National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wal sing ham

  1. Kyungmin Ham

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kyungmin Ham, Ph.D. Title: Assistant Professor - Research Office Tel. :(225) 578-9318

  2. Cam Wal Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cam Wal Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cam Wal Electric Coop, Inc Place: South Dakota Phone Number: 605.649.7676 Website: www.cam-walnet.com Facebook:...

  3. McKinney Wal-Mart Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wal-Mart Developer Bergey Windpower Energy Purchaser Wal-Mart Location McKinney TX Coordinates 33.220625, -96.630571...

  4. Secretary's Achievement Award (SING) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SING) Secretary's Achievement Award (SING) (from left to right) Daniel Poneman; David Arakawa; Barbara Thibadeau; Phillip Kraushaar; Daniel Lehman; Ingrid Kolb (from left to right) Daniel Poneman; David Arakawa; Barbara Thibadeau; Phillip Kraushaar; Daniel Lehman; Ingrid Kolb Presented to: The Office of Science's Spallation Neutron Source Instruments - Next Generation (SING) Project The SING team capitalized on the technical and managerial efficiency gained by combining the five instruments into

  5. Structure and mechanism of the essential two-component signal-transduction system WalKR in Staphylococcus aureus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ji, Quanjiang; Chen, Peter J.; Qin, Guangrong; Deng, Xin; Hao, Ziyang; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Yeo, Won -Sik; Quang, Jenny Winjing; Cho, Hoonsik; Luo, Guan -Zheng; et al

    2016-03-18

    Most low GC Gram-positive bacteria possess an essential walKR two-component system (TCS) for signal transduction involved in regulating cell wall homoeostasis. Despite the well-established intracellular regulatory mechanism, the role of this TCS in extracellular signal recognition and factors that modulate the activity of this TCS remain largely unknown. Here we identify the extracellular receptor of the kinase ‘WalK’ (erWalK) as a key hub for bridging extracellular signal input and intracellular kinase activity modulation in Staphylococcus aureus. Characterization of the crystal structure of erWalK revealed a canonical Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain for signal sensing. Single amino-acid mutation of potential signal-transduction residues resultedmore » in severely impaired function of WalKR. A small molecule derived from structure-based virtual screening against erWalK is capable of selectively activating the walKR TCS. Lastly, the molecular level characterization of erWalK will not only facilitate exploration of natural signal(s) but also provide a template for rational design of erWalK inhibitors.« less

  6. Better Ham & Cheese: Enhanced Anodes and Cathodes for Fuel Cells...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Density-Functional Theory of Electrochemistry Double-band Electrode Channel Flow DEMS Cell Sulfur@Carbon Cathodes for Lithium Sulfur Batteries Better Ham & Cheese: Enhanced...

  7. Singing River Electric Power Association- Comfort Advantage Home Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Singing River Electric Power Association provides rebates on energy efficiency measures in new homes and heat pumps that meet Comfort Advantage weatherization standards. To qualify for this rebate...

  8. Reviewers required major changes, including rearranging the two articles, so the new title of the first paper is: HVAC and Refrigeration Experiments at Wal-Mart Experimental Supercenters in Texas and Colorado --- original title: ASHRAE Journal DRAFT article McKinney and Aurora Wal-Mart Stores, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, J Michael; Deru, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, Wal-Mart opened experimental stores in McKinney, Texas (hot climate), and Aurora, Colo. (cold climate). With these projects Wal-Mart can: * Learn how to achieve sustainability improvements; * Gain experience with the design, design process, and operations for some specific advanced technologies; * Understand energy use patterns in their stores more clearly; * Lay groundwork for better understanding of how to achieve major carbon footprint reductions; and * Measure the potential benefits of specific technologies tested.

  9. Strain and lattice orientation distribution in SiN/Ge complementary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Strain and lattice orientation distribution in SiNGe complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible light emitting microstructures by quick x-ray nano-diffraction microscopy ...

  10. HAM-5 functions as a MAP kinase scaffold during cell fusion in Neurospora crassa

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jonkers, Wilfried; Leeder, Abigail C.; Ansong, Charles; Wang, Yuexi; Yang, Feng; Starr, Trevor L.; Camp, II, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Glass, N. Louise; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-11-20

    Cell fusion in genetically identical Neurospora crassa germlings and in hyphae is a highly regulated process involving the activation of a conserved MAP kinase cascade that includes NRC1, MEK2 and MAK2. During chemotrophic growth in germlings, the MAP kinase cascade members localize to conidial anastomosis tube (CAT) tips every 4 minutes, perfectly out of phase with another protein that is recruited to the tip: SOFT, a protein of unknown biochemical function. How this oscillation process is initiated, maintained and what proteins regulate the MAP kinase cascade is currently unclear. A global phosphoproteomics approach using an allele of mak-2 (mak-2Q100G) thatmore » can be specifically inhibited by the ATP analog 1NM-PP1 was utilized to identify MAK2 kinase targets in germlings that were potentially involved in this process. One such putative target was HAM5, a protein of unknown biochemical function. Previously, Δham-5 mutants were shown to be deficient for hyphal fusion. Here we show that HAM5-GFP co-localized with NRC1, MEK2 and MAK2 and oscillated with identical dynamics from the cytoplasm to CAT tips during chemotropic interactions. In the Δmak-2 strain, HAM5-GFP localized to punctate complexes that did not oscillate, but still localized to the germling tip, suggesting that MAK2 activity influences HAM5 function/localization. However, MAK2-GFP showed only cytoplasmic and nuclear localization in a Δham-5 strain and did not localize to puncta, as observed in wild type germlings. Via co-immunoprecipitation experiments, HAM5 was shown to physically interact with MAK2, MEK2 and NRC1, suggesting that it functions as a scaffold/transport hub for the MAP kinase cascade members during oscillation and chemotropic interactions during both germling and hyphal fusion in N. crassa. The identification of HAM5 as a scaffold-like protein will help to link the activation of MAK2 to upstream factors and other proteins involved in this intriguing process of fungal

  11. ITER Diagnostic First Wal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Douglas Loesser, et. al.

    2012-09-21

    The ITER Diagnostic Division is responsible for designing and procuring the First Wall Blankets that are mounted on the vacuum vessel port plugs at both the upper and equatorial levels This paper will discuss the effects of the diagnostic aperture shape and configuration on the coolant circuit design. The DFW design is driven in large part by the need to conform the coolant arrangement to a wide variety of diagnostic apertures combined with the more severe heating conditions at the surface facing the plasma, the first wall. At the first wall, a radiant heat flux of 35W/cm2 combines with approximate peak volumetric heating rates of 8W/cm3 (equatorial ports) and 5W/cm3 (upper ports). Here at the FW, a fast thermal response is desirable and leads to a thin element between the heat flux and coolant. This requirement is opposed by the wish for a thicker FW element to accommodate surface erosion and other off-normal plasma events.

  12. HAM-5 functions as a MAP kinase scaffold during cell fusion in Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkers, Wilfried; Leeder, Abigail C.; Ansong, Charles; Wang, Yuexi; Yang, Feng; Starr, Trevor L.; Camp, II, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Glass, N. Louise; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-11-20

    Cell fusion in genetically identical Neurospora crassa germlings and in hyphae is a highly regulated process involving the activation of a conserved MAP kinase cascade that includes NRC1, MEK2 and MAK2. During chemotrophic growth in germlings, the MAP kinase cascade members localize to conidial anastomosis tube (CAT) tips every 4 minutes, perfectly out of phase with another protein that is recruited to the tip: SOFT, a protein of unknown biochemical function. How this oscillation process is initiated, maintained and what proteins regulate the MAP kinase cascade is currently unclear. A global phosphoproteomics approach using an allele of mak-2 (mak-2Q100G) that can be specifically inhibited by the ATP analog 1NM-PP1 was utilized to identify MAK2 kinase targets in germlings that were potentially involved in this process. One such putative target was HAM5, a protein of unknown biochemical function. Previously, Δham-5 mutants were shown to be deficient for hyphal fusion. Here we show that HAM5-GFP co-localized with NRC1, MEK2 and MAK2 and oscillated with identical dynamics from the cytoplasm to CAT tips during chemotropic interactions. In the Δmak-2 strain, HAM5-GFP localized to punctate complexes that did not oscillate, but still localized to the germling tip, suggesting that MAK2 activity influences HAM5 function/localization. However, MAK2-GFP showed only cytoplasmic and nuclear localization in a Δham-5 strain and did not localize to puncta, as observed in wild type germlings. Via co-immunoprecipitation experiments, HAM5 was shown to physically interact with MAK2, MEK2 and NRC1, suggesting that it functions as a scaffold/transport hub for the MAP kinase cascade members during oscillation and chemotropic interactions during both germling and hyphal fusion in N. crassa. The identification of HAM5 as a scaffold-like protein will help to link the activation of MAK2 to upstream factors and other proteins involved in this intriguing process of fungal

  13. The radio continuum-star formation rate relation in WSRT sings galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heesen, Volker; Brinks, Elias; Leroy, Adam K.; Heald, George; Braun, Robert; Bigiel, Frank; Beck, Rainer E-mail: v.heesen@soton.ac.uk E-mail: heald@astron.nl E-mail: bigiel@uni-heidelberg.de

    2014-05-01

    We present a study of the spatially resolved radio continuum-star formation rate (RC-SFR) relation using state-of-the-art star formation tracers in a sample of 17 THINGS galaxies. We use SFR surface density (Σ{sub SFR}) maps created by a linear combination of GALEX far-UV (FUV) and Spitzer 24 μm maps. We use RC maps at λλ22 and 18 cm from the WSRT SINGS survey and Hα emission maps to correct for thermal RC emission. We compare azimuthally averaged radial profiles of the RC and FUV/mid-IR (MIR) based Σ{sub SFR} maps and study pixel-by-pixel correlations at fixed linear scales of 1.2 and 0.7 kpc. The ratio of the integrated SFRs from the RC emission to that of the FUV/MIR-based SF tracers is R{sub int}=0.78±0.38, consistent with the relation by Condon. We find a tight correlation between the radial profiles of the radio and FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR} for the entire extent of the disk. The ratio R of the azimuthally averaged radio to FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR} agrees with the integrated ratio and has only quasi-random fluctuations with galactocentric radius that are relatively small (25%). Pixel-by-pixel plots show a tight correlation in log-log diagrams of radio to FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR}, with a typical standard deviation of a factor of two. Averaged over our sample we find (Σ{sub SFR}){sub RC}∝(Σ{sub SFR}){sub hyb}{sup 0.63±0.25}, implying that data points with high Σ{sub SFR} are relatively radio dim, whereas the reverse is true for low Σ{sub SFR}. We interpret this as a result of spectral aging of cosmic-ray electrons (CREs), which are diffusing away from the star formation sites where they are injected into the interstellar medium. This is supported by our finding that the radio spectral index is a second parameter in pixel-by-pixel plots: those data points dominated by young CREs are relatively radio dim, while those dominated by old CREs are slightly more RC bright than what would be expected from a linear extrapolation. We studied the ratio R of

  14. Comments on ''The optimization of electronic precision in ultrasonic velocity measurements: A comparison of the time interval averaging and sing around methods'' (J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 73, 1833--1837 (1983))

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karplus, H.B.

    1984-06-01

    J. D. Aindow and R. C. Chivers (J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 73, 1833 (1983)) compared the precision of the direct ''time-of-flight'' technique with the ''sing-around'' method for sound velocity measurement. Their conclusion is changed by the newer, faster, commercial clocks (2 ns HP5345<0.1 ns HP5370), giving the advantage to the time of flight method. The analysis is herewith augmented by calculating the time jitter in terms of signal to noise ratio, which was correctly shown to be negligible with 100-ns clocks, but becomes increasingly more significant with faster clocks.

  15. Aurora Wal Mart Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GW Number of Units 1 Commercial Online Date 2005 Wind Turbine Manufacturer Bergey Windpower References WENDI1 Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","...

  16. Singing River Elec Pwr Assn (Mississippi) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    9,647.445 93,322.028 60,225 3,117.42 30,825.248 8,207 692.763 8,259.846 11 13,457.628 132,407.122 68,443 2008-06 9,059.584 86,892.462 60,106 3,046.146 30,089.083 8,193 709.428...

  17. Climate signal detection using wavelet transform: How to make a time series sing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, K.M.; Weng, H.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper, the application of the wavelet transform (WT) to climate time series analyses is introduced. A tutorial description of the basic concept of WT, compared with similar concepts used in music, is also provided. Using an analogy between WT representation of a time series and a music score, the authors illustrate the importance of local versus global information in the time-frequency localization of climate signals. Examples of WT applied to climate data analysis are demonstrated using analytic signals as well as real climate time series. Results of WT applied to two climate time series-that is, a proxy paleoclimate time series with a 2.5-Myr deep-sea sediment record of {gamma}{sup 18}O and a 140-yr monthly record of Northern Hemisphere surface temperature-are presented. The former shows the presence of a 40-kyr and a 100-kyr oscillation and an abrupt transition in the oscillation regime at 0.7 Myr before the present, consistent with previous studies. The latter possesses a myriad of oscillatory modes f rom interannual (2-5 yr), interdecadal (10-12 yr, 20-25 yr, and 40-60 yr), and century ({approximately}180 yr) scales at different periods of the data record. In spite of the large difference in timescales, common features in time-frequency characteristics of these two time series have been identified. These features suggest that the variations of the earth`s climate are consistent with those exhibited by a nonlinear dynamical system under external forcings. 32 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Gray QB-sing-faced version 2 (SF2) open environment test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plummer, J.; Immel, D.; Bobbitt, J.; Negron, M.

    2015-02-16

    This report details the design upgrades incorporated into the new version of the GrayQbTM SF2 device and the characterization testing of this upgraded device. Results from controlled characterization testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) R&D Engineering Imaging and Radiation Lab (IRL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) is presented, as well as results from the open environment field testing performed in the E-Area Low Level Waste Storage Area. Resultant images presented in this report were generated using the SRNL developed Radiation Analyzer (RAzerTM) software program which overlays the radiation contour images onto the visual image of the location being surveyed.

  19. 4-25-13-Singed-EA-1939-CCET-RTC-Final-EA-FONSI.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  20. Webinar: Make Your Building Sing!: Building-Retuning to Reduce Energy Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Panelists: Eileen Gohr and Steve Harrison, Parameter Realty Partners; Dennis Bohlayer, Towson University; Benjamin Goldstein, U.S. Department of Energy; Lisa Shulock, Building Owners and Managers...

  1. Impact of chronic lead poisoning on the hematological and biochemical profiles of a fish, Barbus conchonius (Ham)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, H.; Gill, S.T.; Pant, J.

    1987-05-01

    The contamination of natural waters by lead is mostly caused by a variety of anthropogenic activities related to increased mining operations and industrial uses of this metal. Adverse effects of lead poisoning in the fishes have been reported with references to both hematological and biochemical variables. The aim of present investigation was to study the effects of chronically administered sublethal levels of inorganic lead on the hematological and biochemical profiles of widely distributed freshwater fish, Barbus conchonius. The variables such as erythrocyte numbers, hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, blood glucose, glycogen in liver, skeletal muscles, and myocardium, and cholesterol in blood, liver, ovary, and testes were evaluated.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weight and Leak Check System (WALS) The Nuclear Weapons Complex stores radioactive nuclear ... A redundant computer to independently monitor forces on the pit during robot motion. ...

  3. Kim Saylors-Laster | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kim Saylors-Laster About Us Kim Saylors-Laster - Vice President of Energy, Wal-Mart Stores Most Recent Advancing Women in Clean Energy July 24...

  4. June 11 & 12, 2012 Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tuesday, June 12, 2012 Microgrids Panel - Ralph Masiello, EAC Storage Subcommittee Chair Jeff Marqusee, DODOSD Will Agate, Philadelphia Navy Yard Angie Beehler, WalMart ...

  5. Strain and lattice orientation distribution in SiN/Ge complementary metaloxidesemiconductor compatible light emitting microstructures by quick x-ray nano-diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chahine, G. A.; Schlli, T. U.; Zoellner, M. H.; Guha, S.; Reich, C.; Zaumseil, P.; Capellini, G.; Richard, M.-I.; Schroeder, T.

    2015-02-16

    This paper presents a study of the spatial distribution of strain and lattice orientation in CMOS-fabricated strained Ge microstripes using high resolution x-ray micro-diffraction. The recently developed model-free characterization tool, based on a quick scanning x-ray diffraction microscopy technique can image strain down to levels of 10{sup ?5} (?a/a) with a spatial resolution of ?0.5??m. Strain and lattice tilt are extracted using the strain and orientation calculation software package X-SOCS. The obtained results are compared with the biaxial strain distribution obtained by lattice parameter-sensitive ?-Raman and ?-photoluminescence measurements. The experimental data are interpreted with the help of finite element modeling of the strain relaxation dynamics in the investigated structures.

  6. Fermilab at Work | Clubs and Other Organizations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Singers provides an opportunity for people to meet, sing together and learn new music selections. The singers sing once a week on Wednesday at noon in the Auditorium. New...

  7. BOXED LUNCH OPTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOXED LUNCH OPTIONS Price: $12 - Sandwich Boxed Lunches (includes sandwich, pickle, kettle-cooked chips, and cookie) 1. The Cheat Lake Ham, Turkey, Bacon and Pepper Jack cheese piled high on artisan bread 2. The Suncrest Oven roasted Turkey Breast on artisan bread with smoked Gouda cheese 3. The Pierpont Bacon, Gouda Cheese, Lettuce, Tomato, Roasted Red Pepper Mayo 4. The Mylan Park Natural hickory smoked Ham, Swiss cheese on artisan bread 5. The Star City Ham, Turkey, Salami, Provolone cheese

  8. EERE Success Story-Dow Partners with ORNL to Commercialize Advanced...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... unique Heat, Air, and Moisture (HAM) Penetration chamber that measures the impact that ... The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) success stories highlight the ...

  9. Epitaxial Single Crystal Nanostructures for Batteries & PVs ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Lithium Sulfur Batteries Better Ham & Cheese: Enhanced Anodes and Cathodes for Fuel Cells Epitaxial Single Crystal Nanostructures for Batteries & PVs High Performance ...

  10. Sulfur@Carbon Cathodes for Lithium Sulfur Batteries > Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Lithium Sulfur Batteries Better Ham & Cheese: Enhanced Anodes and Cathodes for Fuel Cells Epitaxial Single Crystal Nanostructures for Batteries & PVs High Performance ...

  11. Biphasic Electrode Suspensions for Li-Ion Semi-solid Flow Cells...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Low-Dissipation Flow Authors: Wei, Teng-Sing ; Fan, Frank Y. ; Helal, Ahmed ; Smith, Kyle C. ; McKinley, Gareth H. ; Chiang, Yet-Ming ; Lewis, Jennifer A. 1 ; MIT) 2...

  12. CBFO and WIPP Commemorations for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The WIPP site ceremony also included the posting of colors by an employee volunteer color guard detail and the singing of the National Anthem by CBFO Assistant Manager for...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Transport, and Low-Dissipation Flow Wei, Teng-Sing ; Fan, Frank Y. ; Helal, Ahmed ; Smith, Kyle C. ; McKinley, Gareth H. ; Chiang, Yet-Ming ; Lewis, Jennifer A. ; MIT) ; UIUC) ...

  14. Inspiration of Music | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ernie Tucker Editor, National Renewable Energy Laboratory As Paul Simon began singing "Here Comes the Sun" during his recent Colorado concert, the irony wasn't lost on his fans. ...

  15. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WORKERS' COMPENSATION CLAIM PROCESS FOR HANFORD SITE EMPLOYEES PENSER'S CLAIM PROCESS PENSER and WAL&I *Requests a Physicians Initial Report (PIR) if not already provided *Investigates claim to determine validity *Contacts worker for statement *Verifies employment data and interviews witnesses, if any *Obtains information from contractor's WCR, if appropriate *Requests additional medical documentation if needed *Ensures claim details satisfy requirements of the law *If an investigation does

  16. Energy Efficiency for the Nunamiut People of Anaktuvuk Pass, Alaska

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    November 16, 2011 Dave Messier Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council Energy Department } Established in 1997 } Treaty Based } 70 Tribes and First Nations } Directive - Clean Water Needs Clean Energy } Efficiency First } RE and Energy Efficiency Trainings and Capacity Building } Nunamiut People- Inland Eskimo of Alaska } Anaktuvuk - place of caribou droppings } Corp = The Local Wal-Mart Hardware Store, Bank, Grocery Store, Restaurant, Hotel, Gas Station, radio station } Electric Rate:

  17. Hot electron dynamics in graphene (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thesis/Dissertation: Hot electron dynamics in graphene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hot electron dynamics in graphene Graphene, a two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb structure allotrope of carbon atoms, has a long history since the invention of the pencil [Petroski (1989)] and the linear dispersion band structure proposed by Wallace [Wal]; however, only after Novoselov et al. successively isolated graphene from graphite [Novoselov et al. (2004)], it has been studied intensively during

  18. Powering Business in Ohio with Cellex Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Powering Business in Ohio with Cellex Fuel Cells Cellex powered twelve class 3 electric pallet trucks with its fuel cell power units at two Ohio based Wal-Mart distribution centers for four months to demonstrate the commercial viability of hydrogen fuel cells. This project was funded by the Ohio Department of Development's Third Frontier Fuel Cell Program, which provides grants to support the growth of Ohio's fuel cell industry through collaborations between research organizations, businesses

  19. Factoriality of nodal three-dimensional varieties and connectedness of the locus of log canonical singularities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheltsov, I A

    2006-04-30

    Shokurov's vanishing theorem is used for the proof of the Q-factoriality of the following nodal threefolds: a complete intersection of hypersurfaces F and G in P{sup 5} of degrees n and k, n{>=}k, such that G is smooth and |Sing(F intersection G)|{<=}(n+k-2)(n-1)/5; a double cover of a smooth hypersurface F subset of P{sup 4} of degree n branched over the surface cut on F by a hypersurface G subset of P{sup 4} of degree 2r{>=}n, provided that |Sing(F intersection G)|{<=}2r+n-2)r/4.

  20. To: H: Bauer M: Kahal

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I-T: c;:y::: DhTo: 19 Ma!ch 1985 7117-01.85.aw.17 To: H: Bauer M: Kahal C. Young - B. Fritz &?, \' ,',l --- s"mJ~cI: Elimination of ARF, Chica~go, IL ROY: A. Wal.lo BLDq woe ROOM: m-r: 6320 The enclosed summary wa's prepared on the basis of a review of NRC files. This site was fully licensed. Based on DRAP policy, no additional FUSRAP investigations are warranted. AWfsb Enclosure .: . . > . . . . . ELIMINATION SUMMARY FOR THE ARMOUR RESEARCH FOUNDATION SUMMARY: ji,i7 Records searches

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 2010 Top Supermarkets, by Sales 2010 All Commodity Supermarket Wal-Mart Stores 3,001 Kroger Co. 2,460 Safeway, Inc. 1,461 Supervalu, Inc. 1,504 Ahold USA, Inc. (Stop and Shop, Giant) 746 Publix Super Markets, Inc. 1,035 Delhaize America, Inc. (Food Lion) 1,641 H.E. Butt Grocery Co. (HEB) 291 Meijer Inc. 195 Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. (Pathmark) 373 Note(s): Source(s): All commodity volume in this example represents the "annualized range of the estimated retail sales volume of

  2. IO6490

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 ' f. (5 4 . . i/ IO6490 ~-~~ -Landfill, ' cleanup plan' is. expected by August peruneat OfEnergy tiy they hope mlxa~~amfari~cclcanupplan for four radioactive oitcs m the puwn of Tonawanda by early e- naidE.%rk,DOEsitcman- ~a,saidalltkrexarchandtech- fucd data cdkted at ctkc four 6ilc5 ha3 been forwarded ti his suptx.iors In WashingronJC. ' when it still awaits We' re still wal r .f$, co* liar iEP-+-* 6adMr. Wehmdaiinourd0cum8nu in February .bur unfommuely them' s a group in Wnshington we.

  3. ASCR2017Final

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... p rogramming: M PI + O penMP + CUDAOpenCLxx. * Preliminary r esults o n t he N ERSC D irac G PU t est b ed s ystem s how a 3 x s peedup relative t o M PI---only u sing e ight C ...

  4. David Turner! NERSC User Services Group! NUG New User Training...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NUG New User Training February 23, 2015 Next Steps You A re N ot A lone A c alcula'on o f t he s elf--- generated p lasma current i n t he W 7---X reactor, p erformed u sing the ...

  5. David Turner! NERSC User Services Group! New User Training!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New User Training October 30, 2014 Next Steps You A re N ot A lone A c alcula'on o f t he s elf--- generated p lasma current i n t he W 7---X reactor, p erformed u sing the S ...

  6. A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A . M ihi, A.P. Alivisatos, P .V. B raun, a nd R .G. Nuzzo, A dv. Func. M ater. ( 2012) SEM a nd A FM i mages o f t extured s urfaces fabricated u sing s oL P DMS s tamps mask...

  7. Untitled Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BP proposal selected The CAMD proposal "Elementally Resolved Chemistry of the Evolution of the Gulf Spill Oil" was one of twenty one selected, by peer review, from the fifty eight submitted for funding by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative sponsored by BP Exploration and Production. CAMD Researchers : Drs. Richard L Kurtz, Kyungmin Ham, Orhan Kizilkaya and Amitava Roy will be working with a team of faculty that include Drs. Ed Overton (Environmental Science), Annette Engels

  8. Research Highlights > Research > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Highlights In This Section The Structural Evolution and Diffusion During the Chemical Transformation from Cobalt to Cobalt Phosphide Nanoparticles Joint Density-Functional Theory of Electrochemistry Double-band Electrode Channel Flow DEMS Cell Sulfur@Carbon Cathodes for Lithium Sulfur Batteries Better Ham & Cheese: Enhanced Anodes and Cathodes for Fuel Cells Epitaxial Single Crystal Nanostructures for Batteries & PVs High Performance Alkaline Fuel Cell Membranes Improving Fuel

  9. Double-band Electrode Channel Flow DEMS Cell > Research Highlights >

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Research Highlights In This Section The Structural Evolution and Diffusion During the Chemical Transformation from Cobalt to Cobalt Phosphide Nanoparticles Joint Density-Functional Theory of Electrochemistry Double-band Electrode Channel Flow DEMS Cell Sulfur@Carbon Cathodes for Lithium Sulfur Batteries Better Ham & Cheese: Enhanced Anodes and Cathodes for Fuel Cells Epitaxial Single Crystal Nanostructures for Batteries & PVs High

  10. Improving Fuel Cell Electrodes Two-Steps at a Time > Research Highlights >

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Research Highlights In This Section The Structural Evolution and Diffusion During the Chemical Transformation from Cobalt to Cobalt Phosphide Nanoparticles Joint Density-Functional Theory of Electrochemistry Double-band Electrode Channel Flow DEMS Cell Sulfur@Carbon Cathodes for Lithium Sulfur Batteries Better Ham & Cheese: Enhanced Anodes and Cathodes for Fuel Cells Epitaxial Single Crystal Nanostructures for Batteries & PVs High

  11. Joint Density-Functional Theory of Electrochemistry > Research Highlights >

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Research Highlights In This Section The Structural Evolution and Diffusion During the Chemical Transformation from Cobalt to Cobalt Phosphide Nanoparticles Joint Density-Functional Theory of Electrochemistry Double-band Electrode Channel Flow DEMS Cell Sulfur@Carbon Cathodes for Lithium Sulfur Batteries Better Ham & Cheese: Enhanced Anodes and Cathodes for Fuel Cells Epitaxial Single Crystal Nanostructures for Batteries & PVs High

  12. The Structural Evolution and Diffusion During the Chemical Transformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Cobalt to Cobalt Phosphide Nanoparticles > Research Highlights > Research > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Research Highlights In This Section The Structural Evolution and Diffusion During the Chemical Transformation from Cobalt to Cobalt Phosphide Nanoparticles Joint Density-Functional Theory of Electrochemistry Double-band Electrode Channel Flow DEMS Cell Sulfur@Carbon Cathodes for Lithium Sulfur Batteries Better Ham & Cheese: Enhanced Anodes and Cathodes for Fuel

  13. CrayQuatlerly_20120725_Cray_Compiler_ZhengjiZhao.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    t he C ray C ompiler a t N ERSC --- U sability a nd P erformance Zhengji Z hao, M egan B owling a nd J ack Deslippe NERSC U ser S ervices Cray Q uarterly, J uly 2 5, 2 012 2 * Provide f eedback t o C ray a bout h ow C ray c ompiler i s used a t N ERSC, f ocusing o n i ts u sability a nd performance * Report i ssues e ncountered w ith c ompilaLon, execuLon, v alidity c heck a nd p erformance, u sing a set o f m aterials a nd c hemistry a pplicaLon c odes Instead o f u sing t he s tandard N 6 a

  14. A comparison of the performance of digital mammography systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monnin, P.; Gutierrez, D.; Bulling, S.; Guntern, D.; Verdun, F. R.

    2007-03-15

    An objective analysis of image quality parameters was performed for six digital mammography systems. The presampled modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for the systems were determined at different doses, for 28 kVp with a Mo/Mo or W/Al target/filter combination and 2 mm of additional aluminium filtration. The flat-panel units have higher MTF and DQE in the mid to high frequency range than standard CR systems. The highest DQE, over the whole dose range, is for the slit-scanning direct photon counting system. Dual-side read CR can overcome the inherent x-ray absorption and signal collection limitations of standard CR mammography, improving the low-frequency DQE by 40%, to the same level as full-field systems, but it does not improve the poor spatial resolution of phosphor.

  15. A mirror for lab-based quasi-monochromatic parallel x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Thanhhai; Lu, Xun; Lee, Chang Jun; Jeon, Insu; Jung, Jin-Ho; Jin, Gye-Hwan; Kim, Sung Youb

    2014-09-15

    A multilayered parabolic mirror with six W/Al bilayers was designed and fabricated to generate monochromatic parallel x-rays using a lab-based x-ray source. Using this mirror, curved bright bands were obtained in x-ray images as reflected x-rays. The parallelism of the reflected x-rays was investigated using the shape of the bands. The intensity and monochromatic characteristics of the reflected x-rays were evaluated through measurements of the x-ray spectra in the band. High intensity, nearly monochromatic, and parallel x-rays, which can be used for high resolution x-ray microscopes and local radiation therapy systems, were obtained.

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ENA's Newest Instruments Support Most Extensive Marine Cloud Data Set Bookmark and Share A common sight on the steep cobbled roads of Graciosa Island are carts drawn by donkeys. A common sight on the steep cobbled roads of Graciosa Island are carts drawn by donkeys. An elderly farmer sings in Portuguese as his donkey carries him down the steep cobbled roads to a village below. Hydrangeas and cedar perfume the air around bubbling volcanic geysers and lagoons. A thousand miles from anywhere,

  17. Secretarial Memo 4-27-14 (DOE LMF).pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Secretarial Awards Recognize Employees for Saving Taxpayer Dollars Secretarial Awards Recognize Employees for Saving Taxpayer Dollars September 19, 2012 - 4:58pm Addthis David Arakawa (ORNL) 1 of 6 David Arakawa (ORNL) David Arakawa, from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed the Spallation Neutron Source Instruments - Next Generation (SING) project, where his hands-on approach helped him lead his team to complete the project two months ahead of schedule and $263,000

  18. Ultrasonic flow metering system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomm, Tyler J.; Kraft, Nancy C.; Mauseth, Jason A.; Phelps, Larry D.; Taylor, Steven C.

    2002-01-01

    A system for determining the density, flow velocity, and mass flow of a fluid comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the fluid. A system for determining flow velocity uses two of the inventive circuits with directional transmitters and receivers, one of which is set at an angle to the direction of flow that is different from the others.

  19. Ultrasonic fluid quality sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomm, Tyler J.; Kraft, Nancy C.; Phelps, Larry D.; Taylor, Steven C.

    2002-10-08

    A system for determining the composition of a multiple-component fluid and for determining linear flow comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the multiple-component fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the multiple-component fluid. A system for determining flow uses two of the inventive circuits, one of which is set at an angle that is not perpendicular to the direction of flow.

  20. Ultrasonic Fluid Quality Sensor System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomm, Tyler J.; Kraft, Nancy C.; Phelps, Larry D.; Taylor, Steven C.

    2003-10-21

    A system for determining the composition of a multiple-component fluid and for determining linear flow comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the multiple-component fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the multiple-component fluid. A system for determining flow uses two of the inventive circuits, one of which is set at an angle that is not perpendicular to the direction of flow.

  1. ODU Researcher Visits JLab to Talk About Living in the Arctic (Daily Press)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F

  2. Popular Science Recognizes Innovative Solar Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL

  3. Network Markup Language Base Schema version 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GFD-R-P.206 NML-WG nml-wg@ogf.org Jeroen van der Ham, UvA (editor) Freek Dijkstra, SURFsara Roman Łapacz, PSNC Jason Zurawski, Internet2 May 2013 Network Markup Language Base Schema version 1 Status of This Document Grid Final Draft (GFD), Proposed Recommendation (R-P). Copyright Notice Copyright c Open Grid Forum (2008-2013). Some Rights Reserved. Distribution is unlim- ited. Abstract This document describes a set of normative schemas which allow the description of computer network topologies.

  4. May 2008 Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 May 2008 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editor Melissa Leinart 865-574-1621 (6ml) Associate Editors Amy Alley Heidi Spurling Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Ken Davis Kathy Fahey Stuart Hames Sharon McConathy Patrick McCoy I N S I D E Page 3 Fire department members come to the rescue Page 4 Driving green to protect our natural resources Page 5 73s: Best regards from Y-12's hams Page8 What's the secret? Mary Murray Brett Pate

  5. Special Workshop: Building Location Aware Apps on the iPhone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Special Workshop: Building Location Aware Apps on the iPhone Special Workshop: Building Location Aware Apps on the iPhone WHEN: Jul 17, 2015 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM WHERE: Time Out Pizzeria 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, USA SPEAKER: Mike Ham CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login iPhone App Development Class Event Description Learn to build an iPhone app that uses U.S. Global Positioning System (GPS) data! This three-hour course will cover how to build an

  6. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F

  7. Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL

  8. Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL DEGAS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    COAL DEGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL DEGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL DEGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL

  9. Microsoft Word - FOD.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2003 Synchrotron Mesodiffraction: A Tool for Understanding Turbine Engine Foreign Object Damage B. L. Boyce, 1 A. Mehta, 2 J. O Peters, 3 and R. O. Ritchie 4 1 Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, MS: 0889, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0889 blboyce@sandia.gov 2 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, CA 94025 3 Lufthansa Technik AG, HAM WR 124, Weg beim Jäger 193, 22335 Hamburg, Germany janoke.peters@lht.dlh.de 4 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,

  10. PowerPoint Presentation

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL

  11. This Month on Energy Savers: July 2011 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    July 2011 This Month on Energy Savers: July 2011 July 31, 2011 - 7:14am Addthis Andrea Spikes Former Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory Independence Day was a blast, and summer is in full swing with vacations and day camps and whatever else we fill our spare time with when it's warm and sunny. This week, I noticed that the cicadas (kind of like grasshoppers but louder) started singing in the trees - a sign that the first frost is supposed to be six to eight weeks away.

  12. Geddes_ LPAv3.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P lasma A ccelerator S imula0on U sing L aser a nd Par0cle B eam D rivers C.G.R. G eddes, L BNL F.S. T sung, U CLA 27 November 2012 Office of Science Office of Science SciDAC-2&3 Compass Approach: plasma wave accelerator structure, laser & particle beam evolution excited by laser or particle beam ! λ p ~100µm at 10 17 /cc Laser or beam Trapped particles L plasma ~ mm-m Approach: plasma wave accelerator structure, laser & particle beam evolution excited by laser or particle beam !

  13. OpenFOAM: Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vectorization Effectiveness for GaussSeidel Total % vectoriza.on gain Total vectoriza.on intensity Number of vectorized loops Total T ime ( s) Original w orkload baseline 1 X 4.1 1 707 Original w orkload baseline w ith d isabled auto---vectoriza=on 1.62 X NA 0 436 Tuned w orkload (vectorized u sing intrinsics) 2.25 X 4.2 2 314 Issues with GaussSeidelSmoother Loop Indirect Referencing : - Inefficient use of cacheline - Scatter/Gather overhead Low trip count, on average ~4, not good for

  14. scielzo_abstract

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino a nd n eutron s pectroscopy u sing t rapped i ons Dr. N .D. S cielzo Lawrence L ivermore N ational L aboratory The neutrinos and neutrons emitted in nuclear beta decay can be precisely studied using radioactive ions held in a radiofrequency---quadrupole ion trap. When a radioactive ion decays in the trap, the recoil---daughter nucleus and emitted particles emerge from the ~1---mm 3 trap volume without scattering and propagate unobstructed through vacuum. This allows the momentum and

  15. Choral Group Rehearsal | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Choral Group Rehearsal September 7, 2016 11:45AM to 12:30PM Presenter Patrick Garner (NE) Location Building 362 Type Social Event Rehearsals take place Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in Building 362. The male-female group sings a wide range of musical styles in four-part (SATB) harmony, both with piano accompaniment and a cappella. Information For additional information, visit the Argonne Choral Group website or contact Maestro Patrick Garner (NE) at ext. 2-4872 or

  16. Scaling properties of the pairing problem in the strong coupling limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbaro, M.B.; Cenni, R.; Molinari, A.; Quaglia, M.R.

    2013-10-15

    We study the excited states of the pairing Hamiltonian providing an expansion for their energy in the strong coupling limit. To assess the role of the pairing interaction we apply the formalism to the case of a heavy atomic nucleus. We show that only a few statistical moments of the level distribution are sufficient to yield an accurate estimate of the energy for not too small values of the coupling G and we give the analytic expressions of the first four terms of the series. Further, we discuss the convergence radius G{sub sing} of the expansion showing that it strongly depends upon the details of the level distribution. Furthermore G{sub sing} is not related to the critical values of the coupling G{sub crit}, which characterize the physics of the pairing Hamiltonian, since it can exist even in the absence of these critical points. -- Highlights: •We study the excitation spectrum of the pairing Hamiltonian. •We provide an analytic expansion around the strong coupling limit. •We discuss the convergence radius of the expansion. •We connect the radius with the critical points of H.

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 2010 Top Retail Companies, by Sales # Stores % Change over Chain ($billion) 2009 Revenues 2010 2009 Stores Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. 419.0 3.4% 8,970 6.0% The Kroger Co. 82.2 7.1% 3,605 -0.4% Costco 76.3 9.1% 572 1.1% The Home Depot 68.0 2.8% 2,248 0.2% Walgreen Co. 67.4 6.4% 8,046 7.3% Target Corp. 67.4 3.1% 1,750 0.6% CVS Caremark 57.3 3.6% 7,182 2.2% Best Buy 50.3 1.2% 4,172 3.7% Lowes Cos. 48.8 3.4% 1,749 2.3% Sears Holdings 43.3 -1.6% 4,038 2.2% Source(s): 2010 Revenues % Change over Chain

  18. Sandia PUF Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-06-11

    This program is a graphical user interface for measuring and performing inter-active analysis of physical unclonable functions (PUFs). It is intended for demonstration and education purposes. See license.txt for license details. The program features a PUF visualization that demonstrates how signatures differ between PUFs and how they exhibit noise over repeated measurements. A similarity scoreboard shows the user how close the current measurement is to the closest chip signatures in the database. Other metrics suchmore » as average noise and inter-chip Hamming distances are presented to the user. Randomness tests published in NIST SP 800-22 can be computed and displayed. Noise and inter-chip histograms for the sample of PUFs and repeated PUF measurements can be drawn.« less

  19. Kinetics of subdiffusive growth of new phase particles in supersaturated solid solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svetukhin, V. V. Sibatov, R. T.

    2015-04-15

    The kinetics of the subdiffusion-limited growth of spherical precipitates is studied. The process is described by the equation of anomalous diffusion with a fractional derivative with respect to time. It is shown that a decrease in the concentration of monomers is described by the law exp(−kt{sup 3α/2}) at the initial stage and the power law t{sup −α} at large times, where 0 < α ≤ 1 is the dispersion parameter coinciding with the order of time derivative in the subdiffusion equation. The time dependence of the size of a spherical precipitate is obtained. The results generalize the Ham diffusion theory and are in agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation data.

  20. On enabling secure applications through off-line biometric identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davida, G.I.; Frankel, Y.; Matt, B.J.

    1998-04-01

    In developing secure applications and systems, the designers often must incorporate secure user identification in the design specification. In this paper, the authors study secure off line authenticated user identification schemes based on a biometric system that can measure a user`s biometric accurately (up to some Hamming distance). The schemes presented here enhance identification and authorization in secure applications by binding a biometric template with authorization information on a token such as a magnetic strip. Also developed here are schemes specifically designed to minimize the compromise of a user`s private biometrics data, encapsulated in the authorization information, without requiring secure hardware tokens. In this paper the authors furthermore study the feasibility of biometrics performing as an enabling technology for secure system and application design. The authors investigate a new technology which allows a user`s biometrics to facilitate cryptographic mechanisms.

  1. L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    , . d Sepmber 20, 1976 . e E. K. Limp, Chfdf, Process Facilities Safety liranch, ~%&iCj kP3RT uF FlhimiiS : &TECH SPECSALlY S-EL Cuwr)wTIa:i On huyusf 19, 1976, Fred F, Ha_ytaod, DRdL, and I visttdd be A?j-TzcILi - planf in ' dardrvlltit, ;ic# YorX, to i3ake a orelir;linary assczimx~f of tile radIo?ocjical status of facilities ut47fzad durfnb3 lW-51 for X': contract mrk f WI 1 vi n.; urd a. GcLwter, Ham r4tina+r, ;iismssicms warz &id ' cliL1 :Ir. tionalj fir. Ted Ckx, mo Has fmf 1

  2. Microsoft Word - FAQs for In-Transit Gas Reporting

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Michael E E asley CEO P owder R iver E nergy C orporation Sundance, W Y Chairman W yoming I nfrastructure A uthority D epart o f E nergy Q uadrennial E nergy R eview Infrastructure S iting Cheyenne, W Y August 2 1, 2 014 My n ame i s M ike E asley. I a m t he C hief E xecutive O fficer o f t he P owder R iver E nergy C orporation (PRECorp), W yoming's l argest r ural e lectric c ooperative b ased i n S undance, W Y. P RECorp p rovides 4 00 MW o f p ower t o 2 8,000 m eters u sing 1 0,000 m iles

  3. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In s itu Visualiza(on w ith t he S ierra Simula(on F ramework U sing ParaView C atalyst Jeff M auldin, T homas O tahal, D avid K arelitz, Alan S coF, W arren H unt, N athan F abian What i s I n s itu Visualiza(on? § A t ypical v isualiza(on w orkflow: § Run s imula(on a nd o utput t he f ull 3 d m esh d ata a t s ome s parse (me i nterval. § ASer s imula(on c ompletes, l oad o utput d ata i nto a v isualiza(on tool s uch a s P araView, E nSight, V isIt, e tc. § In s itu

  4. NERSC: Running Jobs Kjiersten Fagnan" NERSC User Services Group"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC: Running Jobs Kjiersten Fagnan" NERSC User Services Group" " " February 3, 2014 Jobs at NERSC * Most j obs a re p arallel, u sing 1 0s t o 1 00,000+ c ores * Produc8on r uns e xecute i n b atch m ode * Interac8ve a nd d ebug j obs a re s upported f or u p t o 3 0 minutes * Typically r un 8 mes a re a f ew t o 1 0s o f h ours. - Each m achine h as d ifferent l imits. - Limits a re n ecessary b ecause o f M TBF a nd t he n eed t o accommodate 5 ,500 u sers' j obs * Also

  5. Running Jobs Scott French" NERSC User Services Group" New User Training"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 23, 2015 Jobs at NERSC * Most j obs a re p arallel, u sing 1 0s t o 1 00,000+ c ores * Produc8on r uns e xecute i n b atch m ode * Interac8ve a nd d ebug j obs a re s upported f or u p t o 3 0 minutes * Typically r un 8 mes a re a f ew t o 1 0s o f h ours. - Each m achine h as d ifferent l imits. - Limits a re n ecessary b ecause o f M TBF a nd t he n eed t o accommodate 5 ,500 u sers' j obs * Also a n umber o f ' serial' j obs - Typically s ome k ind o f p leasantly p arallel s

  6. XE6_Tips_022011.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For m ost u sers a nd a pplica1ons, u sing d efault s e5ngs w ork very well  For users who want to experiment to get the best performance t hey c an, t he f ollowing p resenta1on g ives y ou some informa1on on compilers and se5ngs to try  While i t d oesn't c over a bsolutely e verything, t he p resenta7on tries t o a ddress s ome o f t he t unable p arameters w hich w e h ave found t o p rovide i ncreased p erformance i n t he s itua7ons discussed 2 xtpe---mc12 If n o m odule i s l oaded,

  7. Yun (Helen) He, Alice Koniges, Richard Gerber, Katie Antypas!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alice Koniges, Richard Gerber, Katie Antypas! ! OpenMPCon, Sept 28-30, 2015 Using OpenMP at NERSC Outline * NERSC a nd o ur n ew s ystem - Why M PI + O penMP i s p referred * OpenMP u sage a t N ERSC * What d o w e t ell u sers a bout O penMP s caling - Process a nd t hread a ffinity - Scaling : ps - Tools f or O penMP * Case s tudies o f u sing a nd t uning M PI/OpenMP performance --- 2 --- NERSC and our new system --- 3 --- What is NERSC/LBNL * NaAonal E nergy R esearch S cienAfic C ompuAng

  8. Yun (Helen) He, NERSC!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC! Mar 23, 2015 OpenMP Basics and MPI/OpenMP Scaling --- 1 --- Outline * Introduc)ons t o O penMP * Features i n O penMP 3 .1 * What's n ew i n O penMP 4 .0 * Adding O penMP t o y our c ode u sing C ray R eveal * Hybrid M PI/OpenMP S caling --- 2 --- Introductions to OpenMP --- 3 --- Common Architectures * Shared M emory A rchitecture - Mul)ple C PUs s hare g lobal m emory, c ould h ave l ocal c ache - Uniform M emory A ccess ( UMA) - Typical S hared M emory P rogramming M odel: O penMP,

  9. Lisa Gerhardt NERSC User Services"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gerhardt " NERSC User Services" September 10, 2013" Getting Started at NERSC: Running Jobs Jobs at NERSC * Most j obs a re p arallel, u sing 1 0s t o 1 00,000+ c ores * Produc8on r uns e xecute i n b atch m ode * Interac8ve a nd d ebug j obs a re s upported f or u p t o 3 0 minutes * Typically r un 8 mes a re a f ew t o 1 0s o f h ours. - Each m achine h as d ifferent l imits. - Limits a re n ecessary b ecause o f M TBF a nd t he n eed t o accommodate 5 ,500 u sers' j obs * Also a

  10. 05-RunningJobs-Turner.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David Turner" NERSC User Services Group" New User Training" July 15, 2014 Jobs at NERSC * Most j obs a re p arallel, u sing 1 0s t o 1 00,000+ c ores * Produc8on r uns e xecute i n b atch m ode * Interac8ve a nd d ebug j obs a re s upported f or u p t o 3 0 minutes * Typically run 8mes are a few to 10s of hours. - Each m achine h as d ifferent l imits. - Limits a re n ecessary b ecause o f M TBF a nd t he n eed t o accommodate 5 ,500 u sers' j obs * Also a n umber o f ' serial' j

  11. 08-Wrapup-Wasserman.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Steps You A re N ot A lone ! A c alcula'on o f t he s elf--- generated p lasma current i n t he W 7---X reactor, p erformed u sing the S FINCS c ode o n Edison. T he c olors represent t he a mount o f electric c urrent a long the magne'c field, and the b lack l ines s how magne'c fi eld l ines. Image: M aH L andreman You W ill B e S uccessful ! Collision b etween t wo shells o f m aHer e jected in t wo s upernova erup'ons, s howing a slice t hrough a c orner o f the e vent. C olors

  12. Microsoft Word - Easley Comments QER - Final.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Michael E E asley CEO P owder R iver E nergy C orporation Sundance, W Y Chairman W yoming I nfrastructure A uthority D epart o f E nergy Q uadrennial E nergy R eview Infrastructure S iting Cheyenne, W Y August 2 1, 2 014 My n ame i s M ike E asley. I a m t he C hief E xecutive O fficer o f t he P owder R iver E nergy C orporation (PRECorp), W yoming's l argest r ural e lectric c ooperative b ased i n S undance, W Y. P RECorp p rovides 4 00 MW o f p ower t o 2 8,000 m eters u sing 1 0,000 m iles

  13. HEP Collider HPC Use, Prospects and Wishes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HEP Collider HPC Use, Prospects and Wishes Tom L eCompte High E nergy P hysics D ivision Argonne N a4onal L aboratory 2 Outline § Overview o f t he S cience § Overview o f H PC u se T oday § Some E xtrapola?ons t o t he F uture I a m a n L HC e xperimenter. T his t alk i s a rranged a round t hat experience - a t t he p resent ? me, w e a re t he o nly m ajor experimental H EP g roup u sing H PCs a t t his s cale. 3 Collider Physics for Non-Physicists § We c ollide p ar?cles t

  14. Source Term Analysis for the WIPP Release Quantity 5-28-14

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Source T erm A nalysis f or t he W IPP R elease Q uantity Jeff W hicker, M att G riffin, C hristine B ullock, M ichael M cNaughton, W illiam E isele ( Bill), M urray M oore The c alculations b elow p rovide a n i nitial r ough o rder o f m agnitude e stimate o f t he a irborne r elease quantity i n P anel 7 , R oom 7 , a t t he W IPP s ite s tarting a bout F ebruary 1 4, 2 014. F urther, w e p rovide a n initial a ssessment o f t he p ossibility f or l eakage f rom m ore t han o ne d rum u sing

  15. F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anthropogenic C limate C hange U sing S uper--- Parameteriza0on Cris0ana S tan George M ason U niversity and COLA NERSC BER Requirements for 2017 September 11-12, 2012 Rockville, MD 1. P roject D escrip0on * Objec0ve: C onduct a nd a nalyze s imula0ons o f anthropogenic c limate c hange w ithin a f ramework i n which t he a tmosphere m odel h as a c loud---resolving model e mbedded i n e ach g rid c olumn. * Our p resent f ocus i s t o c onduct s imula0ons i n w hich the c loud---resolving m

  16. Microsoft Word - DOE_science_kits.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C M E T is (T T in S "I a S u a In th U.S. Carls Wast P.O. Carls CARLSBAD Mexico will h Energy's (DO The DOE ov s America's TRU) radioa The kits, targ ncluding nu Southeaster t encourag nd what the Science topi sing electri lso corresp n addition to he other kits Departmen sbad Field O te Isolation Box 3090 sbad, New M WIPP O For D, N.M., Jul have a lot to OE) Carlsb versees the s only deep active wast geted for th clear, but ta rn New Mex es the disc eir impact is ics include city from co

  17. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1986-06-01

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible andmoreare indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.less

  18. An Integrated Signaling-Encryption Mechanism to Reduce Error Propagation in Wireless Communications: Performance Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M; Matalgah, Mustafa M; Bobrek, Miljko

    2015-01-01

    Traditional encryption techniques require packet overhead, produce processing time delay, and suffer from severe quality of service deterioration due to fades and interference in wireless channels. These issues reduce the effective transmission data rate (throughput) considerably in wireless communications, where data rate with limited bandwidth is the main constraint. In this paper, performance evaluation analyses are conducted for an integrated signaling-encryption mechanism that is secure and enables improved throughput and probability of bit-error in wireless channels. This mechanism eliminates the drawbacks stated herein by encrypting only a small portion of an entire transmitted frame, while the rest is not subject to traditional encryption but goes through a signaling process (designed transformation) with the plaintext of the portion selected for encryption. We also propose to incorporate error correction coding solely on the small encrypted portion of the data to drastically improve the overall bit-error rate performance while not noticeably increasing the required bit-rate. We focus on validating the signaling-encryption mechanism utilizing Hamming and convolutional error correction coding by conducting an end-to-end system-level simulation-based study. The average probability of bit-error and throughput of the encryption mechanism are evaluated over standard Gaussian and Rayleigh fading-type channels and compared to the ones of the conventional advanced encryption standard (AES).

  19. Method and system for normalizing biometric variations to authenticate users from a public database and that ensures individual biometric data privacy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strait, Robert S.; Pearson, Peter K.; Sengupta, Sailes K.

    2000-01-01

    A password system comprises a set of codewords spaced apart from one another by a Hamming distance (HD) that exceeds twice the variability that can be projected for a series of biometric measurements for a particular individual and that is less than the HD that can be encountered between two individuals. To enroll an individual, a biometric measurement is taken and exclusive-ORed with a random codeword to produce a "reference value." To verify the individual later, a biometric measurement is taken and exclusive-ORed with the reference value to reproduce the original random codeword or its approximation. If the reproduced value is not a codeword, the nearest codeword to it is found, and the bits that were corrected to produce the codeword to it is found, and the bits that were corrected to produce the codeword are also toggled in the biometric measurement taken and the codeword generated during enrollment. The correction scheme can be implemented by any conventional error correction code such as Reed-Muller code R(m,n). In the implementation using a hand geometry device an R(2,5) code has been used in this invention. Such codeword and biometric measurement can then be used to see if the individual is an authorized user. Conventional Diffie-Hellman public key encryption schemes and hashing procedures can then be used to secure the communications lines carrying the biometric information and to secure the database of authorized users.

  20. A new Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) experiment designed for climate and chemistry models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilmes, S.; Mills, Mike; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Robock, Alan; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Lamarque, J. F.; Pitari, G.; English, J. M.

    2015-01-15

    A new Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) experiment "G4 specified stratospheric aerosols" (short name: G4SSA) is proposed to investigate the impact of stratospheric aerosol geoengineering on atmosphere, chemistry, dynamics, climate, and the environment. In contrast to the earlier G4 GeoMIP experiment, which requires an emission of sulfur dioxide (SO₂) into the model, a prescribed aerosol forcing file is provided to the community, to be consistently applied to future model experiments between 2020 and 2100. This stratospheric aerosol distribution, with a total burden of about 2 Tg S has been derived using the ECHAM5-HAM microphysical model, based on a continuous annual tropical emission of 8 Tg SO₂ yr⁻¹. A ramp-up of geoengineering in 2020 and a ramp-down in 2070 over a period of 2 years are included in the distribution, while a background aerosol burden should be used for the last 3 decades of the experiment. The performance of this experiment using climate and chemistry models in a multi-model comparison framework will allow us to better understand the impact of geoengineering and its abrupt termination after 50 years in a changing environment. The zonal and monthly mean stratospheric aerosol input data set is available at https://www2.acd.ucar.edu/gcm/geomip-g4-specified-stratospheric-aerosol-data-set.

  1. A new Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) experiment designed for climate and chemistry models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tilmes, S.; Mills, Mike; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Robock, Alan; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Lamarque, J. F.; Pitari, G.; English, J. M.

    2015-01-15

    A new Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) experiment "G4 specified stratospheric aerosols" (short name: G4SSA) is proposed to investigate the impact of stratospheric aerosol geoengineering on atmosphere, chemistry, dynamics, climate, and the environment. In contrast to the earlier G4 GeoMIP experiment, which requires an emission of sulfur dioxide (SO₂) into the model, a prescribed aerosol forcing file is provided to the community, to be consistently applied to future model experiments between 2020 and 2100. This stratospheric aerosol distribution, with a total burden of about 2 Tg S has been derived using the ECHAM5-HAM microphysical model, based on a continuous annualmore » tropical emission of 8 Tg SO₂ yr⁻¹. A ramp-up of geoengineering in 2020 and a ramp-down in 2070 over a period of 2 years are included in the distribution, while a background aerosol burden should be used for the last 3 decades of the experiment. The performance of this experiment using climate and chemistry models in a multi-model comparison framework will allow us to better understand the impact of geoengineering and its abrupt termination after 50 years in a changing environment. The zonal and monthly mean stratospheric aerosol input data set is available at https://www2.acd.ucar.edu/gcm/geomip-g4-specified-stratospheric-aerosol-data-set.« less

  2. FEHMN 1.0: Finite element heat and mass transfer code; Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zyvoloski, G.; Dash, Z.; Kelkar, S.

    1992-05-01

    A computer code is described which can simulate non-isothermal multi-phase multicomponent flow in porous media. It is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and groundwater flow. The equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media are solved sing the finite element method. The permeability and porosity of the medium are allowed to depend on pressure and temperature. The code also has provisions for movable air and water phases and noncoupled tracers; that is, tracer solutions that do not affect the heat and mass transfer solutions. The tracers can be passive or reactive. The code can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. A summary of the equations in the model and the numerical solution procedure are provided in this report. A user`s guide and sample problems are also included. The FEHMN (Finite Element Heat and Mass Nuclear) code, described in this report, is a version of FEHM (Finite Element Heat and Mass, Zyvoloski et al., 1988) developed for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The main use of FEHMN will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields in the saturated zone below the potential Yucca Mountain repository.

  3. A simplified fuzzy model to mimic a nonlinear system, applied to a plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z.; Rayner, J.; Cheetham, A.; Lund, T.

    1997-02-01

    This paper develops a fuzzy model to simulate the behavior of a nonlinear system, in particular a plasma source, with a view to developing a control system for materials processing plasmas employing a helicon source. Genetic algorithms are employed to optimize fuzzy rules related to the parameters of the fuzzy model which contain a set of variable zeros and poles of the nonlinear system as well as its time delay. A practical application of the fuzzy model is to estimate the electron number density of a low-temperature plasma. Based on the membership functions of the input and output, a set of fuzzy rules by which the variable zeros and poles are identified is derived and optimized u sing a genetic algorithm. The principal reason for investigating the proposed fuzzy model is the subsequent computer-aided design of a fuzzy controller to control the nonlinear system. Two experimental results are presented to validate the fuzzy model method. One shows a computer simulation and the other predicts the real-time behavior of the plasma source as its input parameters are varied.

  4. Search for surviving companions in type Ia supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M.; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: pmricker@illinois.edu E-mail: taam@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-09-01

    The nature of the progenitor systems of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still unclear. One way to distinguish between the single-degenerate scenario and double-degenerate scenario for their progenitors is to search for the surviving companions (SCs). Using a technique that couples the results from multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with calculations of the structure and evolution of main-sequence- (MS-) and helium-rich SCs, the color and magnitude of MS- and helium-rich SCs are predicted as functions of time. The SC candidates in Galactic type Ia supernova remnants (Ia SNR) and nearby extragalactic Ia SNRs are discussed. We find that the maximum detectable distance of MS SCs (helium-rich SCs) is 0.6-4 Mpc (0.4-16 Mpc), if the apparent magnitude limit is 27 in the absence of extinction, suggesting that the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda Galaxy are excellent environments in which to search for SCs. However, only five Ia SNRs have been searched for SCs, showing little support for the standard channels in the singe-degenerate scenario. To better understand the progenitors of SNe Ia, we encourage the search for SCs in other nearby Ia SNRs.

  5. An implementation of co-simulation for performance prediction of innovative integrated HVAC systems in buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trcka, Marija; Wetter, Michael; Hensen, Jan L.M.

    2010-07-01

    Integrated performance simulation of buildings and heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems can help reducing energy consumption and increasing level of occupant comfort. However, no singe building performance simulation (BPS) tool offers sufficient capabilities and flexibilities to accommodate the ever-increasing complexity and rapid innovations in building and system technologies. One way to alleviate this problem is to use co-simulation. The co-simulation approach represents a particular case of simulation scenario where at least two simulators solve coupled differential-algebraic systems of equations and exchange data that couples these equations during the time integration. This paper elaborates on issues important for co-simulation realization and discusses multiple possibilities to justify the particular approach implemented in a co-simulation prototype. The prototype is verified and validated against the results obtained from the traditional simulation approach. It is further used in a case study for the proof-of-concept, to demonstrate the applicability of the method and to highlight its benefits. Stability and accuracy of different coupling strategies are analyzed to give a guideline for the required coupling frequency. The paper concludes by defining requirements and recommendations for generic cosimulation implementations.

  6. Experimental investigation of a phase-locked harmonic multiplying inverted gyrotwystron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, H.; Rodgers, J.; Chen, S.; Walter, M.; Granatstein, V.L.

    1996-12-31

    The University of Maryland is investigating harmonic multiplication as a means of generating high frequency, large bandwidth, high power microwaves with reduced magnetic fields and high subharmonic injection gain. The current experimental efforts are concentrated on two-stage devices. One of them is the phase-locked, harmonic-multiplying inverted gyrotwystron (phigtron) which uses a MIG produced electron beam (60 kV, 10 A), a combined mode launcher/input coupler, a Ku band fundamental gyro-TWT prebunching section, a radiation-free drift section, and a Ka band special complex cavity as output section. The bandwidth of this phigtron is expected to be improved over that of a gyroklystron since the input cavity is replaced by a traveling wave interaction structure. The second harmonic content of the beam may develop within both the input section and the drift space, and this allows the use of a smaller input signal. For a proof-of-principle experiment, a hot test tube was built. Initial experimental data will be provided in this presentation and will be compared with theoretical predictions. Finally, the feasibility of sing a phigtron configuration with second harmonic prebunching and fourth harmonic output to realize a compact, high performance MMW power source at 94 GHz will be discussed.

  7. Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

    2006-07-31

    This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

  8. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1986-06-01

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible andmore » are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.« less

  9. Modelling of mineral dust for interglacial and glacial climate conditions with a focus on Antarctica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudarchikova, Natalia; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Timmreck, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Schurgers, G.; Sein, Dmitry; Zhang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dust cycle responds to insolation-induced climate change and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Polar ice cores provide unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles in the past which indicates climate variability. In the current study the dust cycle in different climate conditions simulated by ECHAM5-HAM is analyzed. The study is focused on the Southern Hemisphere with emphasis on the Antarctic region. The investigated periods include four interglacial time-slices: the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6,000 years BP), Eemian (126,000 years BP), last glacial inception (115,000 years BP) and one glacial time interval: Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21,000 years BP). This study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles and to understand the quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission, atmospheric transport and precipitation to the total dust deposition in Antarctica. Results suggest increased deposition of mineral dust globally and in Antarctica in the past interglacial periods relative to the preindustrial CTRL simulation. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. One of the major factors responsible for the increase of dust deposition in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. The moderate change of dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. In the LGM simulation, dust deposition over Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times higher Southern Hemisphere dust emissions, 2 times stronger atmospheric transport towards Antarctica, and 30% weaker precipitation over the Southern Ocean. The model is able to reproduce the order of magnitude of dust deposition globally and in Antarctica for the pre-industrial and LGM climate

  10. ULTRAVIOLET+INFRARED STAR FORMATION RATES: HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS WITH SWIFT AND SPITZER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Immler, S.; Johnson, K. E.; Reines, A. E.; Gronwall, C.; Hoversten, E.; Charlton, J. C.

    2010-06-10

    Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey (SINGS) to construct a comparison subsample of galaxies that (1) match HCG galaxies in J-band total galaxy luminosity and (2) are not strongly interacting and largely isolated. This selection eliminates mostly low-luminosity dwarfs and galaxies with some degree of peculiarity, providing a substantially improved, quiescent control sample. Unlike HCG galaxies, galaxies in the comparison SINGS subsample are continuously distributed both in SSFR and {alpha}{sub IRAC}, although they show ranges in SFR{sub TOTAL} values, morphologies and stellar masses similar to those for HCG systems. We test the SSFR bimodality against a number of uncertainties, and find that these can only lead to its further enhancement. Excluding galaxies belonging to HCGs with three giant galaxies (triplets) leaves both the SSFR and the {alpha}{sub IRAC} bimodality completely unaffected. We interpret these results as further evidence that an environment characterized by high galaxy number densities and low galaxy velocity dispersions, such as the one found in compact groups, plays a key role in accelerating galaxy evolution by enhancing star formation processes in galaxies and favoring a fast transition to quiescence.

  11. Solid-state dosimeters: A new approach for mammography measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brateman, Libby F.; Heintz, Philip H.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To compare responses of modern commercially available solid-state dosimeters (SStDs) used in mammography medical physics surveys for two major vendors of current digital mammography units. To compare differences in dose estimates among SStD responses with ionization chamber (IC) measurements for several target/filter (TF) combinations and report their characteristics. To review scientific bases for measurements of quantities required for mammography for traditional measurement procedures and SStDs. Methods: SStDs designed for use with modern digital mammography units were acquired for evaluation from four manufacturers. Each instrument was evaluated under similar conditions with the available mammography beams provided by two modern full-field digital mammography units in clinical use: a GE Healthcare Senographe Essential (Essential) and a Hologic Selenia Dimensions 5000 (Dimensions), with TFs of Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh; and Rh/Rh and W/Rh, W/Ag, and W/Al, respectively. Measurements were compared among the instruments for the TFs over their respective clinical ranges of peak tube potentials for kVp and half-value layer (HVL) measurements. Comparisons for air kerma (AK) and their associated relative calculated average glandular doses (AGDs), i.e., using fixed mAs, were evaluated over the limited range of 2830 kVp. Measurements were compared with reference IC measurements for AK, reference HVLs and calculated AGD, for two compression paddle heights for AK, to evaluate scatter effects from compression paddles. SStDs may require different positioning from current mammography measurement protocols. Results: Measurements of kVp were accurate in general for the SStDs (within ?1.2 and +1.1 kVp) for all instruments over a wide range of set kVps and TFs and most accurate for Mo/Mo and W/Rh. Discrepancies between measurements and reference values were greater for HVL and AK. Measured HVL values differed from reference values by ?6.5% to +3.5% depending on the SStD and TF. AK

  12. High-Energy Permanent Magnets for Hybrid Vehicles and Alternative Energy Uses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjipanayis, George C.; McCallum, William R.; Sellmyer, David J.; Harris, Vincent; Carpenter, Everett E.; Liu, Jinfang

    2013-12-17

    The report summarizes research undertaken by a multidisciplinary team aimed at the development of the next generation high-energy permanent magnets. The principal approach was relied on bottom-up fabrication of anisotropic nanocomposite magnets. Our efforts resulted in further development of the theoretical concept and fabrication principles for the nanocomposites and in synthesis of a range of rare-earth-based hard magnetic nanoparticles. Even though we did not make a breakthrough in the assembly of these hard magnetic particles with separately prepared Fe(Co) nanoparticles and did not obtain a compact nanocomposite magnet, our performed research will help to direct the future efforts, in particular, towards nano-assembly via coating, when the two phases which made the nanocomposite are first organized in core-shell-structured particles. Two other approaches were to synthesize (discover) new materials for the traditional singe-material magnets and the nanocomposite magnets. Integrated theoretical and experimental efforts lead to a significant advance in nanocluster synthesis technique and yielded novel rare-earth-free nanostructured and nanocomposite materials. Examination of fifteen R-Fe-X alloy systems (R = rare earth), which have not been explored earlier due to various synthesis difficulties reveal several new ferromagnetic compounds. The research has made major progress in bottom-up manufacturing of rare-earth-containing nanocomposite magnets with superior energy density and open new directions in development of higher-energy-density magnets that do not contain rare earths. The advance in the scientific knowledge and technology made in the course of the project has been reported in 50 peer-reviewed journal articles and numerous presentations at scientific meetings.

  13. SU-E-T-480: Radiobiological Dose Comparison of Single Fraction SRS, Multi-Fraction SRT and Multi-Stage SRS of Large Target Volumes Using the Linear-Quadratic Formula

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, C; Hrycushko, B; Jiang, S; Meyer, J; Timmerman, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the radiobiological effect on large tumors and surrounding normal tissues from single fraction SRS, multi-fractionated SRT, and multi-staged SRS treatment. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom with a centrally located large volume target (18.2 cm{sup 3}) was scanned using a 16 slice large bore CT simulator. Scans were imported to the Multiplan treatment planning system where a total prescription dose of 20Gy was used for a single, three staged and three fractionated treatment. Cyber Knife treatment plans were inversely optimized for the target volume to achieve at least 95% coverage of the prescription dose. For the multistage plan, the target was segmented into three subtargets having similar volume and shape. Staged plans for individual subtargets were generated based on a planning technique where the beam MUs of the original plan on the total target volume are changed by weighting the MUs based on projected beam lengths within each subtarget. Dose matrices for each plan were export in DICOM format and used to calculate equivalent dose distributions in 2Gy fractions using an alpha beta ratio of 10 for the target and 3 for normal tissue. Results: Singe fraction SRS, multi-stage plan and multi-fractionated SRT plans had an average 2Gy dose equivalent to the target of 62.89Gy, 37.91Gy and 33.68Gy, respectively. The normal tissue within 12Gy physical dose region had an average 2Gy dose equivalent of 29.55Gy, 16.08Gy and 13.93Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The single fraction SRS plan had the largest predicted biological effect for the target and the surrounding normal tissue. The multi-stage treatment provided for a more potent biologically effect on target compared to the multi-fraction SRT treatments with less biological normal tissue than single-fraction SRS treatment.

  14. Construction of energy-stable projection-based reduced order models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kalashnikova, Irina; Barone, Matthew F.; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.

    2014-12-15

    Our paper aims to unify and extend several approaches for building stable projection-based reduced order models (ROMs) using the energy method and the concept of “energy-stability”. Attention is focused on linear time-invariant (LTI) systems. First, an approach for building energy stable Galerkin ROMs for linear hyperbolic or incompletely parabolic systems of partial differential equations (PDEs) using continuous projection is proposed. The key idea is to apply to the system a transformation induced by the Lyapunov function for the system, and to build the ROM in the transformed variables. The result of this procedure will be a ROM that is energy-stablemore » for any choice of reduced basis. It is shown that, for many PDE systems, the desired transformation is induced by a special inner product, termed the “symmetry inner product”. Next, attention is turned to building energy-stable ROMs via discrete projection. A discrete counterpart of the continuous symmetry inner product, termed the “Lyapunov inner product”, is derived. Moreover, it is shown that the Lyapunov inner product can be computed in a black-box fashion for a stable LTI system ari sing from the discretization of a system of PDEs in space. Projection in this inner product guarantees a ROM that is energy-stable, again for any choice of reduced basis. Connections between the Lyapunov inner product and the inner product induced by the balanced truncation algorithm are made. We also made comparisons between the symmetry inner product and the Lyapunov inner product. Performance of ROMs constructed using these inner products is evaluated on several benchmark test cases.« less

  15. Technical Note: On the use of nudging for aerosol–climate model intercomparison studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, K.; Wan, H.; Liu, X.; Ghan, S. J.; Kooperman, G. J.; Ma, P.-L.; Rasch, P. J.; Neubauer, D.; Lohmann, U.

    2014-08-26

    Nudging as an assimilation technique has seen increased use in recent years in the development and evaluation of climate models. Constraining the simulated wind and temperature fields using global weather reanalysis facilitates more straightforward comparison between simulation and observation, and reduces uncertainties associated with natural variabilities of the large-scale circulation. On the other hand, the forcing introduced by nudging can be strong enough to change the basic characteristics of the model climate. In the paper we show that for the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), due to the systematic temperature bias in the standard model and the sensitivity ofmore » simulated ice formation to anthropogenic aerosol concentration, nudging towards reanalysis results in substantial reductions in the ice cloud amount and the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on long-wave cloud forcing. In order to reduce discrepancies between the nudged and unconstrained simulations, and meanwhile take the advantages of nudging, two alternative experimentation methods are evaluated. The first one constrains only the horizontal winds. The second method nudges both winds and temperature, but replaces the long-term climatology of the reanalysis by that of the model. Results show that both methods lead to substantially improved agreement with the free-running model in terms of the top-of-atmosphere radiation budget and cloud ice amount. The wind-only nudging is more convenient to apply, and provides higher correlations of the wind fields, geopotential height and specific humidity between simulation and reanalysis. Results from both CAM5 and a second aerosol–climate model ECHAM6-HAM2 also indicate that compared to the wind-and-temperature nudging, constraining only winds leads to better agreement with the free-running model in terms of the estimated shortwave cloud forcing and the simulated convective activities. This suggests nudging the horizontal winds but not

  16. Modelling of mineral dust for interglacial and glacial climate conditions with a focus on Antarctica

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sudarchikova, Natalia; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Timmreck, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Schurgers, G.; Sein, Dmitry; Zhang, Kai

    2015-05-19

    The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distances. These cores are a palaeoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol–climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission,more » atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret palaeodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time slices: the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP; hereafter referred to as \\"6 kyr\\"), last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"115 kyr\\") and Eemian (126 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"126 kyr\\"). One glacial time interval, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"21 kyr\\"), was simulated as well to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase in mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two-thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one-third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change in dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times

  17. Modelling of mineral dust for interglacial and glacial climate conditions with a focus on Antarctica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudarchikova, Natalia; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Timmreck, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Schurgers, G.; Sein, Dmitry; Zhang, Kai

    2015-05-19

    The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distances. These cores are a palaeoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol–climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission, atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret palaeodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time slices: the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP; hereafter referred to as \\"6 kyr\\"), last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"115 kyr\\") and Eemian (126 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"126 kyr\\"). One glacial time interval, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"21 kyr\\"), was simulated as well to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase in mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two-thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one-third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change in dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times higher

  18. Yakima River Species Interactions Study; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 7 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Temple, Gabriel M.

    2004-05-01

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the twelfth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2003. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong