near our home on Lake Ontario, we often find spider websm that have a horizontal line at the...

213

Photon Sciences | Construction Cameras  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Construction Cameras You may click either the links or the camera icons shown below to access each webcam. Note: It may take 5-20 seconds to load the webcam console. Live...

214

Automatic thesaurus construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce a novel method of automating thesauri using syntactically constrained distributional similarity. With respect to syntactically conditioned cooccurrences, most popular approaches to automatic thesaurus construction simply ignore ... Keywords: distribution, similarity, syntactic dependency

Dongqiang Yang; David M. Powers

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Final Safety Evaluation Report to license the construction and operation of a facility to receive, store, and dispose of 11e.(2) byproduct material near Clive, Utah (Docket No. 40-8989)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff`s review of Envirocare of Utah, Inc.`s (Envirocare`s) application for a license to receive, store, and dispose of uranium and thorium byproduct material (as defined in Section 11e.(2) of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended) at a site near Clive, Utah. Envirocare proposes to dispose of high-volume, low-activity Section 11e.(2) byproduct material in separate earthen disposal cells on a site where the applicant currently disposes of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), low-level waste, and mixed waste under license by the Utah Department of Environmental Quality. The NRC staff review of the December 23, 1991, license application, as revised by page changes dated July 2 and August 10, 1992, April 5, 7, and 10, 1993, and May 3, 6, 7, 11, and 21, 1993, has identified open issues in geotechnical engineering, water resources protection, radon attenuation, financial assurance, and radiological safety. The NRC will not issue a license for the proposed action until Envirocare adequately resolves these open issues.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Experimental investigation of the Trombe wall. Final report, October 1977-March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A variable geometry test facility was constructed and an experimental program conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of the Trombe wall, passive solar heating system. The principal objective met in the research project was the determination of representative values of wall gap thermocirculation parameters for various wall geometries. Velocity and temperature profiles in the wall gap were obtained for 2, 4, and 6-inch gap widths. Maximum values for the Grashof number under measured flow conditions ranged approximately from 6 x 10/sup 5/ for the 2-inch gap to 1.5 x 10/sup 7/ for the 6-inch gap, indicating laminar flow and possibly the initiation of transitional flow regimes at the higher Grashof numbers. Turbulent flow behavior was not exhibited within the relatively broad range of test conditions studied in this research, conditions typical of one-story Trombe walls employing practical geometries. A second objective accomplished in this research was the characterization of the Trombe wall thermal efficiency for a variety of operating conditions and wall geometries. Using data collected under essentially clear-sky conditions, collector efficiency curves similar to those commonly used to describe the performance of flat-plate solar collectors were developed for the Trombe wall. The efficiency plots were determined for 2, 4, and 6-inch gap widths using linear regression fits. These regression fits were sufficiently good to validate the applicability of this approach in describing Trombe wall performance.

Casperson, R.L.; Hocevar, C.J.

1979-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

SRS - Programs - H Area Nuclear Materials Disposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H Area Nuclear Materials Disposition H Area Nuclear Materials Disposition The primary mission of the H-Canyon Complex is to dissolve, purify and blend-down surplus highly enriched uranium (HEU) and aluminum-clad foreign and domestic research reactor fuel to produce a low enriched uranium (LEU) solution suitable for conversion to commercial reactor fuel. A secondary mission for H-Canyon is to dissolve excess plutonium (Pu) not suitable for MOX and transfer it for vitrification in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at SRS. H Canyon was constructed in the early 1950s and began operations in 1955. The building is called a canyon because of its long rectangular shape and two continuous trenches that contains the process vessels. It is approximately 1,000 feet long with several levels to accommodate the various stages of material stabilization, including control rooms to monitor overall equipment and operating processes, equipment and piping gallery for solution transport, storage, and disposition, and unique overhead bridge cranes to support overall process operations. All work is remotely controlled, and employees are further protected from radiation by thick concrete walls.

218

Evaluation of concrete masonry unit walls for lateral natural phenomena hazards loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Older single-story facilities (Pre-1985 vintage) are commonly constructed of structural steel framing with concrete masonry unit (CMU) walls connected to columns and roof girders of the steel framing system. The CMU walls are designed for lateral wind and seismic loads (perpendicular to the wall) and transmit shear loads from the roof diaphragm to the foundation footings. The lateral loads normally govern their design. The structural framing system and the roof diaphragm system are straight forward when analyzing or upgrading the structure for NPH loads. Because of a buildings design vintage, probable use of empirical methodology, and poor design basis documentation (and record retention); it is difficult to qualify or upgrade CMU walls for lateral Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) loads in accordance with References 1, 2 and 3. This paper discusses three analytical approaches and/or techniques (empirical, working stress and yield line) to determine the collapse capacity of a laterally loaded CMU wall, and compares their results

Faires, W.E. Jr.

1996-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

219

Developing Innovative Wall Systems that Improve Hygrothermal Performance of Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as the Topical Report documenting the first year of work completed by Washington State University (WSU) under US Department of Energy Grant, Developing Innovative Wall Systems that Improve Hygrothermal Performance of Residential Buildings. This project is being conducted in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and includes the participation of several industry partners including Weyerhaeuser Company, APA - The Engineered Wood Association, CertainTeed Corporation and Fortifiber. This document summarizes work completed by Washington State University August, 2002 through October, 2003. WSU's primary experimental role is the design and implementation of a field testing protocol that will monitor long term changes in the hygrothermal response of wall systems. In the first year WSU constructed a test facility, developed a matrix of test wall designs, constructed and installed test walls in the test facility, and installed instrumentation in the test walls. By the end of the contract period described in this document, WSU was recording data from the test wall specimens. The experiment described in this report will continue through December, 2005. Each year a number of reports will be published documenting the hygrothermal response of the test wall systems. Public presentation of the results will be made available to the building industry by industry partners and the University cooperators.

Robert Tichy; Chuck Murray

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Design of Roadside Barrier Systems Placed on Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) Retaining Walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Millions of square feet of mechanically stabilized earth retaining wall are constructed annually in the United States. When used in highway fill applications in conjunction with bridges, these MSE walls are typically constructed with a roadside barrier system supported on the edge of the wall. This barrier system generally consists of a traffic barrier or bridge rail placed on a continuous footing or structural slab. The footing is intended to reduce the influence of barrier impact loads on the retaining wall system by distributing the load over a wide area and to provide stability for the barrier against sliding or overturning. The proper design of the roadside barrier, the structural slab, and the MSE wall system requires a good understanding of relevant failure modes, how barrier impact loads are transferred into the wall system, and the magnitude and distribution of these loads. In this study, a procedure is developed that provides guidance for designing: 1. the barrier-moment slab, 2. the wall reinforcement, and 3. the wall panels. These design guidelines are developed in terms of AASHTO LRFD procedures. The research approach consisted of engineering analyses, finite element analyses, static load tests, full-scale dynamic impact tests, and a full-scale vehicle crash test. It was concluded that a 44.5 kN (10 kips) equivalent static load is appropriate for the stability design of the barrier-moment slab system. This will result in much more economical design than systems developed using the 240 kN (54 kips) load that some user agencies are using. Design loads for the wall reinforcement and wall panels are also presented.

Kim, Kang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Steel-framed buildings: Impacts of wall detail configurations on the whole wall thermal performance  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this paper is the influence of architectural wall details on the whole wall thermal performance. Whole wall thermal performance analysis was performed for six light gage steel-framed wall systems (some with wood components). For each wall system, all wall details were simulated using calibrated 3-D finite difference computer modeling. The thermal performance of the six steel-framed wall systems included various system details and the whole wall system thermal performance for a typical single-story ranch house. Currently, predicted heat losses through building walls are typically based on measurements of the wall system clear wall area using test methods such as ASTM C 236 or are calculated by one of the procedures recommended in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals that often is carried out for the clear wall area exclusively. In this paper, clear wall area is defined as the part of the wall system that is free of thermal anomalies due to building envelope details or thermally unaffected by intersections with other surfaces of the building envelope. Clear wall experiments or calculations normally do not include the effects of building envelope details such as corners, window and door openings, and structural intersections with roofs, floors, ceilings, and other walls. In steel-framed wall systems, these details typically consist of much more structural components than the clear wall. For this situation, the thermal properties measured or calculated for the clear wall area do not adequately represent the total wall system thermal performance. Factors that would impact the ability of today`s standard practice to accurately predict the total wall system thermal performance are the accuracy of the calculation methods, the area of the total wall that is clear wall, and the quantity and thermal performance of the various wall system details.

Kosny, J.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Christian, J.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Weatherford Inclined Wellbore Construction  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed construction of an inclined wellbore with seven (7) inch, twenty-three (23) pound casing at a total depth of 1296 feet. The inclined wellbore is near vertical to 180 feet with a build angle of approximately 4.5 degrees per hundred feet thereafter. The inclined wellbore was utilized for further proprietary testing after construction and validation. The wellbore is available to other companies requiring a cased hole environment with known deviation out to fifty degrees (50) from vertical. The wellbore may also be used by RMOTC for further deepening into the fractured shales of the Steele and Niobrara formation.

Schulte, R.

2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

223

Fusion materials modeling: Challenges and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The plasma facing components, first wall, and blanket systems of future tokamak-based fusion power plants arguably represent the single greatest materials engineering challenge of all time. Indeed, the United States National ...

Wirth, B. D.

224

UMC Construction Waste (4493)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

pad. Examples of material are as follows: wrenches, other hand tools, file cabinets, electric motors, batteries, pipe benders, jacks, saws, generators, one 18 ton crane. UMC...

225

Construction Industry Institute  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in one of our country's most vital industries. ... An industry-led program to disseminate practical ... fire-proofing materials, connections, and steel trusses; ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

226

FUEL ELEMENT CONSTRUCTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel elements having a solid core of fissionable material encased in a cladding material are described. A conversion material is provided within the cladding to react with the fission products to form stable, relatively non- volatile compounds thereby minimizing the migration of the fission products into the coolant. The conversion material is preferably a metallic fluoride, such as lead difluoride, and may be in the form of a coating on the fuel core or interior of the cladding, or dispersed within the fuel core. (AEC)

Zumwalt, L.R.

1961-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Insulation Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Insulation Materials Insulation Materials Insulation Materials May 30, 2012 - 10:08am Addthis Cellulose, a fiber insulation material with a high recycled content, is blown into a home attic. | Photo courtesy of Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association. Cellulose, a fiber insulation material with a high recycled content, is blown into a home attic. | Photo courtesy of Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association. Blown-in fiberglass insulation thoroughly fills the stud cavities in this home. | Photo courtesy of Bob Hendron, NREL. Blown-in fiberglass insulation thoroughly fills the stud cavities in this home. | Photo courtesy of Bob Hendron, NREL. Rigid foam board adds R-value to this wall in a Florida home. | Photo courtesy of FSEC/IBACOS. Rigid foam board adds R-value to this wall in a Florida home. | Photo

228

Insulation Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Materials Materials Insulation Materials May 30, 2012 - 10:08am Addthis Cellulose, a fiber insulation material with a high recycled content, is blown into a home attic. | Photo courtesy of Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association. Cellulose, a fiber insulation material with a high recycled content, is blown into a home attic. | Photo courtesy of Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association. Blown-in fiberglass insulation thoroughly fills the stud cavities in this home. | Photo courtesy of Bob Hendron, NREL. Blown-in fiberglass insulation thoroughly fills the stud cavities in this home. | Photo courtesy of Bob Hendron, NREL. Rigid foam board adds R-value to this wall in a Florida home. | Photo courtesy of FSEC/IBACOS. Rigid foam board adds R-value to this wall in a Florida home. | Photo

229

Six Thousand Electrochemical Cycles of Double-Walled Silicon Nanotube Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Despite remarkable progress, lithium ion batteries still need higher energy density and better cycle life for consumer electronics, electric drive vehicles and large-scale renewable energy storage applications. Silicon has recently been explored as a promising anode material for high energy batteries; however, attaining long cycle life remains a significant challenge due to materials pulverization during cycling and an unstable solid-electrolyte interphase. Here, we report double-walled silicon nanotube electrodes that can cycle over 6000 times while retaining more than 85% of the initial capacity. This excellent performance is due to the unique double-walled structure in which the outer silicon oxide wall confines the inner silicon wall to expand only inward during lithiation, resulting in a stable solid-electrolyte interphase. This structural concept is general and could be extended to other battery materials that undergo large volume changes.

Wu, H

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

230

Segmentally Constructed Prestressed Concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Segmentally Constructed Prestressed Concrete Hyperboloid Cooling Tower Saml H. Rizkalla Assistant large capacity power plant facilities, the natural draft cooling tower in the fonn of a thin shell concrete natural draft cooling towers is expensive and time-consuming. The cost of the structure

231

Water Wall Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wall Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Water Wall Turbine Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.wwturbine.com Region Canada LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

232

CFD Simulation of Airflow in Ventilated Wall System Report #9  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report was to examine air movements in vinyl and brick ventilation cavities in detail, using a state of the art CFD commercial modeling tool. The CFD activity was planned to proceed the other activities in order to develop insight on the important magnitudes of scales occurring during ventilation air flow. This information generated by the CFD model was to be used to modify (if necessary) and to validate the air flow dynamics already imbedded in the hygrothermal model for the computer-based air flow simulation procedures. A comprehensive program of advanced, state-of-the-art hygrothermal modeling was then envisaged mainly to extend the knowledge to other wall systems and at least six representative climatic areas. These data were then to be used to provide the basis for the development of design guidelines. CFD results provided timely and much needed answers to many of the concerns and questions related to ventilation flows due to thermal buoyancy and wind-driven flow scenarios. The relative strength between these two mechanisms. Simple correlations were developed and are presented in the report providing the overall pressure drop, and flow through various cavities under different exterior solar and temperature scenarios. Brick Rainscreen Wall: It was initially expected that a 50 mm cavity would offer reduced pressure drops and increased air flow compared to a 19 mm cavity. However, these models showed that the size of the ventilation slots through the wall are the limiting factor rather than the cavity depth. Of course, once the slots are enlarged beyond a certain point, this could change. The effects of natural convection within the air cavities, driven by the temperature difference across the cavity, were shown to be less important than the external wind speed (for a wind direction normal to the wall surface), when wind action is present. Vinyl Rainscreen Wall: The CFD model of the vinyl rainscreen wall was simpler than that for the brick wall. Constant wall temperatures were used rather than conjugate heat transfer. Although this is appropriate for a thin surface with little heat capacity, it does mean that an empirical correlation between solar radiation (and perhaps wind speed) and vinyl temperature is required to use these results appropriately. The results developed from this CFD model were correlated to weather parameters and construction details so that they can be incorporated into ORNL s advanced hygrothermal models MOISTURE- EXPERT.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Karagiozis, Achilles N [ORNL

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Prediction of turbulence control for arbitrary periodic spanwise wall movement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to generalize the well-known spanwise-oscillating-wall technique for drag reduction, non-sinusoidal oscillations of a solid wall are considered as a means to alter the skin-friction drag in a turbulent channel flow. A series of Direct Numerical Simulations is conducted to evaluate the control performance of nine different temporal waveforms, in addition to the usual sinusoid, systematically changing the wave amplitude and the period for each waveform. The turbulent average spanwise motion is found to coincide with the laminar Stokes solution that is constructed, for the generic waveform, through harmonic superposition. This allows us to define and compute, for each waveform, a new penetration depth of the Stokes layer which correlates with the amount of turbulent drag reduction, and eventually to predict both turbulent drag reduction and net energy saving rate for arbitrary waveforms. Among the waveforms considered, the maximum net energy saving rate is obtained by the sinusoidal wave at its optimal ...

Cimarelli, Andrea; Hasegawa, Yosuke; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Quadrio, Maurizio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Through the wall solar cooker  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a solar appliance for extending from the interior of a kitchen through an exterior wall of the building and beyond a predetermined distance in a cantilever manner to receive and concentrate in the appliance outside of the building, solar radiation rays for cooking purposes comprising: a housing, the housing being mounted to extend from a kitchen through an external wall of a building and beyond in a cantilever manner and forming a closed oven, the oven comprising a bottom, glass top, a pair of sides and a first end positioned with access from within the kitchen and comprising an oven door, a first reflective panel member mounted above, juxtapositioned to one edge of the glass top for positioning against the outer surface of the external wall and extending laterally therefrom for receiving and directing solar rays impinging thereon through the glass top and into the oven, and a second double-sided reflective panel mounted above and juxtapositioned to the glass top and extending substantially perpendicular to the first reflective panel for receiving solar rays impinging on either side thereof, and directing the solar rays into the oven.

Kerr, B.P.

1987-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

235

Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and circumference by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

Lagasse, Paul R. (Santa Fe, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and radius by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

Lagasse, P.R.

1985-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

237

Martifer Construction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Martifer Group that deals in construction services. The division operates in wind farm tower construction, also provides engineering services for solar projects. References...

238

Construction Schedule | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Construction Schedule Current Projects APCF 27-ID and 35-ID LOM438 Pentagon F LOM437 Protocol for halting construction because of vibrations 0614...

239

GRR/Section 6 - Construction Permits Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 - Construction Permits Overview 6 - Construction Permits Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6 - Construction Permits Overview 06 - ConstructionPermitsOverview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06 - ConstructionPermitsOverview.pdf 06 - ConstructionPermitsOverview.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Constructing a geothermal power plant requires numerous permits from Federal, state, and local governments, related to transporting construction materials, encroaching upon Federal and state right-of-ways, demolishing existing structures and building new structures.

240

Materials Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Science. Summary: ... Description: Group focus in materials science (inkjet metrology, micro-macro, advanced characterizations). ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ENCAPSULATION OF PALLADIUM IN POROUS WALL HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new encapsulation method was investigated in an attempt to develop an improved palladium packing material for hydrogen isotope separation. Porous wall hollow glass microspheres (PWHGMs) were produced by using a flame former, heat treating and acid leaching. The PWHGMs were then filled with palladium salt using a soak-and-dry process. The palladium salt was reduced at high temperature to leave palladium inside the microspheres.

Heung, L; George Wicks, G; Ray Schumacher, R

2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

242

Construction Readiness RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Readiness Review Module Construction Readiness Review Module March 2010 CD- [This Rev Readiness -0 view Module w s Review (CRR OFFICE O CD-1 was used to dev R). This Review OF ENVIRO Standard R Construc Rev Critical D CD-2 M velop the Revie w Module cont ONMENTA Review Pla ction Rea view Modul Decision (CD C March 2010 ew Plan for Sal tains the lesson Review.] AL MANAG an (SRP) adiness le D) Applicabili D-3 lt Waste Proce ns learned from GEMENT ity CD-4 ssing Facility ( m the SWPF Co Post Ope (SWPF) Const onstruction Re eration truction eadiness Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental

243

400A Construction Schedule | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

27-ID and 35-ID 27-ID and 35-ID Past 27-ID and 35-ID Long Range Schedule (pdf) 27-ID and 35-ID Past Construction Past 27-ID and 35-ID Construction Day Activity Impact Week of 06.11.13 35-ID-D panels arrive, 35-ID-C panel installation complete. Start installation of 35-ID-D. -/- Week of 06.13.13 DCS/RIXS Construction Progress Meeting, LOM 438-C010, 9AM -/- Week of 06.18.13 27-ID-A panels arrive -/- Week of 06.25.13 first shipment of 35-ID-E panels arrives -/- Week of 06.03.13 continue installation of 35-ID-C panels, doors, roof and floor trim Low Week of 05.20.13 35-ID-C panels arrive begin installation of 35-ID-C wall and roof panels Low Week of 05.13.13 completion of 35-ID-B roof panels, installation of lead trim, steel capping and door installation. Low Tuesday - 03.05.13

244

Department of Energy Construction Safety Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

DOE has adopted the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1926 ``Safety and Health Regulations for Construction,`` and related parts of 29 CFR 1910, ``Occupational Safety and Health Standards.`` This nonmandatory reference guide is based on these OSHA regulations and, where appropriate, incorporates additional standards, codes, directives, and work practices that are recognized and accepted by DOE and the construction industry. It covers excavation, scaffolding, electricity, fire, signs/barricades, cranes/hoists/conveyors, hand and power tools, concrete/masonry, stairways/ladders, welding/cutting, motor vehicles/mechanical equipment, demolition, materials, blasting, steel erection, etc.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Compositional characterization and imaging of "Wall-bound" acylesters of Populus trichocarpa Reveal Differential Accumulation of acyl Molecules in Normal and Reactive Woods  

SciTech Connect

Acylesterification is one of the common modifications of cell wall non-cellulosic polysaccharides and/or lignin primarily in monocot plants. We analyzed the cell-wall acylesters of black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray) with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and synchrotron infrared (IR) imaging facility. The results revealed that the cell wall of dicotyledonous poplar, as the walls of many monocot grasses, contains a considerable amount of acylesters, primarily acetyl and p-hydroxycinnamoyl molecules. The 'wall-bound' acetate and phenolics display a distinct tissue specific-, bending stress responsible- and developmental-accumulation pattern. The 'wall-bound' p-coumarate predominantly accumulated in young leaves and decreased in mature leaves, whereas acetate and ferulate mostly amassed in the cell wall of stems. Along the development of stem, the level of the 'wall-bound' ferulate gradually increased, while the basal level of p-coumarate further decreased. Induction of tension wood decreased the accumulation of the 'wall-bound' phenolics while the level of acetate remained constant. Synchrotron IR-mediated chemical compositional imaging revealed a close spatial distribution of acylesters with cell wall polysaccharides in poplar stem. These results indicate that different 'wall-bound' acylesters play distinct roles in poplar cell wall structural construction and/or metabolism of cell wall matrix components.

Guo, J.; Park, S; Yu, X; Liu, C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Characterization of Minerals, Metals and Materials - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... Application of Conical Beam X-Ray Tomography to Multi-Phase Materials ... Digital Construction and Characterization of Reticulated Porous...

247

First Wall and Operational Diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

In this chapter we review numerous diagnostics capable of measurements at or near the first wall, many of which contribute information useful for safe operation of a tokamak. There are sections discussing infrared cameras, visible and VUV cameras, pressure gauges and RGAs, Langmuir probes, thermocouples, and erosion and deposition measurements by insertable probes and quartz microbalance. Also discussed are dust measurements by electrostatic detectors, laser scattering, visible and IR cameras, and manual collection of samples after machine opening. In each case the diagnostic is discussed with a view toward application to a burning plasma machine such as ITER.

Lasnier, C; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Groth, M; Brooks, N; McLean, A; LaBombard, B; Sharpe, J; Skinner, C; Whyte, D; Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

Heat-sound insulating wall  

SciTech Connect

The wall comprises a closed acoustic box-structure which is defined by a slightly ribbed sheet and a flat sheet. The boxstructure has lateral ribs which extend beyond the sheet. A panel of high-density mineral wool which is of small thickness is enclosed inside the box-structure. A heat insulator covers the box-structure and the ribs of the box-structure and is protected by an outer trough which has ribs or corrugations perpendicular to the ribs of the box-structure.

Ovaert, F.; Reneault, P.

1980-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

249

Delays in nuclear power plant construction. Progress report, September 15, 1976--September 14, 1977  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies barriers to shortening nuclear power plant construction schedules and recommends research efforts that should minimize or eliminate the identified barriers. The identified barriers include: (1) design and construction interfacing problems; (2) problems relating to the selection and use of permanent materials and construction methods; (3) construction coordination and communication problems; and (4) problems associated with manpower availability and productivity;

Mason, G.E.; Larew, R.E.

1977-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

250

On construction sequence optimization of cascaded hydroelectric stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In basin planning, many hydroelectric stations are to be constructed in a river in order to develop the water energy cascadedly. If there were no constraints on financial resources, material resources, and manpower, all the stations would be constructed ... Keywords: algorithm, hydroelectric station, optimization, profits

Xingming Sun; Huowang Chen; Jianping Yin; Xinhai Jin; Aiming Yang; Changyun Li

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Experimental results for diffusion and infiltration of moisture in concrete masonry walls exposed to hot and humid climates  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents experimental test results for heat and moisture migration in walls exposed to hot and humid climates. The research was conducted to study the problem of mold and mildew caused by moisture transfer into walls of concrete masonry unit (CMU) type construction by diffusion and convective transport by air infiltration. This type of construction is common in commercial buildings in the southern US. The tests were conducted in two phases. Phase 1 evaluated heat and moisture transfer by diffusion. Phase 2 testing involved air infiltration through the test walls. Data were also collected to determine the rate at which the test walls would dry out without infiltration present. Test results indicate that an exterior vapor retarder will reduce the moisture migration into the wall and thereby lower the moisture accumulation due to infiltration when a vapor retarder (such as vinyl wallpaper) is used for the interior surface treatment. Testing also showed that while the exterior wall treatment does have an effect on reducing the total moisture accumulation in the test walls, the interior wall treatment has a much larger impact when infiltration is present. The data support a proposed criterion for the onset of mold and mildew, which requires a monthly average surface relative humidity of 80% with temperatures between 32 F and 105 F.

Hosni, M.H.; Sipes, J.M.; Wallis, M.H.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Anode Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   Properties of polymeric mesh anodes used for construction applications...(a) Average current output

253

Categorical Exclusion 4565, Waste Management Construction Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FornI FornI Project Title: Waste Management Construction Support (4565) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is an attempt to cover the general activities that construction would perform in support of Waste Management activities. Work includes construction work performed in support of Waste Management Sustainability and Stewardship projects and programs to include: load waste into containers; open, manipulate containers; empty containers; decommission out-of-service equipment (includes removal of liquids, hazardous, and universal wastes); apply fabric and gravel to ground; transport equipment; transport materials; transport waste; remove vegetation; place barriers; place erosion controls; operate wheeled and tracked equipment; general carpentry. Work will be performed on dirt, vegetated, graveled, or paved surfaces in

254

Achieving Sustainable Construction in Affordable Housing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy-efficient design and construction checklist and information sheets on energy-efficient design and construction are two products being developed. These products will help affordable housing providers take the first steps toward a whole-house approach to the design and implementation of energy-efficient construction practices. The checklist presents simple and clear guidance on energy improvements that can be readily addressed now by most affordable housing providers. The information sheets complement the checklist by providing installation instructions and material specifications that are accompanied by detailed graphics. The information sheets also identify benefits of recommended energy-efficiency measures and procedures including cost savings and impacts on health and comfort. This paper presents details on the checklist and information sheets and discusses their use in two affordable housing projects.

Barcik, M.K.; Creech, D.B.; Ternes, M.P.

1998-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

255

Exterior Insulation Finish System (EIFS) Walls ORNL provides the tools to enable industry to engineer durable, moisture-tolerant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the insulating value of walls and the energy efficiency of buildings. The EIFS concept came to America fromExterior Insulation Finish System (EIFS) Walls ORNL provides the tools to enable industry for building materials. EIFS's are among the most cost-effective building technologies for improving

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

256

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Availability Technology Express Licensing Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And...

257

Labor Standards for Construction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Labor Standards for Construction Labor Standards for Construction Labor Standards for Construction More Documents & Publications Chapter 22 - Labor Standards for Construction Labor...

258

Idaho National Laboratory Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho National Laboratory Former Construction Workers, Construction Idaho National Laboratory Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Idaho National Laboratory Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: 1-800-866-9663 Local Outreach Office: Dan Obray 456 N. Arthur Avenue Pocatello, ID 83204 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica

259

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Construction Workers, Construction Worker  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Construction Workers, Construction Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: WIPP Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPh, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (800) 866-9663 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

260

Rocky Flats Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Flats Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Rocky Flats Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Rocky Flats Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Rocky Flats Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (800) 866-9663 Local Outreach Office: Dwayne Adkins 7510 W. Mississippi Ave., Suite 230 Lakewood, CO 80226 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Pinellas Former Construction Worker, Construction Worker Screening Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pinellas Former Construction Worker, Construction Worker Screening Pinellas Former Construction Worker, Construction Worker Screening Projects Pinellas Former Construction Worker, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Pinellas Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: 1-800-866-9663 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

262

Thermal control system and method for a passive solar storage wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a system and method for controlling the storing and elease of thermal energy from a thermal storage wall wherein said wall is capable of storing thermal energy from insolation of solar radiation. The system and method includes a device such as a plurality of louvers spaced a predetermined distance from the thermal wall for regulating the release of thermal energy from the thermal wall. This regulating device is made from a material which is substantially transparent to the incoming solar radiation so that when it is in any operative position, the thermal storage wall substantially receives all of the impacting solar radiation. The material in the regulating device is further capable of being substantially opaque to thermal energy so that when the device is substantially closed, thermal release of energy from the storage wall is substantially minimized. An adjustment device is interconnected with the regulating mechanism for selectively opening and closing it in order to regulate the release of thermal energy from the wall.

Ortega, Joseph K. E. (Westminister, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Revisit of interfacial free energy of the hard sphere system near hard wall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a simple Monte Carlo method to calculate the interfacial free energy between the substrate and the material. Using this method we investigate the interfacial free energys of the hard sphere fluid and solid phases near a smooth hard wall. According to the obtained interfacial free energys of the coexisting fluid and solid phases and the Young equation we are able to determine the contact angle with high accuracy, cos$\\theta$ = 1:010(31), which indicates that a smooth hard wall can be wetted completely by the hard sphere crystal at the interface between the wall and the hard sphere fluid.

Mingcheng Yang; Hongru Ma

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

264

Three-Dimensional Numerical Evaluation of Thermal Performance of Uninsulated Wall Assemblies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This study describes a detailed three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics modeling to evaluate the thermal performance of uninsulated wall assemblies accounting for conduction through framing, convection, and radiation. The model allows for material properties variations with temperature. Parameters that were varied in the study include ambient outdoor temperature and cavity surface emissivity. Understanding the thermal performance of uninsulated wall cavities is essential for accurate prediction of energy use in residential buildings. The results can serve as input for building energy simulation tools for modeling the temperature dependent energy performance of homes with uninsulated walls.

Ridouane, E. H.; Bianchi, M.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

266

TMS 2010 Materials in Nuclear Power Plant Construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONTINUING EDUCATION LINKS. CONTINUING EDUCATION HOME Enhance your professional development by attending these excellent educational events...

267

Manhattan Project: Y-12 Construction, 1943  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Groundbreaking for Y-12, Oak Ridge Y-12: CONSTRUCTION Groundbreaking for Y-12, Oak Ridge Y-12: CONSTRUCTION (Oak Ridge: Clinton, 1943) Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943 Y-12: Operation, 1943-1944 Working K-25 into the Mix, 1943-1944 The Navy and Thermal Diffusion, 1944 Groundbreaking for the Alpha plant of the Y-12 Electromagnetic Plant took place at Oak Ridge on February 18, 1943 (right). Soon blueprints could not be produced fast enough to keep up with construction as Stone & Webster labored to meet Leslie Groves's deadline. The Beta facility was actually begun before formal authorization. While laborers were aggressively recruited, there was always a shortage of workers skilled Y-12 construction, Oak Ridge enough to perform jobs according to the rigid specifications. (A further complication was that some tasks could be performed only by workers with security clearances.) Huge amounts of material had to be obtained (38 million board feet of lumber, for instance), and the magnets needed so much copper for windings that the Army had to borrow almost 15,000 tons of silver bullion from the United States Treasury to fabricate into strips and wind on to coils as a substitute for copper. Treasury silver was also used to manufacture the busbars that ran around the top of the racetracks.

268

Panelized wall system with foam core insulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

269

Materials Characterization | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization Nuclear Forensics Scanning Probes Related Research Materials Theory and Simulation Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials Home | Science &...

270

PROCESS OF FORMING POWDERED MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of forming high-density compacts of a powdered ceramic material is described by agglomerating the powdered ceramic material with a heat- decompossble binder, adding a heat-decompossble lubricant to the agglomerated material, placing a quantity of the material into a die cavity, pressing the material to form a compact, pretreating the compacts in a nonoxidizing atmosphere to remove the binder and lubricant, and sintering the compacts. When this process is used for making nuclear reactor fuel elements, the ceramic material is an oxide powder of a fissionsble material and after forming, the compacts are placed in a cladding tube which is closed at its ends by vapor tight end caps, so that the sintered compacts are held in close contact with each other and with the interior wall of the cladding tube.

Glatter, J.; Schaner, B.E.

1961-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

271

Construction Project Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Execution - (2009 - 2011) North Execution - (2009 - 2011) Construction Project Number 2009 2010 2011 Project Description ANMLPL 0001C 76,675.32 - - Animas-Laplata circuit breaker and power rights CRGRFL 0001C - - 7,177.09 Craig Rifle Bay and transfer bay upgrade to 2000 amps; / Convert CRG RFL to 345 kV out of Bears Ear Sub FGE 0019C - - 39,207.86 Replace 69/25kV transformer KX2A at Flaming Gorge FGE 0020C - - 52,097.12 Flaming Gorge: Replace failed KW2A transformer HDN 0069C 16,638.52 208,893.46 3,704,578.33 Replace failed transformer with KZ1A 250 MVA 230/138kv

272

SF6432-CN Construction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/31/13 7/31/13 Page 1 of 31 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Retrieve latest version electronically. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-CN (07/2013) Section II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR FIRM-FIXED PRICE COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE COVER PAGE OR SECTION I. (CTRL+CLICK ON A LINK BELOW TO ADVANCE DIRECTLY TO THAT SECTION) ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS (Ts&Cs) APPLICABLE LAW ASSIGNMENT AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTORS BANKRUPTCY CANCELLATION OR TERMINATION FOR CONVENIENCE CHANGES COMPLIANCE WITH LAWS DEFINITIONS DIFFERING SITE CONDITIONS DISPUTES

273

Seismic Response of Reinforced Concrete Walls Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... data verification and development of improved models; and (2) investigation of global wall bucking in the 2010 Chile earthquake designed using ...

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

274

Engineering secondary cell wall deposition in plants  

loop, biofuels, cell wall, lignin, sacchari?cation, synthetic biology. Summary ... target speci?c cell types such as ?bre and pith cells. It is well

275

Sources of variability and uncertainty in LCA of single wall carbon nanotubes for Li-ion batteries in electric vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production alternatives for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) such as chemical vapor deposition, laser, arc and flame, vary widely in material and energy yields, catalyst requirements and product characteristics. The overall environmental profile ...

Thomas P. Seager; Ryne P. Raffaelle; Brian J. Landi

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Electronic detection of molecules on the exterior and molecular transport through the interior of single walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are unique materials with high surface to volume ratio and all atoms residing on the surface. Due to their tubular shape both exterior and interior of the SWNT are available for ...

Lee, Chang Young

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Penetration through a wall: Is it reality?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A tennis ball is not expected to penetrate through a brick wall since a motion under a barrier is impossible in classical mechanics. With quantum effects a motion of a particle through a barrier is allowed due to quantum tunneling. According to usual theories of tunneling, the particle density decays inside a classical barrier resulting in an extremely slow pentration process. However, there are no general laws forbidding fast motion through classical barriers. The problem addressed is investigation of unusual features o quantum tunneling through a classic static barrier which is at least two-dimensional. Here we show that penetration through such barrier can be not slow. When the barrier satisfies the certain conditions, a regime of quantum lens is possible with formation of caustics. De Broglie waves are reflected from the caustics, interfere, and result in a not small flux from under the barrier. This strongly contrasts to the usual scenario with a decaying under-barrier density. We construct a particular example of fast motion through a classical barrier. One can unexectedly conclude that, in principle, nature allows fast penetration through classical barriers which against common sense. The phenomenon may be responsible for a variety of processes in labs and nature. For example, tunneling in solids may occur with a different scenario, in biophysics and chemistry one can specify conditions for unusual reactions, and evanescent optical waves may strongly change their properties. In condensed matter and cosmic physics there are phenomena with misterious reasons of an energy emission, for instance, gamma-ray bursts. One can try to treat them in the context of fast escape from under some barriers.

B. Ivlev

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

278

Modeled and metered energy savings from exterior wall insulation  

SciTech Connect

Millions of single-family masonry (block) houses with slab foundations exist in the southern United States. In fact, approximately 50% of Florida`s six million residences are of concrete block construction. The block walls in these homes are usually uninsulated, and the technology for retrofitting wall insulation is not well developed. Two field tests were performed--one near Phoenix, Arizona and one in Cocoa, Florida--to measure the air-conditioning energy savings and demand reduction impact of applying an exterior insulation and finish system (EEFS) to the exterior of the block wall, and gain practical experience with retrofit application techniques and costs. One field test used a {open_quotes}site-fabricated{close_quotes} insulation system, while the other field test used a commercially available system. The field tests measured a savings of 9% in Arizona and less savings in Florida, and emphasized the impact indoor temperature settings have on cooling energy savings: exterior wall insulation on block homes will produce energy savings in Florida houses only if a low cooling thermostat setting is desirable. The field tests also highlighted an improved comfort benefit from the retrofit - namely, elimination of overheating in rooms with south and west exposures. The DOE-2. ID program was used to analyze the energy savings (air-conditioning and heating) and electric demand impact of applying an EIFS. Air-conditioning energy savings were estimated to be in the range of 8% to 10% in many southern U.S. regions. A 12% savings was predicted for Phoenix, Arizona and a savings of 1% to 4% was predicted for seacoast regions, particularly in Florida. These predictions were in good agreement with the measured values. Peak hour cooling energy savings were predicted to be more uniform throughout the country, generally in the range of %8 to %12.

Ternes, M.; Parker, D.; McLain, H.; Barkaszi, S. Jr.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Materials Science Materials Science1354608000000Materials ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access./No/Questions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov Materials Science Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Data Sources Reference Organizations Journals Key Resources CINDAS Materials Property Databases video icon Thermophysical Properties of Matter Database (TPMD) Aerospace Structural Metals Database (ASMD) Damage Tolerant Design Handbook (DTDH) Microelectronics Packaging Materials Database (MPMD) Structural Alloys Handbook (SAH) Proquest Technology Collection Includes the Materials Science collection MRS Online Proceedings Library Papers presented at meetings of the Materials Research Society Data Sources

280

Material containment enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isolation enclosure and a group of isolation enclosures was designed which is useful when a relatively large containment area is required. The enclosure is in the form of a ring having a section removed so that a technician may enter the center area of the ring. in a preferred embodiment, an access zone is located in the transparent wall of the enclosure and extends around the inner perimeter of the ring so that a technician can insert his hands into the enclosure to reach any point within. The inventive enclosures provide more containment area per unit area of floor space than conventional material isolation enclosures.

Carlson, D.O.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1" to 1 1/2"), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

Baker, P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Sandia National Laboratory (NM) Former Workers, Construction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Sandia National Laboratory (NM) Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects...

283

Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Construction specification W-320-C5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This supporting document has been prepared to make the construction specifications for Project W-320 readily available. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), specification is for procurement, fabrication and installation of equipment at the C Tank Farm, including Operator Station and some equipment just outside the C Tank Farm fence, necessary to support the sluicing operation. Work consists of furnishing labor, equipment, and materials to provide the means to procure materials and equipment, fabricate items, excavate and place concrete, and install equipment, piping, wiring, and structures in accordance with the Contract Documents. Major work elements include: Excavation for process and fire protection piping, electrical conduit trenches, and foundations for small structures; Placement of concrete cover blocks, foundations, and equipment pads; Procurement and installation of double walled piping, electrical conduit, fire and raw water piping, chilled water piping, and electrical cable; Procurement and installation of above-ground ventilation system piping between the (HVAC) Process building and Tank C-106; Core drill existing concrete; Furnish and installation of electrical distribution equipment; Installation of the concrete foundation, and assembly installation of the two Seismic Shutdown Systems with Environmental Enclosures; Fabrication and installation of in-pit pipe jumpers, including related valves, instruments and wiring; and Installation of a vertical submersible pump, horizontal booster pump, and winch assembly into tank access riser pits.

Bailey, J.W.

1998-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Construction specification W-320-C7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This supporting document has been prepared to make the construction specifications for Project W-320 readily available. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), specification is for procurement, fabrication and installation of equipment at the C Tank Farm, including Operator Station and some equipment just outside the C Tank Farm fence, necessary to support the sluicing operation. Work consists of furnishing labor, equipment, and materials to provide the means to procure materials and equipment, fabricate items, excavate and place concrete, and install equipment, piping, wiring, and structures in accordance with the Contract Documents. Major work elements include: Excavation for process and fire protection piping, electrical conduit trenches, and foundations for small structures; Placement of concrete cover blocks, foundations, and equipment pads; Procurement and installation of double walled piping, electrical conduit, fire and raw water piping, chilled water piping, and electrical cable; Procurement and installation of above-ground ventilation system piping between the (HVAC) Process building and Tank C-106; Core drill existing concrete; Furnish and installation of electrical distribution equipment; Installation of the concrete foundation, and assembly installation of the two Seismic Shutdown Systems with Environmental Enclosures; Fabrication and installation of in-pit pipe jumpers, including related valves, instruments and wiring; and Installation of a vertical submersible pump, horizontal booster pump, and winch assembly into tank access riser pits.

Bailey, J.W.

1998-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

285

Argonne CNM News: Study of Ferroelectric Domain Walls Offers a New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study of Ferroelectric Domain Walls Offers a New Nanoscale Conduction Path Study of Ferroelectric Domain Walls Offers a New Nanoscale Conduction Path Scanning tunneling microscopy tips SPM images of the (110) surface of cleaved h-HoMnO3. (top) PFM image showing in-plane ferroelectric domains (oriented vertically, red arrows). (bottom) cAFM image showing enhanced conduction along tail-to-tail domain walls; images are 4 microns per side. Facility users from Rutgers University together with the Center for Nanoscale Materials' Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group have identified two-dimensional sheets of charge formed at the boundaries of ferroelectric domains in a multiferroic material. These two-dimensional charged sheets are not pinned by unstable defects, chemical dopants, or structural interface, but are formed naturally as the inevitable

286

Static load cycle testing of a low-aspect-ratio four-inch wall, TRG-type structure, TRG-5-4 (1. 0, 0. 56)  

SciTech Connect

This report is the second in a series of test reports that details the quasi-static cyclic testing of low height-to-length aspect ratio reinforced concrete structures. The test structures were designed according to the recommendations of a technical review group for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored Seismic Category I Structures Program. The structure tested and reported here had 4-in.-thick shear and end walls, and the elastic deformation was dominated by shear. The background of the program and previous results are given for completeness. Details of the geometry, material property tests, construction history, ultrasonic testing, and modal testing to find the undamaged dynamic characteristics of the structures are given. Next, the static test procedure and results in terms of stiffness and load deformation behavior are given. Finally, results are shown relative to other known results, and conclusions are presented. 33 refs., 140 figs., 13 tabs.

Farrar, C.R.; Bennett, J.G.; Dunwoody, W.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Baker, W.E. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

BronWall: a software system for volumetric quantification of the bronchial wall remodeling in MDCT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops an original volumetric quantification approach of the bronchial wall remodeling, based on MDCT acquisitions prior/post-medication delivery. The methodology is implemented as a software system -BronWall- integrating 3D segmentation, ... Keywords: 3D image processing, 3D segmentation, bronchial reactivity, software system, volumetric quantification, wall remodeling

A. Saragaglia; C. Fetita; F. Preteux

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Reactor Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The reactor materials crosscut effort will enable the development of innovative and revolutionary materials and provide broad-based, modern materials science that will benefit all four DOE-NE...

289

Air Sealing for New Home Construction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for New Home Construction for New Home Construction Air Sealing for New Home Construction May 2, 2012 - 6:09pm Addthis Air Sealing for New Home Construction What does this mean for me? Air sealing your house properly during construction will save you energy and money. Ideally, air-sealing techniques are tailored to your site and climate zone. How does it work? Workers will seal all the paths that air can leak in and out of your new home during construction. This process requires care and attention to detail, and it's best to hire professionals with experience building energy-efficient homes. Minimizing air movement in and out of a house is key to building an energy-efficient home. Controlling air leakage is also critical to moisture control. It's always best to use techniques and materials identified as best

290

New Corrosion Resistance Bar in Sandwich Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandwich masonry wall is an energy-saving composite wall with good mechanical properties and durability. But the adhesion strength to its tie bar affects its permanence. In order to simple the traditional production processes, a new method was proposed. ... Keywords: energy-saving, durability, steel bar, insulation

Li Yancang; Ge Xiaohua; Wang Fengxin

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Fire performance of single leaf masonry walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A finite element model called MasSET has been developed which is capable of predicting the structural behaviour of single leaf masonry walls subject to elevated temperatures. The analysis models a slice through the wall as a column strip in plane stress, ... Keywords: boundary conditions, eccentricity, finite element model, masonry in fire, slenderness ratio

A. Nadjai; M. O'Gara; F. Ali

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Materials - Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Assessment The staff of the Energy Systems Division has a long history of technical and economic analysis of the production and recycling of materials for transportation...

293

Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Materials Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos...

294

2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

Daniel J. Cosgrove

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

295

Key Elements of and Materials Performance Targets for Highly Insulating Window Frames  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance of windows is important for energy efficient buildings. Windows typically account for about 30-50 percent of the transmission losses though the building envelope, even if their area fraction of the envelope is far less. The reason for this can be found by comparing the thermal transmittance (U-factor) of windows to the U-factor of their opaque counterparts (wall, roof and floor constructions). In well insulated buildings the U-factor of walls, roofs an floors can be between 0.1-0.2 W/(m2K). The best windows have U-values of about 0.7-1.0. It is therefore obvious that the U-factor of windows needs to be reduced, even though looking at the whole energy balance for windows (i.e. solar gains minus transmission losses) makes the picture more complex.In high performance windows the frame design and material use is of utmost importance, as the frame performance is usually the limiting factor for reducing the total window U-factor further. This paper describes simulation studies analyzing the effects on frame and edge-of-glass U-factors of different surface emissivities as well as frame material and spacer conductivities. The goal of this work is to define materials research targets for window frame components that will result in better frame thermal performance than is exhibited by the best products available on the market today.

Gustavsen, Arild; Grynning, Steinar; Arasteh, Dariush; Jelle, Bjorn Petter; Goudey, Howdy

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

296

MODULAR CONSTRUCTION SYSTEM EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to respond to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Direction Letter (TDL) 02-003 (Waisley 2001), which directs Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) to complete a design study to recommend repository design options to support receipt and/or emplacement of any or all of the following: commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), high-level radioactive waste (HLW), DOE-managed spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) (including naval spent nuclear fuel [SNF]), and immobilized plutonium (if available), as soon as practicable, but no later than 2010. From the possible design options, a recommended approach will be determined for further evaluation to support the preliminary design of the repository. This study integrates the results of the repository Design Evolution Study (Rowe 2002) with supporting studies concerning national transportation options (BSC 2002b) and Nevada transportation options (Gehner 2002). The repository Design Evolution Study documents the processes used to reevaluate the design, construction, operation, and cost of the repository in response to TDL 02-003 (Waisley 2001), and to determine possible repository conceptual design options. The transportation studies evaluate the national and Nevada transportation options that support the repository conceptual design options. An evaluation methodology was established, based on Program-level requirements developed for the study in reference BSC 2001a, to allow the repository and system design options to be evaluated on a consistent basis. The transportation options and the design components were integrated into system design implementation options, which were evaluated using receipt and emplacement scenarios. The scenarios tested the ability of the design concept to adapt to changes in funding, waste receipt rate, and Nevada rail transportation availability. The results of the evaluation (in terms of system throughput, cost, and schedule) were then compared to the Program-level requirements, and recommendations for design alternatives, requirements changes, or further evaluation were developed.

S. Gillespie

2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

297

Construction computer-aided engineering  

SciTech Connect

Hitachi Ltd. and Bechtel Power Corporation are presently designing nuclear power plants for Japanese utilities exclusively on three-dimensional computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) systems. To make these three-dimensional CADD models more effective for construction activities, Hitachi and Bechtel are jointly developing a software package that allows construction engineers and planners to effectively empty an area of the three-dimensional CADD model and rebuild it electronically to simulate, animate, and optimize the construction sequence and methodology. The components in the three-dimensional CADD model are placed as they would be for actual construction (i.e., piping spool pieces, skid-mounted systems, piping, and equipment modules, etc.). The construction engineer and planners can then select the components along with appropriate handling equipment and simulate/animate the actual construction sequence. After the construction sequence has been optimized, it is captured on videotape for use in the field. The results of the simulated activities are then passed on to computer program module (CPM) scheduling and work breakdown structure programs for accurate bottom-up construction activity planning and commodity tracking. This entire process can be iterated to an optimum solution before the actual construction begins. Once construction is in progress, the program can compare the actual status and allow resimulations for workarounds.

Hayashi, T.; Yoshinaga, T.; Atkins, D.; Astleford, R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Steady-State Thermal Performance Evaluation of Steel-Framed Wall Assembly with Local Foam Insulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During January and May, 2009, two configurations of steel-framed walls constructed with conventional 2 4 steel studs insulated with R-19 ~14cm. (5.5-in. thick) and R-13 ~9cm. (3.5-in. thick) fiberglass insulation batts were tested in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) guarded hot-box using ASTM C1363 test procedure. The first test wall used conventional 2 4 steel studs insulated with 2.5-cm. (1-in.) thick foam profiles, called stud snugglers. These stud snugglers converted the 2 4 wall assembly into a 2 6 assembly allowing application of R-19 fiberglass insulation. The second wall tested for comparison was a conventional 2 4 steel stud wall using R-13 insulation batts. Further, numerical simulations were performed in order to evaluate the steady-state thermal performance of various wood- and steel-framed wall assemblies. The effects of adding the stud-snugglers to the wood and steel studs were also investigated numerically. Different combinations of insulation and framing factor were used in the simulations.

Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

DEVICE FOR TREATING MATERIALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Test-hole construction in a reactor to facilitate inserting and removing test specimens from the reactor for irradiation therein is discussed. An elongated chamber extends from the outer face of the reactor shield into the reactor. A shield box, having an open end, is sealed to thc outer face of the reactor shield by its open end surrounding the outer end of the chamber. A removable door is provided in the side wall of the shield box for inscrtion and removal of test specimens. A means operable from thc exterior of the shield box is provided for transferring test specimens between the shield box and the irradiation position within the chamber and consists of an elongated rod having a specimen tray engaging member on its inner end, which may be manipulated by the operator.

Ohlinger, L.A.; Seitz, F.; Young, G.J.

1959-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

300

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is to develop the enabling materials technology for the clean, high-efficiency diesel truck engines of the future. The development of cleaner, higher-efficiency diesel engines imposes greater mechanical, thermal, and tribological demands on materials of construction. Often the enabling technology for a new engine component is the material from which the part can be made. The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE), and the diesel engine companies in the United States, materials suppliers, national laboratories, and universities. A comprehensive research and development program has been developed to meet the enabling materials requirements for the diesel engines of the future. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications.

Sidney Diamond; D. Ray Johnson

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hanford Construction Workers Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONSTRUCTION CONSTRUCTION WORKES AT HANFORD: A NEEDS ASSESSMENT Submitted by Center to Protect Workers' Rights on behalf of The Building and Construction Trades Dept., AFL-CIO and The Central Washington Building and Construction Trades Council In cooperation with United Brotherhood of Carpenters University of Cincinnati Occupational Health Foundation George Washington University Zenith Administrators, Inc. Duke University July 1, 1997 Table bt Cóütn 1. Introduction and Background a. Specific Aims b. Rationale for Program 2. Need for Establishing Medical Evaluation and Notification a. Medical Surveillance b. History of Site c. Special Issues for Construction Workers 3. Size of Construction Workers' Population (Since 1943) a. Crude Estimate of Population Size b. Population Before 1950 c. Population After 1950

302

Construction Safety Forecast for ITER  

SciTech Connect

The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project is poised to begin its construction activity. This paper gives an estimate of construction safety as if the experiment was being built in the United States. This estimate of construction injuries and potential fatalities serves as a useful forecast of what can be expected for construction of such a major facility in any country. These data should be considered by the ITER International Team as it plans for safety during the construction phase. Based on average U.S. construction rates, ITER may expect a lost workday case rate of < 4.0 and a fatality count of 0.5 to 0.9 persons per year.

cadwallader, lee charles

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Thermoelectric Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermoelectric materials can generate electricity or provide cooling by converting thermal gradients to electricity or electricity to thermal gradients. More efficient thermoelectric materials would make feasible the widespread use of thermoelectric converters in mundane applications. This report summarizes the state-of-the-art of thermoelectric materials including currently available materials and applications, new developments, and future prospects.

2000-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

304

Transmission Line Design and Construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry wants to construct reliable and cost-effective overhead lines. A reliable and cost effective line requires not only that the line and structures meet design criteria for strength, clearances, and electrical considerations, but also that it be designed for safe and easy construction and maintenance. Design and construction practices should therefore go hand in hand. Information among various departments within a utility has to be shared for mutual benefit. Communication is a key ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Specifying formative constructs in information systems research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While researchers go to great lengths to justify and prove theoretical links between constructs, the relationship between measurement items and constructs is often ignored. By default, the relationship between construct and item is assumed to be reflective, ... Keywords: composite constructs, formative constructs, latent constructs, measurement models, methodology, reflective constructs, statistical conclusion validity, type i and type II errors

Stacie Petter; Detmar Straub; Arun Rai

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

National Construction Safety Team Act  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This briefing will be scheduled at an upcoming meeting of the ... of documents provided to NIST related to the construction and maintenance of the ...

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

307

Manhattan Project: CP-1 Construction  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

CP-1 construction, November 24, 1942. Visible are portions of layers 27, 28, and 29. The Goodyear balloon is visible in the background. Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 > More...

308

Construction Work in Progress (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act allows nuclear power plants to qualify for recovery of Construction Work in Progress (CWIP) and other preconstruction expenditures in rates. Previously, nuclear power plants were excluded...

309

Fission reactors and materials  

SciTech Connect

The American-designed boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor dominate the designs currently in use and under construction worldwide. As in all energy systems, materials problems have appeared during service; these include stress-corrosion of stainless steel pipes and heat exchangers and questions regarding crack behavior in pressure vessels. To obtain the maximum potential energy from our limited uranium supplies is is essential to develop the fast breeder reactor. The materials in these reactors are subjected to higher temperatures and neutron fluxes but lower pressures than in the water reactors. The performance required of the fuel elements is more arduous in the breeder than in water reactors. Extensive materials programs are in progress in test reactors and in large test rigs to ensure that materials will be available to meet these conditions.

Frost, B.R.T.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Radiological Issues for the Thin Liquid Walls of ARIES-IFE Study  

SciTech Connect

Heavy ion beam driven inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants employ liquid wall materials to protect the structure against the energetic x-rays, ions, and debris emitted from the target following each shot. The objective of this assessment is to identify the radiological issues of the candidate liquid wall materials (Pb, LiPb, Sn, and Flibe) using the ARIES-IFE radiation chamber environment. The issues to be addressed include the radioactivity level and liquid waste minimization for waste management. Specifically, the liquids are evaluated with regard to the Class C limitation for waste disposal, a top-level requirement for all ARIES power plant designs. Two extreme cases were analyzed; the worst case is separation of the liquid wall material (highest radiation exposure) and the breeder (lowest radiation exposure), and the best case is the mixing of the two liquid streams. Both tangential and porous wall injection schemes were examined. Pb and LiPb are more radioactive than Sn and Flibe. For the liquid breeder system, the porous wall injection scheme with mixed liquid flows results in the lowest waste disposal rating and smallest waste stream achieved in our study.

El-Guebaly, L. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Wilson, P. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Henderson, D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Waganer, L. [Boeing Company (United States); Raffray, R. [University of California-San Diego (United States)

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Chemical Construction Co Linden Pilot  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Chemical Construction Co Linden Chemical Construction Co Linden Pilot Plant - NJ 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Chemical Construction Co., Linden Pilot Plant (NJ.12 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Chemical Construction Corporation Pilot Plant Chemico NJ.12-1 NJ.12-2 Location: Linden , New Jersey NJ.12-3 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.12-4 Site Operations: Performed research and development operations under AEC contract to develop a process for recovering uranium, cobalt, nickel, and copper from low grade residues. NJ.12-5 NJ.12-6 NJ.12-7 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to nature and duration of the operations NJ.12-4 NJ.12-8 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NJ.12-6

312

Bio-Synthetic Wall Systems Visualization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bio-Synthetic Wall Systems Visualization Speaker(s): Maria-Paz Gutierrez Date: December 16, 2008 - 10:00am Location: 90-3075 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Michael Donn...

313

Electric and Magnetic Walls on Dielectric Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sufficient conditions of the existence of electric or magnetic walls on dielectric interfaces are given for a multizone uniform dielectric waveguiding system. If one of two adjacent dielectric zones supports a TEM field distribution while the other supports a TM (TE) field distribution, then the common dielectric interface behaves as an electric (magnetic) wall, that is, the electric (magnetic) field line is perpendicular to the interface while the magnetic (electric) field line is parallel to the interface.

Changbiao Wang

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

314

Shear wall experiments and design in Japan  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of recent survey studies on the available experimental data bases and design codes/standards for reinforced concrete (RC) shear wall structures in Japan. Information related to the seismic design of RC reactor buildings and containment structures was emphasized in the survey. The seismic requirements for concrete structures, particularly those related to shear strength design, are outlined. Detailed descriptions are presented on the development of Japanese shear wall equations, design requirements for containment structures, and ductility requirements.

Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A Shell Theory for Chiral Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a characterization of the mechanical response of the linearly elastic shell we associate to a single-wall carbon nanotube of arbitrary chirality. In Bajaj et al. 2013, we gave such a characterization in the case of zigzag and armchair nanotubes; in particular, we showed that the orthotropic response we postulated for the associated shells is to become isotropic in the graphene-limit, that is, when the shell radius grows bigger and bigger. Here we give an explicit recipe to construct the generally anisotropic response of the shell associated to a nanotube of any chirality in terms of the response of the shell associated to a related zigzag or armchair nanotube. The expected coupling of mechanical effects that anisotropy entrains is demonstrated in the case of a torsion problem, where the axial extension accompanying twist is determined analytically and found in good agreement with the available experimental data.

Antonino Favata; Paolo Podio-Guidugli

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

316

Building Technologies Office: Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project on Facebook...

317

Investigating physical properties of novel carbon-based materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we present the results of studies of physical properties in three classes of novel carbon-based materials: carbon aerogels, single-walled carbon nanotubes, and high thermal conductivity graphitic foams. The ...

Demir, Nasser Soliman, 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ASSESSING THE UNCERTAINTY IN TANK 18-F WALL SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tank 18-F in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has had measurements taken from its inner vertical sides in order to determine the level of radionuclide and other analyte concentrations attached to the tank walls. In all, three samples have been obtained by drilling shallow holes into the carbon steel walls and consolidating the material. An Upper Wall Sample (Sample ID: Tk 18-1) was formed by combining two drill samples taken at a height of 17 ft above the tank floor, and a Lower Wall Sample (Sample ID: SPD4) was formed by combining two drill samples taken between 10 and 12 ft above the tank floor. A Scale Sample (Sample ID: Tk 18-2) was formed by combining 5 drill samples obtained between 6 and 7 ft above the tank floor. Photographs of the sampled material and a more detailed description of the samples and the concentration results are presented by Hay and others [2009]. The objective of this report is to determine a method and use it to place an upper confidence bound on the concentrations in the wall samples using only the currently available sample information. None of the three wall locations (tank heights) has been measured more than once. For radionuclides, only the variation among the concentrations per unit mass (g) of the wall samples, ignoring locations, or the variation among the concentrations of the floor samples are possibilities for establishing an upper confidence bound. The wall samples and floor samples were examined for comparability by (a) observing whether the wall sample concentrations fell inside the footprints created by prediction intervals for floor sample radionuclide concentrations and (b) whether the variation among the wall samples was approximately the same as the variation among floor samples. Most of the radionuclide concentrations satisfied (a) but the variation among radionuclide concentrations (b) was smaller for the floor samples. Consequently, upper 95% confidence bounds were established separately for radionuclide concentrations at each of the sampled tank heights using the conservatively estimated variation among the wall samples. A final step to convert concentrations by unit mass (g) to concentrations by sq ft was performed for the Upper Wall Sample and the Lower Wall Sample regions of the tank wall. The Upper Wall Sample and the Lower Wall Sample were not measured for elemental constituents. Consequently, the only possibility for establishing an upper bound for nonradionuclide concentrations for the Scale Sample was using the concentrations from floor samples. However, most non-radionuclide wall concentrations failed to fall within the footprint generated prediction intervals based on the non-radionuclide concentrations for the floor samples. The report concludes that there is no way to establish upper confidence bounds for elemental constituents attached to the inner liner of Tank 18-F based on currently available data.

Shine, G.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

319

Magnetocaloric Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic Materials for Energy Applications IV: Magnetocaloric Materials ... due to cost-effectiveness as well as superior magneto-thermal characteristics. ... metals and p-block elements can be explored in a time- and energy-saving manner.

320

EA-1704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic 704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi EA-1704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi SUMMARY ThIs EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a propsal, (Fulton Project) that consists of the design, construction and operation of a biorefinery facility producing ethanol and other co-products from cellulosic materials utilizing a patented concentrated acid hydrolysis process. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD June 4, 2010 EA-1704: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

SCE - New Construction Advanced Homes Incentives | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Construction Advanced Homes Incentives New Construction Advanced Homes Incentives SCE - New Construction Advanced Homes Incentives < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Base incentives increase until building is 45% above code. Program Info Start Date 1/1/2010 Expiration Date 12/15/2013 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Baseline Advanced Home Incentives: $75-$225/kW, $0.43-$1.29/kWh, $1.72-$5.14/Therm (15%-45% above code) California ENERGY STAR Marketing Support: CAHP provides marketing material valued at up to 10% of baseline project incentive

322

Improving the constructibility of the Clinch River breeder plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extended planning time which became available for Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) architect/engineers may eliminate some of the high materials and labor costs, shortages, and long lead times suffered by recent nuclear projects by allowing construction input into the planning. Since constructibility reviews are less disruptive during the conceptual design stage, a list of specific constructibility criteria has been regularly updated during the past 10 years and has solved several design problems in new technology. Several recommendations intended to save costs or make construction easier illustrate how the process developed. A scale model of the CRBR has helped to eliminate many potential construction problems in the design stage and to determine the best layout of pipe and electrical connections. Engineers can already identify over $25 million in cost avoidance on the project. (DCK)

Scott, W.W.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Materials Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Science. Summary: Key metrologies/systems: In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, linear and non-linear spectroscopies ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

324

Training Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Training Materials. NIST Handbook 44 Self-Study Course. ... Chapter 3 Organization and Format of NIST Handbook 44 DOC. ...

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

Characterization of Plasma Sprayed Beryllium ITER First Wall Mockups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ITER first wall beryllium mockups, which were fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying the beryllium armor, have survived 3000 thermal fatigue cycles at 1 MW/sq m without damage during high heat flux testing at the Plasma Materials Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico. The thermal and mechanical properties of the plasma sprayed beryllium armor have been characterized. Results are reported on the chemical composition of the beryllium armor in the as-deposited condition, the through thickness and normal to the through thickness thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, the four-point bend flexure strength and edge-notch fracture toughness of the beryllium armor, the bond strength between the beryllium armor and the underlying heat sink material, and ultrasonic C-scans of the Be/heat sink interface.

Castro, Richard G.; Vaidya, Rajendra U.; Hollis, Kendall J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Material matting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the widespread use of measured real-world materials, intuitive tools for editing measured reflectance datasets are still lacking. We present a solution inspired by natural image matting and texture synthesis to the material matting problem, ... Keywords: appearance models, material separation, matting, spatially-varying BRDFs, texture synthesis

Daniel Lepage; Jason Lawrence

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Materializing energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated and informed by perspectives on sustainability and design, this paper draws on a diverse body of scholarly works related to energy and materiality to articulate a perspective on energy-as-materiality and propose a design approach of ... Keywords: design, design theory, energy, materiality, sustainability

James Pierce; Eric Paulos

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

An Approach for Measuring Reductions in Construction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. An Approach for Measuring Reductions in Construction Worker Illnesses and Injuries: Baseline Measures of Construction Industry ...

2001-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

329

National Construction Safety Team (NCST) Advisory ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Background on the National Construction Safety Team Act NCST Advisory Committee. ... National Construction Safety Teams Annual Reports. ...

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

330

FEDERAL ASSISTANCE BUDGET INFORMATION (CONSTRUCTION) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL ASSISTANCE BUDGET INFORMATION (CONSTRUCTION) FEDERAL ASSISTANCE BUDGET INFORMATION (CONSTRUCTION) Form provides information on the federal assistance budget for...

331

Mallinckrodt Chemical Co., Former Construction Worker Screening...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mallinckrodt Chemical Co., Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Mallinckrodt Chemical Co., Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades...

332

Sandia National Laboratory (CA) Former Workers, Construction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Sandia National Laboratory (CA) Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health...

333

APEX ADVANCED FERRITIC STEEL, FLIBE SELF-COOLED FIRST WALL AND BLANKET DESIGN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK-B135 As an element in the US Advanced Power Extraction (APEX) program, they evaluated the design option of using advanced nanocomposite ferritic steel (AFS) as the structural material and Flibe as the tritium breeder and coolant. They selected the recirculating flow configuration as the reference design. Based on the material properties of AFS, they found that the reference design can handle a maximum surface heat flux of 1 MW/m{sup 2}, and a maximum neutron wall loading of 5.4 MW/m{sup 2}, with a gross thermal efficiency of 47%, while meeting all the tritium breeding and structural design requirements. This paper covers the results of the following areas of evaluation: materials selection, first wall and blanket design configuration, materials compatibility, components fabrication, neutronics analysis, thermal hydraulics analysis including MHD effects, structural analysis, molten salt and helium closed cycle power conversion system, and safety and waste disposal of the recirculating coolant design.

WONG,CPC; MALANG,S; SAWAN,M; SVIATOSLAVSKY,I; MOGAHED,E; SMOLENTSEV,S; MAJUMDAR,S; MERRILL,B; MATTAS,R; FRIEND,M; BOLIN,J; SHARAFAT,S

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Extensional and Flexural Waves in a Thin-Walled Graphite/Epoxy Tube  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulated acoustic emission signals were induced in a thin-walled graphite/epoxy tube by means of lead breaks (Hsu-Neilsen source). The tube is of similar material and layup to be used by NASA in fabricating the struts of Space Station Freedom. The resulting ...

Prosser William H.; Gorman Michael R.; Dorighi John

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Stretchable Supercapacitors Based on Buckled Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Macrofilms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stretchable Supercapacitors Based on Buckled Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Macrofilms By Cunjiang to accommodate large strains while retaining intact function. Of various power-source devices, supercapacitors in supercapacitors is the development of new electrode materials. Recently, CNTs have been studied as good candidates

Jiang, Hanqing

336

Storage containers for radioactive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive material storage system is claimed for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together. The plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or inventory. Wall mounts are provided to prevent accidental formation of critical masses during storage.

Groh, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Dates, L.R.

1980-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Materials of Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to accumulate and establish a database of construction materials, coatings, refractory liners, and transitional materials that are appropriate for the hardware and scale-up facilities for atmospheric biomass and coal gasification processes. Cost, fabricability, survivability, contamination, modes of corrosion, failure modes, operational temperatures, strength, and compatibility are all areas of materials science for which relevant data would be appropriate. The goal will be an established expertise of materials for the fossil energy area within WRI. This would be an effort to narrow down the overwhelming array of materials information sources to the relevant set which provides current and accurate data for materials selection for fossil fuels processing plant. A significant amount of reference material on materials has been located, examined and compiled. The report that describes these resources is well under way. The reference material is in many forms including texts, periodicals, websites, software and expert systems. The most important part of the labor is to refine the vast array of available resources to information appropriate in content, size and reliability for the tasks conducted by WRI and its clients within the energy field. A significant has been made to collate and capture the best and most up to date references. The resources of the University of Wyoming have been used extensively as a local and assessable location of information. As such, the distribution of materials within the UW library has been added as a portion of the growing document. Literature from recent journals has been combed for all pertinent references to high temperature energy based applications. Several software packages have been examined for relevance and usefulness towards applications in coal gasification and coal fired plant. Collation of the many located resources has been ongoing. Some web-based resources have been examined.

None

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Plant construction and community stress  

SciTech Connect

Reports on a study commissioned by EPRI's Energy Analysis and Environment Division to acquire a better understanding of the power plant construction process and the socioeconomic impacts it can bring about. Points out that because of a parallel study the NRC conducted involving nuclear plants, the EPRI study's emphasis was on coal-fired power plants, which represented 9 of the 12 case studies. Finds that the impacts on communities near the case study plants were considerably less than had been forecast. Emphasizes that improper socioeconomic assessment procedures and poor mitigation planning can contribute to costly construction delays and lower construction worker productivity.

Lihach, N.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Materials Education Community  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital Resource Center Home. Materials Education. Materials Education. Established Materials Technologies. Magnesium Superalloys. Emerging Materials...

340

Emerging Materials Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital Resource Center Home. Materials Education. Materials Education. Established Materials Technologies. Magnesium Superalloys. Emerging Materials...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Established Materials Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital Resource Center Home. Materials Education. Materials Education. Established Materials Technologies. Magnesium Superalloys. Emerging Materials...

342

Polymer and carbon nanotube materials for chemical sensors and organic electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis details the development of new materials for high-performance chemical sensing as well as organic electronic applications. In Chapter 2, we develop a chemiresistive material based on single-walled carbon nanotubes ...

Wang, Fei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Stained glass : an investigation into the design potentials of an architectural material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colored glass is a building material usually associated with churches or days of bygone glory. Yet the material would apparently have much to offer in window openings, curtain walls, even as structural block in the creating ...

Ransom, Shirley Anne

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

A two dimensional thermal network model for a photovoltaic solar wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two dimensional thermal network model is proposed to predict the temperature distribution for a section of photovoltaic solar wall installed in an outdoor room laboratory in Concordia University, Montreal, Canada. The photovoltaic solar wall is constructed with a pair of glass coated photovoltaic modules and a polystyrene filled plywood board as back panel. The active solar ventilation through a photovoltaic solar wall is achieved with an exhaust fan fixed in the outdoor room laboratory. The steady state thermal network nodal equations are developed for conjugate heat exchange and heat transport for a section of a photovoltaic solar wall. The matrix solution procedure is adopted for formulation of conductance and heat source matrices for obtaining numerical solution of one dimensional heat conduction and heat transport equations by performing two dimensional thermal network analyses. The temperature distribution is predicted by the model with measurement data obtained from the section of a photovoltaic solar wall. The effect of conduction heat flow and multi-node radiation heat exchange between composite surfaces is useful for predicting a ventilation rate through a solar ventilation system. (author)

Dehra, Himanshu [1-140 Avenue Windsor, Lachine, Quebec (Canada)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Nuclear reactor control room construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control room for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects labelled 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 in the drawing are no less than four inches from walls labelled 10.2. A ceiling contains cooling fins that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates. A concrete slab is poured over the plates. Studs are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete. 6 figures.

Lamuro, R.C.; Orr, R.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

346

Design and construction of the NMSU Geothermally Heated Greenhouse Research Facility: Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design, construction, and performance of the New Mexico State University (NMSU) Geothermal Greenhouse Research Facility. Two 6000-square-foot greenhouses were built on the NMSU campus and supplied with geothermal energy for heating. The geothermal water is pumped from one of three wells producing water at temperatures from 141/degree/F to 148/degree/F. Heat is delivered to the greenhouse space by means of overhead fan-coil unit heaters. The two greenhouses are double-glazed on roof and wall surfaces employing a total of four different film materials: Tedlar/Reg Sign/, Melinex/Reg Sign/, Softglass/Reg Sign/, and Agrifilm/Reg Sign/. One greenhouse is cooled using a traditional fan and pad cooling system. The second greenhouse is cooled with a high-pressure fog system and natural ventilation through roof and side vents. A 2400-square-foot metal building next to the greenhouses provides office, work, and storage space for the facility. The greenhouse facility was leased to two commerical tenants who produced a variety of crops. The performance of the greenhouses was monitored and reported both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results from the tenant's pilot-scale studies in the NMSU greenhouse facility were transferred and applied to two commercial greenhouse ranges that were built in southern New Mexico during 1986/87. 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Schoenmackers, R.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Design and construction of the NMSU Geothermally Heated Greenhouse Research Facility: Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the design, construction, and performance of the New Mexico State University (NMSU) Geothermal Greenhouse Research Facility. Two 6000-square-foot greenhouses were built on the NMSU campus and supplied with geothermal energy for heating. The geothermal water is pumped from one of three wells producing water at temperatures from 141/degree/F to 148/degree/F. Heat is delivered to the greenhouse space by means of overhead fan-coil unit heaters. The two greenhouses are double-glazed on roof and wall surfaces employing a total of four different film materials: Tedlar/Reg Sign/, Melinex/Reg Sign/, Softglass/Reg Sign/, and Agrifilm/Reg Sign/. One greenhouse is cooled using a traditional fan and pad cooling system. The second greenhouse is cooled with a high-pressure fog system and natural ventilation through roof and side vents. A 2400-square-foot metal building next to the greenhouses provides office, work, and storage space for the facility. The greenhouse facility was leased to two commerical tenants who produced a variety of crops. The performance of the greenhouses was monitored and reported both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results from the tenant's pilot-scale studies in the NMSU greenhouse facility were transferred and applied to two commercial greenhouse ranges that were built in southern New Mexico during 1986/87. 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Schoenmackers, R.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Gradience, constructions and constraint systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the question of quantifying gradient degrees of acceptability by introducing the notion of Density in the context of constructional constraint language processing. We first present here our framework for language processing, ...

Philippe Blache; Jean-Philippe Prost

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

An Update on FLEXLAB Construction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

construction with no safety incidents to date. The FLEXLAB team is now planning the commissioning phase of the project so that they will be ready to go when the exterior structures...

350

Detachable high heel shoe construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal on this investigation was to develop a detachable high heel shoe construction that could enter the current high heel market. The impact of high heel shoes on women's fashion is enormous but there are associated ...

Morales, Alfredo Louis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS F. NAJMABADI* University the trade- offs, to develop operational windows for chamber con- cepts, and to identify high the injection process; (d) for relatively low yield targets ( 250 MJ), an operational window with no buffer gas

California at San Diego, University of

352

Minor Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Materials used in glass manufacture...Table 1 Materials used in glass manufacture Material Purpose Antimony oxide (Sb 2 O 3 ) Decolorizing and fining agent Aplite (K, Na, Ca, Mg, alumina silicate) Source of alumina Aragonite (CaCO 3 ) Source of calcium oxide Arsenic oxide (As 2 O 3 ) Fining and decolorizing agent Barite/barytes (BaSO 4 )...

353

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

355

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

356

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Measure Guideline: Wall Air Sealing and Insulation Methods in Existing Homes; An Overview of Opportunity and Process  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides renovators and retrofit contractors an overview of considerations when including wall air sealing and insulation in an energy retrofit project. It also outlines the potential project risks, various materials for insulating, possible field inspections needed, installation procedures, as well as the benefits and drawbacks. The purpose of this document is to provide the outline of the overview and process of insulating and air sealing walls so that home retrofit professionals can identify approaches to air sealing and insulation measures.

Roberts, S.; Stephenson, R.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Express Licensing Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And Membrane Express Licensing Analysis Of Macromolecule, Liggands And Macromolecule-Lingand Complexes Express Licensing Carbon Microtubes Express Licensing Chemical Synthesis Of Chiral Conducting Polymers Express Licensing Forming Adherent Coatings Using Plasma Processing Express Licensing Hydrogen Scavengers Express Licensing Laser Welding Of Fused Quartz Express Licensing Multiple Feed Powder Splitter Negotiable Licensing Boron-10 Neutron Detectors for Helium-3 Replacement Negotiable Licensing Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Negotiable Licensing Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) Express Licensing Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials

359

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Materials Negotiable Licensing Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Negotiable Licensing A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current...

360

Magnetic Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 27, 2009 ... Extreme magnetic fields (>2 tesla), especially when combined with temperature, are being shown to revolutionize materials processing and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

materials processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the Stainless Steel Elaborated by the Duplex Procedure (Electric Furnace- VOD Installation) [pp. ... Materials Processing on a Solar Furnace Satellite [pp.

362

Materials Studio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 14, 2008 ... G. Fitzgerald; G. Goldbeck-Wood; P. Kung; M. Petersen; L. Subramanian; J. Wescott, " Materials Modeling from Quantum Mechanics to The...

363

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors III ... response of oxide ceramics for nuclear applications through experiment, theory, and...

364

Wall R-values that tell it like it is  

SciTech Connect

The R-value of a whole wall can be considerable lower than the R-value of the insulation that fills it. At DOE`s Buildings Technology Center, scientists have developed a system for measuring whole wall R-value and have already tested several wall systems. Topics covered include the following: how wall r-value is usually calculated; measuring whole-wall r-values; evaluating wall performance; a wall rating label; beyond r-value; r-value terminology. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Christian, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kosny, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Domain wall conduction in multiaxial ferroelectrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conductance of domain wall structures consisting of either stripes or cylindrical domains in multiaxial ferroelectric-semiconductors is analyzed. The effects of the flexoelectric coupling, domain size, wall tilt, and curvature on charge accumulation are analyzed using the Landau-Ginsburg Devonshire theory for polarization vector combined with the Poisson equation for charge distributions. The proximity and size effect of the electron and donor accumulation/depletion by thin stripe domains and cylindrical nanodomains are revealed. In contrast to thick domain stripes and wider cylindrical domains, in which the carrier accumulation (and so the static conductivity) sharply increases at the domain walls only, small nanodomains of radii less than 5-10 correlation lengths appeared conducting across the entire cross-section. Implications of such conductive nanosized channels may be promising for nanoelectronics.

Eliseev, E. A. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Svechnikov, S. V. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Maksymovych, Petro [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

living walls | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

14 14 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142229614 Varnish cache server living walls Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind

367

Domain-wall branes in Lifshitz theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze whether or not Lifshitz field theories in 4 + 1 dimensions may provide ultraviolet-complete domain-wall brane models. We first show that Lifshitz scalar field theory can admit topologically stable domain wall solutions. A Lifshitz fermion field is then added to the toy model, and we demonstrate that 3+1- dimensional Kaluza-Klein zero mode solutions do not exist when the four spatial dimensions are treated isotropically. To recover 3 + 1-dimensional chiral fermions dynamically localized to the domain wall, we must postulate the breaking of full 4-dimensional rotational symmetry down to the subgroup of rotations which mix the usual 3-dimensional spatial directions and fix the extra-dimensional axis in addition to the anisotropy between space and time.

Jayne E. Thompson; Raymond R. Volkas

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

368

Thermodynamics of free Domain Wall fermions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studying various thermodynamic quantities for the free domain wall fermions for both finite and infinite fifth dimensional extent N_5, we find that the lattice corrections are minimum for $N_T\\geq10$ for both energy density and susceptibility, for its irrelevant parameter M in the range 1.45-1.50. The correction terms are, however, quite large for small lattice sizes of $N_T\\leq8$. We propose modifications of the domain wall operator, as well as the overlap operator, to reduce the finite cut-off effects to within 10% of the continuum results of the thermodynamic quantities for the currently used N_T=6-8 lattices. Incorporating chemical potential, we show that \\mu^2 divergences are absent for a large class of such domain wall fermion actions although the chiral symmetry is broken for $\\mu\

R. V. Gavai; Sayantan Sharma

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

369

Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

Campbell, Christian X. (Oviedo, FL); Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

370

Living Walls | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Living Walls Living Walls Home > Groups > Buildings Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more energy from the utility grid than it produces using renewable energy resources, such as solar, wind, or geothermal installations (and sometimes these renewable energy resources actually feed energy back to the utility grid). Architects

371

Construction Cost Analysis : Residential Construction Demonstration Project Cycle II.  

SciTech Connect

The Residential Construction Demonstration Project (RCDP) is designed to demonstrate new residential building techniques and product innovations which advance the stage-of-the-art in constructing energy-efficient electrically heated residences. A secondary purpose is to obtain documented cost and energy savings data from which to make accurate assessments of the cost-effectiveness of various conservation innovations. The project solicits participation of regional homebuilders by offering them financial incentives for constructing homes to the Model Conservation Standards (MCS) and including at least one innovation.'' The innovations are determined by BPA and the States prior to construction and represent construction techniques or energy saving products that might reduce the cost of building MCS homes, or expand the options available to builders in achieving MCS levels of energy efficiency in homes. Besides covering some of the additional risk for employing the innovation, the incentive payment guarantees that builders will provide certain amounts of information regarding the cost and acceptability of building the homes. In addition, an incentive is paid to homeowners for their participation in data collection efforts following construction. Several one-time'' tests were performed on the houses and homeowners were required to report energy consumption and temperature data on a weekly basis for approximately 18 months. BPA and the States compile the information obtained from the builders and homeowners. Access to this data is provided for the purpose of analyzing the cost and performance of the RCDP homes, as well as understanding the value of the various innovations that are tested. 25 tabs., 4 figs.

Barnett, Cole; Thor, Philip W.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Wood Pulp Digetster Wall Corrosion Investigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The modeling of the flow in a wood pulp digester is but one component of the investigation of the corrosion of digesters. This report describes the development of a Near-Wall-Model (NWM) that is intended to couple with a CFD model that determines the flow, heat, and chemical species transport and reaction within the bulk flow of a digester. Lubrication theory approximations were chosen from which to develop a model that could determine the flow conditions within a thin layer near the vessel wall using information from the interior conditions provided by a CFD calculation of the complete digester. The other conditions will be determined by coupled solutions of the wood chip, heat, and chemical species transport and chemical reactions. The NWM was to couple with a digester performance code in an iterative fashion to provide more detailed information about the conditions within the NW region. Process Simulations, Ltd (PSL) is developing the digester performance code. This more detailed (and perhaps more accurate) information from the NWM was to provide an estimate of the conditions that could aggravate the corrosion at the wall. It is intended that this combined tool (NWM-PSL) could be used to understand conditions at/near the wall in order to develop methods to reduce the corrosion. However, development and testing of the NWM flow model took longer than anticipated and the other developments (energy and species transport, chemical reactions and linking with the PSL code) were not completed. The development and testing of the NWM are described in this report. In addition, the investigation of the potential effects of a clear layer (layer reduced in concentration of wood chips) near the wall is reported in Appendix D. The existence of a clear layer was found to enhance the flow near the wall.

Giles, GE

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

373

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy ...  

The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity. Skip to Content. Skip to Content.

374

When wall insulation doesn`t save  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent study in Florida concluded that while wall insulation clearly saves heating energy, it is less effective at saving cooling energy. The study focused on concrete block houses on slab foundations, and determined that whether insulation saves cooling energy depends significantly on the interior thermostat setpoint, the lower the thermostat below outside temperature, the more likely wall installation was to save energy. This article describes the design of the study and compares it to other studies. Results in their entirety are described. 1 fig.

Johnson, D.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Enhancement of wall jet transport properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

Claunch, Scott D. (Broomfield, CO); Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Wanzek Construction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wanzek Construction Wanzek Construction Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Wanzek Construction Name Wanzek Construction Address 2028 2nd Avenue NW Place West Fargo, ND Zip 58078 Country United States Sector Geothermal energy, Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Turnkey Construction Services Stock Symbol MTZ Year founded 1971 Number of employees 1100 Company Type For Profit Company Ownership Public Small Business No Minority Business Yes Affiliated Companies MasTec N.A; MasTec Renewables; Phone number 2816064172 Website http://www.wanzek.com Coordinates 29.78577°, -95.66735° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.78577,"lon":-95.66735,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

377

Material impacts on operational energy usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decisions regarding materials and construction of a building are made all the time in the architectural process, but thought is not always given to how those choices may affect the buildings ultimate energy usage and the ...

Love, Andrea, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Thinking in layers: modeling with layered materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This course serves as a guide to the considerable potential of layered surface models that are available in many commercial products. The key advantage of using such layered materials over traditional shading language constructs is that the end result ...

Andrea Weidlich; Alexander Wilkie

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Digital cellular solids : reconfigurable composite materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Digital materials are comprised of a small number of types of discrete physical building blocks, which assemble to form constructions that meet the versatility and scalability of digital computation and communication ...

Cheung, Kenneth Chun-Wai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Materials Science Advanced Materials News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Contributes to Discovery of Novel Quantum Spin-Liquid Release Date ... Novel Filter Material Could Cut Natural Gas Refining Costs Release Date: 03 ...

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Materials Science Advanced Materials Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to Discovery of Novel Quantum Spin-Liquid. illustration of metal organic framework Novel Filter Material Could Cut Natural Gas Refining Costs. ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

382

EIS-0247: Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

247: Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron 247: Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source EIS-0247: Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source SUMMARY The United States needs a high-flux, short- pulsed neutron source to provide its scientific and industrial research communities with a much more intense source of pulsed neutrons for neutron scattering research than is currently available. This source would assure the availability of a state-of-the-art neutron research facility in the United States in the decades ahead. This facility would be used to conduct research in areas such as materials science, condensed matter physics, the molecular structure of biological materials, properties of polymers and complex fluids, and magnetism. In addition to creating new scientific and

383

Methodical Construction of Database Management Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although more and more database management systems are being developed, constructing such systems in an engineering fashion remains an open problem. An engineering attitude towards construction not only tells how to implement a database management system, but also tries to minimize construction time. Hence, the prime objective of an engineering-style construction approach is construction efficiency.

Andreas Geppert; Erlangung Der; Philosophischen Doktorwrde; Vorgelegt Der; Begutachtet Von; Den Herren; K. R. Dittrich; K. Bauknecht; Prof Dr; Prof Dr; Prof Dr; M. Glinz

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

SNAP II REACTOR CORE MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

A survey was made to select the construction materials for the SDR-1 reactor core vessel and grid plates. Hastelloy C was selected for the reactor vessel, top grid plate, and bottom grid plate. Inconel X was selected for the core hold-down springs. (C.J.G.)

Facha, J.V.

1960-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

385

Berkeley Lab Site Construction Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Construction Projects Construction Projects Old Town Demolition Project Manager: Ted Mankowski, TMankowski@lbl.gov Seismic Upgrades: Phase 2 Project Manager: Jack Heffernan, JSHeffernan@lbl.gov User Test Bed Facility/ FLEXLAB Project Manager: Dan Galvez, DCGalvez@lbl.gov UC Capital Projects Computational Research and Theory Facility Project Manager: Henry Martinez, HMartinez@lbl.gov Solar Energy Research Center (SERC) Project Manager: Jules Feher, JFeher@lbl.gov In Partnership with UC Berkeley Second Campus Sr. Project Manager: Doug Lockhart, DELockhart@lbl.gov What's Happening in the Next Several Weeks: Computational Research & Theory Facility: Currently, the main construction activities are steel and deck placement. The steel placement is due to be complete in December of 2013 and the exterior skin will follow. Project

386

Computers could aid construction projects  

SciTech Connect

The procedures currently used by engineering companies in planning their work on a segmented basis are a very small step from the development of a computer model encompassing the total scope of a very large engineering construction effort. When the computer model concept has been accepted and implemented, the results are a harmonious relationship between divergent groups, replacing the frequent scrambling and reaction among engineering, procurement, and construction that often takes place in completing a capital project. It is a small step to be able to derive all the benefits of early planning based upon logically developed knowledge. Common scheduling techniques used to provide a scenario for a total coordinated effort could provide a computer model of an entire engineering-construction project. To date, it is this concept that has eluded the industry.

Leon, L.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Plant construction and community stress  

SciTech Connect

Communities and utilities can project the impact of construction workers, their families, and the services they require before a project begins and take steps to mitigate any negative effects. Systematic socio-economic assessment is only a decade old, but has gradually taken on the importance of environmental impact assessments. An Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) assessment of 12 case-study plants and their impact on neighboring communities found that population influx was more moderate than expected because of an indigenous work force, the willingness of new workers to drive long distances rather than relocate, and the shift in construction crafts required during the construction phase. Economic impacts were often more positive than expected. The study also underscored the need for proper assessment and appropriate mitigation planning. 2 references. (DCK)

Lihach, N.; Wyzga, R.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR FUEL ELEMENTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>A rib arrangement and an end construction for nuclearfuel elements laid end to end in a coolant tube are described. The rib arrangement is such that each fuel element, when separated from other fuel elements, fits loosely in the coolant tube and so can easily be inserted or withdrawn from the tube. The end construction of the fuel elements is such that the fuel elements when assembled end to end are keyed against relative rotation, and the ribs of each fuel element cooperate with the ribs of the adjacent fuel elements to give the assembled fuel elements a tight fit with the coolant tube. (AEC)

Weems, S.J.

1963-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

389

Structural Materials: 95. Concrete  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power plant concrete structures and their materials of construction are described, and their operating experience noted. Aging and environmental factors that can affect the durability of the concrete structures are identified. Basic components of a program to manage aging of these structures are identified and described. Application of structural reliability theory to devise uniform risk-based criteria by which existing facilities can be evaluated to achieve a desired performance level when subjected to uncertain demands and to quantify the effects of degradation is outlined. Finally, several areas are identified where additional research is desired.

Naus, Dan J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Comparison Test for Infection Control Barriers for Construction in Healthcare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the extent of infection control measures to be taken to protect immunosuppressed and other types of patients from airborne infection agents during construction is crucial knowledge for both healthcare and construction professionals. The number of aspergillosis-related fatalities due to dust transmission during construction activity has decreased with the improvement of antifungal therapy, however the illness is particularly debilitating and the treatment is not always successful. This experimental work is the first stage in a research program to develop better dust controls for construction at existing medical facilities to reduce the incidence of dust borne fungi, such as Aspergillus spp. To better protect at-risk patients from exposure to Aspergillus spp. and other airborne fungal infections, an experiment was conducted to determine what materials can be used to create a barrier for infection control to moderate particle transmission from the construction area to the treatment area. This study investigated the relationship between construction barriers and particle transmission. A new experimental procedure and equipment simulates the transmission of disturbed dust from construction activity across a barrier. The effective of the barrier is determined from measured particle count on filter. The results show that an effective barrier manufactured from simple and readily available building supplies stops the transmission of 12-micron dust particles under a standard set of conditions. The test provides a simple and cost effective method to compare transmission rates for dust.

Bassett, Aimee

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A method for developing visually intelligent construction scheduling data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The integration of methods, materials, and manpower is the basis for planning the activities of a construction project. The scheduling of these resources used during the construction of buildings is a critical factor that can dramatically affect a project's budget, timeline, and overall success. Consequently, much effort should be placed on the schedule's development to define an accurate timeline of predicted construction activities. To aid this effort, tools such as activity-based simulation models and three-dimensional visualization techniques have been utilized to improve the accuracy of scheduling. While simulation models use general programming language to create numeric models of processes in areas of management and manufacturing, construction visualization allows still and animated visual analyses of three-dimensional virtual worlds. Thus, this research integrates numerical activity-based simulation with visual animation to create optimized and intelligent construction scheduling data. This integration improves the accuracy, prediction, and comprehensive capability of construction schedules. The results show that efficiently scheduled construction processes can be created to reduce time and costs and provide visual training data for the owners, contractors, and workers.

Pilgrim, Brent Christian

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Materials - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Coatings & Lubricants * Coatings & Lubricants * Nanofluids * Deformation Joining * Recycling * Catalysts * Assessment * Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Materials ring on liner reciprocating tester Tribology Lab: Ring-on-liner reciprocating tester. Argonne National Laboratory plays an important role in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts to develop advanced materials for transportation. The materials are developed with DOE support from the EERE Office of Vehicle Technology and Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies in collaboration with worldwide industrial partners. Examples

393

Composite Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Properties of composites for electrical make-break contacts...272 (d) 31 (c) 39.5 (d) ? ? C,A Wall switches, thermostat controls Silver-nickel 99.7Ag-0.3Ni ? 10.49 ? 100 53 HR15T (c) 79 HR15T (d) ? ? ? ? T ? 95Ag-5Ni PSR 10.41 9.80??10.41 80??95 32 HRF (c) 84 HRF (d) 165 (c) 24 (c) ? ? C,A,S Appliance switches 90Ag-10Ni PSR 10.31 9.70??10.32 75??90 35 HRF (c) 89 HRF (d)...

394

Composite Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Properties of composites for electrical make-break contacts...HRF (c) 214 (c) 31 (c) ? ? C, A Wall switches, thermostat controls 81 HRF (d) 272 (d) 39.5 (d) ? ? Silver-nickel 99.7Ag-0.3Ni ? 10.49 ? 100 53 HR15T (c) ? ? ? ? T ? 79 HR15T (d) ? ? ? ? 95Ag-5Ni PSR 10.41 9.80??10.41 80??95 32 HRF (c) 165 (c) 24 (c) ? ? C, A, S Appliance switches 84 HRF (d) ? ? ? ?...

395

Thermodynamic Measurements under a Wall Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A storm intercept crew from the University of Oklahoma made a sounding near and underneath the wall cloud of the right-moving member of a splitting thunderstorm in north Texas on 27 May 1985. A comparison between the sounding and an environmental ...

Howard B. Bluestein; Eugene W. McCaul Jr.; Gregory P. Byrd; Robert L. Walko

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Multi-wall carbon nanotubes in microwaves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electromagnetic (EM) response of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) prepared by chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) method has been analyzed in the microwave frequency range. EM absorption properties of MWCNT depend on their medium diameter related ... Keywords: carbon nanotube, coating, electromagnetic absorption, microwave

S. Moseenkov; V. Kuznetsov; A. Usoltseva; I. Mazov; A. Ischenko; T. Buryakov; O. Anikeeva; A. Romanenko; P. Kuzhir; D. Bychenok; K. Batrakov; S. Maksimenko

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

Grigorian, Leonid (Raymond, OH); Hornyak, Louis (Evergreen, CO); Dillon, Anne C (Boulder, CO); Heben, Michael J (Denver, CO)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

398

Evaluating flexibility in railroad construction projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aims to valuate flexibilities in a large-scale railroad construction project. In general, a railroad construction project involves a large amount of flexibilities due to its long construction period and conflicts ...

Oh, Choong Ryun, 1972-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Surface studies of hydroxylated multi-wall carbon nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CVD grown MWCNTs, of typical diameter 5 to 50 nm and with approximately 15-20 concentric graphene layers in the multi-walls, have been surface functionalised using the Fenton hydroxylation reaction. HRTEM reveals little physical difference between the treated and untreated materials; images from both exhibit similar multi-wall structure and contain evidence for some low-level disruption of the very outermost layers. Raman spectra from the two types of nanotubes are almost identical displaying the disorder (D) peaks at approximately 1350 cm{sup -1} and graphite (G) peaks at approximately 1580 cm{sup -1}, characteristic of graphene-based carbon materials, in approximately equal intensity ratios. Equilibrium adsorption data for nitrogen at 77 K leads to BET surface areas of 60.4 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} for the untreated and 71.8 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} for the hydroxylated samples; the increase in area being due to separation of the tube-bundles during functionalization. This is accompanied by a decrease in measured porosity, mostly at high relative pressures of nitrogen, i.e. where larger (meso 2-5 nm and macro >5 nm) pores are being filled, which is consistent with an attendant loss of inter-tube capillarity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that hydroxylation increases the nanotube surface oxygen level from 4.3 at.% to 22.3 at.%; chemical shift data indicate that approximately 75% of that oxygen is present as hydroxyl (-OH) groups. Water vapour adsorption by the hydroxylated surfaces leads to Type II isotherms which are characteristic of relatively high numbers of hydrogen bonding interactions compared to the untreated materials which exhibit Type III curves. This difference in polar surface energy is confirmed by calorimetric enthalpies of immersion in water which are -54 mJ m{sup -2} for the untreated and -192 mJ m{sup -2} for the hydroxylated materials. The treated materials therefore have significantly increased water wettability/dispersivity and a greater potential for cross-linking with matrix compounds. The mechanism by which hydroxylation occurs i.e. free radical (OH{sm_bullet}) attack and subsequent electrophilic addition at CC bonds in the graphene basal planes, is discussed.

Bradley, Robert [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Rd, Oxford, OX1 3PH, UK; Cassity, Kelby [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Andrews, Rodney [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Meier, Mark [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Osbeck, Susan [The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen AB10 1FR, U.K.; Andreu, Aurik [The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen AB10 1FR, U.K.; Johnston, Colin [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Rd, Oxford, OX1 3PH, UK; Crossley, Alison [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Rd, Oxford, OX1 3PH, UK

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Discrete multi-material interface reconstruction for volume fraction data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Material interface reconstruction (MIR) is the task of constructing boundary interfaces between regions of homogeneous material, while satisfying volume constraints, over a structured or unstructured spatial domain. In this paper, we present a discrete ...

J. C. Anderson; C. Garth; M. A. Duchaineau; K. I. Joy

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CONSTRUCTION SAFETY MANUAL ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Steel Construction A.2.9 Demolition using Mechanical Equipment A.2.10 Training A.3 Electrical A.3 Equipment A.3.11 Electrical Safety Workbook and Permits A.4 Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout / Tagout) 4, General industry Safety Orders, Cranes and Other Hoisting Equipment and PUB-3000, Chapter 5. A.1

Knowles, David William

402

Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1988  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity 1988 presents cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1988. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors.

1989-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

403

thermoelectric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been proven that the maximum cooling temperature of a thermoelectric material can be increased by using either pulsed operation or graded Seebeck profiles. In this paper, we show that the maximum cooling temperature can be further increased by the pulsed operation of optimal inhomogeneous thermoelectric materials. A random sampling method is used to obtain the optimal electrical conductivity profile of inhomogeneous materials, which can achieve a much higher cooling temperature than the best uniform materials under the steady-state condition. Numerical simulations of pulsed operation are then carried out in the time domain. In the limit of low thermoelectric figure-of-merit ZT, the finite-difference time-domain simulations are verified by an analytical solution for homogeneous material. This numerical method is applied to high ZT BiTe materials and simulations show that the effective figure-of-merit can be improved by 153 % when both optimal graded electrical conductivity profiles and pulsed operation are used. 1.

Q Zhou; Z Bian; A Shakouri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Deformation and tribology of multi-walled hollow nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-walled hollow nanoparticles made from tungsten disulphide (WS$_2$) show exceptional tribological performance as additives to liquid lubricants due to effective transfer of low shear strength material onto the sliding surfaces. Using a scaling approach based on continuum elasticity theory for shells and pairwise summation of van der Waals interactions, we show that van der Waals interactions cause strong adhesion to the substrate which favors release of delaminated layers onto the surfaces. For large and thin nanoparticles, van der Waals adhesion can cause considerable deformation and subsequent delamination. For the thick WS$_2$ nanoparticles, deformation due to van der Waals interactions remains small and the main mechanism for delamination is pressure which in fact leads to collapse beyond a critical value. We also discuss the effect of shear flow on deformation and rolling on the substrate.

U. S. Schwarz; S. Komura; S. A. Safran

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Construction Timing and Expectations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Timing and Expectations Construction Timing and Expectations Construction Timing and Expectations October 16, 2013 - 5:07pm Addthis Creating a detailed construction schedule that allows all the project elements to be coordinated in a timely manner is fundamental to any successful construction project. The construction schedule should take into account that many tasks cannot be started before others are finished. It should also account for special schedule considerations related to renewable energy systems. Key elements of most new construction or major renovation projects include landscape, structural, architectural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, communication systems, and renewable energy systems. Maintaining the highest quality of construction across all elements is fundamental to any

407

EDIG Construction Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon EDIG Construction Management Jump to: navigation, search Name EDIG Construction Management Place Israel Product...

408

Pantex Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Project Pantex Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Project Project Name: Former Pantex Worker Medical Surveillance...

409

Experimental Estimation Of Energy Damping During Free Rocking Of Unreinforced Masonry Walls. First Results  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an ongoing experimental program on unreinforced masonry walls undergoing free rocking. Aim of the laboratory campaign is the estimation of kinetic energy damping exhibited by walls released with non-zero initial conditions of motion. Such energy damping is necessary for dynamic modelling of unreinforced masonry local mechanisms. After a brief review of the literature on this topic, the main features of the laboratory tests are presented. The program involves the experimental investigation of several parameters: 1) unit material (brick or tuff), 2) wall aspect ratio (ranging between 14.5 and 7.1), 3) restraint condition (two-sided or one-sided rocking), and 4) depth of the contact surface between facade and transverse walls (one-sided rocking only). All walls are single wythe and the mortar is pozzuolanic. The campaign is still in progress. However, it is possible to present the results on most of the mechanical properties of mortar and bricks. Moreover, a few time histories are reported, already indicating the need to correct some of the assumptions frequent in the literature.

Sorrentino, Luigi; Masiani, Renato; Benedetti, Stefano [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Strutturale e Geotecnica, Sapienza Universita di Roma, via Antonio Gramsci, 53-00197 Roma (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

410

Experimental assessment of air permeability in a concrete shear wall subjected to simulated seismic loading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A safety concern for the proposed Special Nuclear Materials Laboratory (SNML) facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was air leakage from the facility if it were to experience a design basis earthquake event. To address this concern, a study was initiated to estimate air leakage, driven by wind-generated pressure gradients, from a seismically damaged concrete structure. This report describes a prototype experiment developed and performed to measure the air permeability in a reinforced concrete shear wall, both before and after simulated seismic loading. A shear wall test structure was fabricated with standard 4000-psi concrete mix. Static load-cycle testing was used to simulate earthquake loading. Permeability measurements were made by pressurizing one side of the shear wall above atmospheric conditions and recording the transient pressure decay. As long as the structure exhibited linear load displacement response, no variation in the air permeability was detected. However, experimental results indicate that the air permeability in the shear wall increased by a factor of 40 after the wall had been damaged (cracked). 17 figs., 8 tabs.

Girrens, S.P.; Farrar, C.R.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

FY06 High Strength Weight Reduction Materials Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HigH StrengtH HigH StrengtH WeigHt reduction MaterialS U.S. Department of Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2006 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Advanced Materials Technologies Edward Wall Program Manager, OFCVT Rogelio Sullivan Advanced Materials Technologies Team Leader James Eberhardt Chief Scientist March 2006 High Strength Weight Reduction Materials FY 2006 Progress Report CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................................... 1 2. MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT .......................................................................................................... 3

412

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Construction USA  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Construction USA Construction USA to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Construction USA on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Construction USA on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Construction USA on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Construction USA on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Construction USA on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Construction USA on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean Construction USA Clean Construction USA is a voluntary program that promotes the reduction of diesel exhaust emissions from construction equipment and vehicles by encouraging proper operations and maintenance, use of emissions-reducing

413

Hardfacing material  

SciTech Connect

A method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of boron, carbon, silicon and phosphorus. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

Branagan, Daniel J. (Iona, ID)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

414

Shipping container for fissile material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a shipping container for the interstate transportation of enriched uranium materials. The shipping container is comprised of a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical-shaped outer vessel lined with thermal insulation. Disposed inside the thermal insulation and spaced apart from the inner walls of the outer vessel is a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical inner vessel impervious to liquid and gaseous substances and having the inner surfaces coated with a layer of cadmium to prevent nuclear criticality. The cadmium is, in turn, lined with a protective shield of high-density urethane for corrosion and wear protection. 2 figs.

Crowder, H.E.

1984-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

415

A container for heat treating materials in microwave ovens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The efficiency of a microwave oven of a conventional two-source configuration and energy level is increased by providing the oven with a container for housing a refractory material to be treated. The container is formed to top and bottom walls transparent to microwaves while the sidewalls, in a circular configuration, are formed of a nonmetallic material opaque to microwave radiation for reflecting the radiation penetrating the top and bottom walls radially inwardly into the center of the container wherein a casket of heat-insulating material is provided for housing the material to be heat treated. The reflection of the microwave radiation from the sidewalls increases the concentration of the microwaves upon the material being heat treated while the concentration of the microwaves upon the material being heat treated while the casket retains the heat to permit the heating of the material to a substantially higher temperature than achievable in the oven without the container.

Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.; Mills, J.E.

1988-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

416

SRS Construction Workers Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SAVANNAH RIVER BUILDING TRADES SAVANNAH RIVER BUILDING TRADES MEDICAL SCREENING PROGRAM A NEEDS ASSESSMENT Submitted by The Center to Protect Workers' Rights on behalf of The Building and Construction Trades Dept., AFL-CIO and The Augusta, Georgia Building and Construction Trades Council In Cooperation with Duke University Medical Center Medlantic Research Institute United Brotherhood of Carpenters Health and Safety Fund University of Cincinnati Medical Center Zenith Administrators, Inc. June 23, 1998 Contents Summary and Response to Needs Assessment Questions , page i 1. Introduction and Rationale, 1 a. Aims, 1 b. Focus of Needs Assessment, 1 c. Organization, 1 d. Rationale for Program, 2 2. Need for Medical Evaluation and Notification, 3 a. Medical Surveillance, 3

417

Radioactive waste material melter apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another. 8 figs.

Newman, D.F.; Ross, W.A.

1990-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

418

Radioactive waste material melter apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another.

Newman, Darrell F. (Richland, WA); Ross, Wayne A. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Reading the Cosmic Writing on the Wall  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reading the Cosmic Reading the Cosmic Writing on the Wall Reading the Cosmic Writing on the Wall NERSC Key to Planck's Revision of Universal Recipe March 21, 2013 Contact: Margie Wylie, mwylie@lbl.gov, + 1 510 486 7421 map800-600.jpg This map shows the oldest light in our universe, as detected with the greatest precision yet by the Planck mission. The ancient light, called the cosmic microwave background, was imprinted on the sky when the universe was 370,000 years old. (Image credit: ESA and the Planck Collaboration) Thanks to a supersensitive space telescope and some sophisticated supercomputing, scientists from the international Planck collaboration have made the closest reading yet of the most ancient story in our universe: the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Today, the team released preliminary results based on the Planck

420

Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3936801°, -79.7861577° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3936801,"lon":-79.7861577,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Schedule planning for construction projects  

SciTech Connect

Operating contractors of government-owned facilities manage construction projects having a maximum value of $1,000,000. Successful execution is dependent upon pragmatic scheduling. Such scheduling requires that all activities (both engineering and non-engineering) be integrated into a compatible sequence of events with adequate time allowed for each event. To develop realistic schedules, project event standards and program measures of performance have been established.

Shunk, W.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Superconducting Cable Construction and Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconducting cables, carrying three to five times more power than conventional cables, can meet increasing power demands in urban areas via retrofit applications. These high capacity cables will allow utilities to greatly enhance capacity, thereby giving the grid more flexibility and reliability. This report describes the development, construction, and testing of a superconducting cable system. Background In the late eighties, a new class of ceramic oxides was discovered with superconducting propertie...

2000-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

423

Solar Decathlon 2013: Raising More Than Just Walls | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Raising More Than Just Walls Solar Decathlon 2013: Raising More Than Just Walls September 10, 2013 - 1:36pm Addthis Key to the University of North Carolina at Charlotte's...

424

TBU-0061- In the Matter of Misti Wall  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Misti Wall (the complainant or Wall), appeals the dismissal of her complaint of retaliation filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. As...

425

After Exodus : re-occupation of the metropolitan wall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The title "Exodus alludes to a restricted exclave encircled by a forbidding wall -- effect, a prison on the scale of a metropolis, and one in which people sought refuge voluntarily. Over the past forty years, similar walls ...

Allison, Jordan Lloyd Norman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cryogenic Material Properties Database Cryogenic Material ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... properties. These include the Handbook on Materials for Superconducting Machinery and the LNG Materials & Fluids. Neither ...

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

427

Hackney Construction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hackney Construction Hackney Construction Jump to: navigation, search Name Hackney Construction Address 309 Farrens Creek Lane/PO Box 13 Place Grangeville, Idaho Zip 83530 Sector Solar Product Green Building, renewable energy Year founded 1991 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 208-983-3109 Website http://DigitalProductsAndRenew Coordinates 45.926552°, -116.1223654° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.926552,"lon":-116.1223654,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

428

Recording of Heart Wall Motion with Ultrasound  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ultrasonic echo?ranging apparatus using a pulse transmitter and high gain broadband receiver connected to a bariumtitanatetransducer has been used to obtain echoes from the walls and septa of the beating heart. The apparatus can be used over a center frequency range of 0.5 to 2.5 Mc. The sound beam is directed into the heart through the spaces between the ribs

John M. Reid

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Clearly impossible : Constructing the phantom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How can light and space influence our consciousness and the shape of the perception? Dematerialization is a mean to alter our perception to this physical world -- Materials lose their sense of solidity and lights reconstruct ...

Huang, Zhe, M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Savannah River Plant construction [100 Area History]: Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses five Reactor (100) Areas constructed at SRP. They were designated as 100-C, K, L, P and R. A minimum distance of two miles separated any two of the areas which were laid out in the form of a semi-circle, Each area contained approximately 40 permanent buildings and facilities for a total of 200 buildings for all of the 100 Areas. Construction was started on the R Area first and this was the first area to be completed and accepted by Operations. Construction of the other areas was started and completed in the following sequence: P, L, K and C. The difference in the design and construction of the various facilities in these areas is noted under the individual building discussion on the following pages of this section of the Construction History and also in the du Pont Engineering and Design History. In the series of manufacturing operations the separation of fissionable materials produced in the 100 Areas is accomplished by chemical and physical means in the 200 Areas These are the 200-F and 200-H Areas which have duplicate facilities in the process phase. However, a central laboratory, area shops, laundry, metallurgical and storage magazine buildings were constructed in the 200-F Area only and serve both areas. These activities are also presented in this report.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Fluctuating pressure correlations in wall turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the present paper is to study the influence of wall-echo on pressure fluctuations $p'$, and on statistical correlations containing $p'$, {\\em viz} redistribution $\\phi_{ij}$ and pressure diffusion $d_{ij}^{(p)}$. We extend the usual analysis of turbulent correlations containing pressure fluctuations in wall-bounded \\tsc{dns} computations [Kim J.: {\\em J. Fluid Mech.} {\\bf 205} (1989) 421--451], separating $p'$ not only into rapid $p_{(\\mathrm{r})}'$ and slow $p_{(\\mathrm{s})}'$ parts [Chou P.Y.: {\\em Quart. Appl. Math.} {\\bf 3} (1945) 38--54], but further into volume (weakly inhomogeneous; $p'_{(\\mathrm{r};\\mathfrak{V})}$ and $p'_{(\\mathrm{s};\\mathfrak{V})}$) and surface (strongly inhomogeneous wall-echo; $p'_{(\\mathrm{r};w)}$ and $p'_{(\\mathrm{s};w)}$) terms. An algorithm, based on a Green's function approach, is developed to compute the above splittings for various correlations containing pressure fluctuations (redistribution, pressure diffusion, velocity/pressure-gradient), in fully develope...

Gerolymos, G A; Senechal, D; Vallet, I

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Polysulfone /Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Nanocomposites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Polyurethane (PU)/ polysulfone/multi-walled carbon nanotubes ( MWNTs) hybrid nanocomposites of different weight ratio have been prepared...

433

Cooperative Dynamics of a 'Conjugated' Domain Wall in Giant ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Cooperative Dynamics of a 'Conjugated' Domain Wall in Giant ... Appropriately designed, such a superstructure can cooperatively move...

434

Green Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... Incorporation of Granite Waste Diamond Wire in Cementitious Matrices: ... determination method simplex from a stroke cement using standard CP-V, ... its property in building materials manufacture, alumina recovery, etc. ... as well as their changes during heat treatment were studied by XRD, FTIR and XPS.

435

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Year Constructed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Constructed Year Constructed Year Constructed More than one-third (37 percent) of the floorspace in commercial buildings was constructed since 1980 and more than one-half (55 percent) after 1969 (Figure 1). Less than one-third of floorspace was constructed before 1960. Detailed tables Figure 1. Distribution of Floorspace by Year Constructed, 1999 Figure 1. Distribution of Floorspace by Year Constructed, 1999. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Overall, relatively more buildings than floorspace were represented in the older age categories and more floorspace than buildings in the newer categories (see graphical comparison) because older buildings were smaller than more recently constructed buildings (Figure 2). Buildings constructed prior to 1960 were 11,700 square feet in size on average while those constructed after 1959 were 37 percent larger at 16,000 square feet per building.

436

Project Construction Team | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Construction Team Project Construction Team Project Construction Team October 16, 2013 - 5:06pm Addthis Photo of two men reviewing a large print document. Both men are wearing construction hats and bright vests. A construction team reviews plans for a 1.9 megawatt methane power generator for a U.S. Marine Corps landfill gas-to-energy project. Assembling the right project construction team is crucial and begins with the request for proposal (RFP). Federal agencies create and RFP for construction services using construction documents developed during the final stage of building design. Construction documents are the blueprints on which every project is built and will be used to generate bids for the construction phase of the project. Renewable energy will either be specified in detail in the

437

Material with core-shell structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

Luhrs, Claudia (Rio Rancho, NM); Richard, Monique N. (Ann Arbor, MI); Dehne, Aaron (Maumee, OH); Phillips, Jonathan (Rio Rancho, NM); Stamm, Kimber L. (Ann Arbor, MI); Fanson, Paul T. (Brighton, MI)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Development of vanadium base alloys for fusion first-wall/blanket applications  

SciTech Connect

Vanadium alloys have been identified as a leading candidate material for fusion first-wall/blanket applications. Certain vanadium alloys exhibit favorable safety and environmental characteristics, good fabricability, high temperature and heat load capability, good compatibility with liquid metals and resistance to irradiation damage effects. The current focus is on vanadium alloys with (3-5)% Cr and (3-5)% Ti with a V-4Cr-4Ti alloy as the leading candidate. Preliminary results indicate that the crack-growth rates of certain alloys are not highly sensitive to irradiation. Results from the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE) which simulates fusion relevant helium/dpa ratios are similar to results from neutron irradiated material. This paper presents an overview of the recent results on the development of vanadium alloys for fusion first wall/blanket applications.

Smith, D.L.; Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Matsui, H. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Votinov, S. [Bochvar Institute of Inorganic Materials (Russia); VanWitzenburg, W. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Comparison of environmental impacts of steel and concrete as building materials using the Life Cycle Assessment method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the United States, the construction industry accounts for almost 75% of total raw material used. This is an obvious drain on natural resources and has a major impact on the surrounding environment. Construction materials ...

Johnson, Timothy Werner

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Recycled materials for roadbuilding. 1970-May, 1980 (citations from the Engineering Index Data Base). Report for 1970-May 80  

SciTech Connect

Road construction materials containing solid wastes are researched. Fly ash, mine wastes, glass, and rubber tires are among the candidates selected for recycling. Pavement surfaces and subbases are constructed using these otherwise discarded materials. (Contains 75 citations)

Habercom, G.E. Jr.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Recycled materials for roadbuilding. 1964-May, 1980 (citations from the NTIS Data Base). Report for 1964-May 80  

SciTech Connect

Road construction materials containing solid wastes are researched. Fly ash, mine wastes, glass, and rubber tires are among the candidates selected for recycling. Pavement surfaces and subbases are constructed using these otherwise discarded materials. (Contains 114 citations)

Habercom, G.E. Jr.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBXM 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBX­M 1 Leonid E. Zakharov, Princeton University; OUTLINE 1. Mini­conference on Lithium walls and low recycling regime. 2. PBX­M Capabilities. 3. Motivation "Lithium covered walls and low recycling regimes in toka­ maks". APS meeting, October 23­27, 2000, Quebec

Zakharov, Leonid E.

443

Simulation of terrace wall methane-steam reforming reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrace wall arrangement is one of the most common arrangements for methane-steam reforming reactor furnaces. In this work, a mathematical model of heat transfer in terrace wall furnaces has been developed. The model has been coupled with a reliable ... Keywords: heat transfer modeling, methane-steam reforming, reformer simulation, terrace wall furnace

J. S. Soltan Mohammadzadeh; A. Zamaniyan

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Electronics Properties of Single-Walled Twisted Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electronic properties are calculated and simulited by using density functional theory based on the nonequilibrium Green's function when a zigzag single-wall carbon nanotube (SCNTs) is twisted. We found that the twist of the single-wall carbon nanotube ... Keywords: single-wall twisted carbon nanotubes, nonequilibrium Green's function, density functional theory, electric structure, electronic transmission

Qing-fang Fu; Da-peng Hao; Xiao-mi Yan; Dao-wei He; Zhi-shun Chen; Li-guang Wang; Terence K. S. W

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1986  

SciTech Connect

Cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1986, are presented. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors.

1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

446

Field Testing of Low-Cost Bio-Based Phase Change Material  

SciTech Connect

A test wall built with phase change material (PCM)-enhanced loose-fill cavity insulation was monitored for a period of about a year in the warm-humid climate of Charleston, South Carolina. The test wall was divided into various sections, one of which contained only loose-fill insulation and served as a control for comparing and evaluating the wall sections with the PCM-enhanced insulation. This report summarizes the findings of the field test.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Interplay of oxygen-evolution kinetics and photovoltaic power curves on the construction of artificial leaves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An artificial leaf can perform direct solar-to-fuels conversion. The construction of an efficient artificial leaf or other photovoltaic (PV)-photoelectrochemical device requires that the power curve of the PV material and ...

Surendranath, Yogesh

448

Synthetic Metals 143 (2004) 283287 Construction of a photovoltaic device by deposition of thin films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. A photovoltaic cell is constructed by depositing polythiocyanogen on nanocrystalline films of n-TiO2 followed; Photovoltaic cell 1. Introduction Conducting polymers are extensively studied as potential materials technology become a great advantage. Many attempts have been made to construct photovoltaic cells

Matsik, Steven G.

449

Architectural Design & Construction Standards For New Construction & Renovation Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Appearance: Clear, non-gloss, non-yellowing. b. Vapor Transmission: Breathing type, non vapor barrier. c Materials: Expansion- and isolation-joint-filler strips. E. CONCRETE MIXTURES 1. Compressive Strength (28 specified in Division 4 with stainless-steel anchors. E. CONCRETE MIXTURES 1. Compressive Strength (28 Days

Yener, Aylin

450

Nuclear Concrete Materials Database Phase I Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FY 2011 accomplishments in Phase I development of the Nuclear Concrete Materials Database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database has been developed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In this Phase I development, the database has been successfully designed and constructed to manage documents in the Portable Document Format generated from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains nuclear concrete materials data and related information. The completion of the Phase I database has established a solid foundation for Phase II development, in which a digital database will be designed and constructed to manage nuclear concrete materials data in various digitized formats to facilitate electronic and mathematical processing for analysis, modeling, and design applications.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Boiling radial flow in fractures of varying wall porosity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this report is the coupling of conductive heat transfer and boiling convective heat transfer, with boiling flow in a rock fracture. A series of experiments observed differences in boiling regimes and behavior, and attempted to quantify a boiling convection coefficient. The experimental study involved boiling radial flow in a simulated fracture, bounded by a variety of materials. Nonporous and impermeable aluminum, highly porous and permeable Berea sandstone, and minimally porous and permeable graywacke from The Geysers geothermal field. On nonporous surfaces, the heat flux was not strongly coupled to injection rate into the fracture. However, for porous surfaces, heat flux, and associated values of excess temperature and a boiling convection coefficient exhibited variation with injection rate. Nucleation was shown to occur not upon the visible surface of porous materials, but a distance below the surface, within the matrix. The depth of boiling was a function of injection rate, thermal power supplied to the fracture, and the porosity and permeability of the rock. Although matrix boiling beyond fracture wall may apply only to a finite radius around the point of injection, higher values of heat flux and a boiling convection coefficient may be realized with boiling in a porous, rather than nonporous surface bounded fracture.

Barnitt, Robb Allan

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Asymmetric error field interaction with rotating conducting walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of error fields with a system of differentially rotating conducting walls is studied analytically and compared to experimental data. Wall rotation causes eddy currents to persist indefinitely, attenuating and rotating the original error field. Superposition of error fields from external coils and plasma currents are found to break the symmetry in wall rotation direction. The vacuum and plasma eigenmodes are modified by wall rotation, with the error field penetration time decreased and the kink instability stabilized, respectively. Wall rotation is also predicted to reduce error field amplification by the marginally stable plasma.

Paz-Soldan, C.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hegna, C. C.; Forest, C. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Effectiveness of radon control features in new house construction, south central Florida. Final report, November 1993-December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report gives results of a study to evaluate the effectiveness of two slab types (monolithic and slab-in-stem wall) in retarding radon entry in new houses built in accordance with the State of Florida`s proposed radon standard for new construction over high radon potential soils. Fourteen houses were monitored during their construction on sites whose soil gas radon concentrations were screened to be > 1000 pCi/L. Some of the house sites had concentrations 12,000 pCi/L. Slab integrity was monitored over time, and post-construction ventilation and radon entry were measured in all the houses.

Fowler, C.S.; McDonough, S.E.; Williamson, A.D.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet Construction | Superconducting Magnet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet Construction Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet Construction The final focus magnets for the International Linear Collider require very small quadrupoles be placed within the detector background field for both the entrance and exit beams. The use of superconducting magnets for this function provide solutions to several problems confronting the machine designers. One constraint is the operation within the 3 tesla detector field. The direct wind magnets are capable of operation without the use of magnetic materials in their construction, making them ideal for compact focussing solutions within detectors. The second constraint is the small physical size dictated by the crossing angle of the beams and proximity to the IR within the detector solenoid. The Direct Wind design does not require a collar to withstand Lorentz

455

Idaho Site Achieves Successful Nuclear Shipment on Newly Constructed Haul  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Achieves Successful Nuclear Shipment on Newly Achieves Successful Nuclear Shipment on Newly Constructed Haul Road Idaho Site Achieves Successful Nuclear Shipment on Newly Constructed Haul Road May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The HFEF-6 cask is transported on the haul road. The HFEF-6 cask is transported on the haul road. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - Close coordination among operations, security and transportation teams at the Idaho site helped ensure the recent success of the first nuclear shipment on a newly constructed haul road. The new road located between the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC) and the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) is expected to help save significant time and cost over the life of the project by avoiding traffic disruptions on the public highway and increased cost associated with

456

Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet Construction | Superconducting Magnet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single Strand Superconductor Windings Single Strand Superconductor Windings Initial direct wind quad coils were constructed using 13 mil diameter single strand wire. This wire provides the smallest coil patterns possible, with quad coils wound easily onto .75 inch (19mm) diameter support tubes. The 13mil diameter superconductor gives the smallest coils possible, the penalty being higher inductance and smaller transfer function, but allowing lower operational currents. long model magnet Figure 1 shows the first one foot long model magnet constructed using the 11 axis ultrasonic wiring machine with 13 mil superconducting wire, the same wire previously used for the 472 RHIC Corrector packages. Existing stock materials were used in the construction, and the coil pattern was not optimized for harmonics, but to put as many coil turns onto the tube as

457

Proceedings: 1989 Fossil Power Plant construction conference  

SciTech Connect

EPRI's First International Conference on Fossil Plant Construction was held in Cincinnati, Ohio on August 29--31, 1989. The Conference was attended by approximately 140 people representing 35 utilities, many US architect engineering companies, equipment suppliers and independent power producers. The conference covered world wide developments in fossil plant construction. Included in these proceedings are papers from the following sessions: The Challenge of Demands for New Capacity and Construction; Recent Plant Construction Experience; Construction Experience for New Technologies; Cogeneration Project Experience; Regulatory Requirements for Fossil Plant Construction; Planning, Development and Design; Modular Construction Techniques; Applications of Advanced Computer Technologies; International and Domestic Construction Advances; Management Challenges of Fossil Projects; and Retrofit and Repowering Construction Experience. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Armor, A.F.; Divakaruni, S.M. (eds.)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Advanced Welding Methods for Irradiated Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the existing LWR fleet ages, the weldability of the structural material used to construct the reactor pressure vessels and reactor internals could be diminished. The decrease in the weldability is caused by the formation of helium in the base material structure. This is caused by nuclear transmutation reactions of boron and nickel, within the reactor materials, and increases as neutron fluence accumulates. Helium-induced weld cracking is a complex phenomenon that is related to the concentration ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

459

Container for heat treating materials in microwave ovens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The efficiency of a microwave oven of a conventional two-source configuration and energy level is increased by providing the oven with a container for housing a refractory material to be treated. The container is formed of top and bottom walls transparent to microwaves while the sidewalls, in a circular configuration, are formed of a nonmetallic material opaque to microwave radiation reflecting the radiation penetrating the top and bottom walls radially inwardly into the center of the container wherein a casket of heat-insulating material is provided for housing the material to be heat treated. The reflection of the microwave radiation from the sidewalls increases the concentration of the microwaves upon the material being heat treated while the casket retains the heat to permit the heating of the material to a substantially higher temperature than achieveable in the oven without the container.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kimrey, Jr., Harold D. (Knoxville, TN); Mills, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

High temperature structural insulating material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

Chen, W.Y.

1984-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wall construction material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Wednesday, 29 July 2009 00:00 Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

462

Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project The Department of Energy is currently conducting research into highly energy efficient wall systems. Walls with high R-values are better insulators, and their development can help buildings come closer to having zero net energy consumption. Project Description This project seeks to develop a commercially viable wall system up to R-40 through integration of vacuum technology with the exterior insulated façade system (EIFS). Dow Corning will develop a wall system configuration of expanded polystyrene vacuum isolation panels that can be specified for R-values of 20, 30, and 40. This project also aims to develop a unitized protection system of vacuum isolation panels and to validate current code

463

Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics Stability Spectrum with a Resistive Wall  

SciTech Connect

We show that the eigenvalue equations describing a cylindrical ideal magnetophydrodynamicsw (MHD) plasma interacting with a thin resistive wall can be put into the standard mathematical form: ??? = ??? ?. This is accomplished by using a finite element basis for the plasma, and by adding an extra degree of freedom corresponding to the electrical current in the thin wall. The standard form allows the use of linear eigenvalue solvers, without additional interations, to compute the complete spectrum of plasma modes in the presence of a surrounding restrictive wall at arbitrary separation. We show that our method recovers standard results in the limits of (1) an infinitely resistive wall (no wall), and (2) a zero resistance wall (ideal wall).

S.P. Smith and S.C. Jardin

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

464

MSD Molecular Materials - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Molecular Materials Molecular Materials Group carries out synthesis and characterization of novel materials whose unique properties originate at the molecular level. Our...

465

APS team works smarter, cuts substation construction costs by 36%  

SciTech Connect

An aggressive, cost-cutting, team of T D employees at Arizona Public Service Co (APS) is building a new distribution substation in Phoenix for less than half the original cost that APS planners had calculated for the project's land, labor and materials. Scheduled for service in June of this year, APS analysts had originally projected land, labor and materials costs for the 20-MVA Bell substation at nearly $1.7-million-not including major equipment such as transformers, circuit breakers, and switches. However, after studying the project, an empowered APS crew was able to slash 36% off the original estimate-more than $610,000. What's more, APS spokesmen say that its new approach to substation construction and design has given its engineers and construction crews a laundry list of additional ideas to try out on future substation ventures. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Nuclear power plant construction activity 1987  

SciTech Connect

This annual report published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) presents data on nuclear power plant construction activity. The previous report, Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity 1986, included data for units that, as of December 31, 1986, were (1) in the construction pipeline, (2) canceled, or (3) commercial operation as of December 31, 1986. The data in this report, which were collected on Form EIA-254, ''Semiannual Report on Status of Reactor Construction,'' update the data in the previous report to be current as of December 31, 1987. Three types of information are included: plant characteristics and ownership; construction costs; and construction schedules and milestone dates.

1988-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

467

Roseville Electric - Residential New Construction Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Construction Rebate Program New Construction Rebate Program Roseville Electric - Residential New Construction Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Efficiency: $500/unit Solar PV: $2/watt Shade Trees: $30/tree Provider Roseville Electric Roseville Electric provides financial incentives to encourage local builders to construct energy efficient homes which incorporate solar resources. Participating builders can choose to build Preferred Homes or

468

Walls of massive Khler sigma models on SO(2N)/U(N) and Sp(N)/U(N)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield wall solutions in massive K\\"ahler nonlinear sigma models on SO(2N)/U(N) and Sp(N)/U(N) in three-dimensional spacetime. We show that SO(2N)/U(N) and Sp(N)/U(N) models have 2^{N-1} and 2^N discrete vacua, respectively. We explicitly construct the exact BPS multiwall solutions for N\\le 3.

Masato Arai; Sunyou