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1

Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M. E. Wolfe, and E. G. O'Neill. 2001. Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and...

2

Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D: D: LISTING OF THROUGHFALL DISPLACEMENT EXPERIMENT PUBLICATIONS A. INTRODUCTORY PAPERS AND SUMMARIES Hanson, P. J., D. E. Todd, D. W. Johnson, J. D. Joslin, and E. G. O'Neill (in press). Responses of eastern deciduous forests to precipitation change. In J. F. Weltzin and G. R. McPherson (eds.), Precipitation and Terrestrial Ecosystems, John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore. Hanson, P. J. 2000. Large-scale water manipulations. pp. 341-352. In O. E. Sala, R. B. Jackson, H. A. Mooney, and R. W. Howarth (eds.), Methods in Ecosystem Science , Springer- Verlag, New York. Hanson, P. J., D. E. Todd, N. T. Edwards, and M. A. Huston. 1995. Field performance of the Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment. pp. 307-313. In A. Jenkins, R. C. Ferrier, and C. Kirby (eds.), Ecosystem

3

Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

4

The Walker Branch Watershed on the Oak Ridge Reservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watershed History Prior to World War II, the Walker Branch Watershed was a typical rural area with a mix of forest, sustenance agriculture, and open woodland grazing. After...

5

Application of throughfall methods to estimate dry deposition of mercury  

SciTech Connect

Several dry deposition methods for Mercury (Hg) are being developed and tested in our laboratory. These include big-leaf and multilayer resistance models, micrometeorological methods such as Bowen ratio gradient approaches, laboratory controlled plant chambers, and throughfall. We have previously described our initial results using modeling and gradient methods. Throughfall may be used to estimate Hg dry deposition if some simplifying assumptions are met. We describe here the application and initial results of throughfull studies at the Walker Branch Watershed forest, and discuss the influence of certain assumptions on interpretation of the data. Throughfall appears useful in that it can place a lower bound to dry deposition under field conditions. Our preliminary throughfall data indicate net dry deposition rates to a pine canopy which increase significantly from winter to summer, as previously predicted by our resistance model. Atmospheric data suggest that rainfall washoff of fine aerosol dry deposition at this site is not sufficient to account for all of the Hg in net throughfall. Potential additional sources include dry deposited gas-phase compounds, soil-derived coarse aerosols, and oxidation reactions at the leaf surface.

Lindberg, S.E.; Owens, J.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Stratton, W. [Earlham Coll., Richmond, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Variation in foliar 15N abundance and the availability of soil nitrogen on Walker Branch Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial patterns in natural {sup 15}N abundance ({sup o}{sup 15}N) in soil, soil solutions, and non-N{sub 2}-fixing plants were studied in the deciduous forest on Walker Branch Watershed near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values are related to the availability of inorganic nitrogen in mineral soil. Soils collected in or near valley bottoms on the watershed had higher levels of net nitrogen mineralization and net nitrification potential than those sampled from ridges and slopes. More positive foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values occurred in valley bottoms, which, relative to other positions on the watershed, were characterized by greater availability of soil nitrogen and lower C-to-N ratios in the O{sub i}-horizon, in the surface mineral soil, and in autumn leaf fall. Although leaf nitrogen concentrations changed significantly over the course of the growing season, there was little seasonal variation in foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values. A hypothesis about the relative importance of different sources of nitrogen to the forest and how nitrogen cycling varies with topography in this nitrogen-deficient ecosystem was derived, in part, from spatial patterns in natural {sup 15}N abundance. There appear to be two processes affecting the topographic patterns in foliar {sup 15}N abundance on this watershed: (1) greater uptake from isotopically heavy pools of inorganic soil nitrogen by plants in valley bottoms, and (2) uptake of isotopically light ammonium-N in atmospheric deposition by plants on ridges and slopes (where the availability of inorganic soil nitrogen to plant roots is more limited). Results from this study indicate that foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values are positively correlated with net nitrification potential in surface soil.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Variation in foliar [sup 15]N abundance and the availability of soil nitrogen on Walker Branch Watershed  

SciTech Connect

Spatial patterns in natural [sup 15]N abundance ([sigma][sup 15]N) in soil, soil solutions, and non-N[sub 2]-fixing plants were studied in the deciduous forest on Walker Branch Watershed near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values are related to the availability of inorganic nitrogen in mineral soil. Soils collected in or near valley bottoms on the watershed had higher levels of net nitrogen mineralization and net nitrification potential than those sampled from ridges and slopes. More positive foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values occurred in valley bottoms, which, relative to other positions on the watershed, were characterized by greater availability of soil nitrogen and lower C-to-N ratios in the O[sub 1]-horizon, in the surface mineral soil, and in autumn leaf fall. Although leaf nitrogen concentrations changed significantly over the course of the growing season, there was little seasonal variation in foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values. A hypothesis about the relative importance of different sources of nitrogen to the forest and how nitrogen cycling varies with topography in this nitrogen-deficient ecosystem was derived, in part, from spatial patterns in natural [sup 15]N abundance. There appear to be two processes affecting the topographic patterns in foliar [sup 15]N abundance on this watershed: (1) greater uptake from isotopically heavy pools of inorganic soil nitrogen by plants in valley bottoms, and (2) uptake of isotopically light ammonium-N in atmospheric deposition by plants on ridges and slopes (where the availability of inorganic soil nitrogen to plant roots is more limited). Results from this study indicate that foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values are positively correlated with net nitrification potential in surface soil. 34 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

Garten, C.T. Jr. (ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Long-Term Data Reveal Patterns and Controls on Stream Water Chemistry in a Forested Stream: Walker Branch, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

We present 20 years of weekly stream water chemistry, hydrology, and climate data for the Walker Branch watershed in eastern Tennessee, USA. Since 1989, the watershed has experienced a similar to 1.08 degrees C increase in mean annual temperature, a similar to 20% decline in precipitation, and a similar to 30% increase in forest evapotranspiration rates. As a result, stream runoff has declined by similar to 34%. We evaluate long-term trends in stream water concentrations and fluxes for nine solutes and use wet deposition data to calculate approximate watershed input-output budgets. Dissolved constituents were classified as geochemical solutes (Ca2+, Mg2+, and SO42-) or nutrients (NH4+, NO3-, soluble reactive phosphorus [SRP], total soluble nitrogen [TSN], total soluble phosphorus [TSP], and dissolved organic carbon [DOC]). Geochemical solutes are predominantly controlled by discharge, and the long-term changes in catchment hydrology have led to significant trends in the concentrations and fluxes of these solutes. Further, the trends in geochemical solute concentrations indicate shifting soil flowpath contributions to streamflow generation through time, with deep groundwater having a greater proportional contribution in recent years. Despite dramatic changes in watershed runoff, there were no trends in inorganic nutrient concentrations (NH4+, NO3-, and SRP). While most nutrients entering the watershed are retained, stream fluxes of nutrient solutes have declined significantly as a result of decreasing runoff. Nutrient concentrations in the stream exhibit large seasonality controlled by in-stream biological uptake. Stream benthic communities are sensitive to hydrologic disturbance, and changes in the frequency or intensity of storm events through time can affect nutrient fluxes. Stream NO3- concentrations are also sensitive to drought, with concentrations decreasing (increasing) if conditions during the three years prior to the time of sampling were drier (wetter) than the long-term mean. Future changes in the incidence of storm events, as well as the number and duration of droughts, have the potential to significantly alter watershed nutrient losses. Our analysis indicates that changing climates can differentially affect watershed element cycles either through changes in biogeochemical process rates or through changes in catchment hydrology. Furthermore, climate change can include both long-term trending in mean climate variables, as well as changes in the frequency and intensity of storms and droughts, with each of these types of change having distinct effects on the biological and geochemical processes governing different solutes.

Lutz, Brian D [Duke University; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Bernhardt, Emily [Duke University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Iain Walker  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels." Building and Environment 59 (2012): 456-465. Download: PDF (2.28 MB) Logue, Jennifer M., William J. N. Turner, Iain S. Walker,...

10

Clean Cities: Jamison Walker  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jamison Walker to someone by E-mail Jamison Walker to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Jamison Walker on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Jamison Walker on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Jamison Walker on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Jamison Walker on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Jamison Walker on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Jamison Walker on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships Hall of Fame Contacts Jamison Walker Project Assistance Jamison Walker provides programmatic and administrative support for Clean Cities as an employee of New West Technologies. He works with the headquarters staff and responds to requests for information from within the U.S. Department of Energy, industry groups, coalitions, and interested individuals and businesses around the country. He also attends meetings and

11

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth (NDP-078A) image Navigate CDIAC...

12

Interview with John Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-organisms, called Cephalosporins which became commercially extremely important and Abraham became immensely wealthy from that and gave a great proportion of his wealth back to Oxford University and Lincoln College, where he was a Fellow; at the time... and was very happy; Hal Dixon and Dan Brown; Aaron Klug and zinc fingers; the Walker motif 12:38:16 Peter Mitchell and his concepts of chemiosmosis dominated the biogenetics field; had been difficult to get established even after his 1978 Nobel Prize; Mitchell...

Walker, John E

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

13

ORISE: Faculty Research Experiences - Dr. Jessie Walker  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jessie Walker Faculty and student team examines cyber security threats, explores options to protect nation's technology infrastructures Kierra Smith, Jessie Walker, and Tarsheika...

14

Wind Walkers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walkers Walkers Jump to: navigation, search Name Wind Walkers Facility Wind Walkers Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner 5045 Wind Partners Developer 5045 Wind Partners Energy Purchaser Alliant Energy Location Waukon IA Coordinates 43.2655101°, -91.4863848° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.2655101,"lon":-91.4863848,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

Oceanic Regulation of the Atmospheric Walker Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled theory is proposed to account for the magnitude of the Walker circulation in the tropical Pacific. It is suggested that the Pacific Walker circulation is at a saturation state, at which the zonal sea surface temperature difference is ...

Zhengyu Liu

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration...

17

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal...

18

Modeling-Computer Simulations (Walker, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations (Walker, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations (Walker, Et...

19

Doreen Walker Consulting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Doreen Walker Consulting Doreen Walker Consulting Jump to: navigation, search Name Doreen Walker Consulting Place Hertfordshire, England, United Kingdom Zip SC1 4BL Sector Wind energy Product England-based wind farm developer. Coordinates 51.84005°, -0.2751° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.84005,"lon":-0.2751,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

20

Dual position locking joint design for a medical walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis we analyzed a joint created for a medical walker currently in the prototyping stage of development. The walker is designed to help a user stand up from a seated position. The joint holds two legs of the ...

Beecher, Eric M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thermal Gradient Holes At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

22

Ground Gravity Survey At Walker Lake Valley Area (Shoffner, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Walker Lake Valley Area (Shoffner, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity...

23

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003)...

24

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

25

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

26

Elevational trends in the fluxes of sulphur and nitrogen in throughfall in the southern Appalachian Mountains: some surprising results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From 1986-1989, a team of scientists measured atmospheric concentrations and fluxes in precipitation and throughfall, and modeled dry and cloudwater deposition in a spruce-fir forest of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park which is located in the Southern Appalachian Region of the United States. The work was part of the Integrated Forest Study (IFS) conducted at 12 forests in N. America and Europe. The spruce-fir forest at 1740 m consistently received the highest total deposition rates ({approx}2200, 1200, and 700 eq ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} for SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +}). During the summers of 1989 and 1990 we used multiple samplers to measure hydrologie, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, and NO{sub 3}{sup -} fluxes in rain and throughfall events beneath spruce forests above (1940 m) and below (1720 m) cloud base. Throughfall was used to estimate total deposition using relationships determined during the IFS. Although the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} fluxes increased with elevation by a factor of 2 due to higher cloudwater interception at 1940 m, the NO{sub 3}{sup -} fluxes decreased with elevation by 30%. To investigate further, we began year round measurements of fluxes of all major ions in throughfall below spruce-fir forests at 1740 m and at 1920 m in 1993-1994. The fluxes of most ions showed a 10-50% increase with elevation due to the 70 cm yr{sup -1} cloudwater input at 1920 m. However, total inorganic nitrogen exhibited a 40% lower flux in throughfall at 1920 m than at 1740 m suggesting either higher dry deposition to trees at 1740 m or much higher canopy uptake of nitrogen by trees at 1920 m. Differential canopy absorption of N by trees at different elevations would have significant consequences for the use of throughfall N fluxes to estimate deposition. We used artificial trees to understand the foliar interactions of N.

Shubzda, John [ORNL; Lindberg, Steven Eric [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Nodvin, S. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Designing a new joint for the iXa walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the fall of 2009, the Purple team developed a walker which allows users to rise from a seated position by folding down to provide a set of handles which the user can push off of to aid in the standing process. The walker ...

Grove, Garth S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region (Redirected from Walker-Lane Transition Zone) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Details Areas (37) Power Plants (15) Projects (10) Techniques (30) Map: {{{Name}}} The northern Walker Lane (NWL) is a structurally complex zone of transition between the Sierra Nevada/Great Valley microplate and the Basin and Range Province. It is a major right-lateral shear zone which has been defined on both physiographic and geologic grounds Evidence from seismic and geologic studies together indicate that this 100 km wide zone is actively deforming and accommodates 20% of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Block modeling of crustal deformation of the northern

29

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Walker Lake Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

30

Magnetotellurics At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

31

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

32

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dixie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard

33

Topographic variation of soil nitrogen dynamics at Walker Branch Watershed, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the spatial and temporal variability of soil nitrogen (N) transformations is central to quantifying the N dynamics and productivity of ecosystems. The objectives of this work were to examine spatial and temporal variation of soil N dynamics and to identify factors correlated with topographic variation in soil N dynamics in a forest watershed. Net N mineralization and net nitrification potential were measured by aerobic laboratory incubations of surface (0-7 cm) mineral soils. Principal components analysis was used to describe sampling sites across the watershed based on 13 site characterization variables. A topographic index used in hydrologic modeling, In ({alpha}/tan {beta}), was calculated for each site as the natural logarithm of the ratio of the upslope drainage area per unit contour length ({alpha}) to the local slope angle (tan {beta}). Soils from valley floors had greater total N concentrations, lower carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratios, greater potential net nitrification, and greater microbial activity (as indicated by short-term urease assays) than soils from ridges. Mean net nitrification potential was 0.59 {micro}g N g{sup -1} d{sup -1} in surface soils from valley floors and was < 0.01 on ridges and slopes. The first principal component was related to the N and C properties of soils, leaf litter, and leaf fall at a site. The second principal component was related to forest stand composition. The topographic index was significantly correlated with important variables related to soil N dynamics. Once calibration data are derived, this index may be useful as a first approximation to total soil N concentrations and soil C:N ratios in forest watersheds because In ({alpha}/tan {beta}) can be calculated from geographic information systems that contain topographic data.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Huston, Michael A [ORNL; Thoms, C. A. [University of Wisconsin

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Regional Assessment of Exploration Potential for Geothermal Systems in The Great Basin Using a Geographic Information System (GIS) - Part II, Coolbaugh, Zehner, Raines, Shevenell, Minor, Sawatzky and Oppliger. The objective is to generate new exploration targets for both conventional and EGS capable geothermal systems by analyzing regional data in a GIS. Digital geothermal data will be made available to industry and researchers on a web site. Relationships among the data will be explored using spatial

35

Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker Lane: 2. Velocity and Strain Rate Tensor Analysis- In: Late Cenozoic Structure and Evolution of the Great Basin-Sierra Nevada Transition Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker Lane: 2. Velocity and Strain Rate Tensor Analysis- In: Late Cenozoic Structure and Evolution of the Great Basin-Sierra Nevada Transition Abstract Abstract unavailable Authors C. Kreemer, Geoffrey Blewitt and William C. Hammond Editors John S. Oldow and Patricia H. Cashman Published Geological Society of America, 2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation

36

Geothermal Literature Review At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Walker-Lane Geothermal Literature Review At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Assembling Crustal Geophysical Data for Geothermal Exploration in the Great Basin, Louie and Coolbaugh. We have compiled velocity information from sources in the literature, results of previous seismic experiments and earthquake-monitoring projects, and data donated from mining, geothermal, and petroleum companies. We also collected (May 2002 and August 2004) two new crustal refraction profiles across western Nevada and the northern and central Sierra. These sections had not been well characterized previously.

37

Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transition Zone Geothermal Region Transition Zone Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Details Areas (37) Power Plants (15) Projects (10) Techniques (30) Map: {{{Name}}} The northern Walker Lane (NWL) is a structurally complex zone of transition between the Sierra Nevada/Great Valley microplate and the Basin and Range Province. It is a major right-lateral shear zone which has been defined on both physiographic and geologic grounds Evidence from seismic and geologic studies together indicate that this 100 km wide zone is actively deforming and accommodates 20% of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Block modeling of crustal deformation of the northern Walker Lane and Basin and Range from GPS velocities[1]

38

The Walker Circulation with Observed Zonal Winds, a Mean Hadley Cell, and Cumulus Friction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The term Walker Circulation is used to refer to the zonal overturning across the equatorial Pacific driven by enhanced convection over the Indonesian region. In this work, an attempt is made to simulate the Walker Circulation using a linear model ...

Karen H. Rosenlof; Duane E. Stevens; John R. Anderson; Paul E. Ciesielski

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Can sulfate fluxes in forest canopy throughfall be used to estimate atmospheric sulfur deposition? - A summary of recent results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flux of sulfate is forest throughfall and stemflow (the sum of which is designated here as TF) may be an indicator of the atmospheric deposition of S, particularly if foliar leaching of internal plant S is small relative to washoff of deposition. Extensive data from 13 forests indicate that annual sulfate fluxes in TF and in atmospheric deposition are very similar, and recent studies with {sup 35}S tracers indicate that leaching is only a few percent of total TF. However, some short-term deposition/TF comparisons show large differences, and there remain questions about interpretation of tracer results. Considering the data, we conclude that TF may be used under some conditions to estimate deposition within acceptable uncertainty limits, but that some assumptions need further testing. If TF does reflect deposition, these data suggest that commonly used methods and models seriously underestimate total S deposition at some sites.

Lindberg, Steven Eric [ORNL; Cape, J. N. [Institute of Terrestrial Ecology; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ivens, W. [University of Utrecht

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Supporting Information: A Synthetic DNA Walker for Molecular Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

species. Non-denaturing PAGE Analysis. Fuel-mediated association of the walker and track was analyzed at 37 C. The whole reaction sample was loaded in a 6.7% non-denaturing gel. Gel electrophoresis (Felix32 software, PTI Co.) to monitor fluorescence intensi- ties at four excitation/emission wavelengths

Pierce, Niles A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

General Transformation Formulas for Fermi-Walker Coordinates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the transformation and inverse transformation, in the form of Taylor expansions, from arbitrary coordinates to Fermi-Walker coordinates in tubular neighborhoods of arbitrary timelike paths for general spacetimes. Explicit formulas for coefficients and the Jacobian matrix are given.

David Klein; Peter Collas

2007-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

42

MHK Projects/Walker Bend Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker Bend Project Walker Bend Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.3678,"lon":-91.1315,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

Field Mapping At Walker Lake Valley Area (Shoffner, Et Al., 2010...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Exploration Using 3D Gravity Inversion In Walker Valley, Nevada Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

44

Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction, Colorado, for Long-Term Radiation Variations (August 1978) Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction, Colorado, for Long-Term Radiation Variations (August 1978) Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction, Colorado, for Long-Term Radiation Variations (August 1978) Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction, Colorado, for Long-Term Radiation Variations (August 1978) More Documents & Publications Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2013 Year-End Summary Report

45

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Walker-Lane_Transitional_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=425676"

46

Refraction Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Refraction Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Michelle Heimgartner, James B. Scott, Weston Thelen, Christopher R. Lopez, John N. Louie (2005) Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Refraction_Survey_At_Walker-Lane_Transitional_Zone_Region_(Heimgartner,_Et_Al.,_2005)&oldid=399615

47

Geothermometry At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Shevenell & De  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell & De Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Ted De Rocher (2005) Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermometry_At_Walker-Lane_Transitional_Zone_Region_(Shevenell_%26_De_Rocher,_2005)&oldid=399607" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes

48

Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

50

Thermal Gradient Holes At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

51

Field Mapping At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Shevenell, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Shevenell, Et Al., Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes On a more local scale, Faulds et al. (2003, 2005a, 2005b, 2006) have conducted structural analysis and detailed geologic mapping at a number of sites throughout Nevada and have found that productive geothermal systems typically occur in one of several structural settings, including step-overs in normal fault zones, near the ends of major normal faults where the

52

A Coupled Theory of Tropical Climatology: Warm Pool, Cold Tongue, and Walker Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on results from analytic and general circulation models, the authors propose a theory for the coupled warm pool, cold tongue, and Walker circulation system. The intensity of the coupled system is determined by the coupling strength, the ...

Zhengyu Liu; Boyin Huang

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations and a Simple Model of an Idealized Walker Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An idealized Walker cell with prescribed sea surface temperature (SST) and prescribed radiative cooling is studied using both a two-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) and a simple conceptual model. In the CRM, for the same SST distribution, ...

Jonathan Wofsy; Zhiming Kuang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Walker-Type Mean Circulations and Convectively Coupled Tropical Waves as an Interacting System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interactions between convectively coupled tropical waves and Walker-type mean circulations are examined using a two-dimensional analytic model wherein drying and cooling of the boundary layer by convective and mesoscale downdrafts are in ...

Jun-Ichi Yano; Mitchell W. Moncrieff; Wojciech W. Grabowski

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Changes in Zonal Surface Temperature Gradients and Walker Circulations in a Wide Range of Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variations in zonal surface temperature gradients and zonally asymmetric tropical overturning circulations (Walker circulations) are examined over a wide range of climates simulated with an idealized atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). ...

Timothy M. Merlis; Tapio Schneider

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The Dependence of the Low-Level Equatorial Easterly Jet on Hadley and Walker Circulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How the time-mean Hadley and Walker circulations affect the formation of a low-level equatorial easterly jet is investigated. Experiments are conducted for equinoctial conditions using a general circulation model, the Community Climate Model (...

David S. Battisti; David D. Ovens

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A Simple Model of a Convectively Coupled Walker Circulation Using the Weak Temperature Gradient Approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An idealized model of a Walker circulation based on the weak temperature gradient (WTG) approximation and a single baroclinic vertical mode for all fields is analyzed. The circulation is forced by a sinusoidal variation of sea surface temperature ...

Christopher S. Bretherton; Adam H. Sobel

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Branching Bisimilarity with Explicit Divergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the relational characterisation of branching bisimilarity with explicit divergence. We prove that it is an equivalence and that it coincides with the original definition of branching bisimilarity with explicit divergence in terms of coloured ...

Rob van Glabbeek; Bas Luttik; Nikola Tr?ka

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Refraction Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Refraction Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Refraction Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Refraction Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Assembling Crustal Geophysical Data for Geothermal Exploration in the Great Basin, Louie and Coolbaugh. We have compiled velocity information from sources in the literature, results of previous seismic experiments and earthquake-monitoring projects, and data donated from mining, geothermal, and petroleum companies. We also collected (May 2002 and August 2004) two new crustal refraction profiles across western Nevada and the northern and central Sierra. These sections had not been well characterized previously.

60

Isotopic Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Walker-Lane Transitional Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Assembling Crustal Geophysical Data for Geothermal Exploration in the Great Basin, Louie and Coolbaugh. We have compiled velocity information from sources in the literature, results of previous seismic experiments and earthquake-monitoring projects, and data donated from mining, geothermal, and petroleum companies. We also collected (May 2002 and August 2004) two new crustal refraction profiles across western Nevada and the northern and central Sierra. These sections had not been well characterized previously.

62

Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional to Basin-Scale Relationships Between Geodetic Strain and Geological Structures, Geoffrey Blewitt. The objectives of this project are to assess the use of inter-seismic crustal strain rates derived from GPS-stations as an exploration tool for non-magmatic high-temperature geothermal systems, and to use this technique to target potential geothermal resources in the Great Basin. Two potential target areas were identified in year one (FY03) by regional-scale studies: (1) the area

63

Water Sampling At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Water Sampling At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

64

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pritchett, 2004) Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

65

Isotopic Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Kennedy & Van  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kennedy & Van Kennedy & Van Soest, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes The correspondence of helium isotope ratios and active transtensional deformation indicates a deformation-enhanced permeability and that mantle fluids can penetrate the ductile lithosphere, even in regions where there is no substantial magmatism. Superimposed on the regional trend are local, high 3He/4He anomalies indicating hidden magmatic activity and/or deep

66

Seeing the sky through Hubble's eye: The COSMOS SkyWalker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large, high-resolution space-based imaging surveys produce a volume of data that is difficult to present to the public in a comprehensible way. While megapixel-sized images can still be printed out or downloaded via the World Wide Web, this is no longer feasible for images with 10^9 pixels (e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys [ACS] images of the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs [GEMS] project) or even 10^10 pixels (for the ACS Cosmic Evolution Survey [COSMOS]). We present a Web-based utility called the COSMOS SkyWalker that allows viewing of the huge ACS image data set, even through slow Internet connections. Using standard HTML and JavaScript, the application successively loads only those portions of the image at a time that are currently being viewed on the screen. The user can move within the image by using the mouse or interacting with an overview image. Using an astrometrically registered image for the COSMOS SkyWalker allows the display of calibrated world coordinates for use in science. The SkyWalker "technique" can be applied to other data sets. This requires some customization, notably the slicing up of a data set into small (e.g., 256^2 pixel) subimages. An advantage of the SkyWalker is the use of standard Web browser components; thus, it requires no installation of any software and can therefore be viewed by anyone across many operating systems.

K. Jahnke; S. F. Sanchez; A. Koekemoer

2006-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

67

Reading Comprehension - The Three Branches of Government  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Three Branches of Government The Three Branches of Government The three branches of the federal government are the _________ local state executive , _________ legislative mayor city , and the _________ judge judicial jury branches. The executive branch is responsible for _________ enforcing making interpreting laws. The head of the executive branch is _________ The President The Congress The Supreme Court . The President is the chief _________ law enforcer judge jury of the United States. The President is also the head of the _________ armed forces Supreme Court Congress . The legislative branch _________ enforces makes interprets laws. The legislative branch is known as _________ The President Congress The Supreme Court . Congress consists of two houses, known as the _________ Senate

68

Issues in Parallel Branch and Price  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Branch and price is the technique of combining column generation methods with branch ... price has been shown to be very e ective at solving large, specially...

69

A RadiativeConvective Equilibrium Perspective of Weakening of the Tropical Walker Circulation in Response to Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both observational analysis and GCM simulations indicate that the tropical Walker circulation is becoming weaker and may continue to weaken as a consequence of climate change. Here, the authors use a conceptual radiativeconvective equilibrium (...

Xianglei Huang; Hui-Wen Chuang; Andrew Dessler; Xiuhong Chen; Kenneth Minschwaner; Yi Ming; V. Ramaswamy

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

The Influence of Ocean Surface Temperature Gradient and Continentality on the Walker Circulation. Part I: Prescribed Tropical Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coarse-mesh, global climate model developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) has been used to assess the influence of ocean surface temperature (OST) gradient and continentality on the Walker circulation. The basic model ...

Robert M. Chervin; Leonard M. Druyan

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A Simplified Model of the Walker Circulation with an Interactive Ocean Mixed Layer and Cloud-Radiative Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloudclimate feedbacks between precipitation, radiation, circulation strength, atmospheric temperature and moisture, and ocean temperature are studied with an idealized model of the Walker circulation in a nonrotating atmosphere coupled to an ...

Matthew E. Peters; Christopher S. Bretherton

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Determining heat loss is one more tool to use in geothermal exploration. It is relatively easy to calculate if the thermal aureole has been mapped with thermal gradient well measurements. With the heat loss information, predicted production capacity can be used to help review the system being explored. References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard

73

Geothermometry At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being

74

The bold and the timorous walkers on the trek from home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a one-dimensional random walk with memory. The behavior of the walker is modified with respect to the simple symmetric random walk (SSRW) only when he is at the maximum distance ever reached from his starting point (home). In this case, having the choice to move farther or to move closer, he decides with different probabilities. If the probability of a forward step is higher then the probability of a backward step, the walker is bold, otherwise he is timorous. We investigate the asymptotic properties of this bold/timorous random walk (BTRW) showing that the scaling behavior vary continuously from subdiffusive (timorous) to superdiffusive (bold). The scaling exponents are fully determined with a new mathematical approach.

Serva, Maurizio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Self Potential At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pritchett, 2004) Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general

76

Analysis of long branch extraction and long branch shortening  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this line is a func- tion of the branch lengths. This area is obviously crucial as seen in Figure 5 because it is the area suffering from LBA. In other words, the predictive power of LBE is being masked by this artificial long branch in the exact area needed... sequences. Lect. Math. Life Sci 1986, 17:57-86. 14. Lanave C, Preparata G, Sacone C, Serio G: A new method for calculating evolutionary substitution rates. Journal of Molecular Evolution 1984, 20:86-93. 15. Rodriguez F, Oliver J, Marin A, Medina J...

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

77

Reducing branch divergence in GPU programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Branch divergence has a significant impact on the performance of GPU programs. We propose two novel software-based optimizations, called iteration delaying and branch distribution that aim to reduce branch divergence. Iteration delaying ... Keywords: GPGPU, branch divergence, data parallel programming

Tianyi David Han; Tarek S. Abdelrahman

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium deposits." References

79

Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30,l 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

ds-branching-web.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This This note will be revised after the new CLEO measurements of thirteen D + s branching fractions (P.U.E. Onyisi et al., Phys. Rev. D88, 032009 (2013)) are added to the Particle Listings. More than a dozen papers on the D + s , most of them from the CLEO experiment, have been published since the 2008 Review. We now know enough to attempt an overview of the branching fractions. Figure 1 shows a partial breakdown of the fractions. The rest of this note is about how the figure was constructed. The values shown make heavy use of CLEO measurements of inclusive branching fractions [1] For other data and references cited in the following, see the Listings. Modes with leptons: The bottom (20.0 ± 0.9)% of Fig. 1 shows the fractions for the exclusive modes that include leptons. Measured e + ν e fractions have been doubled to get the semileptonic ℓ + ν fractions. The sum of the exclusive e + ν e fractions is (6.9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Matthew Walker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... performing actual chemical etching of silicon, and learning how to use an atomic force microscope, a scanning electron microscope, and various ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

Seeing the sky through Hubble's eye: The COSMOS SkyWalker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large, high-resolution space-based imaging surveys produce a volume of data that is difficult to present to the public in a comprehensible way. While megapixel-sized images can still be printed out or downloaded via the World Wide Web, this is no longer feasible for images with 10^9 pixels (e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys [ACS] images of the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs [GEMS] project) or even 10^10 pixels (for the ACS Cosmic Evolution Survey [COSMOS]). We present a Web-based utility called the COSMOS SkyWalker that allows viewing of the huge ACS image data set, even through slow Internet connections. Using standard HTML and JavaScript, the application successively loads only those portions of the image at a time that are currently being viewed on the screen. The user can move within the image by using the mouse or interacting with an overview image. Using an astrometrically registered image for the COSMOS SkyWalker allows the display of calibrated world coordinates f...

Jahnke, K; Koekemoer, A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Titel Autor Jahr URL Accounting in a Nutshell Janet Walker 2009 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9780750687386  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Titel Autor Jahr URL Accounting in a Nutshell Janet Walker 2009 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9780750687386 Benefits of e-business performance measurement systems, The Hinton, Matthew 2008 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9781856175258 Controlling Collaboration between Firms Angelo Ditillo, Ariela Caglio 2009 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book

Osnabrück, University of

84

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

85

Large scale dynamics of the Persistent Turning Walker model of fish behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper considers a new model of individual displacement, based on fish motion, the so-called Persistent Turning Walker (PTW) model, which involves an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process on the curvature of the particle trajectory. The goal is to show that its large time and space scale dynamics is of diffusive type, and to provide an analytic expression of the diffusion coefficient. Two methods are investigated. In the first one, we compute the large time asymptotics of the variance of the individual stochastic trajectories. The second method is based on a diffusion approximation of the kinetic formulation of these stochastic trajectories. The kinetic model is a Fokker-Planck type equation posed in an extended phase-space involving the curvature among the kinetic variables. We show that both methods lead to the same value of the diffusion constant. We present some numerical simulations to illustrate the theoretical results.

Pierre Degond; Sbastien Motsch

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

86

Networks of companies and branches in Poland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study we consider relations between companies in Poland taking into account common branches they belong to. It is clear that companies belonging to the same branch compete for similar customers, so the market induces correlations between them. On the other hand two branches can be related by companies acting in both of them. To remove weak, accidental links we shall use a concept of threshold filtering for weighted networks where a link weight corresponds to a number of existing connections (common companies or branches) between a pair of nodes.

Chmiel, A M; Sienkiewicz, J; Suchecki, K; Chmiel, Anna M.; Holyst, Janusz A.; Sienkiewicz, Julian; Suchecki, Krzysztof

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Stress-Energy Tensor of the Quantized Massive Fields in Friedman-Robertson-Walker Spacetimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The approximate stress-energy tensor of the quantized massive scalar, spinor and vector fields in the spatially flat Friedman-Robertson-Walker universe is constructed. It is shown that for the scalar fields with arbitrary curvature coupling the stress-energy tensor calculated within the framework of the Schwinger-DeWitt approach is identical to the analogous tensor constructed in the adiabatic vacuum. Similarly, the Schwinger-DeWitt stress-energy tensor for higher spins coincides with the analogous result calculated by the Zeldovich-Starobinsky method. The thus obtained stress-energy tensor are subsequently used in the back reaction problem. It is shown that for pure semiclassical Einstein field equations with the vanishing cosmological constant and the source term consisting exclusively of its quantum part there are no self-consistent exponential solutions driven by the spinor and vector field. A similar situation takes place for the conformally coupled scalar field and the allowable values of the coupling constant belong to the interval $\\xi \\lesssim 0.1.$ The perturbative approach to the problem is briefly discussed and possible generalizations of the stress-energy tensor are indicated.

Jerzy Matyjasek; Pawe? Sadurski

2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

88

Behavior of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Cosmological Models in Scalar-Tensor Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze solutions to Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies in Brans-Dicke theory, where a scalar field is coupled to gravity. Matter is modelled by a $\\gamma$-law perfect fluid, including false-vacuum energy as a special case. Through a change of variables, we reduce the field equations from fourth order to second order, and they become equivalent to a two-dimensional dynamical system. We then analyze the entire solution space of this dynamical system, and find that many qualitative features of these cosmologies can be gleaned, including standard non-inflationary or extended inflationary expansion, but also including bifurcations of stable or unstable expansion or contraction, noninflationary vacuum-energy dominated models, and several varieties of ``coasting," ``bouncing," ``hesitating," and ``vacillating" universes. It is shown that inflationary dogma, which states that a universe with curvature and dominated by inflationary matter will always approach a corresponding flat-space solution at late times, does not hold in general for the scalar-tensor theory, but rather that the occurence of inflation depends upon the initial energy of the scalar field relative to the expansion rate. In the case of flat space ($k=0$), the dynamical system formalism generates some previously known exact power-law solutions.

Shawn J. Kolitch; Douglas M. Eardley

1994-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

89

Long Branch Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Branch Capital Branch Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Long Branch Capital Place Austin, Texas Zip 78744 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product Long Branch Capital makes minority investments in private companies focused on renewable energy, clean technology, and efficiency Coordinates 30.267605°, -97.742984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.267605,"lon":-97.742984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

90

Jr., Process Development Branch Construction Division SUBJECT...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FR?M : Jr., Process Development Branch Construction Division SUBJECT: INING TESTS AT BOWEN ENGINEERING, INC. - M A Y 16 AND 16,1961 SYMBOL EPD:ABBrbt I REYAKC: &DiVE;G?i&)il q...

91

FY 1990 Applied Sciences Branch annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Applied Sciences Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/SERI goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility which is capable of providing information on the full range of photovoltaic components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of photovoltaic technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. This report contains information on surface and interface analysis, materials characterization, development, electro-optical characterization module testing and performance, surface interactions and FTIR spectroscopy.

Keyes, B.M.; Dippo, P.C. (eds.)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Correlation and aliasing in dynamic branch predictors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous branch prediction studies have relied primarily upon the SPECint89 and SPECint92 benchmarks for evaluation. Most of these benchmarks exercise a very small amount of code. As a consequence, the resources required by these schemes for accurate ...

Stuart Sechrest; Chih-Chieh Lee; Trevor Mudge

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II: Walker Ridge 313 LWD Operations and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cook Cook 1 , Gilles Guerin 1 , Stefan Mrozewski 1 , Timothy Collett 2 , & Ray Boswell 3 Walker Ridge 313 LWD Operations and Results Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II: 1 Borehole Research Group Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University Palisades, NY 10964 E-mail: Cook: acook@ldeo.columbia.edu Guerin: guerin@ldeo.columbia.edu Mrozewski: stefan@ldeo.columbia.edu 3 National Energy Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 E-mail: ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov 2 US Geological Survey Denver Federal Center, MS-939 Box 25046 Denver, CO 80225 E-mail:

94

TREES AND BRANCHES IN BANACH SPACES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. An infinite dimensional notion of asymptotic structure is considered. This notion is developed in terms of trees and branches on Banach spaces. Every countably infinite countably branching tree T of a certain type on a space X is presumed to have a branch with some property. It is shown that then X can be embedded into a space with an FDD (Ei) so that all normalized sequences in X which are almost a skipped blocking of (Ei) have that property. As an application of our work we prove that if X is a separable reflexive Banach space and for some 1 0, there exists a finite codimensional subspace of X which C 2 + ? embeds into the ?p sum of finite dimensional spaces. 1.

E. Odell; Th. Schlumprecht

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Optimal orientation in branched cytoskeletal networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Actin cytoskeletal protrusions in crawling cells, or lamellipodia, exhibit various morphological properties such as two characteristic peaks in the distribution of filament orientation with respect to the leading edge. To understand these properties, using the dendritic nucleation model as a basis for cytoskeletal restructuring, a kinetic-population model with orientational-dependent branching (birth) and capping (death) is constructed and analyzed. Optimizing for growth yields a relation between the branch angle and filament orientation that explains the two characteristic peaks. The model also exhibits a subdominant population that allows for more accurate modeling of recent measurements of filamentous actin density along the leading edge of lamellipodia in keratocytes. Finally, we explore the relationship between orientational and spatial organization of filamentous actin in lamellipodia and address recent observations of a prevalence of overlapping filaments to branched filaments---a finding that is claimed to be in contradiction with the dendritic nucleation model.

D. A. Quint; J. M. Schwarz

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

96

Hoisting Branch Conditions -- Improving Super-Scalar Processor Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The performance and hardware complexity of super-scalar architectures is hindered by conditional branch instructions. When conditional branches are encountered in a program, the instruction fetch unit must rapidly predict the branch predicate and begin speculatively fetching instructions with no loss of instruction throughput. Speculative execution has a high hardware cost, is limited by dynamic branch prediction accuracies, and does not scale well for increasingly super-scalar architectures. The conditional branch bottleneck would be solved if we could somehow move branch condition evaluation far forward in the instruction stream and provide a new branch instruction that encoded both the source and target address of a branch. This paper summarizes the hardware extensions to support just such a Future Branch, then gives a compiler algorithm for hoisting branch evaluation across many blocks. The algorithm is applicable to other optimizations for parallelism, such as prefetching data. ...

Bill Appelbe; Reid Harmon; Scott Wills; Maurizio Vitale

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Geometrization of postcritically finite branched coverings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study canonical decompositions of postcritically finite branched coverings of the 2-sphere, as defined by K.~Pilgrim. We show that every hyperbolic cycle in the decomposition does not have a Thurston obstruction. It is thus Thurston equivalent to a rational map.

Bonnot, Sylvain

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Geometrization of postcritically finite branched coverings (revised)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study canonical decompositions of postcritically finite branched coverings of the 2-sphere, as defined by K.~Pilgrim. We show that every hyperbolic cycle in the decomposition does not have a Thurston obstruction. It is thus Thurston equivalent to a rational map.

Bonnot, Sylvain

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Branched alkanes from blue-green algae were separated on a 750 feet high resolution capillary gas chromatographic column. The mixture was found to be 90% of 1:1 ratio 7-methyl, and 8-methyl-heptadecane, and 10% of 6-methylheptadecane. An optical rotation of +2.5 {+-} 0.5 was obtained on a 5 mg of mixture.

Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

1970-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Branching vs. Linear Time: Final Showdown  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discussion of the relative merits of linear- versus branching-time frameworks goes back to early 1980s. One of the beliefs dominating this discussion has been that "while specifying is easier in LTL (linear-temporal logic), verification is easier ...

Moshe Y. Vardi

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

TO :Lyall E. Johnson, Chief Licensing Branch  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Lyall E. Johnson, Chief Lyall E. Johnson, Chief Licensing Branch ,,,_ i-.. FROM :Clifford K. Beck, Chief q q+. ., ,,/,j !i-/ I, v' Hazards Evaluation Branch ,: s~~p:~LLItma0~7c ~HEI-IICAL wows We have reviewed the letter of December 10, 1958, from Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, requesting amendment of License No. SNM-33 to permit pelleting operations on uranium enriched to 5% U-235 in a new facility at Hematite, Missouri. Batch sizes throughout the operations will not exceed limited safe masses as specified in Report K-1019, Part 4 (Deleted). Neither the diameter nor capacity of the storage hopper located above the feed hopper of the pelleting press is given. Either the diameter should be not over the limited safe dimension or positive means should be in effect to insure against more than a limited safe m&s in the

102

Electronic branching ratio of the. tau. lepton  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using data accumulated by the CLEO I detector operating at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have measured the ratio {ital R}={Gamma}({tau}{r arrow}{ital e}{bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Gamma}{sub 1}, where {Gamma}{sub 1} is the {tau} decay rate to final states with one charged particle. We find {ital R}=0.2231{plus minus}0.0044{plus minus}0.0073 where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Together with the measured topological one-charged-particle branching fraction, this yields the branching fraction of the {tau} lepton to electrons, {ital B}{sub {ital e}}=0.192{plus minus}0.004{plus minus}0.006.

Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoeller, M.M.; Crawford, G.; Fulton, R.; Gan, K.K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Sung, M.K.; Whitmore, J.; Wilson, P.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Lambrecht, M.; Skubic, P.; Snow, J.; Wang, P.; Bortoletto, D.; Brown, D.N.; Dominick, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Shibata, E.I.; Schaffner, S.F.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Kroha, H.; Roberts, S.; Sparks, K.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.; Stroynowski, R.; Artuso, M.; Goldberg, M.; Haupt, T.; Horwitz, N.; Kennett, R.; Moneti, G.C.; Playfer, S.; Rozen, Y.; Rubin, P.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Thulasidas, M.; Yao, W.; Zhu, G.; Barnes, A.V.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Jain, V.; Letson, T.; Mestayer, M.D.; Akerib, D.S.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; (CLEO Collaboration)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Photovoltaic Program Branch annual report, FY 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Photovoltaic (PV) Program Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30, 1989. The branch is responsible for managing the subcontracted portion of SERI's PV Advanced Research and Development Project. In fiscal year (FY) 1989, this included nearly 50 subcontracts, with a total annualized funding of approximately $13.1 million. Approximately two-thirds of the subcontracts were with universities, at a total funding of nearly $4 million. The six technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontracted program: Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, New Ideas, and University Participation. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1989, and future research directions. Each report will be cataloged individually.

Summers, K A [ed.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Nanomanufacturing of random branching material architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research in vital fields such as micro/opto-electronics, fuel cells and tissue engineering calls for fabrication of functional structures with optimal harvesting or perfusion of matter, energy and information, via permeation and transport through random ... Keywords: Anodized aluminum oxide, Block copolymer self-assembly, Carbon nanofoams, Carbon nanotubes, Fiber electrospining, Fractals, Nanocomposite foils, Nanoheaters, Nanomanufacturing, Plasma processing, Random branching materials, Tissue scaffolds, Ultrasonic corrosion texturing, Ultrasonic powder consolidation

Charalabos C. Doumanidis

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Measurement of tau lepton branching fractions  

SciTech Connect

We present {tau}{sup {minus}} lepton branching fraction measurements based on data from the TPC/Two-Gamma detector at PEP. Using a sample of{tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} events, we examine the resonance structure of the K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} system and obtain the first measurements of branching fractions for {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sub 1}{sup {minus}}(1270) and {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sub 1}{sup {minus}}(1400). We also describe a complete set of branching fraction measurements in which all the decays of the {tau}{sup {minus}} lepton are separated into classes defined by the identities of the charged particles and an estimate of the number of neutrals. This is the first such global measurement with decay classes defined by the four possible charged particle species, e, {mu}, {pi}, and K.

Nicol, N.A.

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Design optimisation of Ironless Motors based on Magnet selection M.C. Greaves*, G.R. Walker* & B.B. Walsh**  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design optimisation of Ironless Motors based on Magnet selection M.C. Greaves*, G.R. Walker* & B. Ltd. Abstract This paper considers the design of a radial flux permanent magnet ironless core brushless DC motor for use in an electric wheel drive with an integrated epicyclic gear reduction. The motor

Walker, Geoff

107

Stochastic and deterministic causes of streamer branching in liquid dielectrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Streamer branching in liquid dielectrics is driven by stochastic and deterministic factors. The presence of stochastic causes of streamer branching such as inhomogeneities inherited from noisy initial states, impurities, ...

Jadidian, Jouya

108

Configuration of a Laminar Cooling System Using a Branch and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Recent Developments in High Strength Steels for Energy Applications ... Cooling System Using a Branch and Bound Optimization Methodology.

109

Quantization of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes in the presence of a negative cosmological constant and radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, we quantize three Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models in the presence of a negative cosmological constant and radiation. The models differ from each other by the constant curvature of their spatial sections, which may be positive, negative or zero. They give rise to Wheeler-DeWitt equations for the scale factor which have the form of the Schroedinger equation for the quartic anharmonic oscillator. We find their eigenvalues and eigenfunctions by using a method first developed by Chhajlany and Malnev. After that, we use the eigenfunctions in order to construct wave packets for each case and evaluate the time-dependent expectation value of the scale factors, which are found to oscillate between finite maximum and minimum values. Since the expectation values of the scale factors never vanish, we have an initial indication that these models may not have singularities at the quantum level.

Monerat, G.A.; Silva, E.V. Correa; Oliveira-Neto, G. [Departamento de Matematica e Computacao, Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Estrada Resende-Riachuelo, s/no, Morada da Colina, CEP 27523-000, Resende-RJ (Brazil); Filho, L.G. Ferreira [Departamento de Mecanica e Energia, Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Estrada Resende-Riachuelo, s/no, Morada da Colina, CEP 27523-000 , Resende-RJ (Brazil); Lemos, N.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, R. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza s/no, Boa Viagem, CEP 24210-340, Niteroi-RJ (Brazil)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Annual report, Basic Sciences Branch, FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. Seven technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL`s in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, Solid-State Spectroscopy, and Superconductivity. Each section explains the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy`s National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Annual report, Basic Sciences Branch, FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. Seven technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL's in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, Solid-State Spectroscopy, and Superconductivity. Each section explains the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Measurement of the Branching Ratio for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured the branching ratio B(\\Upsilon(1S) ! + \\Gamma ) using the CLEO II detector. A clean sample of tau pair events is identified via events containing two charged particles where exactly one of the particles is an identified electron. We find B(\\Upsilon(1S) ! + \\Gamma ) = (2:59 \\Sigma 0:12 +0:13 \\Gamma0:16 )%. The result is consistent with expectations from lepton universality. Permanent address: INP, Novosibirsk, Russia y Permanent address: University of Hawaii at Manoa 1 One of the interesting aspects of heavy quarkonia is that in the lower energy states the electromagnetic decays compete with the strong decays due to OZI suppression. In the b b system, the first three \\Upsilon resonances all lie below the threshold for strong decay into pairs of B mesons, and the measured leptonic decays are of the order of a few percent. For the \\Upsilon(1S), the world average of the branching ratio into tau pairs is (2:97 \\Sigma 0:35)% [1] based on two measureme...

Upsilon Gamma Cinabro; Ichep Ref; Gls Cleo Conf; M. Saulnier; G. Gollin

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Strong Branching Inequalities for Convex Mixed Integer Nonlinear ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 3, 2011 ... ods for using inequalities generated as an immediate byproduct of the strong branching process. Section 3 ...... safety no rotation CH. 18327.

114

Information-Based Branching Schemes for Binary Linear Mixed ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008. Information based branching rules in integer programming. INFORMS Annual Meeting. Washington, DC, USA. Linderoth, J.T., M.W.P. Savelsbergh. 1999.

115

Optimization Online - A Branch-and-Price Algorithm for Combined ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 24, 2008 ... A Branch-and-Price Algorithm for Combined Location and Routing Problems Under Capacity Restrictions. Z. Akca (zelihaakca ***at***...

116

Robust Branch-Cut-and-Price for the Capacitated Minimum ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a robust branch-cut-and-price algorithm for the Capacitated ... of the pricing subproblem or the size of the LPs that are actually solved.

117

Modified Orbital Branching with Applications to Orbitopes and to Unit ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 27, 2012 ... Modified Orbital Branching with Applications to Orbitopes and to Unit Commitment. James Ostrowski (jostrows ***at*** utk.edu) Miguel F. Anjos...

118

Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W...

119

Optimization Online - Robust Branch-Cut-and-Price for the ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 30, 2006 ... Robust Branch-Cut-and-Price for the Capacitated Minimum Spanning Tree Problem over a Large Extended Formulation. Eduardo Uchoa...

120

Radiolabeled dimethyl branched long chain fatty acid for heart imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiolabeled long chain fatty acid for heart imaging that has dimethyl branching at one of the carbons of the chain which inhibits the extent to which oxidation can occur. The closer to the carboxyl the branching is positioned, the more limited the oxidation, thereby resulting in prolonged retention of the radiolabeled compound in the heart.

Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Kirsch, Gilbert (Woippy, FR)

1988-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A note on branch-and-cut-and-price  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a methodology for branch-and-cut-and-price when cuts and columns are generated simultaneously. The methodology is illustrated with two application cases: the Split Delivery Vehicle Routing Problem (SDVRP) and the Bus Rapid Transit ... Keywords: Branch-and-cut-and-price, Bus Rapid Transit Route Design Problem, Column generation, Split Delivery Vehicle Routing Problem

Dominique Feillet; Michel Gendreau; AndrS L. Medaglia; Jose L. Walteros

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Hot Bottom Burning in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hot Bottom Burning in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars By J OHN C. LATTANZ I O 1 , CHERYL A. FROST 1 state of knowledge about the phenomenon of Hot Bottom Burning as seen in Asymptotic Giant Branch stars. This is illustrated with some results from new 6M fi stellar models. 1. Introduction and Motivation Hot Bottom Burning

Lattanzio, John

123

Branching Mechanism of the Tsushima Current in the Korea Strait  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrographic studies show the seasonal variation of the East Korean Warm Current (EKWC), which is a branch of the Tsushima Current along the Korean coast. To understand the dynamics of the branching mechanism of the TC in the Korea Strait, a ...

Yang-Ki Cho; Kuh Kim

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

FY 1992 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Measurements and Characterization Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/NREL goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility that Is capable of providing information on the full range of PV components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of Pv technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. The Measurements and Characterization Branch encompasses seven coordinated research groups, providing integrated research and development that covers all aspects of photovoltaic materials/devices characterization.

Dippo, P.C [ed.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate Area and Carbon Content of Sphagnum Since Last Glacial Maximum (2002) TDE Model Intercomparison Project Data Archive Presentations and abstracts from the recent DOE Terrestrial Science Team Meeting (Argonne National Laboratory, October 29-31, 2001) FACE (Free-Air CO2 Enrichment) Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth (2001), NDP-078A | PDF Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation and Ecosystems: 1990-1999 Literature (2000), CDIAC-129 Direct effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on plants and ecosystems: An updated bibliographic data base (1994), CDIAC-70 A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated

126

Modulo path history for the reduction of pipeline overheads in path-based neural branch predictors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neural-inspired branch predictors achieve very low branch misprediction rates. However, previously proposed implementations have a variety of characteristics that make them challenging to implement in future high-performance processors. In particular, ... Keywords: branch prediction, computer architecture

Gabriel H. Loh; Daniel A. Jimnez

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Near Critical Catalyst Reactant Branching Processes with Controlled Immigration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near critical catalyst-reactant branching processes with controlled immigration are studied. The reactant population evolves according to a branching process whose branching rate is proportional to the total mass of the catalyst. The bulk catalyst evolution is that of a classical continuous time branching process; in addition there is a specific form of immigration. Immigration takes place exactly when the catalyst population falls below a certain threshold, in which case the population is instantaneously replenished to the threshold. Such models are motivated by problems in chemical kinetics where one wants to keep the level of a catalyst above a certain threshold in order to maintain a desired level of reaction activity. A diffusion limit theorem for the scaled processes is presented, in which the catalyst limit is described through a reflected diffusion, while the reactant limit is a diffusion with coefficients that are functions of both the reactant and the catalyst. Stochastic averaging principles under ...

Budhiraja, Amarjit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Electrical resistance of the low dimensional critical branching random walk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the electrical resistance between the origin and generation n of the incipient infinite oriented branching random walk in dimensions d0. This answers a question of Barlow, J\\'arai, Kumagai and Slade [2].

Antal A. Jrai; Asaf Nachmias

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

129

3 One-Line Diagram and Bus/Branch Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One-line diagram and bus/branch model Ohms law Losses Kirchoffs law Power flow calculations (different model idealizations) Reference bus Power System & LMP Fundamentals WEM 301 2008 ISO New England Inc.

Eugene Litvinov Director; Marginal Loss Pricing; Market System; Major Components; Line Line; Line Line

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

NIST Angela Hight Walker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and transition metallic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene. ... actively collaborates include Carbon Nanotube Metrology, Biomagnetic ...

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

131

Branch-and-Price Guided Search for Integer Programs with an ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solved with a branch-and-price algorithm, which, when run to completion, ... small restricted integer programs, and a branch-and-price approach for solving it.

132

FY 1991 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Measurements and Characterization Branch of the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) provides comprehensive photovoltaic (PV) materials, devices, characterization, measurement, fabrication, modeling research, and support for the international PV research community, in the context of the US Department of Energy's Photovoltaic Research Program goals. This report summarizes the progress of the Branch from 31 January 1991 through 31 January 1992. The eight technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups: Surface and interface Analysis; Materials Characterization; Device Development; Electro-optical Characterization; Advanced PV module Performance and Reliability Research; Cell Performance Characterization; Surface Interactions, Modification, and Stability; and FTIR Spectroscopic Research. The including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules, and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of 77 branch originated journal and conference publications, which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 135 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

Osterwald, C.R.; Dippo, P.C. (eds.)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

FY 1991 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Measurements and Characterization Branch of the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) provides comprehensive photovoltaic (PV) materials, devices, characterization, measurement, fabrication, modeling research, and support for the international PV research community, in the context of the US Department of Energy`s Photovoltaic Research Program goals. This report summarizes the progress of the Branch from 31 January 1991 through 31 January 1992. The eight technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups: Surface and interface Analysis; Materials Characterization; Device Development; Electro-optical Characterization; Advanced PV module Performance and Reliability Research; Cell Performance Characterization; Surface Interactions, Modification, and Stability; and FTIR Spectroscopic Research. The including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules, and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of 77 branch originated journal and conference publications, which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 135 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

Osterwald, C.R.; Dippo, P.C. [eds.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Subsea pipeline gets welded branch without halting flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 1994, a 16 in. welded branch was installed without interruption to production onto Wintershall Noordzee BV`s 36-in. gas pipeline from the K13-A platform in the Dutch sector of the North Sea to Den helder, The Netherlands. The procedure is the first successfully to combine hyperbaric welding and subsea hot tapping without interruption to production. Developers of new fields can now consider exporting product without interrupting existing production and through existing infrastructure even if no convenient tie-in locations exist. Unocal evaluated export options and established that the most attractive alternative was to export gas into the Wintershall 36-in. K13-A to Den Helder pipeline. Various options for installing a branch included the following: flooding the pipeline and installing a conventional tee; stopping production and installing a welded branch followed by hot tapping; and continuing production and installing a welded branch followed by hot tapping. The chosen scheme was to retrofit a subsea side-tap assembly. This was achieved by installation of a welded branch followed by hot tapping into the 36-in. pipeline. The paper describes location determination, schedules, onshore preparation, and offshore work.

West, A.; Hutt, G. [Stolt Comex Seaway Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Starsmore, R. [Wintershall Noordzee B.V., Den Helder (Netherlands)

1995-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

135

Diffusion coefficients in trimethyleneoxide containing comb branch polymer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diffusion coefficients in trimethyleneoxide containing comb branch polymer Diffusion coefficients in trimethyleneoxide containing comb branch polymer electrolytes Title Diffusion coefficients in trimethyleneoxide containing comb branch polymer electrolytes Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2004 Authors Liu, Gao, Craig L. Reeder, Xiaoguang Sun, and John B. Kerr Journal Solid State Ionics Volume 175 Pagination 781-783 Keywords comb branch polyethers, conductivity, lithium battery, polymer electrolytes, salt diffusion coefficient, trimethylene oxide Abstract This paper reports on a new comb branch polymer based on trimethylene oxide (TMO) side chains as a polymer electrolyte for potential application in lithium metal rechargeable batteries. The trimethylene oxide (TMO) units are attached to the side chains of a polyepoxide ether to maximize the segmental motion. Lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) salt was used to formulate the polymer electrolyte with the new TMO containing polymers. The new polymer electrolytes show improved salt diffusion coefficients (Ds) and conductivity at ambient and subambient temperature compare to the ethylene oxide (EO) counterpart, whereas performance at high temperature (85 °C) remains the same or is actually worse for salt diffusivity.

136

Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address 591 Ala Moana Blvd. Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96813 Website http://hawaii.gov/health/envir Coordinates 21.300314°, -157.864542° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.300314,"lon":-157.864542,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

137

Memorandum A. J. Rizzo, Chief TO : Operational Safety Branch  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

j Memorandum A. J. Rizzo, Chief TO / : Operational Safety Branch Harold Glauberman, ?a FROM : Operational Safety Branch ' I DATE: September 30, 1966 REMOVAL OF CONTAMINATED EQUlPMEHT AT THE CANEL FACILITY SUBJECT: MI DDLETOWN, CONNECT I CUT' INTRODUCTION The decision to terminate AEC contract activities at the CANEL facility introduced the need to dispose of radioactively contaminated equipment and materials so as to permit release of the facilities. As a result, -' . the Operational Safety Branch, NY, was requested to perform thenecessary Health Physics surveillance and monitoring functions during the-disassembly, removal and packaging of the contaminated equipment. The actual removal and handling of contaminated equipment was performed by the' AEC.contractor,

138

Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Air Branch Clean Air Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch Address P.O. Box 3378 Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96801 Website http://hawaii.gov/health/envir Coordinates 21.31°, -157.86° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.31,"lon":-157.86,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

139

Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch Address P.O. Box 3378 Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96801 Website http://hawaii.gov/health/envir Coordinates 21.31°, -157.86° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.31,"lon":-157.86,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

140

Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Branch Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch Address 919 Ala Moana Blvd Room 308 Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96814 Coordinates 21.294755°, -157.858979° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.294755,"lon":-157.858979,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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141

North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See program website Room A/C: $25, plus $25 for recycling an old, working unit Central A/C: $100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Air Source Heat Pump:$100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Geothermal Heat Pump:$200/ton, plus $25/ton for every 1 EER above minimum

142

Gas compressor with side branch absorber for pulsation control  

SciTech Connect

A method and system for reducing pulsation in lateral piping associated with a gas compressor system. A tunable side branch absorber (TSBA) is installed on the lateral piping. A pulsation sensor is placed in the lateral piping, to measure pulsation within the piping. The sensor output signals are delivered to a controller, which controls actuators that change the acoustic dimensions of the SBA.

Harris, Ralph E. (San Antonio, TX); Scrivner, Christine M. (San Antonio, TX); Broerman, III, Eugene L. (San Antonio, TX)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

143

A new case for the TAGE branch predictor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TAGE predictor is often considered as state-of-the-art in conditional branch predictors proposed by academy. In this paper, we first present directions to reduce the hardware implementation cost of TAGE. Second we show how to further reduce the misprediction ...

Andr Seznec

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars: their influence on binary systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-- the Sun is going out. In a few more months the Earth will be a dark and lifeless ball of ice. Dad says the latter stages of the asymptotic giant branch phase of stellar evolution. Image from http Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.2 Parameterizing the Third Dredge

145

Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars: their influence on binary systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ the Sun is going out. In a few more months the Earth will be a dark and lifeless ball of ice. Dad says the latter stages of the asymptotic giant branch phase of stellar evolution. Image from http Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.2 Parameterizing the Third Dredge

146

Stress Intensification Factors and Flexibility Factors for Unreinforced Branch Connections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides equations, based on analyses and test data, for determining the stress intensification factors and flexibility factors for branch connections. The report contains results of an investigation into the flexibility and stress intensification factors of unreinforced fabricated tees (and other similar configurations). It provides flexibility equations for a more accurate evaluation of these configurations.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

147

Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm Facility Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group/John Deere Capital Developer Wind Capital Group/John Deere Capital Energy Purchaser Associated Electric Cooperative Location Atchison County MO Coordinates 40.423897°, -95.477781° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.423897,"lon":-95.477781,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

148

Electrical Transport Through a Single Nanoscale SemiconductorBranch Point  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Semiconductor tetrapods are three dimensional branched nanostructures, representing a new class of materials for electrical conduction. We employ the single electron transistor approach to investigate how charge carriers migrate through single nanoscale branch points of tetrapods. We find that carriers can delocalize across the branches or localize and hop between arms depending on their coupling strength. In addition, we demonstrate a new single-electron transistor operation scheme enabled by the multiple branched arms of a tetrapod: one arm can be used as a sensitive arm-gate to control the electrical transport through the whole system. Electrical transport through nanocrystals, molecules, nanowires and nanotubes display novel quantum phenomena. These can be studied using the single electron transistor approach to successively change the charge state by one, to reveal charging energies, electronic level spacings, and coupling between electronic, vibrational, and spin degrees of freedom. The advent of colloidal synthesis methods that produce branched nanostructures provides a new class of material which can act as conduits for electrical transport in hybrid organic-inorganic electrical devices such as light emitting diodes and solar cells. Already, the incorporation of branched nanostructures has yielded significant improvements in nanorod/polymer solar cells, where the specific pathways for charge migration can have a significant impact on device performance. Progress in this area requires an understanding of how electrons and holes migrate through individual branch points, for instance do charges delocalize across the branches or do they localize and hop between arms. Here we employ the single electron transistor approach to investigate the simplest three dimensional branched nanostructure, the semiconductor tetrapod, which consists of a pyramidal shaped zinc blende-structured ''core'' with four wurzite-structured arms projecting out at the tetrahedral angle. Monodisperse CdTe tetrapods with arms 8 nm in diameter and 150 nm in length were synthesized as previously reported. The tetrapods dispersed in toluene were deposited onto {approx}10 nm thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} dielectrics with alignment markers and a back gate (see Supporting Information). A tetrapod spontaneously orients with one arm pointing perpendicularly away from the substrate and three arms projecting down towards the surface. Individual 60 nm-thick Pd electrodes were placed by EBL onto each of the three arms downwards so that there are four terminals (three arms and a back gate) as shown schematically in Fig. 1 top inset. Figure 1 bottom inset shows a typical scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of the devices. The center brighter spot is due to the fourth arm pointing up away from the substrate although its controlled breaking is possible. The separation between the metal electrodes and the tetrapod branch point ranges from 30 to 80 nm in our devices. The devices were loaded into a He{sup 4}-flow cryostat for low-temperature ({approx}5K) electrical measurements.

Cui, Yi; Banin, Uri; Bjork, Mikael T.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

149

UBS AG, LONDON BRANCH Order No. EA-263 I. BACKGROUND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On April 11, 2002, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from UBS, AG London Branch (UBS) for authorization to transmit electric energy from the Untied States to Mexico and to Canada. UBS, a Swiss corporation formed in 1998 by the merger of Union Bank of Switzerland and Swiss Bank Corporation, is a power marketer that does not own or control any electric generation or transmission facilities nor does it have any franchised service territory in the United States. The designation "London Branch" indicates the principal booking location of the company's energy trading business; UBS

150

North Branch Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Branch Water & Light Comm North Branch Water & Light Comm Place Minnesota Utility Id 13681 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Large General Service Industrial Residential Residential Residential- Seasonal Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1250/kWh Commercial: $0.1140/kWh Industrial: $0.0750/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

151

Wells Branch, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Branch, Texas: Energy Resources Branch, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.4460353°, -97.6794507° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.4460353,"lon":-97.6794507,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

152

: Hanson Blata, Chief, Radiation Branch Health & Safety Division  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hanson Blata, Chief, Radiation Branch Hanson Blata, Chief, Radiation Branch Health & Safety Division ,DATTE: July 25, 1952 FROM : Eugene Barry, Radiation Brsnchctr@ Health & Safety Division SL-JEm: VISIT TO CANADIAN RADIUM AND UFLANIUM CO, MT. K&O, N. Y. - MAY 28, 1952 SrnOL: HSR:.WB:md On May 28, a visit was made to the Canadian Radium and Uranium Co. of Mt. Kisco, New York, a manufacturer and distributor of radium and polonium products, for the purpose of assisting the New York State Department of Labor in making a contamination S.U"Jey. The following types of samples were taken: 1 l/811 diameter Whatman #&. filter paper smear samples for measuring removable alpha contamination, general air and locsl'air radon samples, air dust samples utilizing the Hudson air sampler with

153

Measurement of the B -> D(*)D(*)K Branching Fractions  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a measurement of the branching fractions of the 22 decay channels of the B{sup 0} and B{sup +} mesons to {bar D}{sup (*)}D{sup (*)}K, where the D{sup (*)} and {bar D}{sup (*)} mesons are fully reconstructed. Summing the 10 neutral modes and the 12 charged modes, the branching fractions are found to be {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {bar D}{sup (*)}D{sup (*)}K) = (3.68 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.24)% and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {bar D}{sup (*)}D{sup (*)}K) = (4.05 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.28)%, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. The results are based on 429 fb{sup -1} of data containing 471 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Sanchez, P.del Amo

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

154

Branching Fraction Measurement of B to omega l nu decays  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of the B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} branching fraction based on a sample of 467 million B{bar B} pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We observe 1041 {+-} 133 signal decays, corresponding to a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.15 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -4}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The dependence of the decay rate on q{sup 2}, the momentum transfer squared to the lepton system, is compared to QCD predictions of the form factors based on a quark model and light-cone sum rules.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

155

Measurement of the B -> Dbar(*)D(*)K branching fractions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the branching fractions of the 22 decay channels of the B0 and B+ mesons to Dbar(*)D(*)K, where the D(*) and Dbar(*) mesons are fully reconstructed. Summing the 10 neutral modes and the 12 charged modes, the branching fractions are found to be B(B0 -> Dbar(*)D(*)K) = (3.68 +- 0.10 +- 0.24)% and B(B+ -> Dbar(*)D(*)K) = (4.05 +- 0.11 +- 0.28)%, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. The results are based on 429 fb^-1 of data containing 471.10^6 BBbar pairs collected at the Y(4S) resonance with the BaBar detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Sanchez, P del Amo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

UBS AG, LONDON BRANCH Order No. EA-261 I. BACKGROUND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On April 11, 2002, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from UBS AG, London Branch (UBS) for authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico. UBS, a Swiss corporation formed in 1998 by the merger of Union Bank of Switzerland and Swiss Bank Corporation, is a power marketer that does not own or control any electric generation or transmission facilities nor does it have any franchised service territory in the United States. The designation "London Branch" indicates the

157

Central Limit Theorem for Branching Random Walks in Random Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider branching random walks in $d$-dimensional integer lattice with time-space i.i.d. offspring distributions. When $d \\ge 3$ and the fluctuation of the environment is well moderated by the random walk, we prove a central limit theorem for the density of the population, together with upper bounds for the density of the most populated site and the replica overlap. We also discuss the phase transition of this model in connection with directed polymers in random environment.

Nobuo Yoshida

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

158

Using the primal-dual interior point algorithm within the branch-price ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 5, 2013 ... Branch-price-and-cut has proven to be a powerful method for solving integer ... For this reason, the branch-and-price method is also known.

159

Parallel Branch-and-Bound for Chemical Engineering Applications: Load Balancing and Scheduling Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Branch-and-prune (BP) and branch-and-bound (BB) techniques are commonly used for intelligent search in finding all solutions, or the optimal solution, within a space of interest. The corresponding binary tree structure provides a natural parallelism ...

Chao-Yang Gau; Mark A. Stadtherr

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Rational growth of branched nanowire heterostructures with synthetically encoded properties and function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Branched nanostructures represent unique, 3D building blocks for the bottom-up paradigm of nanoscale science and technology. Here, we report a rational, multistep approach toward the general synthesis of 3D branched ...

Tian, Bozhi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Numerical simulations of depressurization-induced gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs at the Walker Ridge 312 site, northern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2009, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Gas Hydrates Joint-Industry-Project (JIP) Leg II drilling program confirmed that gas hydrate occurs at high saturations within reservoir-quality sands in the GOM. A comprehensive logging-while-drilling dataset was collected from seven wells at three sites, including two wells at the Walker Ridge 313 site. By constraining the saturations and thicknesses of hydrate-bearing sands using logging-while-drilling data, two-dimensional (2D), cylindrical, r-z and three-dimensional (3D) reservoir models were simulated. The gas hydrate occurrences inferred from seismic analysis are used to delineate the areal extent of the 3D reservoir models. Numerical simulations of gas production from the Walker Ridge reservoirs were conducted using the depressurization method at a constant bottomhole pressure. Results of these simulations indicate that these hydrate deposits are readily produced, owing to high intrinsic reservoir-quality and their proximity to the base of hydrate stability. The elevated in situ reservoir temperatures contribute to high (540 MMscf/day) predicted production rates. The production rates obtained from the 2D and 3D models are in close agreement. To evaluate the effect of spatial dimensions, the 2D reservoir domains were simulated at two outer radii. The results showed increased potential for formation of secondary hydrate and appearance of lag time for production rates as reservoir size increases. Similar phenomena were observed in the 3D reservoir models. The results also suggest that interbedded gas hydrate accumulations might be preferable targets for gas production in comparison with massive deposits. Hydrate in such accumulations can be readily dissociated due to heat supply from surrounding hydrate-free zones. Special cases were considered to evaluate the effect of overburden and underburden permeability on production. The obtained data show that production can be significantly degraded in comparison with a case using impermeable boundaries. The main reason for the reduced productivity is water influx from the surrounding strata; a secondary cause is gas escape into the overburden. The results dictate that in order to reliably estimate production potential, permeability of the surroundings has to be included in a model.

Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Gaddipati, Manohar; Rose, Kelly; Anderson, Brian J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

TO. TO. , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~~~~;.Offi~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~;.Offi~~~~~~~~~~~ ,/-; l UNITED STh , :__ .~. :__ .~. , , TO. TO. , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA Health and Safet Division pa& 1 Ps B.- Klevin :mL -y!yG hMBOL: HSH:PBK hMBOL: HSH:PBK : 1. Purpose of Visit >.. a. To study operations planned by~Bu.reau of Ea: factors for Be, II, thorium, zirconium, etc, i b. ,'To explain to Bureauof Mines' personnel tl in handling any of the aforementioned mate] 2. Scope of Work The Bureau of l&s'mill make a'study of the k several materials specified by-the New York 0p1 1 The study mill include the following tests for .a. Ignition~temperature~of a cloud. b. Determine the amount of inert required to L propagation in any of these materials.

163

Measuring the true managerial efficiency of bank branches in Taiwan: A three-stage DEA analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims to explore the true managerial efficiencies of the branches of a case bank in Taiwan. With 123 branches of the case bank comprising the sample, the study finds that, after the adjustment of environmental factors and statistical noise, ... Keywords: Bank branches, Environmental variables, Malmquist productivity index, Stochastic frontier approach, Three-stage data envelopment analysis, True managerial efficiency

Jonchi Shyu; Terri Chiang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Investigation of Unreinforced Branch Connections on Elbows (PWRMRP-04): PWR Materials Reliability Project (PWRMRP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Branch connections are installed on elbows because of flow considerations. The qualification of these branch connection/elbow configurations is a concern in the design and qualification of certain piping systems. This report presents the results of an investigation of the stress intensification factors, indices, and flexibility factors for branch connections on elbows. The results of new tests are included.

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

111989 111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W Enclosed are the copfes of the final ORNL survey reports on the radiologlcal Surveys conducted on three Teterboro, New Jersey properties; Metpath Incorporated, Allied Aerospace Corporatio; and Sumftomo Machinery Corporation. Copies of these reports have &en sent directly to the owners by our survey contractor Oak Ridge National Laboratory. If you have any questions regardfng these reports. please call me at (301) 353-5439. Sfncerely, Enclosure : < I j i Andrew Wallo III, Designation and Certffication Manager Dfvisfon 01 Facility and Site Oeconanlssionfng Projects

166

FCC LPG olefinicity and branching enhanced by octane catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Refiners are increasingly recognizing the downstream opportunities for fluid catalytic cracking LPG olefins for the production of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE, if the ethanol subsidy is extended to the production of ETBE), and as petrochemical feedstocks. Some of new gasoline FCC octane-enhancing catalysts can support those opportunities because their low non-framework alumina (low NFA) preserve both LPG olefinicity and promote branching of the LPG streams from the FCCU. The combined effect results in more isobutane for alkylate feed, more propylene in the propane/propylene stream, and more isobutene - which makes the addition of an MTBE unit very enticing.

Keyworth, D.A.; Reid, T.A.; Kreider, K.R.; Yatsu, C.A.

1989-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

167

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

SciTech Connect

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

ds_branching_s034dsb-web.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

More More than a dozen papers on the D + s , most of them from the CLEO experiment, have been published since the 2008 Review. We now know enough to attempt an overview of the branching fractions. Figure 1 shows a partial breakdown of the fractions. The rest of this note is about how the figure was constructed. The values shown make heavy use of CLEO measurements of inclusive branching fractions [1] For other data and references cited in the following, see the Listings. Modes with leptons: The bottom (20.0 ± 0.9)% of Fig. 1 shows the fractions for the exclusive modes that include lep- tons. Measured e + ν e fractions have been doubled to get the semileptonic ℓ + ν fractions. The sum of the exclusive e + ν e frac- tions is (6.9 ± 0.4)%, consistent with an inclusive semileptonic e + ν e measurement of (6.5 ± 0.4)%. There seems to be little missing here. Inclusive hadronic KK fractions: The Cabibbo-favored

170

Horizontal Branch evolution, metallicity and sdB stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. Abundance anomalies have been observed in field sdB stars and in nearly all Horizontal Branch (HB) stars of globular clusters with Teff > 11 000K whatever be the cluster metallicity. Aims. The aim is to determine the abundance variations to be expected in sdB stars and in HB stars of metallicities Z \\geq 0.0001 and what observed abundances teach us about hydrodynamical processes competing with atomic diffusion. Methods. Complete stellar evolution models, including the effects of atomic diffusion and radiative acceleration, have been computed from the zero age main-sequence for metallicities of Z0 = 0.0001, 0.001, 0.004 and 0.02. On the HB the masses were selected to cover the Teff interval from 7000 to 37000K. Some 60 evolutionary HB models were calculated. The calculations of surface abundance anomalies during the horizontal branch depend on one parameter, the surface mixed mass. Results. For sdB stars with Teff 11 000K in all observed clusters, independent of metallicity, it was found that most ob...

Michaud, G; Richard, O

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Lubricating bacteria model for branching growth of bacterial colonies, Phys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various bacterial strains (e.g. strains belonging to the genera Bacillus, Paenibacillus, Serratia and Salmonella) exhibit colonial branching patterns during growth on poor semi-solid substrates. These patterns reflect the bacterial cooperative self-organization. Central part of the cooperation is the collective formation of lubricant on top of the agar which enables the bacteria to swim. Hence it provides the colony means to advance towards the food. One method of modeling the colonial development is via coupled reaction-diffusion equations which describe the time evolution of the bacterial density and the concentrations of the relevant chemical fields. This idea has been pursued by a number of groups. Here we present an additional model which specifically includes an evolution equation for the lubricant excreted by the bacteria. We show that when the diffusion of the fluid is governed by nonlinear diffusion coefficient branching patterns evolves. We study the effect of the rates of emission and decomposition of the lubricant fluid on the observed patterns. The results are compared with experimental observations. We also include fields of chemotactic agents and food chemotaxis and conclude that these features are needed in order to explain the observations. 1 I.

Yonathan Kozlovsky; Inon Cohen; Ido Golding; Eshel Ben-jacob

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Mr. Harold Snyder, Chief Discovery and Investigation Branch  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ofll s' Ofll s' :y 1: ,' :*,; / c- tii; 1 ;q' (/. 4 L Department of Energy Washington, D .C. 20545 Mr. Harold Snyder, Chief Discovery and Investigation Branch Hazardous Site Control Division Administration for Solid Waste and Emergency Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 401 M Street Washington, D.C. 20460 Dear Mr. Snyder: The Department of Energy (DOE) radiological survey at the former Horizons, Inc. facility at 2909 East 79th Street in Cleveland, Ohio, performed in 1977, indicated that levels of residual radioactive materials and associated radiation levels were in excess of those used by DOE to determine if a site requires remedial action. The radioactive contamination and elevated radiation levels on the site were found, for the most part, in storage areas, in drains, and under floors. These data did

173

Localization for Branching Random Walks in Random Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider branching random walks in $d$-dimensional integer lattice with time-space i.i.d. offspring distributions. This model is known to exhibit a phase transition: If $d \\ge 3$ and the environment is "not too random", then, the total population grows as fast as its expectation with strictly positive probability. If,on the other hand, $d \\le 2$, or the environment is ``random enough", then the total population grows strictly slower than its expectation almost surely. We show the equivalence between the slow population growth and a natural localization property in terms of "replica overlap". We also prove a certain stronger localization property, whenever the total population grows strictly slower than its expectation almost surely.

Yueyun Hu; Nobuo Yoshida

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

174

Mr. Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Harold Snyder Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch Hazardous Site Control Division Administration for Solid Waste and Emergency Response U. S. Environmental Protection Agency 401 M Street, S. W. Washington, D. C. 70460 Dear Mr. Snyder: The Department of Energy (DDE) has conducted a radiological survey at the Conserv Corporation (The former Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation), Nichols, Florida. This survey indicated that levels of residual radioactive material and associated radiation levels at the sfte are in excess c?f those used by DOE to determine if a site requires remedial actfon. The data did not indicate that, under the current use of the site, there was any hazard to the workers or the general public. However, changes fn site use or modifications to the facility could'possibly result

175

Mr. Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. 20545 . 20545 FEB 2 7 1985 Mr. Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch Hazardous Site Control Division Administration for Solid Waste and Emergency Response U. S. Environmental Protection Agency 401 M Street, S. W. Washington, D. C. 20460 Dear Mr. Snyder: The Department of Olin Corporation, Joliet, Illinois. Energy (DOE) has conducted a radiological survey at the Chemicals Group (The former Blockson Chemical Company), This survey indicated that levels of residual radioactive material and associated radiation levels at the site are in excess of those used by DOE to determine if a site requires remedial action. The data did not indicate that, under the current use of the site, there was any hazard to the workers or the general public. However,

176

IDENTIFYING BLUE HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS USING THE z FILTER  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present a new method for selecting blue horizontal branch (BHB) candidates based on color-color photometry. We make use of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey z band as a surface gravity indicator and show its value for selecting BHB stars from quasars, white dwarfs, and main-sequence A-type stars. Using the g, r, i, and z bands, we demonstrate that extraction accuracies on a par with more traditional u, g, and r photometric selection methods may be achieved. We also show that the completeness necessary to probe major Galactic structure may be maintained. Our new method allows us to efficiently select BHB stars from photometric sky surveys that do not include a u-band filter such as the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System.

Vickers, John J.; Grebel, Eva K.; Huxor, Avon P., E-mail: jvickers@ari.uni-heidelberg.de [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Moenchhofstr. 12-14, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

LP and SDP Branch-and-Cut Algorithms for the Minimum Graph ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more from separating the cycle inequalities of the cut polytope on a slightly .... recent successful study of a combined semidefinite polyhedral branch-and-cut ap -.

178

A Branch-and-Price Algorithm for Multi-Mode Resource Leveling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ability cost, is to be minimized. We present a branch-and-price approach together with a new heuristic to solve the more general turnaround scheduling problem.

179

Using the primal-dual interior point algorithm within the branch-price ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 5, 2012 ... Abstract: Branch-price-and-cut has proven to be a powerful method for solving integer programming problems. It combines decomposition...

180

A branch-and-price algorithm for multi-mode resource leveling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2010 ... We present a branch-and-price approach together with a new heuristic to solve the more general turnaround scheduling problem. Besides...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Optimization Online - A Robust Branch-Cut-and-Price Algorithm for ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 21, 2007 ... A Robust Branch-Cut-and-Price Algorithm for the Heterogeneous Fleet Vehicle Routing Problem. Artur Pessoa (artur ***at*** producao.uff.br)

182

A Branch and Price Approach to the k-Clustering Minimum Biclique ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

work by developing a Branch and Price algorithm that embeds a new metaheuristic based on ... The metaheuristic is also adapted to solve efficiently the pricing.

183

A Robust Branch-Cut-and-Price Algorithm for the Heterogeneous ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

routes that makes the pricing problem solvable in pseudo-polynomial time. ... is shown that these cuts can be incorporated into a Branch-Cut-and-Price (BCP)...

184

Branch-and-Price for Large-Scale Capacitated Hub Location ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a branchandprice algorithm for the Capacitated Hub Location Problem with ... It is shown how to solve the pricing problem for finding new.

185

Optimization Online - A Branch-and-Price Algorithm and New Test ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 30, 2002 ... A Branch-and-Price Algorithm and New Test Problems for Spectrum Auctions. Oktay Gunluk (oktay ***at*** watson.ibm.com) Laci Ladanyi...

186

Stabilized Branch-and-cut-and-price for the Generalized Assignment ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

price for that problem featuring a stabilization mechanism to accelerate ... and- price by Savelsbergh [11] and the branch-and-cut by Farias and Nemhauser. [2].

187

Circadian oscillation of starch branching enzyme gene expression in the sorghum endosperm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B, Aman P, Jansson C. Starch branching enzymes in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and barley (Hordeum vulgare): Comparativethe sbellb genes in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and barley (

Mutisya, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Div ision of T echnology, Industry & Economics Energy Branch Deploying renewable energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Div ision of T echnology, Industry & Economics Energy Branch Deploying renewable energy in developing countries Zitouni Ould-Dada Head of Technology Unit UNEP, 15 rue de Milan 75009 Paris Renewable, Industry & Economics Energy Branch 1. Policy landscape 2. Helping transition to Renewable Energy 3

Canet, Léonie

189

QoS management in trunk-and-branch switched Ethernet networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A likely architecture for the future broadband access network will consist of a trunk-and-branch topology, with very high bandwidth trunks (e.g., 1-10 Gb/s), connected to high-bandwidth drops (or branches) to homes and businesses. A multihop switched ...

K. Rege; S. Dravida; S. Nanda; S. Narayan; J. Strombosky; M. Tandon; D. Gupta

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Branch-and-Price Approach to the Share-of-Choice Product Line Design Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop a branch-and-price algorithm for constructing an optimal product line using partworth estimates from choice-based conjoint analysis. The algorithm determines the specific attribute levels for each multiattribute product in a set of products ... Keywords: branch and price, column generation, combinatorial optimization, conjoint analysis, integer programming, marketing, optimization, product line design, share of choice

Xinfang (Jocelyn) Wang; Jeffrey D. Camm; David J. Curry

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Thrifty BTB: A comprehensive solution for dynamic power reduction in branch target buffers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose Thrifty BTB, a mechanism to reduce the dynamic power dissipated by the BTB. We studied two mechanisms that reduce dynamic power dissipation. The first one is a serial-BTB configuration. The second mechanism is the filter-BTB, a combination ... Keywords: Branch prediction, Branch target buffer, Dynamic power, Microarchitecture

Roger Kahn; Shlomo Weiss

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

November 18, 2004 Mark Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, coal and natural gas provides diversity that spreads risk as compared to placing an undue reliance is primarily attributable to the risk and uncertainty associated with tight supplies of natural gas and dramatic increases in natural gas prices over the last two years. These increases in gas prices

193

October 6, 2006 Mark Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that these activities are being completed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) BPA funded Juvenile Fish Basin fish protection and PNNL's monitoring efforts will help to ensue years of optimal operation thereby protection BPA's investment. PNNL's specialized monitoring activities if eliminated

194

October 18, 2007 Mark Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the bulk of its electricity. Despite the hydro system's benefits however, the Council's study showed the difficulty of maintaining or reducing the CO2 footprint of electric generation in the region. While three is also a flawed when considering the realities of regional requirements and usage. As they become

195

July 13, 2007 Mark Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production assessment and concluded publicly for the first time that natural gas production in the province of each resource, but the dominance of new gas in the regional mix is clear. And it is important to note of key lessons from this. It is important to continue taking a thorough and defensible view

196

New Asymptotic Giant Branch models for a range of metallicities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new grid of stellar model calculations for stars on the Asymptotic Giant Branch between 1.0 and 6.0 M_sun. Our grid consists of 5 chemical mixtures between Z=0.0005 and Z=0.04, with both solar-like and $\\alpha$-element enhanced metal ratios. We treat consistently the carbon-enhancement of the stellar envelopes by using opacity tables with varying C/O-ratio and by employing theoretical mass loss rates for carbon stars. The low temperature opacities have been calculated specifically for this project. For oxygen stars we use an empirical mass loss formalism. The third dredge-up is naturally obtained by including convective overshooting. Our models reach effective temperatures in agreement with earlier synthetic models, which included approximative carbon-enriched molecular opacities and show good agreement with empirically determined carbon-star lifetimes. A fraction of the models could be followed into the post-AGB phase, for which we provide models in a mass range supplementing previous post-AGB c...

Weiss, Achim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Molecular Design of Branched and Binary Molecules at Ordered Interfaces  

SciTech Connect

This study examined five different branched molecular architectures to discern the effect of design on the ability of molecules to form ordered structures at interfaces. Photochromic monodendrons formed kinked packing structures at the air-water interface due to the cross-sectional area mismatch created by varying number of alkyl tails and the hydrophilic polar head group. The lower generations formed orthorhombic unit cell with long range ordering despite the alkyl tails tilted to a large degree. Favorable interactions between liquid crystalline terminal groups and the underlying substrate were observed to compel a flexible carbosilane dendrimer core to form a compressed elliptical conformation which packed stagger within lamellae domains with limited short range ordering. A twelve arm binary star polymer was observed to form two dimensional micelles at the air-water interface attributed to the higher polystyrene block composition. Linear rod-coil molecules formed a multitude of packing structures at the air-water interface due to the varying composition. Tree-like rod-coil molecules demonstrated the ability to form one-dimensional structures at the air-water interface and at the air-solvent interface caused by the preferential ordering of the rigid rod cores. The role of molecular architecture and composition was examined and the influence chemically competing fragments was shown to exert on the packing structure. The amphiphilic balance of the different molecular series exhibited control on the ordering behavior at the air-water interface and within bulk structures. The shell nature and tail type was determined to dictate the preferential ordering structure and molecular reorganization at interfaces with the core nature effect secondary.

Kirsten Larson Genson

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

Research on Automatically Identification of Diagonal Air-flow Branches of Complex Ventilation System of Coal Mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

air-flow branches identification and stability analysis is one of the core contents of stability and reliability theory of mine ventilation system. This current paper takes deeply research on diagonal air-flow branches. Limitations of the path method ... Keywords: diagonal air-flow branch, path collection, path method, node-position method

Feng Cai, Zegong Liu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A Simple Dynamical Model of the Warm-Water Branch of the Middepth Meridional Overturning Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reduced-gravity model is presented of the warm-water branch of the middepth meridional overturning circulation in a rectangular basin with a circumpolar connection. The model describes the balance between production of warm water by Ekman ...

R. M. Samelson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Molecular Plant Pages 110, 2011 RESEARCH ARTICLE Catabolism of Branched Chain Amino Acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

de Biologia Vegetal, Universidade Federal de Vicxosa, 36570­000 Vicxosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil c; tomato. INTRODUCTION Due to their branched carbon skeletons, the amino acids va- line, leucine

Klee, Harry J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Optimization Online - A Branch-and-Cut-and-Price Algorithm for ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 26, 2009 ... A Branch-and-Cut-and-Price Algorithm for Vertex-Biconnectivity Augmentation. Ivana Ljubic(ivana.ljubic ***at*** univie.ac.at). Abstract: In this...

202

Measurement of the [ital D][r arrow][pi][pi] branching fractions  

SciTech Connect

Using data from CLEO II at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring we provide a new measurement of the branching fraction for [ital D][sup 0][r arrow][pi][sup +][pi][sup [minus

Selen, M.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Ball, S.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; O'Neill, J.J.; Severini, H.; Sun, C.R.; Zoeller, M.M.; Crawford, G.; Daubenmeir, C.M.; Fulton, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Skovpen, Y.; Sung, M.; White, C.; Whitmore, J.; Wilson, P.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Lambrecht, M.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Snow, J.; Wang, P.L.; Wood, M.; Bortoletto, D.; Brown, D.N.; Fast, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Schaffner, S.F.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Kroha, H.; Roberts, S.; Sparks, K.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.H.; Dominick, J.; Sanghera, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Artuso, M.; He, D.; Goldberg, M.; Horwitz, N.; Ken; (CLEO Collaboration)

1993-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

203

Emulsion polymerization of ethylene-vinyl acetate-branched vinyl ester using a pressure reactor system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A new pressure reactor system was designed to synthesize a novel branched ester-ethylene-vinyl acetate (BEEVA) emulsion polymer. The reactor system was capable of handling pressure (more)

Tan, Chee Boon.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Controlled synthesis of hyper-branched inorganic nanocrystals with rich three-dimensional structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X. G. et al. Shape control of CdSe nanocrystals. Nature 404,based straight and branched CdSe nanowires. Chemistry ofteardrop-, and tetrapod-shaped CdSe nanocrystals. Journal of

Kanaras, Antonios G.; Sonnichsen, Carsten; Liu, Haitao; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

A branch and bound formulation to an electricity distribution planning problem  

SciTech Connect

The application of a branch-and-bound method to a heuristic circuit-optimisation algorithm for electricity distribution planning is described. The intention is to produce a family of near-optimal designs to a given planning problem. The principal results of this approach are twofold. First, a clearer understanding of the complex network modelling problem is obtained, and secondly the imaginative development of branch-and-bound formulation for optimisation purposes is stimulated.

Boardman, J.T.; Meckiff, C.C.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of atomic collisions based on branching classical trajectories  

SciTech Connect

The branching classical trajectory method for inelastic atomic collision processes is proposed. The approach is based on two features: (i) branching of a classical trajectory in a nonadiabatic region and (ii) the nonadiabatic transition probability formulas particularly adapted for a classical trajectory treatment. In addition to transition probabilities and inelastic cross sections, the proposed approach allows one to calculate incoming and outgoing currents. The method is applied to inelastic Na + H collisions providing the results in reasonable agreement with full quantum calculations.

Belyaev, Andrey K. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Herzen University, St. Petersburg 191186 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, S-75120 Uppsala (Sweden) and LCPQ and LCAR, IRSAMC, Universite Paul Sabatier, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Lebedev, Oleg V. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Herzen University, St. Petersburg 191186 (Russian Federation)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Controlled synthesis of hyper-branched inorganic nanocrystals withrich three-dimensional structures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of crystal growth kinetics are tightly integrated with advances in the creation of new nanoscale inorganic building blocks and their functional assemblies 1-11. Recent examples include the development of semiconductor nanorods which have potential uses in solar cells 12-17, and the discovery of a light driven process to create noble metal particles with sharp corners that can be used in plasmonics 18,19. In the course of studying basic crystal growth kinetics we developed a process for preparing branched semiconductor nanocrystals such as tetrapods and inorganic dendrimers of precisely controlled generation 20,21. Here we report the discovery of a crystal growth kinetics regime in which a new class of hyper-branched nanocrystals are formed. The shapes range from 'thorny balls', to tree-like ramified structures, to delicate 'spider net'-like particles. These intricate shapes depend crucially on a delicate balance of branching and extension. The multitudes of resulting shapes recall the diverse shapes of snowflakes 22.The three dimensional nature of the branch points here, however, lead to even more complex arrangements than the two dimensionally branched structures observed in ice. These hyper-branched particles not only extend the available three-dimensional shapes in nanoparticle synthesis ,but also provide a tool to study growth kinetics by carefully observing and modeling particle morphology.

Kanaras, Antonios G.; Sonnichsen, Carsten; Liu, Haitao; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

208

Langmuir Monolayers of Straight-Chain and Branched Hexadecanol and Eicosanol Mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Langmuir monolayers of straight-chain and branched hexadecanol and eicosanol mixtures were previously studied using surface pressure-area isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy, and interfacial rheology. In this paper, we investigate the structure of these fatty alcohol mixtures using these previous results together with X-ray diffraction and reflectivity measurements, which provide a better understanding of the structure of the monolayer in terms of the phase segregation and location of branched chains. For eicosanol below 25 mN/m, the branched chains are incorporated into the monolayer, yet they are phase-separated from the straight chains. At higher surface pressures, the branched chains are expelled from the monolayer and presumably form micelles or some other aggregate in the subphase. In contrast, the hexadecanol branched chains are not present in the monolayer at any surface pressure. These behaviors are interpreted with the help of the X-ray measurements and density profiles, and are explained in terms of straight-chain flexibility. We will discuss the effect of the monolayer structure on the surface shear viscosity. These studies provide a deeper understanding of the structure and behavior of amphiphilic mixtures, and will ultimately aid in developing models for lipids, micelle formation, and other important biological functions.

Kurtz, R.E.; Toney, M.F.; Pople, J.A.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.; Majewski, J.; Lange, A.; Fuller, G.G. (Stanford); (BASF SE); (SSRL); (CARS); (LANL)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

209

Langmuir Monolayers of Straight-Chain And Branched Hexadecanol And Eicosanol Mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Langmuir monolayers of straight-chain and branched hexadecanol and eicosanol mixtures were previously studied using surface pressure-area isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy, and interfacial rheology. In this paper, we investigate the structure of these fatty alcohol mixtures using these previous results together with X-ray diffraction and reflectivity measurements, which provide a better understanding of the structure of the monolayer in terms of the phase segregation and location of branched chains. For eicosanol below 25 mN/m, the branched chains are incorporated into the monolayer, yet they are phase-separated from the straight chains. At higher surface pressures, the branched chains are expelled from the monolayer and presumably form micelles or some other aggregate in the subphase. In contrast, the hexadecanol branched chains are not present in the monolayer at any surface pressure. These behaviors are interpreted with the help of the X-ray measurements and density profiles, and are explained in terms of straight-chain flexibility. We will discuss the effect of the monolayer structure on the surface shear viscosity. These studies provide a deeper understanding of the structure and behavior of amphiphilic mixtures, and will ultimately aid in developing models for lipids, micelle formation, and other important biological functions.

Kurtz, R.E.; Toney, M.F.; Pople, J.A.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.; Majewski, J.; Lange, A.; Fuller, G.G.

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

210

Experimental studies of adiabatic flow boiling in fractal-like branching microchannels  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results of adiabatic boiling of water flowing through a fractal-like branching microchannel network are presented and compared to numerical model simulations. The goal is to assess the ability of current pressure loss models applied to a bifurcating flow geometry. The fractal-like branching channel network is based on channel length and width ratios between adjacent branching levels of 2{sup -1/2}. There are four branching sections for a total flow length of 18 mm, a channel height of 150 {mu}m and a terminal channel width of 100 {mu}m. The channels were Deep Reactive Ion Etched (DRIE) into a silicon disk. A Pyrex disk was anodically bonded to the silicon to form the channel top to allow visualization of the flow within the channels. The flow rates ranged from 100 to 225 g/min and the inlet subcooling levels varied from 0.5 to 6 C. Pressure drop along the flow network and time averaged void fraction in each branching level were measured for each of the test conditions. The measured pressure drop ranged from 20 to 90 kPa, and the measured void fraction ranged from 0.3 to 0.9. The measured pressure drop results agree well with separated flow model predictions accounting for the varying flow geometry. The measured void fraction results followed the same trends as the model; however, the scatter in the experimental results is rather large. (author)

Daniels, Brian J.; Liburdy, James A.; Pence, Deborah V. [Mechanical Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Branching ratio measurements of the 7.12-MeV state in 16O  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of the gamma-ray branching ratios of the 7.12-MeV state of 16O is important for the extrapolation of the 12C(a,g)16O cross section to astrophysical energies. Ground state transitions provide most of the 12C(a,g)16O total cross section while cascade transitions have contributions of the order of 10-20%. Determining the 7.12-MeV branching ratio will result in a better extrapolation of the cascade and E2 ground state cross section to low energies. We report here on measurements on the branching ratio of the 7.12-MeV level in 16O.

C. Matei; C. R. Brune

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

212

Hawaii Department of Health Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Hazardous Waste Branch and Hazardous Waste Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch Address 919 Ala Moana Boulevard #212 Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96814 Website http://hawaii.gov/health/envir Coordinates 21.294755°, -157.858979° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.294755,"lon":-157.858979,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

213

Effect of magnetic field on quasiparticle branches of intrinsic Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic layer.  

SciTech Connect

The interlayer tunneling spectroscopy has been performed on micron-sized mesa arrays of HgBr{sub 2} intercalated superconducting Bi2212 single crystals. A ferromagnetic multilayer (Au/Co/Au) is deposited on top of the mesas. The spin-polarized current is driven along the c-axis of the mesas through a ferromagnetic Co layer and the hysteretic quasiparticle branches are observed at 4.2 K. Magnetic field evolution of hysteretic quasiparticle branches is obtained to examine the effect of injected spin-polarized current on intrinsic Josephson junction characteristics. It is observed that there is a gradual distribution in quasiparticle branches with the application of magnetic field and increasing field reduces the switching current progressively.

Ozyuzer, L.; Ozdemir, M.; Kurter, C.; Hinks, D. G.; Gray, K. E. (Materials Science Division); (Izmir Inst. of Tech.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

A Measurement of the Semileptonic Branching Fraction of the B_s Meson  

SciTech Connect

We report a measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching fraction of the B{sub s} meson using data collected with the BABAR detector in the center-of-mass energy region above the {gamma}(4S) resonance. We use the inclusive yield of {phi} mesons and the {phi} yield in association with a high-momentum lepton to perform a simultaneous measurement of the semileptonic branching fraction and the production rate of B{sub s} mesons relative to all B mesons as a function of center-of-mass energy. The inclusive semileptonic branching fraction of the B{sub s} meson is determined to be {Beta}(B{sub s} {yields} {ell}{nu}X) = 9.5{sub -2.0}{sup +2.5}(stat){sub -1.9}{sup +1.1}(syst)%, where {ell} indicates the average of e and {mu}.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /Imperial Coll., London /Annecy, LAPP /Barcelona U., ECM /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /Bergen U. /UC, Berkeley /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U.; /more authors..

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

215

Overview of biomass thermochemical conversion activities funded by the biomass energy systems branch of DOE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is actively involved in the development of renewable energy sources through research and development programs sponsored by the Biomass Energy Systems Branch. The overall objective of the thermochemical conversion element of the Biomass Energy Systems Program is to develop competitive processes for the conversion of renewable biomass resources into clean fuels and chemical feedstocks which can supplement fuels from conventional sources. An overview of biomass thermochemical conversion projects sponsored by the Biomass Energy Systems Branch is presented in this paper.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Ergun, S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Stable nitrogen isotope ratios in wet and dry nitrate deposition collected with an artificial tree  

SciTech Connect

Amounts of dry NO{sub 3}-N deposition and N isotope ratios in wet and dry NO{sub 3}-N deposition have been simultaneously determined by examining differences between precipitation collected by open funnels and throughfall collected beneath an artificial Christmas tree. Samples were collected in a forest clearing on Walker Branch Watershed, near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. From mid-summer to early autumn, NO{sub 3}-N fluxes beneath the artificial tree were always greater than those measured in precipitation indicating the tree's effectiveness as a passive collector of dry NO{sub 3}-N deposition. Dry NO{sub 3}-N deposition averaged 60 {+-} 9% of total (wet and dry) deposition. The mean ({+-} SD) calculated {delta}{sup 15}N value for NO{sub 3}-N in dry deposition was + 5.6 {+-} 2.1{per_thousand} (n = 6 sampling periods ranging from 4 to 15 days). On average, this was {approx} 6{per_thousand} heavier than measured {delta}{sup 15}N values for NO{sub 3}-N in precipitation. The calculated {delta}{sup 15}N value for NO{sub 3}-N in dry deposition was consistent with that expected if NO{sub x} precursors to HNO{sub 3} vapor (the major constituent of dry deposition at this site) originated principally from coal combustion.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A Branch-and-Price Method for a Liquefied Natural Gas Inventory Routing Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a maritime inventory routing problem in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) business, called the LNG inventory routing problem (LNG-IRP). Here, an actor is responsible for the routing of the fleet of special purpose ships, and the inventories ... Keywords: branch-and-price, column generation, maritime transportation

Roar Grnhaug; Marielle Christiansen; Guy Desaulniers; Jacques Desrosiers

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A branch-and-cut algorithm for the minimum labeling Hamiltonian cycle problem and two variants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a mathematical model, valid inequalities and polyhedral results for the minimum labeling Hamiltonian cycle problem. This problem is defined on an unweighted graph in which each edge has a label. The aim is to determine a Hamiltonian ... Keywords: Branch-and-cut, Minimum labeling problem, Traveling salesman problem

Nicolas Jozefowiez; Gilbert Laporte; Frdric Semet

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

[2010] Avoiding Side-Channel Attacks in Embedded Systems with Non-deterministic Branches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we suggest handling security in embedded systems by introducing a small architectural change. We propose the use of a non-deterministic branch instruction to generate non-determinism in the execution of encryption algorithms. Non-determinism ... Keywords: embedded system security, side-channel attacks, hiding countermeasure

Pedro Malagon, Juan-Mariano de Goyeneche, Marina Zapater, Jose M. Moya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill By Ed Killer Saturday, June 12 like if touched by an underwater plume of oil. No doubt, much of it would be gone forever. Reed inhabiting the reefs, Reed hoped the oil would not be swept around the tip of Florida and onto the fragile

Belogay, Eugene A.

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221

Branch-and-Cut Algorithms for the Bilinear Matrix Inequality Eigenvalue Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optimization problem with the Bilinear Matrix Inequality (BMI) is one of the problems which have greatly interested researchers of system and control theory in the last few years. This inequality permits to reduce in an elegant way various problems ... Keywords: bilinear matrix inequality, branch-and-cut algorithm, convex relaxation, cut polytope, semidefinite programming

Mituhiro Fukuda; Masakazu Kojima

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

A Case Study: Using Integrated Approach to Design a Net-Zero Bank Branch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a real life project conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and PNC Financial Services Group's design team. This is a demonstration project supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Commercial Partnerships Program, the goal of which is to design and construct a new-zero energy bank branch in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Athalye, Rahul A.; Xie, YuLong; Liu, Bing; Baechler, Michael C.

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

223

Branch-cut singularities in the thermodynamics of Fermi liquid systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Search for non analyticity: If f is smooth and regular in the vicinity of f=0, the standard-analyticities associated with branch-cuts enter via ring diagrams, i.e., ladders which are closed onto themselves p+q p -p, the dominant terms are generated in the thermodynamic potential. In ladders the non- analyticities associated

Fominov, Yakov

224

A Branch-Price-and-Cut Algorithm for Single-Product Maritime Inventory Routing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A branch-price-and-cut algorithm is developed for a complex maritime inventory-routing problem with varying storage capacities and production/consumption rates at facilities. The resulting mixed-integer pricing problem is solved exactly and efficiently ... Keywords: column generation, dynamic programming, integer programming, maritime inventory routing

Faramroze G. Engineer; Kevin C. Furman; George L. Nemhauser; Martin W. P. Savelsbergh; Jin-Hwa Song

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A novel branch and bound algorithm for optimal development of gas fields under uncertainty in reserves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models for planning in the oil and gas exploration and production industry. A major challenge of the available literature that deals with planning of oil and gas field infrastruc- tures uses a deterministicA novel branch and bound algorithm for optimal development of gas fields under uncertainty

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

226

The interplay of matrix metalloproteinases, morphogens and growth factors is necessary for branching of mammary epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect

The mammary gland develops its adult form by a process referred to as branching morphogenesis. Many factors have been reported to affect this process. We have used cultured primary mammary epithelial organoids and mammary epithelial cell lines in three-dimensional collagen gels to elucidate which growth factors, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and mammary morphogens interact in branching morphogenesis. Branching stimulated by stromal fibroblasts, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 7, fibroblast growth factor 2 and hepatocyte growth factor was strongly reduced by inhibitors of MMPs, indicating the requirement of MMPs for three-dimensional growth involved in morphogenesis. Recombinant stromelysin 1/MMP-3 alone was sufficient to drive branching in the absence of growth factors in the organoids. Plasmin also stimulated branching; however, plasmin-dependent branching was abolished by both inhibitors of plasmin and MMPs, suggesting that plasmin activates MMPs. To differentiate between signals for proliferation and morphogenesis, we used a cloned mammary epithelial cell line that lacks epimorphin, an essential mammary morphogen. Both epimorphin and MMPs were required for morphogenesis, but neither was required for epithelial cell proliferation. These results provide direct evidence for a critical role of MMPs in branching in mammary epithelium and suggest that, in addition to epimorphin, MMP activity is a minimum requirement for branching morphogenesis in the mammary gland.

Simian, M.; Harail, Y.; Navre, M.; Werb, Z.; Lochter, A.; Bissell, M.J.

2002-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

227

Orbital Branching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 15, 2006 ... stances beginning with cod are used to compute maximum cardinality binary error correcting codes [8], the instances whose names begin with...

228

Village of the Branch, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Branch, New York: Energy Resources Branch, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.8562092°, -73.1873349° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8562092,"lon":-73.1873349,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

First Measurement of the Branching Fraction of the Decay $\\psi(2S) \\to \\tau\\tau$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The branching fraction of the psi(2S) decay into tau pair has been measured for the first time using the BES detector at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider. The result is $B_{\\tau\\tau}=(2.71\\pm 0.43 \\pm 0.55) \\times 10^{-3}$, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. This value, along with those for the branching fractions into e+e- and mu+mu of this resonance, satisfy well the relation predicted by the sequential lepton hypothesis. Combining all these values with the leptonic width of the resonance the total width of the psi(2S) is determined to be $(252 \\pm 37)$ keV.

Bai, J Z; Bian, J G; Blum, I K; Chen, G P; Chen, H F; Chen, J; Chen Jia Chao; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Chen, Y Q; Cheng Bao Sen; Cui, X Z; Ding, H L; Dong, L Y; Du, Z Z; Dunwoodie, W M; Gao, C S; Gao, M L; Gao, S Q; Gratton, P; Gu, J H; Gu, S D; Gu, W X; Gu, Y F; Guo, Z J; Guo, Y N; Han, S W; Han, Y; Harris, F A; He, J; He, J T; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hitlin, D G; Hu, G Y; Hu, H M; Hu, J L; Hu, Q H; Hu, T; Hu Xiao Qing; Huang, G S; Huang, Y Z; Izen, J M; Jiang, C H; Jin, Y; Jones, B D; Ju, X; Ke, Z J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, B K; Kong, D; Lai, Y F; Lang, P F; Lankford, A J; Li, C G; Li, D; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, P Q; Li, R B; Li, W; Li, W G; Li, X H; Li Xiao Nan; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, R G; Liu, Y; Lou, X C; Lowery, B; Lu, F; Lu, J G; Luo, X L; Ma, E C; Ma, J M; Malchow, R; Mao, H S; Mao, Z P; Meng, X C; Nie, J; Olsen, S L; Oyang, J Y T; Paluselli, D; Pan, L J; Panetta, J; Porter, F; Qi, N D; Qi, X R; Qian, C D; Qiu, J F; Qu, Y H; Que, Y K; Rong, G; Schernau, M; Shao, Y Y; Shen, B W; Shen, D L; Shen, H; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, H Z; Song, X F; Standifird, J; Sun, F; Sun, H S; Sun, Y; Sun, Y Z; Tang, S Q; Toki, W; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, F; Wang, L S; Wang, L Z; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S M; Wang, T J; Wang, Y Y; Weaver, M; Wei, C L; Wu, J M; Wu, N; Wu, Y G; Xi, D M; Xia, X M; Xie, P P; Xie, Y; Xie, Y H; Xu, G F; Xue, S T; Yan, J; Yan, W G; Yang, C M; Yang, C Y; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, W; Yang, X F; Ye, M H; Ye Shu Wei; Ye, Y X; Yu, C S; Yu, C X; Yu, G W; Yu Yu Hei; Yu, Z Q; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zhang Bing Yun; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H L; Zhang, J; Zhang, J W; Zhang, L; Zhang, L S; Zhang, P; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Zhao, D X; Zhao, H W; Zhao Jia Wei; Zhao, M; Zhao Wei Ren; Zhao, Z G; Zheng Jian Ping; Zheng Lin Sheng; Zheng Zhi Peng; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G P; Zhou, H S; Zhou, L; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhuang, B A

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

This form is to be completed by Executive Branch employees who are contacted by  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The information on this form will be available to the public on the Executive Branch agency's recovery website. The information on this form will be available to the public on the Executive Branch agency's recovery website. Written materials prepared by registered lobbyists should be attached to this form for posting on the website. To be completed by the employee contacted. Registered Lobbyist($) Name: Marc Marotta (Not a Federal Lobbyist) William S. Minahan (Not a Federal Lobbyist) David L. Jaeckels (Not a Federal Lobbyist) Steve Kelley (Not a Federal Lobbyist) Bill Broydrick (Registered Federal Lob L Brief description of the contact: (attach separate sheet if necessary) A general discussion on DOE'S efforts to improve building energy efficiency through the Recovery Act and other initiatives Date and time of contact: 1 01 14/09 1 1 :30am Name of the

231

Preparation of a cost data bank for DOE/Biomass Energy Systems Branch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study deals with the preparation of a biomass conversion technology and cost data bank for the Biomass Energy Systems Branch (BES) of DOE/SOLAR. When completed, it may be used with an appropriate methodology to analyze the complex issues of research program planning and analysis. In addition, future market penetration of BES products may be projected, and the options available to the Federal Government to influence the outcome of BES products marketing may also be examined.

Kam, A.Y.; Dickenson, R.L.; Jones, J.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Circadian oscillation of starch branching enzyme gene expression in the sorghum endosperm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expression of the three SBE genes, encoding starch branching enzymes, in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle. Remarkably, the oscillation in SBE expression was maintained in cultured spikes after a 48-h dark treatment, also when fed a continuous solution of sucrose or abscisic acid. Our findings suggest that the rhythmicity in SBE expression in the endosperm is independent of cues from the photosynthetic source and that the oscillator resides within the endosperm itself.

Mutisya, J.; Sun, C.; Jansson, C.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

The effects of thermohaline mixing on low-metallicity asymptotic giant branch stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the effects of thermohaline mixing on the composition of the envelopes of low-metallicity asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We have evolved models of 1, 1.5 and 2 solar masses from the pre-main sequence to the end of the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch with thermohaline mixing applied throughout the simulations. In agreement with other authors, we find that thermohaline mixing substantially reduces the abundance of helium-3 on the upper part of the red giant branch in our lowest mass model. However, the small amount of helium-3 that remains is enough to drive thermohaline mixing on the AGB. We find that thermohaline mixing is most efficient in the early thermal pulses and its efficiency drops from pulse to pulse. Nitrogen is not substantially affected by the process, but we do see substantial changes in carbon-13. The carbon-12 to carbon-13 ratio is substantially lowered during the early thermal pulses but the efficacy of the process is seen to diminish rapidly. As the process stops af...

Stancliffe, Richard J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Teaching medical students dermatology research skills: Six years of experience with the University of Texas Medical Branch dermatology non-degree research honors program, 2001-2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factors at Galveston beaches. Texas Medicine 100(7):62-65,with the University of Texas Medical Branch dermatology non-The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX.

Jr, Richard F Wagner; Lewis, Simon A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Forecasting Techniques Utilized by the Forecast Branch of the National Meteorological Center During a Major Convective Rainfall Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorologists within the Forecast Branch (FB) of the National Meteorological Center (NMC) produce operational quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs). These manual forecasts are prepared utilizing various forecasting techniques, which are ...

Theodore W. Funk

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A branch-point approximant for the equation of state of hard spheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the first seven known virial coefficients and forcing it to possess two branch-point singularities, a new equation of state for the hard-sphere fluid is proposed. This equation of state predicts accurate values of the higher virial coefficients, a radius of convergence smaller than the close-packing value, and it is as accurate as the rescaled virial expansion and better than the Pad\\'e [3/3] equations of state. Consequences regarding the convergence properties of the virial series and the use of similar equations of state for hard-core fluids in $d$ dimensions are also pointed out.

Andrs Santos; Mariano Lpez de Haro

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

237

Review and evaluation of design analysis methods for calculating flexibility of nozzles and branch connections  

SciTech Connect

Modern piping system design generally includes an analytical determination of displacements, rotations, moments, and reaction forces at various postions along the piping system by means of a flexibility analysis. The analytical model is normally based on a strength-of-materials description of the piping system as an interconnected set of straight and curved beams, along with ''flexibility factors'' that are used to compensate for inaccuracies in the model behavior. This report gives an in-depth evaluation of the various analytical descriptions of the flexibility factors associated with piping system branch connection and nozzles. Recommendations are given for developing needed improvements. 59 refs., 29 figs., 26 tabs.

Moore, S.E.; Rodabaugh, E.C.; Mokhtarian, K.; Gwaltney, R.C.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Measurements of the Branching fractions for $B_(s) -> D_(s)???$ and $?_b^0 -> ?_c^+???$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Branching fractions of the decays $H_b\\to H_c\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ relative to $H_b\\to H_c\\pi^-$ are presented, where $H_b$ ($H_c$) represents B^0-bar($D^+$), $B^-$ ($D^0$), B_s^0-bar ($D_s^+$) and $\\Lambda_b^0$ ($\\Lambda_c^+$). The measurements are performed with the LHCb detector using 35${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ of data collected at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV. The ratios of branching fractions are measured to be B(B^0-bar -> D^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)/ B(B^0-bar -> D^+\\pi^-) = 2.38\\pm0.11\\pm0.21 B(B^- -> D^0\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-) / B(B^- -> D^0\\pi^-) = 1.27\\pm0.06\\pm0.11 B(B_s^0-bar -> D_s^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-) / B(B_s^0-bar -> D_s^+\\pi^-) = 2.01\\pm0.37\\pm0.20 B(\\Lambda_b^0->\\Lambda_c^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-) / B(\\Lambda_b^0 -> \\Lambda_c^+\\pi^-) = 1.43\\pm0.16\\pm0.13. We also report measurements of partial decay rates of these decays to excited charm hadrons. These results are of comparable or higher precision than existing measurements.

LHCb Collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Anderson; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; L. Arrabito; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; D. S. Bailey; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; I. Bediaga; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bj rnstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; S. Brisbane; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Bchler-Germann; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; J. M. Caicedo Carvajal; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; N. Chiapolini; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; P. Collins; F. Constantin; G. Conti; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; G. Corti; G. A. Cowan; R. Currie; B. D'Almagne; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; I. De Bonis; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; F. De Lorenzi; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; H. Degaudenzi; M. Deissenroth; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; P. Diniz Batista; S. Donleavy; A. Dosil Surez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; R. Dzhelyadin; C. Eames; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; Ch. Elsasser; D. G. d'Enterria; D. Esperante Pereira; L. Estve; A. Falabella; E. Fanchini; C. Frber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; J. Garofoli; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; V. V. Gligorov; C. Gbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gndara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugs; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; S. Gregson; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; R. Harji; N. Harnew; J. Harrison; P. F. Harrison; J. He; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; E. Hicks; W. Hofmann; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; P. Ilten; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; S. Kandybei; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; S. Koblitz; P. Koppenburg; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; S. Kukulak; R. Kumar; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefvre; A. Leflat; J. Lefranois; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; L. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Lieng; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; N. Lopez-March; J. Luisier; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; S. Malde; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; R. Mrki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; A. Martn Snchez; D. Martinez Santos; A. Massafferri; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; M. Matveev; E. Maurice; B. Maynard; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; R. McNulty; C. Mclean; M. Meissner; M. Merk; J. Merkel; R. Messi; S. Miglioranzi; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Mller; R. Muresan; B. Muryn; M. Musy; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; J. Nardulli; I. Nasteva; M. Nedos; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; C. Nguyen-Mau; M. Nicol; S. Nies; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; A. Oblakowska-Mucha; V. Obraztsov; S. Oggero; S. Ogilvy; O. Okhrimenko; R. Oldeman; M. Orlandea; J. M. Otalora Goicochea; P. Owen; B. Pal; J. Palacios; M. Palutan; J. Panman; A. Papanestis; M. Pappagallo; C. Parkes; C. J. Parkinson; G. Passaleva; G. D. Patel; M. Patel; S. K. Paterson

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

Particle decay branching ratios for states of astrophysical importance in 19Ne  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured proton and alpha-particle branching ratios of excited states in 19Ne formed using the 19F(3He,t) reaction at a beam energy of 25 MeV. These ratios have a large impact on the astrophysical reaction rates of 15O(alpha,gamma), 18F(p,gamma) and 18F(p,alpha), which are of interest in understanding energy generation in x-ray bursts and in interpreting anticipated gamma-ray observations of novae. We detect decay protons and alpha-particles using a silicon detector array in coincidence with tritons measured in the focal plane detector of our Enge split-pole spectrograph. The silicon array consists of five strip detectors of the type used in the Louvain-Edinburgh Detector Array, subtending angles from 130 degrees to 165 degrees with approximately 14% lab efficiency. The correlation angular distributions give additional confidence in some prior spin-parity assignments that were based on gamma branchings. We measure Gamma_p/Gamma=0.387+-0.016 for the 665 keV proton resonance, which agrees well with the direct measurement of Bardayan et al.

D. W. Visser; J. A. Caggiano; R. Lewis; W. B. Handler; A. Parikh; P. D. Parker

2003-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

240

Branching laws for polynomial endomorphisms in CAR algebra for fermions, uniformly hyperfinite algebras and Cuntz algebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previously, we have shown that the CAR algebra for fermions is embedded in the Cuntz algebra ${\\cal O}_{2}$ in such a way that the generators are expressed in terms of polynomials in the canonical generators of the latter, and it coincides with the U(1)-fixed point subalgebra ${\\cal A}\\equiv {\\cal O}_{2}^{U(1)}$ of ${\\cal O}_{2}$ for the canonical gauge action. Based on this embedding formula, some properties of ${\\cal A}$ are studied in detail by restricting those of ${\\cal O}_{2}$. Various endomorphisms of ${\\cal O}_{2}$, which are defined by polynomials in the canonical generators, are explicitly constructed, and transcribed into those of ${\\cal A}$. Especially, we investigate branching laws for a certain family of such endomorphisms with respect to four important representations, i.e., the Fock representation, the infinite wedge representation and their duals. These endomorphisms are completely classified by their branching laws. As an application, we show that the reinterpretation of the Fock vacuum as the Dirac vacuum is described in representation theory through a mixture of fermions.

Mitsuo Abe; Katsunori Kawamura

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Measurement of the B -> D^* l nu Branching Fractions and |Vcb|  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the exclusive semileptonic B meson decays B- -> D*0 l- nu and B0 -> D*+ l- nu using data collected with the CLEO II detector at CESR. We present measurements of the branching fractions B(B0 -> D*+ l-nu) = 0.5/f00* [4.49+/-0.32+/-0.39]% and B(B- -> D*0 l-nu) = 0.5/f+-*[5.13+/-0.54+/-0.64]%, where f00 and f+- are the neutral and charged B meson production fractions at the Upsilon(4s) resonance. Assuming isospion invariance and taking the charged to neutral B meson lifetimes measured at higher energy machines, we determine the ratio f+-/f00=1.04+/-0.14+/-0.13+-/-0.10; further assuming f+- + f00 = 1 we also determine the partial width G(B->D* l nu) = 29.9+/-1.9+/-2.7+/-2.0 ns-1 (independent of f+-/f00). From this partial width we calculate B -> D* l nu branching fractions that do not depend on f+-/f00, nor the individual B lifetimes, but only on the charged to neutral lifetime ratio. The product of the CKM matrix element |Vcb| times the normalization of the decay form factor at the point of zero recoil o...

Barish, B; Chan, S; Cowen, D F; Eigen, G; Miller, J S; O'Grady, C; Urheim, J; Weinstein, A J; Acosta, D; Athanas, M; Masek, G; Paar, H P; Gronberg, J; Kutschke, R; Menary, S; Morrison, R J; Nakanishi, S; Nelson, H N; Nelson, T K; Qiao, C; Richman, J D; Ryd, A; Tajima, H; Sperka, D; Witherell, M S; Procario, M; Balest, R; Cho, K; Daoudi, M; Ford, W T; Johnson, D R; Lingel, K; Lohner, M; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Bebek, C; Berkelman, K; Bloom, K; Browder, T E; Cassel, D G; Cho, H A; Coffman, D M; Crowcroft, D S; Drell, P S; Ehrlich, R; Gaidarev, P; Galik, R S; Garca-Sciveres, M; Geiser, B; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Jones, C D; Jones, S L; Kandaswamy, J; Katayama, N; Kim, P C; Kreinick, D L; Ludwig, G S; Masui, J; Mevissen, J; Mistry, N B; Ng, C R; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Salman, S; Sapper, M; Wrthwein, F; Avery, P; Freyberger, A; Rodrguez, J; Yang, S; Yelton, J; Cinabro, D; Henderson, S; Liu, T; Saulnier, M; Wilson, R; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G; Ong, B; Palmer, M; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Edwards, K W; Ogg, M; Bellerive, A; Britton, D I; Hyatt, E R F; MacFarlane, D B; Patel, P M; Spaan, B; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Ball, S; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Besson, D; Coppage, D; Copty, N; Davis, R; Hancock, N; Kelly, M; Kotov, S; Kravchenko, I; Kwak, N; Lam, H; Kubota, Y; Lattery, M; Momayezi, M; Nelson, J K; Patton, S; Perticone, D; Poling, R; Savinov, V; Schrenk, S; Wang, R; Alam, M S; Kim, I J; Nemati, B; Ling, Z; O'Neill, J J; Severini, H; Sun, C R; Wappler, F; Crawford, G; Daubenmier, C M; Fulton, R; Fujino, D; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Lee, J; Malchow, R; Skovpen, Y; Sung, M; White, C; Zoeller, M M; Butler, F; Fu, X; Kalbfleisch, G; Ross, W R; Skubic, P L; Wood, M; Fast, J; McIlwain, R L; Miao, T; Miller, D H; Modesitt, M; Payne, D; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Wang, P N; Battle, M; Ernst, J; Gibbons, L; Kwon, Y; Roberts, S; Thorndike, E H; Wang, C H; Dominick, J; Lambrecht, M; Sanghera, S; Shelkov, V; Skwarnicki, T; Stroynowski, R; Volobuev, I P; Wei, G; Zadorozhny, P; Artuso, M; Goldberg, M; He, D; Horwitz, N; Kennett, R; Mountain, R; Moneti, G C; Muheim, F; Mukhin, Y; Playfer, S; Rozen, Y; Stone, S; Thulasidas, M; Vasseur, G; Xing, X; Zhu, G; Bartelt, J; Csorna, S E; Egyed, Z; Jain, V; Gibaut, D; Kinoshita, K

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Branching ratio for a light Higgs boson to decay into. mu. /sup +/. mu. /sup -/ pairs  

SciTech Connect

We evaluate the effects of final-state interactions on the decay of a light Higgs boson to two pions. Although the formalism is completely general and can be applied to any strong-interaction decay mode of the Higgs boson, we are particularly interested in the regime where the Higgs-boson mass m/sub h/ satisfies the constraint 2m/sub ..pi../branching ratio to two muons. Since the two-muon mode is the cleanest signature for identifying the Higgs boson, it is important to obtain a good determination of this branching ratio. We find B(h..--> mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/) approx. =0/sup -2/--10/sup -1/.

Raby, S.; West, G.B.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Walker, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan: Energy Resources Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.0014133°, -85.7680915° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0014133,"lon":-85.7680915,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

244

DLMF: ProfilePeter L. Walker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... He was also a contributor to the Wiley Handbook of Applicable Mathematics, published by ... 1.0.6; Release date 2013-05-06 Math-Image version ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

245

Andrew Walker Miller 5021 Garrison St. #205  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Site. A minimal amount of this waste was above the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP of the Site contains areas with elevated concentrations of metals (but below TCLP limits) and potential areas procedure (TCLP) data. If required, the appropriate containers will be obtained from the laboratory

246

Demand forecasting for companies with many branches, low sales numbers per product, and non-recurring orderings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose the new Top-Dog-Index to quantify the historic deviation of the supply data of many small branches for a commodity group from sales data. On the one hand, the common parametric assumptions on the customer demand distribution in the literature could not at all be supported in our real-world data set. On the other hand, a reasonably-looking non-parametric approach to estimate the demand distribution for the different branches directly from the sales distribution could only provide us with statistically weak and unreliable estimates for the future demand. Based on real-world sales data from our industry partner we provide evidence that our Top-Dog-Index is statistically robust. Using the Top-Dog-Index, we propose a heuristics to improve the branch-dependent proportion between supply and demand. Our approach cannot estimate the branch-dependent demand directly. It can, however, classify the branches into a given number of clusters according to an historic oversupply or undersupply. This classification ...

Kurz, Sascha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Mr. Milton Sfegal, Chief Applied Research Branch Division of Che;Rical Development  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Milton Sfegal, Chief Milton Sfegal, Chief Applied Research Branch Division of Che;Rical Development Tennessee Valley Authority NuPcla Shoals, Al&am 35660 . chitlcaea: subject: FiADIOLOGXCAL STATUS OP FORXER ATUHIC lINEG'' COXHXSS132J CO- PACILITXZS ThFs vill confirm discussions arraqfng for Department of Energy representatives to visit those WA facilities at Kusc3.e Shoals vhich vere utilize;! during the 1951-1955 period for vork andar AX contract. A6 a part of a aatiorrA& DO, p site re38sessment program, the.vi.sit uIJ.1 assist us in detemining the adequacy of etiting rariistlon records relative to the deconnFssFonfug +of these facilities at the conclusion of coPtract work. AEC Contract activfriesat Hustle Goals included research and devclop- ment on a process to recover uraaitn during the production of phosphate

248

Absolute Branching Fraction Measurements for D{sup +} and D{sup 0} Inclusive Semileptonic Decays  

SciTech Connect

We present measurements of the inclusive branching fractions for the decays D{sup +}{yields}Xe{sup +}{nu}{sub e} and D{sup 0}{yields}Xe{sup +}{nu}{sub e}, using 281 pb{sup -1} of data collected on the {psi}(3770) resonance with the CLEO-c detector. We find B(D{sup 0}{yields}Xe{sup +}{nu}{sub e})=(6.46{+-}0.17{+-}0.13)% and B(D{sup +}{yields}Xe{sup +}{nu}{sub e})=(16.13{+-}0.20{+-}0.33)%. Using the known D meson lifetimes, we obtain the ratio {gamma}{sub D{sup +}}{sup sl}/{gamma}{sub D{sup 0}}{sup sl}=0.985{+-}0.028{+-}0.015, confirming isospin invariance at the level of 3%. The positron momentum spectra from D{sup +} and D{sup 0} have consistent shapes.

Adam, N. E.; Alexander, J. P.; Berkelman, K.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ecklund, K. M.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C. D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.; Meyer, T. O. [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)] (and others)

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

249

Direct measurement of the {ital D}{sub {ital s}} branching fraction to {phi}{pi}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Beijing Spectrometer (BES) Collaboration has observed exclusive pair production of {ital D}{sub {ital s}} mesons at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPC) at a center-of-mass energy of 4.03 GeV. The {ital D}{sub {ital s}} mesons are detected in the {phi}{pi}{sup +}, {ital {bar K}} {sup *0}{ital K}{sup +}, and {ital {bar K}} {sup 0}{ital K}{sup +} decay modes; two fully reconstructed events yield the value (3.9{sub {minus}1.9{minus}1.1}{sup +5.1+1.8})% for the {ital D}{sub {ital s}} branching fraction to {phi}{pi}. This is the first direct, model-independent measurement of this quantity.

Bai, J.Z.; Bardon, O.; Blum, I.; Breakstone, A.; Burnett, T.; Chen, G.P.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, J.; Chen, S.J.; Chen, S.M.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.B.; Chen, Y.Q.; Cheng, B.S.; Cowan, R.F.; Cui, H.C.; Cui, X.Z.; Ding, H.L.; Du, Z.Z.; Dunwoodie, W.; Fan, X.L.; Fang, J.; Fero, M.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gao, W.X.; Gratton, P.; Gu, J.H.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Gu, Y.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; Harris, F.A.; Hatanaka, M.; He, J.; He, K.R.; He, M.; Hitlin, D.G.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, H.B.; Hu, T.; Hu, X.Q.; Huang, D.Q.; Huang, Y.Z.; Izen, J.M.; Jia, Q.P.; Jiang, C.H.; Jin, Y.; Jones, L.; Kang, S.H.; Kelsey, M.H.; Kim, B.K.; Lai, Y.F.; Lan, H.B.; Lang, P.F.; Lankford, A.; Li, F.; Li, J.; Li, P.Q.; Li, Q.; Li, R.B.; Li, W.; Li, W.D.; Li, W.G.; Li, X.; Li, X.N.; Lin, S.Z.; Liu, H.M.; Liu, J.H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.A.; Lou, X.C.; Lowery, B.; Lu, J.G.; Ma, A.M.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Malchow, R.; Mandelkern, M.; Meng, X.C.; Ni, H.L.; Nie, J.; Olsen, S.L.; Oyang, J.; Paluselli, D.; Pan, L.J.; Panetta, J.; Porter, F.; Prabhakar, E.; Qi, N.D.; Que, Y.K.; Quigley, J.; Rong, G.; Schernau, M.; Schmid, B.; Schultz, J.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, H.; Shen, X.Y.; Sheng, H.Y.; Shi, H.Z.; Shi, X.R.; Smith, A.; Soderstrom, E.; Song, X.F.; Standifird, J.; Stoker, D.; Sun, F.; Sun, H.S.; Sun, S.J.; Synodinos, J.; Tan, Y.P.; Tang, S.Q.; Toki, W.; Tong, G.L.; Torrence, E.; Wang, F.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, W.; Wang, Y.Y.; Whittaker, S.; Wilson, R.; Wisniewski, W.J.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xie, P.P.; Xu, D.Z.; Xu, R.S.; Xu, Z.Q.; Xue, S.T.; Yamamoto, R.; Yan, J.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, W.; Yao, H.B.; Ye, M.H.; Ye, S.Z.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, C.X.; Yu, Z.Q.; Yuan, C.Z.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.Y.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, P.D.; Zhao, W.R.; Zhao, W.X.; Zheng, J.H.; (BES Collabo..

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Measurement of the branching fraction for $D^{+} K^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the CLEO-II detector at CESR we have measured the ratio of branching fractions, {\\cal B}(D^+\\rightarrow K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^+)/{\\cal B}(D^0 \\rightarrow K^-\\pi^+) = 2.35 \\pm 0.16 \\pm 0.16. Our recent measurement of {\\cal B}(D^0 \\rightarrow K^-\\pi^+) then gives {\\cal B}(D^+\\rightarrow K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^+) = (9.3 \\pm 0.6 \\pm 0.8)\\%. hardcopies with figures can be obtained by writing to to: Pam Morehouse preprint secretary Newman Lab Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 or by sending mail to: preprints@lns62.lns.cornell.edu A postscript version is available through World-Wide-Web.

Balest, R; Cho, K; Daoudi, M; Ford, W T; Johnson, D R; Lingel, K; Lohner, M; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Bebek, C; Berkelman, K; Bloom, K; Browder, T E; Cassel, D G; Cho, H A; Coffman, D M; Drell, P S; Ehrlich, R; Gaiderev, P; Garca-Sciveres, M; Geiser, B; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Jones, C D; Jones, S L; Kandaswamy, J; Katayama, N; Kim, P C; Kreinick, D L; Ludwig, G S; Masui, J; Mevissen, J; Mistry, N B; Ng, C R; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Salman, S; Sapper, M; Wrthwein, F; Avery, P; Freyberger, A; Rodrguez, J; Stephens, R; Yang, S; Yelton, J; Cinabro, D; Henderson, S; Liu, T; Saulnier, M; Wilson, R; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G; Ong, B; Palmer, M; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Ball, S; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Besson, D; Coppage, D; Copty, N; Davis, R; Hancock, N; Kelly, M; Kwak, N; Lam, H; Kubota, Y; Lattery, M; Nelson, J K; Patton, S; Perticone, D; Poling, R A; Savinov, V; Schrenk, S; Wang, R; Alam, M S; Kim, I J; Nemati, B; O'Neill, J J; Severini, H; Sun, C R; Zoeller, M M; Crawford, G; Daubenmier, C M; Fulton, R; Fujino, D; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Lee, J; Malchow, R; Skovpen, Y; Sung, M; White, C; Butler, F; Fu, X; Kalbfleisch, G; Ross, W R; Skubic, P L; Snow, J; Wang, P L; Wood, M; Brown, D N; Fast, J; McIlwain, R L; Miao, T; Miller, D H; Modesitt, M; Payne, D; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Wang, P N; Battle, M; Ernst, J; Kwon, Y; Roberts, S; Thorndike, E H; Wang, C H; Dominick, J; Lambrecht, M; Sanghera, S; Shelkov, V; Skwarnicki, T; Stroynowski, R; Volobuev, I P; Wei, G; Zadorozhny, P; Artuso, M; Goldberg, M; He, D; Horwitz, N; Kennett, R; Mountain, R; Moneti, G C; Muheim, F; Mukhin, Y; Playfer, S; Rozen, Y; Stone, S; Thulasidas, M; Vasseur, G; Zhu, G; Bartelt, J; Csorna, S E; Egyed, Z; Jain, V; Kinoshita, K; Edwards, K W; Ogg, M; Britton, D I; Hyatt, E R F; MacFarlane, D B; Patel, P M; Akerib, D S; Barish, B; Chadha, M; Chan, S; Cowen, D F; Eigen, G; Miller, J S; O'Grady, C; Urheim, J; Weinstein, A J; Acosta, D; Athanas, M; Masek, G; Paar, H P; Gronberg, J; Kutschke, R; Menary, S; Morrison, R J; Nakanishi, S; Nelson, H N; Nelson, T K; Qiao, C; Richman, J D; Ryd, A; Tajima, H; Sperka, D; Witherell, M S; Procario, M

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

SERI Materials Branch semiannual report, January 1, 1978--June 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Comprehensive program planning, laboratory development, and cooperative research programs with subcontractors are reported. Initial planning has given direction to the materials research activated by SERI. The program planning activities have been consolidated so that the plans for reflector, absorber, and polymer materials research are complementary to each other and support the Branch effort to assess materials limitations in solar energy conversion systems. New equipment and General Services Administration (GSA) surplus equipment have been obtained or ordered. Laboratories for housing the equipment have been specified, laid out, and are under construction. Cooperative research contracts have been placed with Clarkson College (black chrome degradation) and the Colorado School of Mines (corrosion electrode development, black cobalt preparation and properties, sorption by desiccants). Negotiations are nearly complete for contracts to survey the properties of new thermoelectric materials, to study more corrosion resistant silver alloys for second-surface plastic mirrors, and to study the UV degradation of selected polymers.

Butler, B. L.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Composites of Conjugated Polymers and Dendrimers with Branched Colloidal Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

Charge generation and separation dynamics in donor:acceptor systems based on composites of branched CdSe nanoparticles with a phenyl-cored thiophene-containing dendrimer (4G1-3S), or a low-bandgap conjugated polymer (PCPDTBT) are reported upon exclusive excitation of the donor or the acceptor. Time-resolved microwave conductivity is used to study the dynamics of either transfer of holes from the nanoparticle to dendrimer, or conversely the transfer of electrons from the polymer to the nanoparticle. Higher photoconductance signals and longer decay-times are correlated with device efficiencies, where composites with higher nanoparticle concentration exhibit higher solar photovoltaic power conversion efficiencies and an increase in external quantum efficiencies. This work evaluates the contribution of both components to device performance, but specifically the role of photoexcited nanoparticles.

Dayal, S.; Kopidakis, N.; Rumbles, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Thermochemical conversion of biomass: an overview of R and D activities sponsored by the Biomass Energy Systems Branch of DOE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is actively developing renewable energy sources through research and development programs sponsored by the Biomass Energy Systems Branch. The mission of the thermochemical conversion element of the Biomass Energy Systems Program is to develop competitive processes for the conversion of renewable biomass resources into clean fuels and chemical feedstocks which can supplement those produced from conventional sources. A description of thermochemical conversion program areas and an overview of specific thermochemical conversion projects sponsored by the Biomass Energy Systems Branch are presented in this paper.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Ergun, S.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Theoretical and experimental investigation of an active three-branch Ti:LiNbO/sub 3/ optical waveguide switch  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical and experimental investigation of an active three-branch multimoded Ti:LiNbO/sub 3/ waveguide switch is presented. The theoretical study covers the efficiency of the electrooptic index change in a multimoded waveguide, the mode conversion occurring in a tapered transition and, finally, the power division among the branches of the switch. For the experimental characterization, the optical measurements of a device fabricated in a Z-cut LiNbO/sub 3/ crystal are presented and discussed. Several improvements as well as applications are pointed out.

Belanger, M.; Yip, G.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Teaching medical students dermatology research skills: Six years of experience with the University of Texas Medical Branch dermatology non-degree research honors program, 2001-2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Wagner RF, Ioffe B. Medical student dermatology researchTeaching medical students dermatology research skills: Sixwith the University of Texas Medical Branch dermatology non-

Jr, Richard F Wagner; Lewis, Simon A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Terrestrial laser scanning for measuring the solid wood volume, including branches, of adult standing trees in the forest environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the potential of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to assess the solid wood volume (i.e., stem and branch diameters of more than 7cm) of adult standing trees in the forest environment. The solid wood volume of 42 trees of different ... Keywords: 3D tree modelling, Forestry, LiDAR, Terrestrial laser scanning, Wood volume

Mathieu Dassot; AurLie Colin; Philippe Santenoise; Meriem Fournier; ThiRy Constant

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Criterions with LCR and AFD of Dual-Branch SC Diversity over Specified Wireless Radio Fading Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we proposed the results of average LCR (level crossing rate) and AFD (average fading duration) criterions applied to evaluate the performance of dual-branch SC (selection combining) reception in the specified fading channels characterized ... Keywords: AFD, LCR, Nakagami-m distributed, Rayleigh, Rice, SC reception, Weibull

Joy Iong-Zong Chen; Chin-Chung Yu

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

THE ACS SURVEY OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. IX. HORIZONTAL BRANCH MORPHOLOGY AND THE SECOND PARAMETER PHENOMENON  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The horizontal branch (HB) morphology of globular clusters (GCs) is most strongly influenced by metallicity. The second parameter phenomenon, first described in the 1960s, acknowledges that metallicity alone is not enough to describe the HB morphology of all GCs. In particular, astronomers noticed that the outer Galactic halo contains GCs with redder HBs at a given metallicity than are found inside the solar circle. Thus, at least a second parameter was required to characterize HB morphology. While the term 'second parameter' has since come to be used in a broader context, its identity with respect to the original problem has not been conclusively determined. Here we analyze the median color difference between the HB and the red giant branch, hereafter denoted as DELTA(V - I), measured from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) photometry of 60 GCs within approx20 kpc of the Galactic center. Analysis of this homogeneous data set reveals that, after the influence of metallicity has been removed from the data, the correlation between DELTA(V - I) and age is stronger than that of any other parameter considered. Expanding the sample to include HST ACS and Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 photometry of the six most distant Galactic GCs lends additional support to the correlation between DELTA(V - I) and age. This result is robust with respect to the adopted metallicity scale and the method of age determination, but must bear the caveat that high-quality, detailed abundance information is not available for a significant fraction of the sample. Furthermore, when a subset of GCs with similar metallicities and ages is considered, a correlation between DELTA(V - I) and central luminosity density is exposed. With respect to the existence of GCs with anomalously red HBs at a given metallicity, we conclude that age is the second parameter and central density is most likely the third. Important problems related to HB morphology in GCs, notably multi-modal distributions and faint blue tails, remain to be explained.

Dotter, Aaron [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada); Sarajedini, Ata [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Anderson, Jay; Bedin, Luigi R.; Paust, Nathaniel; Reid, I. Neill [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Aparicio, Antonio; MarIn-Franch, A.; Rosenberg, Alfred [Instituto de AstrofIsica de Canarias, VIa Lactea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna (Spain); Chaboyer, Brian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Majewski, Steven [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Milone, Antonino; Piotto, Giampaolo [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Padova, 35122 Padova (Italy); Siegel, Michael, E-mail: dotter@uvic.c, E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.ed [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, State College, PA 16801 (United States)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Evolution of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars III. Dust production at supersolar metallicities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend the formalism presented in our recent calculations of dust ejecta from the Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch (TP-AGB) phase, to the case of super-solar metallicity stars. The TP-AGB evolutionary models are computed with the COLIBRI code. We adopt our preferred scheme for dust growth. For M-giants, we neglect chemisputtering by H$_2$ molecules and, for C-stars we assume a homogeneous growth scheme which is primarily controlled by the carbon over oxygen excess. At super-solar metallicities, dust forms more efficiently and silicates tend to condense significantly closer to the photosphere (r~1.5 R$_*$) - and thus at higher temperatures and densities - than at solar and sub-solar metallicities (r~2-3 R$_*$). In such conditions, the hypothesis of thermal decoupling between gas and dust becomes questionable, while dust heating due to collisions plays an important role. The heating mechanism delays dust condensation to slightly outer regions in the circumstellar envelope. We find that the same mech...

Nanni, Ambra; Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Lo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Measurement of the branching fraction for $\\tau\\to\\eta K\  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on analyses of tau lepton decays {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, with {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, using 470 fb{sup -1} of data from the BABAR experiment at PEP-II, collected at center-of-mass energies at and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. They measure the branching fraction for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay mode, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.42 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.07(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, and report a 95% confidence level upper limit for the second-class current process {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 9.9 x 10{sup -5}.

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Determination of the 242Pu Branching Ratio via Alpha-Gamma Coincidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When the burn-up is high, the {sup 242}Pu isotopic content becomes more important. The traditional correlation method will fail. The {sup 242}Pu isotopic content in the sample plays an essential role if the neutron coincidence method is used to quantify the total amount of plutonium. In one of the earlier measurements we had a chance to measure an isotopic pure (> 99.95 %) {sup 242}Pu thick sample and realized that the difference in the branching ratio (BR) value among current nuclear data3) for the two important gamma-rays at 103.5-keV and 158.8-keV. In this study, the thick sample was counted on a 15% ORTEC safeguards type HPGe to further improve BR determination of the 159-keV gamma-ray. Furthermore, we have made a thin {sup 242}Pu sample from the thick sample and performed alpha-gamma coincidence measurements. Our preliminary gamma-ray BR results are 4.37(6) E-4, 2.79(8) E-5, and 2.25(8) E-6 for 44.9-keV, 103.5-keV, and 158.9-keV, respectively.

Wang, T F

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

262

DOUBLE HORIZONTAL BRANCHES IN NGC 6440 AND NGC 6569 UNVEILED BY THE VVV SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We report the discovery of a peculiar horizontal branch (HB) in NGC 6440 and NGC 6569, two massive and metal-rich Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) located in the Galactic bulge, within 4 kpc from the Galactic center. In both clusters, two distinct clumps are detected at the level of the cluster HB, separated by only {approx}0.1 mag in the K{sub s} band. They were detected with IR photometric data collected with the 'VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea' Survey, and confirmed in independent IR catalogs available in the literature and Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry. Our analysis demonstrates that these clumps are real cluster features, not a product of field contamination or interstellar reddening. The observed split HBs could be a signature of two stellar sub-populations with different chemical composition and/or age, as recently found in Terzan 5, but it cannot be excluded that they are caused by evolutionary effects, in particular for NGC 6440. This interpretation, however, requires an anomalously high helium content (Y > 0.30). Our discovery suggests that such a peculiar HB morphology could be a common feature of massive, metal-rich bulge GGCs.

Mauro, Francesco; Bidin, Christian Moni; Cohen, Roger; Geisler, Doug; Chene, Andre-Nicolas; Villanova, Sandro [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile); Minniti, Dante; Catelan, Marcio, E-mail: fmauro@astroudec.cl [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago (Chile)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

Operational restoration of the Pen Branch bottomland hardwood and swamp wetlands - the research setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50 percent bald cypress-water tupelo stands, 40 percent mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10 percent shrub, marsh, and open water. Creek corridors were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flooding of the Savannah River and by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp prior to flow into the Savannah River. Upstream dams have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain. Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950's. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. Flow in one of the tributaries, Pen Branch, was typically 0.3 m3 s-1 (10-20) cfs prior to reactor pumping and 11.0 m3 s-1 (400 cfs) during pumping. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 65 degrees C. The nearly continuous flooding of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. In the years since pumping was reduced, early succession has begun in some affected areas. Most of this has been herbs, grasses, and shrubs. Areas that have seedlings are generally willow thickets that support a lower diversity of wildlife. No volunteer seedlings of heavy-seeded hardwoods or cypress have been found in the corridor areas. Research was conducted to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. Three restoration strategies were formulated to deal with the differing conditions of the Upper Corridor, the Lower Corridor, and the Delta regions of the impacted area. Site preparation and planting of each area with mixtures of tree species were carried out to speed the restoration of the ecosystem. Species composition and selection were altered based on the current and expected hydrological regimes that the reforestation areas will be experiencing. Because of the operational design of the restoration project, a research program naturally followed to document the success. Many of those efforts are detailed here.

Nelson, E.A.

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

264

CHEMICAL COMPOSITIONS OF THIN-DISK, HIGH-METALLICITY RED HORIZONTAL-BRANCH FIELD STARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a detailed abundance analysis and atmospheric parameters of 76 stars from a survey to identify field Galactic red horizontal-branch (RHB) stars. High-resolution echelle spectra (R {approx_equal} 60,000, S/N {>=} 100) were obtained with the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. The target stars were selected only by color and parallax information. Overall metallicities and relative abundances of proton-capture elements (C, N, O, Li), {alpha}-elements (Ca and Si), and neutron-capture elements (Eu and La) were determined by either equivalent width or synthetic spectrum analyses. We used CN features at the {lambda}{lambda}7995-8040 region in order to determine the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios of our targets. Investigation of the evolutionary stages, using spectroscopic T{sub eff} and log g values along with derived {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios, revealed the presence of 18 probable RHB stars in our sample. We also derived kinematics of the stars with available distance information. Taking into account both the kinematics and probable evolutionary stages, we conclude that our sample contains 5 thick-disk and 13 thin-disk RHB stars. Up until now, RHB stars have been considered as members of the thick disk, and were expected to have large space velocities and sub-solar metallicities. However, our sample is dominated by low-velocity solar-metallicity RHB stars; their existence cannot be easily explained with standard stellar evolution.

Afsar, M. [Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Sneden, C.; For, B.-Q., E-mail: melike.afsar@ege.edu.tr, E-mail: afsar@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: chris@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: biqing@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: biqing.for@uwa.edu.au [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Measurement of Partial Branching Fractions of Inclusive Charmless B Meson Decays to K , K0, and pi  

SciTech Connect

The authors present measurements of partial branching fractions of B {yields} K{sup +}X, B {yields} K{sup 0} X, and B {yields} {pi}{sup +}X, where X denotes any accessible final state above the endpoint for B decays to charmed mesons, specifically for momenta of the candidate hadron greater than 2.34 (2.36) GeV for kaons (pions) in the B rest frame. These measurements are sensitive to potential new-phisics particles which could enter the b {yields} s(d) loop transitions. The analysis is performed on a data sample consisting of 383 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric energy collider. The results are in agreement with standard model predictions and exclude large enhancements of the inclusive branching fraction due to sources of new physics.

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

266

Evaluation of Medium-Voltage Cable Joints: Single-Phase, Three-Phase, and Branch Transition Joints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates three single-phase transition joints, three three-phase trifurcating transition joints, and one three-phase trifurcating transition branch joint between ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) and paper-insulated lead-covered (PILC) 15-kV cables. Among installation parameters evaluated are time to install, complexity, skill required, ease of assembly, margin for error, and space needed for joint assembly and fabrication.

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

267

Third report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a condition of the modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) on September 11, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream (Mitchell Branch or K-1700 stream). On October 1, 1992, a renewed NPDES permit was issued for the K-25 Site. A biological monitoring plan was submitted for Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, Poplar Creek Embayment of the Clinch River and any unnamed tributaries of these streams. The objectives of BMAP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site protect and maintain the use of Mitchell Branch for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life and (2) document the effects on stream biota resulting from operation of major new pollution abatement facilities, including the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator. The BMAP consists of four tasks: (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring; (3) assessment of fish health; and (4) instream monitoring of biological communities, including benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. This document, the third in a series, reports on the results of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site BMAP; it describes studies that were conducted over various periods of time between June 1990 and December 1993, although monitoring conducted outside this time period is included, as appropriate.

Hinzman, R.L. [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database and the ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters II. Stellar Evolution Tracks, Isochrones, Luminosity Functions, and Synthetic Horizontal-Branch Models  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Web tools are also available at the home page (http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/index.html). These tools allow users to create isochrones and convert them to luminosity functions or create synthetic horizontal branch models.

Dotter, A; Chaboyer, B; Jevremovic, D; Kostov, V; Baron, E; Ferguson, J; Sarajedini, A; Anderson, J

269

Placement of Endovascular Stent across the Branching Arteries: Long-term Serial Evaluation of Stent-tissue Responses Overlying the Arterial Orifices in an Experimental Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PurposeThis study was designed to investigate the effects of stenting across the branching arteries on the patency and stent-tissue responses over the branching arterial orifices. Methods: Thirteen dogs were observed after placing aortic stents across the celiac arteries (CA), superior mesenteric arteries (SMA), and renal arteries (RA). The animals were grouped according to stent types: large-cell group (n = 6) and small-cell group (n = 7). Angiography was performed to evaluate the branching artery patency at 2, 6, and 12 months after stent insertion, and the stent-tissue responses covering the orifices were evaluated on histopathologic examination. Results: All branching arteries were patent on follow-up angiography; however, three patterns of stent-tissue responses over the orifices were observed: neointimal layering, bridging septa, and papillary hyperplasia. Although neointimal layering and bridging septa were evenly observed, severe papillary hyperplasia was more frequent at SMA and CA than RA. Four RA showed less than 50% ostial patency, and localized infarct was observed in six kidneys (24%). The ostial patency tended to decrease with small-cell stent during the follow-up period. Conclusions: Various stent-tissue responses over the branching artery orifices are induced by the aortic stent covering the branching arteries and may not be easily detected by conventional angiography. Subclinical renal infarct also may occur despite patent renal angiography.

Kim, Young Il; Chung, Jin Wook, E-mail: chungjw@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Beom [National Cancer Center of Korea, Department of Radiology and Center for Liver Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jeong Wook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Jae, Hwan Jun; Lee, Whal [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

THE DUST BUDGET OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD: ARE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS THE PRIMARY DUST SOURCE AT LOW METALLICITY?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We estimate the total dust input from the cool evolved stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using the 8 {mu}m excess emission as a proxy for the dust-production rate (DPR). We find that asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars produce (8.6-9.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} of dust, depending on the fraction of far-infrared sources that belong to the evolved star population (with 10%-50% uncertainty in individual DPRs). RSGs contribute the least (budget, this suggests that dust must grow in the ISM or be formed by another unknown mechanism.

Boyer, M. L.; Gordon, K. D.; Meixner, M.; Sargent, B. A. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Srinivasan, S. [UPMC-CNRS UMR7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France); Riebel, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); McDonald, I. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Van Loon, J. Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Clayton, G. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 233-A Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Sloan, G. C., E-mail: mboyer@stsci.edu [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

A Measurement of the B ---> Eta/C K Branching Fraction Using the BaBar Detector  

SciTech Connect

The branching fraction is measured for the decay channels B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sub S}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sup +} where {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}, using the BABAR detector. The {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay channels are used, including non-resonant decays and possibly those through intermediate resonances.

Jackson, Frank; /Manchester U.

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

272

Activity Dependent Branching Ratios in Stocks, Solar X-ray Flux, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld Sandpile Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define an activity dependent branching ratio that allows comparison of different time series $X_{t}$. The branching ratio $b_x$ is defined as $b_x= E[\\xi_x/x]$. The random variable $\\xi_x$ is the value of the next signal given that the previous one is equal to $x$, so $\\xi_x=\\{X_{t+1}|X_t=x\\}$. If $b_x>1$, the process is on average supercritical when the signal is equal to $x$, while if $b_xprices we find $b_x=1$ within statistical uncertainty, for all $x$, consistent with an ``efficient market hypothesis''. For stock volumes, solar X-ray flux intensities, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld (BTW) sandpile model, $b_x$ is supercritical for small values of activity and subcritical for the largest ones, indicating a tendency to return to a typical value. For stock volumes this tendency has an approximate power law behavior. For solar X-ray flux and the BTW model, there is a broad regime of activity where $b_x \\simeq 1$, which we interpret as an indicator of critical behavior. Thi...

Martin, Elliot; Paczuski, Maya

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The Interplay between Branching and Pruning on Neuronal Target Search during Developmental Growth: Functional Role and Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regenerative strategies that facilitate the regrowth and reconnection of neurons are some of the most promising methods in spinal cord injury research. An essential part of these strategies is an increased understanding of the mechanisms by which growing neurites seek out and synapse with viable targets. In this paper, we use computational and theoretical tools to examine the targeting efficiency of growing neurites subject to limited resources, such as maximum total neural tree length. We find that in order to efficiently reach a particular target, growing neurites must achieve balance between pruning and branching: rapidly growing neurites that do not prune will exhaust their resources, and frequently pruning neurites will fail to explore space effectively. We also find that the optimal branching/pruning balance must shift as the target distance changes: different strategies are called for to reach nearby vs. distant targets. This suggests the existence of a currently unidentified higher-level regulatory factor to control arborization dynamics. We propose that these findings may be useful in future therapies seeking to improve targeting rates through manipulation of arborization behaviors.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Second report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch  

SciTech Connect

On September 11, 1986, a modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site), a former uranium-enrichment production facility. As required in Part III of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the biological monitoring of Mitchell Branch (K-1700 stream) and submitted for approval to the US EPA and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The plan described biomonitoring activities that would be conducted over the duration of the permit. The objectives of the BMAP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site protect and maintain the use of Mitchell Branch for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, and to document the effects on stream biota resulting from operation of major new pollution abatement facilities. The BMAP consists of four tasks: ambient toxicity testing; bioaccumulation studies; biological indicator studies; and ecological surveys of stream communities, including benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. This document is the second in a series of reports presenting the results of the studies that were conducted over various periods of time between August 1987 and June 1990.

Smith, J.G. [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Hinzman, R.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Loar, J.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Southworth, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Crumby, W.D. [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

First report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch  

SciTech Connect

A modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued to the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) on September 11, 1986. The Oak Ridge K-25 Site is a former uranium-enrichment production facility, which is currently managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. for the US Department of Energy. As required in Part III (L) of that permit, a plan for the biological monitoring of Mitchell Branch (K-1700 stream) was prepared and submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation [formerly the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (Loar et al. 1992b)]. The K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) described biomonitoring activities that would be conducted over the duration of the permit. Because it was anticipated that the composition of existing effluent streams entering Mitchell Branch would be altered shortly after the modified permit was issued, sampling of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities (Task 4 of BMAP) was initiated in August and September 1986 respectively.

Smith, J.G. [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Kszos, L.A.; Ryon, M.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Loar, J.M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Measurements of Branching Fractions and CP Asymmetries and Studies of Angular Distributions for B to phi phi K Decays  

SciTech Connect

We present branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements as well as angular studies of B {yields} {phi}{phi}K decays using 464 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR experiment. The branching fractions are measured in the {phi}{phi} invariant mass range below the {eta}{sub c} resonance (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV). We find {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup +}) = (5.6 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup 0}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertaintiy is statistical and the second systematic. The measured direct CP asymmetries for the B{sup {+-}} decays are A{sub CP} = -0.10 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02 below the {eta}{sub c} threshold (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV) and A{sub CP} = 0.09 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.02 in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region (m{sub {phi}{phi}} in [2.94,3.02] GeV). Angular distributions are consistent with J{sub P} = 0{sup -} in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region and favor J{sup P} = 0{sup +} below the {eta}{sub c} resonance.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

branche erneuerbare energien branche nergies renouvelables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zukunftskonzepte (Züssow), erneuerbare Energie (Zinzow), Erreichbarkeit von Gesundheitsleistungen (Anklam). Mit

Thévenaz, Jacques

278

Office of Legal Counsel U.S. Department of Justice *1 EFFECT OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR OTHER AGENCIES AND BRANCHES ON THE AUTHORITY TO  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

337, 1995 WL 917146 (O.L.C.) 337, 1995 WL 917146 (O.L.C.) Office of Legal Counsel U.S. Department of Justice *1 EFFECT OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR OTHER AGENCIES AND BRANCHES ON THE AUTHORITY TO CONTINUE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FUNCTIONS DURING THE LAPSE IN THE DEPARTMENT'S APPROPRIATIONS December 13, 1995 Where Congress has provided appropriations for the legislative branch, the Department of Justice may continue to provide testimony at hearings and perform other services related to funded functions of the legislative branch during a lapse in funding for the Department, if the participation of the Department is necessary for the hearing or other funded function to be effective. Similarly, those functions of the Department of Justice that are necessary to the effective execution of functions by an

279

Review of ASME code criteria for control of primary loads on nuclear piping system branch connections and recommendations for additional development work  

SciTech Connect

This report collects and uses available data to reexamine the criteria for controlling primary loads in nuclear piping branch connections as expressed in Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. In particular, the primary load stress indices given in NB-3650 and NB-3683 are reexamined. The report concludes that the present usage of the stress indices in the criteria equations should be continued. However, the complex treatment of combined branch and run moments is not supported by available information. Therefore, it is recommended that this combined loading evaluation procedure be replaced for primary loads by the separate leg evaluation procedure specified in NC/ND-3653.3(c) and NC/ND-3653.3(d). No recommendation is made for fatigue or secondary load evaluations for Class 1 piping. Further work should be done on the development of better criteria for treatment of combined branch and run moment effects.

Rodabaugh, E.C.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Moore, S.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

..&rrbt, Chief, Industrial Hy&na Branch, HerlthbrSas8byLaboratoly  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

tf..@ tf..@ ..&rrbt, Chief, Industrial Hy&na Branch, HerlthbrSas8byLaboratoly ;,.; , ' 1 ' @@w-w 3, 1954 P. B. Klevin, Indurtrial Hygiexn J5rantah, Barrlei &'afelky Lab0raM~ : . .A , 3 t :;p,: . NATIONAL LEiD OF OHIO ROLLINO OFERATIONS AT SIHONr>s SAW 6 STEEL- Amm', +I& y9, <: '.. SmBoLt HSHtPBK ' -: - St. Louis Area Office at the Simnds Saw and Steel Co., k&port, NJ., on tha &boVe clrtm, I oblruloed tb Mat;Lonal Uad umu&m and thorium roll- ing operations which were In pogress at the 16" and 10" mills respectively. Althm& hhls+urV8y w&d: ma& wltbout Qte dlx' aet request of the National Lead Co., I am reporting the results for your information. At the W aill whem 38 fh&m ingots were r&lad into lmgthaned rods,

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281

Measurement of the branching ratio for the decay K sub L sup 0 r arrow. mu. mu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concurrent with our search for the decays {ital K}{sub {ital L}}{sup 0}{r arrow}{mu}e and {ital K}{sub {ital L}}{sup 0}{r arrow}ee, we have observed 87 {ital K}{sub {ital L}}{sup 0}{r arrow}{mu}{mu} events. Normalizing this sample to the simultaneous observation of the decay {ital K}{sub {ital L}}{sup 0}{r arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}, we obtain the branching ratio {ital B}({ital K}{sub {ital L}}{sup 0}{r arrow}{mu}{mu}) =(5.8{plus minus}0.6(stat){plus minus}0.4 (syst)) {times}10{sup {minus}9}.

Mathiazhagan, C.; Molzon, W.R. (University of California, Irvine, California 92717 (US)); Cousins, R.D.; Konigsberg, J.; Kubic, J.; Melese, P.; Rubin, P.; Slater, W.E.; Wagner, D. (University of California, Los Angeles, California 90024); Hart, G.W.; Kinnison, W.W.; Lee, D.M.; McKee, R.J.; Milner, E.C.; Sanders, G.H.; Ziock, H.J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545); Arisaka, K.; Knibbe, P.; Urheim, J. (University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104); Axelrod, S.

1989-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

282

Branching fractions for {psi}(2S){r_arrow}{gamma}{eta}{sup {prime}} and {gamma}{eta}  

SciTech Connect

We report first measurements of the branching fractions B({psi}{sub 2S}{r_arrow}{gamma}{eta}{sup {prime}})=(1.54{plus_minus}0.31{plus_minus}0.20){times}10{sup {minus}4} and B({psi}{sub 2S}{r_arrow}{gamma}{eta})=(0.53{plus_minus}0.31{plus_minus}0.08){times}10{sup {minus}4}. The {psi}(2S){r_arrow}{gamma}{eta}{sup {prime}} result is consistent with expectations of a model that considers the possibility of {eta}{sup {prime}}-{eta}{sub c}(2S) mixing. The ratio of the {psi}(2S){r_arrow}{gamma}{eta}{sup {prime}} and {psi}(2S){r_arrow}{gamma}{eta} rates is used to determine the pseudoscalar octet-singlet mixing angle. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

Bai, J.Z.; Bian, J.G.; Chai, Z.W.; Chen, G.P.; Chen, J.C.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.B.; Chen, Y.Q.; Cheng, B.S.; Cui, X.Z.; Ding, H.L.; Ding, L.Y.; Dong, L.Y.; Du, Z.Z.; Feng, S.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gu, J.H.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Gu, Y.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; He, J.; He, J.T.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, H.M.; Hu, J.L.; Hu, Q.H.; Hu, T.; Hu, X.Q.; Huang, J.D.; Huang, Y.Z.; Jiang, C.H.; Jin, Y.; Ke, Z.J.; Lai, Y.F.; Lang, P.F.; Li, C.G.; Li, D.; Li, H.B.; Li, J.; Li, P.Q.; Li, R.B.; Li, W.; Li, W.D.; Li, W.G.; Li, X.H.; Li, X.N.; Liu, H.M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.H.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, Y.; Lu, F.; Lu, J.G.; Lu, J.Y.; Lu, L.C.; Luo, C.H.; Ma, A.M.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Meng, X.C.; Nie, J.; Qi, N.D.; Qi, X.R.; Qiu, J.F.; Qu, Y.H.; Que, Y.K.; Rong, G.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, H.; Shen, X.Y.; Sheng, H.Y.; Shi, H.Z.; Song, X.F.; Sun, F.; Sun, H.S.; Tang, S.Q.; Tong, G.L.; Wang, F.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wei, C.L.; Wu, Y.G.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xie, P.P.; Xie, Y.; Xie, Y.H.; Xiong, W.J.; Xu, C.C.; Xu, G.F.; Xue, S.T.; Yan, J.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, J.; Yang, X.F.; Ye, M.H.; Yi, K.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, C.X.; Yu, Z.Q.; Yu, Z.T.; Yuan, C.Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.L.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, Q.J.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.Y.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, H.W.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, W.R.; Zhao, Z.G.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, L.S.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhou, G.P.; Zhou, H.S.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhuang, B.A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039, Peoples Republic of (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039, Peoples Republic of (China); Hitlin, D.G.; Kelsey, M.H.; Oyang, J.; Panetta, J.; Porter, F.; Weaver, M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Chen, J.; Malchow, R.; Toki, W.; Yang, W. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Measurement of the B -> Omega l Nu and B -> Eta l Nu Branching Fractions Using Neutrino Reconstruction  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a study of the charmless semileptonic B-meson decays B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}. The analysis is based on 383 million B{bar B} pairs recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The {omega} mesons are reconstructed in the channel {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and the {eta} mesons in the channels {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. They measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.14 {+-} 0.16{sub stat} {+-} 0.08{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (0.31 {+-} 0.06{sub stat} {+-} 0.08{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4}.

Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, Vincent; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

284

A Measurement of the holographic minimum observable beam branching ratio in the Fermilab 15-foot bubble chamber  

SciTech Connect

Holography has been used successfully in combination with conventional optics for the first time in a large cryogenic bubble chamber, the 15-Foot Bubble Chamber at Fermilab, during a physics run. The innovative system combined the reference beam with the object beam, illuminating a conical volume of {approx} 1.4 m{sup 3}. Bubble tracks from neutrino interactions with a width of {approx} 120 {micro}m have been recorded with good contrast. The ratio of intensities of the object light to the reference light striking the film is called the Beam Branching Ratio. We obtained in our experiment an exceedingly small minimum-observable ratio of (0.54 {+-} 0.21) x 10{sup -7}. The technology has the potential for a wide range of applications.

Aderholz, M.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Akbari, H.; Allport, P.P.; Badyal, S.K.; Ballagh, H.C.; Barth, M.; Baton, J.P.; Bingham, H.H.; Bjelkhagen, H.; Brucker, E.B.; Burnstein, R.A.; Campbell, J.R.; Cence, R.J.; Chatterjee, T.K.; Clayton, E.F.; Corrigan, G.; Coutures, C.; DeProspo, D.; Devanand,; De Wolf, E.A.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Brussels U., IIHE /CERN /Punjab U. /Fermilab /Hawaii U. /Imperial Coll., London /IIT, Chicago /Jammu U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Oxford U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /Stevens Tech. /Tufts U.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Branching ratio and CP Asymmetry of B{yields}{rho}{eta}{sup (')} decays in the perturbative QCD approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we calculate the branching ratios and CP-violating asymmetries for B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{eta}{sup (')} and B{sup +}{yields}{rho}{sup +}{eta}{sup (')} decays in the perturbative QCD factorization approach. In this approach, we not only calculate the usual factorizable contributions, but also evaluate the nonfactorizable and annihilation type contributions. Besides the current-current operators, the contributions from the QCD and electroweak penguin operators are also taken into account. The theoretical predictions for the branching ratios are Br(B{sup +}{yields}{rho}{sup +}{eta}{sup (')}){approx_equal}9x10{sup -6} and Br(B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{eta}{sup (')}){approx_equal}5x10{sup -8}, which agree well with the measured values and currently available experimental upper limits. We also predict large CP-violating asymmetries in these decays: A{sub CP}{sup dir}({rho}{sup {+-}}{eta}){approx_equal}-13%, A{sub CP}{sup dir}({rho}{sup {+-}}{eta}{sup '}){approx_equal}-18%, A{sub CP}{sup dir}({rho}{sup 0}{eta}){approx_equal}-41%, A{sub CP}{sup dir}({rho}{sup 0}{eta}{sup '}){approx_equal}-27%, A{sub CP}{sup mix}({rho}{sup 0}{eta}){approx_equal}+25%, and A{sub CP}{sup mix}({rho}{sup 0}{eta}{sup '}){approx_equal}+11%, which can be tested by the current or future B factory experiments.

Liu Xin; Wang Huisheng; Xiao Zhenjun; Guo Libo; Lue Caidian [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210097 (China); CCAST (World Laboratory), P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China) and Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, P.O. Box 918(4) Beijing 100049 (China)

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A Two-Box Model of a Zonal Atmospheric Circulation in the Tropics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple fixed-SST model of a zonal circulation in the tropical atmosphere has been developed that has separate boxes for the ascending and descending branches of the atmospheric circulation. This circulation resembles the Walker circulation. ...

Michael A. Kelly; David A. Randall

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A mixed-integer linear optimization model for local energy system planning based on simplex and branch-and-bound algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Mixed-integer linear optimization model is developed to support the decision making for the sustainable use of energy in the local area. It details exploitation of primary energy sources, electrical and thermal generation, enduse sectors and emissions. ... Keywords: branch-and-bound algorithm, local energy system, low-carbon society, mixed-integer linear optimization, simplex algorithm

Hongbo Ren; Weisheng Zhou; Weijun Gao; Qiong Wu

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Search for the decay D[superscript 0]??? and measurement of the branching fraction for D[superscript 0]??[superscript 0]?[superscript 0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search for the rare decay of the D[superscript 0] meson to two photons, D[superscript 0]???, and present a measurement of the branching fraction for a D[superscript 0] meson decaying to two neutral pions, B(D[superscript ...

Cowan, Ray Franklin

289

Measurement of CP Asymmetries and Branching Fractions in Charmless Two-Body B-Meson Decays to Pions and Kaons  

SciTech Connect

We present improved measurements of CP-violation parameters in the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and of the branching fractions for B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} and B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. The results are obtained with the full data set collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, corresponding to 467 {+-} 5 million B{bar B} pairs. We find the CP-violation parameter values and branching fractions S{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}} = -0.68 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.03, C{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}} = -0.25 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, {Alpha}{sub K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}} = -0.107 {+-} 0.016{sub -0.004}{sup +0.006}, C{sub {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}} = -0.43 {+-} 0.26 {+-} 0.05, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.83 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K0{pi}{sup 0}) = (10.1 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, where in each case, the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic. We observe CP violation with a significance of 6.7 standard deviations for B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and 6.1 standard deviations for B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, including systematic uncertainties. Constraints on the Unitarity Triangle angle {alpha} are determined from the isospin relations among the B {yields} {pi}{pi} rates and asymmetries. Considering only the solution preferred by the Standard Model, we find {alpha} to be in the range [71{sup o}, 109{sup o}] at the 68% confidence level.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

290

Interference by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin with cultured mouse submandibular gland branching morphogenesis involves reduced epidermal growth factor receptor signaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to mouse embryonic teeth, sharing features of early development with salivary glands in common, involves enhanced apoptosis and depends on the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. EGF receptor signaling, on the other hand, is essential for salivary gland branching morphogenesis. To see if TCDD impairs salivary gland morphogenesis and if the impairment is associated with EGF receptor signaling, we cultured mouse (NMRI) E13 submandibular glands with TCDD or TCDD in combination with EGF or fibronectin (FN), both previously found to enhance branching morphogenesis. Explants were examined stereomicroscopically and processed to paraffin sections. TCDD exposure impaired epithelial branching and cleft formation, resulting in enlarged buds. The glands were smaller than normal. EGF and FN alone concentration-dependently stimulated or inhibited branching morphogenesis but when co-administered with TCDD, failed to compensate for its effect. TCDD induced cytochrome P4501A1 expression in the glandular epithelium, indicating activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. TCDD somewhat increased epithelial apoptosis as observed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated nick end-labeling method but the increase could not be correlated with morphological changes. The frequency of proliferating cells was not altered. Corresponding to the reduced cleft sites in TCDD-exposed explants, FN immunoreactivity in the epithelium was reduced. The results show that TCDD, comparably with EGF and FN at morphogenesis-inhibiting concentrations, impaired salivary gland branching morphogenesis in vitro. Together with the failure of EGF and FN at morphogenesis-stimulating concentrations to compensate for the effect of TCDD this implies that TCDD toxicity to developing salivary gland involves reduced EGF receptor signaling.

Kiukkonen, Anu [Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland) and Department of Oral Pathology, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)]. E-mail: anummela@mappi.helsinki.fi; Sahlberg, Carin [Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Partanen, Anna-Maija [Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Alaluusua, Satu [Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Pohjanvirta, Raimo [Academy of Finland, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Food and Environmental Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Tuomisto, Jouko [Department of Environmental Health, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio (Finland); Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa [Department of Oral Pathology, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Pathology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Branch-shaped NaGdF{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nanocrystals: Selective synthesis, and photoluminescence properties  

SciTech Connect

The branch-shaped NaGdF{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nanocrystals (NCs) were synthesized by using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping agent in ethylene glycol (EG) solution. The NCs were readily dispersed into water or ethanol to form a relatively stable suspension, which may facilitate their applications in biological fields. Meanwhile, the crystal structures of the NCs were tunable from the mixture of the {alpha}-(cubic) and {beta}-(hexagonal) phases to the pure {beta}-phase by varying the F{sup -}/Ln{sup 3+} molar ratio or the reaction temperature. The pure {beta}-phase NCs were obtained at relatively high F{sup -}/Ln{sup 3+} molar ratio and reaction temperature. In addition, the Eu{sup 3+}-doping concentration-dependent optical properties of the NaGdF{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} NCs were investigated in detail. The result shows that the emissions from high energy level transitions (e.g., {sup 5}D{sub 1}, {sup 5}D{sub 2}, and {sup 5}D{sub 3}) are significantly impaired with increasing the Eu{sup 3+}-doping concentration due to the cross-relaxation process, and the emission at 612 nm is predominant since the doped Eu{sup 3+} ions locate in the crystal fields without inversion center.

Wang Shangbing, E-mail: wsb1978@mail.ustc.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy and Resources, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Anhui University of Technology, Ma'anshan, Anhui, 243002 (China); Li Qing; Pei Lizhai [School of Metallurgy and Resources, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Anhui University of Technology, Ma'anshan, Anhui, 243002 (China); Zhang Qianfeng, E-mail: zhangqf@ahut.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy and Resources, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Anhui University of Technology, Ma'anshan, Anhui, 243002 (China)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Electrochemical Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain Reaction-Free Detection and Quantification of Oncogenes in Messenger RNA  

SciTech Connect

We describe a novel electrochemical branched-DNA (bDNA) assay for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-free detection and quantification of p185 BCR-ABL leukemia fusion transcript in the population of messenger RNA (mRNA) extracted from cell lines. The bDNA amplifier carrying high loading of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) tracers was used to amplify targets signal. The targets were captured on microplate well surfaces through cooperative sandwich hybridization prior to the labeling of bDNA. The activity of captured ALP was monitored by square-wave voltammetric (SWV) analysis of the electroactive enzymatic product in the presence of 1-napthyl-phosphate. The specificity and sensitivity of assay enabled direct detection of target transcript in as little as 4.6 ng mRNA without PCR amplification. In combination with the use of a well-quantified standard, the electrochemical bDNA assay was capable of direct use for a PCR-free quantitative analysis of target transcript in total mRNA population. The approach thus provides a simple, sensitive, accurate and quantitative tool alternate to the RQ-PCR for early disease diagnosis.

Lee, Ai Cheng; Dai, Ziyu; Chen, Baowei; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Aiguo; Zhang, Lurong; Lim, Tit-Meng; Lin, Yuehe

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Executive Branch Management Scorecard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 30, 2009 June 30, 2009 CURRENT STATUS (As of June 30,, 2009) PROGRESS Third Quarter FY 2009 COMMENTS REAL PROPERTY Agency Lead: Paul Bosco, Senior Real Property Officer Lead RMO Examiner: Cynthia Vallina Lead OFFM Analyst: Joseph Pika Asset management plan (AMP) X in place by Q1 2005 (Y) X consistent with Federal Real Property Council (FRPC) standards or expected equivalent by Q2 2005 (Y) X OMB-approved by Q2 2005 (Y) X 3 year timeline for meeting plan goals/objectives by Q3 2006 (G) X evidence that plan is being implemented to achieve improved real property mgmt by Q4 2006 (G) Accurate and current inventory X in place by Q3 2004 (Y) X consistent with FRPC standards or expected equivalent by Q3 2004 (Y) X provided to govt.-wide real property

294

Executive Branch Management Scorecard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 30, 2009 September 30, 2009 CURRENT STATUS (As of September 30, 2009) PROGRESS Fourth Quarter FY 2009 COMMENTS REAL PROPERTY Agency Lead: Paul Bosco, Senior Real Property Officer Lead RMO Examiner: Cynthia Vallina Lead OFFM Analyst: Joseph Pika Asset management plan (AMP) X in place by Q1 2005 (Y) X consistent with Federal Real Property Council (FRPC) standards or expected equivalent by Q2 2005 (Y) X OMB-approved by Q2 2005 (Y) X 3 year timeline for meeting plan goals/objectives by Q3 2006 (G) X evidence that plan is being implemented to achieve improved real property mgmt by Q4 2006 (G) Accurate and current inventory X in place by Q3 2004 (Y) X consistent with FRPC standards or expected equivalent by Q3 2004 (Y) X provided to govt.-wide real property

295

Special Projects Branch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On June 6, 2005, you submitted a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) report providing the basis for DOEs cost estimate for dispositioning depleted uranium generated at your proposed uranium enrichment facility in

Dear Mr. Krich; Joseph G. Giitter; S Troy Harris/lovington; James Ferl; Cty John Parker/nmed

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Industrial Permits Branch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disclaimer: Please note that this version of the document has been converted from hard copy to an electronic file in PDF format. Therefore, this document may not match exactly the format of hard

unknown authors

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Branch Chief HABITAT CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

employees, contractors, and subcontractors make no warrant, express or implied, and assume no legal liability for the information in this report; nor does any party represent that the uses of this information will not infringe upon privately owned rights. This report has not been approved or disapproved by the California Energy Commission or California Department of Fish and Game nor has the Energy Commission or the California Department of Fish and Game passed

Richard L. Anderson; Susan D. Sanders; N. Misa Ward; Rick York; Paul Richins; B. B. Blevins; Scott A. Flint; David Sterner; Joseph A. Vincenty; Kevin Hunting; Sonke Mastrup; Ryan Broddrick

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Environmental Review Branch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GE-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment (GLE) submitted its Environmental Report on January 31, 2009 to construct and operate a laser enrichment facility. Since the original ER was finalized, the location of the entrance and roadway into the Wilmington Site has been revise. GLE hereby submits the GLE Environmental Report Supplement 2- Revised Entrance and Roadway to describe the environmental impacts of the change. If you have any questions, or require additional information, please contact Julie Olivier of my staff at 910-819-4799, or at Julie.Olivier@qe.com; or myself at 910-819-1925 or at Alberte.Kennedy @ pe.com.

Albert Kennedy; Andrea Kock Chief

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg) - North Branch / East Main - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves installing 4.83 miles of multi-size pipeline to replace a segment of the North Branch / East Main canal. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 48-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 5,838 ac-ft of water per year and 3,293,049,926 BTUs (965,138 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $15.58 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0000392 per BTU ($0.134 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamations three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $30.68 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0000544 per BTU ($0.186 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -1.58.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

THE S{sup 4}G PERSPECTIVE ON CIRCUMSTELLAR DUST EXTINCTION OF ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS IN M100  

SciTech Connect

We examine the effect of circumstellar dust extinction on the near-IR (NIR) contribution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in intermediate-age clusters throughout the disk of M100. For our sample of 17 AGB-dominated clusters we extract optical-to-mid-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and find that NIR brightness is coupled to the mid-IR dust emission in such a way that a significant reduction of AGB light, of up to 1 mag in the K band, follows from extinction by the dust shell formed during this stage. Since the dust optical depth varies with AGB chemistry (C-rich or O-rich), our results suggest that the contribution of AGB stars to the flux from their host clusters will be closely linked to the metallicity and the progenitor mass of the AGB star, to which dust chemistry and mass-loss rate are sensitive. Our sample of clusters-each the analogue of a {approx}1 Gyr old post-starburst galaxy-has implications within the context of mass and age estimation via SED modeling at high-z: we find that the average {approx}0.5 mag extinction estimated here may be sufficient to reduce the AGB contribution in the (rest-frame) K band from {approx}70%, as predicted in the latest generation of synthesis models, to {approx}35%. Our technique for selecting AGB-dominated clusters in nearby galaxies promises to be effective for discriminating the uncertainties associated with AGB stars in intermediate-age populations that plague age and mass estimation in high-z galaxies.

Meidt, Sharon E.; Schinnerer, Eva [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie/Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Kim, Taehyun [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Holwerda, Benne [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F.; Sheth, Kartik; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Seibert, Mark [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA (United States); Knapen, Johan H. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife (Spain); Bosma, Albert; Athanassoula, E. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM), Marseille (France); Hinz, Joannah L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Regan, Michael [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); De Paz, Armando Gil [Departamento de Astrofisica, Universidad Complutense Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Mizusawa, Trisha [Spitzer Science Center, Pasadena, CA (United States); Gadotti, Dimitri A. [European Southern Observatory, Santiago (Chile); Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki [Astronomy Division, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); and others

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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301

THREE-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMICAL SIMULATIONS OF A PROTON INGESTION EPISODE IN A LOW-METALLICITY ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use the three-dimensional (3D) stellar structure code DJEHUTY to model the ingestion of protons into the intershell convection zone of a 1 M{sub Sun} asymptotic giant branch star of metallicity Z = 10{sup -4}. We have run two simulations: a low-resolution one of around 300,000 zones and a high-resolution one consisting of 2,000,000 zones. Both simulations have been evolved for about 4 hr of stellar time. We observe the existence of fast, downward flowing plumes that are able to transport hydrogen into close proximity to the helium-burning shell before burning takes place. The intershell in the 3D model is richer in protons than the 1D model by several orders of magnitude and so we obtain substantially higher hydrogen-burning luminosities-over 10{sup 8} L{sub Sun} in the high-resolution simulation-than are found in the 1D model. Convective velocities in these simulations are over ten times greater than the predictions of mixing length theory, though the 3D simulations have greater energy generation due to the enhanced hydrogen burning. We find no evidence of the convective zone splitting into two, though this could be as a result of insufficient spatial resolution or because the models have not been evolved for long enough. We suggest that the 1D mixing length theory and particularly the use of a diffusion algorithm for mixing do not give an accurate picture of these events. An advective mixing scheme may give a better representation of the transport processes seen in the 3D models.

Stancliffe, Richard J.; Lattanzio, John C.; Heap, Stuart A.; Campbell, Simon W. [Monash Centre for Astrophysics (formerly the Centre for Stellar and Planetary Astrophysics), Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Dearborn, David S. P., E-mail: rjs@mso.anu.edu.au [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Results of the Quarterly Tritium Survey of Fourmile Branch and Its Seeplines in the F and H Areas of SRS: May 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Technology Center established a quarterly monitoring program of the Fourmile Branch stream and its associated seepline located down gradient from the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins. The primary focus of this program was to survey and track changes in tritium levels; however, specific conductivity, and pH were also surveyed and tracked. The measurement from the eleventh survey (May 1995) exhibited similar tritium levels, conductivity measurements, and pH values to data from previous sampling events. The overall results of the tritium survey and stream monitoring data (Looney et al., 1993) indicate that the tritium plume resulting from the past operation of the seepage basins continues to flush from the Fourmile Branch wetland system.

Koch, J.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Dixon, K.L.

1995-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

303

Geothermal Literature Review At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the Great Basin, Louie and Coolbaugh. We have compiled velocity information from sources in the literature, results of previous seismic experiments and...

304

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the Great Basin, Louie and Coolbaugh. We have compiled velocity information from sources in the literature, results of previous seismic experiments and...

305

Digging deeper into quantum mechanics Dr. P. Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will need to press further before we can understand anything about even a simple atomic situation: the neutral hydrogen atom. Among other ideas, you could use this model to explain the Balmer series understanding of the mathematical theory as well as its application to a physical problem. Three examples

Barber, Stuart

306

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOE-funding Unknown Notes Determining heat loss is one more tool to use in geothermal exploration. It is relatively easy to calculate if the thermal aureole has been mapped...

307

Okapi at TREC Stephen E. Robertson, Stephen Walker ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... words Examples: australia, australian, australasia, australasian buyout, buy out mit, massachusetts institute of technology porn, porno, pornography ...

1998-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

308

Geothermometry At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Ted De Rocher (2005) Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power...

309

Isotopic Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Kennedy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of deep permeability from surface measurements, and anomalies superimposed on regional trends can identify potential resources. References B. M. Kennedy, M. C. van Soest (2007)...

310

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoreticalcomputer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range...

311

Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium deposits." References Mark Coolbaugh, Paul Lechler, Chris...

312

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium deposits." References Mark Coolbaugh, Paul Lechler, Chris...

313

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for geothermal development. These samples are being collected to support more detailed work and assessment at those sites. (e.g., Buffalo Valley and Rawhide-Fairview Peak)....

314

Dynamics of Teleconnections and Walker Circulations Forced by Equatorial Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a linearized model with constant mean wind on an equatorial ?-plane, two types of atmospheric response to steady tropical forcing are studied by an eigenmode analysis. The first type is the less rotationally trapped barotropic motions ...

H. Lim; C-P. Chang

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Robert L. Fleischer, P. Buford Price, Robert M. Walker, 1971...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

of scientific fields including nuclear fuel development, archaeological dating, the search for super-heavy elements in nature, cosmic ray research, nuclear materials safeguards,...

316

Walker County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5°, -87.3016132° 5°, -87.3016132° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.8563605,"lon":-87.3016132,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

317

Walker County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

95.6457951° 95.6457951° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.6815394,"lon":-95.6457951,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

318

Walker County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

85.354965° 85.354965° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.6858231,"lon":-85.354965,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

319

Walker Valley, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6337047°, -74.377932° 6337047°, -74.377932° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6337047,"lon":-74.377932,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

320

Solar preheating of both domestic hot water and space. Final technical report for the Sea Loft restaurant in Long Branch, New Jersey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stephen Giddio's Sea Loft Restaurant in Long Branch, NJ is equipped with an active solar system for preheating water for both space heating and domestic hot water. Three pumped water loops, each a closed circuit, transfer heat from one major component to another. Solar heat is collected by an array of 83 evacuated tube collectors. The acceptance test results are appended, as well as the operational and maintenance manual. Reference CAPE-2805. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Review of elastic stress and fatigue-to-failure data for branch connections and tees in relation to ASME design criteria for nuclear power piping systems  

SciTech Connect

This is the third in a series of reports on the state-of-the art design guidance for piping system branch connections and tees provided by Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The other reports covered primary or limit-loads and nozzle flexibility. The principal objective of this report, as with the others, was to identify and collect the pertinent literature on the the subject and to identify needed improvements in the design methods and criteria of the Code based on the evaluation of the available information. This report does not propose changes in the design procedure of the Code. This report discusses the evaluation of stresses in branch connections and tees, correlation of these stresses with fatigue failures, and the Code rules for protection against fatigue failure in design applications. Because of the extensive amount of available information, the report was divided into two parts. Part I discusses cyclic internal pressure loading and Part II discusses moment loadings for the branch and run. The cyclic pressure loading fatigue parameters are mostly based on leakage, whereas, if the parameters were based on crack initiation, different and possibly higher valves would be developed. The fatigue evaluation procedure, which attempts to relate fatigue strength of piping components to strain-controlled, polished bar, and fatigue data appears to be inaccurate on the conservative side for high amplitude cycles and inaccurate on the unconservative side for low amplitude cycles. The report proposes additional analytical and experimental work.

Rodabaugh, E.C.; Moore, S.E.; Gwaltney, R.C.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Neutrino interactions with e/sup +/. mu. /sup -/ and multiple K/sup 0/'s. [Branching ratio  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A scan for directly produced positrons in 5,000 neutrino interactions in the neon (21 percent) hydrogen filled bubble chamber at Fermilab has yielded 15 events, 9 of which have ..mu../sup -/'s identified in the external muon identifier. On correcting for detection efficiency one obtains sigma(e/sup +/..mu../sup -/)/sigma(..mu../sup -/) approximately 1 x 10/sup -2/ for E/sub e/sup +// > .8 GeV and E/sub ..nu../ > 5 GeV. The kaon multiplicity is unexpectedly high. Eleven of the events have one or more Vees and three have two or more. Among the 11 events are two clear ..lambda..'s and two ambiguous K/sup 0//..lambda... There are four events with identifiable charged kaons. A 16th e/sup +/ event (9) is a definite ..nu../sub e/. From this information one concludes that the kaon multiplicity is 2 +- .6 K/sup 0/'s and 2 +- 1 K/sup + -/'s per interaction. From the observation

/

= 6.6, one concludes that the e/sup +/'s are probably not uniquely from heavy lepton decay. From a variety of analyses involving the e/sup +/ and/or K/sup 0/'s one learns that the mass of the hadron (C) that produces the e/sup +/'s is greater than 1.6 GeV. By determining the fraction of normal charged current (CC) events that have K/sup 0//sub s/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ one is able to compare this fraction with the fraction of CC events that have e/sup +/..mu../sup -/ (K/sup 0//sub s/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/) to establish a conservative lower limit to the semileptonic branching ratio, C ..-->.. (e/sup +/ and ..mu../sup +/) ..nu../C ..-->.. all > 0.33 (1 +- .42), provided that the same number of K/sup 0//sub s/ exists in thenonleptonic decays as in the semileptonic ones, and that the phase space for ..mu../sup +/ and e/sup +/ are nearly equal. There is no compelling evidence for an energy threshold and there is a hint of some neutral current events among the e/sup +/ events.

Stevenson, M.L.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Measurements of branching fractions, polarizations, and direct CP-violation asymmetries in B -> rho0 K* and B -> f0(980) K* decays  

SciTech Connect

We present measurements of the branching fractions, longitudinal polarization, and direct CP-violation asymmetries for the decays B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +} and B{sup +} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +} with a sample of (467 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +} with a significance of 5.3{sigma} and measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +}) = (4.6 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, the longitudinal polarization f{sub L} = 0.78 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.03, and the CP-violation asymmetry A{sub CP} = 0.31 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.03. We observe B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +} and measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +}) x {Beta}(f{sub 0}(980) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (4.2 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and the CP-violation asymmetry A{sub CP} = -0.15 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.03. The first uncertainty quoted is statistical and the second is systematic.

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

324

Red variables in the OGLE-II database. I. Pulsations and period-luminosity relations below the tip of the Red Giant Branch of the LMC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present period-luminosity relations for more than 23,000 red giants in the Large Magellanic Cloud observed by the OGLE-II microlensing project. The OGLE period values were combined with the 2MASS single-epoch JHK photometric data. For the brighter stars we find agreement with previous results (four different sequences corresponding to different modes of pulsation in AGB stars). We also discovered two distinct and well-separated sequences below the tip of the Red Giant Branch. They consist of almost 10,000 short-period (15 d solar-like oscillations driven by convection.

Kiss, L L

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Red variables in the OGLE-II database. I. Pulsations and period-luminosity relations below the tip of the Red Giant Branch of the LMC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present period-luminosity relations for more than 23,000 red giants in the Large Magellanic Cloud observed by the OGLE-II microlensing project. The OGLE period values were combined with the 2MASS single-epoch JHK photometric data. For the brighter stars we find agreement with previous results (four different sequences corresponding to different modes of pulsation in AGB stars). We also discovered two distinct and well-separated sequences below the tip of the Red Giant Branch. They consist of almost 10,000 short-period (15 d solar-like oscillations driven by convection.

L. L. Kiss; T. Bedding

2003-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

326

Additional Research Supporting Changes to the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Waste Form: Summary of EPRI I nput to the Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLWR) has changed significantly with the loss of Class B and C disposal access for ~85% of U.S. nuclear power plants. To promote increased disposal options, EPRI began to develop a technical basis for proposed modifications for the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation (BTP) for consideration by the U.S. NRC and other stakeholders during the revision process. This report summarizes a continuation of that BTP effort since the 2...

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Measurement of Branching Fractions and CP Asymmetries in B -> wK Decays and First Evidence of CP Violation in B0 -> wKS0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the branching fractions and charge-parity (CP) violating parameters in B --> omega K decays. The results are obtained from the final data sample containing 772 million BBbar pairs collected at the {\\Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We obtain the branching fractions, B(B0 --> omega K0) = (4.5+/- 0.4 (stat) +/- 0.3 (syst)) x 10^-6, B(B+ --> omega K+) = (6.8 +/- 0.4 (stat) +/- 0.4 (syst)) x 10^-6, which are in agreement with their respective current world averages. For the CP violating parameters we obtain, A (B0 --> omega K0S) = -0.36 +/- 0.19 (stat) +/- 0.05 (syst), S (B0 --> omega K0S) = +0.91 +/- 0.32 (stat) +/- 0.05 (syst), A (B+ --> omega K+) = -0.03 +/- 0.04 (stat) +/- 0.01 (syst), where A and S represent the direct and mixing-induced CP asymmetry, respectively. We find no evidence of CP violation in the decay channel B+ --> omega K+; however, we obtain the first evidence of CP violation in the B0 --> omega K0 decay channel at the level of 3.1 standard deviations.

V. Chobanova; J. Dalseno; C. Kiesling; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. M. Asner; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; T. Aziz; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; Y. Ban; K. Belous; B. Bhuyan; A. Bobrov; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; T. E. Browder; D. ?ervenkov; V. Chekelian; A. Chen; B. G. Cheon; K. Chilikin; R. Chistov; K. Cho; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; M. Danilov; Z. Doleal; Z. Drsal; D. Dutta; K. Dutta; S. Eidelman; S. Esen; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; T. Ferber; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; S. Ganguly; A. Garmash; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; K. Hayasaka; X. H. He; Y. Horii; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; Y. Iwasaki; T. Iwashita; I. Jaegle; T. Julius; J. H. Kang; E. Kato; H. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; D. Y. Kim; H. J. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; M. J. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; J. Klucar; B. R. Ko; P. Kody; S. Korpar; P. Krokovny; B. Kronenbitter; T. Kuhr; T. Kumita; A. Kuzmin; J. S. Lange; S. -H. Lee; J. Li; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; J. Libby; D. Liventsev; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; G. B. Mohanty; A. Moll; N. Muramatsu; R. Mussa; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; E. Nedelkovska; C. Ng; N. K. Nisar; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Ogawa; S. Okuno; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; C. W. Park; H. Park; H. K. Park; T. K. Pedlar; T. Peng; R. Pestotnik; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; M. Ritter; M. Rhrken; A. Rostomyan; H. Sahoo; T. Saito; Y. Sakai; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; A. J. Schwartz; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; O. Seon; M. E. Sevior; M. Shapkin; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; A. Sibidanov; F. Simon; Y. -S. Sohn; S. Stani?; M. Stari?; M. Steder; K. Sumisawa; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; K. Trabelsi; M. Uchida; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; A. Vinokurova; V. Vorobyev; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; M. -Z. Wang; P. Wang; M. Watanabe; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; H. Yamamoto; Y. Yamashita; S. Yashchenko; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; V. Zhulanov; A. Zupanc

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

328

Measurement of the B0 to pi l nu Form Factor Shape and Branching Fraction, and Determination of |Vub| with a Loose Neutrino Reconstruction Technique  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the results of a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu} decay undertaken with approximately 227 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses events in which the signal B mesons are reconstructed with a novel loose neutrino reconstruction technique. We obtain partial branching fractions in 12 bins of q{sup 2}, the {ell}{sup +}{nu} invariant mass squared, from which we extract the f{sup +}(q{sup 2}) form factor shape and the total branching fraction: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = 1.44 {+-} 0.08{sub stat} {+-} 0.10{sub syst} x 10{sup -4}. Based on a recent theoretical calculation of the form factor, we find the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}| to be (4.1 {+-} 0.2{sub stat} {+-} 0.2{sub syst{sub -0.4}{sup +0.6}}FF) x 10{sup -3}, where the last uncertainty is due to the normalization of the form factor.

Cote, D

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

329

Determination of J/{psi} leptonic branching fraction via {psi}(2S){r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}J/{psi}  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of the rates for {psi}(2S){r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}J/{psi}, J/{psi}{r_arrow}l{sup +}l{sup {minus}} and J/{psi}{r_arrow} anything is used to determine the J/{psi} leptonic branching fractions. The results are B(J/{psi}{r_arrow}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}})=(5.90{plus_minus}0.05{plus_minus}0.10){percent} and B(J/{psi}{r_arrow}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}})=(5.84{plus_minus}0.06{plus_minus}0.10){percent}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Assuming lepton universality, the leptonic branching fraction of the J/{psi} is B(J/{psi}{r_arrow}l{sup +}l{sup {minus}})=(5.87{plus_minus}0.04{plus_minus}0.09){percent} per species. This result is used to estimate the QCD scale factor {Lambda}{sub {ovr MS}}{sup (4)} and the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

Bai, J.Z.; Bian, J.G.; Chai, Z.W.; Chen, G.P.; Chen, J.C.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.B.; Chen, Y.Q.; Cheng, B.S.; Cui, X.Z.; Ding, H.L.; Ding, L.Y.; Dong, L.Y.; Du, Z.Z.; Feng, S.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gu, J.H.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Gu, Y.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; He, J.; He, J.T.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, H.M.; Hu, J.L.; Hu, Q.H.; Hu, T.; Hu, X.Q.; Huang, J.D.; Huang, Y.Z.; Jiang, C.H.; Jin, Y.; Ke, Z.J.; Lai, Y.F.; Lang, P.F.; Li, C.G.; Li, D.; Li, H.B.; Li, J.; Li, P.Q.; Li, R.B.; Li, W.; Li, W.D.; Li, W.G.; Li, X.H.; Li, X.N.; Liu, H.M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.H.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, Y.; Lu, F.; Lu, J.G.; Lu, J.Y.; Lu, L.C.; Luo, C.H.; Ma, A.M.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Meng, X.C.; Nie, J.; Qi, N.D.; Qi, X.R.; Qiu, J.F.; Qu, Y.H.; Que, Y.K.; Rong, G.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, H.; Shen, X.Y.; Sheng, H.Y.; Shi, H.Z.; Song, X.F.; Sun, F.; Sun, H.S.; Tang, S.Q.; Tong, G.L.; Wang, F.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wei, C.L.; Wu, Y.G.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xie, P.P.; Xie, Y.; Xie, Y.H.; Xiong, W.J.; Xu, C.C.; Xu, G.F.; Xue, S.T.; Yan, J.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, J.; Yang, X.F.; Ye, M.H.; Yi, K.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, C.X.; Yu, Z.Q.; Yu, Z.T.; Yuan, C.Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.L.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, Q.J.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.Y.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, H.W.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, W.R.; Zhao, Z.G.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, L.S.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhou, G.P.; Zhou, H.S.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhuang, B.A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039, Peoples Republic of (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039, Peoples Republic of (China); Hitlin, D.G.; Kelsey, M.H.; Oyang, J.; Panetta, J.; Porter, F.; Weaver, M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Chen, J.; Malchow, R.; Toki, W.; Yang, W. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

First Observation of the Cabibbo-suppressed Decays Xi+(c) ---> Sigma+ pi- pi+ and Xi+(c) ---> Sigma- pi+ pi+ and Measurement of their Branching Ratios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. They observe 56 {+-} 13 over a background of 21, and 23 {+-} 7 over a background of 12 events, respectively, for the signals. The data were accumulated using the SELEX spectrometer during the 1996-1997 fixed target run at Fermilab, chiefly from a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratios of the decays relative to the Cabibbo-favored {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} are measured to be B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/B({xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.50 {+-} 0.20, and B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.23 {+-} 0.11, respectively. They also report branching ratios for the same decay modes of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}.

Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Engelfried, J.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Akgun, U.; /Iowa U.; Alkhazov, Georgiy; /St. Petersburg, INP; Amaro-Reyes, J.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Ayan, Ahmet Sedat; /Iowa U.; Balatz, M.Y.; /Moscow, ITEP; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Bondar, N.F.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Cooper, Peter S.; /Fermilab /Michigan U., Flint

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Properties of the 5- state at 839 keV in 176Lu and the s-process branching at A = 176  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The s-process branching at mass number A = 176 depends on the coupling between the high-K ground state and a low-lying low-K isomer in 176Lu. This coupling is based on electromagnetic transitions via intermediate states at higher energies. The properties of the lowest experimentally confirmed intermediate state at 839 keV are reviewed, and the transition rate between low-K and high-K states under stellar conditions is calculated on the basis of new experimental data for the 839 keV state. Properties of further candidates for intermediate states are briefly analyzed. It is found that the coupling between the high-K ground state and the low-K isomer in 176Lu is at least one order of magnitude stronger than previously assumed leading to crucial consequences for the interpretation of the 176Lu/176Hf pair as an s-process thermometer.

P. Mohr; S. Bisterzo; R. Gallino; F. Kppeler; U. Kneissl; N. Winckler

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

332

Results of the quarterly tritium survey of Fourmile Branch and its seeplines in the F and H areas of SRS: December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) established a quarterly monitoring program of the Fourmile Branch (FMB) stream and its associated seepline down gradient from the F- and H- Area seepage basins. The program surveys and tracks changes in tritium, specific conductivity, and pH for the seepline water. Measurements from the seventh quarterly survey (December 1993) showed similar to slightly lower tritium and conductivity measurements and similar pH values compared to measurements from previous studies. Changes in tritium concentrations and conductivity values, as compared to previous surveys, are attributed to the flushing of tritium from the system and the seasonal rise in the water table since the September 1993 sampling event. Overall results of the tritium survey and related stream monitoring data continue to indicate that the tritium plume that resulted from operation of the seepage basins in flushing from the FMB system.

Rogers, V.A.; Dixon, K.L.; Looney, B.B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

International scientific cooperation during the 1930s. Bruno Rossi and the development of the status of cosmic rays into a branch of physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the 1920s and 1930s strong relationships established between Italy and other European countries such as Germany, Great Britain and France, as well as with some physicists of the U.S. scientific community. Bruno Rossi, a leading personality in the study of cosmic rays and the pioneer of this research field in Italy since the early 1930s, is a prominent example in this sense. During those turbulent years in European history, when physics underwent major changes and the traditional internationalism of physics assumed a more institutionalised character, his early work was crucial in transforming the field in a branch of modern physics. His friendly relationship with eminent scientists -notably Enrico Fermi, Walther Bothe, Werner Heisenberg, Hans Bethe, Homi Bhabha- was instrumental for the exchange of knowledge about experimental practises and for theoretical discussions, as well as in attracting the attention of physicists such as Arthur Compton, Louis Leprince-Ringuet, Pierre Auger and Patrick Blackett o...

Bonolis, Luisa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

New experimental limits on K sub L sup 0 r arrow. mu. e and K sub L sup 0 r arrow ee branching ratios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A search for the decays {ital K}{sub {ital L}}{sup 0}{r arrow}{mu}e and {ital K}{sub {ital L}}{sup 0}{r arrow}ee has produced no examples of either process. When normalized to the decay {ital K}{sub {ital L}}{sup 0}{r arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}, the 90%-C.L. upper limits on the branching ratios are {ital B}({ital K}{sub {ital L}}{sup 0}{r arrow}{mu}e){lt}2.2{times}10{sup {minus}10} and {ital B}({ital K}{sub {ital L}}{sup 0}{r arrow}ee){lt}3.2{times}10{sup {minus}10}.

Mathiazhagan, C.; Molzon, W.R. (University of California, Irvine, California 92717 (US)); Cousins, R.D.; Konigsberg, J.; Kubic, J.; Melese, P.; Rubin, P.; Slater, W.E.; Wagner, D. (University of California, Los Angeles, California 90024); Hart, G.W.; Kinnison, W.W.; Lee, D.M.; McKee, R.J.; Milner, E.C.; Sanders, G.H.; Ziock, H.J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545); Arisaka, K.; Knibbe, P.; Urheim, J. (University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104); Axelrod, S.

1989-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

335

Measurement of the relative branching ratio of B-s(0) -> J/psi f(0)(980) to B-s(0) -> J/psi phi  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of the relative branching fraction, R{sub f{sub 0}/{phi}}, of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}f{sub 0}(980), with f{sub 0}(980) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, to the process B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}, with {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. The J/{psi}f{sub 0}(980) final state corresponds to a CP-odd eigenstate of B{sub s}{sup 0} that could be of interest in future studies of CP violation. Using 8 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we find R{sub f{sub 0}/{phi}} = 0.275 {+-} 0.041(stat) {+-} 0.061(syst).

Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

336

Measurement of branching fractions for B \\to J/??K decays and search for a narrow resonance in the J/??final state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report an observation of the $B^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\eta K^{\\pm}$ and $B^0 \\to J/\\psi \\eta K^0_S$ decays using 772$\\times 10^{6}$ $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider. We obtain the branching fractions ${\\cal B}(B^{\\pm}\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\eta K^{\\pm})=(1.27\\pm 0.11{\\rm (stat.)\\pm 0.11{\\rm (syst.)})}\\times10^{-4}$ and ${\\cal B}(B^0\\to J/\\psi \\eta K^0_S)=(5.22 \\pm 0.78 {\\rm(stat.)} \\pm 0.49{\\rm(syst.)})\\times10^{-5}$. We search for a new narrow charmonium(-like) state $X$ in the $J/\\psi \\eta$ mass spectrum and find no significant excess. We set upper limits on the product of branching fractions, ${\\cal B}(B^\\pm \\to XK^\\pm){\\cal B}(X \\to J/\\psi \\eta)$, at 3872 MeV$/c^2$ where a $C$-odd partner of X(3872) may exist, at $\\psi(4040)$ and $\\psi(4160)$ assuming their known mass and width, and over a range from 3.8 to 4.8 GeV$/c^2$. % at a 5 MeV$/c^2$ step. The obtained upper limits at 90% confidence level for $X^{C{\\rm -odd}}(3872)$, $\\psi(4040)$ and $\\psi(4160)$ are 3.8$\\times 10^{-6}$, 15.5$\\times 10^{-6}$ and 8.1$\\times 10^{-6}$, respectively.

Belle Collaboration; T. Iwashita; K. Miyabayashi; V. Bhardwaj; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. M. Asner; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; B. Bhuyan; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; T. E. Browder; M. -C. Chang; A. Chen; B. G. Cheon; K. Chilikin; R. Chistov; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; S. -K. Choi; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dalseno; M. Danilov; Z. Doleal; Z. Drsal; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; S. Esen; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; M. Feindt; T. Ferber; A. Frey; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; S. Ganguly; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; T. Hara; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; T. Higuchi; Y. Horii; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; I. Jaegle; T. Julius; D. H. Kah; J. H. Kang; E. Kato; T. Kawasaki; H. Kichimi; C. Kiesling; D. Y. Kim; H. J. Kim; H. O. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; M. J. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; J. Klucar; B. R. Ko; P. Kody; S. Korpar; P. Krian; P. Krokovny; T. Kuhr; T. Kumita; A. Kuzmin; Y. -J. Kwon; J. S. Lange; S. -H. Lee; Y. Li; J. Libby; C. Liu; Y. Liu; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; A. Moll; T. Mori; Y. Nagasaka; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; C. Ng; N. K. Nisar; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Ogawa; S. Okuno; G. Pakhlova; E. Panzenbock; H. Park; H. K. Park; T. K. Pedlar; R. Pestotnik; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; M. Ritter; M. Rohrken; A. Rostomyan; S. Ryu; H. Sahoo; T. Saito; K. Sakai; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; D. Santel; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; C. Schwanda; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; O. Seon; M. E. Sevior; M. Shapkin; C. P. Shen; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; A. Sibidanov; F. Simon; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; S. Stanic; M. Stari?; M. Steder; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; K. Tanida; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; K. Trabelsi; T. Tsuboyama; M. Uchida; S. Uehara; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; V. Vorobyev; A. Vossen; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; M. -Z. Wang; P. Wang; X. L. Wang; M. Watanabe; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; B. D. Yabsley; Y. Yamashita; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yook; C. Z. Yuan; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; A. Zupanc

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

337

Branching Ratio Measurements of B ---> J/psi eta K and B+- ---> D0 K+- with D0 ---> pi+ pi- pi0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented for the decays of B {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K and B{sup {+-}} {yields} DK{sup {+-}}, respectively, with experimental data collected with BABAR detector at PEP-II, located at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). With 90 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, we obtained branching fractions of {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sup {+-}}) = [10.8 {+-} 2.3(stat) {+-} 2.4(syst)] x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sub S}{sup 0}) = [8.4 {+-} 2.6(stat) {+-} 2.7(syst)] x 10{sup -5}; and we set an upper limit of {Beta}[B{sup {+-}} {yields} X(3872)K{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sup {+-}}] < 7.7 x 10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. The branching fraction of decay chain {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} DK{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}) = [5.5 {+-} 1.0(stat) {+-} 0.7(syst)] x 10{sup -6} with 229 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events at {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, here D represents the neutral D meson. The decay rate asymmetry is A = 0.02 {+-} 0.16(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst) for this full decay chain. This decay can be used to extract the unitarity angle {gamma}, a weak CP violation phase, through the interference of decay production of D{sup 0} and {bar D}{sup 0} to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}.

Zeng, Qinglin; /Colorado State U.

2006-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

338

Measurement of the tau- to eta pi-pi+pi-nu tau Branching Fraction and a Search for a Second-Class Current in the tau- to eta'(958)pi-nu tau Decay  

SciTech Connect

The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay with the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode is studied using 384 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BABAR detector. The branching fraction is measured to be (1.60 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -4}. It is found that {tau}{sup -} {yields} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is the dominant decay mode with a branching fraction of (1.11 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -4}. The first error on the branching fractions is statistical and the second systematic. In addition, a 90% confidence level upper limit on the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is measured to be 7.2 x 10{sup -6}. This last decay proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of isospin symmetry.

Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

339

Measurement of branching fractions of B decays to K [subscript 1] (1270) pi and K [subscript 1] (1400) pi and determination of the CKM angle Alpha from B [superscript 0]--> a [subscript 1] (1260) (+/-) pi (-/+)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report measurements of the branching fractions of neutral and charged B meson decays to final states containing a K1(1270) or K1(1400) meson and a charged pion. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC ...

Fisher, Peter H.

340

Magnetic fields in single late-type giants in the Solar vicinity: How common is magnetic activity on the giant branches?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present our first results on a new sample containing all single G,K and M giants down to V = 4 mag in the Solar vicinity, suitable for spectropolarimetric (Stokes V) observations with Narval at TBL, France. For detection and measurement of the magnetic field (MF), the Least Squares Deconvolution (LSD) method was applied (Donati et al. 1997) that in the present case enables detection of large-scale MFs even weaker than the solar one (the typical precision of our longitudinal MF measurements is 0.1-0.2 G). The evolutionary status of the stars is determined on the basis of the evolutionary models with rotation (Lagarde et al. 2012; Charbonnel et al., in prep.) and fundamental parameters given by Massarotti et al. (1998). The stars appear to be in the mass range 1-4 M_sun, situated at different evolutionary stages after the Main Sequence (MS), up to the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB). The sample contains 45 stars. Up to now, 29 stars are observed (that is about 64 % of the sample), each observed at least twice....

Konstantinova-Antova, R; Charbonnel, C; Drake, N A; Wade, G; Tsvetkova, S; Petit, P; Schrder, K -P; Lbre, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Formation of SiC Grains in Pulsation-Enhanced Dust-Driven Wind Around Carbon Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the formation of silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the framework of dust-driven wind around pulsating carbon-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch (C-rich AGB) stars in order to reveal not only the amount but also the size distribution. Two cases are considered for the nucleation process; one is the LTE case where the vibration temperature of SiC clusters $T_{\\rm v}$ is equal to the gas temperature as usual, and another is the non-LTE case in which $T_{\\rm v}$ is assumed to be the same as the temperature of small SiC grains. The results of hydrodynamical calculations for a model with stellar parameters of mass $M_{\\ast}$=1.0 $M_{\\odot}$, luminosity $L_{\\ast}$=10$^{4}$ $L_{\\odot}$, effective temperature $T_{\\rm eff}$=2600 K, C/O ratio=1.4, and pulsation period $P$=650 days show the followings: In the LTE case, SiC grains condense in accelerated outflowing gas after the formation of carbon grains and the resulting averaged mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains of $\\sim$ 10$^{-8}$ is too small to reproduce the ...

Yasuda, Yuki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Measurement of the Branching Fractions of the Rare Decays B0 to Ds(*)+pi-,B0 to Ds(*)+rho-, and B0 to Ds(*)-K(*)+  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the measurement of the branching fractions of the rare decays B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} {pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} {rho}{sup -}, and B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} K{sup (*)+} in a sample of 381 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) decays into B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. They present evidence for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} K*{sup +} and the vector-vector decays B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup *+} {rho}{sup -} and B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup *-} K{sup *+}, as well as the first measurement of the vector meson polarization in these decays. They also determine the ratios of the CM-suppressed to CKM-favored amplitudes r(D{sup (*)}{pi}) and r(D{sup (*)}{rho}) in decays B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)}{sup {+-}}{rho}{sup {-+}}, and comment on the prospects for measuring the Cp observable sin(2{beta} + {gamma}).

Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R.N.; /Energy Sci. Network /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

343

An R&D Project Management and Selection System for the Utilization Technology Branch, Division of Geothermal Energy, Volume III - Project Selection Procedure and Benefit/Cost Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report in three volumes describes an R and D project management and selection system developed for the Utilization Technology Branch of the Division of Geothermal Energy, Department of Energy. The proposed project management system (PMS) consists of a project data system (PDS) and a project selection procedure (PSP). The project data system consists of a series of project data forms and project status logs, and descriptions of information pathways. The PDS emphasizes timely monitoring of the technical and financial progress of projects, maintenance of the history of the project and rapid access to project information to facilitate responsive reporting to DGE and DOE Upper Management. The project selection procedure emphasizes a R and D product-oriented approach to benefit/cost analysis of individual projects. The report includes: (a) a description of the system, and recommendations for its implementation, (b) the PDS forms and explanation of their use, (c) a glossary of terms for use on the forms, (d) a description of the benefit/cost approach, (e) a data base for estimating R and D benefits, and (f) examples of test applications of the system to nine current DGE projects. This volume describes a proposed procedure for R and D project selection. The benefit/cost analysis part of the procedure estimates financial savings expected to result from the commercial use of hardware or process products of R and D. Savings are estimated with respect to the geothermal power plants expected to come on line between 1978 and 2000.

Dhillon, Harpal S.; Entingh, Daniel J.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The Uncertainties in the 22Ne + alpha-capture Reaction Rates and the Production of the Heavy Magnesium Isotopes in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars of Intermediate Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new rates for the 22Ne(alpha, n)25Mg and 22Ne(alpha,gamma)26Mg reactions, with uncertainties that have been considerably reduced compared to previous estimates, and we study how these new rates affect the production of the heavy magnesium isotopes in models of intermediate mass Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars of different initial compositions. All the models have deep third dredge-up, hot bottom burning and mass loss. Calculations have been performed using the two most commonly used estimates of the 22Ne + alpha rates as well as the new recommended rates, and with combinations of their upper and lower limits. The main result of the present study is that with the new rates, uncertainties on the production of isotopes from Mg to P coming from the 22Ne + alpha-capture rates have been considerably reduced. We have therefore removed one of the important sources of uncertainty to effect models of AGB stars. We have studied the effects of varying the mass-loss rate on nucleosynthesis and discuss other uncertainties related to the physics employed in the computation of stellar structure, such as the modeling of convection, the inclusion of a partial mixing zone and the definition of convective borders. These uncertainties are found to be much larger than those coming from 22Ne + alpha-capture rates, when using our new estimates. Much effort is needed to improve the situation for AGB models.

A. Karakas; M. Lugaro; M. Wiescher; J. Goerres; C. Ugalde

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

345

Low-Level Waste Branch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enclosed please find five copies of an application for ground water Alternate Concentration Limits (ACLs) for the Shirley Basin mill and tailings site. Pathfinder requests that the NRC amend the above referenced license to incorporate the proposed ACLs. Pathfinder has been endeavoring for over fifteen years to accomplish a ground water restoration at the site with overall favorable results. Of the thirteen constituents assigned ground water protection standards in the license, only two continue to exceed the site standard limits: uranium and thorium-230. While both of these parameters have been dramatically reduced in the ground water over the years, they remain at levels which have become very difficult to further reduce. Additionally, it is noteworthy that over the period of record these two constituents have routinely exceeded the site standards in the designated site background well. This would suggest that the site standards for uranium and thorium-230 originally were set unrealistically low. We have concluded that we have essentially reached the point of ALARA relative to ground water restoration at the Shirley Basin site, prompting this application for ACLs. The enclosed application discusses the attainment of ALARA, presents sound technical justification for the proposed ACLs, and ably demonstrates the minimal public health risk associated with the proposed ACLs.

Mr. Thomas; H. Essig

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

INTERIM RESULTS FROM A STUDY OF THE IMPACTS OF TIN(II) BASED MERCURY TREATMENT IN A SMALL STREAM ECOSYSTEM: TIMS BRANCH, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) has been identified as a 'persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic' pollutant with widespread impacts throughout North America and the world (EPA. 1997a, 1997b, 1998a, 1998b, 2000). Although most of the mercury in the environment is inorganic Hg, a small proportion of total Hg is transformed through the actions of aquatic microbes into methylmercury (MeHg). In contrast to virtually all other metals, MeHg biomagnifies or becomes increasingly concentrated as it is transferred through aquatic food chains so that the consumption of mercury contaminated fish is the primary route of this toxin to humans. For this reason, the ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) for mercury is based on a fish tissue endpoint rather than an aqueous Hg concentration, as the tissue concentration (e.g., fish are more closely linked to aqueous MeHg than to inorganic Hg concentrations (Sveinsdottir and Mason 2005), but MeHg production is not easily predicted or controlled. At point-source contaminated sites, mercury methylation is not only affected by the absolute mercury load, but also by the form of mercury loaded. In addition, once MeHg is formed, the hydrology, trophic structure, and water chemistry of a given system affect how it is transformed and transferred through the food chain to fish. Decreasing inorganic Hg concentrations and loading may often therefore be a more achievable remediation goal, but has led to mixed results in terms of responses in fish bioaccumulation. A number of source control measures have resulted in rapid responses in lake or reservoir fisheries (Joslin 1994, Turner and Southworth 1999; Orihel et al., 2007), but examples of similar responses in Hg-contaminated stream ecosystems are less common. Recent work suggests that stream systems may actually be more susceptible to mercury bioaccumulation than lakes, highlighting the need to better understand the ecological drivers of mercury bioaccumulation in stream-dwelling fish (Chasar et al. 2009, Ward et al. 2010). In the present study we examine the response of fish to remedial actions in Tims Branch, a point-source contaminated stream on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This second order stream received inorganic mercury inputs at its headwaters from the 1950s-2000s which contaminated the water, sediments, and biota downstream. In 2007, an innovative mercury removal system using tin (II) chloride (stannous chloride, SnCl{sub 2}) was implemented at a pre-existing air stripper. Tin(II) reduces dissolved Hg (II) to Hg (0), which is removed by the air stripper. During this process, tin(II) is oxidized to tin (IV) which is expected to precipitate as colloidal tin(IV) oxides and hydroxides, particulate materials with relatively low toxicity (Hallas and Cooney, 1981, EPA 2002, ATSDR, 2005). The objectives of the present research are to provide an initial assessment of the net impacts of the tin(II) based mercury treatment on key biota and to document the distribution and fate of inorganic tin in this small stream ecosystem after the first several years of operating a full scale system. To support these objectives, we collected fish, sediment, water, invertebrates, and biofilm samples from Tims Branch to quantify the general behavior and accumulation patterns for mercury and tin in the ecosystem and to determine if the treatment process has resulted in: (1) a measurable beneficial impact on (i.e., decrease of) mercury concentration in upper trophic level fish and other biota; this is a key environmental endpoint since reducing mercury concen

Looney, B.; Bryan, L.; Mathews, T.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

EUROPIUM s-PROCESS SIGNATURE AT CLOSE-TO-SOLAR METALLICITY IN STARDUST SiC GRAINS FROM ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS  

SciTech Connect

Individual mainstream stardust silicon carbide (SiC) grains and a SiC-enriched bulk sample from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite have been analyzed by the Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe-Reverse Geometry for Eu isotopes. The mainstream grains are believed to have condensed in the outflows of {approx}1.5-3 M{sub Sun} carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with close-to-solar metallicity. The {sup 151}Eu fractions [fr({sup 151}Eu) = {sup 151}Eu/({sup 151}Eu+{sup 153}Eu)] derived from our measurements are compared with previous astronomical observations of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars enriched in elements made by slow neutron captures (the s-process). Despite the difference in metallicity between the parent stars of the grains and the metal-poor stars, the fr({sup 151}Eu) values derived from our measurements agree well with fr({sup 151}Eu) values derived from astronomical observations. We have also compared the SiC data with theoretical predictions of the evolution of Eu isotopic ratios in the envelope of AGB stars. Because of the low Eu abundances in the SiC grains, the fr({sup 151}Eu) values derived from our measurements show large uncertainties, in most cases being larger than the difference between solar and predicted fr({sup 151}Eu) values. The SiC aggregate yields a fr({sup 151}Eu) value within the range observed in the single grains and provides a more precise result (fr({sup 151}Eu) = 0.54 {+-} 0.03, 95% conf.), but is approximately 12% higher than current s-process predictions. The AGB models can match the SiC data if we use an improved formalism to evaluate the contribution of excited nuclear states in the calculation of the {sup 151}Sm(n, {gamma}) stellar reaction rate.

Avila, Janaina N.; Ireland, Trevor R.; Holden, Peter [Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Lugaro, Maria [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); Gyngard, Frank; Zinner, Ernst [Laboratory for Space Sciences and the Department of Physics, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Cristallo, Sergio [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, INAF, via Maggini snc, Teramo I-64100 (Italy); Rauscher, Thomas, E-mail: janaina.avila@anu.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics Research, School of Physics, Astronomy, and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Solar preheating of both domestic hot water and space. Final technical report for the Sea Loft restaurant in Long Branch, New Jersey (Engineering Materials)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stephen Giddio's Sea Loft Restaurant in Long Branch, NJ is equipped with an active solar system for preheating of both Space and Domestic Hot Water (DHW). Three pumped water loops, each closed circuit, transfer heat from one major equipment component to another. The closed loop drain back solar energy collection circuit uses a 3/4 horsepower pump to circulate seventeen gallons per minute of deionized water from the Solar Storage Tank to the Solar Collector Array, and return. This tank has a capacity of 600 gallons. The solar array consist of eighty-three evacuated tube type concentrating collectors. The heat gathered in this circuit is stored in the tank for either simultaneous or future use in either or both of the Space and DHW preheating loops. The preheating of city water prior to its entrance into the gas fired 86 gallon DHW heater is accomplished in a separate 600 gallon capacity tank. Two thirty-five square foot tubed heat exchanger bundles inserted into this tank accept solar heated hot water from the Solar Storage Tank. This solar heated water is pumped at sixteen GPM in a closed loop circuit using a 1/4 HP pump. The preheating of restaurant space is accomplished in a closed loop circuit between the Solar Storage Tank and an eight SF hot water coil inserted into the return air from the Main Dining Room of the restaurant. A 1/4 HP pump circulates fifteen gallons of solar heated hot water per minute. This system incorporates a differential temperature controller that utilizes a multitude of pressure sensors and temperature thermistors located throughout the various portions of the system components and piping. The Display Board mounted on the wall of the Bar-Lounge Area serves to integrate the entire solar system. It not only displays the flow but houses the Btu flowmeters, Digital temperature readouts, and HVAC EMS Programmer. Reference DOE/CS/30007-T1.

Not Available

1982-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

349

Remedial investigation work plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 4 (Rogers Quarry/Lower McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant includes - 800 acres near the northeast comer of the reservation and adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge (Fig. 1-1). The plant is a manufacturing and developmental engineering facility that produced components for various nuclear weapons systems and provides engineering support to other Energy Systems facilities. More than 200 contaminated sites have been identified at the Y-12 Plant that resulted from past waste management practices. Many of the sites have operable units (OUs) based on priority and on investigative and remediation requirements. This Remedial Investigation RI work plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Chestnut Ridge OU 4 consists of Rogers Quarry and Lower McCoy Branch (MCB). Rogers Quarry, which is also known as Old Rogers Quarry or Bethel Valley Quarry was used for quarrying from the late 1940s or early 1950s until about 1960. Since that time, the quarry has been used for disposal of coal ash and materials from Y-12 production operations, including classified materials. Disposal of coal ash ended in July 1993. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern, support an Ecological Risk Assessment and a Human Health Risk Assessment, support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this work plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the risk posed to human health and the environment by OU 4.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

IRAS 17423-1755 (HEN 3-1475) REVISITED: AN O-RICH HIGH-MASS POST-ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR  

SciTech Connect

The high-resolution (R {approx} 600) Spitzer/IRS spectrum of the bipolar protoplanetary nebula (PN) IRAS 17423-1755 is presented in order to clarify the dominant chemistry (C-rich versus O-rich) of its circumstellar envelope as well as to constrain its evolutionary stage. The high-quality Spitzer/IRS spectrum shows weak 9.7 {mu}m absorption from amorphous silicates. This confirms for the first time the O-rich nature of IRAS 17423-1755 in contradiction to a previous C-rich classification, which was based on the wrong identification of the strong 3.1 {mu}m absorption feature seen in the Infrared Space Observatory spectrum as due to acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}). The high-resolution Spitzer/IRS spectrum displays a complete lack of C-rich mid-IR features such as molecular absorption features (e.g., 13.7 {mu}m C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, 14.0 {mu}m HCN, etc.) or the classical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon infrared emission bands. Thus, the strong 3.1 {mu}m absorption band toward IRAS 17423-1755 has to be identified as water ice. In addition, an [Ne II] nebular emission line at 12.8 {mu}m is clearly detected, indicating that the ionization of its central region may be already started. The spectral energy distribution in the infrared ({approx}2-200 {mu}m) and other observational properties of IRAS 17423-1755 are discussed in comparison with the similar post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) objects IRAS 19343+2926 and IRAS 17393-2727. We conclude that IRAS 17423-1755 is an O-rich high-mass post-AGB object that represents a link between OH/IR stars with extreme outflows and highly bipolar PN.

Manteiga, M. [Departamento de Ciencias de la Navegacion y de la Tierra, Universidade da Coruna, Paseo de Ronda 51, E-15011 A Coruna (Spain); GarcIa-Hernandez, D. A.; Manchado, A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), VIa Lactea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Ulla, A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende, Universidade de Vigo, E-36310 Vigo, Pontevedra (Spain); GarcIa-Lario, P., E-mail: manteiga@udc.es [Herschel Science Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC)/European Space Agency (ESA), Villafranca del Castillo, Apartado de Correos 78, E-28080 Madrid (Spain)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Branching Fraction for B0 -> pi- l+ nu and Determination of |Vub| in Upsilon(4S) -> B0 B0bar Events Tagged by B0bar -> D(*)+ l- nubar  

SciTech Connect

We report preliminary results from a study of the charmless exclusive semileptonic decay B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu} based on the data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance using the BABAR detector at SLAC. The analysis uses events in which the signal B meson recoils against a B meson that has been reconstructed in a semileptonic decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)+}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}. We extract the total branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.03 {+-} 0.25{sub stat.} {+-} 0.13{sub syst.}) x 10{sup -4} and the partial branching fractions in three bins of q{sup 2}, the invariant mass squared of the lepton-neutrino system. From the partial branching fractions and theoretical predictions for the form factors, we determine the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}|. We find |V{sub ub}| = (3.3 {+-} 0.4{sub stat.} {+-} 0.2{sub syst.} {sub -0.4}{sup +0.8}FF) x 10{sup -3}, where the last error is due to normalization of the form factor.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

352

FORMATION OF SiC GRAINS IN PULSATION-ENHANCED DUST-DRIVEN WIND AROUND CARBON-RICH ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the formation of silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the framework of dust-driven wind around pulsating carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (C-rich AGB) stars to reveal not only the amount but also the size distribution. Two cases are considered for the nucleation process: one is the local thermal equilibrium (LTE) case where the vibration temperature of SiC clusters T{sub v} is equal to the gas temperature as usual, and another is the non-LTE case in which T{sub v} is assumed to be the same as the temperature of small SiC grains. The results of the hydrodynamical calculations for a model with stellar parameters of mass M{sub *} = 1.0 M{sub Sun }, luminosity L{sub *} = 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }, effective temperature T{sub eff} = 2600 K, C/O ratio = 1.4, and pulsation period P = 650 days show the following: in the LTE case, SiC grains condense in accelerated outflowing gas after the formation of carbon grains, and the resulting averaged mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains of {approx}10{sup -8} is too small to reproduce the value of 0.01-0.3, which is inferred from the radiative transfer models. On the other hand, in the non-LTE case, the formation region of the SiC grains is more internal and/or almost identical to that of the carbon grains due to the so-called inverse greenhouse effect. The mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains averaged at the outer boundary ranges from 0.098 to 0.23 for the sticking probability {alpha}{sub s} = 0.1-1.0. The size distributions with the peak at {approx}0.2-0.3 {mu}m in radius cover the range of size derived from the analysis of the presolar SiC grains. Thus, the difference between the temperatures of the small cluster and gas plays a crucial role in the formation process of SiC grains around C-rich AGB stars, and this aspect should be explored for the formation process of dust grains in astrophysical environments.

Yasuda, Yuki; Kozasa, Takashi, E-mail: yuki@antares-a.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Natural History Sciences, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Interim Results from a Study of the Impacts of Tin (II) Based Mercury Treatment in a Small Stream Ecosystem: Tims Branch, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

A research team is assessing the impacts of an innovative mercury treatment system in Tims Branch, a small southeastern stream. The treatment system, installed in 2007, reduces and removes inorganic mercury from water using tin(II) (stannous) chloride addition followed by air stripping. The system results in discharge of inorganic tin to the ecosystem. This screening study is based on historical information combined with measurements of contaminant concentrations in water, fish, sediment, biofilms and invertebrates. Initial mercury data indicate that first few years of mercury treatment resulted in a significant decrease in mercury concentration in an upper trophic level fish, redfin pickerel, at all sampling locations in the impacted reach. For example, the whole body mercury concentration in redfin pickerel collected from the most impacted pond decreased approximately 72% between 2006 (pre-treatment) and 2010 (post-treatment). Over this same period, mercury concentrations in the fillet of redfin pickerel in this pond were estimated to have decreased from approximately 1.45 {micro}g/g (wet weight basis) to 0.45 {micro}g/g - a decrease from 4.8x to 1.5x the current EPA guideline concentration for mercury in fillet (0.3 {micro}g/g). Thermodynamic modeling, scanning electron microscopy, and other sampling data for tin suggest that particulate tin (IV) oxides are a significant geochemical species entering the ecosystem with elevated levels of tin measured in surficial sediments and biofilms. Detectable increases in tin in sediments and biofilms extended approximately 3km from the discharge location. Tin oxides are recalcitrant solids that are relatively non-toxic and resistant to dissolution. Work continues to develop and validate methods to analyze total tin in the collected biota samples. In general, the interim results of this screening study suggest that the treatment process has performed as predicted and that the concentration of mercury in upper trophic level fish, as a surrogate for all of the underlying transport and transformation processes in a complex ecosystem, has declined as a direct result of the elimination of inorganic mercury inputs. Inorganic tin released to the ecosystem has been found in compartments where particles accumulate with notable levels measured in biofilms.

Looney, Brian [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); BryanJr., Larry [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

FROM THE COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAM OF {omega} CENTAURI AND (SUPER-)ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STELLAR MODELS TO A GALACTIC PLANE PASSAGE GAS PURGING CHEMICAL EVOLUTION SCENARIO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated the color-magnitude diagram of {omega} Centauri and find that the blue main sequence (bMS) can be reproduced only by models that have a helium abundance in the range Y = 0.35-0.40. To explain the faint subgiant branch of the reddest stars ('MS-a/RG-a' sequence), isochrones for the observed metallicity ([Fe/H] Almost-Equal-To -0.7) appear to require both a high age ({approx}13 Gyr) and enhanced CNO abundances ([CNO/Fe] Almost-Equal-To 0.9). Y Almost-Equal-To 0.35 must also be assumed in order to counteract the effects of high CNO on turnoff colors and thereby to obtain a good fit to the relatively blue turnoff of this stellar population. This suggests a short chemical evolution period of time (=} 6.8 M{sub Sun }, M{sub He,core} {>=} 1.245 M{sub Sun }) predict too large N enhancements, which limit their role in contributing to the extreme populations. In order to address the observed central concentration of stars with He-rich abundance, we show here quantitatively that highly He- and N-enriched AGB ejecta have particularly efficient cooling properties. Based on these results and on the reconstruction of the orbit of {omega} Cen with respect to the Milky Way, we propose the Galactic plane passage gas purging scenario for the chemical evolution of this cluster. The bMS population formed shortly after the purging of most of the cluster gas as a result of the passage of {omega} Cen through the Galactic disk (which occurs today every {approx}40 Myr for {omega} Cen) when the initial mass function of the dominant population had 'burned' through most of the Type II supernova mass range. AGB stars would eject most of their masses into the gas-depleted cluster through low-velocity winds that sink to the cluster core due to their favorable cooling properties and form the bMS population. In our discussion we follow our model through four passage events, which could explain some key properties not only of the bMS but also of the MS-a/RGB-a and the s-enriched stars.

Herwig, Falk; VandenBerg, Don A.; Navarro, Julio F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Ferguson, Jason [Department of Physics, Wichita State University Wichita, KS 67260 (United States); Paxton, Bill, E-mail: fherwig@uvic.ca, E-mail: vandenbe@uvic.ca, E-mail: jason.ferguson@wichita.edu, E-mail: paxton@kitp.ucsb.edu [KITP/UC Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

INTERIM RESULTS FROM A STUDY OF THE IMPACTS OF TIN(II) BASED MERCURY TREATMENT IN A SMALL STREAM ECOSYSTEM: TIMS BRANCH, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) has been identified as a 'persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic' pollutant with widespread impacts throughout North America and the world (EPA. 1997a, 1997b, 1998a, 1998b, 2000). Although most of the mercury in the environment is inorganic Hg, a small proportion of total Hg is transformed through the actions of aquatic microbes into methylmercury (MeHg). In contrast to virtually all other metals, MeHg biomagnifies or becomes increasingly concentrated as it is transferred through aquatic food chains so that the consumption of mercury contaminated fish is the primary route of this toxin to humans. For this reason, the ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) for mercury is based on a fish tissue endpoint rather than an aqueous Hg concentration, as the tissue concentration (e.g., < 0.3 {mu}g/g fillet) is considered to be a more consistent indicator of exposure and risk (EPA, 2001). Effective mercury remediation at point-source contaminated sites requires an understanding of the nature and magnitude of mercury inputs, and also knowledge of how these inputs must be controlled in order to achieve the desired reduction of mercury contamination in biota necessary for compliance with AWQC targets. One of the challenges to remediation is that mercury body burdens in fish are more closely linked to aqueous MeHg than to inorganic Hg concentrations (Sveinsdottir and Mason 2005), but MeHg production is not easily predicted or controlled. At point-source contaminated sites, mercury methylation is not only affected by the absolute mercury load, but also by the form of mercury loaded. In addition, once MeHg is formed, the hydrology, trophic structure, and water chemistry of a given system affect how it is transformed and transferred through the food chain to fish. Decreasing inorganic Hg concentrations and loading may often therefore be a more achievable remediation goal, but has led to mixed results in terms of responses in fish bioaccumulation. A number of source control measures have resulted in rapid responses in lake or reservoir fisheries (Joslin 1994, Turner and Southworth 1999; Orihel et al., 2007), but examples of similar responses in Hg-contaminated stream ecosystems are less common. Recent work suggests that stream systems may actually be more susceptible to mercury bioaccumulation than lakes, highlighting the need to better understand the ecological drivers of mercury bioaccumulation in stream-dwelling fish (Chasar et al. 2009, Ward et al. 2010). In the present study we examine the response of fish to remedial actions in Tims Branch, a point-source contaminated stream on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This second order stream received inorganic mercury inputs at its headwaters from the 1950s-2000s which contaminated the water, sediments, and biota downstream. In 2007, an innovative mercury removal system using tin (II) chloride (stannous chloride, SnCl{sub 2}) was implemented at a pre-existing air stripper. Tin(II) reduces dissolved Hg (II) to Hg (0), which is removed by the air stripper. During this process, tin(II) is oxidized to tin (IV) which is expected to precipitate as colloidal tin(IV) oxides and hydroxides, particulate materials with relatively low toxicity (Hallas and Cooney, 1981, EPA 2002, ATSDR, 2005). The objectives of the present research are to provide an initial assessment of the net impacts of the tin(II) based mercury treatment on key biota and to document the distribution and fate of inorganic tin in this small stream ecosystem after the first several years of operating a full scale system. To support these objectives, we collected fish, sediment, water, invertebrates, and biofilm samples from Tims Branch to quantify the general behavior and accumulation patterns for mercury and tin in the ecosystem and to determine if the treatment process has resulted in: (1) a measurable beneficial impact on (i.e., decrease of) mercury concentration in upper trophic level fish and other biota; this is a key environmental endpoint since reducing mercury concen

Looney, B.; Bryan, L.; Mathews, T.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Simulated effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on nitrogen cycling using the NuCM model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interactions between elevated CO{sub 2} and N cycling were explored using simulations generated by the Nutrient Cycling Model (NuCM) for a Pinus taeda site at Duke, North Carolina and a mixed deciduous site at Walker Branch, Tennessee. The simulations tested whether N limitation would prevent growth increase in response to elevated CO{sub 2} and whether growth response to CO{sub 2} in N-limited systems could be facilitated by increased biomass/N (reduced concentration) and/or increased litter N mineralization. Nitrogen limitation precluded additional growth when target growth rates and litterfall were increased (simulating potential response to elevated CO{sub 2}) at the Duke site. At the Walker Branch site, increasing target growth and litterfall caused a slight (790) increases in growth. Reducing foliar N concentrations caused reduced growth because of N limitation created by reduced litter quality (C/N ratio), reduced decomposition and N accumulation in forest floor. These effects were most pronounced at the Duke site, where the forest floor N turnover rate was lower than at the Walker Branch site. Reducing wood N concentration allowed prolonged increases in growth because of greater biomass/N; however, N uptake was reduced, allowing greater N immobilization in the forest floor and soil. Increased N mineralization caused increased growth at the Duke site but not at Walker Branch.

D.W. Johnson

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

358

Enriched Background Isotope Study (EBIS) Litter reciprocal transplant studies to understand sources, transport and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ecosystem C pools would help to mitigate greenhouse gas accumulation in the atmosphere (IPCC 1996; IGBP 1998 signature of soil derived CO2 could only be explained by a local release of 14 C in the form of 14 CO2 gas of total soil respiration (top) and soil gas (bottom) for two sites on the Walker Branch Watershed. #12

359

S U B G A P A B S O R P T I O N IN CONJUGATED POLYMERS M. Sinclair*, C. H. Seager*, D. McBranch**, A.J. Heeger** f^fij^-^; Baker***  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U U B G A P A B S O R P T I O N IN CONJUGATED POLYMERS M. Sinclair*, C. H. Seager*, D. McBranch**, A.J. Heeger** f^fij^-^; Baker*** *Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM **University of California, Santa Barbara, CA SAND-90-3023C ***Bell Communications Research, Red Bank, NJ ^ , ^ , « , ^ ^ ' DE91 012655 A B S T R A C T ^ Along with x^^\ the magnitude of the optical absorption in the transparent window be- low the principal absorption edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utihty of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an aibsorptance sensitivity of < 10~^, Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is ideal for determin- ing the absorption coefficients of thin films of "transpjo-ent" materials. We have used PDS

360

Fragmentation of multiply charged hydrocarbon molecules C{sub n}H{sup q+} (n{<=} 4, q{<=} 9) produced in high-velocity collisions: Branching ratios and kinetic energy release of the H{sup +} fragment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fragmentation branching ratios for channels involving H{sup +} emission and associated kinetic energy release of the H{sup +} fragment [KER(H{sup +})] have been measured for multicharged C{sub n}H{sup q+} molecules produced in high velocity (3.6 a.u.) collisions between C{sub n}H{sup +} projectiles and helium atoms. For CH{sup q+} (q{=} 5), inner-shell ionization contributed in a prominent way to the ion production. In these two cases it was shown that measured KER(H{sup +}) were in good agreement with PCCM predictions when those were corrected for Auger relaxation with the same Auger lifetime value as in CH{sup 3+}.

Beroff, K.; Pino, T.; Carpentier, Y. [Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d'Orsay (ISMO), UMR CNRS 8214, Universite Paris Sud 11, bat.210, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Van-Oanh, N. T. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique (LCP), UMR CNRS 8000, Universite Paris Sud 11, Bat.349, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Chabot, M.; Tuna, T.; Martinet, G. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d'Orsay (IPNO), IN2P3- CNRS, Universite Paris Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Le Padellec, A. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), UMR CNRS 5187, Universite de Toulouse, 9 avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Lavergne, L. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et de Hautes Energies (LPNHE) UPMC, UPD, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

walker:Users:jim:Desktop:Nordkalk_Koping_Searchforconsortia.docx Mall:Memo.dotver1.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be developed to reduce the amount of imported fuel in their district heating system. Nordkalk is a company a hot water boiler that is connected to the local district heating system. Our project idea Nordkalk has. The purpose with the boiler is to provide heated water to the district heating system of Köping municipality

Papadopoulos, Evangelos

362

Saving Tons at the Register Iain Walker, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years. Does not remediate contaminated media. Cryogenic Barrier (In-situ process - material disposal than 1X10-6 cm/sec. Does not remediate contaminated media. Chemical Solidification/ Stabilization (In-situ, but does not include buildings and structures. The liquid media includes groundwater, surface water

363

Ventilation Requirements in Hot Humid Iain S. Walker and Max H. Sherman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as it provides cooling (i.e. sensible load removal). Conventional systems have well known limits because it brings in moisture which can cause mold problems and/or increase loads on the cooling system for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Building Technologies Program, U.S. Department

364

Off the Clock: Walker Evans and the Crisis of American Capital, 1933-38  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four items from MMA WEA 1994.250.91 (file 21) relate to thelife. That many MMA/WEA 1994.250.4 (file 11). ?Outline ofand catalog, MMA / WEA 1994.250.57, file 23). Maddows text,

May, Jessica Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Synonymous Codon Usage in Escherichia coli: Selection for Translational Nina Stoletzki* and Adam Eyre-Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

usage. Genetics. 129:897­907. Bu¨rger R, Willensdorfer M, Nowak MA. 2006. Why are pheno- typic mutationSynonymous Codon Usage in Escherichia coli: Selection for Translational Accuracy Nina Stoletzki that produce non- or misfunctional proteins are costly to the cell because they consume amino acids and energy

Eyre-Walker, Adam

366

Detectability of Changes in the Walker Circulation in Response to Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the gradients in sea level pressure (SLP) and sea surface temperature (SST) along the equatorial Pacific are analyzed in observations and 101 numerical experiments performed with 37 climate models participating in the fifth phase of the ...

Pedro N. DiNezio; Gabriel A. Vecchi; Amy C. Clement

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Lifecycle Costs of Ultracapacitors in Electric Vehicle Applications A. G. Simpson G. R. Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and cost of the battery under consideration. However, it is likely that the lifecycle cost benefits that examines the lifecycle costs of ultracapacitors in battery electric vehicle applications. The lifecycle). · The high capital cost and relatively short lifetime (commonly 3 years) of electrochemical batteries, which

Walker, Geoff

368

Kinematic and Mechanical Reconstruction of Walker Ridge Structures, Deepwater Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent high-resolution seismic imaging has allowed detailed reconstruction of the relationship between fold development and crestal faulting of the Chinook and Cascade folds in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. Using 3-D seismic and biostratigraphic data, we have found that (1) short wavelength (~2300m), small amplitude folds (~540m) within the upper Cretaceous and upper Jurassic stratigraphic sequences took place no later than the late Jurassic, (2) large wavelength and amplitude fold growth, starting in the early Cretaceous, was produced by salt withdrawal, and (3) periods of increased sedimentation, fold growth, and fault slip occurred during the middle Miocene and late Miocene. Although the dominant stage of long wavelength, large amplitude fold growth started around early Cretaceous, the development of the Cascade and Chinook structures was continuous, punctuated by episodes of accelerated growth during the middle Miocene at rates of 337 and 235 m/Ma in the Cascade and 203 and 230 m/Ma in the Chinook. A later event of accelerated growth occurred during the late Miocene at rates of 1038 m/Ma in the Cascade and 1189 m/Ma in the Chinook. Accompanying fold growth was sedimentation, which was highest at 1949 m/Ma in the Cascade and 2585 m/Ma in the Chinook. Although limb tilt rates varied through fold growth, the highest rates also occurred during the middle Miocene at 0.330 and 0.196 degree/Ma for the Cascade and Chinook, respectively with the development of crestal faults at maximum slip rates of 88 and 90 m/Ma.

Majekodunmi, Oluwatosin Eniola

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Migrations of Hunger and Knowledge: Food Insecurity and California's Indigenous Farmworkers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Walker, Chair Professor Jake Kosek Professor Nancy Pelusocommittee, Richard Walker, Jake Kosek, Nancy Peluso, Carolyn

Minkoff-Zern, Laura-Anne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Measurement of branching fractions of B decays to K1(1270)pi and K1(1400)pi and determination of the CKM angle alpha from B0 --> a1(1260) - pi-  

SciTech Connect

In the Standard Model, CP violation in weak interactions involving quarks is parameterized by an irreducible complex phase in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) quark-mixing-matrix. The precise determination of the CKM elements is a necessary ingredient for a stringent test of the Standard Model predictions, and is a crucial input for reducing the theoretical error in many New Physics searches with flavor, e.g., in the kaon sector. The unitarity of the CKM matrix is typically expressed as a triangle relationship among its parameters, where the area of the so-called Unitarity Triangle visually depicts the amount of asymmetry between the decays of B particles and their antimatter counterparts. In the past few years, the BABAR and Belle experiments have been able to measure all three angles of the triangle from CP asymmetry measurements. The first asymmetry measurements in B particle decays, about ten years ago, allowed to determine {beta}, which is now known to better than 5% precision. The angles {alpha} and {gamma}, measured in much rarer processes, required several years of data taking before analyses could yield reliable answers. A remarkable feature is that the direct measurement of the angles of the Unitarity Triangle generates an area that is consistent with the area predicted by measurement of the sides. In this thesis we have presented the branching fraction measurements of charged and neutral B meson decays to K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and K{sub 1}(1400){pi}, obtained from a data sample of 454 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events. This analysis is particularly challenging from the experimental side since the branching fractions involved are very low, at the level of 10{sup -6} - 10{sup -7}, and the signal is characterized by the simultaneous presence of two overlapping resonances, which exhibit sizeable interference effects. The combined K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and K{sub 1}(1400){pi} signal is therefore modeled with a K-matrix formalism, which accounts for the effects of interference between the K{sub 1}(1270) and K{sub 1}(1400) mesons by introducing two effective parameters. The model is derived from the analysis, performed by the ACCMOR Collaboration, of the diffractive production of strange mesons.

Stracka, Simone; /Milan U. /SLAC

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

371

Measurement of the D branching fractions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,10 C. Hearty,10 N. S. Knecht,10 T. S. Mattison,10 J. A. McKenna,10 A. Khan,11 P. Kyberd,11 M. Saleem. Zhang,21 A. Chen,22 E. A. Eckhart,22 A. Soffer,22 W. H. Toki,22 R. J. Wilson,22 F. Winklmeier,22 Q. Zeng. Boutigny,1 F. Couderc,1 Y. Karyotakis,1 J. P. Lees,1 V. Poireau,1 V. Tisserand,1 A. Zghiche,1 E. Grauges,2

Honscheid, Klaus

372

Photoelectron branching ratios and asymmetry parameters for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... single intense peak. In nitrogen, this strong feature has been identified as being due to the lau+ lng transition. Dehmer and ...

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

373

BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE RECEIV r - LAWREW RADIATIONAlkanes From Blue-Green Algae by Jerry Han and Oep~rtment l~alkanes from blue-green algae were separated on a The

Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Improved strategies for branching on general disjunctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 21, 2008 ... row number as a tie breaker. 3.3 The depth of the cut is not always a good measure. As stated earlier, the improvement in the objective function...

375

Optimization Online - Strong Branching Inequalities for Convex ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Citation: Technical Report, Computer Science Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Download: [PDF]. Entry Submitted: 09/03/2011. Entry Accepted:...

376

Vibrational Branching Ratios and Asymmetry Parameters in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... At energies 2 eV above the threshold, it was not ... into the regions of high vibrational energy, in contrast ... 1] A. Dalgarno and JL Fox, Unimolecular and ...

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

377

North Branch Municipal Water & Light - Commercial & Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

150 - 400 Dishwashers: 300 - 1,000 Ventilation Hood Controllers: 165HP Low-Flow Spray Valve: 50% of installed cost Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (http:...

378

Branching and Bounding Improvements for Global Optimization ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 5, 2013 ... address the problem of balancing the load between processors by ..... formance profiles of the total runtime for the first order estimation...

379

Automated Anatomical Labeling of Bronchial Branches Extracted ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

1. Graduate School of Information Science, Nagoya University, kensaku@is. nagoya-u.ac.jp. 2. Innovative Research Center for Preventive Medical Engineering,...

380

Nanocrystals with linear and branched topology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are nanostructures comprising distinct dots and rods coupled through potential barriers of tuneable height and width, and arranged in three dimensional space at well defined angles and distances. Such control allows investigation of potential applications ranging from quantum information processing to artificial photosynthesis.

Alivisatos, A. Paul (Oakland, CA); Milliron, Delia (Berkeley, CA); Manna, Liberato (Lecce, IT); Hughes, Steven M. (Berkeley, CA)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nucleic acid amplification using modular branched primers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and compositions expand the options for making primers for use in amplifying nucleic acid segments. The invention eliminates the step of custom synthesis of primers for Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). Instead of being custom-synthesized, a primer is replaced by a combination of several oligonucleotide modules selected from a pre-synthesized library. A modular combination of just a few oligonucleotides essentially mimics the performance of a conventional, custom-made primer by matching the sequence of the priming site in the template. Each oligonucleotide module has a segment that matches one of the stretches within the priming site.

Ulanovsky, Levy (Westmont, IL); Raja, Mugasimangalam C. (Downers Grove, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Targeted Expression of Stromelysin-1 in Mammary Gland Provides Evidence for a Role of Proteinases in Branching Morphogenesis and the Requirement for an Intact Basement Membrane for Tissue-specific Gene Expression  

SciTech Connect

The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an important regulator of the differentiated phenotype of mammary epithelial cells in culture. Despite the fact that ECM-degrading enzymes have been implicated in morphogenesis and tissue remodeling, there is little evidence for a direct role for such regulation in vivo. We generated transgenic mice that express autoactivated isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, under the control of the whey acidic protein gene promoter, to examine the effect of inappropriate expression of this enzyme. Stromelysin-1 is implicated as the primary player in the loss of basement membrane and loss of function in the mammary gland during involution. The transgene was expressed at low levels in mammary glands of virgin female mice, leading to an unexpected phenotype: The primary ducts had supernumerary branches and showed precocious development of alveoli that expressed beta-casein at levels similar to that of an early- to mid-pregnant gland. Lactating glands showed high levels of transgene expression, with accumulation at the basement membrane, and a decrease in laminin and collagen IV, resulting in a loss of basement membrane integrity; this was accompanied by a dramatic alteration of alveolar morphology, with decreased size and shrunken lumina containing little beta-casein. During pregnancy, expression of endogenous whey acidic protein and beta-casein was reduced in transgenic glands, confirming the observed dependence of milk protein transcription of ECM in mammary epithelial cells in culture. These data provide direct evidence that stromelysin-1 activity can be morphogenic for mammary epithelial cells, inducing hyperproliferation and differentiation in virgin animals, and that its lytic activity can, indeed, disrupt membrane integrity and reduce mammary-specific function. We conclude that the balance of ECM-degrading enzymes with their inhibitors, and the associated regulation of ECM structure, is crucial for tissue-specific gene expression and morphogenesis in vivo.

Sympson, Carolyn J; Talhouk, Rabih S; Alexander, Caroline M; Chin, Jennie R; Cliff, Shirley M; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Measurement of the Ratios of Branching Fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) and B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi)  

SciTech Connect

Using 355 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, they study the fully reconstructed hadronic decays B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. They present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 1.05 {+-} 0.10(stat.) {+-} 0.22(syst.). They also update their measurement of {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) to 1.13 {+-} 0.08(stat.) {+-} 0.23(syst.) improving the statistical uncertainty by more than a factor of two. They find {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) = [3.8 {+-} 0.3(stat.) {+-} 1.3(syst.)] x 10{sup -3} and {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = [8.4 {+-} 0.8(stat.) {+-} 3.2(syst.)] x 10{sup -3}.

Abulencia, A.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U.; Affolder, T.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, M.G.; /Fermilab; Ambrose, D.; /Fermilab; Amerio, S.; /Padua U.; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Anikeev, K.; /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati /Taiwan, Inst. Phys.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Measurements of Time-Dependent CP-Asymmetry Parameters in B Meson Decays to \\eta^{\\prime} K^0 and of Branching Fractions of SU(3) Related Modes with BaBar Experiment at SLAC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this thesis work we have measured the following upper limits at 90% of confidence level, for B meson decays (in units of 10{sup -6}), using a statistics of 465.0 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{eta}) < 1.4 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{eta}{prime}) < 2.1 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{phi}) < 0.52 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{omega}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{phi}) < 1.2 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}) < 1.7 We have no observation of any decay mode, statistical significance for our measurements is in the range 1.3-3.5 standard deviation. We have a 3.5{sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{omega} and a 3.1 {sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}. The absence of observation of the B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0} open an issue related to the large difference compared to the charged mode B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +} branching fraction, which is measured to be 3.7 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.1 [118]. Our results represent substantial improvements of the previous ones [109, 110, 111] and are consistent with theoretical predictions. All these results were presented at Flavor Physics and CP Violation (FPCP) 2008 Conference, that took place in Taipei, Taiwan. They will be soon included into a paper to be submitted to Physical Review D. For time-dependent analysis, we have reconstructed 1820 {+-} 48 flavor-tagged B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0} events, using the final BABAR statistic of 467.4 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs. We use these events to measure the time-dependent asymmetry parameters S and C. We find S = 0.59 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, and C = -0.06 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.02. A non-zero value of C would represent a directly CP non-conserving component in B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, while S would be equal to sin2{beta} measured in B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} [108], a mixing-decay interference effect, provided the decay is dominated by amplitudes of a single weak phase. The new measured value of S can be considered in agreement with the expectations of the 'Standard Model', inside the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Inconsistency of our result for S with CP conservation (S = 0) has a significance of 7.1 standard deviations (statistical and systematics included). Our result for the direct-CP violation parameter C is 0.9 standard deviations from zero (statistical and systematics included). Our results are in agreement with the previous ones [18]. Despite the statistics is only 20% larger than the one used in previous measurement, we improved of 20% the error on S and of 14% the error on C. This error is the smaller ever achieved, by both BABAR and Belle, in Time-Dependent CP Violation Parameters measurement is a b {yields} s transition.

Biassoni, Pietro; /Milan U.

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

385

Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Leadership: President...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Walker Vice President, Weapons Engineering and Product Realization, Chief Engineer for Nuclear Weapons Bruce Walker Bruce C. Walker is Vice President of Weapons Engineering and...

386

Measurement of the B0 ->π−ℓνand B ->η(′)ℓνBranching Fractions, the B0 ->π−ℓνand B ->ηℓνForm-Factor Shapes, and Determination of |Vub|  

SciTech Connect

We report the results of a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decays, B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sup {prime}}{ell}{sup +}{nu} and B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}, undertaken with approximately 464 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses events in which the signal B decays are reconstructed with a loose neutrino reconstruction technique. We obtain partial branching fractions for B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu} and B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu} decays in three and 12 bins of q{sup 2}, respectively, from which we extract the f{sub +}(q{sup 2}) form-factor shapes and the total branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (0.36 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.04{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.42 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.07{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4}. We also measure {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sup {prime}}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (0.24 {+-} 0.08{sub stat} {+-} 0.03{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4}. We obtain values for the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}| using three different QCD calculations.

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

387

370 P. L. WALKER,JR.,AND EMILERAATS Vol. 60 EFFECT OF GAS DIFFUSION IN GRAPHITIZED CARBON RODS ON THEIR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, and N2O VOC, CO, and NOx as optional GHGs GREET estimates emissions of five/Compression Are Key Steps for Gaseous H2 NA NG Recovery (97.5%) Compressed G.H2 at Refueling Stations LNG Gasification Critical for Evaluating Costs Define Pathways Estimate Fuel Demand Estimate Size of Facilities Capital

388

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sub-Grid-Scale Isentropic Transports on McRAS Evaluations Sub-Grid-Scale Isentropic Transports on McRAS Evaluations Using ARM-CART SCM Datasets Sud, Y.C., Walker, G.K., and Tao, W.-K., Climate and Radiation Branch, Laboratory for Atmospheres, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Influence of Sub-grid-Scale Isentropic Transports on McRAS: Evaluation using ARM-CART SCM Datasets. Y. C. Sud, G. K. Walker and W.-K. Tao In GCM-physics evaluations with the currently available ARM-CART SCM datasets, McRAS produced very similar character of near surface errors of simulated temperature and humidity containing typically warm and moist biases near the surface and cold and dry biases aloft. We argued it must have a common cause presumably rooted in the model physics. Lack of vertical adjustment

389

Branching Fraction Measurements of the Color-Suppressed Decays B0bar to D(*)0 pi0, D(*)0 eta, D(*)0 omega, and D(*)0 eta_prime and Measurement of the Polarization in the Decay B0bar to D*0 omega  

SciTech Connect

We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}', and D*{sup 0}{eta}'. We measure the branching fractions (x10{sup -4}): {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.13, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 3.05 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.28, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.53 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.11, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.23, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{omega}) = 2.57 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.14, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{omega}) = 4.55 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.39, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.48 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.07, and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.49 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.15. We also present the first measurement of the longitudinal polarization fraction of the decay channel D*{sup 0}{omega}, f{sub L} = (66.5 {+-} 4.7 {+-} 1.5)%. In the above, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The measurements are the most precise determinations of these quantities from a single experiment. They are compared to theoretical predictions obtained by factorization, Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). We find that the presence of final state interactions is favored and the measurements are in better agreement with SCET than with pQCD.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

Branch County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8913835°, -85.023346° 8913835°, -85.023346° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8913835,"lon":-85.023346,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

391

ORIGINAL SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE Branching Out with Coevolutionary Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratory May 2008 #12;The Yucca Mountain Geologic RepositoryThe Yucca Mountain Geologic repository. s In 1987 Yucca Mountain was selected as the single site for further study. s In 2002, the President signed into law a congressional resolution designating the Yucca Mountain site for development

Segraves, Kari A.

392

North Branch Municipal Water & Light- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency ([http://www.smmpa.com SMMPA]) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit, municipally...

393

I-17 Mr. Barold Snyder, Chief Discovery and Investigations Branch  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

records by DoEhas determined that the Department does not have authority under the Atanic Energy Act to conduct remedial action at this site to remove the contamination. Therefore,...

394

Deciding full branching time logic by program transformation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a method based on logic program transformation, for verifying Computation Tree Logic (CTL*) properties of finite state reactive systems. The finite state systems and the CTL* properties we want to verify, are encoded ...

Alberto Pettorossi; Maurizio Proietti; Valerio Senni

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Optimization Online - Branch-and-Price Guided Search for Integer ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 15, 2012 ... Column generation is used both for generating these problem restrictions ... Citation: INFORMS Journal on Computing (Accepted 1/16/2012).

396

Branch-and-Lift Algorithm for Global Optimal Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refine the control parameterization during the search and where the ... and G; as well as OCPs having an additional Lagrange term in the objective function. ... typically control inputs are forces or torques which enter affinely in the dynamic...

397

Branching and Bounds Tightening Techniques for Non-Convex MINLP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 13, 2008 ... (sBB), and we use this term throughout the paper. ... appropriately so as to encourage a search for good feasible ..... enter an infinite loop.

398

A branching fuzzy-logic classifier for building optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an input-output model that learns to emulate a complex building simulation of high dimensionality. Many multi-dimensional systems are dominated by the behavior of a small number of inputs over a limited range ...

Lehar, Matthew A., 1977-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Branch and cut algorithms for detecting critical nodes in undirected ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

instances derived from the Ohio's state highway network. Dinh et al. [6] focus on telecommunication networks; they propose algorithms for detecting in a directed ...

400

An Enhanced Spatial Branch-and-Bound Method in Global ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 22, 2013 ... Section 5, and Section 6 concludes the paper with some final remarks. The notation in this paper is standard. In particular, Df denotes the row.

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401

Structure of Ionic Liquids with Linear, Branched and Cyclic Alkyl...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Edward W. Castner J. Phys. Chem. B 117, Just Accepted (2013). Find paper at ACS Publications Abstract: X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations have been...

402

A Branch-and-Cut Algorithm for Graph Coloring ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2030. 33751. 5. 8 ? 4-FullIns 3. 114. 541. 6. 7 ? 4-FullIns 4. 690. 6650. 6. 8 ? 4- FullIns 5. 4146. 77305. 6. 9 ? 5-FullIns 3. 154. 792. 7. 8 ? 5-FullIns 4. 1085. 11395.

403

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEDICAL BRANCH SCHOOL OF NURSING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the fundamental principles of pharmacology and pathophysiology for nursing practice. Learning objectives://www.utmb.edu/enrollmentservices/about/catalogs.html), and SON Student Handbook, (http://www.son.utmb.edu/studentaffairs/handbooks/), taken together guide. Student Handbook: Each student is responsible for knowing and adhering to the University of Texas Medical

Wood, James B.

404

Basis Reduction, and the Complexity of Branch-and-Bound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis builds on the ideas of Furst and Kannan to bound the number .... However, they seem difficult to analyze in general. Aardal ..... and Job W. Smeltink.

405

A Branch-and-Cut Decomposition Algorithm for Solving Chance ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pk are described as in (2), this model doesn't consider costs associated with these recourse actions ...... approach to stochastic programming of heating oil.

406

New Executive Branch Fellowship Focuses on the Material Genome ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 14, 2012?arrendale, PA? new fellowship with placement in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) is positioned as a key...

407

DOE Solar Decathlon: University of Maryland: Branching out in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darmstadt Georgia Illinois Kansas Lawrence Madrid Maryland MIT Montral NYIT Penn State Puerto Rico Rolla Santa Clara Texas Texas A&M Quick Links Solar Decathlon Home Solar...

408

Branch-and-Cut for Separable Piecewise Linear Optimization ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2011 ... We performed our computational tests in the Texas Tech High Performance Computing Center's. Intel Xeon E5450 3.0GHz CPU with 16GB...

409

Brief paper: Branch and bound method for multiobjective pairing selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the available methods for selection of input-output pairings for decentralized control require evaluation of all alternatives to find the optimal pairings. As the number of alternatives grows rapidly with process dimensions, pairing selection ... Keywords: Computer-aided control system design, Decentralized control, Global optimization, Large-scale systems, Multiobjective optimizations, Relative gain array, Structured singular value

Vinay Kariwala; Yi Cao

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Branched Polymeric Media: Boron-Chelating Resins from Hyperbranched Polyethylenimine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

magnesium oxide from brines, and (iv) nuclear power generation.1-4 Boron is an essential nutrient for plants.5 However, it adversely affects plant growth and damages crops (e.g., citrus and corn) when desalination, ultrapure water production, and nuclear power generation. Today's commercial boron

Goddard III, William A.

411

Uranium studies in the Tims Branch and Steed Pond system  

SciTech Connect

During the weekend of September 2--3, 1984, a part of the wooden spillway for Steed Pond gave way and the pond slowly drained. Consideration is being given to leaving Steed Pond dry. Steed Pond has accumulated some of the uranium discharged from 300 Area operations and past surveys have shown that the uranium concentration in the sediments ranges between 20 and 531 pCi/gm. The recently completed aerial survey of the exposed area of Steed Pond showed that the uranium was widely spread in the sediments of Steed Pond. Until ground cover is established over the exposed pond sediments, they will be subject to erosion. As much as 90 tons of sediment could be eroded from the exposed sediments in Steed Pond the first year, but the erosion could be reduced to 5--15 tons by establishing a ground cover such as rye grass. Only about 40% of the eroded sediment would be delivered to Upper Three Runs Creek, because most of the eroded sediment deposited before it reaches Upper Three Runs Creek. Less than 20 mCi of uranium would be transported downstream the first year from erosion of Steed Pond sediments, and this could be reduced to 2-- 5 mCi/year if ground cover is established.

Hayes, D.W.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A branch and cut algorithm for minimum spanning trees under ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(eds) Network Models, Handbooks in Operations Research and Management Science, vol 7, Elsevier, pp 503 615. Oncan T, Zhang R, Punnen AP (2013) The...

413

North Branch Municipal Water & Light - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

unit Central AC: 100 - 200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Air Source Heat Pump:100 - 200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above...

414

Modified Orbital Branching with Applications to Orbitopes and to Unit ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 27, 2012 ... electricity spot market. IEEE Transactions on Power Systems 15(3), 1098. 1104 (2000). [2] Carrion, M., Arroyo, J.: A computationally efficient...

415

BRANCH-CUT-AND-PROPAGATE FOR THE MAXIMUM k ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to (IPk(G)) does not change the optimal value. Proof. .... v3. 1 21011. 33. 33 (20, 234) wa712. 237. 4458. >21013. 35. 35 (20, 236) .... F. Rossi, P. van Beek, and T. Walsh, editors, Handbook of Constraint Programming,.

416

Techniques for the measurement of Higgs-boson branching fractions  

SciTech Connect

We describe methods that can be employed at a [radical][ital s] =500 GeV [ital e][sup +][ital e[minus

Hildreth, M.D.; Barklow, T.L.; Burke, D.L. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California 94309 (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Semidefinite-Based Branch-and-Bound for Nonconvex Quadratic ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 27, 2005 ... Likewise, if P does not satisfy Assumption 1.2, then dimension- reduction .... However, there is a fundamental problem with such an approach, namely that ( RKKT) ...... editors, Handbook of global optimization, pages 217269.

418

Advanced Branching Control and Characterization of Inorganic Semiconducting Nanocrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Shape-Controlled Colloidal CdSe Quantum Rods. Nano Lett.of highly luminescent CdSe/CdS coreshell nanocrystals viabowings, and defects in CdS, CdSe, CdTe, and . In Journal

Hughes, Steven Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Robust Branch-Cut-and-Price Algorithms for Vehicle Routing ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

terms of variables from a suitable original formulation could be dynamically separated .... The in-degree constraints (1b) state that exactly one arc must enter each non-depot vertex. ...... In short, we perform a sort of binary search to determine a...

420

A BRANCH-AND-BOUND ALGORITHM FOR BIOBJECTIVE MIXED ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the search when it can be proved that the subproblem does not contain any optimal solution. In order to exclude a ...... never enter the set Y. This is correct behavior ..... In terms of CPU time, the BB algorithm takes longer time due to solving the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Black holes in supergravity: the non-BPS branch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Seed Solution: Non-BPS Black Holes with 5nd that the mass of the non-BPS black hole remains that of aconstruction of regular black hole solutions in supergravity

Gimon, Eric G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

More Branch-and-Bound Experiments in Convex Nonlinear Integer ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 29, 2011 ... We warmly thank Roger Fletcher for his great code BQPD, which is essential to the ... Special facilities in a general mathematical programming.

423

Branch-and-Bound Approach for Parsimonious Inference of a ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 19, 2010 ... Speciation is the fundamental mechanism of genome evolution, especially ...... consider in order to evaluate their performance for phylogenetic inference. ..... Macmu. Human. Pantr. Fig. 4. The species tree for the 29 animals...

424

HARBOR BRANCH OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTE AT FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and HQ40 dissolved oxygen meters, YSI salinity and conductivity meters, PointfourTM CO2 meter, a CO2 gas meter, a gas tensionometer, YSI multiprobe meter, nine YSI 5200 water quality monitor and control with a temperaturecontrolled centrifuge, microhematocrit centrifuge, tissue homogenizers, freeze dryer, ultracold freezer

Fernandez, Eduardo

425

Starch branching enzymes and their genes in Sorghum.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Starch is an important raw material both for food and non-food purposes. It is synthesized and stored in source and sink tissues in plants. The (more)

Mutisya, Joel

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

140 P. L. WALKER,JR.,J. I?. RAICSZAWSKIAND G. R. IMPERIAL Vol. 63 surface area (0.8 m."g.) as compared to that of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

could have been to get the generation and load patterns at each node as published in the FERC Form 715

427

Reply to 'Comment on 'Quantization of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes in the presence of a negative cosmological constant and radiation''  

SciTech Connect

The previous Comment contains a valid criticism of the numerical precision of the results reported in a recent paper of ours, as well as fresh ideas on how to characterize a quantum cosmological singularity. However, we argue that, contrary to what is suggested in the Comment, the quantum cosmological models we studied show hardly any sign of singular behavior.

Lemos, N. A.; Monerat, G. A.; Silva, E. V. Correa; Oliveira-Neto, G.; Filho, L. G. Ferreira [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, R. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza s/n, CEP 24210-340, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Departamento de Matematica e Computacao, Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Estrada Resende-Riachuelo s/n, CEP 27523-000, Resende, RJ (Brazil); Departamento de Mecanica e Energia, Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Estrada Resende-Riachuelo s/n, CEP 27523-000, Resende, RJ (Brazil)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

SIMULATED LIFECYCLE COSTS OF ULTRACAPACITORS IN BATTERY ELECTRIC VEHICLES A.G. Simpson*, P.C. Sernia and G.R. Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIMULATED LIFECYCLE COSTS OF ULTRACAPACITORS IN BATTERY ELECTRIC VEHICLES A.G. Simpson*, P, vehicle driving range, battery pack lifetime, and potential reductions in system lifecycle cost costs of ultracapacitors in battery electric vehicle applications. The lifecycle operation

Walker, Geoff

429

THE ULTRACOMMUTER: A VIABLE AND DESIRAB LE SOLAR-POWERED COMMUTER VEHICLE A. Simpson, G. Walker, M. Greaves, D. Finn and B. Guymer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Electrical Engineering The University of Queensland Abstract The University of Queensland Ultra, electric commuter vehicle equipped with a 2.5m2 on- board solar array. A key goal of the project is to make to predict the solar driving range for the UltraCommuter and this is compared to typical urban usage patterns

Walker, Geoff

430

Bulk and Surface Simulation Studies of La1-xCaxMnO3 M. Javed Akhtar,*,, C. Richard A. Catlow, Ben Slater, Andrew M. Walker,, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad, Pakistan, and Research School of Earth Sciences Institution of Great Britain, 21 Albemarle Street, London W1S 4BS, United Kingdom, Pakistan Institute

Cambridge, University of

431

Evaluation of commercially available techniques and development of simplified methods for measuring grille airflows in HVAC systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Walker. 2002. Residential HVAC and Distribution researchMeasuring Grille Airflows in HVAC Systems I.S. Walker, C.P.Measuring Grille Airflows in HVAC Systems I.S. Walker, C.P.

Walker, Iain S.; Wray, Craig P.; Guillot, Cyril; Masson, S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Posters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters The Effects of Radiative Transfer in Maintaining the Indian Summer Monsoon M. J. Leach and S. Raman Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences North Carolina State University Raleigh, North Carolina Introduction Atmospheric radiative transfer is an important thermodynamic forcing for the Indian summer monsoon. The Indian summer monsoon is a component of a larger scale circulation system the principal components of which are the Hadley cell and the Walker Circulation. The Hadley cell is a thermally direct circulation that transports heat toward the poles. In the northern hemispheric summer, the ascending branch of the Hadley cell moves northward, driven by heating of the land masses. This ascending branch of the Hadley cell is commonly referred to as the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ).

433

Absolute diffuse calibration of IRAC through mid-infrared and radio study of HII regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

124, 26 Wainscoat, R. , Cohen, M. , Volk, K. ,Walker, H.J. ,1988 Walker, H.J. , Cohen, M. , Volk, K. , Wainscoat, R. ,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Argonne Transportation Technology R&D Center - Battery Test Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Battery Test Facility Argonne researcher Lee Walker Argonne researcher Lee Walker examines a...

435

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biology...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Walker Jr., Philip L. (Philip L. Walker Jr.) - Wildenschild, Dorthe (Dorthe Wildenschild) - School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University...

436

Mirrors and Echoes: Women's Writing in Twentieth-Century Spain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collection of essays by both scholars and creative artistscreative daughter in a stiflingly repressive environment? Alice Walkers remarkable volume of essays,

Bergmann, Emilie L.; Herr, Richard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Technical note Use of mixed ion exchange resin and the denitrifier method to determine isotopic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or canopy throughfall by sampling aqueous solutions in the field (Hoering, 1957; Moore, 1977; Garten, 1992 followed by either (1) diffusions (Garten, 1992; Downs et al., 1999) or (2) purification of NO3 ? as AgNO3

Templer, Pamela

438

Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Location, Air Leakage and Insulation Iain S. Walker Energy4 Duct Insulation, Location and Leakageinsulation

Walker, Iain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Variable stars in the Fornax dSph Galaxy. II. Pulsating stars below the horizontal branch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have carried out an intensive survey of the northern region of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy with the aim of detecting the galaxy's short--period pulsating stars (Pled us to reconstruct the Period-Luminosity relation for short-period pulsating stars. An excellent linear fit, M(V)=-1.83(+/-0.08)-3.65(+/-0.07) log P(fund), was obtained using 153 Delta Scuti and SX Phoenicis stars in a number of different stellar systems.

Ennio Poretti; Gisella Clementini; Enrico V. Held; Claudia Greco; Mario Mateo; Luca Dell'Arciprete; Luca Rizzi; Marco Gullieuszik; Marcella Maio

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

440

Integrating S P and branch-and-bound for Mixed Integer Nonlinear ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the optimization of core reload patterns for nuclear reactors [22]. For a comprehensive survey of applications of MINLP applications see Grossmann and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

PROGRAM SUPPORT FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT BRANCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the 3rd Annual Solar Heating and Cooling R&D Contractors'6782 Program Support for Solar Heating and Marlo Martin andPROGRAN SUPPORT FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING RESEARCH AND

Martin, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Kinetic overshoot in actin network assembly induced jointly by branching and capping proteins Hyeran Kang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Depol Experiment Experimental Setup Measurement Principle Storage Method Complementary Method of a collaboration by PSI-TUM-GUMZ-ILL Technische Universität München 8th UCN Workshop, 2011 #12;Depol Experiment Investigation #12;Depol Experiment Experimental Setup Measurement Principle Storage Method Complementary Method

Tang, Jay X.

443

Dynamic rupture through a branched fault2 configuration at Yucca Mountain and resulting3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the District of Columbia Circuit, which remanded to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency its Yucca Mountain). The design of surface facilities at Yucca Mountain should be an integrated part of the total waste, storage, and disposal) casks for transporting, storing, and disposing of spent fuel at Yucca Mountain

Dmowska, Renata

444

Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground Motions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-term care. Now, after decades of expensive false starts, and with an uncertain future for Yucca Mountain Yucca Mountain can handle, even if the statutory limits on its capacity are doubled repository. Second, it is unclear whether Yucca Mountain will ever receive a license from the Nuclear

Bhat, Harsha S.

445

All executive branch employees are subject to statutory and regulatory conflict of interest restrictions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GUIDANCE ON ACCESSING SUBCONTRACTOR EMPLOYMENT RECORDS GUIDANCE ON ACCESSING SUBCONTRACTOR EMPLOYMENT RECORDS Federal officials, on occasion, may seek access to contractor or subcontractor employment and personnel records. There are circumstances in which such access is appropriate and permissible. But access should only be granted in circumstances that demonstrate such access is authorized and that creates a record of such access that can be reviewed. In some situations, such as an investigation by the Inspector General, specific officials are authorized to have access. Other officials who wish access to such records should coordinate with the contracting officer, who should maintain a record of both the officials who are seeking access and their declared purpose for the access. This process will permit legitimate

446

Measurements of Branching Fractions and Time-Dependent CP-Violating Asymmetries B. Aubert,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kenna,10 D. Thiessen,10 A. Khan,11 P. Kyberd,11 L. Teodorescu,11 A. E. Blinov,12 V. E. Blinov,12 V. P,22 Q. Zeng,22 B. Spaan,23 D. Altenburg,24 T. Brandt,24 J. Brose,24 M. Dickopp,24 E. Feltresi,24 A A. Zghiche,1 E. Grauges-Pous,2 A. Palano,3 A. Pompili,3 J. C. Chen,4 N. D. Qi,4 G. Rong,4 P. Wang,4

Ford, William

447

A Branch-and-Cut Algorithm for the Discrete (r|p)-Centroid Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2011 ... Moreover, we report several experiments with different number of customers and applicant facilities and different values of p and r. Our results...

448

DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002195 Diversity Through a Branched Reaction Pathway: Generation of Multicyclic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the discovery of new drugs.[2] The de- velopment of efficient methods for the construction of libra- ries Engineering, Changzhou University Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu, (P.R. China) Supporting information

Fenteany, Gabriel

449

Improving the LP bound of a MILP by dual concurrent branching and ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transformed to the dual space in the textbook standard way, we get: g1 : y1 + ... In 2.1 we call those inequalities, where the right hand side is greater 0 the main.

450

The Discovery of Archaea, the 'Third Branch of Life', and Its...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

... looked like nothing seen before in biology. The genes involved in energy production, cell division, and metabolism were similar to those in bacteria, whereas those...

451

Optimization Online - A branch-and-cut algorithm for a resource ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 10, 2006... algorithm along with extensive computational results demonstrating its ... Category 2: Applications -- OR and Management Sciences ... Citation: Report n PE/BSC/INF/017912, Nortel GSM Access R&D, march 2006.

452

Modern automatic system for the optimization of the electrical drives for working machines with mechanical branches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After a consequent adjustable electric drives experience, once with establish of the analysis desiderata's, during of prepares and experimentations time, there are selected some few problems who underlie this work definition. This paper brings some contributions ... Keywords: electric drive system, flux bearing, frequency converter, speed adjustment of a high power asynchronous motor, system for adjustment speed to asynchronous motor

Mihail-Florin Stan; Marcel Ionel; Octavian-Marcel Ionel

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

A Branch-and-Cut Algorithm for the Stochastic Uncapacitated Lot ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the end of period i, and yi indicates if there is a production set-up in period i. Problem parameters ?i,?i,hi, and di represent the production cost, set-up cost...

454

Branch-and-cut Approaches for Chance-constrained Formulations of ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1: An example graph with known arc failure probabilities and costs. for some integer ...... approach to stochastic programming of heating oil. Manage. Sci .

455

A mathematical model for the branched chain amino acid biosynthetic pathways of Escherichia coli K12  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biotechnol 19, 125-130 Herring, P. A. , McKnight, B. L. ,1257-1265 Jackson, J. H. , Herring, P. A. , Patterson, E.250: 4477-85, 1975 17 Herring P.A. et al. Biochem. Biophy.

Yang, C R; Shapiro, B E; Hung, S P; Mjolsness, E D; Hatfield, G W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Meanders, Ramsey Theory and lower bounds for branching programs Noga Alon+ *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

theoretic lemma that is of interest in its own right. This lemma has other applica- tions, including a tight and for disjoint sets S, T ~ N we say that an interval xi xi +1 · · .xi +j is a link between Sand T if Xi Sand T. More generally, for any function g:N .. R+, M is a g(x)-meander (over n numbers) if for any

Shamir, Ron

457

A Robust Branch-Cut-and-Price Algorithm for the Heterogeneous ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

routes that makes the pricing problem solvable in pseudo-polynomial time. ... Price (BCP) algorithm in a robust way, i.e., without increasing the complexity.

458

Proposed Modification to the NRC Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation (BTP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the United States has changed significantly with the loss of Class B and C disposal access for 85 of U.S. nuclear power plants. Waste processing and disposal methods and radiation exposure modeling methods as well as significantly different economic considerations exist that were not envisioned during the development of existing regulations and guidance documents. To promote increased disposal options, this report evaluates alternatives to current waste classifi...

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

459

Theoretical and simulations-based modeling of micellization in linear and branched surfactant systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surfactants are chemically-heterogeneous molecules possessing hydrophilic (head) and hydrophobic (tail) moieties. This dual nature of surfactants leads to interesting phase behavior in aqueous solution as a function of ...

Mendenhall, Jonathan David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A measurement of the branching fraction B(tau$^{+}$ --> h$^{-}$ $\\pi$sup(0) $\  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using data from the CLEO II detector at CESR, we measure {\\cal B}(\\tau^\\pm\\rightarrow h^\\pm\\pi^0\

Artuso, M; He, D; Horwitz, N; Kennett, R; Mountain, R; Moneti, G C; Muheim, F; Mukhin, Y; Playfer, S; Rozen, Y; Stone, S; Thulasidas, M; Vasseur, G; Xing, X; Zhu, G; Bartelt, J; Csorna, S E; Egyed, Z; Jain, V; Kinoshita, K; Barish, B; Chadha, M; Chan, S; Cowen, D F; Eigen, G; Miller, J S; O'Grady, C; Urheim, J; Weinstein, A J; Acosta, D; Athanas, M; Masek, G; Paar, H P; Sivertz, M; Gronberg, J; Kutschke, R; Menary, S; Morrison, R J; Nakanishi, S; Nelson, H N; Nelson, T K; Qiao, C; Richman, J D; Ryd, A; Tajima, H; Sperka, D; Witherell, M S; Procario, M; Balest, R; Cho, K; Daoudi, M; Ford, W T; Johnson, D R; Lingel, K; Lohner, M; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Bebek, C; Berkelman, K; Bloom, K; Browder, T E; Cassel, D G; Cho, H A; Coffman, D M; Crowcroft, D S; Drell, P S; Ehrlich, R; Gaidarev, P; Galik, R S; Garca-Sciveres, M; Geiser, B; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Jones, C D; Jones, S L; Kandaswamy, J; Katayama, N; Kim, P C; Kreinick, D L; Ludwig, G S; Masui, J; Mevissen, J; Mistry, N B; Ng, C R; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Salman, S; Sapper, M; Wrthwein, F; Avery, P; Freyberger, A; Rodrguez, J; Stephens, R; Yang, S; Yelton, J; Cinabro, D; Henderson, S; Liu, T; Saulnier, M; Wilson, R; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G; Ong, B; Palmer, M; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Edwards, K W; Ogg, M; Spaan, B; Bellerive, A; Britton, D I; Hyatt, E R F; MacFarlane, D B; Patel, P M; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Ball, S; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Besson, D; Coppage, D; Copty, N; Davis, R; Hancock, N; Kelly, M; Kotov, S; Kravchenko, I; Kwak, N; Lam, H; Kubota, Y; Lattery, M; Momayezi, M; Nelson, J K; Patton, S; Perticone, D; Poling, R; Savinov, V; Schrenk, S; Wang, R; Alam, M S; Kim, I J; Nemati, B; O'Neill, J J; Severini, H; Sun, C R; Zoeller, M M; Crawford, G; Daubenmier, C M; Fulton, R; Fujino, D; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Lee, J; Malchow, R; Skovpen, Y; Sung, M; White, C; Butler, F; Fu, X; Kalbfleisch, G; Ross, W R; Skubic, P L; Wood, M; Fast, J; McIlwain, R L; Miao, T; Miller, D H; Modesitt, M; Payne, D; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Wang, P N; Battle, M; Ernst, J; Gibbons, L; Kwon, Y; Roberts, S; Thorndike, E H; Wang, C H; Dominick, J; Lambrecht, M; Sanghera, S; Shelkov, V; Skwarnicki, T; Stroynowski, R; Volobuev, I P; Wei, G; Zadorozhny, P

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "walker branch throughfall" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

THE STRUCTURE OF HEAVY NUCLEI: A STUDY OF VERY WEAK ALPHA BRANCHING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Procedure Results A. B. C. D. Pu a --I> U E. F. G. H. I. J.VI. The U 230 Series a Th 228 U 232 a Th U 234 a U232 Pu 236a U Pu a Pu U a Am Np 243 -.. Np239 a Am a Cm Pu a Cm Pu a

Lederer, Charles Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Spectrometer sensitivity calibration in the extreme uv by means of branching ratios of magnetic dipole lines  

SciTech Connect

Relative intensity measurements of various line pairs resulting from magnetic dipole transitions within the configurations s/sup 2/p/sup 2/ and s/sup 2/p/sup 4/, in conjunction with calculated transition probabilities, have been used to determine the wavelength dependence of the sensitivity of a grazing incidence spectrometer, in the range 400 to 1000 A. Emissions from Cr XIX, Fe XXI, Ni XXI and XXIII, Cu XXIV, and Zr XXVII ions in PLT tokamak discharges were used for this purpose. Absolute sensitivity of the spectrometer at selected wavelengths had been determined by the traditional hydrogen, helium, carbon, and oxygen electric-dipole line pairs from the same discharges. Similar attempts to use transitions in the s/sup 2/p/sup 3/ configurations in Cr XVIII, Zr XXVI, and Mo XXVIII ions resulted in significant discrepancies that are ascribed to uncertainties in the corresponding calculated transition probabilities.

Denne, B.; Hinnov, E.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

A Hybrid Relax-and-Cut/Branch and Cut Algorithm for the Degree ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational results indicate that our hybrid algorithm dominates similar .... [15], the Traveling Salesman Problem [4], the Vehicle Routing Problem [43], the...

464

Measurement of the B+--> omega l+ nu and B+--> eta l+ nu branching fractions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a study of the charmless semileptonic B-meson decays B+-->omega?+? and B+-->eta?+nu. The analysis is based on 3.83108 BB[over-bar] pairs recorded at the ?(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The ? mesons ...

Fisher, Peter H.

465

Multi-objective branch-and-bound. Application to the bi-objective ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

derivations of the well-known cut and cycle rules that are useful to identify ...... Numerical experiments clearly show that this procedure, combined with an effi-.

466

Lattice-free sets, multi-branch split disjunctions, and mixed-integer ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By analyzing -dimensional lattice-free sets, we prove that for every integer ... in lattice-free sets as a way to generate cutting planes for mixed-integer programs...

467

A Branch-and-Price Guided Search Approach to Maritime Inventory ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coordinating inventory management and vehicle routing decisions presents ... almost all papers on the Inventory Routing Problem (IRP) are motivated by an.

468

MODULAR BRANCHING RULES FOR 2-COLUMN DIAGRAM REPRESENTATIONS OF GENERAL LINEAR GROUPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline for doing work at SSRL Goals: 1. Work effectively, efficiently and safely 2. Compliance://www-group.slac.stanford.edu/esh/general/isems/ 3. Compliance with SLAC operating directives as found on the SSRL safety web page http://www-ssrl processes given in http://www- ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/safety/index.html. 5. Ensure procedures are up to date

Baranov, Alexander

469

A branch and bound algorithm for the global optimization of Hessian ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 1, 2011 ... lies under the curve in Figure 3.) We have .... ments (Santner, Williams, and Notz, 2003), machine learning (Rasmussen and Williams, 2006).

470

North Branch Municipal Water & Light- Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency ([http://www.smmpa.com SMMPA]) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit,...

471

A Branch-and-Cut Algorithm for the Discrete (r|p)-Centroid Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 28, 2011 ... firm to enter the market (leader) or the second one (follower). The leader ... et al. (

472

Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences BUDKER INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and taxes See page 5 for details. shmuelthaler #12;Industry leader creates endowed chair A$1 million gift that shaped plans for the library project. A retired technology industry executive, Mura-smith has also made Professor, Earth Sciences, and Vice Provost and Dean, Graduate Studies Virginia Steel University Librarian

473

On the impact of symmetry-breaking constraints on spatial Branch ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are considered as electrical charges repulsing each other [15], billiard simula- tion method ..... generators for the group GP of variable permutations which keep the formulation ..... European Journal of Operational Research 77(3) (1994) 466 .

474

Improving the LP bound of a MILP by dual concurrent branching and ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 9, 2011 ... Now take two different nodes in this tree, so you look at two different ...... variables who eat less of our stock but still give a good improvement in...

475

Tubular and Sector Heat Pipes with Interconnected Branches for Gas Turbine and/or Compressor Cooling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Designing turbines for either aerospace or power production is a daunting task for any heat transfer scientist or engineer. Turbine designers are continuously pursuing (more)

Reding, Brian D., II

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

PROGRAM SUPPORT FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT BRANCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the University of California, the Lawrence BerkeleyLAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIABERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94720

Martin, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z