Sample records for wakefield accelerator facility

  1. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and FACET - Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams at SLAC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Andrei Seryi

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is one of the most promising approaches to advancing accelerator technology. This approach offers a potential 1,000-fold or more increase in acceleration over a given distance, compared to existing accelerators.  FACET, enabled by the Recovery Act funds, will study plasma acceleration, using short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons. In this lecture, the physics of plasma acceleration and features of FACET will be presented.  

  2. Experimental Plans to Explore Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration in the THZ Regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; /Northern Illinois U.; Piot, P.; /Fermilab; Behrens, C.; Elsen, E.; Flottmann, K.; Gerth, C.; Kube, G.; Schmidt, B.; /DESY; Osterhoff, J.; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II; Stoltz, P.

    2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Dielectric wakefield accelerators have shown great promise toward high-gradient acceleration. We investigate the performances of a possible experiment under consideration at the FLASH facility in DESY to explore wakefield acceleration with an enhanced transformer ratio. The experiment capitalizes on a unique pulse shaping capability recently demonstrated at this facility. In addition, the facility incorporates a superconducting linear accelerator that could generate bunch trains with closely spaced bunches thereby opening the exploration of potential dynamical effects in dielectric wakefield accelerators.

  3. Tomography of a laser wakefield accelerator Tomography of a laser wakefield accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    history of laser-plasma accelerators is reviewed. The excitation of plasma waves by ultra-short laser Tomography of a laser wakefield accelerator Tomography of a laser wakefield accelerator 692220024 #12; Tomography of a laser wakefield accelerator i #12; Tomography of a laser

  4. High Transformer ratios in collinear wakefield accelerators.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W.; Jing, C.; Kanreykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs, LLC

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on our previous experiment that successfully demonstrated wakefield transformer ratio enhancement in a 13.625 GHz dielectric-loaded collinear wakefield accelerator using the ramped bunch train technique, we present here a redesigned experimental scheme for even higher enhancement of the efficiency of this accelerator. Design of a collinear wakefield device with a transformer ratio R2, is presented. Using a ramped bunch train (RBT) rather than a single drive bunch, the enhanced transformer ratio (ETR) technique is able to increase the transformer ratio R above the ordinary limit of 2. To match the wavelength of the fundamental mode of the wakefield with the bunch length (sigmaz=2 mm) of the new Argonne wakefield accelerator (AWA) drive gun (where the experiment will be performed), a 26.625 GHz dielectric based accelerating structure is required. This transformer ratio enhancement technique based on our dielectric-loaded waveguide design will result in a compact, high efficiency accelerating structures for future wakefield accelerators.

  5. Current Filamentation Instability in Laser Wakefield Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntington, C. M.; Drake, R. P. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48103 (United States); Thomas, A. G. R.; McGuffey, C.; Matsuoka, T.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kneip, S.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Katsouleas, T. [Platt School of Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, 27708 (United States)

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments using an electron beam produced by laser-wakefield acceleration have shown that varying the overall beam-plasma interaction length results in current filamentation at lengths that exceed the laser depletion length in the plasma. Three-dimensional simulations show this to be a combination of hosing, beam erosion, and filamentation of the decelerated beam. This work suggests the ability to perform scaled experiments of astrophysical instabilities. Additionally, understanding the processes involved with electron beam propagation is essential to the development of wakefield accelerator applications.

  6. GeV electrons due to a transition from laser wakefield acceleration to plasma wakefield acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. E. Masson-Laborde; M. Z. Mo; A. Ali; S. Fourmaux; P. Lassonde; J. C. Kieffer; W. Rozmus; D. Teychenne; R. Fedosejevs

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We show through experiments that a transition from laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) regime to a plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) regime can drive electrons up to energies close to the GeV level. Initially, the acceleration mechanism is dominated by the bubble created by the laser in the nonlinear regime of LWFA, leading to an injection of a large number of electrons. After propagation beyond the depletion length, leading to a depletion of the laser pulse, whose transverse ponderomotive force is not able to sustain the bubble anymore, the high energy dense bunch of electrons propagating inside bubble will drive its own wakefield by a PWFA regime. This wakefield will be able to trap and accelerate a population of electrons up to the GeV level during this second stage. Three dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations support this analysis, and confirm the scenario.

  7. High transformer ratio drive beams for wakefield accelerator studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    England, R. J.; Ng, C.-K.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Muggli, P.; Joshi, C.; An, W.; Andonian, G.; Mori, W.; Lu, W. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Max Planck Institute for Physics, 80805 Munich (Germany); University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    For wakefield based acceleration schemes, use of an asymmetric (or linearly ramped) drive bunch current profile has been predicted to enhance the transformer ratio and generate large accelerating wakes. We discuss plans and initial results for producing such bunches using the 20 to 23 GeV electron beam at the FACET facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and sending them through plasmas and dielectric tubes to generate transformer ratios greater than 2 (the limit for symmetric bunches). The scheme proposed utilizes the final FACET chicane compressor and transverse collimation to shape the longitudinal phase space of the beam.

  8. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator to drive the future FEL Light Source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing, C.; Power, J.; Zholents, A. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)); ( HEP); (LLC)

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and a large part of the cost of the entire facility is driven by the accelerator. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may provide a significant cost saving and reduction of the facility size. In this article, we investigate using a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator to provide a high repetition rate, high current, high energy beam to drive a future FEL x-ray light source. As an initial case study, a {approx}100 MV/m loaded gradient, 850 GHz quartz dielectric based 2-stage, wakefield accelerator is proposed to generate a main electron beam of 8 GeV, 50 pC/bunch, {approx}1.2 kA of peak current, 10 x 10 kHz (10 beamlines) in just 100 meters with the fill factor and beam loading considered. This scheme provides 10 parallel main beams with one 100 kHz drive beam. A drive-to-main beam efficiency {approx}38.5% can be achieved with an advanced transformer ratio enhancement technique. rf power dissipation in the structure is only 5 W/cm{sup 2} in the high repetition rate, high gradient operation mode, which is in the range of advanced water cooling capability. Details of study presented in the article include the overall layout, the transform ratio enhancement scheme used to increase the drive to main beam efficiency, main wakefield linac design, cooling of the structure, etc.

  9. Laser wakefield simulations towards development of compact particle accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Laser wakefield simulations towards development of compact particle accelerators C.G.R. Geddes1, D understanding of accelerator physics to advance beam performance and stability, and particle simulations model, France; 9 Oxford University, UK E-mail: cgrgeddes@lbl.gov Abstract. Laser driven wakefield accelerators

  10. Laser Guiding at Relativistic Intensities and Wakefield Particle Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Laser Guiding at Relativistic Intensities and Wakefield Particle Acceleration in Plasma Channels C for the first time in a high gradient laser wakefield accelerator by guiding the drive laser pulse. Channels formed by hydrodynamic shock were used to guide acceleration relevant laser intensities of at least 1E18

  11. Measurement of wakefields generated in accelerator test structures using the SLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.; Loew, G.; Ruth, R.; Thompson, K.; Wang, J.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is underway at SLAC to develop accelerator structures for the next generation linear collider. An important feature of the design is a detuning of the dipole modes of the cells to suppress the long-range transverse wakefield by two orders of magnitude. This paper describes a facility, called ASSET, that will be incorporated into the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) to test the long-range wakefield suppression and also to measure the other components of the wakefields generated in accelerator test structures.

  12. Wakefield Damping in a Pair of X-Band Accelerators for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.M.; Adolphsen, C.E.; Wang, J.W.; Li, Z.; /SLAC

    2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider means to damp the wake-field left behind ultra-relativistic charges. In particular, we focus on a pair of travelling wave accelerators operating at an X-band frequency of 11.424 GHz. In order to maximize the efficiency of acceleration, in the context of a linear collider, multiple bunches of charged particles are accelerated within a given pulse of the electromagnetic field. The wake-field left behind successive bunches, if left unchecked, can seriously disturb the progress of trailing bunches and can lead to an appreciable dilution in the emittance of the beam. We report on a method to minimize the influence of the wake-field on trailing bunches. This method entails detuning the characteristic mode frequencies which make-up the electromagnetic field, damping the wake-field, and interleaving the frequencies of adjacent accelerating structures. Theoretical predictions of the wake-field and modes, based on a circuit model, are compared with experimental measurements of the wake-field conducted within the ASSET facility at SLAC. Very good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment and this allows us to have some confidence in designing the damping of wake-fields in a future linear collider consisting of several thousand of these accelerating structures.

  13. A proposal for a 1 GeV plasma-wakefield acceleration experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Assmann, R. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma-based wakefield acceleration (PWFA) experiment is proposed that will accelerate parts of an SLC bunch by up to 1 GeV/m over a length of 1 m. A single SLC bunch is used to both induce wakefields in the one meter long plasma and to witness the resulting beam acceleration. The proposed experiment will explore and further develop the techniques that are needed to apply high-gradient plasma wakefield acceleration to large scale accelerators. The one meter length of the experiment is about two orders of magnitude larger than other high-gradient PWFA experiments and the 1 GeV/m accelerating gradient is roughly ten times larger than that achieved with conventional metallic structures. Using existing SLAC facilities, the proposed experiment will allow the study of high-gradient acceleration at the forefront of advanced accelerator research.

  14. Beyond injection: Trojan horse underdense photocathode plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hidding, B.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Xi, Y.; O'Shea, B.; Andonian, G.; Schiller, D.; Barber, S.; Williams, O.; Pretzler, G.; Koenigstein, T.; Kleeschulte, F.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Corde, S.; White, W. W.; Muggli, P.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Lotov, K. [Institut fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany) and Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, Department for Physics and Astronomy, UCLA (United States); Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, Department for Physics and Astronomy, UCLA (United States); Institut fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado (United States) and 1348 Redwood Ave., Boulder, Colorado 80304 (United States); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation) and Novosibirsk State University, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview on the underlying principles of the hybrid plasma wakefield acceleration scheme dubbed 'Trojan Horse' acceleration is given. The concept is based on laser-controlled release of electrons directly into a particle-beam-driven plasma blowout, paving the way for controlled, shapeable electron bunches with ultralow emittance and ultrahigh brightness. Combining the virtues of a low-ionization-threshold underdense photocathode with the GV/m-scale electric fields of a practically dephasing-free beam-driven plasma blowout, this constitutes a 4th generation electron acceleration scheme. It is applicable as a beam brightness transformer for electron bunches from LWFA and PWFA systems alike. At FACET, the proof-of-concept experiment 'E-210: Trojan Horse Plasma Wakefield Acceleration' has recently been approved and is in preparation. At the same time, various LWFA facilities are currently considered to host experiments aiming at stabilizing and boosting the electron bunch output quality via a trojan horse afterburner stage. Since normalized emittance and brightness can be improved by many orders of magnitude, the scheme is an ideal candidate for light sources such as free-electron-lasers and those based on Thomson scattering and betatron radiation alike.

  15. Measurement of wakefield suppression in a detuned x-band accelerator structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.; Higo, T.; Kubo, K.; Miller, R.; Ruth, R.; Thompson, K.; Wang, J.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is underway at SLAC to develop accelerator structures for a next generation linear collider. A full-scale prototype X-band structure has been built in which the dipole mode frequencies were detuned to suppress the long-range transverse wakefield by about two orders of magnitude. To verify that the detuning works as expected, a facility to measure the long-range wakefield, called the Accelerator Structure SETup, or ASSET, was constructed in the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). This paper presents the results from the measurement of the prototype X-band structure with this facility.

  16. Increasing the transformer ratio at the Argonne wakefield accelerator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Power, J.G.; Conde, M.; Liu, W.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A. (High Energy Physics); (Euclid Techlabs, LLC)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transformer ratio is defined as the ratio of the maximum energy gain of the witness bunch to the maximum energy loss experienced by the drive bunch (or a bunch within a multidrive bunch train). This plays an important role in the collinear wakefield acceleration scheme. A high transformer ratio is desirable since it leads to a higher overall efficiency under similar conditions (e.g. the same beam loading, the same structure, etc.). One technique to enhance the transformer ratio beyond the ordinary limit of 2 is to use a ramped bunch train. The first experimental demonstration observed a transformer ratio only marginally above 2 due to the mismatch between the drive microbunch length and the frequency of the accelerating structure [C. Jing, A. Kanareykin, J. Power, M. Conde, Z. Yusof, P. Schoessow, and W. Gai, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 144801 (2007)]. Recently, we revisited this experiment with an optimized microbunch length using a UV laser stacking technique at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility and measured a transformer ratio of 3.4. Measurements and data analysis from these experiments are presented in detail.

  17. Automatic beam path analysis of laser wakefield particle acceleration data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Automatic beam path analysis of laser wakefield particle acceleration data Oliver Rübel1 particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high-energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration

  18. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data Oliver R¨ubel1 particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration

  19. Start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of double triangular current profile generation in Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ha, G.; Power, J.; Kim, S. H.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.-J.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W. [POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of) and Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of) and Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Double triangular current profile (DT) gives a high transformer ratio which is the determining factor of the performance of collinear wakefield accelerator. This current profile can be generated using the emittance exchange (EEX) beam line. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility plans to generate DT using the EEX beam line. We conducted start-to-end simulation for the AWA beam line using PARMELA code. Also, we discuss requirements of beam parameters for the generation of DT.

  20. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  1. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pisin Chen; Toshiki Tajima; Yoshiyuki Takahashi

    2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A cosmic acceleration mechanism is introduced which is based on the wakefields excited by the Alfven shocks in a relativistically flowing plasma, where the energy gain per distance of a test particle is Lorentz invariant. We show that there exists a threshold condition for transparency below which the accelerating particle is collision-free and suffers little energy loss in the plasma medium. The stochastic encounters of the random accelerating-decelerating phases results in a power-law energy spectrum: f(e) 1/e^2. The environment suitable for such plasma wakefield acceleration can be cosmically abundant. As an example, we discuss the possible production of super-GZK ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) through this mechanism in the atmosphere of gamma ray bursts. We show that the acceleration gradient can be as high as G ~ 10^16 eV/cm. The estimated event rate in our model agrees with that from UHECR observations.

  2. Observation of Enhanced Transformer Ratio in Collinear Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A. [Euclid Techlabs, LLC, Solon, OH-44139 (United States); Power, J.; Conde, M.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W. [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL-60439 (United States)

    2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The transformer ratio R is a parameter that characterizes the efficiency of the energy transferred from the drive beam to the trailing witness beam passing through a wakefield accelerating structure (all metal or dielectric based) or a plasma chamber. Using a ramped bunch train (RBT) rather than a single drive bunch, the enhanced transformer ratio (ETR) technique is able to increase the transformer ratio R above the ordinary limit of 2 for a single bunch in a collinear wakefield accelerator. The RBT is a train of electron bunches separated by half integer multiples wavelength of the wakefield. The charge of the leading bunch is lowest and subsequent bunch charges are increased in such a way as to maximize R. In this article, an experimental study of this scheme is presented in which an RBT of 2 bunches with charge ratio of 1:2.5 and bunch length {sigma}z = 2 mm were used to enhance the transformer ratio. Measurement results and data analysis show good agreement with theoretical predictions. The ETR technique demonstrated here can be used in any collinear wakefield accelerator configuration, either structure- or plasma-based.

  3. Observation of enhanced transformer ratio in collinear Wakefield acceleration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Power, J.; Conde, M.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs, LLC

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transformer ratio R is a parameter that characterizes the efficiency of the energy transferred from the drive beam to the trailing witness beam passing through a wakefield accelerating structure (all metal or dielectric based) or a plasma chamber. Using a ramped bunch train (RBT) rather than a single drive bunch, the enhanced transformer ratio (ETR) technique is able to increase the transformer ratio R above the ordinary limit of 2 for a single bunch in a collinear wakefield accelerator. The RBT is a train of electron bunches separated by half integer multiples wavelength of the wakefield. The charge of the leading bunch is lowest and subsequent bunch charges are increased in such a way as to maximize R. In this article, an experimental study of this scheme is presented in which an RBT of 2 bunches with charge ratio of 1:2.5 and bunch length {sigma}{sub z} = 2 mm were used to enhance the transformer ratio. Measurement results and data analysis show good agreement with theoretical predictions. The ETR technique demonstrated here can be used in any collinear wakefield accelerator configuration, either structure- or plasma-based.

  4. Proof-of-principle experiments of laser Wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, K.; Kawakubo, T.; Nakanishi, H. [National Lab. for Higher Energy Physics, Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently there has been a great interest in laser-plasma accelerators as possible next-generation particle accelerators because of their potential for ultra high accelerating gradients and compact size compared with conventional accelerators. It is known that the laser pulse is capable of exciting a plasma wave propagating at a phase velocity close to the velocity of light by means of beating two-frequency lasers or an ultra short laser pulse. These schemes came to be known as the Beat Wave Accelerator (BWA) for beating lasers or as the Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) for a short pulse laser. In this paper, the principle of laser wakefield particle acceleration has been tested by the Nd:glass laser system providing a short pulse with a power of 10 TW and a duration of 1 ps. Electrons accelerated up to 18 MeV/c have been observed by injecting 1 MeV/c electrons emitted from a solid target by an intense laser impact. The accelerating field gradient of 30 GeV/m is inferred.

  5. Stern-Gerlach surfing in laser wakefield accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flood, Stephen P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effects of a Stern-Gerlach-type addition to the Lorentz force on electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator. The Stern-Gerlach-type terms are found to generate a family of trajectories describing electrons that surf along the plasma density wave driven by a laser pulse. Such trajectories could lead to an increase in the size of an electron bunch, which may have implications for attempts to exploit such bunches in future free electron lasers.

  6. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration: How it Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This animation explains how electrons can be efficiently accelerated to high energy using wakes created in a plasma.

  7. Unphysical kinetic effects in particle-in-cell modeling of laser wakefield accelerators Estelle Cormier-Michel,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Unphysical kinetic effects in particle-in-cell modeling of laser wakefield accelerators Estelle of laser wakefield accelerators using particle-in-cell codes are investigated. A dark current free laser wakefield accelerator stage, in which no trapping of background plasma electrons into the plasma wave should

  8. Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration, time- varying laser wakefield particle accelerator simulation data. We ex- tend histogramBit, a state-of-the-art index/query technology, to acceler- ate data mining and multi-dimensional histogram

  9. Multimode Analysis of the Hollow Plasma Channel Wakefield Accelerator C. B. Schroeder,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    by resonant excitation [1]. In conventional accelerators, the size of these accel- erating fields is limited particle beam. For the laser wakefield accelerator one of the most se- vere limitations is the weakening- neous plasma. These properties make it well suited as a structure for both particle beam wakefield

  10. RECENT PROGRESS AT LBNL ON CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATED ELECTRON BUNCHES USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    RECENT PROGRESS AT LBNL ON CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATED ELECTRON BUNCHES USING. Schroeder, J. van Tilborg, Cs. T´oth Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract At LBNL, laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) can now produce ultra-short electron bunches

  11. Benchmarking the codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC with Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    with ultra-short Ti-Sapphire laser pulses propagating in hydrogen gas. Both first-order and secondBenchmarking the codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC with Laser Wakefield Acceleration Simulations K Técnico, Lisboa, Portugal Abstract. Three-dimensional laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) simulations have

  12. Observation of Enhanced Transformer Ratio in Collinear Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P. [Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, Ohio 44139 (United States); Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W. [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois-60439 (United States)

    2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    One approach to future high energy particle accelerators is based on the wakefield principle: a leading high-charge drive bunch is used to excite fields in an accelerating structure or plasma that in turn accelerates a trailing low-charge witness bunch. The transformer ratio R is defined as the ratio of the maximum energy gain of the witness bunch to the maximum energy loss of the drive bunch. In general, R<2 for this configuration. A number of techniques have been proposed to overcome the transformer ratio limitation. We report here the first experimental study of the ramped bunch train (RBT) technique in a dielectric based accelerating structure. A single drive bunch was replaced by two bunches with charge ratio of 1 ratio 2.5 and a separation of 10.5 wavelengths of the fundamental mode. An average measured transformer ratio enhancement by a factor of 1.31 over the single drive bunch case was obtained.

  13. Beam Head Erosion in Self-Ionized Plasma Wakefield Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, M.K.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the recent plasma wakefield accelerator experiments at SLAC, the energy of the particles in the tail of the 42 GeV electron beam were doubled in less than one meter [1]. Simulations suggest that the acceleration length was limited by a new phenomenon--beam head erosion in self-ionized plasmas. In vacuum, a particle beam expands transversely in a distance given by {beta}*. In the blowout regime of a plasma wakefield [2], the majority of the beam is focused by the ion channel, while the beam head slowly spreads since it takes a finite time for the ion channel to form. It is observed that in self-ionized plasmas, the head spreading is exacerbated compared to that in pre-ionized plasmas, causing the ionization front to move backward (erode). A simple theoretical model is used to estimate the upper limit of the erosion rate for a bi-gaussian beam by assuming free expansion of the beam head before the ionization front. Comparison with simulations suggests that half this maximum value can serve as an estimate for the erosion rate. Critical parameters to the erosion rate are discussed.

  14. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS OF A PLASMA WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR USING MULTIPLE ELECTRON BUNCHES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    ) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). We have observed increasing energy loss along the length of the beam preliminary experimental results of a plasma wakefield accelerator technique which utilizes multiple electron oscillations that can support electric fields (wakefields) that can be orders of magnitude higher than those

  15. ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORY PHYSICS DEPARTMENT Effective: 04012004 Page 1 of 2 Subject: Accelerator Test Facility - Linear Accelerator General Systems Guide Prepared by: Michael Zarcone...

  16. Calculation of wakefields in a 17 GHz beam-driven photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Min

    We present the theoretical analysis and computer simulation of the wakefields in a 17 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) structure for accelerator applications. Using the commercial code CST Particle Studio, the fundamental ...

  17. A THz Coaxial Two-Channel Dielectric Wakefield Structure for High Gradient Acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, T. C. [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States); Sotnikov, G. V. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States); NSC Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine); Hirshfield, J. L. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States); Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A coaxial two-channel dielectric wakefield structure is examined for use as a high gradient accelerator. A THz design, having radius {approx}1 mm, is shown to provide GeV/m--level acceleration gradient, high transformer ratio, and stable accelerated bunch motion when excited by a stable-moving 5-GeV 6-nC annular drive bunch.

  18. Properties of Trapped Electron Bunches in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Neil; /SLAC

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma-based accelerators use the propagation of a drive bunch through plasma to create large electric fields. Recent plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments, carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), successfully doubled the energy for some of the 42 GeV drive bunch electrons in less than a meter; this feat would have required 3 km in the SLAC linac. This dissertation covers one phenomenon associated with the PWFA, electron trapping. Recently it was shown that PWFAs, operated in the nonlinear bubble regime, can trap electrons that are released by ionization inside the plasma wake and accelerate them to high energies. These trapped electrons occupy and can degrade the accelerating portion of the plasma wake, so it is important to understand their origins and how to remove them. Here, the onset of electron trapping is connected to the drive bunch properties. Additionally, the trapped electron bunches are observed with normalized transverse emittance divided by peak current, {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t}, below the level of 0.2 {micro}m/kA. A theoretical model of the trapped electron emittance, developed here, indicates that the emittance scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density in the non-linear 'bubble' regime of the PWFA. This model and simulations indicate that the observed values of {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t} result from multi-GeV trapped electron bunches with emittances of a few {micro}m and multi-kA peak currents. These properties make the trapped electrons a possible particle source for next generation light sources. This dissertation is organized as follows. The first chapter is an overview of the PWFA, which includes a review of the accelerating and focusing fields and a survey of the remaining issues for a plasma-based particle collider. Then, the second chapter examines the physics of electron trapping in the PWFA. The third chapter uses theory and simulations to analyze the properties of the trapped electron bunches. Chapters four and five present the experimental diagnostics and measurements for the trapped electrons. Next, the sixth chapter introduces suggestions for future trapped electron experiments. Then, Chapter seven contains the conclusions. In addition, there is an appendix chapter that covers a topic which is extraneous to electron trapping, but relevant to the PWFA. This chapter explores the feasibility of one idea for the production of a hollow channel plasma, which if produced could solve some of the remaining issues for a plasma-based collider.

  19. Accelerator Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Facility Vitaly Yakimenko October 6-7, 2010 ATF User meeting DOE HE, S. Vigdor, ALD - (Contact) T. Ludlam Chair, Physics Department V. Yakimenko Director ATF, Accelerator...

  20. EXPERIMENTAL DEMONSTRATION OF WAKEFIELD EFFECTS IN A 250 GHZ PLANAR DIAMOND ACCELERATING STRUCTURE*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    of a rectangular waveguide loaded with polycrystalline CVD diamond plates as an accelerating structure. It should polycrystalline diamond plates loaded in a 6 cm long waveguide (Fig. 2). The beam gap was 200 microns (Fig. TM11EXPERIMENTAL DEMONSTRATION OF WAKEFIELD EFFECTS IN A 250 GHZ PLANAR DIAMOND ACCELERATING STRUCTURE

  1. Role of stochastic heating in wakefield acceleration when optical injection is used

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rassou, S.; Bourdier, A.; Drouin, M. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of an electron in two counterpropagating waves is investigated. Conditions for stochastic acceleration are derived. The possibility of stochastic heating is confirmed when two waves interact with low density plasma by performing PIC (Particle In Cell) code simulations. It is shown that stochastic heating can play an important role in laser wakefield acceleration. When considering low density plasma interacting with a high intensity wave perturbed by a low intensity counterpropagating wave, stochastic heating can provide electrons with the right momentum for trapping in the wakefield. The influence of stochastic acceleration on the trapping of electrons is compared to the one of the beatwave force which is responsible for cold injection. To do so, several polarizations for the colliding pulses are considered. For some value of the plasma density and pulse duration, a transition from an injection due to stochastic acceleration to a cold injection dominated regime—regarding the trapped charge—has been observed from 2D and 3D PIC code simulations. This transition is ruled by the ratio of the interaction length of the pulses to the longitudinal size of the bubble. When the interaction length of the laser pulses reaches the radius of the accelerating cavity stochastic heating becomes dominant, and might be necessary to get electrons trapped into the wakefield, when wakefield inhibition grows with plasma density.

  2. Visual Exploration of Turbulent Combustion and Laser-Wakefield Accelerator Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hydrogen flames under different levels of turbulence ­ Lean combustion reduces emissions Important hydrogen flames] #12;Visual Exploration of Turbulent Combustion and Laser-Wakefield Accelerator Simulations 12 Tracking Graph Extraction Pipeline 1. Concatenate to obtain 4D mesh 2. Extract isotherm in 4D 3

  3. Generation of electron beams from a laser wakefield acceleration in pure neon gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Song; Hafz, Nasr A. M., E-mail: nasr@sjtu.edu.cn; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Elsied, Ahmed M. M.; Ge, Xulei; Liu, Feng; Sokollik, Thomas; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Tao, Mengze; Chen, Liming [Bejing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the generation of quasimonoenergetic electron beams by the laser wakefield acceleration of 17–50 TW, 30 fs laser pulses in pure neon gas jet. The generated beams have energies in the range 40–120?MeV and up to ?430 pC of charge. At a relatively high density, we observed multiple electron beamlets which has been interpreted by simulations to be the result of breakup of the laser pulse into multiple filaments in the plasma. Each filament drives its own wakefield and generates its own electron beamlet.

  4. Scaling of the Longitudinal Electric Field and Transformer Ratio in a Nonlinear Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenfeld, I.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; /UCLA; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC; Huang, C.; /UCLA; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; /SLAC; Joshi, C.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.; /Southern California U.; Kirby, N.; /SLAC; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; /UCLA; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Zhou, M.; /UCLA

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The scaling of the two important figures of merit, the transformer ratio T and the longitudinal electric field E{sub z}, with the peak drive-bunch current I{sub p}, in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator is presented for the first time. The longitudinal field scales as I{sub P}{sup 0.623{+-}0.007}, in good agreement with nonlinear wakefield theory ({approx}I{sub P}{sup 0.5}), while the unloaded transformer ratio is shown to be greater than unity and scales weakly with the bunch current. The effect of bunch head erosion on both parameters is also discussed.

  5. Numerical Verification of the Power Transfer and Wakefield Coupling in the CLIC Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candel, Arno; NG, C; Rawat, V; Schussman, G; Ko, K; Syratchev, I; Grudiev, A; Wuensch, W

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept envisions complex 3D structures, which must be modeled to high accuracy so that simulation results can be directly used to prepare CAD drawings for machining. The required simulations include not only the fundamental mode properties of the accelerating structures but also the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), as well as the coupling between the two systems. Time-domain simulations will be performed to understand pulse formation, wakefield damping, fundamental power transfer and wakefield coupling in these structures. Applying SLAC’s parallel finite element code suite, these large-scale problems will be solved on some of the largest supercomputers available. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel two-beam accelerator scheme.

  6. Wakefield acceleration in atmospheric plasmas: a possible source of MeV electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arrayás, M; Seviour, R; Trueba, J L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense electromagnetic pulses interacting with a plasma can create a wake of plasma oscillations. Electrons trapped in such oscillations can be accelerated under certain conditions to very high energies. We study the conditions for the wakefield acceleration to produce MeV electrons in atmospheric plasmas. This mechanism may explain the origin of MeV or runaway electrons needed in the current theories for the production of Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes.

  7. Laser pulse propagation in inhomogeneous magnetoplasma channels and wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, B. S., E-mail: bs-phy@yahoo.com; Jain, Archana [Government College Kota, Kota 324001 (India)] [Government College Kota, Kota 324001 (India); Jaiman, N. K. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, University of Kota, Kota 324010 (India)] [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, University of Kota, Kota 324010 (India); Gupta, D. N. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)] [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Jang, D. G.; Suk, H. [Department of Physics and Photon Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics and Photon Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kulagin, V. V. [Sternberg Astronomical Institute of Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)] [Sternberg Astronomical Institute of Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Wakefield excitation in a preformed inhomogeneous parabolic plasma channel by an intense relativistic (?10{sup 19}?W/cm{sup 2}) circularly polarized Gaussian laser pulse is investigated analytically and numerically in the presence of an external longitudinal magnetic field. A three dimensional envelope equation for the evolution of the laser pulse is derived, which includes the effect of the nonparaxial and applied external magnetic field. A relation for the channel radius with the laser spot size is derived and examines numerically to see the external magnetic field effect. It is observed that the channel radius depends on the applied external magnetic field. An analytical expression for the wakefield is derived and validated with the help of a two dimensional particle in cell (2D PIC) simulation code. It is shown that the electromagnetic nature of the wakes in an inhomogeneous plasma channel makes their excitation nonlocal, which results in change of fields with time and external magnetic field due to phase mixing of the plasma oscillations with spatially varying frequencies. The magnetic field effect on perturbation of the plasma density and decreasing length is also analyzed numerically. In addition, it has been shown that the electron energy gain in the inhomogeneous parabolic magnetoplasma channel can be increased significantly compared with the homogeneous plasma channel.

  8. Injection and acceleration of electron bunch in a plasma wakefield produced by a chirped laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afhami, Saeedeh; Eslami, Esmaeil, E-mail: eeslami@iust.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Narmak, Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrashort laser pulse propagating in plasma can excite a nonlinear plasma wakefield which can trap and accelerate charged particles up to GeV. One-dimensional analysis of electron injection, trapping, and acceleration by different chirped pulses propagating in plasma is investigated numerically. In this paper, we inject electron bunches in front of the chirped pulses. It is indicated that periodical chirped laser pulse can trap electrons earlier than other pulses. It is shown that periodical chirped laser pulses lead to decrease the minimum momentum necessary to trap the electrons. This is due to the fact that periodical chirped laser pulses are globally much efficient than nonchirped pulses in the wakefield generation. It is found that chirped laser pulses could lead to much larger electron energy than that of nonchirped pulses. Relative energy spread has a lower value in the case of periodical chirped laser pulses.

  9. Emittance and Current of Electrons Trapped in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, N; Blumenfeld, I; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Huang, C.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Muggli, P; Oz, E.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.R.; Zhou, M.; /SLAC /UCLA /USC

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent experiments plasma electrons became trapped in a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA). The transverse size of these trapped electrons on a downstream diagnostic yields an upper limit measurement of transverse normalized emittance divided by peak current, {var_epsilon}{sub N,x}/I. The lowest upper limit for {var_epsilon}{sub N,x}/I measured in the experiment is 1.3 {center_dot} 10{sup -10} m/A.

  10. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC and its Radiological Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, X.S.; Leitner, M.Santana; Vollaire, J.

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) in SLAC will be used to study plasma wakefield acceleration. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design a maze wall to separate FACET project and LCLS project to allow persons working in FACET side during LCLS operation. Also FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design the shielding for FACET dump to get optimum design for shielding both prompt and residual doses, as well as reducing environmental impact. FACET will be an experimental facility that provides short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons to excite plasma wakefields and study a variety of critical issues associated with plasma wakefield acceleration [1]. This paper describes the FACET beam parameters, the lay-out and its radiological issues.

  11. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 71 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility the irradiated cells. Both the microbeam and the track segment facilities continue to be utilized in various investigations of this phenomenon. The single- particle microbeam facility provides precise control of the number

  12. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 1 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility for Radiological Research (CRR). Using the mi- crobeam facility, 10% of the cells were irradiated through particle beam as well as the first fo- cused microbeam in the new microbeam facility. · Another significant

  13. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tuckmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia, G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN -- the AWAKE experiment -- has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  14. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tuckmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia G , G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN { the AWAKE experiment { has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  15. Energy Doubling of 42 GeV Electrons in a Meter-scale Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenfeld, Ian; Clayton, Christopher E.; Decker, Franz-Josef; Hogan, Mark J.; Huang, Chengkun; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Iverson, Richard; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Katsouleas,; Kirby, Neil; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; Muggli, Patric; Oz, Erdem; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, Dieter; Zhou, Miaomiao; /SLAC /UCLA /Southern California U.

    2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy frontier of particle physics is several trillion electron volts, but colliders capable of reaching this regime (such as the Large Hadron Collider and the International Linear Collider) are costly and time-consuming to build; it is therefore important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators, a drive beam (either laser or particle) produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultrahigh accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. Here we show that an energy gain of more than 42 GeV is achieved in a plasma wakefield accelerator of 85 cm length, driven by a 42 GeV electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The results are in excellent agreement with the predictions of three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx} 52GV m{sup -1}. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3-km-long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. This is an important step towards demonstrating the viability of plasma accelerators for high-energy physics applications.

  16. Numerical modeling of multi-GeV laser wakefield electron acceleration inside a dielectric capillary tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paradkar, B. S.; Cros, B.; Maynard, G. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, University Paris Sud 11-CNRS, Orsay (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, University Paris Sud 11-CNRS, Orsay (France); Mora, P. [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)] [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical modeling of laser wakefield electron acceleration inside a gas filled dielectric capillary tube is presented. Guiding of a short pulse laser inside a dielectric capillary tube over a long distance (?1 m) and acceleration of an externally injected electron bunch to ultra-relativistic energies (?5-10 GeV) are demonstrated in the quasi-linear regime of laser wakefield acceleration. Two dimensional axisymmetric simulations were performed with the code WAKE-EP (Extended Performances), which allows computationally efficient simulations of such long scale plasma. The code is an upgrade of the quasi-static particle code, WAKE [P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen, Jr., Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)], to simulate the acceleration of an externally injected electron bunch (including beam loading effect) and propagation of the laser beam inside a dielectric capillary. The influence of the transverse electric field of the plasma wake on the radial loss of the accelerated electrons to the dielectric wall is investigated. The stable acceleration of electrons to multi-GeV energy with a non-resonant laser pulse with a large spot-size is demonstrated.

  17. Sub-femtosecond electron bunches created by direct laser acceleration in a laser wakefield accelerator with ionization injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemos, N; Marsh, K A; Joshi, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we will show through three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that direct laser acceleration in laser a wakefield accelerator can generate sub-femtosecond electron bunches. Two simulations were done with two laser pulse durations, such that the shortest laser pulse occupies only a fraction of the first bubble, whereas the longer pulse fills the entire first bubble. In the latter case, as the trapped electrons moved forward and interacted with the high intensity region of the laser pulse, micro-bunching occurred naturally, producing 0.5 fs electron bunches. This is not observed in the short pulse simulation.

  18. Detailed dynamics of electron beams self-trapped and accelerated in a self-modulated laser wakefield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    . These features are explained by analysis and test particle simulations of electron dynamics during acceleration wave,1 such as the plasma wakefield accel- erator, the plasma beat-wave accelerator, the Laser Wake the linear dephasing limit, and explained it, using Particle-In-Cell PIC simulations, as a result

  19. Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, C.G.R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider,"E.Esarey, and W.P.Leemans, "Free-electron laser driven bythe LBNL laser-plasma accelerator," in Proc. Adv. Acc. Con.

  20. Correlation of Beam Parameters to Decelerating Gradient in the E-167 Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenfeld, I.; Berry, M.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments at SLAC have shown that high gradient acceleration of electrons is achievable in meter scale plasmas [1,2]. Results from these experiments show that the wakefield is sensitive to parameters in the electron beam which drives it. In the experiment the bunch length and beam waist location were varied systematically at constant charge. Here we investigate the correlation of peak beam current to the decelerating gradient. Limits on the transformer ratio will also be discussed. The results are compared to simulation.

  1. Multi-bunch Plasma Wakefield Acceleration at ATF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 P D 9.7972e+18 3-D 0.002032 E Ewb 0.02052 Kp 590 r 15 Wake build-up at resonance: 3% detuning accelerates later bunches 0 0.5 1 1.5 -0.03 -0.02 -0.01...

  2. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    175 THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY #12;176 #12;177 THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH the microbeam and the track-segment facilities have been utilized in various investigations. Table 1 lists-segment facility. Samples are treated with graded doses of radical scavengers to observe changes in the cluster

  3. Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubel, Oliver; Prabhat, Mr.; Wu, Kesheng; Childs, Hank; Meredith, Jeremy; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Ahern, Sean; Weber, Gunther H.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Our work combines and extends techniques from high-performance scientific data management and visualization to enable scientific researchers to gain insight from extremely large, complex, time-varying laser wakefield particle accelerator simulation data. We extend histogram-based parallel coordinates for use in visual information display as well as an interface for guiding and performing data mining operations, which are based upon multi-dimensional and temporal thresholding and data subsetting operations. To achieve very high performance on parallel computing platforms, we leverage FastBit, a state-of-the-art index/query technology, to accelerate data mining and multi-dimensional histogram computation. We show how these techniques are used in practice by scientific researchers to identify, visualize and analyze a particle beam in a large, time-varying dataset.

  4. Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development of the Solid-State Laser System for the Accelerator Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User's Meeting April 3, 2009 Outline Motivation for...

  5. ACE3P Computations of Wakefield Coupling in the CLIC Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its novel two-beam accelerator concept envisions rf power transfer to the accelerating structures from a separate high-current decelerator beam line consisting of power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). It is critical to numerically verify the fundamental and higher-order mode properties in and between the two beam lines with high accuracy and confidence. To solve these large-scale problems, SLAC's parallel finite element electromagnetic code suite ACE3P is employed. Using curvilinear conformal meshes and higher-order finite element vector basis functions, unprecedented accuracy and computational efficiency are achieved, enabling high-fidelity modeling of complex detuned structures such as the CLIC TD24 accelerating structure. In this paper, time-domain simulations of wakefield coupling effects in the combined system of PETS and the TD24 structures are presented. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel CLIC two-beam accelerator scheme.

  6. Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish accelerator-specific safety requirements which, when supplemented by other applicable safety and health requirements, will serve to prevent injuries and illnesses associated with Department of Energy (DOE) or National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) accelerator operations. Cancels DOE O 420.2A. Certified 5-13-08. Canceled by DOE O 420.2C.

  7. Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The order defines accelerators and establishes accelerator specific safety requirements and approval authorities which, when supplemented by other applicable safety and health requirements, promote safe operations to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Cancels DOE O 420.2B.

  8. Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish accelerator-specific safety requirements which, when supplemented by other applicable safety and health requirements, will serve to prevent injuries and illnesses associated with Department of Energy (DOE) or National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) accelerator operations. Cancels DOE O 420.2. Canceled by DOE O 420.2B.

  9. An ultrashort pulse ultra-violet radiation undulator source driven by a laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anania, M. P. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Brunetti, E.; Wiggins, S. M.; Grant, D. W.; Welsh, G. H.; Issac, R. C.; Cipiccia, S.; Shanks, R. P.; Manahan, G. G.; Aniculaesei, C.; Jaroszynski, D. A., E-mail: d.a.jaroszynski@strath.ac.uk [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Geer, S. B. van der; Loos, M. J. de [Pulsar Physics, Burghstraat 47, 5614 BC Eindhoven (Netherlands); Poole, M. W.; Shepherd, B. J. A.; Clarke, J. A. [ASTeC, STFC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Gillespie, W. A. [SUPA, School of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); MacLeod, A. M. [School of Computing and Creative Technologies, University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee DD1 1HG (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Narrow band undulator radiation tuneable over the wavelength range of 150–260?nm has been produced by short electron bunches from a 2?mm long laser plasma wakefield accelerator based on a 20?TW femtosecond laser system. The number of photons measured is up to 9?×?10{sup 6} per shot for a 100 period undulator, with a mean peak brilliance of 1?×?10{sup 18} photons/s/mrad{sup 2}/mm{sup 2}/0.1% bandwidth. Simulations estimate that the driving electron bunch r.m.s. duration is as short as 3 fs when the electron beam has energy of 120–130?MeV with the radiation pulse duration in the range of 50–100 fs.

  10. Measurements of the critical power for self-injection of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Froula, D H; Clayton, C E; Doppner, T; Fonseca, R A; Marsh, K A; Barty, C J; Divol, L; Glenzer, S H; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Martins, S F; Michel, P; Mori, W; Palastro, J P; Pollock, B B; Pak, A; Ralph, J E; Ross, J S; Siders, C; Silva, L O; Wang, T

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser wakefield acceleration study has been performed in the matched, self-guided, blow-out regime where a 10 J, 60 fs laser produced 720 {+-} 50 MeV quasi-monoenergetic electrons with a divergence of {Delta}{theta} = 2.85 {+-} 0.15 mRad. While maintaining a nearly constant plasma density (3 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}), a linear electron energy gain was measured from 100 MeV to 700 MeV when the plasma length was scaled from 3 mm to 8 mm. Absolute charge measurements indicate that self-injection occurs when P/P{sub cr} > 4 and saturates around 100 pC for P/P{sub cr} > 12. The results are compared with both analytical scalings and full 3D particle-in-cell simulations.

  11. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Grames, Douglas Higinbotham, Hugh Montgomery

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

  12. BNL | Accelerator Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and new approaches to particle acceleration and x-ray generation. A next-generation ultra-fast CO2 laser based on chirped pulse amplification in isotopic gas mixtures is...

  13. Radiological Research Accelerator Facility Service Request Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiological Research Accelerator Facility Service Request Form National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Radiological Research Accelerator Facility Service request form Estimate when(s) to control for this experiment (if more than one, please prioritize): Radiological Research Accelerator

  14. Quasimonoenergetic collimated electron beams from a laser wakefield acceleration in low density pure nitrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Mengze [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Bejing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hafz, Nasr A. M., E-mail: nasr@sjtu.edu.cn; Li, Song; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Elsied, Ahmed M. M.; Ge, Xulei; Liu, Feng; Sokollik, Thomas; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chen, Liming [Bejing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) experiment is performed using 30 TW, 30 fs, and 800?nm laser pulses, focused onto pure nitrogen plasma having relatively low densities in the range of 0.8×10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3} to 2.7×10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3}. Electron beams having a low divergence of ?3??mrad (full-width at half-maximum) and quasi-monoenergetic peak energies of ?105??MeV are achieved over 4-mm interaction length. The total electron beam charge reached to 2 nC, however, only 1%–2% of this (tens of pC) had energies >35?MeV. We tried different conditions to optimize the electron beam acceleration; our experiment verifies that lower nitrogen plasma densities are generating electron beams with high quality in terms of divergence, charge, pointing stability, and maximum energy. In addition, if LWFA is to be widely used as a basis for compact particle accelerators in the future, therefore, from the economic and safety points of view we propose the use of nitrogen gas rather than helium or hydrogen.

  15. Wakefield and RF Kicks Due to Coupler Asymmetry in TESLA-Type Accelerating Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; /SLAC; Dohlus, M.; Zagorodnov, I.; /DESY; Gonin, I.; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab; Gjonaj, E.; Weiland, T.; /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch.

    2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In a future linear collider, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), trains of high current, low emittance bunches will be accelerated in a linac before colliding at the interaction point. Asymmetries in the accelerating cavities of the linac will generate fields that will kick the beam transversely and degrade the beam emittance and thus the collider performance. In the main linac of the ILC, which is filled with TESLA-type superconducting cavities, it is the fundamental (FM) and higher mode (HM) couplers that are asymmetric and thus the source of such kicks. The kicks are of two types: one, due to (the asymmetry in) the fundamental RF fields and the other, due to transverse wakefields that are generated by the beam even when it is on axis. In this report we calculate the strength of these kicks and estimate their effect on the ILC beam. The TESLA cavity comprises nine cells, one HM coupler in the upstream end, and one (identical, though rotated) HM coupler and one FM coupler in the downstream end (for their shapes and location see Figs. 1, 2) [1]. The cavity is 1.1 m long, the iris radius 35 mm, and the coupler beam pipe radius 39 mm. Note that the couplers reach closer to the axis than the irises, down to a distance of 30 mm.

  16. Modeling Self-Ionized Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Afterburner Parameters Using QuickPIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, M.; Clayton, C.E.; Decyk, V.K.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; Tsung, F.S.; /UCLA; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern; Decker, F.-J.; Iverson, R.; O'Connel, C.; Walz, D.; /SLAC

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    For the parameters envisaged in possible afterburner stages[1] of a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA), the self-fields of the particle beam can be intense enough to tunnel ionize some neutral gases. Tunnel ionization has been investigated as a way for the beam itself to create the plasma, and the wakes generated may differ from those generated in pre-ionized plasmas[2],[3]. However, it is not practical to model the whole stage of PWFA with afterburner parameters using the models described in [2] and [3]. Here we describe the addition of a tunnel ionization package using the ADK model into QuickPIC, a highly efficient quasi-static particle in cell (PIC) code which can model a PWFA with afterburner parameters. Comparison between results from OSIRIS (a full PIC code with ionization) and from QuickPIC with the ionization package shows good agreement. Preliminary results using parameters relevant to the E164X experiment and the upcoming E167 experiment at SLAC are shown.

  17. VOLUME 82, NUMBER 6 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 8 FEBRUARY 1999 Multimode Analysis of the Hollow Plasma Channel Wakefield Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    ]. In conventional accelerators, the size of these accel- erating fields is limited by breakdown. For two decades wakefield accelerator, the plasma wave is excited by the self-fields of an intense relativistic particle- neous plasma. These properties make it well suited as a structure for both particle beam wakefield

  18. The Radiological Research Accelerator THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility #12;84 THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY Director: David J. Brenner, Ph.D., D.Sc., Manager: Stephen A. Marino, M.S. An NIH SupportedV/µm 4 He ions using the microbeam facility (Exp. 73) also continued. The transformation frequency

  19. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106-2099 (United States)] [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106-2099 (United States); Beaurepaire, B.; Malka, V.; Faure, J. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France)] [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  20. Laser Wakefield Acceleration: Structural and Dynamic Studies. Final Technical Report ER40954

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downer, Michael C.

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle accelerators enable scientists to study the fundamental structure of the universe, but have become the largest and most expensive of scientific instruments. In this project, we advanced the science and technology of laser-plasma accelerators, which are thousands of times smaller and less expensive than their conventional counterparts. In a laser-plasma accelerator, a powerful laser pulse exerts light pressure on an ionized gas, or plasma, thereby driving an electron density wave, which resembles the wake behind a boat. Electrostatic fields within this plasma wake reach tens of billions of volts per meter, fields far stronger than ordinary non-plasma matter (such as the matter that a conventional accelerator is made of) can withstand. Under the right conditions, stray electrons from the surrounding plasma become trapped within these “wake-fields”, surf them, and acquire energy much faster than is possible in a conventional accelerator. Laser-plasma accelerators thus might herald a new generation of compact, low-cost accelerators for future particle physics, x-ray and medical research. In this project, we made two major advances in the science of laser-plasma accelerators. The first of these was to accelerate electrons beyond 1 gigaelectronvolt (1 GeV) for the first time. In experimental results reported in Nature Communications in 2013, about 1 billion electrons were captured from a tenuous plasma (about 1/100 of atmosphere density) and accelerated to 2 GeV within about one inch, while maintaining less than 5% energy spread, and spreading out less than ½ milliradian (i.e. ½ millimeter per meter of travel). Low energy spread and high beam collimation are important for applications of accelerators as coherent x-ray sources or particle colliders. This advance was made possible by exploiting unique properties of the Texas Petawatt Laser, a powerful laser at the University of Texas at Austin that produces pulses of 150 femtoseconds (1 femtosecond is 10-15 seconds) in duration and 150 Joules in energy (equivalent to the muzzle energy of a small pistol bullet). This duration was well matched to the natural electron density oscillation period of plasma of 1/100 atmospheric density, enabling efficient excitation of a plasma wake, while this energy was sufficient to drive a high-amplitude wake of the right shape to produce an energetic, collimated electron beam. Continuing research is aimed at increasing electron energy even further, increasing the number of electrons captured and accelerated, and developing applications of the compact, multi-GeV accelerator as a coherent, hard x-ray source for materials science, biomedical imaging and homeland security applications. The second major advance under this project was to develop new methods of visualizing the laser-driven plasma wake structures that underlie laser-plasma accelerators. Visualizing these structures is essential to understanding, optimizing and scaling laser-plasma accelerators. Yet prior to work under this project, computer simulations based on estimated initial conditions were the sole source of detailed knowledge of the complex, evolving internal structure of laser-driven plasma wakes. In this project we developed and demonstrated a suite of optical visualization methods based on well-known methods such as holography, streak cameras, and coherence tomography, but adapted to the ultrafast, light-speed, microscopic world of laser-driven plasma wakes. Our methods output images of laser-driven plasma structures in a single laser shot. We first reported snapshots of low-amplitude laser wakes in Nature Physics in 2006. We subsequently reported images of high-amplitude laser-driven plasma “bubbles”, which are important for producing electron beams with low energy spread, in Physical Review Letters in 2010. More recently, we have figured out how to image laser-driven structures that change shape while propagating in a single laser shot. The latter techniques, which use the methods of computerized tomography, were demonstrated on test objects – e.g. laser-d

  1. Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, M.J.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Hast, C.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; /UCLA; Muggli, P.; Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; /Southern California U.

    2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to {approx}20{micro}m long and focused to {approx}10{micro}m wide. The intense fields of the FACET bunches will be used to field ionize neutral lithium or cesium vapor produced in a heat pipe oven. Previous experiments at the SLAC FFTB facility demonstrated 50GeV/m gradients in an 85cm field ionized lithium plasma where the interaction distance was limited by head erosion. Simulations indicate the lower ionization potential of cesium will decrease the rate of head erosion and increase single stage performance. The initial experimental program will compare the performance of lithium and cesium plasma sources with single and double bunches. Later experiments will investigate improved performance with a pre-ionized cesium plasma. The status of the experiments and expected performance are reviewed. The FACET Facility is being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The facility will begin commissioning in summer 2011 and conduct an experimental program over the coming five years to study electron and positron beam driven plasma acceleration with strong wake loading in the non-linear regime. The FACET experiments aim to demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of electron and positron beams with high efficiency and negligible emittance growth.

  2. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R., E-mail: agrt@umich.edu [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  3. Results from Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.Z.; Clarke, C.I.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Jobe, R.K.; Litos, M.D.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Muggli, P.; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; /UCLA; Adli, E.; /U. Oslo

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report initial results of the Plasma Wakefield Acceleration (PWFA) Experiments performed at FACET - Facility for Advanced aCcelertor Experimental Tests at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. At FACET a 23 GeV electron beam with 1.8 x 10{sup 10} electrons is compressed to 20 {mu}m longitudinally and focused down to 10 {mu}m x 10 {mu}m transverse spot size for user driven experiments. Construction of the FACET facility completed in May 2011 with a first run of user assisted commissioning throughout the summer. The first PWFA experiments will use single electron bunches combined with a high density lithium plasma to produce accelerating gradients > 10 GeV/m benchmarking the FACET beam and the newly installed experimental hardware. Future plans for further study of plasma wakefield acceleration will be reviewed. The experimental hardware and operation of the plasma heat-pipe oven have been successfully commissioned. Plasma wakefield acceleration was not observed because the electron bunch density was insufficient to ionize the lithium vapor. The remaining commissioning time in summer 2011 will be dedicated to delivering the FACET design parameters for the experimental programs which will begin in early 2012. PWFA experiments require the shorter bunches and smaller transverse sizes to create the plasma and drive large amplitude wakefields. Low emittance and high energy will minimize head erosion which was found to be a limiting factor in acceleration distance and energy gain. We will run the PWFA experiments with the design single bunch conditions in early 2012. Future PWFA experiments at FACET are discussed in [5][6] and include drive and witness bunch production for high energy beam manipulation, ramped bunch to optimize tranformer ratio, field-ionized cesium plasma, preionized plasmas, positron acceleration, etc.. We will install a notch collimator for two-bunch operation as well as new beam diagnostics such as the X-band TCAV [7] to resolve the two bunches. With these new instruments and desired beam parameters in place next year, we will be able to complete the studies of plasma wakefield acceleration in the next few years.

  4. Plasma wakefields driven by an incoherent combination of laser pulses: a path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    he wakefield generated in a plasma by incoherently combining a large number of low energy laser pulses (i.e.,without constraining the pulse phases) is studied analytically and by means of fully-self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations. The structure of the wakefield has been characterized and its amplitude compared with the amplitude of the wake generated by a single (coherent) laser pulse. We show that, in spite of the incoherent nature of the wakefield within the volume occupied by the laser pulses, behind this region the structure of the wakefield can be regular with an amplitude comparable or equal to that obtained from a single pulse with the same energy. Wake generation requires that the incoherent structure in the laser energy density produced by the combined pulses exists on a time scale short compared to the plasma period. Incoherent combination of multiple laser pulses may enable a technologically simpler path to high-repetition rate, high-average power laser-plasma accelerators and associated applications.

  5. Single Bunch Wakefields in the CERN-PSI-ELETTRA X-band Linear Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Ashmawy, Mostafa; Dehler, Micha; Raguin, Jean-Yves; Riddone, Germana; Zennaro, Riccardo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FERMI@ELETTRA and PSI-XFEL are 4th Generation Light Sources that require high quality electron beam at the entrance of the undulator chains. In this context, a specially developed X-band structure with integrated alignment monitors will be used to mitigate the nonlinearities in the longitudinal phase space due to the second order RF time curvature and the second order momentum compaction term of chicane compressor. The knowledge of the transverse and longitudinal short range wakefields in the X-band structure is essential to evaluate the beam quality in terms of longitudinal energy spread and transverse kick spread. We have used the ABCI code to numerically evaluate the transverse and longitudinal wake potentials for short bunches in this structure

  6. Independent Oversight Inspection, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility- August 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Inspection of Environment, Safety and Health Programs at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

  7. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY RARAF -Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 75 RARAF - Table of Contents RARAF Professional FOR RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH · ANNUAL REPORT 2005 76 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility AN NIH .................................................................................................................................................72 Development of Facilities

  8. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY RARAF -Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 113 RARAF - Table of Contents RARAF Professional · ANNUAL REPORT 2007 114 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility AN NIH-SUPPORTED RESOURCE CENTER................................................................................................................................................114 Development of Facilities

  9. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY RARAF Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY RARAF Table of Contents RARAF Professional Staff RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT 2009 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility AN NIH-SUPPORTED RESOURCE................................................................................................................................................101 Development of Facilities

  10. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY RARAF Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 118 RARAF Table of Contents RARAF Professional ANNUAL REPORT 2008 119 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility AN NIH-SUPPORTED RESOURCE CENTER................................................................................................................................................119 Development of Facilities

  11. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY RARAF -Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 117 RARAF - Table of Contents RARAF Professional RESEARCH · ANNUAL REPORT 2010 118 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility AN NIH-SUPPORTED RESOURCE................................................................................................................................................117 Development of Facilities

  12. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY RARAF -Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 65 RARAF - Table of Contents RARAF Professional FOR RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH · ANNUAL REPORT 2006 66 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility AN NIH..................................................................................................................................................66 Development of facilities

  13. Recent Progress at LBNL on Characterization of Laser Wakefield Accelerated Electron Bunches using Coherent Transition Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RECENT PROGRESS AT LBNL ON CHARACTERIZATION OF LASERBerkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA 94720,USA Abstract At LBNL, laser wake?eld accelerators (LWFA) can

  14. Drive Beam Shaping and Witness Bunch Generation for the Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Muggli, P. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Joshi, C. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024 (United States)

    2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    High transformer ratio operation of the plasma wake field accelerator requires a tailored drive beam current profile followed by a short witness bunch. We discuss techniques for generating the requisite dual bunches and for obtaining the desired drive beam profile, with emphasis on the FACET experiment at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

  15. Recent Experiment on Wakefield Transformer Ratio Enhancement at AWA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A. [Euclid Techlabs, LLC, 5900 Harper Rd, Solon, OH 44139 (United States); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Liu, W.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W. [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    One technique to enhance the transformer ratio beyond the ordinary limit of 2 in a collinear wakefield acceleration scheme is to use a ramped bunched train (RBT). The first experimental demonstration has been reported in [1]. However, due to the mismatch between the beam bunch length and frequency of the accelerating structure, the observed transformer ratio was only marginally above 2 in the earlier experiment. We recently revisited this experiment with an optimized bunch length using the laser stacking technique at Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility. A transformer ratio of 3.4 has been measured using two drive bunches. Attempting to use four drive bunches met with major challenges. In this article, measurement results and data analysis from these experiments are presented in detail.

  16. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, R.; Bottke, I.; Fernow, R.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is the VAX/CAMAC-based control system for Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility, a laser/linac research complex. Details of hardware and software configurations are presented along with experiences of using Vsystem, a commercial control system package.

  17. BNL ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY CONTROL SYSTEM UPGRADE R. Malone...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY CONTROL SYSTEM UPGRADE R. Malone, I. Ben-Zvi, X. Wang, V. Yakimenko BNL , Upton, NY 11973, USA Abstract Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator...

  18. Development of high gradient laser wakefield accelerators towards nuclear detection applications at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron GR

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    detection applications at LBNL Cameron G.R. Geddes 1 , DavidLeemans 1,4 LOASIS Program, LBNL, 1 Cyclotron Rd MS 71-259,accelerator experiments at LBNL demonstrated narrow energy

  19. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakeman, M.S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Weingartner, R.; Gruner, F.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

  20. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  1. Two Channel Dielectric-Lined Rectangular High Transformer Ratio Accelerator Structure Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shchelkunov, S. V.; LaPointe, M. A. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, 272 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Hirshfield, J. L. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, 272 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Marshall, T. C. [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Sotnikov, G. [NSC Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine); Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Gai, Wei; Conde, M.; Power, J.; Mihalcea, D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Current status of a two-channel cm-scale rectangular dielectric lined wakefield accelerator structure is described. This structure is installed at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility (AWA), and is presently being evaluated. The device has a transformer ratio of {approx}12.5:1. When driven by a {approx}50 nC single drive bunch it is expected to obtain {approx}6 MV/m acceleration gradient. Related issues are discussed.

  2. Transverse self-modulation of ultra-relativistic lepton beams in the plasma wakefield accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vieira, J; Mori, W B; Silva, L O; Muggli, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transverse self-modulation of ultra-relativistic, long lepton bunches in high-density plasmas is explored through full-scale particle-in-cell simulations. We demonstrate that long SLAC-type electron and positron bunches can become strongly self-modulated over centimeter distances, leading to wake excitation in the blowout regime with accelerating fields in excess of 20 GV/m. We show that particles energy variations exceeding 10 GeV can occur in meter-long plasmas. We find that the self-modulation of positively and negatively charged bunches differ when the blowout is reached. Seeding the self-modulation instability suppresses the competing hosing instability. This work reveals that a proof-of-principle experiment to test the physics of bunch self-modulation can be performed with available lepton bunches and with existing experimental apparatus and diagnostics.

  3. Visualizing Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Laser Wakefield Particle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of times greater than those obtained in conventional particle accelerators. LWFAs use the electric field of a plasma wave - the wakefield - driven by the radiation pressure of an...

  4. Terahertz radiation as a bunch diagnostic for laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Tilborg, Jeroen; Schroeder, Carl; Filip, Catalin; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Fubiani, Gwenael; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results are reported from two measurement techniques (semiconductor switching and electro-optic sampling) that allow temporal characterization of electron bunches produced by a laser-driven plasma-based accelerator. As femtosecond electron bunches exit the plasma-vacuum interface, coherent transition radiation (at THz frequencies) is emitted. Measuring the properties of this radiation allows characterization of the electron bunches. Theoretical work on the emission mechanism is presented, including a model that calculates the THz wave form from a given bunch profile. It is found that the spectrum of the THz pulse is coherent up to the 200 {micro}m thick crystal (ZnTe) detection limit of 4 THz, which corresponds to the production of sub-50 fs (rms) electron bunch structure. The measurements demonstrate both the shot-to-shot stability of bunch parameters that are critical to THz emission (such as total charge and bunch length), as well as femtosecond synchronization among bunch, THz pulse, and laser beam.

  5. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with femtosecond pulses of betatron radiation from a compact laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneip, S. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States); McGuffey, C.; Dollar, F.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Matsuoka, T.; Schumaker, W.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yanovsky, V. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States); Bloom, M. S.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Schreiber, J. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that x-rays from a recently demonstrated table top source of bright, ultrafast, coherent synchrotron radiation [Kneip et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 980 (2010)] can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens. Our scheme is based on focusing a high power short pulse laser in a tenuous gas jet, setting up a plasma wakefield accelerator that accelerates and wiggles electrons analogously to a conventional synchrotron, but on the centimeter rather than tens of meter scale. We use the scheme to record absorption and phase contrast images of a tetra fish, damselfly and yellow jacket, in particular highlighting the contrast enhancement achievable with the simple propagation technique of phase contrast imaging. Coherence and ultrafast pulse duration will allow for the study of various aspects of biomechanics.

  6. COAXIAL TWO-CHANNEL DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc.

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Theory, computations, and experimental apparatus are presented that describe and are intended to confirm novel properties of a coaxial two-channel dielectric wake field accelerator. In this configuration, an annular drive beam in the outer coaxial channel excites multimode wakefields which, in the inner channel, can accelerate a test beam to an energy much higher than the energy of the drive beam. This high transformer ratio is the result of judicious choice of the dielectric structure parameters, and of the phase separation between drive bunches and test bunches. A structure with cm-scale wakefields has been build for tests at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Laboratory, and a structure with mm-scale wakefields has been built for tests at the SLAC FACET facility. Both tests await scheduling by the respective facilities.

  7. Accelerator Design Concept for Future Neutrino Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ISS Accelerator Working Group; Zisman, Michael S; Berg, J. S.; Blondel, A.; Brooks, S.; Campagne, J.-E.; Caspar, D.; Cevata, C.; Chimenti, P.; Cobb, J.; Dracos, M.; Edgecock, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Fernow, R.; Filthaut, F.; Gallardo, J.; Garoby, R.; Geer, S.; Gerigk, F.; Hanson, G.; Johnson, R.; Johnstone, C.; Kaplan, D.; Keil, E.; Kirk, H.; Klier, A.; Kurup, A.; Lettry, J.; Long, K.; Machida, S.; McDonald, K.; Meot, F.; Mori, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R.; Paul, K.; Poklonskiy, A.; Popovic, M.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rossi, C.; Rovelli, T.; Sandstrom, R.; Sevior, R.; Sievers, P.; Simos, N.; Torun, Y.; Vretenar, M.; Yoshimura, K.; Zisman, Michael S

    2008-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the findings of the Accelerator Working Group (AWG) of the International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Future Neutrino Factory and Superbeam Facility. The work of the group took place at three plenary meetings along with three workshops, and an oral summary report was presented at the NuFact06 workshop held at UC-Irvine in August, 2006. The goal was to reach consensus on a baseline design for a Neutrino Factory complex. One aspect of this endeavor was to examine critically the advantages and disadvantages of the various Neutrino Factory schemes that have been proposed in recent years.

  8. Flame acceleration studies in the MINIFLAME facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tieszen, S.R.; Sherman, M.P.; Benedick, W.B.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) studies have been conducted in a 19.4-cm high, 14.5-cm wide, and 2. 242-m long channel (MINIFLAME) that is a 1:12.6 scale model of the 136-m{sup 3} FLAME facility. Tests were conducted with two levels of hydrogen concentration -- 20% and 30%, with and without obstacles in the channel, and with three levels of transverse top venting -- 0%, 13%, and 50%. The flame acceleration results in MINIFLAME are qualitatively similar to those in FLAME; however, the small-scale results are more benign quantitatively. The results show that insufficient venting, 13% venting in this case, can promote flame acceleration due to turbulence produced by the flow through the vents in smooth channels. However, with obstacle-generated turbulence in the channel, 13% top venting was found to be beneficial. Flame acceleration resulting in DDT was shown to occur in as little as 35 liters of mixture. Comparison of the DDT data with obstacles in MINIFLAME and FLAME supports d/{lambda} scaling of DDT, where {lambda} is the detonation cell width of the mixture and d is the characteristic open diameter of the channel. In the MINIFLAME and FLAME tests, DDT occurred for d/{lambda} greater than approximately three. Comparison with other experiments shows that the value of d/{lambda} for DDT is not constant but depends on the obstacle type, spacing, and channel geometry. The comparison of MINIFLAME and FLAME experiments extends the use of d/{lambda} scaling to different geometries and larger scales than previous studies. Small-scale-model testing of flame acceleration and DDT with the same combustible mixture as the full-scale prototype underpredicts flame speeds, overpressures, and the possibility of DDT. 18 refs., 16 figs.

  9. Accelerator Facility Safety Implementation Guide for DOE O 420.2B, Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an aid to understanding and meeting the requirements of DOE O 420.2B, Safety of Accelerator Facilities, dated 7/23/04. It does not impose requirements beyond those stated in that Order or any other DOE Order. No cancellation.

  10. accelerator facility complex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 1 Complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities CERN Preprints Summary: This report outlines the research...

  11. Wakefield measurements of SLAC linac structures at the Argonne AATF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.W.; Loew, G.A. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Simpson, J.; Chojnacki, E.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Schoessow, P. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Damped and detuned linac structures designed to minimize the effects of wakefields excited by e{sup {plus minus}} bunch trains in future linear colliders are presently under investigation at SLAC. This paper describes the results of measurements of both longitudinal and transverse wakefields performed at the ANL Advanced Accelerator Test Facility with two SLAC-built X-Band disk-loaded waveguides: a conventional 30-cavity long constant-impedance structure and a non-conventional 50-cavity long structure along which the iris and spacer diameters have been varied so as to stagger-tune the HEM{sub 11} mode frequency by 37%. The results are shown to be in excellent agreement with computations made by KN7C, TRANSVRS, TBCI, and LINACBBU. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Indoor Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing Facility (Indoor-PCAT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conductors in parallel tests. The tension limitations (i.e., the number of conductors) inherent in towersIndoor Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing Facility (Indoor-PCAT) Overview: The Indoor Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing facility (or Indoor-PCAT), planned for construction in FY04 at Oak

  13. Upgrade of the Drive LINAC for the AWA Facility Dielectric Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Power, John; /Argonne; Conde, Manoel; /Argonne; Gai, Wei; /Argonne; Li, Zenghai; /SLAC; Mihalcea, Daniel; /Northern Illinois U.

    2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the design of a seven-cell, standing-wave, 1.3-GHz rf cavity and the associated beam dynamics studies for the upgrade of the drive beamline LINAC at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility. The LINAC design is a compromise between single-bunch operation (100 nC {at} 75 MeV) and minimization of the energy droop along the bunch train during bunch-train operation. The 1.3-GHz drive bunch-train target parameters are 75 MeV, 10-20-ns macropulse duration, and 16 x 60 nC microbunches; this is equivalent to a macropulse current and beam power of 80 A and 6 GW, respectively. Each LINAC structure accelerates approximately 1000 nC in 10 ns by a voltage of 11 MV at an rf power of 10 MW. Due to the short bunch-train duration desired ({approx}10 ns) and the existing frequency (1.3 GHz), compensation of the energy droop along the bunch train is difficult to accomplish by means of the two standard techniques: time-domain or frequency-domain beam loading compensation. Therefore, to minimize the energy droop, our design is based on a large stored energy rf cavity. In this paper, we present our rf cavity optimization method, detailed rf cavity design, and beam dynamics studies of the drive beamline.

  14. Brookhaven National Laboratory | Accelerator Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advisory Committee's report, to the Chair of the Collider-Accelerator Department and the NPP ALD. The current membership of the Program Advisory Committee is listed below....

  15. Linear Accelerator Facility, Kildee Hall aluminum, brick, concrete, rock, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    and demonstration facility for the irradiation of food and non-food materials. It is primarily used for the reduction or elimination of bacteria from foods and feed. Interior Garden is an environmental installation) are examples of the types of foodstuff that is irradiated in the Linear Accelerator Facility. The table has

  16. FACET: SLAC___s New User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, C.I.; Decker, F.-J.; England, R.J.; Erickson, R.A.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.D.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seeman, J.T.; Sheppard, J.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests) is a new User Facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The first User Run started in spring 2012 with 20 GeV, 3 nC electron beams. The facility is designed to provide short (20 {micro}m) bunches and small (20 {micro}m wide) spot sizes, producing uniquely high power beams. FACET supports studies from many fields but in particular those of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration. The creation of drive and witness bunches and shaped bunch profiles is possible with 'Notch' Collimation. FACET is also a source of THz radiation for material studies. Positrons will be available at FACET in future user runs. We present the User Facility and the available tools and opportunities for future experiments.

  17. Fermilab accelerator control system: Analog monitoring facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seino, K.; Anderson, L.; Smedinghoff, J.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thousands of analog signals are monitored in different areas of the Fermilab accelerator complex. For general purposes, analog signals are sent over coaxial or twinaxial cables with varying lengths, collected at fan-in boxes and digitized with 12 bit multiplexed ADCs. For higher resolution requirements, analog signals are digitized at sources and are serially sent to the control system. This paper surveys ADC subsystems that are used with the accelerator control systems and discusses practical problems and solutions, and it describes how analog data are presented on the console system.

  18. BARC TIFR Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    enterprise using accelerated heavy ion beams is to unravel the complexities of the nuclear world in all repulsion so that the collision process is governed by the nuclear interactions. Using a variety at this centre to pursue research in nuclear, atomic, condensed matter and bio-environmental physics. While

  19. accelerator test facility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accelerator test facility First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Powerline Conductor...

  20. Characterization and Application of Hard X-Ray Betatron Radiation Generated by Relativistic Electrons from a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnell, Michael; Uschmann, Ingo; Jansen, Oliver; Kaluza, Malte Christoph; Spielmann, Christian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The necessity for compact table-top x-ray sources with higher brightness, shorter wavelength and shorter pulse duration has led to the development of complementary sources based on laser-plasma accelerators, in contrast to conventional accelerators. Relativistic interaction of short-pulse lasers with underdense plasmas results in acceleration of electrons and in consequence in the emission of spatially coherent radiation, which is known in the literature as betatron radiation. In this article we report on our recent results in the rapidly developing field of secondary x-ray radiation generated by high-energy electron pulses. The betatron radiation is characterized with a novel setup allowing to measure the energy, the spatial energy distribution in the far-field of the beam and the source size in a single laser shot. Furthermore, the polarization state is measured for each laser shot. In this way the emitted betatron x-rays can be used as a non-invasive diagnostic tool to retrieve very subtle information of t...

  1. A Staged Muon Accelerator Facility For Neutrino and Collider Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; Brice, Stephen; Bross, Alan David; Denisov, Dmitri; Eichten, Estia; Holmes, Stephen; Lipton, Ronald; Neuffer, David; Palmer, Mark Alan; Bogacz, S Alex; Huber, Patrick; Kaplan, Daniel M; Snopok, Pavel; Kirk, Harold G; Palmer, Robert B; Ryne, Robert D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon-based facilities offer unique potential to provide capabilities at both the Intensity Frontier with Neutrino Factories and the Energy Frontier with Muon Colliders. They rely on a novel technology with challenging parameters, for which the feasibility is currently being evaluated by the Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). A realistic scenario for a complementary series of staged facilities with increasing complexity and significant physics potential at each stage has been developed. It takes advantage of and leverages the capabilities already planned for Fermilab, especially the strategy for long-term improvement of the accelerator complex being initiated with the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP-II) and the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF). Each stage is designed to provide an R&D platform to validate the technologies required for subsequent stages. The rationale and sequence of the staging process and the critical issues to be addressed at each stage, are presented.

  2. Recent Advances in Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, Mark

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The costs and the time scales of colliders intended to reach the energy frontier are such that it is important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators a drive beam, either laser or particle, produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultra-high accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. More than 42 GeV energy gain was achieved in an 85 cm long plasma wakefield accelerator driven by a 42 GeV electron drive beam in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) Facility at SLAC. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx}52 GV/m. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3 km long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. Prospects for a drive-witness bunch configuration and high-gradient positron acceleration experiments planned for the SABER facility will be discussed.

  3. Parameter sensitivity of plasma wakefields driven by self-modulating proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotov, K. V.; Minakov, V. A.; Sosedkin, A. P. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia and Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dependence of wakefield amplitude and phase on beam and plasma parameters is studied in the parameter area of interest for self-modulating proton beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The wakefield phase is shown to be extremely sensitive to small variations of the plasma density, while sensitivity to small variations of other parameters is reasonably low. The study of large parameter variations clarifies the effects that limit the achievable accelerating field in different parts of the parameter space: nonlinear elongation of the wakefield period, insufficient charge of the drive beam, emittance-driven beam divergence, and motion of plasma ions.

  4. Wakefield generation by a relativistic ring beam in a coaxial two channel dielectric loaded structure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, W.; Gai, W. (High Energy Physics)

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we give a complete analytical solution for wakefields generated by an azimuthally symmetric ring beam propagating in a coaxial two-channel dielectric structure. This wakefield can be used to accelerate a witness beam in the central channel. The ratio of the peak accelerating field in the center channel to the decelerating field in the ring channel (defined as transformer ratio R) is also derived. We find that, by appropriate choice of parameters, R can be much greater than 2, the limiting value for collinear wakefield accelerators.

  5. Plasma wakefields in the quasi-nonlinear regime: Experiments at ATF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Andonian, G.; Barber, S.; Ferrario, M.; Muggli, P.; O'Shea, B.; Sakai, Y.; Valloni, A.; Williams, O.; Xi, Y.; Yakimenko, V. [UCLA Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, 405 Hilgard Ave. Los Angeles, CA, 90095 (United States); Accelerator Division, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati , Via E. Fermi 40, Frascati (RM) 00044 (Italy); Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); UCLA Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, 405 Hilgard Ave. Los Angeles, CA, 90095 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present details of planned experiments to investigate certain aspects of the quasi non linear regime (QNL) of plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). In the QNL regime it is, in principal, possible to combine the benefits of both nonlinear and linear PWFA. That is, beams of high quality can be maintained through acceleration due to the complete ejection of plasma electrons from beam occupied region, while large energy gains can be achieved through use of transformer ratio increasing schemes, such as ramped bunch trains. With the addition of an short focal length PMQ triplet capable of focusing beams to the few micron scale and the ability to generate tunable bunch trains, the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Lab offers the unique capabilities to probe these characteristics of the QNL regime.

  6. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  7. Treatment Facility F: Accelerated Removal and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, J.J.; Buettner, M.H.; Carrigan, C.R. [and others

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerated Removal and Validation (ARV) phase of remediation at the Treatment Facility F (TFF) site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was designed to accelerate removal of gasoline from the site when compared to normal, single shift, pump-and-treat operations. The intent was to take advantage of the in-place infrastructure plus the increased underground temperatures resulting from the Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration Project (DUSDP). Operations continued 24-hours (h) per day between October 4 and December 12, 1993. Three contaminant removal rate enhancement approaches were explored during the period of continuous operation. First, we tried several configurations of the vapor pumping system to maximize the contaminant removal rate. Second, we conducted two brief trials of air injection into the lower steam zone. Results were compared with computer models, and the process was assessed for contaminant removal rate enhancement. Third, we installed equipment to provide additional electrical heating of contaminated low-permeability soil. Four new electrodes were connected into the power system. Diagnostic capabilities at the TFF site were upgraded so that we could safely monitor electrical currents, soil temperatures, and water treatment system processes while approximately 300 kW of electrical energy was being applied to the subsurface.

  8. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of high- gradient, laser plasma particle accelerators.accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. Theseleft) showing the laser (red), plasma wake density (purple-

  9. Beam dynamics and wakefield suppression in interleaved damped and detuned structures for CLIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Elia, A; Khan, V F; Jones, R M; Latina, A; Nesmiyan, I; Riddone, G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acceleration of multiple bunches of charged particles in the main linacs of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) with high accelerating fields provides two major challenges: firstly, to ensure the surface electromagnetic fields do not cause electrical breakdown and subsequent surface damage, and secondly, to ensure the beam-excited wakefields are sufficiently suppressed to avoid appreciable emittance dilution. In the baseline design for CLIC, heavy wakefield suppression is used (Q ~ 10) [1] and this ensures the beam quality is well-preserved [2]. Here we discuss an alternative means to suppress the wakefield which relies on strong detuning of the cell dipole frequencies, together with moderate damping, effected by manifolds which are slot-coupled to each accelerating cell. This damped and detuned wakefield suppression scheme is based on the methodology developed for the Japanese Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider (JLC/NLC) [3]. Here we track the multi-bunch beam down the complete collider, u...

  10. On-Line Educational Means on Radiological Protection and Accelerator General Safety Policy in Radiotherapy and Industrial Sterilization Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spyropoulos, B

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On-Line Educational Means on Radiological Protection and Accelerator General Safety Policy in Radiotherapy and Industrial Sterilization Facilities

  11. accelerator facilities coefficients: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of suitable neutron sources that are compactible with installation in a hospital enviroment. A low-energy accelerator-based neutron source has the potential for meeting...

  12. accelerator-based radiobiology facilities: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of suitable neutron sources that are compactible with installation in a hospital enviroment. A low-energy accelerator-based neutron source has the potential for meeting...

  13. Ground Broken for New Job-Creating Accelerator Research Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    our nation in the areas of sustainable energy, a cleaner environment, economic security, health care and national defense. The accelerators of tomorrow have the potential to make...

  14. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leibfritz, J.; Andrews, R.; Baffes, C.M.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Church, M.D.; Harms, E.R.; Klebaner, A.L.; Kucera, M.; Martinez, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  15. Tailored electron bunches with smooth current profiles for enhanced transformer ratios in beam-driven acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemery, Francois

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collinear high-gradient ${\\cal O} (GV/m)$ beam-driven wakefield methods for charged-particle acceleration could be critical to the realization of compact, cost-efficient, accelerators, e.g., in support of TeV-scale lepton colliders or multiple-user free-electron laser facilities. To make these options viable, the high accelerating fields need to be complemented with large transformer ratios $>2$, a parameter characterizing the efficiency of the energy transfer between a wakefield-exciting "drive" bunch to an accelerated "witness" bunch. While several potential current distributions have been discussed, their practical realization appears challenging due to their often discontinuous nature. In this paper we propose several alternative current profiles which are smooth which also lead to enhanced transformer ratios. We especially explore a laser-shaping method capable of generating one the suggested distributions directly out of a photoinjector and discuss a linac concept that could possible drive a dielectric ...

  16. A facility for accelerator research and education at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, Mike; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab is currently constructing the 'SRF Test Accelerator at the New Muon Lab' (NML). NML consists of a photo-emitted RF electron gun, followed by a bunch compressor, low energy test beamlines, SCRF accelerating structures, and high energy test beamlines. The initial primary purpose of NML will be to test superconducting RF accelerating modules for the ILC and for Fermilab's 'Project X' - a proposal for a high intensity proton source. The unique capability of NML will be to test these modules under conditions of high intensity electron beams with ILC-like beam parameters. In addition NML incorporates a photoinjector which offers significant tunability and especially the possibility to generate a bright electron beam with brightness comparable to state-of-the-art accelerators. This opens the exciting possibility of also using NML for fundamental beams research and tests of new concepts in beam manipulations and acceleration, instrumentation, and the applications of beams.

  17. accelerator facility project: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Fusion Websites Summary: US ITER Project Providing a Facility for Burning Plasma Research Ned Sauthoff Project Manager, US to position the US for Burning Plasma Research...

  18. Accelerator Facility Safety Implementation Guide for DOE Order (0) 420.2C, Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The revision will address implementation of roles and responsibilities, improve operational efficiency using operating experience, and clarify the use of program requirements such as the Unreviewed Safety Issue and Accelerator Readiness Review.

  19. Feed forward rf control system of the accelerator test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Xie, Jialin; Zhang, Renshan.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a scheme to control the amplitude and phase of the rf accelerating field in a klystron driven electron linac. The amplitude and phase distribution within the rf pulse can be controlled to follow specified functions to reduce the energy spread of the electron beam being accelerated. The scheme employs fast beam energy and phase detectors and voltage-controlled electronic attenuator and phase shifter in the amplifier chain. The control voltages of these devices are generated by arbitrary function generators. The function generators' outputs are calculated numerically using an algorithm which takes into consideration the desired target function and the deviation (due to load variations or system parameter drift) from the target function. Results of preliminary tests on producing flat rf power and phase pulses from a high power klystron indicate that amplitude variation of {plus minus}0.2% and phase variation of {plus minus}1{degree} can be readily achieved. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Ultra-Accelerated Natural Sunlight Exposure Testing Facilities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO); Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO)

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-faceted concentrator apparatus for providing ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing for sample materials under controlled weathering conditions comprising: facets that receive incident natural sunlight, transmits VIS/NIR and reflects UV/VIS onto a secondary reflector that delivers a uniform flux of UV/VIS onto a sample exposure plane located near a center of a facet array in a chamber that provide concurrent levels of temperature and/or relative humidity at high levels of up to 100.times. of natural sunlight that allow sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a significant period of time of about 3 to 10 days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth representative weathering of sample materials.

  1. Ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing facilities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewandowski, Allan A.; Jorgensen, Gary J.

    2003-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-faceted concentrator apparatus for providing ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing for sample materials under controlled weathering conditions comprising: facets that receive incident natural sunlight, transmits VIS/NIR and reflects UV/VIS to deliver a uniform flux of UV/VIS onto a sample exposure plane located near a center of a facet array in chamber means that provide concurrent levels of temperature and/or relative humidity at high levels of up to 100.times. of natural sunlight that allow sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a significant period of time of about 3 to 10 days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth representative weathering of sample materials.

  2. Status and specifications of a Project X front-end accelerator test facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimel, J.; Webber, R.; Madrak, R.; Wildman, D.; Pasquinelli, R.; Evans-Peoples, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the construction and operational status of an accelerator test facility for Project X. The purpose of this facility is for Project X component development activities that benefit from beam tests and any development activities that require 325 MHz or 650 MHz RF power. It presently includes an H- beam line, a 325 MHz superconducting cavity test facility, a 325 MHz (pulsed) RF power source, and a 650 MHz (CW) RF power source. The paper also discusses some specific Project X components that will be tested in the facility. Fermilab's future involves new facilities to advance the intensity frontier. In the early 2000's, the vision was a pulsed, superconducting, 8 GeV linac capable of injecting directly into the Fermilab Main Injector. Prototyping the front-end of such a machine started in 2005 under a program named the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS). While the HINS test facility was being constructed, the concept of a new, more versatile accelerator for the intensity frontier, now called Project X, was forming. This accelerator comprises a 3 GeV CW superconducting linac with an associated experimental program, followed by a pulsed 8 GeV superconducting linac to feed the Main Injector synchrotron. The CW Project X design is now the model for Fermilab's future intensity frontier program. Although CW operation is incompatible with the original HINS front-end design, the installation remains useful for development and testing many Project X components.

  3. ASTA at Fermilab: Accelerator Physics and Accelerator Education Programs at the Modern Accelerator R&D Users Facility for HEP and Accelerator Applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.; Piot, P.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the current and planned beam physics research program and accelerator education program at Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab.

  4. Operational experience from a large EPICS-based accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciarlette, D.J.; Gerig, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a third-generation x-ray light source which uses the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) to operate its linear accelerator, positron accumulator ring, booster synchrotron, and storage ring equipment. EPICS has been used at the APS since the beginning of installation and commissioning. Currently, EPICS controls approximately 100 VME crates containing over 100,000 process variables. With this complexity, the APS has had to review some of the methods originally employed and make changes as necessary. In addition, due to commissioning and operational needs, higher-level operator software needed to be created. EPICS has been flexible enough to allow this.

  5. Complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilski, P; D'Errico, F; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernàndez, F; Fuchs, A; Golnik, N; Lacoste, V; Leuschner, A; Sandri, S; Silari, M; Spurny, F; Wiegel, B; Wright, P

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the research needs and research activities within Europe to develop new and improved methods and techniques for the characterization of complex radiation fields at workplaces around high-energy accelerators and the next generation of thermonuclear fusion facilities under the auspices of the COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry (CONRAD) project funded by the European Commission.

  6. OSCAR API v2.1 with Flexible Accelerator Control Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasahara, Hironori

    Kimura #12;Application Development Environment with OSCAR Compiler, OSCAR API and API Standard TranslatorOSCAR API v2.1 with Flexible Accelerator Control Facilities Keiji Kimura, Waseda University 13. The execution timing of them can be notified by FlagVariables Overview of OSCAR API v2.0 (before 2

  7. Wakefield effects of the bypass line in LCLS-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In LCLS-II, after acceleration and compression and just before entering the undulator, the beam passes through 2.5 km of 24.5 mm (radius) stainless steel pipe. The bunch that passes through the pipe is extremely short---with an rms of 8 um for the nominal 100 pC case. Thus, even though the pipe has a large aperture, the wake that applies is the {\\it short-range} resistive wall wakefield. The bunch distribution is approximately uniform, and therefore the wake induced voltage is characterized by a rather linear voltage chirp. It turns out that the wake supplies needed dechirping to the LCLS-II beam before it enters the undulator. In this note we calculate the wake, discuss the confidence in the calculation, and investigate how to improve the induced chirp linearity and/or strength. Finally, we also study the strength and effects of the transverse (dipole) resistive wall wakefield.

  8. Optimization of Drive-Bunch Current Profile for Enhanced Transformer Ratio in Beam-Driven Acceleration Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Prokop, C.R.; /Northern Illinois U.; Piot, P.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2012-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, wakefield acceleration has gained attention due to its high acceleration gradients and cost effectiveness. In beam-driven wakefield acceleration, a critical parameter to optimize is the transformer ratio. It has been shown that current shaping of electron beams allows for enhanced (> 2) transformer ratios. In this paper we present the optimization of the pulse shape of the drive bunch for dielectric-wakefield acceleration.

  9. Computational studies and optimization of wakefield accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, C.G.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    France [1] ILC- www.linearcollider.org/cms ; LCLS- www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/lcls/ [2] T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson,while machines such as the LCLS will use km-scale linacs to

  10. Laser Wakefield Particle Accelerators Project at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratoryRowlandRevolutionizingLaser

  11. Evaluation of pelletron accelerator facility to study radiation effects on semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash, A. P. Gnana; Pushpa, N.; Praveen, K. C.; Naik, P. S.; Revannasiddaiah, D. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore-570006, Karnataka (India)

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present the comprehensive results on the effects of different radiation on the electrical characteristics of different semiconductor devices like Si BJT, n-channel MOSFETs, 50 GHz and 200 GHz silicon-germanium heterojunction bipolar transistor (SiGe HBTs). The total dose effects of different radiation are compared in the same total dose ranging from 100 krad to 100 Mrad. We show that the irradiation time needed to reach very high total dose can be reduced by using Pelletron accelerator facilities instead of conventional irradiation facilities.

  12. Extremely short relativistic-electron-bunch generation in the laser wakefield via novel bunch injection scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    Extremely short relativistic-electron-bunch generation in the laser wakefield via novel bunch accelerator (LWFA) a short in- tense laser pulse, with a duration on the order of a plasma wave period July 2004; published 6 December 2004) Recently a new electron-bunch injection scheme for the laser

  13. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A445 (2000) 59. [13] W. M. Fawley, LBNL Technical Report No.LBNL-49625 (2002); see also paper MOPPH073, theseLASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR AT THE LBNL LOASIS FACILITY ? C. B.

  14. Wakefield induced Losses in the Manual Valves of the TESLA Cryomodule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Wakefield induced Losses in the Manual Valves of the TESLA Cryomodule M.Dohlus,H.-P.Wedekind,K.Zapfe DeutschesElektronenSynchrotron Notkestr.85,D-22603Hamburg,Germany Abstract The beam pipe of the TESLA valves with spring type rf-shield which are presently used in the linac of the TESLA Test Facility

  15. A Proposal for a TESLA Accelerator Module Test Facility W.D.Moeller, B.Petersen, B.Sparr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 A Proposal for a TESLA Accelerator Module Test Facility W.D.Moeller, B.Petersen, B.Sparr Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron TESLA Report No. 2001-08 Abstract The Tera-eV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA), a 32 km long superconducting linear electron/positron collider of 500 GeV (upgradeable

  16. Early Commissioning Experience and Future Plans for the 12 GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spata, Michael F. [JLAB

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Lab has recently completed the accelerator portion of the 12 GeV Upgrade for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. All 52 SRF cryomodules have been commissioned and operated with beam. The initial beam transport goals of demonstrating 2.2 GeV per pass, greater than 6 GeV in 3 passes to an existing experimental facility and greater than 10 GeV in 5-1/2 passes have all been accomplished. These results along with future plans to commission the remaining beamlines and to increase the performance of the accelerator to achieve reliable, robust and efficient operations at 12 GeV are presented.

  17. Development of an accelerator-based BNCT facility at the Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Bleuel, D.; Chu, W.T.; Donahue, R.J.; Kwan, J.; Reginato, L.L.; Wells, R.P.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accelerator-based BNCT facility is under construction at the Berkeley Lab. An electrostatic-quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator is under development for the production of neutrons via the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction at proton energies between 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. A novel type of power supply, an air-core coupled transformer power supply, is being built for the acceleration of beam currents exceeding 50 mA. A metallic lithium target has been developed for handling such high beam currents. Moderator, reflector and neutron beam delimiter have extensively been modeled and designs have been identified which produce epithermal neutron spectra sharply peaked between 10 and 20 keV. These. neutron beams are predicted to deliver significantly higher doses to deep seated brain tumors, up to 50% more near the midline of the brain than is possible with currently available reactor beams. The accelerator neutron source will be suitable for future installation at hospitals.

  18. FACET: The New User Facility at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, C.I.; Decker, F.J.; Erikson, R.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Li, S.Z.; Nosochkov, Y.; Phinney, N.; Sheppard, J.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC; Seryi, A.; /Oxford U., JAI; Wittmer, W.; /Michigan State U.

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests) is a new User Facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Its high power electron and positron beams make it a unique facility, ideal for beam-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration studies. The first 2 km of the SLAC linac produce 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron and positron beams with short bunch lengths of 20 {mu}m. A final focusing system can produce beam spots 10 {mu}m wide. User-aided Commissioning took place in summer 2011 and FACET will formally come online in early 2012. We present the User Facility, the current features, planned upgrades and the opportunities for further experiments. Accelerators are our primary tool for discovering the fundamental laws to the universe. Each new frontier we probe requires a new, more powerful method. Accelerators are therefore increasing in size and cost. The future of this field requires new accelerating techniques that can reach the high energies required over shorter distances. New concepts for high gradient acceleration include utilizing the wakes in plasma and dielectric and metallic structures. FACET was built to provide a test bed for novel accelerating concepts with its high charge and highly compressed beams. As a test facility unlike any other, it has also attracted groups interested in beam diagnostic techniques and terahertz studies. The first phase of the construction was completed in May 2011. Beam commissioning began in June and was interleaved with the installation of five experiments. Users were invited to aid with the commissioning for the month of August during which time experimental hardware and software were checked out and some first measurements were taken. FACET is currently in the process of becoming a Department of Energy User Facility for High Energy Physics.

  19. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also included.

  20. Transformer ratio improvement for beam based plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Shea, Brendan; Rosenzweig, James; Barber, Samuel; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Williams, Oliver; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Kusche, Karl [University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); University of Southern California, Department of Electrical Engineering, Los Angeles, CA 90089 U.S.A. and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Muenchen (Germany); Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing the transformer ratio of wakefield accelerating systems improves the viability of present novel accelerating schemes. The use of asymmetric bunches to improve the transformer ratio of beam based plasma systems has been proposed for some time[1, 2] but suffered from lack appropriate beam creation systems. Recently these impediments have been overcome [3, 4] and the ability now exists to create bunches with current profiles shaped to overcome the symmetric beam limit of R {<=} 2. We present here work towards experiments designed to measure the transformer ratio of such beams, including theoretical models and simulations using VORPAL (a 3D capable PIC code) [5]. Specifically we discuss projects to be carried out in the quasi-nonlinear regime [6] at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory and the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Lab.

  1. Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Y.I.; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Ainsworth, R.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Aryshev, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Boogert, S.T.; Boorman, G.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Heo, A.; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Honda, Y.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Hwang, W.H.; Huang, J.Y.; /Pohang Accelerator Lab.; Kim, E-S.; /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM) system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1 {mu}m for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

  2. YALINA facility a sub-critical Accelerator- Driven System (ADS) for nuclear energy research facility description and an overview of the research program (1997-2008).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The YALINA facility is a zero-power, sub-critical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was conceived, constructed, and put into operation at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus located in Minsk-Sosny, Belarus. This facility was conceived for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems, and to serve as a neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinide nuclei. This report provides a detailed description of this facility and documents the progress of research carried out there during a period of approximately a decade since the facility was conceived and built until the end of 2008. During its history of development and operation to date (1997-2008), the YALINA facility has hosted several foreign groups that worked with the resident staff as collaborators. The participation of Argonne National Laboratory in the YALINA research programs commenced in 2005. For obvious reasons, special emphasis is placed in this report on the work at YALINA facility that has involved Argonne's participation. Attention is given here to the experimental program at YALINA facility as well as to analytical investigations aimed at validating codes and computational procedures and at providing a better understanding of the physics and operational behavior of the YALINA facility in particular, and ADS systems in general, during the period 1997-2008.

  3. Environmental Management Assessment of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, Virginia. During this assessment, activities and records were reviewed and interviews were conducted with personnel from the CEBAF Site Office; the CEBAF management and operating contractor (M&O), Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc. (SURA); the Oak Ridge Field Office (OR); and the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Office, the Office of Energy Research (ER). The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from March 8 through March 19, 1993, by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, ``Environment, Safety and Health Appraisal Program,`` and Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN)-6E-92, ``Departmental Organizational and Management Arrangements,`` establish the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission utilizing systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations, and through use of supplemental activities which serve to strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations.

  4. Linear induction accelerators at the Los Alamos National Laboratory DARHT facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nath, Subrata [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory consists of two linear induction accelerators at right angles to each other. The First Axis, operating since 1999, produces a nominal 20-MeV, 2-kA single beam-pulse with 60-nsec width. In contrast, the DARHT Second Axis, operating since 2008, produces up to four pulses in a variable pulse format by slicing micro-pulses out of a longer {approx}1.6-microseconds (flat-top) pulse of nominal beam-energy and -current of 17 MeV and 2 kA respectively. Bremsstrahlung x-rays, shining on a hydro-dynamical experimental device, are produced by focusing the electron beam-pulses onto a high-Z target. Variable pulse-formats allow for adjustment of the pulse-to-pulse doses to record a time sequence of x-ray images of the explosively driven imploding mock device. Herein, we present a sampling of the numerous physics and engineering aspects along with the current status of the fully operational dual axes capability. First successful simultaneous use of both the axes for a hydrodynamic experiment was achieved in 2009.

  5. Feasibility study of channeling acceleration experiment at the Fermilab ASTA facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Young-Min; Still, Dean A; Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystal channeling technology has offered various opportunities in accelerator community with a viability of ultrahigh gradient (TV/m) acceleration for future HEP collider in Energy Frontier. The major challenge of the channeling acceleration is that ultimate acceleration gradients might require high power driver at hard x-ray regime (~ 40 keV), exceeding those conceivable for x-rays as of today, though x-ray lasers can efficiently excite solid plasma and accelerate particles inside a crystal channel. Moreover, only disposable crystal accelerators are possible at such high externally excited fields which would exceed the ionization thresholds destroying the atomic structure, so acceleration will take place only in a short time before full dissociation of the lattice. Carbon- based nanostructures have great potential with a wide range of flexibility and superior physical strength, which can be applied to channeling acceleration. This paper present beam-driven channeling acceleration concept with CNTs and discu...

  6. Automated analysis for detecting beams in laser wakefield simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ushizima, Daniela M.; Rubel, Oliver; Prabhat, Mr.; Weber, Gunther H.; Bethel, E. Wes; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Hamann, Bernd; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans

    2008-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser wakefield particle accelerators have shown the potential to generate electric fields thousands of times higher than those of conventional accelerators. The resulting extremely short particle acceleration distance could yield a potential new compact source of energetic electrons and radiation, with wide applications from medicine to physics. Physicists investigate laser-plasma internal dynamics by running particle-in-cell simulations; however, this generates a large dataset that requires time-consuming, manual inspection by experts in order to detect key features such as beam formation. This paper describes a framework to automate the data analysis and classification of simulation data. First, we propose a new method to identify locations with high density of particles in the space-time domain, based on maximum extremum point detection on the particle distribution. We analyze high density electron regions using a lifetime diagram by organizing and pruning the maximum extrema as nodes in a minimum spanning tree. Second, we partition the multivariate data using fuzzy clustering to detect time steps in a experiment that may contain a high quality electron beam. Finally, we combine results from fuzzy clustering and bunch lifetime analysis to estimate spatially confined beams. We demonstrate our algorithms successfully on four different simulation datasets.

  7. Beam manipulation by self-wakefield at ATF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Committee and the ATF Users' Meetings, April 26 - 27, 2012 Outline 1. Enhanced Transformer Ratio demonstration (wakefield mapping with the shaped beam) 2. Tunable beam energy...

  8. Wakefield Municipal Gas and Light Department- Residential Conservation Services Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wakefield Municipal Gas and Light Department (WMGLD), in cooperation with the Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company (MMWEC), offers the "Incentive Rebate Program" to encourage...

  9. accelerator-based bnct facility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of suitable neutron sources that are compactible with installation in a hospital enviroment. A low-energy accelerator-based neutron source has the potential for meeting...

  10. accelerator-based spes-bnct facility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of suitable neutron sources that are compactible with installation in a hospital enviroment. A low-energy accelerator-based neutron source has the potential for meeting...

  11. FPGA-based Particle Recognition in the HADES Abstract--Modern FPGA technologies are often employed in nuclear and particle physics experimental facilities to accelerate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jantsch, Axel

    are often employed in nuclear and particle physics experimental facilities to accelerate application the emission direction, the en- ergy, and the mass of the produced particles when the accelerated beam hits1 FPGA-based Particle Recognition in the HADES Experiment Abstract--Modern FPGA technologies

  12. Fermilab's SC Accelerator Magnet Program for Future U.S. HEP Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamm, Michael; Zlobin, Alexander; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention of SC accelerator magnets in the 1970s opened wide the possibilities for advancing the energy frontier of particle accelerators, while limiting the machine circumference and reducing their energy consumption. The successful development of SC accelerator magnets based on NbTi superconductor have made possible a proton-antiproton collider (Tevatron) at Fermilab, an electron-proton collider (HERA) at DESY, a relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) at BNL and recently a proton-proton collider (LHC) at CERN. Further technological innovations and inventions are required as the US HEP looks forward towards the post-LHC energy or/and intensity frontiers. A strong, goal oriented national SC accelerator magnet program must take on this challenge to provide a strong base for the future of HEP in the U.S. The results and experience obtained by Fermilab during the past 30 years will allow us to play a leadership role in the SC accelerator magnet development in the U.S., in particular, focusing on magnets for a Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory [1]-[2]. In this paper, we summarize the required Muon Collider magnet needs and challenges, summarize the technology advances in the Fermilab accelerator magnet development over the past few years, and present and discuss our vision and long-term plans for these Fermilab-supported accelerator initiatives.

  13. Use of the LEDA Facility as an ADS High-Power Accelerator Test Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garnett, R. W. (Robert W.); Sheffield, R. L. (Richard L.)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low-Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) was built to generate high-current proton beams. Its successful full-power operation and testing in 1999-2001 confirmed the feasibility of a high-power linear accelerator (linac) front end, the most technically challenging portion of such a machine. The 6.7-MeV accelerator operates reliably at 95-mA CW beam current with few interruptions orjaults, and qualiJes as one of the most powerful accelerators in the world. LEDA is now available to address the needs of other programs. LEDA can be upgraded in a staged fashion to allow for full-power accelerator demonstrations. The proposed post-h!FQ accelerator structures are 350-MHz superconducting spoke cavities developed for the AAA /APT program. The superconducting portion of the accelerator is designed for a IOO-mA proton beam current. Superconducting cavities were chosen because of the signijkant thermal issues with room-temperature structures, the larger superconducting cavity apertures, and the lower operating costs ('because of improved electrical efficiency) of a superconducting accelerator. Since high reliability is a major issue for an ADS system, the superconducting design architecture alIows operation through faults due to the failure of single magnets or superconducting cavities. The presently installed power capacity of 13 MVA of input ACpower is capable of supporting a 40-MeVproton beam at 100 mA. (The input power is easily expandable to 25 MVA, allowing up to 100-MeV operation). Operation at 40-MeV would provide a complete demonstration of all of the critical accelerator sub-systems ofa full-power ADS system.

  14. accelerator-based facility design: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    future use in the MITR-II. The information obtained includes reactivity effects, core flux ... Meagher, Paul Christopher 1976-01-01 26 LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED COLLIDERS C....

  15. EIS-0003: Proton-Proton Storage Accelerator Facility (Isabelle), Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to analyze the significant environmental effects associated with construction and operation of the ISABELLE research facility to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  16. BETA BEAMS: AN ACCELERATOR BASED FACILITY TO EXPLORE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    them decay in a race-track shaped stor- age ring. EURO Beta Beams are based on CERNs infras- tructure to get high neutrino flux at a gamma boost of 100. INTRODUCTION Production of (anti-)neutrinos from beta facility, using the isotope pair 6 He/18 Ne and detector in the Fr´ejus tunnel (France) has been studied

  17. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Accelerator Physics Faculty Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Accelerator Physics Faculty Search The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory invites applications for a faculty appointment in Accelerator Physics (LCLS), LCLS-II, SPEAR-3, NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA), Cathode Test Facility (CTF), the proposed

  18. Recent developments of the ion sources at Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bricault, P. G.; Ames, F.; Dombsky, M.; Labrecque, F.; Lassen, J.; Mjos, A.; Minor, G. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Tigelhoefer, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department Of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the recent progresses concerning the on-line ion source at the Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator (TRIUMF/ISAC) Radioactive Ion-Beam Facility; description of the new design of the surface-ion-source for improved stability of the beam intensity, description of the transport path to the east target station at ISAC, description of the new brazing techniques that solved recurrent problems with water leaks on the target/ion source assembly in the vacuum system, finally, recent developments concerning the Forced Electron Beam Induced Arc Discharge (FEBIAD) ion source are reported. In particular, a study on the effect of the plasma chamber volume on the ionization efficiency was completed.

  19. Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4(SC) Mapping the ImpactSCDOE Office ofTheAboutAccelerator Test

  20. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Oliver

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Without compression, the size of a bitmap index increasesnumber of bitmaps per index. Compression is used to reduceindex software called FastBit [9]. It implements the fastest known bitmap compression

  1. ATF Plasma Sources for Wakefield Electron Acceleration ATF User...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Sources at ATF Ablative discharge capillary Gas-filled capillary Gas jet Plasma Sources: Ablative discharge capillary +20 kV DC 1k 1M HV generator (20kV,...

  2. Modeling laser wakefield accelerators in a Lorentz boosted frame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vay, J.-L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1:2:4) Mean beam position (m) VAX Sen c >SA- i— s( i) c 3- a2) - - - S(1:2:3)! S(1:2:4); VAX c c 3 0J u xi E2i SO) S(l:4) Mean beam position (m) VAX Figure 20: (left) Average beam

  3. Modeling Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of experiments on new lasers such as BELLA. Principal Investigator: Cameron Geddes, LBNL More Information: See J.-L. Vay, C. G. R. Geddes, E. Cormier-Michel, and D. P. Grote,...

  4. Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data LWFAIllustrationSmall.png In collaboration with researchers of the LOASIS program (LBNL) and the SciDAC SDM center (LBNL) we have been working on various efforts aimed at...

  5. UNDULATOR-BASED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakeman, M.S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ultra-short, high-peak- current, electron beams are ideal for driving a compact XUV free electron laser (

  6. Modeling Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A.Model Verification andModeling Laser

  7. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    structure providing a linear mechanism with potential to harness low-energy laser systems [11 orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them and diagnostics. This includes laser wakefield acceleration [1], where acceleration by a plasma wave excited

  8. Powerful, pulsed, THz radiation from laser accelerated relativistic electron bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    by strongly focused ( 6 µm), high peak power (up to 10 TW), ultra-short ( 50 fs) laser pulses of a 10 Hz at the exit of the plasma accelerator. Keywords: ultrahigh-fields, ultra-short, laser-plasma, wakefieldPowerful, pulsed, THz radiation from laser accelerated relativistic electron bunches Cs. T´otha, J

  9. Experimental demonstration of wakefield effects in a THz planar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Change in D-W spacing energy gainloss of a witness Wakefield structure c b (c) * Polycrystalline diamond, 75um thick * 250 GHz slab-symmetrical structure Why Diamond...

  10. Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators E. Esarey, C. B. Schroeder, and W. P. Leemans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators E. Esarey, C. B. Schroeder, and W. P Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators, which are capable of supporting fields in excess of 100 GV/m, are reviewed. This includes the laser wakefield accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self

  11. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  12. Handling Radioactive Waste from the Proton Accelerator Facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) - Always Surprising? - 13320

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueth, Joachim [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)] [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) is the largest national research centre in Switzerland. Its multidisciplinary research is dedicated to a wide field in natural science and technology as well as particle physics. In this context, PSI is operating, amongst others, a large proton accelerator facility since more than 30 years. In two cyclotrons, protons are accelerated to high speeds and then guided along roughly 100 m of beam line to three different target stations to produce secondary particles like mesons and neutrons for experiments and a separately beam line for UCN. The protons induce spallation processes in the target materials, and also at other beam loss points along the way, with emission of protons, neutrons, hydrogen, tritium, helium, heavier fragments and fission processes. In particular the produced neutrons, due to their large penetration depth, will then interact also with the surrounding materials. These interactions of radiation with matter lead to activation and partly to contamination of machine components and the surrounding infrastructures. Maintenance, operation and decommissioning of installations generate inevitably substantial amounts of radioactive operational and dismantling waste like targets, magnets, collimators, shielding (concrete, steel) and of course secondary waste. To achieve an optimal waste management strategy for interim storage or final disposal, radioactive waste has to be characterized, sorted and treated. This strategy is based on radiation protection demands, raw waste properties (size, material, etc.), and requirements to reduce the volume of waste, mainly for legal and economical reasons. In addition, the radiological limitations for transportation of the waste packages to a future disposal site have to be taken into account, as well as special regulatory demands. The characterization is a task of the waste producer. The conditioning processes and quality checks for radioactive waste packages are part of an accredited waste management process of PSI, especially of the Section Dismantling and Waste Management. Strictly proven and accepted methods needed to be developed and enhanced for safe treatment, transport, conditioning and storage. But in the field of waste from research activities, individual and new solutions have to be found in an increasingly growing administrative environment. Furthermore, a wide variety of components, with a really large inventory of radioactive nuclides, has to be handled. And there are always surprising challenges concerning the unusual materials or the nuclide inventory. In case of the operational and dismantling radioactive accelerator waste, the existing conditioning methods are in the process of a continuous enhancement - technically and administratively. The existing authorized specifications of conditioning processes have to be extended to optimize and fully describe the treatment of the inevitably occurring radioactive waste from the accelerator facility. Additional challenges are the changes with time concerning the legal and regulatory requirements - or do we have to consider it as business as usual? This paper gives an overview of the current practices in radioactive waste management and decommissioning of the existing operational accelerator waste. (authors)

  13. AUGMENTING COMPUTER MUSIC WITH JUST-IN-TIME COMPILATION Wesley Smith, Graham Wakefield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    AUGMENTING COMPUTER MUSIC WITH JUST-IN-TIME COMPILATION Wesley Smith, Graham Wakefield University of California Santa Barbara Media Arts and Technology whsmith|wakefield@mat.ucsb.edu ABSTRACT We discuss

  14. MuSiC: a Multibunch and multiparticle Simulation Code with an alternative approach to wakefield effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migliorati, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The simulation of beam dynamics in presence of collective effects requires a strong computational effort to take into account, in a self consistent way, the wakefield acting on a given charge and produced by all the others. Generally this is done by means of a convolution integral or sum. Moreover, if the electromagnetic fields consist of resonant modes with high quality factors, responsible, for example, of coupled bunch instabilities, a charge is also affected by itself in previous turns, and a very long record of wakefield must be properly taken into account. In this paper we present a new simulation code for the longitudinal beam dynamics in a circular accelerator, which exploits an alternative approach to the currently used convolution sum, reducing the computing time and avoiding the issues related to the length of wakefield for coupled bunch instabilities. With this approach it is possible to simulate, without the need of a large computing power, simultaneously, the single and multi-bunch beam dynamics...

  15. Environmental Assessment for US Department of Energy support of an Iowa State University Linear Accelerator Facility at Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action is financial and technical support of construction and initial operation of an agricultural commodity irradiator (principally for meat), employing a dual mode electron beam generator capable of producing x-rays, at the Iowa State University Linear Accelerator located at Ames, Iowa. The planned pilot commercial-scale facility would be used for the following activities: conducting irradiation research on agricultural commodities, principally meats; in the future, after the pilot phase, as schedules permit, possibly conducting research on other, non-edible materials; evaluating effects of irradiation on nutritional and sensory quality of agricultural products; demonstrating the efficiency of the process to control or eliminate pathogens, and/or to prolong the commodities' post-harvest shelf-life via control or elimination of bacteria, fungi, and/or insects; providing information to the public on the benefits, safety and risks of irradiated agricultural commodities; determining consumer acceptability of the irradiated products; providing data for use by regulatory agencies in developing protocols for various treatments of Iowa agricultural commodities; and training operators, maintenance and quality control technicians, scientists, engineers, and staff of regulatory agencies in agricultural commodity irradiation technology. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  16. The CAMS Accelerator Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPoints of ContactDepartment of Energy

  17. SLAC Accelerator Test Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are hereNewsOurAD SLACPortal >

  18. USING LUA FOR AUDIOVISUAL COMPOSTION Graham Wakefield Wesley Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    USING LUA FOR AUDIOVISUAL COMPOSTION Graham Wakefield Wesley Smith University of California Santa Barbara Media Arts and Technology Program Santa Barbara, California, USA ABSTRACT In this paper, we/MSP/Jitter [27], PureData [19], etc.) are popular choices for composing interactive digital media works because

  19. Wakefield Calculations for the LCLS in Multbunch Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bane, K; /SLAC

    2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Normally the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) operates in single-bunch mode, sending a bunch of up to 250 pC charge at 120 Hz through the linac and the undulator, and the resulting FEL radiation into one of the experimental hutches. With two bunches per rf pulse, each pulse could feed either two experiments or one experiment in a pump-probe type configuration. Two-bunch FEL operation has already been briefly tested at the LCLS, and works reasonably well, although not yet routinely. In this report we study the longitudinal and transverse long-range (bunch-to-bunch) wakefields of the linacs and their effects on LCLS performance in two-bunch mode, which is initially the most likely scenario. The longitudinal wake changes the average energy at the second bunch, and the transverse wake misaligns the second bunch (in transverse phase space) in the presence of e.g. transverse injection jitter or quad misalignments. Finally, we extend the study to consider the LCLS with trains of up to 20 bunches per rf pulse. In the LCLS the bunch is created in an rf gun, and then passes in sequence through Linac 0, Linac 1, Linac X, Bunch Compressor 1 (BC 1), Linac 2, BC 2, Linac 3, and finally the undulator. In the process the bunch energy reaches 13.5 GeV and peak current 3 kA. In Table 1 we present some machine and beam parameters in three of the linacs that we will use in the calculations: initial beam energy E{sub 0}, total accelerator length L, average beta function {beta}{sub y}, bunch peak current I, and rf phase (with respect to crest) {phi}; the final energy of a linac equals E{sub 0} of the following linac, and in Linac 3 is E{sub f} = 13.5 GeV. (The X-band linac, with L = 60 cm, has wake effects that are small compared to the other linacs, and will not be discussed.) In this report we limit our study to trains of equally populated, equally spaced bunches with a total length of less than 100 ns. The charge of each bunch is eN{sub b} = 250 pC.

  20. Muon acceleration in cosmic-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Spencer R.; Mikkelsen, Rune E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Becker Tjus, Julia [Fakultät für Physik and Astronomie, Theoretische Physik I, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in gamma-ray bursts, magnetars, or other sources. These transient sources have short lifetimes, which necessitate very high accelerating gradients, up to 10{sup 13} keV cm{sup –1}. At gradients above 1.6 keV cm{sup –1}, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This muon acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. Using the IceCube high-energy diffuse neutrino flux limits, we set two-dimensional limits on the source opacity and matter density, as a function of accelerating gradient. These limits put strong constraints on different models of particle acceleration, particularly those based on plasma wake-field acceleration, and limit models for sources like gamma-ray bursts and magnetars.

  1. TWO-CHANNEL DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results are reported for test beam acceleration and deflection in a two-channel, cm-scale, rectangular dielectric-lined wakefield accelerator structure energized by a 14-MeV drive beam. The dominant waveguide mode of the structure is at {approx}30 GHz, and the structure is configured to exhibit a high transformer ratio ({approx}12:1). Accelerated bunches in the narrow secondary channel of the structure are continuously energized via Cherenkov radiation that is emitted by a drive bunch moving in the wider primary channel. Observed energy gains and losses, transverse deflections, and changes in the test bunch charge distribution compare favorably with predictions of theory.

  2. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    laser system to focus ultra-short (?30 fs) laser pulses ofLASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR The LOASIS Laboratory at LBNL presently produces ultra-short (short-pulse laser driver, making such a source ideal for ultra-

  3. Muon Acceleration in Cosmic-ray Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer R. Klein; Rune Mikkelsen; Julia K. Becker Tjus

    2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in Gamma-Ray Bursts magnetars, or other sources. These source models require very high accelerating gradients, $10^{13}$ keV/cm, with the minimum gradient set by the length of the source. At gradients above 1.6 keV/cm, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. We rule out many models of linear acceleration, setting strong constraints on plasma wakefield accelerators and on models for sources like Gamma Ray Bursts and magnetars.

  4. Optimization of the LCLS X-ray FEL output performance in the presence of strong undulator wakefields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiche, S; Emma, P; Fawley, W M; Huang, Z; Nuhn, H D; Stupakov, G V

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimization of the LCLS X-ray FEL output performance in the presence of strong undulator wakefields

  5. User Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Facilities Advanced Photon Source Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System Center for Nanoscale Materials Transportation Research and...

  6. Observation of Wakefields and Resonances in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billinghurst, B E; Baribeau, C; Batten, T; Dallin, L; May, T E; Vogt, J M; Wurtz, W A; Warnock, R; Bizzizero, D A; Kramer, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on high resolution measurements of resonances in the spectrum of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). The resonances permeate the spectrum at wavenumber intervals of $0.074 ~\\textrm{cm}^{-1}$, and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup (energy, bucket filling pattern, CSR in bursting or continuous mode). Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory as eigenmodes of a smooth toroidal vacuum chamber driven by a bunched beam moving on a circular orbit. A corollary of peaks in the spectrum is the presence of pulses in the wakefield of the bunch at well defined spatial intervals. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber, which has a fluted form much different from a smooth torus. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by RF diodes, and indirectly by an interferometer in the THz range. The wake pulse sequence found by diodes is less ...

  7. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ti:Sapphire laser system to focus ultra-short (?30 fs) laserLASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR The LOASIS Laboratory at LBNL presently produces ultra-short (laser-plasma inter- action lengths. These LWFA-produced electron beams are high current (?10 kA) and ultra-short (

  8. Wakefield Induced Correlated Energy Spread and Emittance Growth at TTF FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Wakefield Induced Correlated Energy Spread and Emittance Growth at TTF FEL Feng ZHOU DESY) at DESY. During FEL operations, the longitudinal and transverse wakefields which are generated by vacuum and emittance growth at the TTF FEL of phase I and II. 1 Introduction The Free Electron Laser at the TESLA Test

  9. Stable laser–plasma accelerators at low densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Song; Hafz, Nasr A. M., E-mail: nasr@sjtu.edu.cn; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Ge, Xulei; Sokollik, Thomas; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report stable laser wakefield acceleration using 17–50 TW laser pulses interacting with 4?mm-long helium gas jet. The initial laser spot size was relatively large (28??m) and the plasma densities were 0.48–2.0?×?10{sup 19?}cm{sup ?3}. High-quality 100–MeV electron beams were generated at the plasma density of 7.5?×?10{sup 18?}cm{sup ?3}, at which the beam parameters (pointing angle, energy spectrum, charge, and divergence angle) were measured and stabilized. At higher densities, filamentation instability of the laser-plasma interaction was observed and it has led to multiple wakefield accelerated electron beams. The experimental results are supported by 2D particle-in-cell simulations. The achievement presented here is an important step toward the use of laser-driven accelerators in real applications.

  10. FLAME facility: The effect of obstacles and transverse venting on flame acceleration and transition on detonation for hydrogen-air mixtures at large scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, M.P.; Tieszen, S.R.; Benedick, W.B.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research on flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) for hydrogen-air mixtures carried out in the FLAME facility, and describes its relevance to nuclear reactor safety. Flame acceleration and DDT can generate high peak pressures that may cause failure of containment. FLAME is a large rectangular channel 30.5 m long, 2.44 m high, and 1.83 m wide. It is closed on the ignition end and open on the far end. The three test variables were hydrogen mole fraction (12--30%), degree of transverse venting (by moving steel top plates---0%, 13%, and 50%), and the absence or presence of certain obstacles in the channel (zero or 33% blockage ratio). The most important variable was the hydrogen mole fraction. The presence of the obstacles tested greatly increased the flame speeds, overpressures, and tendency for DDT compared to similar tests without obstacles. Different obstacle configurations could have greater or lesser effects on flame acceleration and DDT. Large degrees of transverse venting reduced the flame speeds, overpressures, and possibility of DDT. For small degrees of transverse venting (13% top venting), the flame speeds and overpressures were higher than for no transverse venting with reactive mixtures (>18% H/sub 2/), but they were lower with leaner mixtures. The effect of the turbulence generated by the flow out the vents on increasing flame speed can be larger than the effect of venting gas out of the channel and hence reducing the overpressure. With no obstacles and 50% top venting, the flame speeds and overpressures were low, and there was no DDT. For all other cases, DDT was observed above some threshold hydrogen concentration. DDT was obtained at 15% H/sub 2/ with obstacles and no transverse venting. 67 refs., 62 figs.

  11. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  12. HIGH-GRADIENT, HIGH-TRANSFORMER-RATIO, DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phase I work reported here responds to DoE'ss stated need "...to develop improved accelerator designs that can provide very high gradient (>200 MV/m for electrons...) acceleration of intense bunches of particles." Omega-P'�s approach to this goal is through use of a ramped train of annular electron bunches to drive a coaxial dielectric wakefield accelerator (CDWA) structure. This approach is a direct extension of the CDWA concept from acceleration in wake fields caused by a single drive bunch, to the more efficient acceleration that we predict can be realized from a tailored (or ramped) train of several drive bunches. This is possible because of a much higher transformer ratio for the latter. The CDWA structure itself has a number of unique features, including: a high accelerating gradient G, potentially with G > 1 GeV/m; continuous energy coupling from drive to test bunches without transfer structures; inherent transverse focusing forces for particles in the accelerated bunch; highly stable motion of high charge annular drive bunches; acceptable alignment tolerances for a multi-section system. What is new in the present approach is that the coaxial dielectric structure is now to be energized by-not one-�but by a short train of ramped annular-shaped drive bunches moving in the outer coaxial channel of the structure. We have shown that this allows acceleration of an electron bunch traveling along the axis in the inner channel with a markedly higher transformer ratio T than for a single drive bunch. As described in this report, the structure will be a GHz-scale prototype with cm-scale transverse dimensions that is expected to confirm principles that can be applied to the design of a future THz-scale high gradient (> 500 MV/m) accelerator with mm-scale transverse dimensions. We show here a new means to significantly increase the transformer ratio T of the device, and thereby to significantly improve its suitability as a flexible and effective component in a future high energy, high gradient accelerator facility. We predict that the T of a high gradient CDWA can be increased by a substantial factor; this enhancement is dramatically greater than what has been demonstrated heretofore. This large enhancement in T that we predict arises from using a train of three or four drive bunches in which the spacing of the bunches and their respective charges are selected according to a simple principle that requires each bunch lose energy to the wakefields at the same rate, so as not to sacrifice drive beam efficiency�¢����as would be the case if one bunch exhausted its available energy while others had not. It is anticipated that results from the study proposed here can have a direct impact on design of the dielectric accelerator in a TeV-scale collider concept, and in the accelerator for an x-ray FEL.

  13. Collimator Wakefield Calculations for ILC-TRC Report(LCC-0101)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tenenbaum, P

    2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the formalism of collimator wakefields and their effect on beams that are near the center of the collimator gap, and apply the formalism to the TESLA, NLC, and CLIC collimation systems.

  14. Comparative Wakefield Analysis of a First Prototype of a DDS Structure for CLIC Main Linac

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Elia, A; Khan, V F; Grudiev, A; Wuensch, W

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Damped Detuned Structure (DDS) for CLIC main linac has been proposed as an alternative to the present baseline design which is based on heavy damping. A first prototype, CLIC_DDS_A, for high power tests has been already designed and is under construction. It is also foreseen to design a further prototype, CLIC_DDS_B, to test both the wakefield suppression and high power performances. Wakefield calculations for DDS are, in the early design stage, based on single infinitely periodic cells. Though cell-to-cell interaction is taken into account to calculate the wakefields, it is important to study full structure properties using computational tools. In particular this is fundamental for defining the input parameters for the HOM coupler that is crucial for the performances of DDS. In the following a full analysis of wakefields and impedances based on simulations conducted with finite difference based electromagnetic computer code GdfidL will be presented.

  15. P. Muggli, ATF Users Meeting 07/05/07 Multi-bunch Plasma Wakefield

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optronics, Inc., Bellevue, WA Presented by Patric Muggli, USC Work supported by US DoE 2 P. Muggli, ATF Users Meeting 070507 OUTLINE Introduction to the plasma wakefield...

  16. Particle-In-Cell Modeling of Plasma-Based Accelerators in Two and Three Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemker, Roy G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, a fully object-oriented, fully relativistic, multi-dimensional Particle-In-Cell code was developed and applied to answer key questions in plasma-based accelerator research. The simulations increase the understanding of the processes in laser plasma and beam-plasma interaction, allow for comparison with experiments, and motivate the development of theoretical models. The simulations support the idea that the injection of electrons in a plasma wave by using a transversely propagating laser pulse is possible. The beam parameters of the injected electrons found in the simulations compare reasonably with beams produced by conventional methods and therefore laser injection is an interesting concept for future plasma-based accelerators. Simulations of the optical guiding of a laser wakefield driver in a parabolic plasma channel support the idea that electrons can be accelerated over distances much longer than the Rayleigh length in a channel. Simulations of plasma wakefield acceleration in the ...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Scaled Wind Farm Technologies Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies Facility Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Baselining Project Accelerates Work On April 7, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable...

  18. ALL OPTICAL ACCELERATOR EXPERIMENTS AT LBNL/ W.P. Leemans, D. Rodgers, P.E. Catravas, G. Fubiani, C.G.R. Geddes, E. Esarey, B.A.Shadwick,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    ALL OPTICAL ACCELERATOR EXPERIMENTS AT LBNL/ W.P. Leemans, D. Rodgers, P.E. Catravas, G. Fubiani, C wakefield acceleration research at the l'OASIS laboratory of the Cen- ter for Beam Physics at LBNL]- [14]. In this article we describe experiments performed at the l'OASIS laboratory of LBNL [15

  19. 2011_Accelerator_Detector_RD_PI_Meeting_files | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Principal Investigators' Meetings 2011 Accelerator Detector RD PI Meeting files Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities Projects Accelerator &...

  20. Meter scale plasma source for plasma wakefield experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Hogan, M. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High accelerating gradients generated by a high density electron beam moving through plasma has been used to double the energy of the SLAC electron beam [1]. During that experiment, the electron current density was high enough to generate its own plasma without significant head erosion. In the newly commissioned FACET facility at SLAC, the peak current will be lower and without pre-ionization, head erosion will be a significant challenge for the planned experiments. In this work we report on our design of a meter scale plasma source for these experiments to effectively avoid the problem of head erosion. The plasma source is based on a homogeneous metal vapor gas column that is generated in a heat pipe oven [2]. A lithium oven over 30 cm long at densities over 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} has been constructed and tested at UCLA. The plasma is then generated by coupling a 10 TW short pulse Ti:Sapphire laser into the gas column using an axicon lens setup. The Bessel profile of the axicon setup creates a region of high intensity that can stretch over the full length of the gas column with approximately constant diameter. In this region of high intensity, the alkali metal vapor is ionized through multi-photon ionization process. In this manner, a fully ionized meter scale plasma of uniform density can be formed. Methods for controlling the plasma diameter and length will also be discussed.

  1. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milchberg, Howard M

    2013-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The eventual success of laser-plasma based acceleration schemes for high-energy particle physics will require the focusing and stable guiding of short intense laser pulses in reproducible plasma channels. For this goal to be realized, many scientific issues need to be addressed. These issues include an understanding of the basic physics of, and an exploration of various schemes for, plasma channel formation. In addition, the coupling of intense laser pulses to these channels and the stable propagation of pulses in the channels require study. Finally, new theoretical and computational tools need to be developed to aid in the design and analysis of experiments and future accelerators. Here we propose a 3-year renewal of our combined theoretical and experimental program on the applications of plasma waveguides to high-energy accelerators. During the past grant period we have made a number of significant advances in the science of laser-plasma based acceleration. We pioneered the development of clustered gases as a new highly efficient medium for plasma channel formation. Our contributions here include theoretical and experimental studies of the physics of cluster ionization, heating, explosion, and channel formation. We have demonstrated for the first time the generation of and guiding in a corrugated plasma waveguide. The fine structure demonstrated in these guides is only possible with cluster jet heating by lasers. The corrugated guide is a slow wave structure operable at arbitrarily high laser intensities, allowing direct laser acceleration, a process we have explored in detail with simulations. The development of these guides opens the possibility of direct laser acceleration, a true miniature analogue of the SLAC RF-based accelerator. Our theoretical studies during this period have also contributed to the further development of the simulation codes, Wake and QuickPIC, which can be used for both laser driven and beam driven plasma based acceleration schemes. We will continue our development of advanced simulation tools by modifying the QuickPIC algorithm to allow for the simulation of plasma particle pick-up by the wake fields. We have also performed extensive simulations of plasma slow wave structures for efficient THz generation by guided laser beams or accelerated electron beams. We will pursue experimental studies of direct laser acceleration, and THz generation by two methods, ponderomotive-induced THz polarization, and THz radiation by laser accelerated electron beams. We also plan to study both conventional and corrugated plasma channels using our new 30 TW in our new lab facilities. We will investigate production of very long hydrogen plasma waveguides (5 cm). We will study guiding at increasing power levels through the onset of laser-induced cavitation (bubble regime) to assess the role played by the preformed channel. Experiments in direct acceleration will be performed, using laser plasma wakefields as the electron injector. Finally, we will use 2-colour ionization of gases as a high frequency THz source (<60 THz) in order for femtosecond measurements of low plasma densities in waveguides and beams.

  2. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Young-Min [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 Ap to 0.6 .Ap in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  3. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shin, Young-Min [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 ?p to 0.6 ?p in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  4. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shin, Young-Min

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r)more »from 0.2 ?p to 0.6 ?p in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.« less

  5. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Lucien Wielopolski and colleagues from Brookhaven National Laboratory continued the characterization

  6. Radiological Training for Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |DDOE HDBK-1113-2008 April 2008

  7. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plasma accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS facility”, in: Proc.electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator ?National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose

  8. Energy limitation of laser-plasma electron accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardenas, D E; Xu, J; Hofmann, L; Buck, A; Schmid, K; Sears, C M S; Rivas, D E; Shen, B; Veisz, L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on systematic and high-precision measurements of dephasing, an effect that fundamentally limits the performance of laser wakefield accelerators. Utilizing shock-front injection, a technique providing stable, tunable and high-quality electron bunches, acceleration and deceleration of few-MeV quasi-monoenergetic beams were measured with sub-5-fs and 8-fs laser pulses. Typical density dependent electron energy evolution with 65-300 micrometers dephasing length and 6-20 MeV peak energy was observed and is well described with a simple model.

  9. Using Surface Impedance for Calculating Wakefields in Flat Geometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bane, Karl; Stupakov, Gennady

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning with Maxwell's equations and assuming only that the wall interaction can be approximated by a surface impedance, we derive formulas for the generalized longitudinal and transverse impedance in flat geometry, from which the wakefields can also be obtained. From the generalized impedances, by taking the proper limits, we obtain the normal longitudinal, dipole, and quad impedances in flat geometry. These equations can be applied to any surface impedance, such as the known dc, ac, and anomalous skin models of wall resistance, a model of wall roughness, or one for a pipe with small, periodic corrugations. We show that, formore »the particular case of dc wall resistance, the longitudinal impedance obtained here agrees with a known result in the literature, a result that was derived from a very general formula by Henke and Napoly. As concrete example, we apply our results to representative beam and machine parameters in the undulator region of LCLS-II and estimate the impact of the transverse wakes on the machine performance.« less

  10. Using Surface Impedance for Calculating Wakefields in Flat Geometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bane, Karl; Stupakov, Gennady

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning with Maxwell's equations and assuming only that the wall interaction can be approximated by a surface impedance, we derive formulas for the generalized longitudinal and transverse impedance in flat geometry, from which the wakefields can also be obtained. From the generalized impedances, by taking the proper limits, we obtain the normal longitudinal, dipole, and quad impedances in flat geometry. These equations can be applied to any surface impedance, such as the known dc, ac, and anomalous skin models of wall resistance, a model of wall roughness, or one for a pipe with small, periodic corrugations. We show that, for the particular case of dc wall resistance, the longitudinal impedance obtained here agrees with a known result in the literature, a result that was derived from a very general formula by Henke and Napoly. As concrete example, we apply our results to representative beam and machine parameters in the undulator region of LCLS-II and estimate the impact of the transverse wakes on the machine performance.

  11. Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Oliver

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    index/query system for data extraction and subsetting. It implements the fastest-known bitmap compression

  12. Driving laser pulse evolution in a hollow channel laser wakefield accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    of different methods for laser accel- eration and summaries of experimental and theoretical progress can particle in the LWFA to about one Rayleigh range. Laser guiding in plasma channels has been proposed

  13. Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators: Wakefield excitation, channel guiding, and laser triggered particle injection*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    particle injection* W. P. Leemans,,a) P. Volfbeyn, K. Z. Guo, and S. Chattopadhyay Ernest Orlando Lawrence-based injection of particles into a plasma wake, are presented. Details of the experimental program at Lawrence for the accel- erating fields as well as guiding for the laser, and a suitable laser driver. The most

  14. STABLE, MONOENERGETIC 50-400 MeV ELECTRON BEAMS WITH A MATCHED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    progress in laser-based particle accelera- tors [1]. Early breakthroughs in laser-based electron accel

  15. Multi-GeV Energy Gain in a Plasma-Wakefield Accelerator M. J. Hogan,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalali. Bahram

    m at the entrance of a 10 cm long column of lithium vapor with density 2:8 1017 atoms=cm3. The electron bunch fully ionizes the lithium vapor to create a plasma and then expels the plasma electrons-plasma interactions have demonstrated focusing gradients of MT=m [1] while laser plasma interactions have demonstrated

  16. Development of high gradient laser wakefield accelerators towards nuclear detection applications at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    at LBNL Cameron G.R. Geddes1 , David L. Bruhwiler2 , John R. Cary2,3 , Eric H. Esarey1,4 , Anthony J Program, LBNL, 1 Cyclotron Rd MS 71-259, Berkeley CA 94720, United States 2 Tech-X Corp., 5621 Arapahoe experiments at LBNL demonstrated narrow energy spread beams, now with energies of up to 1 GeV in 3 cm using

  17. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakeman, M.S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ultra-short, high- peak-current, electron beams are ideal for driving a compact X U V free electron laser (

  18. THz radiation as a bunch diagnostic for laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the vacuum chamber by an ultra-intense laser pulse. A secondEO) crystal. An ultra-short NIR laser beam was used to probe

  19. Beam Matching to a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Using a Ramped Density

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search BatterylessBeProfile

  20. Two GeV Electrons Achieved by Laser Plasma Wakefield Acceleration | U.S.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Zandof Energy Two CompaniesTwoTwoDOE

  1. Control of focusing forces and emittances in plasma-based accelerators using near-hollow plasma channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A near-hollow plasma channel, where the plasma density in the channel is much less than the plasma density in the walls, is proposed to provide independent control over the focusing and accelerating forces in a plasma accelerator. In this geometry the low density in the channel contributes to the focusing forces, while the accelerating fields are determined by the high density in the channel walls. The channel also provides guiding for intense laser pulses used for wakefield excitation. Both electron and positron beams can be accelerated in a nearly symmetric fashion. Near-hollow plasma channels can effectively mitigate emittance growth due to Coulomb scattering for high energy physics applications.

  2. LuaAV: Extensibility and Heterogeneity for Audiovisual Graham WAKEFIELD and Wesley SMITH and Charles ROBERTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    LuaAV: Extensibility and Heterogeneity for Audiovisual Computing Graham WAKEFIELD and Wesley SMITH and Charles ROBERTS Media Arts and Technology, University of California Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, CA 93110 providing the flexibility and temporal accuracy demanded by interactive audio-visual media. Code generation

  3. User Facilities | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    User Facilities Dev X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal...

  4. Proceedings of the international workshop on hadron facility technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiessen, H.A. (comp.)

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conference included papers on facility plans, beam dynamics, accelerator hardware, and experimental facilities. Individual abstracts were prepared for 43 papers in the conference proceedings. (LEW)

  5. Machine Parameter Studies for an FEL Facility Using Staff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinsch, M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PARAMETER STUDIES FOR AN FEL FACILITY USING STAFF ? M.USA Abstract Designing an FEL facility requires balancingmultiple science needs, FEL and accelerator physics

  6. Jefferson Lab accelerator upgrade completed: Initial operations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE to begin initial operations of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as part of its ongoing 338 million upgrade. With the approval of Critical...

  7. CEBAF accelerator achievements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y.C. Chao, M. Drury, C. Hovater, A. Hutton, G.A. Krafft, M. Poelker, C. Reece, M. Tiefenback

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade, nuclear physics users of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have benefited from accelerator physics advances and machine improvements. As of early 2011, CEBAF operates routinely at 6 GeV, with a 12 GeV upgrade underway. This article reports highlights of CEBAF's scientific and technological evolution in the areas of cryomodule refurbishment, RF control, polarized source development, beam transport for parity experiments, magnets and hysteresis handling, beam breakup, and helium refrigerator operational optimization.

  8. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corlett, John; Attwood, David; Byrd, John; Denes, Peter; Falcone, Roger; Heimann, Phil; Leemans, Wim; Padmore, Howard; Prestemon, Soren; Sannibale, Fernando; Schlueter, Ross; Schroeder, Carl; Staples, John; Venturini, Marco; Warwick, Tony; Wells, Russell; Wilcox, Russell; Zholent, Alexander; Adolphsen, Chris; Arthur, John; Bergmann, Uwe; Cai, Yunhai; Colby, Eric; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Fox, John; Frisch, Josef; Galayda, John; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Zhirong; Phinney, Nan; Rabedeau, Tom; Raubenheimer, Tor; Reis, David; Schmerge, John; Stöhr, Joachim; Stupakov, Gennady; White, Bill; Xiang, Dao

    2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Several recent reports have identified the scientific requirements for a future soft x-ray light source, and a high-repetition-rate free-electron laser (FEL) facility that is responsive to these requirements is now on the horizon. R&D in some critical areas is needed, however, to demonstrate technical performance, thus reducing technical risks and construction costs. Such a facility most likely will be based on a CW superconducting linear accelerator with beam supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun operating in CW mode, and on an array of FELs to which the accelerated beam is distributed, each operating at high repetition rate and with even pulse spacing. Dependent on experimental requirements, the individual FELs can be configured for either self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), seeded, or oscillator mode of operation, including the use of high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enhanced harmonic generation (EEHG), harmonic cascade, or other configurations. In this White Paper we identify the overall accelerator R&D needs, and highlight the most important pre-construction R&D tasks required to value-engineer the design configuration and deliverables for such a facility. In Section 1.4 we identify the comprehensive R&D ultimately needed. We identify below the highest-priority requirements for understanding machine performance and reduce risk and costs at this pre-conceptual design stage. Details of implementing the required tasks will be the subject of future evaluation. Our highest-priority R&D program is the injector, which must be capable of delivering a beam with bunches up to a nanocoulomb at MHz repetition rate and with normalized emittance {le} 1 mm {center_dot} mrad. This will require integrated accelerating structure, cathode, and laser systems development. Cathode materials will impact the choice of laser technology in wavelength and energy per pulse, as well as vacuum requirements in the accelerating structure. Demonstration experiments in advanced seeding techniques, such as EEHG, and other optical manipulations to enhance the FEL process are required to reduce technical risk in producing temporally coherent and ultrashort x-ray output using optical seed lasers. Success of EEHG in particular would result in reduced development and cost of laser systems and accelerator hardware for seeded FELs. With a 1.5-2.5 GeV linac, FELs could operate in the VUV-soft x-ray range, where the actual beam energy will be determined by undulator technology; for example, to use the lower energy would require the use of advanced designs for which undulator R&D is needed. Significant reductions in both unit costs and accelerator costs resulting from the lower electron beam energy required to achieve lasing at a particular wavelength could be obtained with undulator development. Characterization of the wakefields of the vacuum chambers in narrow-gap undulators will be needed to minimize risk in ability to deliver close to transform limited pulses. CW superconducting RF technology for an FEL facility with short bunches at MHz rate and up to mA average current will require selection of design choices in cavity frequency and geometry, higher order mode suppression and power dissipation, RF power supply and distribution, accelerating gradient, and cryogenics systems. R&D is needed to define a cost and performance optimum. Developments in laser technology are proceeding at rapid pace, and progress in high-power lasers, harmonic generation, and tunable sources will need to be tracked.

  9. Production, Characterization, and Acceleration of Optical Microbunches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Christopher M.S.; /Stanford U. /SLAC

    2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical microbunches with a spacing of 800 nm have been produced for laser acceleration research. The microbunches are produced using a inverse Free-Electron-Laser (IFEL) followed by a dispersive chicane. The microbunched electron beam is characterized by coherent optical transition radiation (COTR) with good agreement to the analytic theory for bunch formation. In a second experiment the bunches are accelerated in a second stage to achieve for the first time direct net acceleration of electrons traveling in a vacuum with visible light. This dissertation presents the theory of microbunch formation and characterization of the microbunches. It also presents the design of the experimental hardware from magnetostatic and particle tracking simulations, to fabrication and measurement of the undulator and chicane magnets. Finally, the dissertation discusses three experiments aimed at demonstrating the IFEL interaction, microbunch production, and the net acceleration of the microbunched beam. At the close of the dissertation, a separate but related research effort on the tight focusing of electrons for coupling into optical scale, Photonic Bandgap, structures is presented. This includes the design and fabrication of a strong focusing permanent magnet quadrupole triplet and an outline of an initial experiment using the triplet to observe wakefields generated by an electron beam passing through an optical scale accelerator.

  10. Self-guided wakefield experiments driven by petawatt class ultra-short laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangles, S P D; Bellei, C; Dangor, A E; Kamperidis, C; Kneip, S; Nagel, S R; Willingale, L; Najmudin, Z

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the extension of self-injecting laser wakefield experiments to the regime that will be accessible with the next generation of petawatt class ultra-short pulse laser systems. Using linear scalings, current experimental trends and numerical simulations we determine the optimal laser and target parameters, i.e. focusing geometry, plasma density and target length, that are required to increase the electron beam energy (to > 1 GeV) without the use of external guiding structures.

  11. Facilities and Centers | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research Center Center for Nanoscale Materials Facilities & Centers Argonne's...

  12. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malamud, Ernest

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a PhD in accelerator physics was by E.O. Lawrence.of Beams) organizes accelerator physics sessions at APSstudents specializing in accelerator physics are not being “

  13. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palastro, J P; Gordon, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons tailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  14. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    XPLOTGIN, Technical Report LBNL-49625, Lawrence BerkeleyLASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR AT THE LBNL LOASIS FACILITY,” inelectron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

  15. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Cowan, B.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Mullowney, P.J.; Messmer, P.; Esarey, E.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Vay, J.-L.

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating>10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of ~;;2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  16. PLANS FOR FUTURE MEGAWATT FACILITIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROSER,T.

    2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton accelerators producing beam powers of up to 1 MW are presently either operating or under construction and designs for Multi-Megawatt facilities are being developed. High beam power has applications in the production of high intensity secondary beams of neutrons, muons, kaons and neutrinos as well as in nuclear waste transmutation and accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors. Each of these applications has additional requirements on beam energy and duty cycle. This paper will review how present designs for future Multi-Megawatt facilities meet these requirements and will also review the experience with present high power facilities.

  17. AN ACCELERATOR-BASED NEUTRON MICROBEAM SYSTEM FOR STUDIES OF RADIATION EFFECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    and David J. Brenner1 1 Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, Columbia University, Irvington, NY 10533 2010 A novel neutron microbeam is being developed at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility on existing microbeam tech- niques at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) of Columbia

  18. Tomorrow's cities -the lamp-posts watching every move1 by Jane Wakefield for BBC News2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Bohemia, University of

    the city council is looking to upgrade its23 streetlights to more energy-efficient LED lights - likely in the area. The pilot project will be integrated with the newly built City Operations Centre, where CCTVTomorrow's cities - the lamp-posts watching every move1 by Jane Wakefield for BBC News2 3 Imagine

  19. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Young-Min [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 ?p to 0.6 ?p in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  20. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Young-Min [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Accelerator Physics Center (APC), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 10{sup 25?}m{sup ?3} and 1.6?×?10{sup 28?}m{sup ?3} plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers ?20% higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 ?{sub p} to 0.6 ?{sub p} in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g., nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  1. IPAC15 Jefferson Lab - International Particle Accelerator Conference...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Accelerator Facility United States of America Gupta Lalit Institute for Plasma Research India Gupta Lipi Cornell University CLASSE Cornell Laboratory for...

  2. accelerator research complex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2013-01-01 14 Complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities CERN Preprints Summary: This report outlines the research...

  3. Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of...

  4. Tuning the electron energy by controlling the density perturbation position in laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brijesh, P.; Thaury, C.; Phuoc, K. T.; Corde, S.; Lambert, G.; Malka, V. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS UMR7639, Ecole Polytechnique, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Mangles, S. P. D.; Bloom, M.; Kneip, S. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A density perturbation in an underdense plasma was used to improve the quality of electron bunches produced in the laser-plasma wakefield acceleration scheme. Quasi-monoenergetic electrons were generated by controlled injection in the longitudinal density gradients of the density perturbation. By tuning the position of the density perturbation along the laser propagation axis, a fine control of the electron energy from a mean value of 60 MeV to 120 MeV has been demonstrated with a relative energy-spread of 15 {+-} 3.6%, divergence of 4 {+-} 0.8 mrad, and charge of 6 {+-} 1.8 pC.

  5. EDITED--LS-332-DWA_FEL_August16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    32 August 2012 A Compact Soft X-ray Free-Electron Laser Facility based on a Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator C. Jing, P. Schoessow, A. Kanareykin, Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, OH...

  6. LANSCE | Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LINAC Outreach Affiliations Visiting LANSCE Facilities Isotope Production Facility Lujan Neutron Scattering Center MaRIE Proton Radiography Ultracold Neutrons Weapons Neutron...

  7. Accelerator Technology Division progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schriber, S.O.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Heighway, E.A.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; Defense Free-Electron Lasers; AXY Programs; A Next Generation High-Power Neutron-Scattering Facility; JAERI OMEGA Project and Intense Neutron Sources for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Supercollider; The High-Power Microwave (HPM) Program; Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Power Systems Highlights; Industrial Partnering; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Accelerator Theory and Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  8. BNL | Accelerator Test Facility Cable Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the most valuable resources is cables used for signals (50 ohm), video signals (75 ohm), control cables and power supply cables. Since the number of cables installed at the ATF is...

  9. Fermilab | Illinois Accelerator Research Center | Fermilab Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A This photophoto Fermilab

  10. Fermilab | Illinois Accelerator Research Center | IARC Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A This photophoto FermilabFunding andIARC

  11. Accelerator Design Concept for Future Neutrino Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, J. S.; ISS Accelerator Working Group

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simulation program such as ZGOUBI [7]. 2.5 Linac Option Theusing specialized codes like ZGOUBI [7] that can handle this

  12. Radiological Safety Training for Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |D IMEASUREMENT1-20082TS NOT

  13. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Technology Marketing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis ofwas published inFebruary

  14. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Persis Drell, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    . Reichanadter, Acting ALD L. Dardzinski Interim Assistant Director LCLS Directorate J. Stöhr, ALD U. Bergmann, Facilities LCLS-II John Galayda Mechanical Engineering and Technical Support Division K. Fant Accelerator Research Division E. Colby LCLS Accelerator Systems Division A. Brachmann Instrumentation & Controls

  15. DARHT: Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to analyze mockups of nuclear weapons. The DARHT Facility DARHT consists of two linear induction accelerators that are oriented at two right angles to one another. Each electron...

  16. New Wind Test Facilities Open in Colorado and South Carolina...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Act, the new facilities will accelerate the development and deployment of next-generation wind energy technologies for both offshore and land-based applications. Located on a...

  17. assembly facility maf: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility W.D.Moeller, B.Petersen, B.Sparr Physics Websites Summary: 1 A Proposal for a TESLA Accelerator Module Test Facility W.D.Moeller, B.Petersen, B tests. The qualification...

  18. Facility Microgrids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  19. Accelerator Technology Division progress report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schriber, S.O.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Heighway, E.A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: A Next-Generation Spallation-Neutron Source; Accelerator Performance Demonstration Facility; APEX Free-Electron Laser Project; The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) Program; Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Linac Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Radio-Frequency Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operation.

  20. Accelerate Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerate Energy Productivity 2030 Over the next year, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Council on Competitiveness and the Alliance to Save Energy will join forces to undertake...

  1. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

  2. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

  3. Acceleration Fund

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 Introduction In theACME - AcceleratedAccelerating

  4. 27. Accelerator physics of colliders 1 27. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS OF COLLIDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's facilities, and end with some remarks on future possibilities. 27.2. Beam Dynamics The first concern of beam27. Accelerator physics of colliders 1 27. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS OF COLLIDERS Revised July 2011 by D × L (t)dt. (27.1) Today's colliders all employ bunched beams. If two bunches containing n1 and n2

  5. 25. Accelerator physics of colliders 1 25. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS OF COLLIDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's facilities, and end with some remarks on future possibilities. 25.2. Beam Dynamics The first concern of beam25. Accelerator physics of colliders 1 25. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS OF COLLIDERS Revised July 2011 by D × L (t)dt. (25.1) Today's colliders all employ bunched beams. If two bunches containing n1 and n2

  6. Plasma accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhehui (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, Cris W. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  7. COLLIDING PULSE INJECTION EXPERIMENTS IN NON-COLLINEAR GEOMETRY FOR CONTROLLED LASER PLASMA WAKEFIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    emittance) is important for future plasma based accelerators and for applications. In any particle accelerator, particle injection into the accelerating structure is a key technology. In all cur- rent laser with acceler- Work supported by DOE grant DE-AC02-05CH11231, DARPA, and INCITE computational grant. CToth

  8. University of Virginia Reactor Facility Decommissioning Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ervin, P. F.; Lundberg, L. A.; Benneche, P. E.; Mulder, R. U.; Steva, D. P.

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility started accelerated decommissioning in 2002. The facility consists of two licensed reactors, the CAVALIER and the UVAR. This paper will describe the progress in 2002, remaining efforts and the unique organizational structure of the project team.

  9. Effect of the laser wavefront in a laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaurepaire, B; Bocoum, M; Böhle, F; Jullien, A; Rousseau, J-P; Lefrou, T; Douillet, D; Iaquaniello, G; Lopez-Martens, R; Lifschitz, A; Faure, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high repetition rate electron source was generated by tightly focusing kHz, few-mJ laser pulses into an underdense plasma. This high intensity laser-plasma interaction led to stable electron beams over several hours but with strikingly complex transverse distributions even for good quality laser focal spots. Analysis of the experimental data, along with results of PIC simulations demonstrate the role of the laser wavefront on the acceleration of electrons. Distortions of the laser wavefront cause spatial inhomogeneities in the out-of-focus laser distribution and consequently, the laser pulse drives an inhomogenous transverse wakefield whose focusing/defocusing properties affect the electron distribution. These findings explain the experimental results and suggest the possibility of controlling the electron spatial distribution in laser-plasma accelerators by tailoring the laser wavefront.

  10. Some wakefield effects in the superconducting RF cavities of LCLS-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, K; Yakovlev, V

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For LCLS-II we estimate the power of radiated wakefields generated in the SRF cavities (including the 3rd harmonic cavities) and in the end transitions. Much of this power will pass through and reflect in the strings of cryomodules that comprise linacs L1, L2, or L3. Presumably, some of it will be absorbed by the higher order mode (HOM) couplers, or by the absorbers at warmer temperatures situated between the cryomodules. We investigate where such power gets generated, but not where it ends up. As such the results can serve as a pessimistic calculation of the extra power that needs to be removed by the cryosystem. Finally, we also estimate---under the assumption that all the wake power ends up in the SRF walls---the wall heating and the extent of Cooper pair breaking in L3, where the bunch is most intense. Note that all calculations here are of single bunch effects; thus resonant interactions are not included.

  11. Engineering Design of a Multipurpose X-band Accelerating Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudkov, Dmitry; Samoshkin, Alexander; Zennaro, Riccardo; Dehler, Micha; Raguin, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both FEL projects, SwissFEL and Fermi-Elettra each require an X-band RF accelerating structure for optimal bunch compression at the respective injectors. As the CLIC project is pursuing a program for producing and testing the X-band high-gradient RF structures, a collaboration between PSI, Elettra and CERN has been established to build a multipurpose X-band accelerating structure. This paper focuses on its engineering design, which is based on the disked cells jointed together by diffusion bonding. Vacuum brazing and laser beam welding is used for auxiliary components. The accelerating structure consists of two coupler subassemblies, 73 disks and includes a wakefield monitor and diagnostic waveguides. The engineering study includes the external cooling system, consisting of two parallel cooling circuits and an RF tuning system, which allows phase advance tuning of the cell by deforming the outer wall. The engineering solution for the installation and sealing of the wake field monitor feed-through devices that...

  12. MUON ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERG,S.J.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major motivations driving recent interest in FFAGs is their use for the cost-effective acceleration of muons. This paper summarizes the progress in this area that was achieved leading up to and at the FFAG workshop at KEK from July 7-12, 2003. Much of the relevant background and references are also given here, to give a context to the progress we have made.

  13. A New Control Room for SLAC Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Roger; Guerra, E.; Stanek, M.; Hoover, Z.Van; Warren, J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We are planning to construct a new control room at SLAC to unify and improve the operation of the LCLS, SPEAR3, and FACET accelerator facilities, and to provide the space and flexibility needed to support the LCLS-II and proposed new test beam facilities. The existing control rooms for the linac and SPEAR3 have been upgraded in various ways over the last decade, but their basic features have remained unchanged. We propose to build a larger modern Accelerator Control Room (ACR) in the new Research Support Building (RSB) which is currently under construction at SLAC. Shifting the center of control for the accelerator facilities entails both technical and administrative challenges. In this paper, we describe the history, concept, and status of this project.

  14. Accelerator Facility Safety Implementation Guide for DOE O 420.2C, Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a guide to understanding and meeting the requirements of DOE O 420.2C, and shares lessons learned based on valuable experience within the community. Cancels DOE G 420.2-1.

  15. Accelerator Facility Safety Implementation Guide for DOE Order 420.2C, Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a guide to understanding and meeting the requirements of DOE Order 420.2C and shares lessons learned based on valuable experience within the community.

  16. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  17. Accelerating deactivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FISHBACK, K.M.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the focus of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex has shifted from defense production to facility stabilization, decommissioning, and environmental restoration. This shift from production to cleanup requires a parallel shift from operations-focused management to project-focused management for an efficient facility deactivation. In the operation-focused management organization, activities are planned and executed based on production goals and are typically repetitive and cyclic. In the project-focused management environment, activities are based on a defined scope/end objective, start date, and completion date. Since the workforce used to perform production operations is also usually relied onto perform facility deactivation, it is important to shift from an operations management approach to a project management approach. It is best if the transition is accomplished quickly so the project can move forward and workers don't spend a lot of energy anticipating change. Therefore, it is essential that managers, planners, and other workers understand the key elements associated with planning a deactivation project. This paper describes a planning approach that has been used successfully to plan deactivation projects consistent with the requirements provided in DOE Order 430.1A Life Cycle Asset Management and the companion Deactivation Implementation Guide, G430. 1A-3, while exceeding schedule expectations and reducing costs. Although the planning of a deactivation project closely mirrors the classic project planning for construction projects, there are unique variations associated with facility deactivation. The key elements of planning a deactivation project are discussed relative to scope, schedule, and cost. Management tools such as project metrics and histograms are discussed as desired outputs from the planning process. In addition, lessons learned from planning deactivation projects across the DOE complex are discussed relative to making the transition from operations management to project management and the implications for deactivation project planning.

  18. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for Department of Energy facilities, which includes nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards mitigation, and the System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1A. DOE O 420.1B Chg 1 issued 4-19-10.

  19. Optimization of the Combined Proton Acceleration Regime with a Target Composition Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, W P; Zheng, C Y; Liu, Z J; Yan, X Q

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A target composition scheme to optimize the combined proton acceleration regime is presented and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell (2D PIC) simulations by using an ultra-intense circularly-polarized (CP) laser pulse irradiating an overdense hydrocarbon (CH) target, instead of a pure hydrogen (H) one. The combined acceleration regime is a two-stage proton acceleration scheme combining the radiation pressure dominated acceleration (RPDA) stage and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) stage sequentially together. With an ultra-intense CP laser pulse irradiating an overdense CH target, followed by an underdense tritium plasma gas, protons with higher energies (from about $20$ GeV up to about $30$ GeV) and lower energy spreads (from about $18\\%$ down to about $5\\%$ in full-width at half-maximum, or FWHM) are generated, as compared to the use of a pure H target. It is because protons can be more stably pre-accelerated in the first RPDA stage when using CH targets. With the increase of the carbon-to-hy...

  20. Peculiar acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Amendola; Claudia Quercellini; Amedeo Balbi

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been proposed recently to observe the change in cosmological redshift of distant galaxies or quasars with the next generation of large telescope and ultra-stable spectrographs (the so-called Sandage-Loeb test). Here we investigate the possibility of observing the change in peculiar velocity in nearby clusters and galaxies. This ``peculiar acceleration'' could help reconstructing the gravitational potential without assuming virialization. We show that the expected effect is of the same order of magnitude of the cosmological velocity shift. Finally, we discuss how to convert the theoretical predictions into quantities directly related to observations.

  1. ACCELERATE ENERGY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy ThisThistheSummaryACCELERATE ENERGY

  2. Linear Accelerator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinear Accelerator

  3. accelerator-driven system ads: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    experimental facilities 1 T. Takizuka; T. Sasa; K. Tsujimoto; H. Takano 5 Thorium as a Fuel for Accelerator Driven Subcritical Electronuclear Systems CERN Preprints Summary:...

  4. PNL-SA-22914 Presented at the 48th Meeting of the Mechanical Failures Prevention Group (MFPG 48) 19-21 April 1994 in Wakefield, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -21 April 1994 in Wakefield, MA AN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK SYSTEM FOR DIAGNOSING GAS TURBINE ENGINE FUEL until it produces an accurate diagnosis. For example, troubleshooting the AGT-1500 gas turbine engine Laboratory are developing a turbine engine diagnostic system for the M1A1 Abrams tank. This system employs

  5. Shielding effect and wakefield pattern of a moving test charge in a non-Maxwellian dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, S. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)] [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Khan, S. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan) [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Gomal University, Dera Ismail Khan 29050 (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By using the Vlasov-Poisson equations, we calculate an expression for the electrostatic potential caused by a test charge in an unmagnetized non-Maxwellian dusty plasma, whose constituents are the superthermal hot-electrons, the mobile cold-electrons with a neutralizing background of cold ions, and charge fluctuating isolated dust grains. The superthermality effects due to hot electrons not only modify the dielectric constant of the electron-acoustic waves but also significantly affect the electrostatic potential. The latter can be decomposed into the Debye-Hückel and oscillatory wake potentials. Analytical and numerical results reveal that the Debye-Hückel and wakefield potentials converge to the Maxwellian case for large values of superthermality parameter. Furthermore, the plasma parameters play a vital role in the formation of shielding and wakefield pattern in a two-electron temperature plasma. The present results should be important for laboratory and space dusty plasmas, where hot-electrons can be assumed to follow the non-Maxwellian distribution function.

  6. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish facility safety requirements for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 420.1. Canceled by DOE O 420.1B.

  7. Accelerator and electrodynamics capability review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Kevin W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses capability reviews to assess the science, technology and engineering (STE) quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Laboratory Management will use this report for STE assessment and planning. LANL has defined fifteen STE capabilities. Electrodynamics and Accelerators is one of the seven STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) has identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. Accelerators and electrodynamics at LANL comprise a blend of large-scale facilities and innovative small-scale research with a growing focus on national security applications. This review is organized into five topical areas: (1) Free Electron Lasers; (2) Linear Accelerator Science and Technology; (3) Advanced Electromagnetics; (4) Next Generation Accelerator Concepts; and (5) National Security Accelerator Applications. The focus is on innovative technology with an emphasis on applications relevant to Laboratory mission. The role of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) in support of accelerators/electrodynamics will be discussed. The review provides an opportunity for interaction with early career staff. Program sponsors and customers will provide their input on the value of the accelerator and electrodynamics capability to the Laboratory mission.

  8. A Phenomenological Cost Model for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Shiltsev

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerator-based high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. In this paper we derive a simple scaling model for the cost of large accelerators and colliding beam facilities based on costs of 17 big facilities which have been either built or carefully estimated. Although this approach cannot replace an actual cost estimate based on an engineering design, this parameterization is to indicate a somewhat realistic cost range for consideration of what future frontier accelerator facilities might be fiscally realizable.

  9. Analysis of Capillary Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator Experiments at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kei; Advanced Light Source

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerator Experiments at LBNL K. Nakamura ?,† , A. J.National Labo- ratory (LBNL) [5, 6]. In this scheme, intenseof the LOASIS facility at LBNL. The laser beam was focused

  10. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and the System Engineer Program.Chg 1 incorporates the use of DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, mandatory for Hazard Category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 420.1A.

  11. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-STD-1104 contains the Department's method and criteria for reviewing and approving nuclear facility's documented safety analysis (DSA). This review and approval formally document the basis for DOE, concluding that a facility can be operated safely in a manner that adequately protects workers, the public, and the environment. Therefore, it is appropriate to formally require implementation of the review methodology and criteria contained in DOE-STD-1104.

  12. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Order is to establish facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. The Order has Change 1 dated 11-16-95, Change 2 dated 10-24-96, and the latest Change 3 dated 11-22-00 incorporated. The latest change satisfies a commitment made to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in response to DNFSB recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety.

  13. Accelerated Decontamination and Decommissioning at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, M.C.; Douglas, L.M.; Marske, S.G.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site has over 100 facilities that have been declared surplus and are scheduled to be decommissioned. In addition to these surplus facilities, there is a significant number of facilities that are currently being shut down, deactivated, and transferred to the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) program. In the last year, Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, have developed and implemented an initiative to accelerate the D&D work at the Hanford Site. The strategy associated with accelerated D&D is to reduce the number of surplus facilities, eliminate potential safety hazards, demonstrate meaningful cleanup progress, and recycle materials for other uses. This initiative has been extremely successful and has resulted in the safe demolition of 13 facilities in fiscal year (FY) 1993. In addition, four facilities have been completed in FY 1994 and demolition of several other facilities is currently underway.

  14. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spentzouris, P.; /Fermilab; Cary, J.; /Tech-X, Boulder; McInnes, L.C.; /Argonne; Mori, W.; /UCLA; Ng, C.; /SLAC; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization for software development and applications accounts for the natural domain areas (beam dynamics, electromagnetics, and advanced acceleration), and all areas depend on the enabling technologies activities, such as solvers and component technology, to deliver the desired performance and integrated simulation environment. The ComPASS applications focus on computationally challenging problems important for design or performance optimization to all major HEP, NP, and BES accelerator facilities. With the cost and complexity of particle accelerators rising, the use of computation to optimize their designs and find improved operating regimes becomes essential, potentially leading to significant cost savings with modest investment.

  15. for sequence accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Vladimir

    Wynn's -algorithm for sequence accelerators using high precision arithmetic Rachel Baumann University of Arizona Wynn's -algorithm for sequence accelerators using high precision arithmetic Rachel Baumann University of Arizona April 17, 2012 #12;Wynn's -algorithm for sequence accelerators using high

  16. Laser wakefield simulation using a speed-of-light frame envelope model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser wake?eld simulation using a speed-of-light frameAbstract. Simulation of laser wake?eld accelerator (LWFA)extend hundreds of laser wave- lengths transversely and many

  17. Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron A Research Centre develops, builds and operates large accelerator facilities for photon science and particle physics of the Helmholtz Association ASTROPARTICLE PHYSICS· DESY, Zeuthen location, is seeking: Scientist (f/m) DESY DESY

  18. Accelerator Science and Technology Centre ASTeC Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the construction of important accelerator test facilities. The vital role of ASTeC in continuing to contribute a mastery of high brightness electron beam physics and technology, and this has been exploited by ASTeAccelerator Science and Technology Centre ASTeC Annual Report 2004 ­ 2005 CCLRC Rutherford Appleton

  19. Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron A Research CentreD-Students (f/m) DESY DESY is one of the world's leading research centres for photon science, particle and astroparticle physics as well as accelerator physics. The Photo Injector Test Facility PITZ in Zeuthen (near

  20. Multiorbit induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvontsov, A.A.; Kas'yanov, V.A.; Chakhlov, V.L.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large numbers of particles accelerated per cycle are made possible by accelerating simultaneously in several equilibrium orbits in a single betatron structure. (AIP)

  1. INTRODUCTION A research facility is most valuable if it is available when we

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    physics accelerators, synchrotron light sources, neutron scattering facilities, electron beam facilities and the Bayerisches Geoinstitut in Bayreuth (Germany). In contrast, synchrotron, neutron, and electron beam facilities be as important to the continuing operation of the facility as it is to the success and well-being of the user

  2. ISIS Facility: Facility Design Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ­ Cooling ­ Radiation Damage & Rad Accelerated Corrosion ­ Remote Handling/Radioactive Waste ­ Remote are assumed. 2. Hot Cell / Remote Handling ­ All mercury target and process components must be contained in nature to a similar solid target. · PROCESS EQUIPMENT: Remote handling requirements of mercury pump, HX

  3. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. Cancels DOE 5480.7A, DOE 5480.24, DOE 5480.28 and Division 13 of DOE 6430.1A. Canceled by DOE O 420.1A.

  4. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for DOE and NNSA for nuclear safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1B, DOE G 420.1-2 and DOE G 420.1-3.

  5. Plasma density from Cerenkov radiation, betatron oscillations, and beam steering in a plasma wakefield experiment at 30 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catravas, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Assmann, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Whittum, D.; Blue, B.; Clayton, C.; Joshi, C.; Marsh, K.; Mori, W.B.; Wang, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S.; Muggli, P.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for using Cerenkov radiation near atomic spectral lines to measure plasma source properties for plasma wakefield applications has been discussed and experimentally verified. Because the radiation co-propagates with the electron beam, the radiation samples the source properties exactly along the path of interest with perfect temporal synchronization. Observation wavelengths were chosen with respect to the atomic resonances of the plasma source, where the relative change in the index of refraction strongly affects the Cerenkov cone angle, and permits flexible diagnostic design. The Cerenkov spatial profiles were systematically studied for a Lithium heat pipe oven as a function of oven temperature and observation wavelength. Neutral densities and plasma densities were extracted from the measurements.

  6. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael S. Zisman

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 \\times 10^34 cm^-2s^-1. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance ("cooling"). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  7. Production expansion continues to accelerate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that Saudi Arabian Oil Co. (Saudi Aramco) is continuing its accelerated Crude Oil Expansion Program initiated in 1989 that aims at achieving a 10 million bpd productive capacity by 1995. In addition to major engineering, construction and renovation work related to production expansion, Saudi Aramco drilling and workover operations have been markedly expanded. Since January 1991, rig activity has doubled. As an indication of aging of Saudi production, projects include modernizing current injection water treatment facilities, installing a new seawater injection plant on the Persian Gulf, installing dewatering facilities in a number of locations and installing a pilot gas lift project. In addition, equipment orders indicate the new discoveries south of Riyadh may also need the assistance of water injection from inception of production.

  8. Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Accelerator Cavities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Reece, Charlie

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Charlie Reece, an accelerator technology scientist, explains how superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities work.

  9. Experimental demonstration of longitudinal beam phase space linearizer in a free-electron laser facility by corrugated structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Haixiao; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Feng, Lie; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yao, Haifeng; Shen, Lei; Li, Bin; Zhang, Junqiang; Li, Xuan; Fang, Wencheng; Wang, Dan; Couprie, Marie-emmanuelle; Lin, Guoqiang; Liu, Bo; Gu, Qiang; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Removal of residual linear energy chirp and intrinsic nonlinear energy curvature in the relativistic electron beam from radiofrequency linear accelerator is of paramount importance for efficient lasing of a high-gain free-electron laser. Recently, it was theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that the longitudinal wakefield excited by the electrons itself in the corrugated structure allows for precise control of the electron beam phase space. In this Letter, we report the first utilization of a corrugated structure as beam linearizer in the operation of a seeded free-electron laser driven by a 140 MeV linear accelerator, where a gain of ~10,000 over spontaneous emission was achieved at the second harmonic of the 1047 nm seed laser, and a free-electron laser bandwidth narrowing by about 50% was observed, in good agreement with the theoretical expectations.

  10. FMIT facility control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suyama, R.M.; Machen, D.R.; Johnson, J.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The control system for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility, under construction at Richland, Washington, uses current techniques in distributed processing to achieve responsiveness, maintainability and reliability. Developmental experience with the system on the FMIT Prototype Accelerator (FPA) being designed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is described as a function of the system's design goals and details. The functional requirements of the FMIT control system dictated the use of a highly operator-responsive, display-oriented structure, using state-of-the-art console devices for man-machine communications. Further, current technology has allowed the movement of device-dependent tasks into the area traditionally occupied by remote input-output equipment; the system's dual central process computers communicate with remote communications nodes containing microcomputers that are architecturally similar to the top-level machines. The system has been designed to take advantage of commercially available hardware and software.

  11. Controlled Electron Injection into Plasma Accelerators and SpaceCharge Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fubiani, Gwenael J.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma based accelerators are capable of producing electron sources which are ultra-compact (a few microns) and high energies (up to hundreds of MeVs) in much shorter distances than conventional accelerators. This is due to the large longitudinal electric field that can be excited without the limitation of breakdown as in RF structures.The characteristic scale length of the accelerating field is the plasma wavelength and for typical densities ranging from 1018 - 1019 cm-3, the accelerating fields and scale length can hence be on the order of 10-100GV/m and 10-40 mu m, respectively. The production of quasimonoenergetic beams was recently obtained in a regime relying on self-trapping of background plasma electrons, using a single laser pulse for wakefield generation. In this dissertation, we study the controlled injection via the beating of two lasers (the pump laser pulse creating the plasma wave and a second beam being propagated in opposite direction) which induce a localized injection of background plasma electrons. The aim of this dissertation is to describe in detail the physics of optical injection using two lasers, the characteristics of the electron beams produced (the micrometer scale plasma wavelength can result in femtosecond and even attosecond bunches) as well as a concise estimate of the effects of space charge on the dynamics of an ultra-dense electron bunch with a large energy spread.

  12. Machine Protection: Availability for Particle Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apollonio, Andrea; Schmidt, Ruediger

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Machine availability is a key indicator for the performance of the next generation of particle accelerators. Availability requirements need to be carefully considered during the design phase to achieve challenging objectives in different fields, as e.g. particle physics and material science. For existing and future High-Power facilities, such as ESS (European Spallation Source) and HL-LHC (High-Luminosity LHC), operation with unprecedented beam power requires highly dependable Machine Protection Systems (MPS) to avoid any damage-induced downtime. Due to the high complexity of accelerator systems, finding the optimal balance between equipment safety and accelerator availability is challenging. The MPS architecture, as well as the choice of electronic components, have a large influence on the achievable level of availability. In this thesis novel methods to address the availability of accelerators and their protection systems are presented. Examples of studies related to dependable MPS architectures are given i...

  13. K. Baird, F.-J. Decker, M. J. Hogan* , R.H. Iverson, P. Raimondi, R.H. Siemann, D. Walz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a unique and timely opportunity for looking at, plasma focusing and wakefield acceleration of positron

  14. Estimation of Radiation Protection Shielding for a EURISOL Linear Proton Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Otto, CERN

    A linear accelerator for protons, based on superconducting radiofrequency technology, is envisaged as a driver accelerator for the isotope production targets in a future EURISOL facility. This note reports basic estimates of the required radiation protection shielding of such an accelerator.

  15. Development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatum, B.A.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) construction project has been completed and the first radioactive ion beam has been successfully accelerated. The project, which began in 1992, has involved numerous facility modifications. The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron has been converted from an energy booster for heavy ion beams to a light ion accelerator with internal ion source. A target-ion source and mass analysis system have been commissioned as key components of the facility`s radioactive ion beam injector to the 25MV tandem electrostatic accelerator. Beam transport lines have been completed, and new diagnostics for very low intensity beams have been developed. Work continues on a unified control system. Development of research quality radioactive beams for the nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics communities continues. This paper details facility development to date.

  16. Ultra-low emittance beam generation using two-color ionization injection in a CO2 laser-driven plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C B; Bulanov, S S; Chen, M; Esarey, E; Geddes, C G R; Vay, J -L; Yu, L -L; Leemans, W P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-low emittance (tens of nm) beams can be generated in a plasma accelerator using ionization injection of electrons into a wakefield. An all-optical method of beam generation uses two laser pulses of different colors. A long-wavelength drive laser pulse (with a large ponderomotive force and small peak electric field) is used to excite a large wakefield without fully ionizing a gas, and a short-wavelength injection laser pulse (with a small ponderomotive force and large peak electric field), co-propagating and delayed with respect to the pump laser, to ionize a fraction of the remaining bound electrons at a trapped wake phase, generating an electron beam that is accelerated in the wake. The trapping condition, the ionized electron distribution, and the trapped bunch dynamics are discussed. Expressions for the beam transverse emittance, parallel and orthogonal to the ionization laser polarization, are presented. An example is shown using a 10-micron CO2 laser to drive the wake and a frequency-doubled Ti:Al2...

  17. Characterization of diffuse emissions from the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, Noel Davis

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) is an 800 megaelectron volt (MeV) proton accelerator operated by the University of California for the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The accelerator produces activation products...

  18. A microbeam irradiator without an accelerator G. Garty *, G.J. Ross, A. Bigelow, G. Randers-Pehrson, D.J. Brenner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Pehrson, D.J. Brenner Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, Columbia University, 136 S. Broadway-alone; Accelerator 1. Introduction and overall design Columbia UniversityÕs Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) currently offers its users access to a few-micron diameter single-cell/ single

  19. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed.

  20. Mobile Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide Capture inFacility AMF Information Science

  1. Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd ofEvaluations in Covered Facilities | Department of Energy

  2. Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd ofEvaluations in Covered Facilities | Department of Energy063-2011

  3. Facility Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFYRANDOM DRUG TESTING The requirementFacility

  4. Monte Carlo Characterization of a Pulsed Laser-Wakefield Driven Monochromatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    facility at the University of Nebraska- Lincoln (UNL) is a 100-TW, 30-fs pulsed Ti:sapphire laser system submitted on November 13, 2009. S. D. Clarke is with the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological@umich.edu). S. A. Pozzi is with the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences

  5. Application of a Laser-Wakefield Driven Monochromatic Photon Source to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    of approximately 170. I. INTRODUCTION HE Diocles laser facility at The University of Nebraska- Lincoln (UNL is with the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI and Radiological Sciences of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA (tel: 734-615-7830, e

  6. Non-linear Ion-wake Excitation by Ultra-relativistic Electron Wakefields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahai, Aakash A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The excitation of a non-linear ion-wake by a train of ultra-relativistic plasmons is modeled and its use for a novel regime of positron acceleration is explored. Its channel-like structure is independent of the energy-source driving the bubble-shaped slowly-propagating high phase-velocity electron density waves. The back of the bubble electron compression sucks-in the ions and the space-charge within the bubble expels them, forming a near-void channel with on-axis and bubble-edge density-spikes. The channel-edge density-spike is driven radially outwards as a non-linear ion acoustic-wave by the wake electron thermal pressure. OSIRIS PIC simulations are used to study the ion-wake structure, its evolution and its use for positron acceleration.

  7. Some Frontiers of Accelerator Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some Frontiers of Accelerator Physics A.M. Sessler OctoberSOME FRONTIERS OF ACCELERATOR PHYSICS* Andrew M. Sessleris Some Frontiers of Accelerator Physics and it is most

  8. Novel Methods in the Particle-In-Cell Accelerator Code-Framework Warp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vay, J. -L.; Grote, D. P.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) Code-Framework Warp is being developed by the Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) to guide the development of accelerators that can deliver beams suitable for high energy density experiments and implosion of inertial fusion capsules. It is also applied in various areas outside the Heavy Ion Fusion program to the study and design of existing and next-generation high-energy accelerators, including the study of electron cloud effects and laser wakefield acceleration for example. This paper presents an overview of Warp’s capabilities, summarizing recent original numerical methods that were developed by the HIFS-VNL (including Particle-In-Cell with Adaptive Mesh Refinement, a large-timestep “drift-Lorentz” mover for arbitrarily magnetized species, a relativistic Lorentz invariant leapfrog particle pusher, simulations in Lorentz boosted frames, an electromagnetic solver with tunable numerical dispersion and efficient stride20 based digital filtering), with great emphasis on the description of the mesh refinement capability. Selected examples of applications of the methods to the abovementioned fields are given.

  9. Entanglement of Accelerating Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. L. Ku; M. -C. Chu

    2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how the entanglement of a maximally entangled pair of particles is affected when one or both of the pair are uniformly accelerated, while the detector remains in an inertial frame. We find that the entanglement is unchanged if all degrees of freedom are considered. However, particle pairs are produced, and the entanglements of different bipartite systems may change with the acceleration. In particular, the entanglement between accelerating fermions is transferred preferentially to the produced antiparticles when the acceleration is large, and the entanglement transfer is complete when the acceleration approaches infinity. However, for scalar particles, no entanglement transfer to the antiparticles is observed.

  10. Energy Management Working Group: Accelerating Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheihing, P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Standardization (ISO) published the ISO 50001 energy management standard in 2011. ISO 50001 provides industrial companies with guidelines for integrating energy efficiency into their management practices— including fine-tuning production processes... efficiency. GSEP’s Energy Management Working Group (EMWG) advocates the increased adoption of EnMS or ISO 50001 in industry and commercial buildings. It goal is to accelerate the adoption and use of energy management systems in industrial facilities...

  11. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Bethel, E. Wes; Jacobsen, J.; Prabhat, ,; R.ubel, O.; Weber, G,; Hamann, B.

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of laser-plasma wakefield (particle) accelerators model the acceleration of electrons trapped in plasma oscillations (wakes) left behind when an intense laser pulse propagates through the plasma. The goal of these simulations is to better understand the process involved in plasma wake generation and how electrons are trapped and accelerated by the wake. Understanding of such accelerators, and their development, offer high accelerating gradients, potentially reducing size and cost of new accelerators. One operating regime of interest is where a trapped subset of electrons loads the wake and forms an isolated group of accelerated particles with low spread in momentum and position, desirable characteristics for many applications. The electrons trapped in the wake may be accelerated to high energies, the plasma gradient in the wake reaching up to a gigaelectronvolt per centimeter. High-energy electron accelerators power intense X-ray radiation to terahertz sources, and are used in many applications including medical radiotherapy and imaging. To extract information from the simulation about the quality of the beam, a typical approach is to examine plots of the entire dataset, visually determining the adequate parameters necessary to select a subset of particles, which is then further analyzed. This procedure requires laborious examination of massive data sets over many time steps using several plots, a routine that is unfeasible for large data collections. Demand for automated analysis is growing along with the volume and size of simulations. Current 2D LWFA simulation datasets are typically between 1GB and 100GB in size, but simulations in 3D are of the order of TBs. The increase in the number of datasets and dataset sizes leads to a need for automatic routines to recognize particle patterns as particle bunches (beam of electrons) for subsequent analysis. Because of the growth in dataset size, the application of machine learning techniques for scientific data mining is increasingly considered. In plasma simulations, Bagherjeiran et al. presented a comprehensive report on applying graph-based techniques for orbit classification. They used the KAM classifier to label points and components in single and multiple orbits. Love et al. conducted an image space analysis of coherent structures in plasma simulations. They used a number of segmentation and region-growing techniques to isolate regions of interest in orbit plots. Both approaches analyzed particle accelerator data, targeting the system dynamics in terms of particle orbits. However, they did not address particle dynamics as a function of time or inspected the behavior of bunches of particles. Ruebel et al. addressed the visual analysis of massive laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) simulation data using interactive procedures to query the data. Sophisticated visualization tools were provided to inspect the data manually. Ruebel et al. have integrated these tools to the visualization and analysis system VisIt, in addition to utilizing efficient data management based on HDF5, H5Part, and the index/query tool FastBit. In Ruebel et al. proposed automatic beam path analysis using a suite of methods to classify particles in simulation data and to analyze their temporal evolution. To enable researchers to accurately define particle beams, the method computes a set of measures based on the path of particles relative to the distance of the particles to a beam. To achieve good performance, this framework uses an analysis pipeline designed to quickly reduce the amount of data that needs to be considered in the actual path distance computation. As part of this process, region-growing methods are utilized to detect particle bunches at single time steps. Efficient data reduction is essential to enable automated analysis of large data sets as described in the next section, where data reduction methods are steered to the particular requirements of our clustering analysis. Previously, we have described the application of a set of algorithms to automate the data analys

  12. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM); Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM); Young, Lloyd M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  13. RF properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.W.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of the SLAC electron-positron linear collider (SLC) in the 100 GeV center-of-mass energy range, research and development work on even higher energy machines of this type has started in several laboratories in the United States, Europe, the Soviet Union and Japan. These linear colliders appear to provide the only promising approach to studying e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// physics at center-of-mass energies approaching 1 TeV. This thesis concerns itself with the study of radio frequency properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders and their interaction with bunched beams. The topics that have been investigated are: experimental measurements of the energy loss of single bunches to longitudinal modes in two types of structures, using an equivalent signal on a coaxial wire to simulate the beam; a method of canceling the energy spread created within a single bunch by longitudinal wakefields, through appropriate shaping of the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch; derivation of the complete transient beam-loading equation for a train of bunches passing through a constant-gradient accelerator section, with application to the calculation and minimization of multi-bunch energy spread; detailed study of field emission and radio frequency breakdown in disk-loaded structures at S-, C- and X-band frequencies under extremely high-gradient conditions, with special attention to thermal effects, radiation, sparking, emission of gases, surface damage through explosive emission and its possible control through RF-gas processing. 53 refs., 49 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. Upgrade of the cryogenic CERN RF test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirotte, O.; Benda, V.; Brunner, O.; Inglese, V.; Maesen, P.; Vullierme, B. [CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Koettig, T. [ESS - European Spallation Source, Box 176, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    With the large number of superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cryomodules to be tested for the former LEP and the present LHC accelerator a RF test facility was erected early in the 1990’s in the largest cryogenic test facility at CERN located at Point 18. This facility consisted of four vertical test stands for single cavities and originally one and then two horizontal test benches for RF cryomodules operating at 4.5 K in saturated helium. CERN is presently working on the upgrade of its accelerator infrastructure, which requires new superconducting cavities operating below 2 K in saturated superfluid helium. Consequently, the RF test facility has been renewed in order to allow efficient cavity and cryomodule tests in superfluid helium and to improve its thermal performances. The new RF test facility is described and its performances are presented.

  15. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schafer, R.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

  16. Leaky Fermi accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Kushal; Rom-Kedar, Vered; Turaev, Dmitry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Fermi accelerator is a billiard with oscillating walls. A leaky accelerator interacts with an environment of an ideal gas at equilibrium by exchange of particles through a small hole on its boundary. Such interaction may heat the gas: we estimate the net energy flow through the hole under the assumption that the particles inside the billiard do not collide with each other and remain in the accelerator for sufficiently long time. The heat production is found to depend strongly on the type of the Fermi accelerator. An ergodic accelerator, i.e. one which has a single ergodic component, produces a weaker energy flow than a multi-component accelerator. Specifically, in the ergodic case the energy gain is independent of the hole size, whereas in the multi-component case the energy flow may be significantly increased by shrinking the hole size.

  17. THE DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Sampayan, S E

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  18. from Isotope Production Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium 2:32 Isotope cancer treatment...

  19. Fuel Fabrication Facility

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility November 2005 May 2007 June 2008 May 2012...

  20. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  1. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, John S. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  2. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 12 APRIL 2009; CORRECTED ONLINE: 24 APRIL 2009 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1248 Proton-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    therefore be used for accel- erating particles to relativistic energies1­3 . Initially, laser-driven plasma to produce electric fields of 10­100 GV m-1 . This has opened up the possibility of building compact particle to the energy frontier of particle physics--the teraelectronvolt regime. Here, we introduce the possibility

  3. Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on high energy ion generation Levi Schachter Active Media Accelerators Benjamin Bowes Ultrafast 2-D radiative transport in a micron-scale aluminum plasma excited at...

  4. Accelerator Concepts Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colliders to Synchrotron Radiation Sources. The wide scope of the workshop includes new methods of particle acceleration to high energies, techniques for production of...

  5. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Palmer, Robert B. (Shoreham, NY)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  6. Accelerator R&D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting RF Module with a PBG Coupler Cell, 2013 North American Particle Accelerator Conference, Pasadena, CA, September 29 - October 4th, 2013. Evgenya I. Simakov,...

  7. Market Acceleration (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fact sheet summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its market acceleration subprogram.

  8. Guide to research facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  9. Beam Physics of Integrable Optics Test Accelerator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagaitsev, S.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab; Danilov, V.V.; /Oak Ridge; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab's Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an electron storage ring designed for testing advanced accelerator physics concepts, including implementation of nonlinear integrable beam optics and experiments on optical stochastic cooling. The machine is currently under construction at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator facility. In this report we present the goals and the current status of the project, and describe the details of machine design. In particular, we concentrate on numerical simulations setting the requirements on the design and supporting the choice of machine parameters.

  10. A practical target system for accelerator-based BNCT which may effectively double the dose rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    . Randers-Pehrsona) and D. J. Brenner Center for Radiological Research, Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, Columbia University, Irvington, New York 10533 Received 27 May 1997; accepted for publication 31

  11. Community petascale project for accelerator science and simulation: Advancing computational science for future accelerators and accelerator technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    program for computational accelerator physics development isof computational accelerator physics applications, withof computational accelerator physics. Under ComPASS, the

  12. Neutrino physics at accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Fernandez

    2006-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Present and future neutrino experiments at accelerators are mainly concerned with understanding the neutrino oscillation phenomenon and its implications. Here a brief account of neutrino oscillations is given together with a description of the supporting data. Some current and planned accelerator neutrino experiments are also explained.

  13. Microscale acceleration history discriminators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polosky, Marc A. (Albuquerque, NM); Plummer, David W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of micromechanical acceleration history discriminators is claimed. These discriminators allow the precise differentiation of a wide range of acceleration-time histories, thereby allowing adaptive events to be triggered in response to the severity (or lack thereof) of an external environment. Such devices have applications in airbag activation, and other safety and surety applications.

  14. Accelerators (4/5)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  15. Accelerators (5/5)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  16. Accelerators (3/5)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  17. Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Light Ion Facility Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Michael B.; McMahan, Margaret A.; Gimpel, Thomas L.; Tiffany, William S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a position- sensitive ion chamber for online dosimetry, theBeam Exit Window The ion chamber (Fig. 3) monitors the beamthe nitrogen-filled ion chamber leave a trail of ions that

  18. Data acquisition system at the RIKEN accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichihara, T.; Inamura, T.; Wada, T.; Ishihara, M. (RIKEN Accelerator facility 2-1, Hirosawa, Wako, 351-01 (JP))

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes data acquisition system using J11 CPU (Starburst 2180 ACC) and Micro VAX II. Each event is processed by J11 CPU. Buffered data is transferred to Micro VAX II through Kinetic parallel bus. The executable image on J11 is builded on Micro VAX II using VAX/RSX and down-line loaded via CAMAC dataway.

  19. accelerator facility atlas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exotic signatures using the ATLAS detector at the LHC is given. The results presented use data collected at center-of-mass energies of sqrts 7 TeV and sqrts 8 TeV,...

  20. accelerator target facilities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    play a central role in the theoretical modeling of these phenomena. Many have their roots in non-relativstic plasma studies, often driven by space plasma physics experiments....

  1. accelerator facility target: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    play a central role in the theoretical modeling of these phenomena. Many have their roots in non-relativstic plasma studies, often driven by space plasma physics experiments....

  2. New Facility Saves $20 Million, Accelerates Waste Processing | Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011R - 445 CU - 2

  3. Accelerator Modeling for Discovery | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related LinksATHENA couldAbout BudgetAboutNewsOSTI, US Dept

  4. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Technologies Available for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPoints ofProjectcoordination

  5. Neutrino factory and beta beam: accelerator options for future neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2012-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Two accelerator options for producing intense neutrino beams a Neutrino Factory based on stored muon beams and a Beta Beam facility based on stored beams of beta unstable ions are described. Technical challenges for each are described and current R&D efforts aimed at mitigating these challenges are indicated. Progress is being made in the design of both types of facility, each of which would extend the state-of-the-art in accelerator science.

  6. Accelerated Quantum Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Morgan H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we establish a formalism for the computation of observables due to acceleration-induced particle physics processes. General expressions for the transition rate, multiplicity, power, spectra, and displacement law of particles undergoing time-dependent acceleration and transitioning into a final state of arbitrary particle number are obtained. The transition rate, power, and spectra are characterised by unique polynomials of multiplicity and thermal distributions of both bosonic and fermionic statistics. The acceleration dependent multiplicity is computed in terms of the branching fractions of the associated inertial processes. The displacement law of the spectra predicts the energy of the emitted particles are directly proportional to the accelerated temperature. These results extend our understanding of particle physics into the high acceleration sector.

  7. Compensation of wakefield-driven energy spread in energy recovery linacs Georg H. Hoffstaetter and Yang Hao Lau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffstaetter, Georg

    and Yang Hao Lau Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA (Received 16 May 2008; published 23 July, so that their energy is available for the acceleration of new particles. During this deceleration at a decelerating phase to recover the particles' energy. This energy is then used to accelerate new bunches

  8. Facility Automation Products--Systems--Applications--Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bynum, H. D.

    are to be commended, and should accelerate energy action plans by bringing the suppliers and demanders together for concentrated energy saving discussions. From this following view of the evolution and trends of energy control and facility management systems... of electric motor load control ???? shutting down motors when they were not required and starting them up as late as possible to perform their assigned tasks. Cycling motors off for 10 to 40 percent of the time during their duty period saved additional...

  9. A Framework for a General Purpose Intelligent Control System for Particle Accelerators. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Robert Westervelt; Dr. William Klein; Dr. Michael Kroupa; Eric Olsson; Rick Rothrock

    1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Vista Control Systems, Inc. has developed a portable system for intelligent accelerator control. The design is general in scope and is thus configurable to a wide range of accelerator facilities and control problems. The control system employs a multi-layer organization in which knowledge-based decision making is used to dynamically configure lower level optimization and control algorithms.

  10. Physics 309, The University of Chicago, Winter 2003 INTRODUCTION TO ACCELERATOR PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physics 309, The University of Chicago, Winter 2003 INTRODUCTION TO ACCELERATOR PHYSICS Instructor: Kwang-Je Kim (kwangje@aps.anl.gov) Particle accelerators are becoming larger and more complex to satisfy in high-energy colliders for elementary particle physics and in synchrotron radiation facilities

  11. GeV electron beams from a centimetre-scale accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to synchrotron radiation facilities and free-electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radiofrequency-based accelerators are limited to relatively low accelerating fields (10-50 MV m-1 ), requiring tens to hundreds of metres to reach the multi-GeV beam energies needed to drive radiation sources

  12. GeV electron beams from a centimetre-scale accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    V) electron accelerators are essential to synchrotron radiation facilities and free-electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radiofrequency-based accelerators are limited to relatively low needed to drive radiation sources, and many kilometres to generate particle energies of interest to high

  13. Proceedings of the fifth PTCOG meeting and international workshop on biomedical accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the proceeding and individual papers presented at the Fifth PTCOG meeting and International Workshop on Biomedical Accelerators. The meeting was divided into sessions on the biomedical aspects of therapy delivery, new biomedical accelerators, facilities, and beam localization and status report. Individual papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base.

  14. World-Wide Experience with SRF Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Hutton, Adam Carpenter

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The speaker will review and analyze the performance of existing SRF facilities in the world, addressing issues of usage and availability for different customers (HEP research, material sciences, ADS). Lessons learned should be summarized for proposed future facilities (ILC, Project X, Muon Collider). The first use of superconducting cavities for accelerating beams was at HEPL, Stanford University in the early sixties. Rather quickly, other laboratories followed suit, notably the University of Illinois at Champagne, Urbana and Cornell University. There were two main uses, which still persist today. The first is to provide accelerated particles as an injector or for fixed target experiments. The second is to maintain circulating beams, either for synchrotron light sources or for colliding beam experiments. Given the differing requirements, these two uses led to rather different implementations and, in particular, different average operating gradients. A second difference in the implementation is the speed of the particle being accelerated. Electrons are sufficiently relativistic at low beam energies (> {approx} 5 MeV) that cavities designed for relativistic beams can also function acceptably at low energy. This is not the case for protons or ion accelerators so, until recently, copper cavities were used to cover the first {approx} 100 MeV. Superconducting cavities are now also being proposed to cover this energy range as well using a series of superconducting cavities, each of which is matched to the particle velocity.

  15. CRAD, Radiological Controls- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Radiation Protection Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  16. CRAD, Training- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Training Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  17. CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Conduct of Operations program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  18. CRAD, Fire Protection- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Fire Protection program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  19. CRAD, Emergency Management- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Emergency Management program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  20. CRAD, Quality Assurance- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Quality Assurance Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  1. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  2. CRAD, Maintenance- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Maintenance program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  3. CRAD, Safety Basis- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Safety Basis at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  4. CRAD, Criticality Safety- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  5. Analysis of Capillary Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator Experiments at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Analysis of Capillary Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator Experiments at LBNL K. Nakamura , A. J (LBNL) [5, 6]. In this scheme, intense laser pulses were guided over a distance 10 times the Rayleigh facility at LBNL. The laser was focused onto the entrance of a capillary discharge waveguide by an f/25 off

  6. TURKISH ACCELERATOR COMPLEX & STATUS OF TAC SASE FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TURKISH ACCELERATOR COMPLEX & STATUS OF TAC SASE FEL Dr. Hatice DURAN YILDIZ On the Behalf of the TAC & TAC SASE-FEL Group DESY April 5, 2011 #12;2 Content Aim & Phases of the TAC Project TAC-TARLA Facility TARLA Resonator System TAC SASE-FEL Group Members & Duties TAC SASE-FEL Tentative Parameters

  7. Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing Facility (PCAT) The Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing facility (PCAT) at Oak Ridge National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to address the growing demands for electric power at a time when the amount of electricity that can and provide one way of solving the problems of growing energy demand and transmission bottlenecks. Figure 1 associated with electricity transmission reliability and security in the US. Figures 1 and 2 show a view

  8. Jar mechanism accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, E.A.; Webb, D.D.

    1989-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an accelerator for use with a jar mechanism in a well pipe string to enhance the jarring impact delivered to a stuck object wherein the jar mechanism includes inner and outer members for connection, respectively, between the well pipe string the stuck object. The jar mechanism members are constructed to (1) restrict relative longitudinal movement therebetween to build up energy in the well pipe string and accelerator and then (2) to release the jar mechanism members for unrestrained, free relative longitudinal movement therebetween to engage jarring surfaces on the jar mechanism members for delivering a jarring impact to the stuck object. The accelerator includes: inner and outer telescopically connected members relatively movable longitudinally to accumulate energy in the accelerator; the inner and outer accelerator members each having means for connecting the accelerator in the well pipe string; means associated with the inner and outer members for initially accomodating a predetermined minimum length of unrestrained, free relative longitudinal movement between the inner and outer accelerator members.

  9. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses test campaign GCT4 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT4. GCT4 was planned as a 250-hour test run to continue characterization of the transport reactor using a blend of several Powder River Basin (PRB) coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: Operational Stability--Characterize reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal-feed rate, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids-circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. Secondary objectives included the following: Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. Effects of Reactor Conditions on Synthesis Gas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam/coal ratio, solids-circulation rate, and reactor temperature on CO/CO{sub 2} ratio, synthesis gas Lower Heating Value (LHV), carbon conversion, and cold and hot gas efficiencies. Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) Testing--Provide syngas in support of the DSRP commissioning. Loop Seal Operations--Optimize loop seal operations and investigate increases to previously achieved maximum solids-circulation rate.

  10. CRAD, Facility Safety- Nuclear Facility Safety Basis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Nuclear Facility Safety Basis.

  11. Texas Facilities Commission's Facility Management Strategic Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, J. A.

    , Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 Facility Strategic Plan ?High Performance Building Approach ? Envelope ? Load Reduction ? (Re)Design ? Advanced Tactics ?Building Automation ? Sub-metering ? Controls ?Commissioning ? Assessment ? Continuous ?Facility... International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 Commissioning Assessment ?30 buildings ?CC Opportunities ?O&M Improvements ?Energy/Capital Improvement Opportunities ?Quick Payback Implementation ?Levering DM...

  12. Test facilities for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past several years there has been a tremendous amount of progress on Linear Collider technology world wide. This research has led to the construction of the test facilities described in this report. Some of the facilities will be complete as early as the end of 1996, while others will be finishing up around the end 1997. Even now there are extensive tests ongoing for the enabling technologies for all of the test facilities. At the same time the Linear Collider designs are quite mature now and the SLC is providing the key experience base that can only come from a working collider. All this taken together indicates that the technology and accelerator physics will be ready for a future Linear Collider project to begin in the last half of the 1990s.

  13. The Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Heise

    2014-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota is being transformed into a dedicated laboratory to pursue underground research in rare-process physics, as well as offering research opportunities in other disciplines such as biology, geology and engineering. A key component of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is the Davis Campus, which is in operation at the 4850-foot level (4300 m.w.e) and currently hosts three projects: the LUX dark matter experiment, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment and the CUBED low-background counter. Plans for possible future experiments at SURF are well underway and include long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, future dark matter experiments as well as nuclear astrophysics accelerators. Facility upgrades to accommodate some of these future projects have already started. SURF is a dedicated facility with significant expansion capability.

  14. The Sanford underground research facility at Homestake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heise, J. [Sanford Underground Research Facility, 630 East Summit Street, Lead, SD 57754 (United States)

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota is being transformed into a dedicated laboratory to pursue underground research in rare-process physics, as well as offering research opportunities in other disciplines such as biology, geology and engineering. A key component of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is the Davis Campus, which is in operation at the 4850-foot level (4300 m.w.e) and currently hosts three projects: the LUX dark matter experiment, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment and the CUBED low-background counter. Plans for possible future experiments at SURF are well underway and include long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, future dark matter experiments as well as nuclear astrophysics accelerators. Facility upgrades to accommodate some of these future projects have already started. SURF is a dedicated facility with significant expansion capability.

  15. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  16. Accelerator on a Chip

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    England, Joel

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  17. Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    There are more than 30,000 particle accelerators in operation around the world. At Fermilab, scientists are collaborating with other laboratories and industry to optimize the manufacturing processes for a new type of powerful accelerator that uses superconducting niobium cavities. Experimenting with unique polishing materials, a Fermilab team has now developed an efficient and environmentally friendly way of creating cavities that can propel particles with more than 30 million volts per meter.

  18. APT accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, J.D.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed accelerator production of tritium (APT) project requires an accelerator providing a cw proton beam of 100 mA at 1300 MeV. Since most of the technical risk of a high-current cw (continuous-wave, 100% DF) accelerator resides in the low-energy section, Los Alamos is building a 20 MeV duplicate of the accelerator front end to confirm design codes, beam performance, and demonstrate operaional reliability. We report on design details of this low-energy demonstration accelerator (LEDA) and discuss the integrated design of the full accelerator for the APT plant. LEDA`s proton injector is under test and has produced more than 130 mA at 75 keV. Fabrication is proceeding on a 6.7-KeV, 8-m long RFQ, and detailed design is underway on coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) structures. Detailed design and technology experiments are underway on medium-beta superconducting cavities to assess feasibility of replacing the conventional (room-temperature copper) high-energy linac with a linac made of niobium superconducting RF cavities.

  19. Technology Transitions Facilities Database

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The types of R&D facilities at the DOE Laboratories available to the public typically fall into three broad classes depending on the mode of access: Designated User Facilities, Shared R&D...

  20. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  1. Physically Based Rendering Intersection Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazhdan, Michael

    Physically Based Rendering (600.657) Intersection Acceleration #12;Intersection Testing Accelerated partitions: Group objects into clusters Cluster volumes may overlap #12;Uniform (Voxel) Grid Acceleration Acceleration · Trace rays through grid cells ­ Fast ­ Incremental A B C D E F Only check primitives

  2. Design Studies and Commissioning Plans for PARS Experimental Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mete, O; Xia, G; Dover, M; Wigram, M; Wright, J; Zhang, J; Smith, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PARS (Plasma Acceleration Research Station) is an electron beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration test stand proposed for VELA/CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory. In order to optimise various operational configurations, 2D numerical studies were performed by using VSIM for a range of parameters such as bunch length, radius, plasma density and positioning of the bunches with respect to each other for the two-beam acceleration scheme. In this paper, some of these numerical studies and considered measurement methods are presented.

  3. Fermilab | Science | Particle Accelerators | Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A ThisFermilab's Accelerator Complex photo

  4. Fermilab | Science | Particle Accelerators | Leading Accelerator Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A ThisFermilab's Accelerator ComplexLeading

  5. Microelectromechanical acceleration-sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Robb M. (Albuquerque, NM); Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM); Polosky, Marc A. (Albuquerque, NM); Hoke, Darren A. (Albuquerque, NM); Vernon, George E. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An acceleration-sensing apparatus is disclosed which includes a moveable shuttle (i.e. a suspended mass) and a latch for capturing and holding the shuttle when an acceleration event is sensed above a predetermined threshold level. The acceleration-sensing apparatus provides a switch closure upon sensing the acceleration event and remains latched in place thereafter. Examples of the acceleration-sensing apparatus are provided which are responsive to an acceleration component in a single direction (i.e. a single-sided device) or to two oppositely-directed acceleration components (i.e. a dual-sided device). A two-stage acceleration-sensing apparatus is also disclosed which can sense two acceleration events separated in time. The acceleration-sensing apparatus of the present invention has applications, for example, in an automotive airbag deployment system.

  6. Essay: Robert H. Siemann As Leader of the Advanced Accelerator Research Department

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, Eric R.; Hogan, Mark J.; /SLAC

    2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Robert H. Siemann originally conceived of the Advanced Accelerator Research Department (AARD) as an academic, experimental group dedicated to probing the technical limitations of accelerators while providing excellent educational opportunities for young scientists. The early years of the Accelerator Research Department B, as it was then known, were dedicated to a wealth of mostly student-led experiments to examine the promise of advanced accelerator techniques. High-gradient techniques including millimeter-wave rf acceleration, beam-driven plasma acceleration, and direct laser acceleration were pursued, including tests of materials under rf pulsed heating and short-pulse laser radiation, to establish the ultimate limitations on gradient. As the department and program grew, so did the motivation to found an accelerator research center that brought experimentalists together in a test facility environment to conduct a broad range of experiments. The Final Focus Test Beam and later the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator provided unique experimental facilities for AARD staff and collaborators to carry out advanced accelerator experiments. Throughout the evolution of this dynamic program, Bob maintained a department atmosphere and culture more reminiscent of a university research group than a national laboratory department. His exceptional ability to balance multiple roles as scientist, professor, and administrator enabled the creation and preservation of an environment that fostered technical innovation and scholarship.

  7. Perturbations for transient acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, Cristofher Zuñiga; Zimdahl, Winfried [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Departamento de Física, Av. Fernando Ferrari, 514, Campus de Goiabeiras, CEP 29075-910, Vitória, Espírito Santo (Brazil); Hipólito-Ricaldi, Wiliam S., E-mail: win_unac@hotmail.com, E-mail: hipolito@ceunes.ufes.br, E-mail: winfried.zimdahl@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Grupo de Física Teórica, Rodovia BR 101 Norte, km 60, Campus de São Mateus, CEP 29932-540, São Mateus, Espírito Santo (Brazil)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the standard ?CDM model, the accelerated expansion of the Universe will go on forever. Motivated by recent observational results, we explore the possibility of a finite phase of acceleration which asymptotically approaches another period of decelerated expansion. Extending an earlier study on a corresponding homogeneous and isotropic dynamics, in which interactions between dark matter and dark energy are crucial, the present paper also investigates the dynamics of the matter perturbations both on the Newtonian and General Relativistic (GR) levels and quantifies the potential relevance of perturbations of the dark-energy component. In the background, the model is tested against the Supernova type Ia (SNIa) data of the Constitution set and on the perturbative level against growth rate data, among them those of the WiggleZ survey, and the data of the 2dFGRS project. Our results indicate that a transient phase of accelerated expansion is not excluded by current observations.

  8. PALS/07/001 Science and Technology Facilities Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    Executive Group to discuss the implications of the spending review Accelerator Science Advisory Board created within STFC, headed by Professor Mike Dunne, to coordinate the operation and development of its light source facilities and associated science. A research institute for photon science is also proposed

  9. The BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA): A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leemans, W.P.; Duarte, R.; Esarey, E.; Fournier, S.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Lockhart, D.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, C.; Vay, J.-L.; Zimmermann, S.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview is presented of the design of a 10 GeV laser plasma accelerator (LPA) that will be driven by a PW-class laser system and of the BELLA Project, which has as its primary goal to build and install the required Ti:sapphire laser system for the acceleration experiments. The basic design of the 10 GeV stage aims at operation in the quasi-linear regime, where the laser excited wakes are largely sinusoidal and offer the possibility of accelerating both electrons and positrons. Simulations show that a 10 GeV electron beam can be generated in a meter scale plasma channel guided LPA operating at a density of about 1017 cm-3 and powered by laser pulses containing 30-40 J of energy in a 50- 200 fs duration pulse, focused to a spotsize of 50-100 micron. The lay-out of the facility and laser system will be presented as well as the progress on building the facility.

  10. Control system for the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatum, B.A.; Juras, R.C.; Meigs, M.J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new accelerator control system is being implemented as part of the development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), a first generation radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility. The pre- existing accelerator control systems are based on 1970`s technology and addition or alteration of controls is cumbersome and costly. A new, unified control system for the cyclotron and tandem accelerators, the RIB injector, ion sources, and accelerator beam lines is based on a commercial product from Vista Control Systems, Inc. Several other accelerator facilities, as well as numerous industrial sites, are now using this system. The control system is distributed over a number of computers which communicate over Ethernet and is easily extensible. Presently, implementation at the HRIBF is based on VAX/VMS, VAX/ELN, VME, and Allen-Bradley PLC5 programmable logic controller architectures. Expansion to include UNIX platforms and CAMAC hardware support is planned. Operator interface is via X- terminals. The system has proven to be quite powerful, yet is has been easy to implement with a small staff. A Vista users group has resulted in shared software to implement specific controls. This paper details present system features and future implementations at the HRIBF.

  11. Accelerator technology program. Progress report, January-June 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A. (comps.)

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Accelerator Technology Division during the first 6 months of calendar 1981. We discuss the Division's major projects, which reflect a variety of applications and sponsors. The varied technologies concerned with the Proton Storage ring are concerned with the Proton Storage Ring are continuing and are discussed in detail. For the racetrack microtron (RTM) project, the major effort has been the design and construction of the demonstration RTM. Our development of the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator continues to stimulate interest for many possible applications. Frequent contacts from other laboratories have revealed a wide acceptance of the RFQ principle in solving low-velocity acceleration problems. In recent work on heavy ion fusion we have developed ideas for funneling beams from RFQ linacs; the funneling process is explained. To test as many aspects as possible of a fully integrated low-energy portion of a Pion generator for Medical Irradiation (PIGMI) Accelerator, a prototype accelerator was designed to take advantage of several pieces of existing accelerator hardware. The important principles to be tested in this prototype accelerator are detailed. Our prototype gyrocon has been extensively tested and modified; we discuss results from our investigations. Our work with the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility is reviewed in this report.

  12. Small Power Production Facilities (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purpose of these regulations, a small power production facility is defined as a facility that:...

  13. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  14. Status of the TESLA Test Facility Linac H. Weise, for the TESLA Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Status of the TESLA Test Facility Linac H. Weise, for the TESLA Collaboration Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY D-22603 Hamburg, Germany Abstract The TTF linac, a major effort of the TESLA Test Facility, is now GeV collider is the usage of superconducting (s.c.) accelerating structures. The international TESLA

  15. PERFORMANCE STATUS OF THE RF-GUN BASED INJECTOR OF THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PERFORMANCE STATUS OF THE RF-GUN BASED INJECTOR OF THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC S. Schreiber£ for the TESLA Collaboration, DESY, 22603 Hamburg, Germany Abstract The TESLA Test Facility Linac (TTFL) at DESY uses two modules with 8 TESLA superconducting accelerat- ing structures each to accelerate an electron

  16. FIRST EXPERIMENTS WITH THE RF GUN BASED INJECTOR FOR THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIRST EXPERIMENTS WITH THE RF GUN BASED INJECTOR FOR THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC S. Schreiber for the TESLA Collaboration, DESY, 22603 Hamburg, Germany Abstract During 1997 and 1998 a first accelerator module was tested successfully at the TESLA Test Facility Linac (TTFL) at DESY. Eight superconducting

  17. Status of CHESS facility and research programs: 2010 Ernest Fontes n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    intensity X-ray beams produced at 5.3 GeV and 250 mA. The facility consists of a mix of dedicated, as well as an accelerator R&D program aimed at upgrading the existing facility to realize the first high since 2003. Continuing from the past, CHESS utilizes radiation from both electrons and positrons

  18. Tested by Fire - How two recent Wildfires affected Accelerator Operations at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickermann, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a little more than a decade two large wild fires threatened Los Alamos and impacted accelerator operations at LANL. In 2000 the Cerro Grande Fire destroyed hundreds of homes, as well as structures and equipment at the DARHT facility. The DARHT accelerators were safe in a fire-proof building. In 2011 the Las Conchas Fire burned about 630 square kilometers (250 square miles) and came dangerously close to Los Alamos/LANL. LANSCE accelerator operations Lessons Learned during Las Conchas fire: (1) Develop a plan to efficiently shut down the accelerator on short notice; (2) Establish clear lines of communication in emergency situations; and (3) Plan recovery and keep squirrels out.

  19. Settlement in an Amereican landscape : a place of work amidst a particle accelerator's transformation of the Texas prarie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falliers, Christopher B. (Christopher Basil)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis considers the design of the research facility accompanying the Superconducting Super Collider, a large particle accelerator planned for central Texas. It will focus on this Pl'Qject as a form of human settlement ...

  20. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations for the 600 Area facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document determines the need for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans for Westinghouse Hanford Company's 600 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (WHC 1991). Five major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 600 Area were evaluated: the Purge Water Storage Facility, 212-N, -P, and -R Facilities, the 616 Facility, and the 213-J K Storage Vaults. Of the five major facilities evaluated in the 600 Area, none will require preparation of a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan.

  1. Control of Laser Plasma Based Accelerators up to 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Kei

    2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation documents the development of a broadband electron spectrometer (ESM) for GeV class Laser Wakefield Accelerators (LWFA), the production of high quality GeV electron beams (e-beams) for the first time in a LWFA by using a capillary discharge guide (CDG), and a statistical analysis of CDG-LWFAs. An ESM specialized for CDG-LWFAs with an unprecedented wide momentum acceptance, from 0.01 to 1.1 GeV in a single shot, has been developed. Simultaneous measurement of e-beam spectra and output laser properties as well as a large angular acceptance (> {+-} 10 mrad) were realized by employing a slitless scheme. A scintillating screen (LANEX Fast back, LANEX-FB)--camera system allowed faster than 1 Hz operation and evaluation of the spatial properties of e-beams. The design provided sufficient resolution for the whole range of the ESM (below 5% for beams with 2 mrad divergence). The calibration between light yield from LANEX-FB and total charge, and a study on the electron energy dependence (0.071 to 1.23 GeV) of LANEX-FB were performed at the Advanced light source (ALS), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Using this calibration data, the developed ESM provided a charge measurement as well. The production of high quality electron beams up to 1 GeV from a centimeter-scale accelerator was demonstrated. The experiment used a 310 {micro}m diameter gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide that channeled relativistically-intense laser pulses (42 TW, 4.5 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) over 3.3 centimeters of sufficiently low density ({approx_equal} 4.3 x 10{sup 18}/cm{sup 3}) plasma. Also demonstrated was stable self-injection and acceleration at a beam energy of {approx_equal} 0.5 GeV by using a 225 {micro}m diameter capillary. Relativistically-intense laser pulses (12 TW, 1.3 x 10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2}) were guided over 3.3 centimeters of low density ({approx_equal} 3.5 x 10{sup 18}/cm{sup 3}) plasma in this experiment. A statistical analysis of the CDG-LWFAs performance was carried out. By taking advantage of the high repetition rate experimental system, several thousands of shots were taken in a broad range of the laser and plasma parameters. An analysis program was developed to sort and select the data by specified parameters, and then to evaluate performance statistically. The analysis suggested that the generation of GeV-level beams comes from a highly unstable and regime. By having the plasma density slightly above the threshold density for self injection, (1) the longest dephasing length possible was provided, which led to the generation of high energy e-beams, and (2) the number of electrons injected into the wakefield was kept small, which led to the generation of high quality (low energy spread) e-beams by minimizing the beam loading effect on the wake. The analysis of the stable half-GeV beam regime showed the requirements for stable self injection and acceleration. A small change of discharge delay t{sub dsc}, and input energy E{sub in}, significantly affected performance. The statistical analysis provided information for future optimization, and suggested possible schemes for improvement of the stability and higher quality beam generation. A CDG-LWFA is envisioned as a construction block for the next generation accelerator, enabling significant cost and size reductions.

  2. Accelerating Ab Initio Nuclear Physics Calculations with GPUs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugh Potter; Dossay Oryspayev; Pieter Maris; Masha Sosonkina; James Vary; Sven Binder; Angelo Calci; Joachim Langhammer; Robert Roth; Ümit Çatalyürek; Erik Saule

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes some applications of GPU acceleration in ab initio nuclear structure calculations. Specifically, we discuss GPU acceleration of the software package MFDn, a parallel nuclear structure eigensolver. We modify the matrix construction stage to run partly on the GPU. On the Titan supercomputer at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility, this produces a speedup of approximately 2.2x - 2.7x for the matrix construction stage and 1.2x - 1.4x for the entire run.

  3. A STUDY OF POLARIZED PROTON ACCELERATION IN J-PARC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUCCIO, A.U.; BAI, M.; ROSER, T.

    2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the feasibility of polarized proton acceleration in rhe J-PARC accelerator facility, consisting of a 400 MeV linac, a 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) and a 50 GeV synchrotron (MR). We show how the polarization of the beam can be preserved using an rf dipole in the RCS and two superconductive partial helical Siberian snakes in the MR. The lattice of the MR will be modified with the addition of quadrupoles to compensate for the focusing properties of the snakes.

  4. Accelerator & Fusion Research Division: 1993 Summary of activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chew, J.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division (AFRD) is not only one of the largest scientific divisions at LBL, but also the one of the most diverse. Major efforts include: (1) investigations in both inertial and magnetic fusion energy; (2) operation of the Advanced Light Source, a state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation facility; (3) exploratory investigations of novel radiation sources and colliders; (4) research and development in superconducting magnets for accelerators and other scientific and industrial applications; and (5) ion beam technology development for nuclear physics and for industrial and biomedical applications. Each of these topics is discussed in detail in this book.

  5. Testing a combined vibration and acceleration environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jepsen, Richard Alan; Romero, Edward F.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has previously tested a capability to impose a 7.5 g-rms (30 g peak) radial vibration load up to 2 kHz on a 25 lb object with superimposed 50 g acceleration at its centrifuge facility. This was accomplished by attaching a 3,000 lb Unholtz-Dickie mechanical shaker at the end of the centrifuge arm to create a 'Vibrafuge'. However, the combination of non-radial vibration directions, and linear accelerations higher than 50g's are currently not possible because of the load capabilities of the shaker and the stresses on the internal shaker components due to the combined centrifuge acceleration. Therefore, a new technique using amplified piezo-electric actuators has been developed to surpass the limitations of the mechanical shaker system. They are lightweight, modular and would overcome several limitations presented by the current shaker. They are 'scalable', that is, adding more piezo-electric units in parallel or in series can support larger-weight test articles or displacement/frequency regimes. In addition, the units could be mounted on the centrifuge arm in various configurations to provide a variety of input directions. The design along with test results will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the new piezo-electric Vibrafuge.

  6. R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muon Accelerator Program; Zisman, Michael S.; Geer, Stephen

    2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons--the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently indicated, is essential for the long-term health of high-energy physics.

  7. PULSED-FOCUSING RECIRCULATING LINACS FOR MUON ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland PAUL

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the muon has a short lifetime, fast acceleration is essential for high-energy applications such as muon colliders, Higgs factories, or neutrino factories. The best one can do is to make a linear accelerator with the highest possible accelerating gradient to make the accelerating time as short as possible. However, the cost of such a single linear accelerator is prohibitively large due to expensive power sources, cavities, tunnels, and related infrastructure. As was demonstrated in the Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), an elegant solution to reduce cost is to use magnetic return arcs to recirculate the beam through the accelerating RF cavities many times, where they gain energy on each pass. In such a Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA), the magnetic focusing strength diminishes as the beam energy increases in a conventional linac that has constant strength quadrupoles. After some number of passes the focusing strength is insufficient to keep the beam from going unstable and being lost. In this project, the use of fast pulsed quadrupoles in the linac sections was considered for stronger focusing as a function of time to allow more successive passes of a muon beam in a recirculating linear accelerator. In one simulation, it was shown that the number of passes could be increased from 8 to 12 using pulsed magnet designs that have been developed and tested. This could reduce the cost of linac sections of a muon RLA by 8/12, where more improvement is still possible. The expense of a greater number of passes and corresponding number of return arcs was also addressed in this project by exploring the use of ramped or FFAG-style magnets in the return arcs. A better solution, invented in this project, is to use combined-function dipole-quadrupole magnets to simultaneously transport two beams of different energies through one magnet string to reduce costs of return arcs by almost a factor of two. A patent application was filed for this invention and a detailed report published in Physical Review Special Topics. A scaled model using an electron beam was developed and proposed to test the concept of a dog bone RLA with combined-function return arcs. The efforts supported by this grant were reported in a series of contributions to particle accelerator conferences that are reproduced in the appendices and summarized in the body of this report.

  8. Computational accelerator science needs towards laser-plasma accelerators for future colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, C G R; Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser plasma accelerators have the potential to reduce the size of future linacs for high energy physics by more than an order of magnitude, due to their high gradient. Research is in progress at current facilities, including the BELLA PetaWatt laser at LBNL, towards high quality 10 GeV beams and staging of multiple modules, as well as control of injection and beam quality. The path towards high-energy physics applications will likely involve hundreds of such stages, with beam transport, conditioning and focusing. Current research focuses on addressing physics and R&D challenges required for a detailed conceptual design of a future collider. Here, the tools used to model these accelerators and their resource requirements are summarized, both for current work and to support R&D addressing issues related to collider concepts.

  9. ARM Mobile Facilities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Orr, Brad; Coulter, Rich

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This video provides an overview of the ARM Mobile Facilities, two portable climate laboratories that can deploy anywhere in the world for campaigns of at least six months.

  10. DOE Designated Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactor** Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Joint Genome Institute - Production Genomics Facility (PGF)** (joint with LLNL, LANL, ORNL and PNNL) Advanced Light Source (ALS)...

  11. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Carbon Fiber Technology Facility is relevant in proving the scale- up of low-cost carbon fiber precursor materials and advanced manufacturing technologies * Significant...

  12. Science and Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    IBRF Project Lessons Learned Report Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Lessons Learned - Stage I Acquisition through Stage II Construction Completion August 2011 This...

  13. Programs & User Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Facility Climate, Ocean, and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Terrestrial Ecosystem and Climate Dynamics Fusion Energy Sciences Magnetic Fusion Experiments Plasma Surface...

  14. Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated facilities for energy research Argonne National Laboratory is home to some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated...

  15. Existing Facilities Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The NYSERDA Existing Facilities program merges the former Peak Load Reduction and Enhanced Commercial and Industrial Performance programs. The new program offers a broad array of different...

  16. Facility Survey & Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    InstituteSandia Photovoltaic Systems Symposium On April 15, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Facilities, Grid Integration, News,...

  18. TOPICS IN THE PHYSICS OF PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their whole lives to accelerator physics. As high energysome appreciation of accelerator physics. We cannot, nor dolectures on basic accelerator physics; then you will hear

  19. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  20. Progress on laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, P.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several laser plasma accelerator schemes are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA). Theory indicates that a very high acceleration gradient, of order 1 GeV/m, can exist in the plasma wave driven by the beating lasers. Experimental results obtained on the PBWA experiment at UCLA confirms this. Parameters related to the PBWA as an accelerator system are derived, among them issues concerning the efficiency and the laser power and energy requirements are discussed.

  1. Particle Acceleration at Relativistic Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yves A. Gallant

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the current status of Fermi acceleration theory at relativistic shocks. I first discuss the relativistic shock jump conditions, then describe the non-relativistic Fermi mechanism and the differences introduced by relativistic flows. I present numerical calculations of the accelerated particle spectrum, and examine the maximum energy attainable by this process. I briefly consider the minimum energy for Fermi acceleration, and a possible electron pre-acceleration mechanism.

  2. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  3. Head erosion with emittance growth in PWFA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S. Z.; Adli, E.; England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Walz, D. R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W.; Vafaei, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States) and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States) and University of Oslo, Oslo, N-0316 (Norway) and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Head erosion is one of the limiting factors in plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). We present a study of head erosion with emittance growth in field-ionized plasma from the PWFA experiments performed at the FACET user facility at SLAC. At FACET, a 20.3 GeV bunch with 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons is optimized in beam transverse size and combined with a high density lithium plasma for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. A target foil is inserted upstream of the plasma source to increase the bunch emittance through multiple scattering. Its effect on beamplasma interaction is observed with an energy spectrometer after a vertical bend magnet. Results from the first experiments show that increasing the emittance has suppressed vapor field-ionization and plasma wakefields excitation. Plans for the future are presented.

  4. Parametric Study of Emerging High Power Accelerator Applications Using Accelerator Systems Model (ASM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berwald, D H; Myers, T J; Paulson, C C; Peacock, M A; Piaszczyk, C M; Rathke, J W; Piechowiak, E M

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametric Study of Emerging High Power Accelerator Applications Using Accelerator Systems Model (ASM)

  5. Radiation from Accelerated Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohab Abou-Zeid; Miguel S. Costa

    2000-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation emitted by accelerated fundamental strings and D-branes is studied within the linear approximation to the supergravity limit of string theory. We show that scalar, gauge field and gravitational radiation is generically emitted by such branes. In the case where an external scalar field accelerates the branes, we derive a Larmor-type formula for the emitted scalar radiation and study the angular distribution of the outgoing energy flux. The classical radii of the branes are calculated by means of the corresponding Thompson scattering cross sections. Within the linear approximation, the interaction of the external scalar field with the velocity fields of the branes gives a contribution to the observed gauge field and gravitational radiation.

  6. Adaptive control for accelerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eaton, Lawrie E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jachim, Stephen P. (Los Alamos, NM); Natter, Eckard F. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An adaptive feedforward control loop is provided to stabilize accelerator beam loading of the radio frequency field in an accelerator cavity during successive pulses of the beam into the cavity. A digital signal processor enables an adaptive algorithm to generate a feedforward error correcting signal functionally determined by the feedback error obtained by a beam pulse loading the cavity after the previous correcting signal was applied to the cavity. Each cavity feedforward correcting signal is successively stored in the digital processor and modified by the feedback error resulting from its application to generate the next feedforward error correcting signal. A feedforward error correcting signal is generated by the digital processor in advance of the beam pulse to enable a composite correcting signal and the beam pulse to arrive concurrently at the cavity.

  7. Accelerator research studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,'' (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,'' (Co-P.I.'s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,'' (Co-P.I.'s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  8. MINERAL FACILITIES MAPPING PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    MINERAL FACILITIES MAPPING PROJECT Yadira Soto-Viruet Supervisor: David Menzie, Yolanda Fong-Sam Minerals Information Team (MIT) USGS Summer Internship 2009 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Minerals Information Team (MIT): Annually reports on the minerals facilities of more than 180 countries

  9. A Materials Facilities Initiative -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Materials Facilities Initiative - FMITS & MPEX D.L. Hillis and ORNL Team Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division July 10, 2014 #12;2 Materials Facilities Initiative JET ITER FNSF Fusion Reactor Challenges for materials: fluxes and fluence, temperatures 50 x divertor ion fluxes up to 100 x neutron

  10. Geophysical InversionFacility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    UBC Geophysical InversionFacility Modelling and Inversion of EMI data collected over magnetic soils of EMI data acquired at sites with magnetic soils · Geophysical Proveouts · Geonics EM63 Data · First model parameters: · Location · Orientation · Polarizabilities 4 #12;UBC Geophysical Inversion Facility

  11. Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2010 ANNUAL REPORT S C I E N C E P O W E R E D B Y S U P E R C O M P U T I N G ANL-11/15 The Argonne Leadership Computing States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees

  12. Emergency Facilities and Equipment

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume clarifies requirements of DOE O 151.1 to ensure that emergency facilities and equipment are considered as part of emergency management program and that activities conducted at these emergency facilities are fully integrated. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  13. Nanotechnology User Facility for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A National Nanotechnology User Facility for Industry Academia Government #12;The National Institute of Commerce's nanotechnology user facility. The CNST enables innovation by providing rapid access to the tools new measurement and fabrication methods in response to national nanotechnology needs. www

  14. Linear induction accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buttram, M.T.; Ginn, J.W.

    1988-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities. 4 figs.

  15. Accelerating QDP++ using GPUs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Winter

    2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) are getting increasingly important as target architectures in scientific High Performance Computing (HPC). NVIDIA established CUDA as a parallel computing architecture controlling and making use of the compute power of GPUs. CUDA provides sufficient support for C++ language elements to enable the Expression Template (ET) technique in the device memory domain. QDP++ is a C++ vector class library suited for quantum field theory which provides vector data types and expressions and forms the basis of the lattice QCD software suite Chroma. In this work accelerating QDP++ expression evaluation to a GPU was successfully implemented leveraging the ET technique and using Just-In-Time (JIT) compilation. The Portable Expression Template Engine (PETE) and the C API for CUDA kernel arguments were used to build the bridge between host and device memory domains. This provides the possibility to accelerate Chroma routines to a GPU which are typically not subject to special optimisation. As an application example a smearing routine was accelerated to execute on a GPU. A significant speed-up compared to normal CPU execution could be measured.

  16. CESR Test Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, David L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) was reconfigured in 2008 as a test accelerator to investigate the physics of ultra-low emittance damping rings. During the approximately 40 days/year available for dedicated operation as a test accelerator, specialized instrumentation is used to measure growth and mitigation of the electron cloud, emittance growth due to electron cloud, intra-beam scattering, and ions, and single and multi-bunch instabilities generated by collective effects. The flexibility of the CESR guide field optics and the integration of accelerator modeling codes with the control system have made possible an extraordinary range of experiments. Findings at CesrTA with respect to electron cloud effects, emittance tuning techniques, and beam instrumentation for measuring electron cloud, beam sizes, and beam positions are the basis for much of the design of the ILC damping rings as documented in the ILC-Technical Design Report. The program has allowed the Cornell group to cultivate the kind of talen...

  17. An Injector Test Facility for the LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, E., (ed.); /SLAC

    2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    SLAC is in the privileged position of being the site for the world's first 4th generation light source as well as having a premier accelerator research staff and facilities. Operation of the world's first x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facility will require innovations in electron injectors to provide electron beams of unprecedented quality. Upgrades to provide ever shorter wavelength x-ray beams of increasing intensity will require significant advances in the state-of-the-art. The BESAC 20-Year Facilities Roadmap identifies the electron gun as ''the critical enabling technology to advance linac-based light sources'' and recognizes that the sources for next-generation light sources are ''the highest-leveraged technology'', and that ''BES should strongly support and coordinate research and development in this unique and critical technology''.[1] This white paper presents an R&D plan and a description of a facility for developing the knowledge and technology required to successfully achieve these upgrades, and to coordinate efforts on short-pulse source development for linac-based light sources.

  18. Massachusetts Large Blade Test Facility Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahul Yarala; Rob Priore

    2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Objective: The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (CEC) will design, construct, and ultimately have responsibility for the operation of the Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility, which is an advanced blade testing facility capable of testing wind turbine blades up to at least 90 meters in length on three test stands. Background: Wind turbine blade testing is required to meet international design standards, and is a critical factor in maintaining high levels of reliability and mitigating the technical and financial risk of deploying massproduced wind turbine models. Testing is also needed to identify specific blade design issues that may contribute to reduced wind turbine reliability and performance. Testing is also required to optimize aerodynamics, structural performance, encourage new technologies and materials development making wind even more competitive. The objective of this project is to accelerate the design and construction of a large wind blade testing facility capable of testing blades with minimum queue times at a reasonable cost. This testing facility will encourage and provide the opportunity for the U.S wind industry to conduct more rigorous testing of blades to improve wind turbine reliability.

  19. The Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaret Heise

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota has been transformed into a dedicated facility to pursue underground research in rare-process physics, as well as offering research opportunities in other disciplines such as biology, geology and engineering. A key component of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is the Davis Campus, which is in operation at the 4850-foot level (4300 m.w.e.) and currently hosts two main physics projects: the LUX dark matter experiment and the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment. In addition, two low-background counters currently operate at the Davis Campus in support of current and future experiments. Expansion of the underground laboratory space is underway at the 4850L Ross Campus in order to maintain and enhance low-background assay capabilities as well as to host a unique nuclear astrophysics accelerator facility. Plans to accommodate other future experiments at SURF are also underway and include the next generation of direct-search dark matter experiments and the Fermilab-led international long-baseline neutrino program. Planning to understand the infrastructure developments necessary to accommodate these future projects is well advanced and in some cases have already started. SURF is a dedicated research facility with significant expansion capability.

  20. Supercomputing | Facilities | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GB of memory. Each of the 18,688 Titan compute nodes is paired with an NVIDIA Kepler graphics processing unit (GPU) designed to accelerate calculations. With a peak performance...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and industrial gas giant Linde LLC have signed an umbrella cooperative R&D agreement (CRADA) that is expected to accelerate the development of low-carbon energy and industrial...

  2. Ionizing wave via high-power HF acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishin, Evgeny

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent ionospheric modification experiments with the 3.6 MW transmitter at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska led to discovery of artificial ionization descending from the nominal interaction altitude in the background F-region ionosphere by ~60 km. This paper presents a physical model of an ionizing wavefront created by suprathermal electrons accelerated by the HF-excited plasma turbulence.

  3. Upgrade of the MIT Linear Electrostatic Ion Accelerator (LEIA) for nuclear diagnostics development for Omega, Z and the NIF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute of Radiological Sciences Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 02A332 (2012) Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 02B107 (2012) A 2 MV Van de, Z, and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Sig- nificant improvements to the system in recent

  4. Muon Acceleration - RLA and FFAG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex Bogacz

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various acceleration schemes for muons are presented. The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and 'beam shaping' can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a non-scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. The RLAs offer very efficient usage of high gradient superconducting RF and ability to adjust path-length after each linac pass through individual return arcs with uniformly periodic FODO optics suitable for chromatic compensation of emittance dilution with sextupoles. However, they require spreaders/recombiners switchyards at both linac ends and significant total length of the arcs. The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring combines compactness with very large chromatic acceptance (twice the injection energy) and it allows for large number of passes through the RF (at least eight, possibly as high as 15).

  5. Beam dynamics in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Epifanio O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragon, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Rita [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cook, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dalmas, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esquibel, Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gallegos, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garnett, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harrison, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Jeffrey B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jacquez, Edward B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Cuistian, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Nicholas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nath, Subrato [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nielsen, Kurt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prichard, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rose, Chris R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Manolito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schauer, Martin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seitz, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulze, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bender, Howard A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Broste, William B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frayer, Daniel K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Douglas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tom, C Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trainham, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scarpetti, Raymond [LLNL; Genoni, Thomas [VOSS; Hughes, Thomas [VOSS; Toma, Carsten [VOSS

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiography of Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6 microseconds. It accomplishes this by slicing four micro-pulses out of a long 1.8-kA, 16.5-MeV electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The long beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for radiography. High frequency motion, such as from beam breakup instability, would blur the individual spots. Low frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed power variation, would produce spot to spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it.

  6. STAR Facility Tritium Accountancy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. J. Pawelko; J. P. Sharpe; B. J. Denny

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed.

  7. STAR facility tritium accountancy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawelko, R. J.; Sharpe, J. P.; Denny, B. J. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5 g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed. (authors)

  8. DOE/NNSA Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NNSA Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor Award Date End Date OptionsAward Term Ultimate Potential Expiration Date Contract FY Competed Parent Companies LLC...

  9. Cryogenic supply for accelerators and experiments at FAIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauschke, M.; Xiang, Y.; Schroeder, C. H.; Streicher, B.; Kollmus, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1,64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In the coming years the new international accelerator facility FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), one of the largest research projects worldwide, will be built at GSI. In the final construction FAIR consists of synchrotrons and storage rings with up to 1,100 meters in circumference, two linear accelerators and about 3.5 kilometers beam transfer lines. The existing GSI accelerators serve as pre-accelerators. Partly the new machines will consist of superconducting magnets and therefore require a reliable supply with liquid helium. As the requirements for the magnets is depending on the machine and have a high variety, the cooling system is different for each machine; two phase cooling, forced flow cooling and bath cooling respectively. In addition the cold mass of the individual magnets varies between less than 1t up to 80t and some magnets will cause a dynamic heat load due to ramping that is higher than the static loads. The full cryogenic system will be operated above atmospheric pressure. The refrigeration and liquefaction power will be provided by two main cryogenic plants of 8 and 25 kW at 4K and two smaller plants next to the experiments.

  10. Accelerator waste - A new challenge for radio-analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumann, Dorothea; Neuhausen, Joer; Wohlmuther, Michaelg [Paul Scherrer Institute 5232, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) at Villigen (Switzerland) operates the most powerful accelerator facility in Europe. Due to the increasing quantities of accelerator waste with almost unknown radionuclide inventory, the development of new radio-analytical methods is an urgent task. Besides the characterization by {gamma}-measurements and dose rate determinations, also the investigation of long-lived radionuclides, being probably essential for a final disposal, is required from Swiss authorities. Chemical separation is necessary for the determination of the majority of these isotopes. As a representative example for such studies, the analytics of a beam dump assembly is introduced. Samples were taken from the target E beam dump station from the 590 MeV proton accelerator facility. The content of several radionuclides with half-lives between 2 and 10{sup 7} years was determined by {gamma}-spectrometry and, after chemical separation, by Liquid Scintillation Counting (LSC) as well as Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The results are compared with theoretical predictions. Long-term object of these studies is the elaboration of nuclide vectors, which allow the estimation of nuclide inventories by simple calculations. (authors)

  11. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses test campaign GCT3 of the Halliburton KBR transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT3. GCT3 was planned as a 250-hour test run to commission the loop seal and continue the characterization of the limits of operational parameter variations using a blend of several Powder River Basin coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: (1) Loop Seal Commissioning--Evaluate the operational stability of the loop seal with sand and limestone as a bed material at different solids circulation rates and establish a maximum solids circulation rate through the loop seal with the inert bed. (2) Loop Seal Operations--Evaluate the loop seal operational stability during coal feed operations and establish maximum solids circulation rate. Secondary objectives included the continuation of reactor characterization, including: (1) Operational Stability--Characterize the reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal feed, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. (2) Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. (3) Effects of Reactor Conditions on Syngas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam/coal ratio, solids circulation rate, and reactor temperature on CO/CO{sub 2} ratio, H{sub 2}/converted carbon ratio, gasification rates, carbon conversion, and cold and hot gas efficiencies. Test run GCT3 was started on December 1, 2000, with the startup of the thermal oxidizer fan, and was completed on February 1, 2001. This test was conducted in two parts; the loop seal was commissioned during the first part of this test run from December 1 through 15, which consisted of hot inert solids circulation testing. These initial tests provided preliminary data necessary to understand different parameters associated with the operation and performance of the loop seal. The loop seal was tested with coal feed during the second part of the test run and additional data was gathered to analyze reactor operations and to identify necessary modifications to improve equipment and process performance. In the second part of GCT3, the gasification portion of the test, from January 20 to February 1, 2001, the mixing zone and riser temperatures were varied between 1,675 and 1,825 F at pressures ranging from 200 to 240 psig. There were 306 hours of solid circulation and 184 hours of coal feed attained in GCT3.

  12. Sandia Energy - About the Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Facility About the FacilityTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-11T19:38:37+00:00 Test-Bed Wind Turbines Allow Facility Flexibility While Providing Reliable Data in Many Regimes SWiFT...

  13. APT accelerator. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, G.; Rusthoi, D. [comp.] [ed.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, sponsored by Department of Energy Defense Programs (DOE/DP), involves the preconceptual design of an accelerator system to produce tritium for the nation`s stockpile of nuclear weapons. Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen used in nuclear weapons, and must be replenished because of radioactive decay (its half-life is approximately 12 years). Because the annual production requirements for tritium has greatly decreased since the end of the Cold War, an alternative approach to reactors for tritium production, based on a linear accelerator, is now being seriously considered. The annual tritium requirement at the time this study was undertaken (1992-1993) was 3/8 that of the 1988 goal, usually stated as 3/8-Goal. Continued reduction in the number of weapons in the stockpile has led to a revised (lower) production requirement today (March, 1995). The production requirement needed to maintain the reduced stockpile, as stated in the recent Nuclear Posture Review (summer 1994) is approximately 3/16-Goal, half the previous level. The Nuclear Posture Review also requires that the production plant be designed to accomodate a production increase (surge) to 3/8-Goal capability within five years, to allow recovery from a possible extended outage of the tritium plant. A multi-laboratory team, collaborating with several industrial partners, has developed a preconceptual APT design for the 3/8-Goal, operating at 75% capacity. The team has presented APT as a promising alternative to the reactor concepts proposed for Complex-21. Given the requirements of a reduced weapons stockpile, APT offers both significant safety, environmental, and production-fexibility advantages in comparison with reactor systems, and the prospect of successful development in time to meet the US defense requirements of the 21st Century.

  14. Particle Acceleration by MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jungyeon Cho; A. Lazarian

    2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in understanding of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence call for revisions in the picture of particle acceleration. We make use of the recently established scaling of slow and fast MHD modes in strong and weak MHD turbulence to provide a systematic study of particle acceleration in magnetic pressure (low-$\\beta$) and gaseous pressure (high-$\\beta$) dominated plasmas. We consider the acceleration by large scale compressions in both slow and fast particle diffusion limits. We compare the results with the acceleration rate that arises from resonance scattering and Transit-Time Damping (TTD). We establish that fast modes accelerate particles more efficiently than slow modes. We find that particle acceleration by pitch-angle scattering and TTD dominates acceleration by slow or fast modes when the spatial diffusion rate is small. When the rate of spatial diffusion of particles is high, we establish an enhancement of the efficiency of particle acceleration by slow and fast modes in weak turbulence. We show that highly supersonic turbulence is an efficient agent for particle acceleration. We find that even incompressible turbulence can accelerate particles on the scales comparable with the particle mean free path.

  15. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 300 Area facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 300 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. These determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. Sixteen Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 300 Area were evaluated: 303 (A, B, C, E, F, G, J and K), 303 M, 306 E, 308, 309, 313, 333, 334 A, and the 340 Waste Handling Facility. The 303, 306, 313, 333, and 334 facilities Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared by Columbia Energy and Environmental Services of Richland, Washington. The 340 Central Waste Complex determination was prepared by Bovay Northwest, Incorporated. The 308 and 309 facility determinations were prepared by Westinghouse Handford Company. Of the 16 facilities evaluated, 3 will require preparation of a Facility effluent Monitoring Plan: the 313 N Fuels Fabrication Support Building, 333 N Fuels fabrication Building, and the 340 Waste Handling Facility. 26 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Accelerators AND Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 Introduction In theACME -Toggle FermilabAccelerators

  17. Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in...

  18. Pollution Control Facilities (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purpose of this legislation, pollution control facilities are defined as any facilities designed for the elimination, mitigation or prevention of air or water pollution, including all...

  19. LANL | Physics | Trident Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery science at Trident Laser Facility Several important discoveries and first observations have been made at the Trident Laser Facility, a unique three-beam neodymium-glass...

  20. Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure, and post-closure of these facilities.