National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wait period ends

  1. Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: December 31, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Cast Stone Replacement 901833 Quarterly Construction Status Report for Period Ending: December 31, 2014

  2. Holding Period Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has published a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), and the 30-day waiting period has ended. DOE is preparing a Record of Decision to announce and explain its chosen project alternative...

  3. Physics division. Progress report for period ending September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, S.J. [ed.

    1997-04-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1995 and 1996 fiscal years, beginning October 1, 1994, and ending September 30, 1996. The activities of the Division continue to be concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. In addition, there are smaller programs in plasma diagnostics and data compilation and evaluation. During the period of this report, there has been considerable success in bringing the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) into routine operation. The budgets of the nuclear physics portion of the Division have increased each year in nearly all areas, and several new members have been added to the Division research and development staff. On August 30, 1996, the HRIBF successfully accelerated its first radioactive ion beams, {sup 69}As and {sup 70}As. Prior to this, the heart of the facility, the RIB injector system, was completed, including installation of a remote handling system for the target/ion source assembly. Target and ion source development is likely to be the technical key to success of the HRIBF. We have expanded our efforts in those development areas. Of special note is the development of highly permeable composite targets which have now been shown to allow release of difficult-to-produce radioactive ions such as {sup 17,18}F. A summary of the HRIBF work is provided in Chapter 1, along with supporting activities of the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research.

  4. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1985-01-01

    The research activities of the Division are centered primarily in three areas: experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The largest of these efforts, experimental nuclear physics, is dominated by the heavy ion research program. A major responsibility under this program is the operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. During the period of this report, the facility has begun routine operation for the experimental program. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. The theoretical physics program, both nuclear and atomic, is covered. This program has benefited this year from the success of the VAX-AP computer system and from the increase in manpower provided by the ORNL/University of Tennessee Distinguished Scientist Program. Smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics are summarized. During the period of this report, we continued to explore possible future extensions of the Holifield Facility. We retain a strong interest in a relativistic heavy-ion collider in the 10 x 10 GeV/nuclear energy range. The ideas for such a facility, described in last year's report, have been modified to utilize the HHIRF 25 MV tandem accelerator as the first stage. Finally, the report concludes with some general information on publications, Division activities, and personnel changes.

  5. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B.

    1989-03-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1988 fiscal year, beginning October 1, 1987, and ending September 30, 1988. The activities of this Division are concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. Operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility continues to represent the single largest activity within the Division. This year saw the completion of the acceleration tube upgrade of the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator and the achievement of record terminal potentials, operation for an experiment with 25 million volts on terminal, and successful tests with beam at 25.5 MV. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to be dominated by research utilizing heavy ions. These activities, while continuing to center largely on the Holifield Facility, have seen significant growth in the use of facilities that provide intermediate energies and especially ultrarelativistic beams. The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been intimately associated with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. In addition to the Holifield Facility, the Division operates two smaller facilities, the EN Tandem and the ECR Ion Source Facility, as ''User Resources.'' The efforts in theoretical physics, covering both nuclear and atomic physics, are presented. In addition to research with multicharged heavy ions from the ECR source, the effort on atomic physics in support of the controlled fusion program includes a plasma diagnostics development program. The concentration of this program on optical and laser technology is marked by the change in designation to the Laser and Electro-Optics Lab. A small, continuing effort in elementary particle physics, carried out in collaboration with the University of Tennessee, is reported.

  6. Advertising Emergency Department Wait Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiner, Scott G

    2013-01-01

    studies evaluating the advertising of ED wait times. Only 1potentially used for advertising may be inaccurate. AccessedE ditorial Advertising Emergency Department Wait Times Scott

  7. Waiting to Vote in 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart III, Charles H.

    2013-04-01

    Waiting in line to vote is one of the clichés of Election Day, whether the venue is Kenya or the United States. The length of time waiting to vote has regularly been an issue in the voting wars of the past decade. Long ...

  8. Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. [eds.

    1992-09-01

    During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, superconductivity, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. The High Flux Isotope Reactor was returned to full operation.

  9. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W.

    1991-03-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1989, to September 30, 1990. During this period, division research programs were significantly enhanced by the restart of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and by new initiatives in processing and characterization of materials.

  10. Analytical Chemistry Division. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1982-04-01

    The functions of the Analytical Chemistry Division fall into three general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development and utilization; (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections each of which may carry out any type of work falling into the thre categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections which are: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectrometry; analytical technical support; bio/organic analysis section; and nuclear and radiochemical analysis. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Chapter 7 covers supplementary activities. Chapter 8 is on presentation of research results (publications, articles reviewed or referred for periodicals). Approximately 56 articles, 31 proceedings publications and 33 reports have been published, and 119 oral presentations given during this reporting period.

  11. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, R.C.

    1993-05-01

    In this report, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations organized into sections following the five major operating units in the division: Mathematical Sciences, Intelligent Systems, Nuclear Data and Measurement Analysis, Nuclear Analysis and Shielding, and the Engineering Physics Information Centers. Each section begins with an introduction highlighting honors, awards, and significant research accomplishments in that unit during the reporting period.

  12. Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W.

    1997-12-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1995, through March 31, 1997. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program in support of Department of Energy science and technology missions. The report includes brief summaries of research activities in condensed matter theory, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. An addendum includes listings of division publications and professional activities.

  13. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1985-03-01

    During the reporting period, relatively minor changes have occurred in the research areas of interest to the Division. Nearly all the research of the Division can be classified broadly as mission-oriented basic research. Topics covered include: theoretical solid state physics; surface and near-surface properties of solids; defects in solids; transport properties of solids; neutron scattering; and preparation and characterization of research materials. (GHT)

  14. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1994, which extended from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to covey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who wee in ESD at the end of FY 1994 is located in the final section of the report.

  15. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report.

  16. HTGR Generic Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Generic Technology Program at General Atomic during the second half of FY-80. It covers a period when the design direction of the National HTGR Program is in the process of an overall review. The HTGR Generic Technology Program activities have continued so as to provide the basic technology required for all HTGR applications. The activities include the need to develop an LEU fuel and the need to qualify materials and components for the higher temperatures of the gas turbines and process heat plants.

  17. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shults, W.D.

    1993-04-01

    This report is divided into: Analytical spectroscopy (optical spectroscopy, organic mass spectrometry, inorganic mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry), inorganic and radiochemistry (transuranium and activation analysis, low-level radiochemical analysis, inorganic analysis, radioactive materials analysis, special projects), organic chemistry (organic spectroscopy, separations and synthesis, special projects, organic analysis, ORNL/UT research program), operations (quality assurance/quality control, environmental protection, safety, analytical improvement, training, radiation control), education programs, supplementary activities, and presentation of research results. Tables are included for articles reviewed or refereed for periodicals, analytical service work, division manpower and financial summary, and organization chart; a glossary is also included.

  18. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1983-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Dvision of Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development, and utilization; and (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections, each of which may carry out any type of work falling in the three categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections (analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials, bio/organic analysis, and general and environmental analysis) during the period January 1, 1982 to December 31, 1982. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 61 articles, 32 proceedings publications and 37 reports have been published, and 107 oral presentations were given during this reporting period.

  19. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: Analytical Research, Development and Implementation; Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization; and Technical Support. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1989. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 69 articles, 41 proceedings, and 31 reports were published, and 151 oral presentations were given during this reporting period. Some 308,981 determinations were performed.

  20. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) that is managed in conjunction with the University`s Institute of Ecology. The laboratory`s overall mission is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under an M&O contract with the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. Significant accomplishments were made during the year ending July 31, 1994 in the areas of research, education and service. Reviewed in this document are research projects in the following areas: Environmental Operations Support (impacted wetlands, streams, trace organics, radioecology, database synthesis, wild life studies, zooplankton, safety and quality assurance); wood stork foraging and breeding ecology; defence waste processing facility; environmental risk assessment (endangered species, fish, ash basin studies); ecosystem alteration by chemical pollutants; wetlands systems; biodiversity on the SRS; Environmental toxicology; environmental outreach and education; Par Pond drawdown studies in wildlife and fish and metals; theoretical ecology; DOE-SR National Environmental Research Park; wildlife studies. Summaries of educational programs and publications are also give.

  1. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1988: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described in this annual progress report for Fiscal Year (FY) 1988. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of the way society makes choices in energy use and energy-using technologies, (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental implications of changes in energy technology, and (3) improving and developing new energy-efficient technologies. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on four major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) transportation and decision systems research, (3) technology research and development for improving the efficiency of energy and end-use technologies, and (4) electric power systems. The Division's total expenditures in FY 1988 were $44.3 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 139 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics.

  2. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This report provides an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period June 30, 1985 through September 30, 1987. Work in Mathematical Sciences continues to include applied mathematics research, statistics research, and computer science. Nuclear-data measurements and evaluations continue for fusion reactors, fission reactors, and other nuclear systems. Also discussed are long-standing studies of fission-reactor shields through experiments and related analysis, of accelerator shielding, and of fusion-reactor neutronics. Work in Machine Intelligence continues to feature the development of an autonomous robot. The last descriptive part of this report reflects the work in our Engineering Physics Information Center, which again concentrates primarily upon radiation-shielding methods and related data.

  3. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sincovec, R.F.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides a record of the research activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division for the period January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1994. This report is the final archival record of the EPM Division. On October 1, 1994, ORELA was transferred to Physics Division and on January 1, 1995, the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division and the Computer Applications Division reorganized to form the Computer Science and Mathematics Division and the Computational Physics and Engineering Division. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL`s research in the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division.

  4. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to provide an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period September 1, 1989 through March 31, 1991. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL's research on the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the division. As in previous reports, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations. Summary lists of publications and presentations, staff additions and departures, scientific and professional activities of division staff, and technical conferences organized and sponsored by the division are included as appendices. The report is organized following the division of our research among four sections and information centers. These research areas are: Mathematical Sciences; Nuclear Data Measurement and Evaluations; Intelligent Systems; Nuclear Analysis and Shielding; and Engineering Physics Information Center.

  5. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, D.F.; Bradley, R.A.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides an overview of activities and accomplishsments of the division from October 1992 through December 1993; the division is organized to provide technical support, mainly in the area of high-temperature materials, for technologies being developed by DOE. Activities span the range from basic research to industrial interactions (cooperative research and technology transfer). Sections 1-5 describe the different functional groups (engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials). Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines. Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative R and D programs and technology transfer functions. Finally, Sect. 8 briefly describes the division`s involvement in educational activities. Several organizational changes were effected during this period.

  6. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD`s accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  7. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD's accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  8. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) Analytical Research, Development, and Implementation. The division maintains a program to conceptualize, investigate, develop, assess, improve, and implement advanced technology for chemical and physicochemical measurements. Emphasis is on problems and needs identified with ORNL and Department of Energy (DOE) programs; however, attention is also given to advancing the analytical sciences themselves. (2) Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization. The division carries out a wide variety of chemical work that typically involves analytical research and/or development plus the utilization of analytical capabilities to expedite programmatic interests. (3) Technical Support. The division performs chemical and physicochemical analyses of virtually all types. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each of which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1988. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8.

  9. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. This research effort was enhanced by new capabilities in atomic-scale materials characterization, new emphasis on the synthesis and processing of materials, and increased partnering with industry and universities. The theoretical effort included a broad range of analytical studies, as well as a new emphasis on numerical simulation stimulated by advances in high-performance computing and by strong interest in related division experimental programs. Superconductivity research continued to advance on a broad front from fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity to the development of new materials and processing techniques. The Neutron Scattering Program was characterized by a strong scientific user program and growing diversity represented by new initiatives in complex fluids and residual stress. The national emphasis on materials synthesis and processing was mirrored in division research programs in thin-film processing, surface modification, and crystal growth. Research on advanced processing techniques such as laser ablation, ion implantation, and plasma processing was complemented by strong programs in the characterization of materials and surfaces including ultrahigh resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic-resolution chemical analysis, synchrotron x-ray research, and scanning tunneling microscopy.

  10. Ferrocyanide Safety Program. Quarterly report for the period ending March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1994-04-01

    Various high-level radioactive waste from defense operations has accumulated at the Hanford Site in underground storage tanks since the mid-1940s. During the 1950s, additional tank storage space was required to support the defense mission. To obtain this additional storage volume within a short time period, and to minimize the need for constructing additional storage tanks, Hanford Site scientists developed a process to scavenge {sup 137}Cs from tank waste liquids. In implementing this process, approximately 140 metric tons of ferrocyanide were added to waste that was later routed to some Hanford Site single-shell tanks. The reactive nature of ferrocyanide in the presence of an oxidizer has been known for decades, but the conditions under which the compound can undergo endothermic and exothermic reactions have not been thoroughly studied. Because the scavenging process precipitated ferrocyanide from solutions containing nitrate and nitrite, an intimate mixture of ferrocyanides and nitrates and/or nitrites is likely to exist in some regions of the ferrocyanide tanks. This quarterly report provides a status of the activities underway at the Hanford Site on the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue, as requested by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in their Recommendation 90-7. A revised Ferrocyanide Safety Program Plan addressing the total Ferrocyanide Safety Program, including the six parts of DNFSB Recommendation 90-7, was recently prepared and released in March 1994. Activities in the revised program plan are underway or have been completed, and the status of each is described in Section 4.0 of this report.

  11. Waiting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    riding to the sea entering the estuary Living in the ocean sWimming upstream cLimbing fish Ladders return ing to spaWning grounds reneWing the cycLe 5 4 3 2 1 10 9 8 7 6 1...

  12. Waiting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nerg *415,Rates

  13. Final Report for Research in High Energy Physics at the University of Pennsylvania for the period ending April 30, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Hugh H.; Balasubramanian, V.; Bernstein, G.; Beier, E. W.; Cveti?c, M.; Gladney, L.; Jain, B.; Klein, J.; Kroll, J.; Lipeles, E.; Ovrut, B.; Thomson, E.

    2015-07-23

    The University of Pennsylvania elementary particle physics/particle cosmology group, funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science, participates in research in high energy physics and particle cosmology that addresses some of the most important unanswered questions in science. The research is divided into five areas. Energy Frontier - We participate in the study of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland using the ATLAS detector. The University of Pennsylvania group was responsible for the design, installation, and commissioning of the front-end electronics for the Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) and plays the primary role in its maintenance and operation. We play an important role in the triggering of ATLAS, and we have made large contributions to the TRT performance and to the study and identification of electrons, photons, and taus. We have been actively involved in searches for the Higgs boson and for SUSY and other exotic particles. We have made significant contributions to measurement of Standard Model processes such as inclusive photon production and WW pair production. We also have participated significantly in R&D for upgrades to the ATLAS detector. Cosmic Frontier - The Dark Energy Survey (DES) telescope will be used to elucidate the nature of dark energy and the distribution of dark matter. Penn has played a leading role both in the use of weak gravitational lensing of distant galaxies and the discovery of large numbers of distant supernovae. The techniques and forecasts developed at Penn are also guiding the development of the proposed Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).We are also developing a new detector, MiniClean, to search for direct detection of dark matter particles. Intensity Frontier - We are participating in the design and R&D of detectors for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (now DUNE), a new experiment to study the properties of neutrinos. Advanced Techology R&D - We have an extensive involvement in electronics required for sophisticated new detectors at the LHC and are developing electronics for the LSST camera. Theoretical Physics - We are carrying out a broad program studying the fundamental forces of nature and early universe cosmology and mathematical physics. Our activities span the range from model building, formal field theory, and string theory to new paradigms for cosmology and the interface of string theory with mathematics. Our effort combines extensive development of the formal aspects of string theory with a focus on real phenomena in particle physics, cosmology and gravity.

  14. Electron Waiting Times in Mesoscopic Conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathias Albert; Géraldine Haack; Christian Flindt; Markus Büttiker

    2012-02-14

    Electron transport in mesoscopic conductors has traditionally involved investigations of the mean current and the fluctuations of the current. A complementary view on charge transport is provided by the distribution of waiting times between charge carriers, but a proper theoretical framework for coherent electronic systems has so far been lacking. Here we develop a quantum theory of electron waiting times in mesoscopic conductors expressed by a compact determinant formula. We illustrate our methodology by calculating the waiting time distribution for a quantum point contact and find a cross-over from Wigner-Dyson statistics at full transmission to Poisson statistics close to pinch-off. Even when the low-frequency transport is noiseless, the electrons are not equally spaced in time due to their inherent wave nature. We discuss the implications for renewal theory in mesoscopic systems and point out several analogies with energy level statistics and random matrix theory.

  15. At the end of the secure period, Technology Transfer (for patent works) or the Office of Research and Creative Activities (Export Controls) will be contacted to verify that the work can be released.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    At the end of the secure period, Technology Transfer (for patent works) or the Office of Research a patent, OR 2. Works with Export Control restrictions. Graduate Studies 105 FPH, Provo, UT, 84602 Tel@byu.edu patent OR export control restrictions #12;

  16. Climate change is not "a problem" wait-ing for "a solution". It is an environ-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    41 Climate change is not "a problem" wait- ing for "a solution". It is an environ- mental, cultural humanity's place on Earth. My new book, Why We Disagree About Climate Change, dissects this idea of climate about it. It also develops a different way of approaching the idea of climate change and of working

  17. The Origin of the Solar Flare Waiting-Time Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Wheatland

    2000-05-08

    It was recently pointed out that the distribution of times between solar flares (the flare waiting-time distribution) follows a power law, for long waiting times. Based on 25 years of soft X-ray flares observed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) instruments it is shown that 1. the waiting-time distribution of flares is consistent with a time-dependent Poisson process, and 2. the fraction of time the Sun spends with different flaring rates approximately follows an exponential distribution. The second result is a new phenomenological law for flares. It is shown analytically how the observed power-law behavior of the waiting times originates in the exponential distribution of flaring rates. These results are argued to be consistent with a non-stationary avalanche model for flares.

  18. Waiting for the Boom:Waiting for the Boom:Waiting for the Boom:Waiting for the Boom: A Simulation Study of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    prices to climb to surprisingly high values during peak periods in the summer. When new power plants of Behavior Summary PART THREE. POST SCRIPT The West Coast Crisis California Enters the Power Business Power of energy in fuel CEC California Energy Commission CERA Cambridge Energy Research Associates CC Combined

  19. Water Research Consortium U.S. Department of Energy Grant Award Number DE-FG02-05ER64132 Final Technical Report For Period Beginning: 15 September 2005 And Ending: 31 December 2009 Report Date: 16 March 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven R. Billingsley

    2010-03-18

    This report summarizes the activities of the INRA Water Research Consortium (IWRC) for the period beginning September 15, 2005 and ending December 16, 2010. This report compares accomplishments to project objectives, documents the activities associated with this project, and lists products developed during the course of the project. The Water Resources Research Needs Assessment team received funding from the Inland Northwest Research Alliance Water Resources Steering Committee to facilitate a structured needs assessment process that could provide a basis for future targeted research efforts to improve regional water resources management in the Inland Northwest region. The original INRA proposal specifically mentions the need to conduct a detailed assessment of the information and research needs of policy makers and water user groups during a period of increasing competition for scarce water supplies. A particular focus of this assessment would be to understand what types of research might facilitate water resource management during periods of drought. The specific goals of the Needs Assessment project were to: (1) Quickly ascertain the perceptions of diverse stakeholders in this region; (2) Condense this complex information into a format that can be shared with the INRA scientific panel, and (3) Develop of a realistic set of research needs & priorities that can shape future INRA-funded research activities.

  20. How kinesin waits between steps Teppei Mori1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vale, Ronald D.

    - leotide binding becomes rate-limiting at low ATP concentrations, kinesin waits for ATP in a one-head on the leading head and the 215 dye on the trailing head and the low-FRET peak (about 10%) corresponds motility involves the hand-over-hand motion of the two motor domains (`heads')5­7 , a process driven

  1. University of technology Many embedded electronic systems are waiting for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svenningsson, Josef

    , reliability, power consumption, and size. EMBEDDED ELECTRONIC SYSTEM DESIGN MASTER'S PROGRAMME EESD in their career, young designers often focus on implementation and verification of embedded systems, from embeddedUniversity of technology Many embedded electronic systems are waiting for you to implement them Did

  2. On Utility Accrual Processor Scheduling with Wait-Free Synchronization for Embedded Real-Time Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravindran, Binoy

    On Utility Accrual Processor Scheduling with Wait-Free Synchronization for Embedded Real-Time Software ABSTRACT We present the first wait-free utility accrual (UA) real-time scheduling algorithms for embedded real-time systems. UA scheduling algorithms allow application activities to be sub- ject to time/utility

  3. Discrimination and Visualization of ELM Types Based on a Probabilistic Description of Inter-ELM Waiting Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Discrimination and Visualization of ELM Types Based on a Probabilistic Description of Inter-ELM Waiting Times

  4. WEIGHTING WAITING IN COLLECTIVE DECISION MAKING ROBERT PLANQUE1,3,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Planqué, Bob

    , but it is partic- ularly good when emigration conditions are harsh. #12;WEIGHTING WAITING IN COLLECTIVE DECISION that ant colonies have found a good compromise between impatience and procrastination. Early flexibility

  5. MyNERSC Gives Users Easier Access to Data, Jobs, Wait Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MyNERSC Gives Users Easier Access to Data, Jobs, Wait Times April 6, 2015 MyNERSC, a web-based portal that provides NERSC users with real-time information on their jobs, disk...

  6. 'Hanging in-between': experiences of waiting among asylum seekers living in Glasgow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotter, Rebecca Victoria Elizabeth

    2010-11-26

    This thesis explores the experiences of applicants for Refugee Status in the United Kingdom who had, at the time of the research, waited for between two and nine years for the conclusion of the asylum process. Despite ...

  7. An examination of liver offers to candidates on the liver transplant wait-list

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, JC; Feng, S; Roberts, JP

    2012-01-01

    the availability of de- LIVER OFFERS ON THE WAIT–LISTAn Examination of Liver Offers to Candidates on the Liverrange) number of liver offers for all candidates was 5 (

  8. LIMITS FOR QUEUES AS THE WAITING ROOM GROWS Daniel P. Heyman Ward Whitt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitt, Ward

    LIMITS FOR QUEUES AS THE WAITING ROOM GROWS by Daniel P. Heyman Ward Whitt Bell Communications Research AT&T Bell Laboratories Red Bank, NJ 07701 Murray Hill, NJ 07974 May 11, 1988 #12;ABSTRACT We study

  9. LIMITS FOR QUEUES AS THE WAITING ROOM GROWS Daniel P. Heyman Ward Whitt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitt, Ward

    LIMITS FOR QUEUES AS THE WAITING ROOM GROWS by Daniel P. Heyman Ward Whitt Bell Communications Research AT&T Bell Laboratories Red Bank, NJ 07701 Murray Hill, NJ 07974 May 11, 1988 #12; ABSTRACT We

  10. The Weakest Failure Detector for Solving Wait-Free, Eventually Bounded-Fair Dining Philosophers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Yantao

    2010-01-14

    This dissertation explores the necessary and sufficient conditions to solve a variant of the dining philosophers problem. This dining variant is defined by three properties: wait-freedom, eventual weak exclusion, and ...

  11. Electronic waiting-time distribution of a quantum-dot spin valve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Björn Sothmann

    2014-10-27

    We discuss the electronic waiting-time distribution of a quantum-dot spin valve, i.e. a single-level quantum dot coupled to two ferromagnetic electrodes with magnetizations that can point in arbitrary directions. We demonstrate that the rich transport physics of this setup such as dynamical channel blockade and spin precession in an interaction-driven exchange field shows up in the waiting-time distribution and analyze the conditions necessary to observe the various effects.

  12. Application of reservoir characterization and advanced technology to improve recovery and economics in a lower quality shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. End of budget period report, August 3, 1994--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, A.R.; Hinterlong, G.; Watts, G.; Justice, J.; Brown, K.; Hickman, T.S.

    1997-12-01

    The Oxy West Welch project is designed to demonstrate how the use of advanced technology can improve the economics of miscible CO{sub 2} injection projects in a lower quality shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. The research and design phase primarily involves advanced reservoir characterization and accelerating the production response. The demonstration phase will implement the reservoir management plan based on an optimum miscible CO{sub 2} flood as designed in the initial phase. During Budget Period 1, work was completed on the CO{sub 2} stimulation treatments and the hydraulic fracture design. Analysis of the CO{sub 2} stimulation treatment provided a methodology for predicting results. The hydraulic fracture treatment proved up both the fracture design approach a and the use of passive seismic for mapping the fracture wing orientation. Although the 3-D seismic interpretation is still being integrated into the geologic model and interpretation of borehole seismic is still underway, the simulator has been enhanced to the point of giving good waterflood history matches. The simulator-forecasted results for an optimal designed miscible CO{sub 2} flood in the demonstration area gave sufficient economics to justify continuation of the project into Budget Period 2.

  13. Summary Comparison of UNM Dental Plan Options Benefit Period July 1, 2015 through June 30, 2016 Benefits administered by Delta Dental of New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    ) month Benefit Waiting Period on Major Services applies. If employee was previously covered under a UNM) 395-9420. For easy access to the provider directory applicable to each option, log onto Delta

  14. Data Sync: End To End BenefitsData Sync: End To End Benefits MIT Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    Data Sync: End To End BenefitsData Sync: End To End Benefits MIT Conference Created by Xavier Franco Director of Global Data Management Presented by Larry Dziedzic Information Management Data Importance Of Data Standards The Role Of Data Sync A Case For Item Data Sync Plans Moving Forward #12;3 J

  15. Processing communications events in parallel active messaging interface by awakening thread from wait state

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-10-22

    Processing data communications events in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer that includes compute nodes that execute a parallel application, with the PAMI including data communications endpoints, and the endpoints are coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through other data communications resources, including determining by an advance function that there are no actionable data communications events pending for its context, placing by the advance function its thread of execution into a wait state, waiting for a subsequent data communications event for the context; responsive to occurrence of a subsequent data communications event for the context, awakening by the thread from the wait state; and processing by the advance function the subsequent data communications event now pending for the context.

  16. The waves of damage in elastic-plastic lattices with waiting links: design and simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherkaev, Andrej

    The waves of damage in elastic-plastic lattices with waiting links: design and simulation A, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA Abstract We consider protective structures with elastic-plastic links: Protective structure, Elastic-plastic material, Necking, Bistability, Partial damage, Collision, Waves

  17. Burst wait time simulation of CALIBAN reactor at delayed super-critical state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humbert, P.; Authier, N.; Richard, B.; Grivot, P.; Casoli, P.

    2012-07-01

    In the past, the super prompt critical wait time probability distribution was measured on CALIBAN fast burst reactor [4]. Afterwards, these experiments were simulated with a very good agreement by solving the non-extinction probability equation [5]. Recently, the burst wait time probability distribution has been measured at CEA-Valduc on CALIBAN at different delayed super-critical states [6]. However, in the delayed super-critical case the non-extinction probability does not give access to the wait time distribution. In this case it is necessary to compute the time dependent evolution of the full neutron count number probability distribution. In this paper we present the point model deterministic method used to calculate the probability distribution of the wait time before a prescribed count level taking into account prompt neutrons and delayed neutron precursors. This method is based on the solution of the time dependent adjoint Kolmogorov master equations for the number of detections using the generating function methodology [8,9,10] and inverse discrete Fourier transforms. The obtained results are then compared to the measurements and Monte-Carlo calculations based on the algorithm presented in [7]. (authors)

  18. A new method for deriving waiting-time approximations in polling systems with renewal arrivals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Mei, Rob

    . The most general results known for renewal-driven polling models are asymp- totic results, such as heavy models with renewal arrivals. Motivated by this, in this paper we propose a new method for derivingA new method for deriving waiting-time approximations in polling systems with renewal arrivals J

  19. WAITING TIME DISTRIBUTION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS MODELED WITH A NON-STATIONARY POISSON PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.; Su, W.; Fang, C.; Zhong, S. J.; Wang, L.

    2014-09-10

    We present a study of the waiting time distributions (WTDs) of solar energetic particle (SEP) events observed with the spacecraft WIND and GOES. The WTDs of both solar electron events (SEEs) and solar proton events (SPEs) display a power-law tail of ??t {sup –?}. The SEEs display a broken power-law WTD. The power-law index is ?{sub 1} = 0.99 for the short waiting times (<70 hr) and ?{sub 2} = 1.92 for large waiting times (>100 hr). The break of the WTD of SEEs is probably due to the modulation of the corotating interaction regions. The power-law index, ? ? 1.82, is derived for the WTD of the SPEs which is consistent with the WTD of type II radio bursts, indicating a close relationship between the shock wave and the production of energetic protons. The WTDs of SEP events can be modeled with a non-stationary Poisson process, which was proposed to understand the waiting time statistics of solar flares. We generalize the method and find that, if the SEP event rate ? = 1/?t varies as the time distribution of event rate f(?) = A?{sup –?}exp (– ??), the time-dependent Poisson distribution can produce a power-law tail WTD of ??t {sup ?} {sup –3}, where 0 ? ? < 2.

  20. The World Is Waiting HMS launches transformative $750 million fundraising campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corey, David P.

    The World Is Waiting HMS launches transformative $750 million fundraising campaign Harvard Medical of the largest biomedical research community in the world.Together with our 16 renowned affiliated hospitals and research institutions, we are making breakthroughs that have a tangible impact on how the world understands

  1. Physics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    Progress is reported in detail in the following areas: Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, the UNISOR program, neutron physics, theoretical physics, the Nuclear Data Project, atomic and plasma physics, and high energy physics. Publications are listed. Separate abstracts were prepared for 34 papers. (WHK)

  2. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    Research and development activities are summarized in the following areas: Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, the UNISOR program, accelerator-based atomic physics, theoretical physics, nuclear science applications, atomic physics and plasma diagnostics for fusion program, high-energy physics, the nuclear data project, and the relativistic heavy-ion collider study. Publications and papers presented are listed. (WHK)

  3. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1986-04-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1985 fiscal year. The research activities were centered on experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The experimental nuclear physics program is dominated by heavy ion research. A major part of this effort is the responsibility for operating the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. A major new activity described is the preparation for participation in an ultrarelativistic heavy ion experiment to be performed at CERN in 1986. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. Theory efforts associated with the UNISOR program are described, as well as smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics. (LEW)

  4. Physics division progress report for period ending September 30 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B. [ed.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in physics. The areas covered are: Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; low/medium energy nuclear physics; high energy experimental physics; the Unisor program; experimental atomic physics; laser and electro-optics lab; theoretical physics; compilations and evaluations; and radioactive ion beam development. (LSP)

  5. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1991-03-01

    The activities of this Division continue to be concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility and its operation as a national user facility continued as the single largest activity within the Division. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to emphasize heavy ion studies, with much of the activity centered at the Holifield Facility. The work with heavy ions at ultrarelativistic energies continues at the CERN SPS. Studies at the Brookhaven AGS, particularly in preparation of future experiments at RHIC, have seen an increased emphasis. A major consortium has been formed to propose the design and construction of a dimuon detector as the basis for one the principal experiments for RHIC. Also included are results from the increasing effort in particle physics, including participation in the L* proposal for the SSC. The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been associated intimately with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. A major area of experimental research for the Division is atomic physics. This activity comprises two groups: one on accelerator-based atomic physics, centered primarily at the EN-tandem and the Holifield Facility, but extending this year to an experiment at ultrarelativistic energies at the CERN SPS; and one on atomic physics in support of fusion energy, based primarily at the ECR ion source facility. Included in this section is also a description of a new effort in multicharged ion-surface interactions, and details of a planned upgrade of the ECR source.

  6. Solid state division progress report, period ending February 29, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Research is reported concerning theoretical solid state physics; surface and near-surface properties of solids; defects in solids; transport properties of solids; neutron scattering; crystal growth and characterization; and isotope research materials.

  7. Engineering Physics Division progress report period ending May 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    Progress is described in the following areas: nuclear cross sections and related quantities; methods for generating and validating multigroup cross-section libraries; methods for reactor and shield analysis; methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis; integral experiments and nuclear analyses (integral experiments supporting fusion reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting fusion reactor designs, high-energy particle transport calculations, integral experiments supporting gas-cooled fast breeder reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting gas-cooled reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting utilization of light-water reactors, and integral experiment analyses supporting surveillance dosimetry improvement program); energy economics modeling and analysis; safety and reliability assessments for nuclear power reactors; and information analysis and distribution. Publications and papers presented are listed. (WHK)

  8. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B.

    1990-03-01

    This report discusses topics in the following areas: Holifield heavy ion research; Experimental Nuclear physics; The Uniser program; Experimental Atomic Physics; Theoretical Physics; Laser and electro-optics lab; High Energy Physics; compilations and evaluations; and accelerator design and development. (FI)

  9. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1988-03-01

    The activities of this Division are concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. A major activity within the Division is operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. Highlights for this year, which include a record number of beam hours provided for research, are summarized. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to be dominated by research utilizing heavy ions. These activities, while continuing to center largely on the Holifield Facility, have seen growth in the use of facilities that provide intermediate energies (GANIL) and ultrarelativistic beams (CERN). The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been intimately associated with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. The experimental nuclear structure research of this consortium is included. In addition to the Holifield Facility, the Division also operates two smaller facilities, the EN Tandem and the ECR Ion Source Facility, as /open quotes/User Resources/close quotes/. The tandem continues a long history of supporting research in accelerator-based atomic physics. During this past year, new beam lines have been added to the ECR ion source to create user opportunities for atomic physics experiments with this unique device. These two facilities and the experimental programs in atomic physics are discussed. The efforts in theoretical physics, covering both nuclear and atomic physics, are presented. Also included is the theory effort in support of the UNISOR structure program. In addition to research with multicharged heavy ions from the ECR source, the effort on atomic physics in support of the controlled fusion program includes a plasma diagnostics development program and operation of an atomic physics data center. The nuclear physics program also operates a compilation and evaluation effort; this work is also described.

  10. Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: December 31, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Greenhouse Upgrade Heating System 901367c Whetten Quad Pedestrian Safety Improvements Phase I 901629 Heating System 901698 Homer Babbidge Library - Replace Floor Coverings 901715 Arjona & Monteith - Renovations foot (gsf) two story steel framed building with exterior masonry walls. The floor surface

  11. Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: September 30, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Campus Student Center 901278 Floriculture Greenhouse Upgrade Heating System 901367c Young Building - Heating/AC/Electrical Repairs 901580 Whetten Quad Pedestrian Safety Improvements Phase I 901629 Repair One - Replace Floor Coverings 901715 Arjona & Monteith - Renovations 901719 Gant Building Renovation - Immediate

  12. Property:Building/EndPeriod | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,InformationAwardee JumpBrineConstituentsCounty

  13. Relative entropy and waiting times for continuous-time Markov processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Rene Chazottes; Cristian Giardina; Frank Redig

    2005-12-16

    For discrete-time stochastic processes, there is a close connection between return/waiting times and entropy. Such a connection cannot be straightforwardly extended to the continuous-time setting. Contrarily to the discrete-time case one does need a reference measure and so the natural object is relative entropy rather than entropy. In this paper we elaborate on this in the case of continuous-time Markov processes with finite state space. A reference measure of special interest is the one associated to the time-reversed process. In that case relative entropy is interpreted as the entropy production rate. The main results of this paper are: almost-sure convergence to relative entropy of suitable waiting-times and their fluctuation properties (central limit theorem and large deviation principle).

  14. Models of Impulsivity with a Focus on Waiting Impulsivity: Translational Potential for Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voon, Valerie

    2014-10-03

    ]. The broader concept of impulsivity is a heterogeneous construct, which can be subdivided into: waiting impulsivity; motor re- sponse inhibition (the ability to cancel or restrain a pre-potent motor response); and decisional forms, including delay discounting... of the apertures before performing a nose-poke at the aperture. Accurate responding is rewarded with a food pellet collected at the food dispenser. Premature responding is measured as an early nose-poke before cue or target V. Voon (*) Department of Psychiatry...

  15. Stochastic Model Based Proxy Servers Architecture for VoD to Achieve Reduced Client Waiting Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, T R GopalaKrishnan

    2010-01-01

    In a video on demand system, the main video repository may be far away from the user and generally has limited streaming capacities. Since a high quality video's size is huge, it requires high bandwidth for streaming over the internet. In order to achieve a higher video hit ratio, reduced client waiting time, distributed server's architecture can be used, in which multiple local servers are placed close to clients and, based on their regional demands video contents are cached dynamically from the main server. As the cost of proxy server is decreasing and demand for reduced waiting time is increasing day by day, newer architectures are explored, innovative schemes are arrived at. In this paper we present novel 3 layer architecture, includes main multimedia server, a Tracker and Proxy servers. This architecture targets to optimize the client waiting time. We also propose an efficient prefix caching and load sharing algorithm at the proxy server to allocate the cache according to regional popularity of the video...

  16. Capture reactions into borromean two-proton systems at rp-waiting points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Hove; A. S. Jensen; H. O. U. Fynbo; N. T. Zinner; D. V. Fedorov; E. Garrido

    2015-07-07

    We investigate even-even two-proton borromean systems at prominent intermediate heavy waiting points for the rapid proton capture process. The most likely single-particle levels are used to calculate three-body energy and structure as a function of proton-core resonance energy. We establish a linear dependence between two- and three-body energies with the same slope, but the absolute value slightly dependent on partial wave structure. Using these relations we predict low-lying excited states in the isotones following the critical waiting points. The capture rate for producing a borromean bound state is described both based on a full three-body calculation and on a very simple analytic rate expression for temperatures about $1-5$~GK. This rate is valid for both direct and sequential capture paths, and it only depends on the three-body resonance energy. As a result the relevant path of the radiative capture reactions can be determined. We present numerical results for $E1$ and $E2$ photon emission, and discuss occurrence preferences in general as well as relative sizes of these most likely processes. Finally, we present narrow estimated intervals for the proton capture rates relevant for the critical waiting points.

  17. Please wait

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energy codesPhiladelhia GasDepartment ofN O R Tof

  18. Robotic end effector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minichan, R.L.

    1993-10-05

    An end effector is described for use in probing a surface with a robotic arm. The end effector has a first portion that carries a gimbal with a probe, the gimbal holding the probe normal to the surface, and a second portion with a set of three shafts within a housing for urging the gimbal and probe against the surface. The second portion contains a potentiometer connected by another shaft to the first portion to measure the position of the first portion with respect to the second so that the second portion can be moved to place and maintain the shafts at the midpoint of their travel. Then, as irregularities in the surface are encountered, the first portion can respond by moving closer to or farther from the second portion. 7 figures.

  19. Robotic end effector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minichan, Richard L. (23 Pineview Dr., Warrenville, SC 29851)

    1993-01-01

    An end effector for use in probing a surface with a robotic arm. The end effector has a first portion that carries a gimbal with a probe, the gimbal holding the probe normal to the surface, and a second portion with a set of three shafts within a housing for urging the gimbal and probe against the surface. The second portion contains a potentiometer connected by another shaft to the first portion to measure the position of the first portion with respect to the second so that the second portion can be moved to place and maintain the shafts at the midpoint of their travel. Then, as irregularities in the surface are encountered, the first portion can respond by moving closer to or farther from the second portion.

  20. Capture reactions into borromean two-proton systems at rp-waiting points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hove, D; Fynbo, H O U; Zinner, N T; Fedorov, D V; Garrido, E

    2015-01-01

    We investigate even-even two-proton borromean systems at prominent intermediate heavy waiting points for the rapid proton capture process. The most likely single-particle levels are used to calculate three-body energy and structure as a function of proton-core resonance energy. We establish a linear dependence between two- and three-body energies with the same slope, but the absolute value slightly dependent on partial wave structure. Using these relations we predict low-lying excited states in the isotones following the critical waiting points. The capture rate for producing a borromean bound state is described both based on a full three-body calculation and on a very simple analytic rate expression for temperatures about $1-5$~GK. This rate is valid for both direct and sequential capture paths, and it only depends on the three-body resonance energy. As a result the relevant path of the radiative capture reactions can be determined. We present numerical results for $E1$ and $E2$ photon emission, and discuss ...

  1. Improving end-to-end availability using overlay networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, David G. (David Godbe), 1975-

    2005-01-01

    The end-to-end availability of Internet services is between two and three orders of magnitude worse than other important engineered systems, including the US airline system, the 911 emergency response system, and the US ...

  2. EVOLUTIONARY AND BIOGEOGRAPHIC PATTERNS OF TRILOBITES DURING THE END ORDOVICIAN MASS EXTINCTION EVENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Congreve, Curtis Raymond

    2008-01-01

    The end Ordovician mass extinction event is believed to have been caused by a geologically brief, sudden onset glacial period that interrupted a period of extreme greenhouse conditions. The cause of this icehouse is a ...

  3. Storm Water Analytical Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Individual Permit Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial...

  4. Evaluation of End Mill Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. J. Lazarus; R. L. Hester,

    2005-08-01

    Milling tests were run on families of High Speed Steel (HSS) end mills to determine their lives while machining 304 Stainless Steel. The end mills tested were made from M7, M42 and T15-CPM High Speed Steels. The end mills were also evaluated with no coatings as well as with Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Titanium Carbo-Nitride (TiCN) coatings to determine which combination of HSS and coating provided the highest increase in end mill life while increasing the cost of the tool the least. We found end mill made from M42 gave us the largest increase in tool life with the least increase in cost. The results of this study will be used by Cutting Tool Engineering in determining which end mill descriptions will be dropped from our tool catalog.

  5. End Use and Fuel Certification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–B: End Use and Fuel Certification John Eichberger, Vice President of Government Relations, National Association for Convenience Stores

  6. Time-periodic universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-Xing Kong; Kefeng Liu; Ming Shen

    2008-08-30

    In this letter we construct a new time-periodic solution of the vacuum Einstein's field equations whose Riemann curvature norm takes the infinity at some points. We show that this solution is intrinsically time-periodic and describes a time-periodic universe with the "black hole". New physical phenomena are investigated and new singularities are analyzed for this universal model.

  7. EIS-0466: Re-opening of Public Scoping Period and Announcement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Scoping Meetings Continued Operation of the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico Comment Period Ends: 9122011 Submit Comments to: Ms. Jeanette Norte NNSA Sandia Site...

  8. High-Level Information An Approach for Integrating Front-End and Back-End Compilers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhiyuan

    High-Level Information ­ An Approach for Integrating Front-End and Back-End Compilers Sangyeun Cho-end and back-end compilers by passing front-end information to the back-end compiler. Importing this information into an existing back- end leverages the state-of-the-art analysis and transforma- tion

  9. End-Use Sector Flowchart

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This system of energy intensity indicators for total energy covers the economy as a whole and each of the major end-use sectors—transportation, industry, commercial and residential—identified in Figure 1. By clicking on any of the boxes with the word "Sector" in the title will reveal the more detailed structure within that sector.

  10. Genealogy of periodic trajectories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Adguiar, M.A.M.; Maldta, C.P.; de Passos, E.J.V.

    1986-05-20

    The periodic solutions of non-integrable classical Hamiltonian systems with two degrees of freedom are numerically investigated. Curves of periodic families are given in plots of energy vs. period. Results are presented for this Hamiltonian: H = 1/2(p/sub x//sup 2/ + p/sub y//sup 2/) + 1/2 x/sup 2/ + 3/2 y/sup 2/ - x/sup 2/y + 1/12 x/sup 4/. Properties of the families of curves are pointed out. (LEW)

  11. Fourier series and periodicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donal F. Connon

    2014-12-07

    A large number of the classical texts dealing with Fourier series more or less state that the hypothesis of periodicity is required for pointwise convergence. In this paper, we highlight the fact that this condition is not necessary.

  12. End moldings for cable dielectrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roose, Lars D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    End moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of the cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. Disclosed is a method for making the cable connectors either in the field or in a factory, molds suitable for use with the method, and the molded cable connectors, themselves.

  13. End-to-End Supply Chain Tracking - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.EmilioDaveAdvanced MaterialsC) 00End

  14. Observation of Isomeric Decays in the r-Process Waiting-Point Nucleus {sup 130}Cd{sub 82}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungclaus, A.; Poves, A.; Modamio, V.; Walker, J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Caceres, L. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Langanke, K.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Cuenca-Garcia, J. J.; Doornenbal, P.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Prokopowicz, W.; Schaffner, H.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Montes, F.; Tashenov, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)] (and others)

    2007-09-28

    The {gamma} decay of excited states in the waiting-point nucleus {sup 130}Cd{sub 82} has been observed for the first time. An 8{sup +} two-quasiparticle isomer has been populated both in the fragmentation of a {sup 136}Xe beam as well as in projectile fission of {sup 238}U, making {sup 130}Cd the most neutron-rich N=82 isotone for which information about excited states is available. The results, interpreted using state-of-the-art nuclear shell-model calculations, show no evidence of an N=82 shell quenching at Z=48. They allow us to follow nuclear isomerism throughout a full major neutron shell from {sup 98}Cd{sub 50} to {sup 130}Cd{sub 82} and reveal, in comparison with {sup 76}Ni{sub 48} one major proton shell below, an apparently abnormal scaling of nuclear two-body interactions.

  15. An End-to-End Approach to Globally Scalable Network Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plank, Jim

    An End-to-End Approach to Globally Scalable Network Storage Micah Beck Terry Moore James S. Plank-to-end design principles, which are characteristic of the architecture of the Internet, to network storage. While putting storage into the network fabric may seem to contradict end-to-end arguments, we try

  16. DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training Steam Distribution Losses Module 1 June 29, 2010 Steam EndUser Training Steam Distribution System Losses Module Slide 1 pressure. #12;DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training Steam Distribution

  17. End of an Era | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End of an Era May 9, 2012 On May 18, we will stop operations of CEBAF, our Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, marking the end of our FY12 operations. As we anticipated,...

  18. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1984-05-01

    Progress and activities are reported in: analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials analysis, bio/organic analysis, general and environmental analysis, and quality assurance and safety. Supplementary activities are also discussed, and a bibliography of publications is also included. (DLC)

  19. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This report covers work done during FY 1983 by the staff of the Energy Division and its subcontractors and by colleagues in other Oak Ridge National Laboratory divisions working on Energy Division projects. The work can be divided into four areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) models and data systems, (3) research to improve the efficiency of energy use and to improve electric power transmission and distribution, and (4) research utilization. Support came principally from the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the US Department of Defense, but also from a number of other agencies and organizations. Analysis and assessment included work on (a) environmental issues, including those deriving from the preparation of environmental impact statements; (b) energy and resource analysis; and (c) emergency preparedness. The models and data systems area involved research on evaluating and developing energy, environment, and engineering simulation models and on devising large data management systems, evaluating user data requirements, and compiling data bases. Research on improving the efficiency of energy use was focused primarily on the buildings and electricity sectors. A major effort on heat pump technology, which includes both heat-activated and electrically driven systems, continues. An important aspect of all the work was research utilization. Since the Energy Division is doing applied research, results are, by definition, intended to solve problems or answer questions of DOE and other sponsors. However, there are other users, and research utilization activities include technology transfer, commercialization efforts, outreach to state and regional organizations, and, of course, information dissemination.

  20. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaitkus, M.R.; Wein, G.R. [eds.; Johnson, G.

    1993-11-01

    This progress report gives an overview of research programs at the Savannah River Site. Topics include; environmental operations support, wood stork foraging and breeding, defense waste processing, environmental stresses, alterations in the environment due to pollutants, wetland ecology, biodiversity, pond drawdown studies, and environmental toxicology.

  1. Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamics Program (Component Development and Integration Facility) in Butte, Montana, continued its site preparation for the TRW first-stage combustor installation. In the area of flue gas cleanup, our in-house research program is continuing its investigation into the causes of sorbent attrition in PETC's fluidized-bed copper oxide process for simultaneous SO/sub 2//NO/sub x/ removal. Interwoven with these tests is a series of spray dryer/electrostatic precipitator tests that are being conducted with the cooperation of Wheelabrator-Frye, Inc. This test series was completed this quarter, and the data show that when using a Kentucky coal, Wheelabrator-Frye's electrostatic precipitator provides excellent particulate control efficiency while using a spray dryer for sulfur dioxide removal. A unique project at Carnegie-Mellon University is looking at the concept of integrated environmental control for coal-fired power plants making use of precombustion, combustion, and postcombustion control, including systems for the simultaneous removal of more than one pollutant. The objective of this research is to develop a computer model and assessment for integrated environmental control systems that utilize conventional or advanced systems. The Liquid Phase Methanol Project Development Unit in LaPorte, Texas, was restarted after a successful shakedown run was completed. PETC has recently begun an in-house research project aimed at exploring the basic chemistry of liquefying coal in the presence of water under supercritical conditions. In the Alternative Fuels Technology Program, the Gulf Research and Development Company has completed the preliminary testing phase of its erosion test loop. Their results indicate that when pumping a coal-water slurry fuel through a flow loop, the erosion rate increases as velocity increases, suggesting a well-defined relationship between these two parameters.

  2. Semi-annual report for the unconventional gas recovery program, period ending March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manilla, R.D.

    1980-06-01

    Four subprograms are reported on: methane recovery from coalbeds, Eastern gas shales, Western gas sands, and methane from geopressured aquifers. (DLC)

  3. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1988-11-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

  4. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    Progress is reported in the following fields: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, elecrochemistry, catalysis, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemistry of hazardous chemicals, and thermal energy storage.

  5. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for period ending December 31, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burn, G.

    2000-03-01

    This is the twenty-seventh in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components.

  6. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    The Fusion Program carries out work in a number of areas: (1) experimental and theoretical research on two magnetic confinement concepts - the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) and the tokamak, (2) theoretical and engineering studies on a third concept - the stellarator, (3) engineering and physics of present-generation fusion devices, (4) development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques, (5) development and testing of materials for fusion devices, (6) development and testing of the essential technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, (7) development and testing of the superconducting magnets that will be needed to confine these plasmas, (8) design of future devices, (9) assessment of the environmental impact of fusion energy, and (10) assembly and distribution to the fusion community of data bases on atomic physics and radiation effects. The interactions between these activities and their integration into a unified program are major factors in the success of the individual activities, and the ORNL Fusion Program strives to maintain a balance among these activities that will lead to continued growth.

  7. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending August 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This paper contains abstracts on research performed at the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The areas covered are: mathematical science; nuclear-data measurement and evaluation; intelligent systems; nuclear analysis and shielding; and Engineering Physics Information Center. (LSP)

  8. Chemistry Division: Annual progress report for period ending March 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This report is divided into the following sections: coal chemistry; aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures; geochemistry of crustal processes to high temperatures and pressures; chemistry of advanced inorganic materials; structure and dynamics of advanced polymeric materials; chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds; separations chemistry; reactions and catalysis in molten salts; surface science related to heterogeneous catalysis; electron spectroscopy; chemistry related to nuclear waste disposal; computational modeling of security document printing; and special topics. (DLC)

  9. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1987-10-01

    This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

  10. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This is the eighteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: {sm_bullet} Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance. {sm_bullet} Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies. {sm_bullet} Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. This report has been compiled and edited under the guidance of A.F. Rowcliffe by Gabrielle Burn, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Their efforts, and the efforts of the many persons who made technical contributions, are gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Fusion energy division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The ORNL Program encompasses most aspects of magnetic fusion research including research on two magnetic confinement programs (tokamaks and ELMO bumpy tori); the development of the essential technologies for plasma heating, fueling, superconducting magnets, and materials; the development of diagnostics; the development of atomic physics and radiation effect data bases; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; the physics and engineering of present-generation devices; and the design of future devices. The integration of all of these activities into one program is a major factor in the success of each activity. An excellent example of this integration is the extremely successful application of neutral injection heating systems developed at ORNL to tokamaks both in the Fusion Energy Division and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The goal of the ORNL Fusion Program is to maintain this balance between plasma confinement, technology, and engineering activities.

  12. Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending December 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowcliff, A.F.; Burn, G.

    1999-04-01

    This is the twenty-fifth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately.

  13. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M&C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

  14. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

  15. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1995-07-01

    This is the seventeenth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six pans of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (DOE 1994b), and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented.

  16. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1994-07-01

    This is the thirteenth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated With Hanford site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (Borsheim et al. 1993), and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1.2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 3.0 and 4.0.

  17. Quarterly report on the ferrocyanide safety program for the period ending June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dukelow, G.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31

    This quarterly report provides a status of activities underway on the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue at the Hanford Site, including actions in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). In March 1991, a DNFSB implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the six parts of Recommendation 90-7 was prepared and sent to the DNFSB. A ferrocyanide safety program plan addressing the total Ferrocyanide Safety Program, including the six parts of DNFSB Recommendation 90-7, was released in October 1994 (DOE 1994b). Activities in the program plan are underway or are completed, and the status of each is described in Sections 2.0 and 3. 0 of this report.

  18. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending, March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cash, R.J.; Meacham, J.E.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1995-04-01

    This quarterly report provides a status of the activities underway on the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue at the Hanford Site, including actions in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). In March 1991, a DNFSB implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the six parts of Recommendation 90-7 was prepared and sent to the DNFSB. A Ferrocyanide Safety Program Plan addressing the total Ferrocyanide Safety Program, including the six parts of DNFSB Recommendation 90-7, was released in October 1994 (DOE 1994b). Activities in the program plan are underway or have been completed, and the status of each is described in Sections 2.0 and 3.0 of this report.

  19. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cash, R.J.; Meacham, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    This is the nineteenth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (DOE 1994b), and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1.2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 2.0 through 4.0. 58 refs.

  20. Quarterly report on the ferrocyanide safety program for the period ending March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.

    1996-05-08

    This is the twentieth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (DOE 1994b), and this report follows the same fomzat presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1. 2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 2. 0 through 4. 0.

  1. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1994-10-01

    This is the fourteenth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan, and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1.2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 3.0 and 4.0.

  2. Quarterly report on the ferrocyanide safety program for the period ending December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1995-01-01

    This is the fifteenth quarterly report on the progress of active addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (DOE 1994b), and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1.2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 2.0 through 4.0. 60 refs.

  3. Quarterly report on ferrocyanide safety program for the period ending December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1994-02-01

    This is the eleventh quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing safety issues associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks that contain ferrocyanide compounds. In the presence of oxidizing materials, such as nitrates or nitrites, ferrocyanide can be made to explode in the laboratory by heating to high temperatures [above 285{degree}C (545{degree}F)]. In the mid 1950s, approximately 140 metric tons of ferrocyanide were added to waste now stored in underground high-level radioactive waste tanks. An implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990) was issued in March 1991 describing the activities that were planned and underway to address each of the six parts of Recommendation 90-7. A revision to the original plan (Borsheim et al. 1992) was transmitted to the US Department of Energy by Westinghouse Hanford Company in December 1992, and subsequently to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board in 1993. The implementation plan was updated and revised this quarter and re-released as the ferrocyanide safety program plan (Borsheim et al, 1993a). The program plan still addresses the six parts of Recommendation 90-7; however, it also includes all work in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program. This quarterly report is reported against the new program plan.

  4. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1995-10-01

    This is the eighteenth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (DOE 1994b), and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1.2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 2.0 through 4.0.

  5. ORNL nuclear waste programs annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    Research progress is reported in 20 activities under the headings: spent fuels, defense waste management, commercial waste management, remedial action, and conventional reactors. Separate entries were prepared for each activity.

  6. Solid State Division: Progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1988-03-01

    This paper contains a collection of articles on research done at the Solid State Division of ORNL. General topics covered are: theoretical solid state physics; neutron scattering; physical properties of superconductors and ceramics; synthesis and characterization of solids; ion beam and laser processing; and surface and defect studies. (LSP)

  7. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selden, R.H.

    1991-06-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division are described in this annual progress report for FY 1990. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of how societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy efficient technologies; and (4) developing improved transportation planning and policy. Disciplines of the 129 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, chemical heat pumps, refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building enveloped (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), retrofits for existing buildings, and electric power systems. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. 48 refs., 34 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, J.N.

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division's total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  9. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This eighth annual report of the Division covers work done during FY 1981 (October 1, 1980, through September 30, 1981). As with these documents in the past, the format follows approximately the organizational structure of the Energy Division. Chapters 2 through 6 summarize the activities of the sections of the Division: Environmental Impact Section, headed by H.E. Zittel; Regional and Urban Studies Section, R.M. Davis; Economic Analysis Section, R.B. Shelton; Data and Analysis Section, A.S. Loebl; and Efficiency and Renewables Research Section, J.W. Michel. In addition, work on a variety of projects which cut across section lines is reported in Chapter 7, Integrated Programs. These activities are under the supervision of T.J. Wilbanks, Associate Director for the Division. Separate abstracts are included for individual projects.

  10. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program.

  11. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This report describes work done by staff of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during FY 1986. The work of the Division is quite diversified, but it can be divided into four research themes: (1) technology for improving the productivity of energy use; (2) technology for electric power systems; (3) analysis and assessment of energy and environmental issues, policies, and technologies; and (4) data systems research and development (R and D). The research is supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), numerous other federal agencies, and some private organizations. 190 refs., 60 figs., 23 tabs.

  12. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, J.N.

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division`s total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division`s programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  13. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending July 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Research is reported on: chemistry of coal liquefaction, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures, geosciences, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of TRU elements and compounds, separations chemistry, electrochemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, inorganic chemistry of hydrogen cycles, molten salt systems, and enhanced oil recovery. Separate abstracts were prepared for the sections dealing with coal liquefaction, TRU elements and compounds, separations, nuclear wastes, and enhanced oil recovery. (DLC)

  14. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    This report has been indexed by 11 separate chapters. The subjects covered are: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, materials chemistry, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, catalysis, electron spectroscopy, nuclear waste chemistry, heuristic modeling, and special topics. (PLG)

  15. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashdown, B.G.

    1980-10-01

    This report is organized along topical lines in parallel to a Program Plan of the same title so that activities and accomplishments may be followed readily relative to that Program Plan. Thus, the work of a given laboratory may appear throughout the report. Chapters 1, 2, 8, and 9 review activities on analysis and evaluation, test methods development, status of irradiation experiments, and corrosion testing and hydrogen permeation studies, respectively. These activities relate to each of the alloy development paths. Chapters 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 present the ongoing work on each alloy development path. The Table of Contents is annotated for the convenience of the reader.

  16. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This is the fourteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Depart of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Separate abstracts were prepared for each individual section.

  17. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report: For period ending December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This report is divided into analytical spectroscopy; radioactive materials analysis; inorganic chemistry; organic chemistry; ORNL environmental programs; quality assurance, safety, and training; supplementary activities; and presentation of research results.

  18. Engineering Physics Division progress report for period ending November 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Separate abstracts are included for sections concerning measurement of nuclear cross sections and related quantities; nuclear cross-section evaluations and theory; nuclear cross-section processing, testing, and sensitivity analysis; engineering physics division integral experiments and their analyses; development of methods for shield and reactor analysis; analyses for specific systems or applications; energy model validation; systems reliability and operations research; and information analysis and distribution.

  19. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

  20. HTGR Gas Turbine Program. Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    Information on the HTGR-GT program is presented concerning systems design methods; systems dynamics methods; alternate design; miscellaneous controls and auxiliary systems; structural mechanics; shielding analysis; licensing; safety; availability; reactor turbine system integration with plant; PCRV liners, penetrations, and closures; PCRV structures; thermal barrier; reactor internals; turbomachinery; turbomachine remote maintenance; control valve; heat exchangers; plant protection system; and plant control system.

  1. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  2. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  3. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    Research programs from the following sections and programs are summarized: aquatic ecology, environmental resources, earth sciences, terrestrial ecology, advanced fossil energy program, toxic substances program, environmental impacts program, biomass, low-level waste research and development program, US DOE low-level waste management program, and waste isolation program.

  4. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shults, W.D.; Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1980-05-01

    The progress is reported in the following sections: analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, technical support, bio-organic analysis, nuclear and radiochemical analysis, and quality assurance. (DLC)

  5. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poutsma, M.L.; Ferris, L.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    The Chemistry Division conducts basic and applied chemical research on projects important to DOE`s missions in sciences, energy technologies, advanced materials, and waste management/environmental restoration; it also conducts complementary research for other sponsors. The research are arranged according to: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, chemistry of advanced inorganic materials, structure and dynamics of advanced polymeric materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, chemical and structural principles in solvent extraction, surface science related to heterogeneous catalysis, photolytic transformations of hazardous organics, DNA sequencing and mapping, and special topics.

  6. Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center quarterly technical progress report for the period ending September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    Encouraging progress was made toward the development of acid rain control technology. PETC competitively selected and awarded contracts totaling over $8 million over the next three years to firms proposing new concepts for reducing the costs of cleaning the flue gas emissions of older, coal-burning power plants. PETC and ANL have undertaken a joint venture in dry flue-gas scrubbing that will ultimately lead to testing of a sorbent for combined SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ removal in Argonne's 20-megawatt spray dryer. The overall objective of a high-sulfur coal research program is to conduct a broad spectrum of coal-related research in order to increase and expand the use of coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. In the liquefaction program area, operations with Wyodak subbituminous coal are proceeding smoothly (Run 249) at the Wilsonville Process Development Unit. Understanding the processes involved in catalyst deactivation is important to the development of longer lived catalysts. In the area of process analysis, PETC has acquired a new version of ASPEN (Advanced System for Process Engineeering) software. The new version was recently installed on PETC's VAX/VMS operating system and is the most up-to-date version currently available. Work at PETC has resulted in the development and testing of a highly automated capillary tube viscometer for use with heavy coal-derived liquids. Results of PETC research in Fischer-Tropsch product characterization were also shared with the technical community. A particularly difficult analytical problem in the characterization of Fischer-Tropsch products is quantitative determination of carbon number distributions by compound class. PETC scientists developed a method that uses capillary gas chromatographic techniques to make these determinations. A paper describing the method was the lead article in the July 1985 issue of the Journal of Chromatographic Science and was featured on the cover.

  7. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    This annual report summarizes activities in the Aquatic Ecology, Earth Sciences, Environmental Analyses, and Terrestrial Ecology sections, as well as in the Fossil Energy, Biomass, Low-Level Waste Research and Management, and Global Carbon Cycle Programs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each section. (ACR)

  8. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, D.F.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the division, whose purpose is to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by US DOE. Activities range from basic research to industrial research and technology transfer. The division (and the report) is divided into the following: Engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials, program activities, collaborative research facilities and technology transfer, and educational programs.

  9. Solid State Division Progress Report for period ending March 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1986-08-01

    This report is divided into: theoretical solid-state physics, surface and near-surface properties of solids, defects in solids, transport properties of solids, neutron scattering, and synthesis and properties of novel materials. (DLC)

  10. Solid-State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1983-09-01

    Progress and activities are reported on: theoretical solid-state physics (surfaces; electronic, vibrational, and magnetic properties; particle-solid interactions; laser annealing), surface and near-surface properties of solids (surface, plasma-material interactions, ion implantation and ion-beam mixing, pulsed-laser and thermal processing), defects in solids (radiation effects, fracture, impurities and defects, semiconductor physics and photovoltaic conversion), transport properties of solids (fast-ion conductors, superconductivity, mass and charge transport in materials), neutron scattering (small-angle scattering, lattice dynamics, magnetic properties, structure and instrumentation), and preparation and characterization of research materials (growth and preparative methods, nuclear waste forms, special materials). (DLC)

  11. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-01-01

    The following sentences highlight some of the technical activities carried out during 1991. They illustrate the diversity of programs and technical work performed within the Analytical Chemistry Division. Our neutron activation analysis laboratory at HFIR was placed into operation during 1991. We have combined inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) with a preparation procedure developed at the Argonne National Laboratory to measure ultra-trace levels of U, Pu, Np, and Am in body fluids, primarily urine. Much progress has been made over the last year in the interfacing of an rf-powered glow discharge source to a double-focusing mass spectrometer. Preliminary experiments using electrospray ionization combined with ion trap mass spectrometry show much promise for the analysis of metals in solution. A secondary ion microprobe has been constructed that permits determination of the distribution of organic compounds less than a monolayer thick on samples as large as 1 cm diameter. Fourier transform mass spectrometry has been demonstrated to be a highly effective tool for the detailed characterization of biopolymers, especially normal and modified oligonucleotides. Much has been accomplished in understanding the fundamentals of quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Work with ITMS instrumentation has led to the development of rapid methods for the detection of trace organics in environmental and physiological samples. A new type of time-of-flight mass spectrometer was designed for use with our positron ionization experiments. Fundamental research on chromatography at high concentrations and on gas-solid adsorption has continued. The preparation of a monograph on the chemistry of environmental tobacco smoke was completed this year.

  12. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This progress report is divided into: engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, program activities, and collaborative research facilities. Very little hard data is presented. The appendices include listings of seminars, publications, and conference papers. (DLC)

  13. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, P.P.

    1994-07-01

    One of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY1993. Energy Division is committed to (1) understanding the mechanisms by which societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society`s understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy-efficient technologies; (4) improving transportation policy and planning; (5) enhancing basic knowledge in the social sciences as related to energy and associated issues. Energy Division`s expenditures in FY1993 totaled $42 million. The work was supported by the US DOE, DOD, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 126.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and computer sciences and data systems. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy use and delivery technologies, and (3) transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on emergency preparedness, transportation analysis, and analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries. Energy use and delivery technologies focus on electric power systems, building equipment, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Transportation systems research is conducted both to improve the quality of civilian transportation and for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  14. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1980. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    Research conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division for the Fiscal Year 1980 included studies carried out in the following Division programs and sections: (1) Advanced Fossil Energy Program, (2) Nuclear Program, (3) Environmental Impact Program, (4) Ecosystem Studies Program, (5) Low-Level Waste Research and Development Program, (6) National Low-Level Waste Program, (7) Aquatic Ecology Section, (8) Environmental Resources Section, (9) Earth Sciences Section, and (10) Terrestrial Ecology Section. In addition, Educational Activities and the dedication of the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park are reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report.

  15. Analytical Chemistry Division. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1981-05-01

    This report is divided into: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectrometry; technical support; bio/organic analysis; nuclear and radiochemical analysis; quality assurance, safety, and tabulation of analyses; supplementary activities; and presentation of research results. Separate abstracts were prepared for the technical support, bio/organic analysis, and nuclear and radiochemical analysis. (DLC)

  16. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1985-04-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following sections: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectroscopy; radioactive materials analysis; bio/organic analysis; and general and environmental analysis; quality assurance, safety, and tabulation analyses. In addition a list of publications and oral presentations and supplemental activities are included.

  17. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffield, J.; Berry, L.A.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1990-02-01

    This report discusses the following topics on fusion research: toroidal confinement activities; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; fusion theory and computation; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; advanced systems program; fusion materials research; neutron transport; and management services, quality assurance, and safety.

  18. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Counce, D.M.; Wolff, P.P.

    1993-04-01

    Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related Issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1992. Energy Division`s total expenditures in FY 1992 were $42.8 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, the US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 116.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, technology transfer, analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries, and civilian transportation analysis. Energy conservation technologies focus on electric power systems, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems conduct research for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. Much of Energy Division`s research is valuable to other organizations as well as to sponsors. This information is disseminated by the staff`s involvement in professional and trade organizations and workshops; joint research with universities and private-sector firms; collaboration with state and local governments; presentation of work at conferences; and publication of research results in journals, reports, and conference proceedings.

  19. Semiannual Report to Congress for the period ending March 31, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretary Moniz's OpenEnergySeizing a CleanSelf-SelectOCTOBER 1,

  20. High Pressure Fuel Storage Cylinders Periodic Inspection and End of Life

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡High HIGH PERFORMANCE and1 DOE0

  1. The Front End Fermi National Accelerator Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    The Front End MAP Review Fermi National Accelerator Lab August 24-26, 2010 Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory #12;August 2426, 2010 MAP ReviewFront End Harold G. Kirk ReviewFront End Harold G. Kirk 3 The Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory

  2. Network Performance Improvements For Web Services : : An End-to-End View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radhakrishnan, Sivasankar

    2014-01-01

    Modern Web Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .handshake overhead for all web services accessed by ChromeImprovements For Web Services – An End-to-End View A

  3. The End of Cheap Uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Dittmar

    2011-06-21

    Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10+- 2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58 +- 4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54 +- 5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41 +- 5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a worldwide nuclear energy phase-out is in order. If such a slow global phase-out is not voluntarily effected, the end of the present cheap uranium supply situation will be unavoidable. The result will be that some countries will simply be unable to afford sufficient uranium fuel at that point, which implies involuntary and perhaps chaotic nuclear phase-outs in those countries involving brownouts, blackouts, and worse.

  4. Towards End-to-End Secure Content Storage and Delivery with Public Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryder, Barbara G.

    Towards End-to-End Secure Content Storage and Delivery with Public Cloud Huijun Xiong§, Xinwen of leveraging cloud- based services for large scale content storage, processing, and distribution. Security and privacy are among top con- cerns for the public cloud environments. Towards end-to- end content security

  5. END-TO-END SCHEDULING TO MEET DEADLINES IN DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettati, Riccardo

    protocols and end-to-end scheduling. Finally, we show that by using end-to-end scheduling we can simplify resource access protocols and thus increase the utilization of resources. iii #12;To my parents, Aldo the years. Sam has always had a tender hart for starving graduate students. Let me acknowledge Hoichi Cheong

  6. DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training Navigational Tutorial - 1 8/27/2010 Steam End User Training Navigational Tutorial Module Slide 1 ­ Introduction Hello, and welcome to the Steam End User Training. I would like to take a few minutes to show you how to navigate through

  7. DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training Introduction Module - 1 8/27/2010 Steam End User Training Introduction Module Slide 1 - Introduction Title Page Hello, and welcome to the Steam System End User training. In this training, we will investigate how to assess, evaluate

  8. End-to-End Availability Policies and Noninterference Lantian Zheng Andrew C. Myers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamlen, Kevin W.

    End-to-End Availability Policies and Noninterference Lantian Zheng Andrew C. Myers Computer Science information flow analysis for the specification and enforcement of end-to- end availability policies, to also include security policies for availability. These policies characterize acceptable risks

  9. Ball Packings with Periodic Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Connelly; Jeffrey D. Shen; Alexander D. Smith

    2013-01-04

    We call a periodic ball packing in d-dimensional Euclidean space periodically (strictly) jammed with respect to a period lattice if there are no nontrivial motions of the balls that preserve the period (that maintain some period with smaller or equal volume). In particular, we call a packing consistently periodically (strictly) jammed if it is periodically (strictly) jammed on every one of its periods. After extending a well-known bar framework and stress condition to strict jamming, we prove that a packing with period Lambda is consistently strictly jammed if and only if it is strictly jammed with respect to Lambda and consistently periodically jammed. We next extend a result about rigid unit mode spectra in crystallography to characterize periodic jamming on sublattices. After that, we prove that there are finitely many strictly jammed packings of m unit balls and other similar results. An interesting example shows that the size of the first sublattice on which a packing is first periodically unjammed is not bounded. Finally, we find an example of a consistently periodically jammed packing of low density \\delta = \\frac{4 \\pi}{6 \\sqrt{3} + 11} + \\epsilon ~ 0.59, where \\epsilon is an arbitrarily small positive number. Throughout the paper, the statements for the closely related notions of periodic infinitesimal rigidity and affine infinitesimal rigidity for tensegrity frameworks are also given.

  10. End-use taxes: Current EIA practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-17

    There are inconsistencies in the EIA published end-use price data with respect to Federal, state, and local government sales and excise taxes; some publications include end-use taxes and others do not. The reason for including these taxes in end-use energy prices is to provide consistent and accurate information on the total cost of energy purchased by the final consumer. Preliminary estimates are made of the effect on prices (bias) reported in SEPER (State Energy Price and Expenditure Report) resulting from the inconsistent treatment of taxes. EIA has undertaken several actions to enhance the reporting of end-use energy prices.

  11. LHC end-of-year jamboree

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    A review of the accelerator performance and of the experimental results, at the end of the 2010 run of the LHC

  12. Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring Michael Sheppy, Shanti Pless, and Feitau Kung National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NRELTP-5500-61064 August 2014 NREL is a...

  13. Use of Risk-Based End States

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-07-15

    The policy addresses conducting cleanup that is aimed at, and achieves, clearly defined, risk-based end states. Canceled by DOE N 251.106.

  14. Tevatron End-of-Run Beam Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valishev, A.; Gu, X.; Miyamoto, R.; White, S.; Schmidt, F.; Qiang, J.; /LBNL

    2012-05-01

    Before the Tevatron Collider Run II ended in September of 2011, a number of specialized beam study periods were dedicated to the experiments on various accelerator physics concepts and effects during the last year of the machine operation. The study topics included collimation with bent crystals and hollow electron beams, diffusion measurements and various aspects of beam-beam interactions. In this report we concentrate on the subject of beam-beam interactions, summarizing the results of beam experiments. The covered topics include offset collisions, coherent beam stability, effect of the bunch-length-to-beta-function ratio, and operation of AC dipole with colliding beams.

  15. Tevatron End-of-Run Beam Physics Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valishev, A; Miyamoto, R; White, S; Schmidt, F; Qiang, J

    2012-01-01

    Before the Tevatron Collider Run II ended in September of 2011, a number of specialized beam study periods were dedicated to the experiments on various accelerator physics concepts and effects during the last year of the machine operation. The study topics included collimation with bent crystals and hollow electron beams, diffusion measurements and various aspects of beambeam interactions. In this report we concentrate on the subject of beam-beam interactions, summarizing the results of beam experiments. The covered topics include offset collisions, coherent beam stability, effect of the bunch-length-to-beta-function ratio, and operation of AC dipole with colliding beams.

  16. Laser rods with undoped, flanged end-caps for end-pumped laser applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meissner, Helmuth E. (Pleasanton, CA); Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA); Bibeau, Camille (Danville, CA); Sutton, Steven B. (Manteca, CA); Mitchell, Scott (Tracy, CA); Bass, Isaac (Castro Valley, CA); Honea, Eric (Sunol, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving improved performance in a solid state laser is provided. A flanged, at least partially undoped end-cap is attached to at least one end of a laserable medium. Preferably flanged, undoped end-caps are attached to both ends of the laserable medium. Due to the low scatter requirements for the interface between the end-caps and the laser rod, a non-adhesive method of bonding is utilized such as optical contacting combined with a subsequent heat treatment of the optically contacted composite. The non-bonded end surfaces of the flanged end-caps are coated with laser cavity coatings appropriate for the lasing wavelength of the laser rod. A cooling jacket, sealably coupled to the flanged end-caps, surrounds the entire length of the laserable medium. Radiation from a pump source is focussed by a lens duct and passed through at least one flanged end-cap into the laser rod.

  17. An End-to-end Web Services-based Infrastructure for Biomedical Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Sriram

    An End-to-end Web Services-based Infrastructure for Biomedical Applications Sriram Krishnan, Kim K Chemistry, University of Zurich Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland sriram@sdsc.edu, kimb

  18. Front End G4beamline simulation update Front End G4beamline simulation update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    1 Front End G4beamline simulation update Front End G4beamline simulation update Pavel Snopok University of California Riverside September 14, 2010 #12;2 Front End G4beamline simulation update More yields per incident proton. Energy deposition study in G4beamline is underway. All numerical results

  19. F3ildCrypt: End-to-End Protection of Sensitive Information in Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keromytis, Angelos D.

    - tion's web pipeline, from the outward-facing web servers to the back-end databases. The problem-clearing intermediaries. We present F3ildCrypt, a system that provides end-to-end protection of data across a web pipeline risk; to our knowl- edge, this is one of the first uses of web scripting that enhances overall security

  20. EndNote X5 Basics What is EndNote?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will need to choose between two installation types ­ Typical or Custom. If you choose Typical, you. This guide will show you the following basic steps for using EndNote: Opening or creating an EndNote Library Adding bibliographic references or citations to your library Using EndNote with Microsoft Word

  1. Curved EFC/F-BAR-Domain Dimers Are Joined End to End into a Filament for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhijie, Liu

    Curved EFC/F-BAR-Domain Dimers Are Joined End to End into a Filament for Membrane Invagination a gently curved helical-bundle dimer of $220 A° in length, which forms filaments through end that impaired filament formation also impaired membrane tubulation and cell membrane invagination. Furthermore

  2. Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"OmahaEnergy Sources and End Uses Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses End-UseA 6 J 9 U B u o f l53DecadeVehicle

  3. Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"OmahaEnergy Sources and End Uses Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses End-UseA 6 J 9 U BEstimatedSales (Billion342,261

  4. Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"OmahaEnergy Sources and End Uses Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses End-UseA 6 J 9Cubic Feet) Oil1369,739 330,914

  5. Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"OmahaEnergy Sources and End Uses Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses End-UseA 6 J 9CubicFeet)

  6. Shift End | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShift End Shift End A shift ends and the race

  7. Electrically heated particulate matter filter with recessed inlet end plugs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Ament, Frank (Troy, MI)

    2012-02-21

    A particulate matter (PM) filter includes filter walls having inlet ends and outlet ends. First adjacent pairs of the filter walls define inlet channels. Second adjacent pairs of the filter walls define outlet channels. Outlet end plugs are arranged in the inlet channels adjacent to the output ends. Inlet end plugs arranged in the outlet channels spaced from the inlet ends.

  8. Center for High-End Computing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butt, Ali R.

    /Vision/Goals · " ... world-class computer systems research in the service of high-end computing." · A consortium of CS-aware computing: frameworks for power, energy, and thermal measurement, analysis, and optimization · Performance

  9. End of the Concessionary Regime in Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulido, Mario

    2015-01-01

    expropriated. Instead, Mexico saw prosperity from cateringEnd of the Concessionary Regime in Mexico By Mario Pulido OnMarch 18, 1938, President of Mexico Lazaro Cardenas formally

  10. Preliminary CBECS End-Use Estimates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    For the past three CBECS (1989, 1992, and 1995), we used a statistically-adjusted engineering (SAE) methodology to estimate end-use consumption. The core of the SAE methodology...

  11. End of semester project Global Optimization algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreyfuss, Pierre

    End of semester project Global Optimization algorithms Ecole Polytechnique de l'Université de Nice.......................................................................................................................................3 II. Simulated annealing algorithm (SA.........................................................................................................................................7 2.Principle,algorithm and choice of parameters

  12. Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier Series 23.2 Introduction In this Section we show how, then the Fourier series expansion takes the form: f(t) = a0 2 + n=1 (an cos nt + bn sin nt) Our main purpose here Fourier coefficients of a function of period 2 calculate Fourier coefficients of a function of general

  13. Shortest recurrence periods of novae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Mariko [Department of Astronomy, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8521 (Japan); Saio, Hideyuki [Astronomical Institute, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Hachisu, Izumi [Department of Earth Science and Astronomy, College of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Nomoto, Ken'ichi, E-mail: mariko@educ.cc.keio.ac.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-10-01

    Stimulated by the recent discovery of the 1 yr recurrence period nova M31N 2008-12a, we examined the shortest recurrence periods of hydrogen shell flashes on mass-accreting white dwarfs (WDs). We discuss the mechanism that yields a finite minimum recurrence period for a given WD mass. Calculating the unstable flashes for various WD masses and mass accretion rates, we identified a shortest recurrence period of about two months for a non-rotating 1.38 M {sub ?} WD with a mass accretion rate of 3.6 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}. A 1 yr recurrence period is realized for very massive (? 1.3 M {sub ?}) WDs with very high accretion rates (? 1.5 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}). We revised our stability limit of hydrogen shell burning, which will be useful for binary evolution calculations toward Type Ia supernovae.

  14. Dynamical system theory of periodically collapsing bubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yukalov, V I; Sornette, D

    2015-01-01

    We propose a reduced form set of two coupled continuous time equations linking the price of a representative asset and the price of a bond, the later quantifying the cost of borrowing. The feedbacks between asset prices and bonds are mediated by the dependence of their "fundamental values" on past asset prices and bond themselves. The obtained nonlinear self-referencing price dynamics can induce, in a completely objective deterministic way, the appearance of periodically exploding bubbles ending in crashes. Technically, the periodically explosive bubbles arise due to the proximity of two types of bifurcations as a function of the two key control parameters $b$ and $g$, which represent, respectively, the sensitivity of the fundamental asset price on past asset and bond prices and of the fundamental bond price on past asset prices. One is a Hopf bifurcation, when a stable focus transforms into an unstable focus and a limit cycle appears. The other is a rather unusual bifurcation, when a stable node and a saddle...

  15. Abrupt change of Antarctic moisture origin at the end of Termination II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    Abrupt change of Antarctic moisture origin at the end of Termination II V. Masson-Delmottea,1 , B of events involved in Termination II, the transition between the penultimate glacial and interglacial periods. This termination is marked by a north­south seesaw behavior, with first a slow methane concen

  16. Laser rods with undoped, flanged end-caps for end-pumped laser applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meissner, H.E.; Beach, R.J.; Bibeau, C.; Sutton, S.B.; Mitchell, S.; Bass, I.; Honea, E.

    1999-08-10

    A method and apparatus for achieving improved performance in a solid state laser is provided. A flanged, at least partially undoped end-cap is attached to at least one end of a laserable medium. Preferably flanged, undoped end-caps are attached to both ends of the laserable medium. Due to the low scatter requirements for the interface between the end-caps and the laser rod, a non-adhesive method of bonding is utilized such as optical contacting combined with a subsequent heat treatment of the optically contacted composite. The non-bonded end surfaces of the flanged end-caps are coated with laser cavity coatings appropriate for the lasing wavelength of the laser rod. A cooling jacket, sealably coupled to the flanged end-caps, surrounds the entire length of the laserable medium. Radiation from a pump source is focused by a lens duct and passed through at least one flanged end-cap into the laser rod. 14 figs.

  17. Legend"s End Issue 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonds, Martha

    1984-01-01

    to LEGEND'S END. I'm glad It's In youn. hand* at last. This Is a stony that'6 been with me hor a long, long turn. The writing wa* begun several year* ago, though wiXh other committment*, I couldn't begin in earnest until the. hall oh '11. Then health... tyranny and heroism. It i* about the men who created a legend and who rehuse to let It end. Thl* i* volume one oh two ? but don't panic. The *tory you hold In your hand* Is complete between these coven*. Volume II i* In the early planning *tage...

  18. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of34 End3.

  19. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of34 End3.7

  20. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of34 End3.78

  1. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of348 End

  2. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of348 End7

  3. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of348 End78

  4. Detailed End Use Load Modeling for Distribution System Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.

    2010-04-09

    The field of distribution system analysis has made significant advances in the past ten years. It is now standard practice when performing a power flow simulation to use an algorithm that is capable of unbalanced per-phase analysis. Recent work has also focused on examining the need for time-series simulations instead of examining a single time period, i.e., peak loading. One area that still requires a significant amount of work is the proper modeling of end use loads. Currently it is common practice to use a simple load model consisting of a combination of constant power, constant impedance, and constant current elements. While this simple form of end use load modeling is sufficient for a single point in time, the exact model values are difficult to determine and it is inadequate for some time-series simulations. This paper will examine how to improve simple time invariant load models as well as develop multi-state time variant models.

  5. End-to-end absolute energy calibration of atmospheric fluorescence telescopes by an electron linear accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    End-to-end absolute energy calibration of atmospheric fluorescence telescopes by an electron linear of fluorescence telescopes by using air showers induced by electron beams from a linear accelerator, which and constructing a compact linear accelerator with a maximum electron energy of 40 MeV and an intensity of 6.4 m

  6. Multi-domain Diagnosis of End-to-End Service Failures in Hierarchically Routed Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethi, Adarshpal

    to find a consensus explanation of the observed disorder. We show through simulation that the proposed.g., a malfunctioning interface, intermittent connectivity, etc., may disorder one or more end- to-end paths containing, Cooperative Agreement DAAD19-01-2-0011. The U. S. Government is authorized to reproduce and distribute

  7. Distributed End-to-end Proportional Delay Differentiation in Wireless LAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahrstedt, Klara

    1 Distributed End-to-end Proportional Delay Differentiation in Wireless LAN Yuan Xue, Kai Chen a clear service differentiation model, proportional service differentiation, to the domain of wireless network which targets at providing proportional delay differentiation in wireless LAN. Due to the unique

  8. Tesla: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Framework for End-to-end Network Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesla: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Framework for End-to-end Network Services by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arthur C. Smith Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Students #12;2 #12;Tesla: A Transparent of these services, we describe Tesla, a transparent and extensible framework that allows session-layer services

  9. Tesla: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Framework for End-to-end Network Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesla: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Framework for End-to-end Network Services by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arthur C. Smith Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Students #12; 2 #12; Tesla: A Transparent of these services, we describe Tesla, a transparent and extensible framework that allows session-layer services

  10. TESLA: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Architecture for End-to-end Network Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TESLA: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Architecture for End-to-end Network Services Jon describes TESLA, a transparent and extensible framework allowing session- layer services to be developed using a high-level flow- based abstraction. TESLA services can be deployed transparently using dynamic

  11. TESLA: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Architecture for End-to-end Network Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TESLA: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Architecture for End-to-end Network Services Jon describes TESLA, a transparent and extensible framework allowing session- layer services to be developed using a high-level ¤ow- based abstraction. TESLA services can be deployed transparently using dynamic

  12. END-TO-END SIMULATIONS FOR THE EBIS PREINJECTOR* D. Raparia#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Frankfurt/Main, Germany Abstract The EBIS Project at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in the second year Collider (RHIC), and for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The preinjector will provide all ions, and intensities of ~2.0 mA. End-to-end simulations (from EBIS to the Booster injection) as well as error

  13. Oceanography Vol.21, No.490 Northern End

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCready, Parker

    Oceanography Vol.21, No.490 Whyis the Northern End of the California Current System So Productive a N Pr O C E S S E S E CO S y St E M r E S P O N S E Oceanography Vol.21, No.490 ThisarticlehasbeenpublishedinOceanography,Volume21,Number4,aquarterlyjournalofTheOceanographySociety.Copyright2008byTheOceanography

  14. OPEN-ENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    radio telescopes, devices that use the second observability window of radio waves. Why configurationsOPEN-ENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES: A GEOMETRICAL ANALYSIS Vladik Kreinovich, Scott A. The quality of radio astronomical images drastically depends on where we place the radio telescopes. During

  15. Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report describes the NREL partnership with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, which can be used to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

  16. PV Odds & Ends by John Wiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    PV Odds & Ends by John Wiles Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy There are two primary wiring methods for connecting PV modules together--using exposed single-conductor cables, and using conduits. Each dictates a different grounding method, but in either case, PV modules must always

  17. Front End Processing Challenges David J. Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chintan

    /SiO2/Silicon New materials: Arsenic, Refractory Metals (Ti, Ta, W), Nitride 2005 (Today) ­ MOS is really Polycide/Nitrided SiO2/Modified Silicon New materials: Copper, Germanium 2015 (End of Moore's Law?) ­ MOS will be ??/??/Modified silicon New materials: metal gate, gate dielectric, nickel silicide, others

  18. Energy deposition update Front End phone meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Energy deposition update P. Snopok Front End phone meeting March 31, 2015 #12;MARS · Modified geometry is strongly desired · Energy change is via RF kick at the center of the cavity ­ MARS invokes in ICOOL/G4beamline · How thick the beampipe and shielding around (if any) should be ­ energy deposition

  19. Analytic aspects of periodic instantons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charbonneau, Benoit, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    The main result is a computation of the Nahm transform of a SU(2)-instanton over R x T³, called spatially-periodic instanton. It is a singular monopole over T³, a solution to the Bogomolny equation, whose rank is computed ...

  20. Stratified Steady Periodic Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Walsh

    2009-02-11

    This paper considers two-dimensional stratified water waves propagating under the force of gravity over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. We prove the existence of a global continuum of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. These waves, moreover, can exhibit large density variation, speed and amplitude.

  1. ANDERSON LOCALIZATION FOR TIME PERIODIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    disorder, Anderson localization in Z d is stable un- der localized time-periodic perturbations by proving random Schrodinger operators at large disorder has been well known since the seminal work of Fr is approximated by the potential V . The equation governing the system is (1.5) i @ @t = (#1; + V ) on Z d #2

  2. Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newes, E.; Bush, B.; Inman, D.; Lin, Y.; Mai, T.; Martinez, A.; Mulcahy, D.; Short, W.; Simpkins, T.; Uriarte, C.; Peck, C.

    2012-05-01

    The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a system dynamics model developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the biofuels industry in the United States. However, it does not currently have the capability to account for allocation of biomass resources among the various end uses, which limits its utilization in analysis of policies that target biomass uses outside the biofuels industry. This report provides a more holistic understanding of the dynamics surrounding the allocation of biomass among uses that include traditional use, wood pellet exports, bio-based products and bioproducts, biopower, and biofuels by (1) highlighting the methods used in existing models' treatments of competition for biomass resources; (2) identifying coverage and gaps in industry data regarding the competing end uses; and (3) exploring options for developing models of biomass allocation that could be integrated with the BSM to actively exchange and incorporate relevant information.

  3. Process of modifying a cable end

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roose, L.D.

    1995-08-01

    End moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of the cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. Disclosed are a method for making the cable connectors either in the field or in a factory, molds suitable for use with the method, and the molded cable connectors, themselves. 5 figs.

  4. FAMS DECOMMISSIONING END-STATE ALTERNATIVE EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimm, B; Stephen Chostner, S; Brenda Green, B

    2006-05-25

    Nuclear Material Management (NMM) completed a comprehensive study at the request of the Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR) in 2004 (Reference 11.1). The study evaluated the feasibility of removal and/or mitigation of the Pu-238 source term in the F-Area Material Storage (FAMS) facility during on-going material storage operations. The study recommended different options to remove and/or mitigate the Pu-238 source term depending on its location within the facility. During April 2005, the Department of Energy (DOE) sent a letter of direction (LOD) to Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) directing WSRC to implement a new program direction that would enable an accelerated shutdown and decommissioning of FAMS (Reference 11.2). Further direction in the LOD stated that effective December 1, 2006 the facility will be transitioned to begin deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities. To implement the LOD, Site D&D (SDD) and DOE agreed the planning end-state would be demolition of the FAMS structure to the building slab. SDD developed the D&D strategy, preliminary cost and schedule, and issued the deactivation project plan in December 2005 (Reference 11.3). Due to concerns and questions regarding the FAMS planning end-state and in support of the project's Critical Decision 1, an alternative study was performed to evaluate the various decommissioning end-states and the methods by which those end-states are achieved. This report documents the results of the alternative evaluation which was performed in a structured decision-making process as outlined in the E7 Manual, Procedure 2.15, ''Alternative Studies'' (Reference 11.4).

  5. Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Ermerging Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Information about the implementation of emerging technologies to maximize end-use efficiency in buildings.

  6. The Most Commonly Asked Questions About the Waiting List 1. When is my reply due? Please reply before May 1st. We may be able to offer some students a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    before May 1st. We may be able to offer some students a place in this fall's class immediately after which I would attend if I am not offered a place at Wesleyan from the waiting list? Yes. You need to reserve your place there in case Wesleyan is unable to offer you admission. The deposit is usually non

  7. Examination Schools Room Layout During Trinity Term use the Merton Street entrance and wait in the quad marquee until your examination is called. Outside of Trinity Term enter via the High Street entrance and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    South SchoolEast School SI Student Information Desk wc wc wc PLEASE NOTE: THERE IS NO CAR PARKING until your examination is called. Outside of Trinity Term please go directly to the Exam Hall. Reception Exam Office EXAM HALL wc Exam Office Reception wc QUAD MARQUEE WAITING AREA Entrance ­ via car park

  8. Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-07-16

    An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  9. Down hole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  10. Open end protection for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zafred, Paolo R. (Murrysville, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Tomlins, Gregory W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Toms, James M. (Irwin, PA); Folser, George R. (Lower Burrell, PA); Schmidt, Douglas S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Hager, Charles A. (Zelienople, PA)

    2001-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell (40) having a closed end (44) and an open end (42) operates in a fuel cell generator (10) where the fuel cell open end (42) of each fuel cell contains a sleeve (60, 64) fitted over the open end (42), where the sleeve (60, 64) extends beyond the open end (42) of the fuel cell (40) to prevent degradation of the interior air electrode of the fuel cell by fuel gas during operation of the generator (10).

  11. Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppy, M.; Pless, S.; Kung, F.

    2014-08-01

    NREL partnered with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, including preheat, heating, and reheat; humidification; service water heating; cooling; fans; pumps; lighting; and select plug and process loads. Additional data from medical office buildings were provided for an analysis focused on plug loads. Facility managers, energy managers, and engineers in the healthcare sector will be able to use these results to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

  12. Tao Probing the End of the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung-Soo Kim; Masato Taki; Futoshi Yagi

    2015-06-25

    We introduce a new IIB 5-brane description for the E-string theory which is the world-volume theory on M5-brane probing the end of the world M9-brane. The E- string in the new realization is depicted as spiral 5-branes web equipped with the cyclic structure which is a key to uplifting to 6 dimensions. Utilizing the topological vertex to the 5-brane web configuration enables us to write down a combinatorial formula for the generating function of the E-string elliptic genera, namely the full partition function of topological strings on local 1/2 K3 surface.

  13. Tao Probing the End of the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung-Soo Kim; Masato Taki; Futoshi Yagi

    2015-08-02

    We introduce a new type IIB 5-brane description for the E-string theory which is the world-volume theory on the M5-brane probing the end of the world M9-brane. The E-string in the new realization is depicted as spiral 5-branes web equipped with the cyclic structure which is key to uplifting to six dimensions. Utilizing the topological vertex to the 5-brane web configuration enables us to write down a combinatorial formula for the generating function of the E-string elliptic genera, namely the full partition function of topological strings on the local 1/2 K3 surface.

  14. Tomatoes: Irrigation Spacing Blossom-End Rot. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerard, C. J.; Hipp, B. W.; Cowley, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    produced significantly less than tomatoes which were 6 to 12 inches apart. From the relationship between incidence of bb 1 som-end rot (BER) and moisture stress, it was deter - mined that spring-grown pear tomatoes should ttl irrigated 7 to 15 days... after initiation ol first blooir to keep BER incidence below 5 percent on medium. I textured soils. In contrast, spring-grown pear tom. toes on Harlingen clay soils had high BER inridena even under high soil moisture conrlitions because i. good...

  15. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of34

  16. End of the road for Roadrunner

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployeeJonHere »ArgonneEnablingEnd

  17. Property:EndDate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, search PropertyIsoOther JumpEndDate Jump to: navigation, search

  18. Property:EndYear | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, search PropertyIsoOther JumpEndDate Jump to: navigation,

  19. Office Buildings - End-Use Equipment

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan FebElements)Feet) Decade8 45YearYearEnd-Use

  20. Frozen light in periodic metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Figotin; I. Vitebskiy

    2006-09-16

    Wave propagation in spatially periodic media, such as photonic crystals, can be qualitatively different from any uniform substance. The differences are particularly pronounced when the electromagnetic wavelength is comparable to the primitive translation of the periodic structure. In such a case, the periodic medium cannot be assigned any meaningful refractive index. Still, such features as negative refraction and/or opposite phase and group velocities for certain directions of light propagation can be found in almost any photonic crystal. The only reservation is that unlike hypothetical uniform left-handed media, photonic crystals are essentially anisotropic at frequency range of interest. Consider now a plane wave incident on a semi-infinite photonic crystal. One can assume, for instance, that in the case of positive refraction, the normal components of the group and the phase velocities of the transmitted Bloch wave have the same sign, while in the case of negative refraction, those components have opposite signs. What happens if the normal component of the transmitted wave group velocity vanishes? Let us call it a "zero-refraction" case. At first sight, zero normal component of the transmitted wave group velocity implies total reflection of the incident wave. But we demonstrate that total reflection is not the only possibility. Instead, the transmitted wave can appear in the form of an abnormal grazing mode with huge amplitude and nearly tangential group velocity. This spectacular phenomenon is extremely sensitive to the frequency and direction of propagation of the incident plane wave. These features can be very attractive in numerous applications, such as higher harmonic generation and wave mixing, light amplification and lasing, highly efficient superprizms, etc.

  1. Sampling TCP Data-Path Quality with TCP Data Probes Rocky K. C. Chang, Edmond W. W. Chan, Waiting W. T. Fok, and Xiapu Luo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Rocky Kow-Chuen

    the existing tools, OneProbe uses legiti- mate TCP data probes to profile TCP data-path quality by sampling and Hong Kong. 1 Introduction This paper considers active measurement methods for end- to-end paths without controlling the remote endpoint. We refer this class of methods to as solo-active. In contrast, duet

  2. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings1992 -- Overview/End-Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul1998,(Million CubicEnd1995 End-Use

  3. FY 2002 Quarterly Report Reporting Period Ending September 30, 2002 Grant No. DE-FG03-01SF22335

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-09-30

    A consensus-based collaborative formed in 1994, the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC) is comprised of representatives from utility, wind, environmental, consumer, regulatory, power marketer, agricultural, tribal, economic development, State and federal government sectors interested in encouraging the prudent acceleration of wind power deployment in the United States. B263

  4. Advanced research and technology development fossil energy materials program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, R.A.

    1981-12-01

    This is the fourth combined quarterly progress report for those projects that are part of the Advanced Research and Technology Development Fossil Energy Materials Program. The objective is to conduct a program of research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. Work performed on the program generally falls into the Applied Research and Exploratory Development categories as defined in the DOE Technology Base Review, although basic research and engineering development are also conducted. A substantial portion of the work on the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program is performed by participating cntractor organizations. All subcontractor work is monitored by Program staff members at ORNL and Argonne National Laboratory. This report is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure defined in the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program Plan for FY 1981 in which projects are organized according to fossil energy technologies. We hope this series of AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program quarterly progress reports will aid in the dissemination of information developed on the program.

  5. Quarterly report on Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 for the period ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.; Forbes, C.J.; Meacham, J.E.

    1993-06-01

    This is the eighth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing safety issues associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks that contain ferrocyanide compounds. In the presence of oxidizing materials, such as nitrates or nitrites, ferrocyanide can be made to explode in the laboratory by heating it to high temperatures [above 285{degree}C (545{degree}F)]. In the mid 1950s, approximately 140 metric tons of ferrocyanide were added to 24 underground high-level radioactive waste tanks. An implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990) was issued in March 1991 describing the activities that were planned and underway to address each of the six parts of Recommendation 90-7. A revision to the original plan was transmitted to the US Department of Energy by Westinghouse Hanford Company in December 1992.

  6. Quarterly report on Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 for the period ending June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.; Forbes, C.J.; Meacham, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    This is the ninth quarterly report on the progress of activities that address safety issues associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks containing ferrocyanide compounds. Milestones completed this quarter include (1) a report on the credibility of hot spots and a recommendation on infrared scans; (2) a document discussing the strength and limitations of proposed moisture monitoring technologies; (3) limited calibration of the neutron probe in simulant-filled drums; (4) a report interpreting data from auger surface samples of ferrocyanide tank 241-BY-104; (5) a document on the effect of possible catalyst, initiator, and diluents on ferrocyanide reactivity; (6) a report on small scale sensitivity tests of ferrocyanide flowsheet simulants; and (7) preparation and shipment of T Plant simulants for calorimetric and dryout tests.

  7. Quarterly report on Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 for the period ending March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1992-05-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing safety issues associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks that contain ferrocyanide compounds. In the presence of oxidizing materials, such as nitrates or nitrites, ferrocyanide can be made to explode in the laboratory by heating it to high temperatures (above 285{degrees}C (545{degree}F)). In the mid 1950s approximately 140 metric tons of ferrocyanide were added to 24 underground high-level radioactive waste tanks. An implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990) was issued in March 1991 describing the activities planned and underway to address each of the six parts of the recommendation.

  8. Quarterly report on Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 for the period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.; Forbes, C.J.

    1993-03-01

    This is the seventh quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing safety issues associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks that contain ferrocyanide compounds. In the presence of oxidizing materials, such as nitrates or nitrites, ferrocyanide can be made to explode in the laboratory by heating it to high temperatures [above 285{degrees}C (545{degrees}F)]. In the mid 1950s approximately 140 metric tons of ferrocyanide were added to 24 underground high-level radioactive waste tanks. An implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990) was issued in March 1991 describing the activities that were planned and underway to address each of the six parts of Recommendation 90-7. A revision to the original plan was transmitted to US Department of Energy by Westinghouse Hanford Company in December 1992. Milestones completed this quarter are described in this report. Contents of this report include: Introduction; Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Implementation Plan Task Activities (Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation for enhanced temperature measurement, Recommendation for continuous temperature monitoring, Recommendation for cover gas monitoring, Recommendation for ferrocyanide waste characterization, Recommendation for chemical reaction studies, and Recommendation for emergency response planning); Schedules; and References. All actions recommended by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board for emergency planning by Hanford Site emergency preparedness organizations have been completed.

  9. Quarterly report on Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board recommendation 90-7 for the period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1993-12-01

    This is the tenth quarterly repose on the progress of activities addressing safety issues associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks that contain ferrocyanide compounds. In the Presence of oxidizing materials, such as nitrates or nitrites, ferrocyanide can be made to explode in the laboratory by hearing it to high temperatures [above 285{degree} C (545{degree} F)]. In the mid 1950s, approximately 140 metric tons of ferrocyanide were added to waste now stored in underground high-level radioactive waste tanks. An implementation plan responding to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990){sup 2} was issued in March 1991 describing the activities that were planned and underway to address each of the six parts of Recommendation 90-7. A revision to the original plan was transmitted to the US Department of Energy by Westinghouse Hanford in December 1992, and subsequently to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board in 1993.

  10. Quarterly report on Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 for the period ending March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1992-05-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing safety issues associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks that contain ferrocyanide compounds. In the presence of oxidizing materials, such as nitrates or nitrites, ferrocyanide can be made to explode in the laboratory by heating it to high temperatures [above 285{degrees}C (545{degree}F)]. In the mid 1950s approximately 140 metric tons of ferrocyanide were added to 24 underground high-level radioactive waste tanks. An implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990) was issued in March 1991 describing the activities planned and underway to address each of the six parts of the recommendation.

  11. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. Quarterly technical progress report for period ending March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The present study shows that activation of a high surface area Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst in CO in a (CSTR), continuously stirred tank reactor using tetralin as solvent results in an activated that is three times of material that is activated in H{sub 2} or directly in the syngas.

  12. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology. (KRM)

  13. Vigorous exchange between the Indian and Atlantic oceans at the end of the past five glacial periods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peeters, Frank JC; Acheson, Ruth; Brummer, Geert-Jan A; de Ruijter, Wilhelmus P. M; Schneider, Ralph R; Ganssen, Gerald M; Ufkes, Els; Kroon, Dick

    2004-08-05

    The magnitude of heat and salt transfer between the Indian and Atlantic oceans through ‘Agulhas leakage’ is considered important for balancing the global thermohaline circulation1–3. Increases or reductions of this ...

  14. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program. Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R.

    1992-12-01

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  15. Russia vows to end oil export tax

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-27

    This paper reports that Russia will eliminate its oil export tax by 1994 and until then will allow some exemptions, Russian officials have assured a group of US tax specialists. They stopped short of saying it would be repealed by the end of the year, the Ken Crawford, a member of a Tax Foundation delegation visiting Russia and managing partner of KPMG Peat Marwick's Moscow office. The export tax was one of several tax related Russian economic issues on which the US experts and Russian officials exchanged views early this month. The 15 member delegation was in Moscow on invitation from Russia's Ministry of Finance and State Committee on Taxation to help develop guidelines for laws governing Russia's taxation of foreign investment. The US group was sponsored by the Tax Foundation, Washington, DC, a nonprofit, nonpartisan tax and fiscal policy research and public education group.

  16. End-to-End Delay Analysis in Wireless Sensor Networks with Service Vacation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    and control systems, where sensors detect chemical gases and operating conditions of plant facilities. On th distributions matches the simulation results. Index Terms--Wireless sensor networks, queueing theory, end- to-equipped, low-power, and low-cost devices with limited sensing, data processing, transmission range, memory

  17. Prediction of end-to-end single flow characteristics in best-effort networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shukla, Yashkumar Dipakkumar

    2005-08-29

    -to-end Single Flow Characteristics in Best-effort Networks. (May 2005) Yashkumar Shukla, B.E., Nirma Institute of Technology, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Alexander Parlos The nature of user traffic in coming years will become...

  18. Adaptive Routing with End-to-End feedback: Distributed Learning and Geometric Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinberg, Robert D.

    algorithm must choose, in each round, a strategy from some compact set S Rd so as to try to minimize a linear cost function which is only revealed at the end of the round. Kalai and Vempala [4] gave an algorithm for such problems in the transparent feedback model, where the entire cost function is revealed

  19. Monitoring of Electrical End-Use Loads in Commercial Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, M.; Alereza, T.; Mort, D.

    1988-01-01

    custom-designed to facilitate collection and validation of the end-use load data. For example, the Load Profile Viewer is a PC-based software program for reviewing and validating the end-use load data....

  20. Front-end electronics and trigger systems - status and challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spieler, Helmuth G

    2008-01-01

    of the 12th Workshop on Electronics For LHC and Future19-24, 2007 Front-end electronics and trigger systems –about a revolution in front-end electronics for large- scale

  1. Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency; Industrial Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    specified by the manufacturer, and the air going to all end uses should be free of condensate to maximize tool life and effectiveness. 6 End uses having similar air requirements...

  2. Host Multicast: A Framework for Delivering Multicast To End Users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    delivery to end hosts where IP multicast is not available. With HMTP, end-hosts and proxy gateways of IP configuration of tunnels to connect these IP multicast enabled "islands" to form the MBone, a static overlay and Engineers (PECASE) 1998, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship 2001. ends of each tunnel

  3. EndNote X6 Basics For Windows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will need to choose between two installation types ­ Typical or Custom. If you choose Typical, you EndNote: Opening or creating an EndNote Library Adding bibliographic references or citations to your library Using EndNote with Microsoft Word to organize research papers, insert references using Cite While

  4. Short Polymer Chain Statistics and the Relationship to End to End Electronic Excitation Transport: Random Walks with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Short Polymer Chain Statistics and the Relationship to End to End Electronic Excitation Transport of the distribution of distances between the ends of a polymer chain for short chains (asmallnumber. Theseareused as models for low molecularweight polymers in whichthefirst and last statisticalsegmentsare

  5. Long-period pulses Motivation Developed program Results Long-period disturbances in records of Swiss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Long-period pulses Motivation Developed program Results Long-period disturbances in records 2014 #12;Long-period pulses Motivation Developed program Results Index 1 Long-period pulses in records 2 Motivation for the study 3 Developed program 4 Results #12;Long-period pulses Motivation Developed

  6. End-to-end interoperability and workflows from building architecture design to one or more simulations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chao, Tian-Jy; Kim, Younghun

    2015-02-10

    An end-to-end interoperability and workflows from building architecture design to one or more simulations, in one aspect, may comprise establishing a BIM enablement platform architecture. A data model defines data entities and entity relationships for enabling the interoperability and workflows. A data definition language may be implemented that defines and creates a table schema of a database associated with the data model. Data management services and/or application programming interfaces may be implemented for interacting with the data model. Web services may also be provided for interacting with the data model via the Web. A user interface may be implemented that communicates with users and uses the BIM enablement platform architecture, the data model, the data definition language, data management services and application programming interfaces to provide functions to the users to perform work related to building information management.

  7. A Periodic Solution to Impulsive Logistic Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gyong-Chol Kim; Hyong-Chol O; Sang-Mun Kim; Chol Kim

    2014-03-28

    In this paper is provided a new representation of periodic solution to the impulsive Logistic equation considered in [7].

  8. Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles Spencer Bloch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloch, Spencer

    K0(X) = CHp (X)Q Spencer Bloch () Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles March 3, 2014 Albert) CHp(X, n) := H-n(Zp(X, ·)). Spencer Bloch () Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles March 3, 2014 ) - Zp (X) CHp(X, n) := H-n(Zp(X, ·)). Spencer Bloch () Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles March 3

  9. Detection of superimposed periodic signals using wavelets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Otazu; M. Ribo; M. Peracaula; J. M. Paredes; J. Nunez

    2002-02-05

    In this paper we present a wavelet based algorithm that is able to detect superimposed periodic signals in data with low signal-noise ratio. In this context, the results given by classical period determination methods highly depend on the intrinsic characteristics of each periodic signal, like amplitude or profile. It is then difficult to detect the different periods present in the data set. The results given by the wavelet based method for period determination we present here are independent of the characteristics of the signals.

  10. Method for making an elastomeric member with end pieces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, L.O.; McNinch, J.H. Jr.; Nowell, G.C.

    1984-10-23

    A molding process is described for molding an elongated elastomeric member with wire mesh sleeves bonded to the ends. A molding preform of elastomeric material is positioned within a seamless mold cylinder, and the open ends of the wire mesh sleeves are mounted to end plug assemblies slidably received into the mold cylinder and positioned against the ends of the preform. A specialized profile is formed into surfaces of the respective end plug assemblies and by heating of the mold, the ends of the elastomeric preform are molded to the profile, as well as bonded to the reinforcing wire mesh sleeves. Vacuum is applied to the interior of the mold to draw outgassing vapors through relief spaces there through. The completed elastomeric member is removed from the mold cylinder by stretching, the consequent reduction in diameter enabling ready separation from the mold cylinder and removal thereof. 9 figs.

  11. Method for making an elastomeric member with end pieces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI); McNinch, Jr., Joseph H. (Livonia, MI); Nowell, Gregory C. (Livonia, MI)

    1984-01-01

    A molding process for molding an elongated elastomeric member (60) with wire mesh sleeves (16) bonded to the ends (14). A molding preform (10) of elastomeric material is positioned within a seamless mold cylinder (26), and the open ends of the wire mesh sleeves (16) are mounted to end plug assemblies (30) slidably received into the mold cylinder (26) and positioned against the ends (14) of the preform (10). A specialized profile is formed into surfaces (44) of the respective end plug assemblies (30) and by heating of the mold (26), the ends (14) of the elastomeric preform (10) are molded to the profile, as well as bonded to the reinforcing wire mesh sleeves (16). Vacuum is applied to the interior of the mold to draw outgassing vapors through relief spaces therethrough. The completed elastomeric member (60) is removed from the mold cylinder (26) by stretching, the consequent reduction in diameter enabling ready separation from the mold cylinder (26) and removal thereof.

  12. Effects of caloric restriction during the growing period on the performance of egg type replacement stock 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deaton, James Washington

    1959-01-01

    respectively. At twelve, sixteen, and twenty oue weeks of age, fifty birds from each 100 bird replicate were weighed individually. Table 6 shows the average body weight for each treatment replicate for the 12, 16, end 21 week periods end the comMned mens... consistently consumed more feed and gained more weight. Tlxe total feed conxxumd for tom'. fall hatched birds vas 18. 27 pounds average pez bird compared to 15. N pounds fcr the spring hatched birds with the faU. hatched pglaca aaaragisg 6. 185$ gaaag...

  13. Seismic isolation of two dimensional periodic foundations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Y.; Mo, Y. L.; Laskar, A.; Cheng, Z.; Shi, Z.; Menq, F.; Tang, Y.

    2014-07-28

    Phononic crystal is now used to control acoustic waves. When the crystal goes to a larger scale, it is called periodic structure. The band gaps of the periodic structure can be reduced to range from 0.5?Hz to 50?Hz. Therefore, the periodic structure has potential applications in seismic wave reflection. In civil engineering, the periodic structure can be served as the foundation of upper structure. This type of foundation consisting of periodic structure is called periodic foundation. When the frequency of seismic waves falls into the band gaps of the periodic foundation, the seismic wave can be blocked. Field experiments of a scaled two dimensional (2D) periodic foundation with an upper structure were conducted to verify the band gap effects. Test results showed the 2D periodic foundation can effectively reduce the response of the upper structure for excitations with frequencies within the frequency band gaps. When the experimental and the finite element analysis results are compared, they agree well with each other, indicating that 2D periodic foundation is a feasible way of reducing seismic vibrations.

  14. The Access Almanac: Ending the Abuse of Disabled Parking Placards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Ending the Abuse of Disabled Parking Placards DONALD SHOUP Aattention for repeatedly parking illegally in spaceshandicappedfraud.org. Making curb parking accessible to

  15. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Estimates The end-use estimates had two main sources: the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system....

  16. Marius Stan Returning to Reddit To Tie Up Loose Ends

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marius Stan, computational scientist and Breaking Bad actor, will be returning to Reddit once again to tie up loose ends by answering questions.

  17. Mergers and Mass Accretion for Infalling Halos Both End Well...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Halos Both End Well Outside Cluster Virial Radii Authors: Behroozi, Peter S. ; Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. Stanford U., Phys. Dept. SLAC KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Wechsler,...

  18. Geographic Area Month Sales to End Users Sales

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Area Month Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Residential Consumers Commercial Institutional Consumers Industrial Consumers Through Retail Outlets Petro- Chemical Other...

  19. Secure Hop-by-Hop Aggregation of End-to-End Concealed Data in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mlaih, Esam

    2008-01-01

    In-network data aggregation is an essential technique in mission critical wireless sensor networks (WSNs) for achieving effective transmission and hence better power conservation. Common security protocols for aggregated WSNs are either hop-by-hop or end-to-end, each of which has its own encryption schemes considering different security primitives. End-to-end encrypted data aggregation protocols introduce maximum data secrecy with in-efficient data aggregation and more vulnerability to active attacks, while hop-by-hop data aggregation protocols introduce maximum data integrity with efficient data aggregation and more vulnerability to passive attacks. In this paper, we propose a secure aggregation protocol for aggregated WSNs deployed in hostile environments in which dual attack modes are present. Our proposed protocol is a blend of flexible data aggregation as in hop-by-hop protocols and optimal data confidentiality as in end-to-end protocols. Our protocol introduces an efficient $O(1)$ heuristic for checking...

  20. Do triatomic molecules echo atomic periodicity?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hefferlin, R. Barrow, J.

    2015-03-30

    Demonstrations of periodicity among triatomic-molecular spectroscopic constants underscore the role of the periodic law as a foundation of chemistry. The objective of this work is to prepare for another test using vibration frequencies ?{sub 1} of free, ground-state, main-group triatomic molecules. Using data from four data bases and from computation, we have collected ?{sub 1} data for molecules formed from second period atoms.

  1. Pricing Conspicuous Consumption Products in Recession Periods ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-09-26

    cally used in chemical engineering, e.g., to avoid irreversible reactions in ... Our basic problem is based on an economic setting with a recession period followed.

  2. Impact of wireless losses on the predictability of end-to-end flow characteristics in Mobile IP Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhoite, Sameer Prabhakarrao

    2005-02-17

    -1 IMPACT OF WIRELESS LOSSES ON THE PREDICTABILITY OF END-TO-END FLOW CHARACTERISTICS IN MOBILE IP NETWORKS A Thesis by SAMEER BHOITE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2004 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering IMPACT OF WIRELESS LOSSES ON THE PREDICTABILITY OF END-TO-END FLOW CHARACTERISTICS IN MOBILE IP NETWORKS A Thesis by SAMEER BHOITE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial...

  3. Residential Behavioral Savings: An Analysis of Principal Electricity End Uses in British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiedemann, Kenneth Mr.

    2013-01-01

    of residential end use electricity consumption for Britishresidential electricity consumption by end use Apply theresidential end use electricity consumption using a

  4. Theoretical and Computational Investigation of Periodically Focused Intense Charged-Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-06-26

    The purpose of this report is to summarize results of theoretical and computational investigations of periodically focused intense charged-particle beams in parameter regimes relevant to the development of advanced high-brightness, high-power accelerators for high-energy physics research. The breakthroughs and highlights in our research in the period from April 1, 2010 to March 30, 2013 were: a) Theory and simulation of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow; b) Particle-in-cell simulations of adiabatic thermal beams in periodic solenoidal focusing field; c)Dynamics of charged particles in an adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium in a periodic solenoidal focusing field; d) Training of undergraduate researchers and graduate student in accelerator and beam physics. A brief introduction and summary is presented. Detailed descriptions of research results are provided in an appendix of publications at the end of the report.

  5. Inference and Visualization of Periodic Sequences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Ying

    2011-10-21

    are evenly spaced in time. The period is estimated by a "leave-out-one-cycle" version of cross-validation (CV) and complements the periodogram, a widely used tool for period estimation. The CV method is computationally simple and implicitly penalizes...

  6. Periodic cellular automata and Bethe ansatz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atsuo Kuniba; Akira Takenouchi

    2006-01-07

    We review and generalize the recent progress in a soliton cellular automaton known as the periodic box-ball system. It has the extended affine Weyl group symmetry and admits the commuting transfer matrix method and the Bethe ansatz at q=0. Explicit formulas are proposed for the dynamical period and the number of states characterized by conserved quantities.

  7. Mathematical Modelling of End-to-End Packet Delay in Multi-hop Wireless Networks and their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Mathematical Modelling of End-to-End Packet Delay in Multi-hop Wireless NetworksS) provisioning in multi-hop wireless networks. The multi-hop wireless technology increases capacity and coverage): 1) packets traverse multiple wireless network devices and 2) packets are transmitted to or received

  8. USER-MANAGED END-TO-END LIGHTPATH PROVISIONING OVER Jing Wu, Scott Campbell, J. Michel Savoie, Hanxi Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Bochmann, Gregor

    USER-MANAGED END-TO-END LIGHTPATH PROVISIONING OVER CA*NET 4 Jing Wu, Scott Campbell, J. Michel dark fibre networks and long-haul wavelength networks. Schools, hospitals and government departments are acquiring their own metro dark fibres. They participate in so-called "condominium" dark fibre networks

  9. Experimental Demonstration of End-to-End PCI Express Communication over a Transparent All-Optical Photonic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Keren

    Experimental Demonstration of End-to-End PCI Express Communication over a Transparent All@ee.columbia.edu Abstract: We successfully establish a PCI Express link, demonstrating device recognition between and industry-wide acceptance of various standard communication protocols, such as PCI Express, Hyper

  10. The end-to-end distribution function for a flexible chain with weak excluded-volume interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Drozdov

    2004-06-25

    An explicit expression is derived for the distribution function of end-to-end vectors and for the mean square end-to-end distance of a flexible chain with excluded-volume interactions. The Hamiltonian for a flexible chain with weak intra-chain interactions is determined by two small parameters: the ratio $\\epsilon$ of the energy of interaction between segments (within a sphere whose radius coincides with the cut-off length for the potential) to the thermal energy, and the ratio $\\delta$ of the cut-off length to the radius of gyration for a Gaussian chain. Unlike conventional approaches grounded on the mean-field evaluation of the end-to-end distance, the Green function is found explicitly (in the first approximation with respect to $\\epsilon$). It is demonstrated that (i) the distribution function depends on $\\epsilon$ in a regular way, while its dependence on $\\delta$ is singular, and (ii) the leading term in the expression for the mean square end-to-end distance linearly grows with $\\epsilon$ and remains independent of $\\delta$.

  11. System for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burry, David B. (Westminster, CO); Williams, Paul M. (Lafayette, CO)

    1991-02-19

    A system and method for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot permits exchange during a programmed task. The exchange mechanism is located off the robot, thus reducing the mass of the robot arm and permitting smaller robots to perform designated tasks. A simple spring/collet mechanism mounted on the robot is used which permits the engagement and disengagement of the tool or end effector without the need for a rotational orientation of the tool to the end effector/collet interface. As the tool changing system is not located on the robot arm no umbilical cords are located on robot.

  12. System for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burry, D.B.; Williams, P.M.

    1991-02-19

    A system and method for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot permits exchange during a programmed task. The exchange mechanism is located off the robot, thus reducing the mass of the robot arm and permitting smaller robots to perform designated tasks. A simple spring/collet mechanism mounted on the robot is used which permits the engagement and disengagement of the tool or end effector without the need for a rotational orientation of the tool to the end effector/collet interface. As the tool changing system is not located on the robot arm no umbilical cords are located on robot. 12 figures.

  13. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of3 End1 End

  14. Periodic Measurement of Advertising Effectiveness Using Multiple-Test-Period Geo Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    of ad effectiveness measurements across time. Additionally, the experimental units should rotate betweenPeriodic Measurement of Advertising Effectiveness Using Multiple-Test-Period Geo Experiments Jon experiments to the measurement of advertising effectiveness. One reason this method of measurement

  15. Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Gopal (Naperville, IL); Lewellen, John (Plainfield, IL); Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Vinokurov, Nikolai (Novosibirsk, RU)

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  16. VARIABILITY OF SOUTHERN AND NORTHERN SKR PERIODICITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer-Vernet, Nicole

    wind speed, its long-term fluctuations (months to years) were proposed to be triggered by Enceladus of Cassini continuous radio measurements are investigated, from 2004 (pre-equinox) to the end of 2010 (post-equinox to the fluctuations of the solar wind speed (while the SKR intensity is correlated to the solar wind dynamic pressure

  17. Dynamics of Periodically-kicked Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin K. Lin; Lai-Sang Young

    2010-04-21

    We review some recent results surrounding a general mechanism for producing chaotic behavior in periodically-kicked oscillators. The key geometric ideas are illustrated via a simple linear shear model.

  18. Impact of Motor Failures on Payback Periods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheek, K. F.; Pillay, P.; Dudley, K. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper uses MotorMaster and Vaughen's Complete Price Guide to determine payback periods for different motor failure scenarios. Some scenarios considered are rewinds, reconditions, and replacement of bearings. Prices for these repairs...

  19. University of Oregon Libraries Types of Periodicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockery, Shawn

    University of Oregon Libraries Types of Periodicals Scholarly Sources Popular Sources SCHOLARLY American Quarterly RN Automotive News Library Journal Restaurants & Institutions Chemical Engineering News & biographical information Statistics, including forecasts Some book reviews Commentary on political & social

  20. RF CMOS UWB transmitter and receiver front-end design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Meng

    2009-05-15

    The low-cost low-power complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) ultra wideband (UWB) transmitter and receiver front-ends based on impulse technology were developed. The CMOS UWB pulse generator with frequency-band ...

  1. Energy Learning Exchange 2014-15 Year-End Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branoff, Theodore J.

    Energy Learning Exchange 2014-15 Year-End Report June 2015 #12;#12;Introduction to the Energy ................................................................................................2 What is the Energy Learning Exchange (ELE......................................................................................................................................6 Achieving the Objectives of the Energy Learning Exchange

  2. Supplemental Schedules For the Year Ended June 30, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Supplemental Schedules For the Year Ended June 30, 2014 Clemson, south Carolina A component unit & Learning Technologies, Clemson University. #12;~ 1 ~ Supplemental Schedules #12;~ 2 ~ #12;~ 3 ~ Detailed Supplemental Statements of Financial Activity Balance Sheet - Unrestricted Current Funds

  3. Supplemental Schedules For the Year Ended June 30, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Supplemental Schedules For the Year Ended June 30, 2012 Included in the Higher Education ~ Supplemental Schedules #12;~ 2 ~ #12;~ 3 ~ Detailed Supplemental Statements of Financial Activity ................................................................ 41 Supplemental Statements of Assets Investment in Plant

  4. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    as buildings of the 1980's. In this section, intensities are based upon the entire building stock, not just those buildings using a particular fuel for a given end use. This...

  5. Evolutionary Patterns of Trilobites Across the End Ordovician Mass Extinction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Congreve, Curtis Raymond

    2013-05-31

    The end Ordovician mass extinction is the second largest extinction event in the history or life and it is classically interpreted as being caused by a sudden and unstable icehouse during otherwise greenhouse conditions. ...

  6. Scientia : An end user development environment for decision support systems/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Clayton Tyler

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes an end user programming environment that allows non-programmers to create decision support protocols for use on electronic devices. User centered design techniques were followed to identify the ...

  7. Methanogenic burst in the end-Permian carbon cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothman, Daniel H.

    The end-Permian extinction is associated with a mysterious disruption to Earth’s carbon cycle. Here we identify causal mechanisms via three observations. First, we show that geochemical signals indicate superexponential ...

  8. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    N ATIONAL L ABORATORY India Energy Outlook: End Use DemandTables Figures Figure 1. India Primary Energy Supply by fuel33 Table 15. India Industry Energy Intensities (GJ/

  9. United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shehabi, Arman

    2014-01-01

    by end uses (e.g. , boilers, process, electric drives,MECS 2002, and MECS 1998 data. Indirect Uses-Boiler FuelConventional Boiler Use CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

  10. Making Plans: "Architecture Begins and Ends in Pictures"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, Hilary

    2010-01-01

    BEGINS AND ENDS IN PICTURES” Hilary French Royal College ofexamples the 20th Century ‘picture books’. For architects,on a whole series of ‘picture books’ of housing design

  11. QM/MM description of periodic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doll, K

    2015-01-01

    A QM/MM implementation for periodic systems is reported. This is done for the case of molecules and for systems with two and three-dimensional periodicity, which is suitable to model electrolytes in contact with electrodes. Tests on different water-containing systems, ranging from the water dimer up to liquid water indicate the correctness of the scheme. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations are performed, as a possible direction to study realistic systems.

  12. The periodicity of the eta Carinae events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Damineli; M. F. Corcoran; D. J. Hillier; O. Stahl; R. S. Levenhagen; N. V. Leister; J. H. Groh; M. Teodoro; J. F. Albacete Colombo; F. Gonzalez; J. Arias; H. Levato; M. Grosso; N. Morrell; R. Gamen; G. Wallerstein; V. Niemela

    2007-11-27

    Extensive spectral observations of eta Carinae over the last cycle, and particularly around the 2003.5 low excitation event, have been obtained. The variability of both narrow and broad lines, when combined with data taken from two earlier cycles, reveal a common and well defined period. We have combined the cycle lengths derived from the many lines in the optical spectrum with those from broad-band X-rays, optical and near-infrared observations, and obtained a period length of 2022.7+-1.3 d. Spectroscopic data collected during the last 60 years yield an average period of 2020+-4 d, consistent with the present day period. The period cannot have changed by more than $\\Delta$P/P=0.0007 since 1948. This confirms the previous claims of a true, stable periodicity, and gives strong support to the binary scenario. We have used the disappearance of the narrow component of HeI 6678 to define the epoch of the Cycle 11 minimum, T_0=JD 2,452,819.8. The next event is predicted to occur on 2009 January 11 (+-2 days). The dates for the start of the minimum in other spectral features and broad-bands is very close to this date, and have well determined time delays from the HeI epoch.

  13. U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download...

  14. Kepler and the long-period variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartig, Erich; Lebzelter, Thomas [University of Vienna, Department of Astrophysics, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Cash, Jennifer [Department of Biological and Physical Sciences, South Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7024, Orangeburg, SC 29117 (United States); Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Mighell, Kenneth J. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Walter, Donald K., E-mail: erich.hartig@univie.ac.at, E-mail: thomas.lebzelter@univie.ac.at, E-mail: jcash@physics.scsu.edu, E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu, E-mail: mighell@noao.edu, E-mail: dkw@physics.scsu.edu [Department of Biological and Physical Sciences, South Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7296, Orangeburg, SC 29117 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Kepler photometry is used to explore the details of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) light curves. Since AGB variability has a typical timescale on the order of a year, we discuss at length the removal of long-term trends and quarterly changes in Kepler data. Photometry for a small sample of nine semi-regular (SR) AGB stars is examined using a 30 minute cadence over a period of 45 months. While undergoing long-period variations of many magnitudes, the light curves are shown to be smooth at the millimagnitude level over much shorter time intervals. No flares or other rapid events were detected on a sub-day timescale. The shortest AGB period detected is on the order of 100 days. All the SR variables in our sample are shown to have multiple modes. This is always the first overtone, typically combined with the fundamental. A second common characteristic of SR variables is shown to be the simultaneous excitation of multiple closely separated periods for the same overtone mode. Approximately half the sample had a much longer variation in the light curve, likely a long secondary period (LSP). The light curves were all well represented by a combination of sinusoids. However, the properties of the sinusoids are time variable, with irregular variations present at low levels. No non-radial pulsations were detected. It is argued that the LSP variation seen in many SR variables is intrinsic to the star and linked to multiple mode pulsation.

  15. Periodic subsystem density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genova, Alessandro; Pavanello, Michele; Ceresoli, Davide

    2014-11-07

    By partitioning the electron density into subsystem contributions, the Frozen Density Embedding (FDE) formulation of subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) has recently emerged as a powerful tool for reducing the computational scaling of Kohn–Sham DFT. To date, however, FDE has been employed to molecular systems only. Periodic systems, such as metals, semiconductors, and other crystalline solids have been outside the applicability of FDE, mostly because of the lack of a periodic FDE implementation. To fill this gap, in this work we aim at extending FDE to treat subsystems of molecular and periodic character. This goal is achieved by a dual approach. On one side, the development of a theoretical framework for periodic subsystem DFT. On the other, the realization of the method into a parallel computer code. We find that periodic FDE is capable of reproducing total electron densities and (to a lesser extent) also interaction energies of molecular systems weakly interacting with metallic surfaces. In the pilot calculations considered, we find that FDE fails in those cases where there is appreciable density overlap between the subsystems. Conversely, we find FDE to be in semiquantitative agreement with Kohn–Sham DFT when the inter-subsystem density overlap is low. We also conclude that to make FDE a suitable method for describing molecular adsorption at surfaces, kinetic energy density functionals that go beyond the GGA level must be employed.

  16. Magnetomechanically induced long period fiber gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Causado-Buelvas, Jesus D.; Gomez-Cardona, Nelson D.; Torres, Pedro

    2008-04-15

    In this work, we report a simple, flexible method to create long period fiber gratings mechanically by controlling the repulsion/attraction force between two magnets that pressing a plate with a periodic array of small glass cylinders to a short length of optical fiber. Via the photoelastic effect, the pressure points induce the required periodic refractive index modulation to create the LPFG. We found that the induced device exhibits spectral characteristics similar to those of other types of LPFG. As the optical properties of LPFGs are directly related to the nature of the applied perturbations, we show, to our knowledge for the frrst time, how is the evolution of birefringence effects in mechanically induced LPFGs.

  17. Sequential conditions for fixed and periodic points 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Burnis Charles

    1970-01-01

    ) (Member) ~A (Month) 1970 (Year) ~04SQQ ABSTRACT Sec, uential Conditions fo. Fixed and Periodic Points (August 1970) Burnis C. Peter, Jr. , B. A. , Texas ASM University; M. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Jack Bryant and L. F. Guseman, Jr.... Let (X, d) be a metric space and f a selfmap of X. It is shown that a number of known theorems on the existence of fixed and periodic points are related through simple properties of the n sequence (f ) of iterates . ACMOVI. EDGEMENTS I wish...

  18. Emergent hyperuniformity in periodically-driven emulsions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joost H. Weijs; Raphaël Jeanneret; Rémi Dreyfus; Denis Bartolo

    2015-04-28

    We report the emergence of large-scale hyperuniformity in microfluidic emulsions. Upon periodic driving confined emulsions undergo a first-order transition from a reversible to an irreversible dynamics. We evidence that this dynamical transition is accompanied by structural changes at all scales yielding macroscopic yet finite hyperuniform structures. Numerical simulations are performed to single out the very ingredients responsible for the suppression of density fluctuations. We show that as opposed to equilibrium systems the long-range nature of the hydrodynamic interactions are not required for the formation of hyperuniform patterns, thereby suggesting a robust relation between reversibility and hyperuniformity which should hold in a broad class of periodically driven materials.

  19. Method Of Making Closed End Ceramic Fuel Cell Tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borglum, Brian P. (Edgewood, PA)

    2002-04-30

    A method of manufacturing closed end ceramic fuel cell tubes with improved properties and higher manufacturing yield is disclosed. The method involves bonding an unfired cap to a hollow unfired tube to form a compound joint. The assembly is then fired to net shape without subsequent machining. The resultant closed end tube is superior in that it provides a leak-tight seal and its porosity is substantially identical to that of the tube wall. The higher manufacturing yield associated with the present method decreases overall fuel cell cost significantly.

  20. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of3 End Uses

  1. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of3 End

  2. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of3 End1

  3. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of3 End13

  4. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of3 End134

  5. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of3 End1341

  6. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of3 End13412

  7. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of34 End

  8. Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses of5 End

  9. Residential sector end-use forecasting with EPRI-Reeps 2.1: Summary input assumptions and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, J.G.; Brown, R.E.; Richey, R.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes current and projected future energy use by end-use and fuel for the U.S. residential sector, and assesses which end-uses are growing most rapidly over time. The inputs to this forecast are based on a multi-year data compilation effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. We use the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) REEPS model, as reconfigured to reflect the latest end-use technology data. Residential primary energy use is expected to grow 0.3% per year between 1995 and 2010, while electricity demand is projected to grow at about 0.7% per year over this period. The number of households is expected to grow at about 0.8% per year, which implies that the overall primary energy intensity per household of the residential sector is declining, and the electricity intensity per household is remaining roughly constant over the forecast period. These relatively low growth rates are dependent on the assumed growth rate for miscellaneous electricity, which is the single largest contributor to demand growth in many recent forecasts.

  10. Localization length of nearly periodic layered metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Barco, O

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed numerically the localization length of light $\\xi$ for nearly periodic arrangements of homogeneous stacks (formed exclusively by right-handed materials) and mixed stacks (with alternating right and left-handed metamaterials). Layers with index of refraction $n_1$ and thickness $L_1$ alternate with layers of index of refraction $n_2$ and thickness $L_2$. Positional disorder has been considered by shifting randomly the positions of the layer boundaries with respect to periodic values. For homogeneous stacks, we have shown that the localization length is modulated by the corresponding bands and that $\\xi$ is enhanced at the center of each allowed band. In the limit of long-wavelengths $\\lambda$, the parabolic behavior previously found in purely disordered systems is recovered, whereas for $\\lambda \\ll L_1 + L_2$ a saturation is reached. In the case of nearly periodic mixed stacks with the condition $|n_1 L_1|=|n_2 L_2|$, instead of bands there is a periodic arrangement of Lorenztian resonances, ...

  11. Utility Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV -2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ELECTRICITY Consumption MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 8 CCF STEAM Consumption CHILLED WATER Consumption GAS Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV - 2013 032 JACKSON HALL: 150,393 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption,550 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption 114,185 KWHRS MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 1,423 CCF STEAM Consumption

  12. Periodic Reward-Based Scheduling and Its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydin, Hakan

    catastrophic. Examples of real-time systems can be found in control systems of nuclear power plants, air36 Periodic Reward-Based Scheduling and Its Application to Power-Aware Real-Time Systems Hakan ........................... 36-9 Modeling Real-Time Workload and Energy on a Variable Speed CPU · Correlating Real-Time Power

  13. Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-06-15

    An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

  14. Two Hundred Fifty Years of Aerosols and Climate: The End of the Age of Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Bond, Tami C.

    2014-01-20

    Carbonaceous and sulfur aerosols have a substantial global and regional influence on climate in addition to their impact on health and ecosystems. The magnitude of this influence has changed substantially over the past and is expected to continue to change into the future. An integrated picture of the changing climatic influence of black carbon, organic carbon and sulfate over the period 1850 through 2100, focusing on uncertainty, is presented using updated historical inventories and a coordinated set of emission projections. While aerosols have had a substantial impact on climate over the past century, by the end of the 21st century aerosols will likely be only a minor contributor to radiative forcing due to increases in greenhouse gas forcing and a global decrease in pollutant emissions. This outcome is even more certain under a successful implementation of a policy to limit greenhouse gas emissions as low-carbon energy technologies that do not emit appreciable aerosol or SO2 are deployed.

  15. Elsevier Journal Specific Embargo Periods 2013 Journal Name Issn Embargo Period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio

    Elsevier Journal Specific Embargo Periods 2013 Journal Name Issn Embargo Period ACADEMIC PEDIATRICS 18762859 12 ACADEMIC RADIOLOGY 10766332 12 ACC CARDIOSOURCE REVIEW JOURNAL 15568571 12 ACCIDENT ANALYSIS 18759637 24 AEROSPACE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 12709638 24 AESTHETIC SURGERY JOURNAL 1090820X 12 AESTHETISCHE

  16. Welcome to the 2015 SFO Fiscal Year End

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elzanowski, Marek

    · General Prep & Deadlines · Prepaid Expenses · Closing · Q & A Agenda #12;Year end close occurs in 3 stepsst, ALL BANNER INPUT FOR FY15 MUST USE A 30-JUN-2015 TRANSACTION DATE ***** #12;Prepaid expenses are future expenses that have been paid in advance. You can think of prepaid expenses as costs that have been

  17. MA Thesis Degree Program Checklist By End of Second Term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    MA Thesis Degree Program Checklist By End of Second Term ( ) Select major professor and other two Advisory Committee members. ( ) Submit Program of Study. ( ) Submit thesis proposal to Advisory Committee for approval. ( ) Submit copy of approved thesis proposal to Grady Graduate Studies Office. ( ) Pick up thesis

  18. Development of RF CMOS receiver front-ends for ultrawideband 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guan, Xin

    2009-05-15

    .5dB and a noise figure of 3.3-4.5dB from 3-9.5GHz, while only consuming 9mW power. Based on the distributed amplifier and resistive shunt-feedback amplifier designs, two UWB RF front-ends are developed. One is a distributed LNA-Mixer. Unlike...

  19. Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    This report summarizes revisions to the design basis for the linear programing refining model that is being used in the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. This revision primarily reflects the addition of data for the upgrading of direct coal liquids.

  20. Industrial Steam Power Cycles Final End-Use Classification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterland, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    Final end uses of steam include two major classifications: those uses that condense the steam against heat transfer surfaces to provide heat to an item of process or service equipment; and those that require a mass flow of steam for stripping...

  1. Managing Blossom-End Rot BECKY SIDEMAN, PHD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    expanding fruit. Initially, symptoms appear as a water-soaked area that becomes a dark brown or black dry rot (see below). Secondary infections, such as botrytis (gray mold), may also occur (see below at the bottom of fruits (center fruit), and on the sides (top left and top right fruits). Mild blossom-end rot

  2. Elizabeth Harvey Memorial Sustainable Development Intern Year End Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elizabeth Harvey Memorial Sustainable Development Intern Year End Report For the Academic Year 2011 ­ 2012 Submitted May 8th , 2012 to the Bishop's Sustainable Development and Land Use Committee by Lauri Lidstone #12;Sustainable Development Student Intern Report 2011-2012 1 I would like to thank the Elizabeth

  3. By war's end,in 1945,the University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    III By war's end,in 1945,the University was braced for the influx of returning veterans who were. By then the nation had already been at war for two years and had turned itself into "the Arsenal of Democracy the howitzer that had stood on Front Campus for twenty years as reminder of the school's World War I dead

  4. Managing References using EndNote online: Pharmacy & Pharmacology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheichl, Robert

    . In the catalogue search box, type in Web of Science 3. The open Web of Science database by clicking view online and then the Register link (drop-down under the Customize your experience option) 2. Enter your University of Bath email. Read and agree to terms use of use to complete registration 8. To access EndNote online in the future

  5. Shielded RF Lattice for the Muon Front End Chris Rogers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Shielded RF Lattice for the Muon Front End Chris Rogers, Accelerator Science and Technology Centre (ASTeC), Rutherford Appleton Laboratory #12; Shielded RF Lattice I wanted to remind folks a lot of slides apologies I've tried to break it up a bit #12; Part 1 Shielded Lattice Baseline

  6. Financial Report For the Year Ended June 30, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Financial Report For the Year Ended June 30, 2012 #12;University of Connecticut Health Center June, the University of Connecticut (University) serves as the state's flagship for higher education, meeting the integration of teaching, research and service. The University of Connecticut is a comprehensive institution

  7. Financial Report For the Year Ended June 30, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Financial Report For the Year Ended June 30, 2008 #12;University of Connecticut Health Center June, the University of Connecticut (University) serves as the state's flagship for higher education, meeting the integration of teaching, research and service. The University of Connecticut is a comprehensive institution

  8. Financial Report For the Year Ended June 30, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Financial Report For the Year Ended June 30, 2014 #12;#12;University of Connecticut June 30, 2014 in 1881, the University of Connecticut (University) serves as the State of Connecticut's (State) flagship. The University of Connecticut is a comprehensive institution of higher education which includes the University

  9. Financial Report For the Year Ended June 30, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Financial Report For the Year Ended June 30, 2011 #12;University of Connecticut Health Center June, the University of Connecticut (University) serves as the state's flagship for higher education, meeting the integration of teaching, research and service. The University of Connecticut is a comprehensive institution

  10. Financial Report For the Year Ended June 30, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Financial Report For the Year Ended June 30, 2013 #12;University of Connecticut Health Center June Founded in 1881, the University of Connecticut (University) serves as the state's flagship for higher students through the integration of teaching, research and service. The University of Connecticut

  11. Financial Report For the Year Ended June 30, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Financial Report For the Year Ended June 30, 2007 #12;University of Connecticut Health Center June, the University of Connecticut (University) serves as the state's flagship for higher education, meeting president, Michael J. Hogan. The University of Connecticut is a comprehensive institution of higher

  12. High Availability for High-End Scientific A Dissertation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    High Availability for High-End Scientific Computing A Dissertation Submitted In Partial Fulfilment in the area of high availability is essential to meet the needs to sustain the current growth. This thesis introduces a new approach to high availability which focuses on the head node of a cluster system

  13. Concepts for High Availability in Scientific High-End Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    Concepts for High Availability in Scientific High-End Computing Christian Engelmann 1,2 and Stephen 2 Department of Computer Science The University of Reading, Reading, UK High Availability and Stephen L. Scott, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Concepts for High Availability in Scientific High

  14. Start Paint Branch Dr End 3501 University Blvd E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Start Paint Branch Dr End 3501 University Blvd E Hyattsville, MD 20783 Travel 1.3 mi ­ about 5 mins ©2008 Google - Map data ©2008 NAVTEQTM - Terms of Use Page 1 of 2Paint Branch Dr to 3501 University Blvd E, Hyattsville, MD 20783 - Google Maps 6/1/2008http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&hl=en&geocode=&saddr=Paint

  15. Analyzing the performance of diamond-coated micro end mills.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, C. D.; Heaney, P. J.; Sumant, A. V.; Hamilton, M. A.; Carpick, R. W.; Pfefferkorn, F. E.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Univ. of Pennsylvania

    2009-06-01

    A method is presented to improve the tool life and cutting performance of 300 {micro}m diameter tungsten carbide (WC) micro end mills by applying thin (<300 nm) fine-grained diamond (FGD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings using the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) process. The performance of the diamond-coated tools has been evaluated by comparing their performance in dry slot milling of 6061-T6 aluminum against uncoated WC micro end mills. Tool wear, coating integrity, and chip morphology were characterized using SEM and white light interferometry. The initial test results show a dramatic improvement in the tool integrity (i.e., corners not breaking off), a lower wear rate, no observable adhesion of aluminum to the diamond-coated tool, and a significant reduction in the cutting forces (>50%). Reduction of the cutting forces is attributed to the low friction and adhesion of the diamond coating. However, approximately 80% of the tools coated with the larger FGD coatings failed during testing due to delamination. Additional machining benefits were attained for the NCD films, which was obtained by using a higher nucleation density seeding process for diamond growth. This process allowed for thinner, smaller grained diamond coatings to be deposited on the micro end mills, and enabled continued operation of the tool even after the integrity of the diamond coating had been compromised. As opposed to the FGD-coated end mills, only 40% of the NCD-tools experienced delamination issues.

  16. Managing References using EndNote online: Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheichl, Robert

    search box, type in Web of Science 3. The open Web of Science database by clicking view online under and then the Register link (drop-down under the Customize your experience option) 2. Enter your University of Bath email. Read and agree to terms use of use to complete registration 8. To access EndNote online in the future

  17. End of Year reporting & Carry forward process for ARC & NHMRC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blennerhassett, Peter

    End of Year reporting & Carry forward process for ARC & NHMRC PREPARATION · September - GMO sends reminder email to CIs to review research account expenditure · October - GMO sends advice to all CIs Financial Statement amounts and GMO classifies accounts according to reporting required; % of carry forward

  18. Healthcare Energy: Using End-Use Data to Inform Decisions | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Using End-Use Data to Inform Decisions Healthcare Energy: Using End-Use Data to Inform Decisions The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring...

  19. Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

  20. Rest period duration of the coronary arteries: Implications for magnetic resonance coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shechter, Guy; Resar, Jon R.; McVeigh, Elliot R. [Lab of Cardiac Energetics, NHLBI, NIH Building 10, Room B1D-412, msc-1061, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1061 (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 600 North Wolfe Street, Blalock 524B, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Lab of Cardiac Energetics, NHLBI, NIH Building 10, Room B1D-412, msc-1061, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1061 (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography coronary imaging is susceptible to artifacts caused by motion of the heart. The presence of rest periods during the cardiac and respiratory cycles suggests that images free of motion artifacts could be acquired. In this paper, we studied the rest period (RP) duration of the coronary arteries during a cardiac contraction and a tidal respiratory cycle. We also studied whether three MR motion correction methods could be used to increase the respiratory RP duration. Free breathing x-ray coronary angiograms were acquired in ten patients. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of the coronary arteries was reconstructed from a biplane acquisition using stereo reconstruction methods. The 3D motion of the arterial model was then recovered using an automatic motion tracking algorithm. The motion field was then decomposed into separate cardiac and respiratory components using a cardiac respiratory parametric model. For the proximal-to-middle segments of the right coronary artery (RCA), a cardiac RP (<1 mm 3D displacement) of 76{+-}34 ms was measured at end systole (ES), and 65{+-}42 ms in mid-diastole (MD). The cardiac RP was 80{+-}25 ms at ES and 112{+-}42 ms at MD for the proximal 5 cm of the left coronary tree. At end expiration, the respiratory RP (in percent of the respiratory period) was 26{+-}8% for the RCA and 27{+-}17% for the left coronary tree. Left coronary respiratory RP (<0.5 mm 3D displacement) increased with translation (32% of the respiratory period), rigid body (51%), and affine (79%) motion correction. The RCA respiratory RP using translational (27%) and rigid body (33%) motion correction were not statistically different from each other. Measurements of the cardiac and respiratory rest periods will improve our understanding of the temporal and spatial resolution constraints for coronary imaging.

  1. The Super Period Matrix With Ramond Punctures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Witten

    2015-01-11

    We generalize the super period matrix of a super Riemann surface to the case that Ramond punctures are present. For a super Riemann surface of genus g with 2r Ramond punctures, we define, modulo certain choices that generalize those in the classical theory (and assuming a certain generic condition is satisfied), a g|r x g|r period matrix that is symmetric in the Z_2-graded sense. As an application, we analyze the genus 2 vacuum amplitude in string theory compactifications to four dimensions that are supersymmetric at tree level. We find an explanation for a result that has been found in orbifold examples in explicit computations by D'Hoker and Phong: with their integration procedure, the genus 2 vacuum amplitude always vanishes "pointwise" after summing over spin structures, and hence is given entirely by a boundary contribution.

  2. Beat Cepheid Period Ratios from OPAL Opacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Morgan; D. L. Welch

    1997-06-26

    The discovery of a large number of beat Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud in the MACHO survey, provides an opportunity to compare the characteristics of such Cepheids over a range of metallicities. We produced a large grid of linear nonadiabatic pulsation models using the OPAL opacity tables and with compositions corresponding to those of the Milky Way, and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Using the relationship between the period ratio and the main pulsation period, we are able to define a range of models which correspond to the observed beat Cepheids, and thereby constrain the physical characteristics of the LMC beat Cepheids. We are also able to make some predictions about the nature of the yet-to-be-discovered SMC beat Cepheids.

  3. High field pulsed microwiggler comprising a conductive tube with periodically space slots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, R.W.

    1992-09-01

    A microwiggler assembly produces large magnetic fields for oscillating charged particle beams, particularly electron beams for free electron laser (FEL) application. A tube of electrically conductive material is formed with radial slots axially spaced at the period of the electron beam. The slots have alternate 180[degree] relationships and are formed to a maximum depth of 0.6 to 0.7 times the tube circumference. An optimum slot depth is selected to eliminate magnetic quadrupole fields within the microwiggler as determined from a conventional pulsed wire technique. Suitable slot configurations include single slits, double slits, triple slits, and elliptical slots. An axial electron beam direction is maintained by experimentally placing end slits adjacent entrance and exit portions of the assembly, where the end slit depth is determined by use of the pulsed wire technique outside the tube. 10 figs.

  4. High field pulsed microwiggler comprising a conductive tube with periodically space slots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, Roger W. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A microwiggler assembly produces large magnetic fields for oscillating ched particle beams, particularly electron beams for free electron laser (FEL) application. A tube of electrically conductive material is formed with radial slots axially spaced at the period of the electron beam. The slots have alternate 180.degree. relationships and are formed to a maximum depth of 0.6 to 0.7 times the tube circumference. An optimum slot depth is selected to eliminate magnetic quadrupole fields within the microwiggler as determined from a conventional pulsed wire technique. Suitable slot configurations include single slits, double slits, triple slits, and elliptical slots. An axial electron beam direction is maintained by experimentally placing end slits adjacent entrance and exit portions of the assembly, where the end slit depth is determined by use of the pulsed wire technique outside the tube.

  5. Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding 5 Years Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding 5 Years Attached is Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of...

  6. Emissions from Idling Trucks for Extended Time Periods | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Idling Trucks for Extended Time Periods Emissions from Idling Trucks for Extended Time Periods 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2002deerlewis.pdf...

  7. Microsoft Word - Alcoa Extended Initial Period ROD - 2010-10...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extended Initial Period... 6 b. Benefits to BPA will equal or exceed costs for the Extended Initial Period of the Block Contract. ......

  8. DOE Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOE Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing...

  9. Analyses Of Two End-User Software Vulnerability Exposure Metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason L. Wright; Miles McQueen; Lawrence Wellman

    2012-08-01

    The risk due to software vulnerabilities will not be completely resolved in the near future. Instead, putting reliable vulnerability measures into the hands of end-users so that informed decisions can be made regarding the relative security exposure incurred by choosing one software package over another is of importance. To that end, we propose two new security metrics, average active vulnerabilities (AAV) and vulnerability free days (VFD). These metrics capture both the speed with which new vulnerabilities are reported to vendors and the rate at which software vendors fix them. We then examine how the metrics are computed using currently available datasets and demonstrate their estimation in a simulation experiment using four different browsers as a case study. Finally, we discuss how the metrics may be used by the various stakeholders of software and to software usage decisions.

  10. End-fire injection of guided light into optical microcavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Shuai; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Kaiyang; Xiao, Shumin; Lyu, Quan; Song, Qinghai

    2015-01-01

    Coupling light into microdisk plays a key role in a number of applications such as resonant filters and optical sensors. While several approaches have successfully coupled light into microdisk efficiently, most of them suffer from the ultrahigh sensitivity to the environmental vibration. Here we demonstrate a robust mechanism, which is termed as end-fire injection. By connecting an input waveguide to a circular microdisk directly, the mechanism shows that light can be efficiently coupled into optical microcavity. The coupling efficiency can be as high as 0.75 when the input signals are on resonances. Our numerical results reveal that the high coupling efficiency is attributed to the constructive interference between the whispering gallery modes and the input signals. We have also shown that the end-fire injection can be further extended to the long-lived resonances with low refractive index such as n = 1.45. We believe our results will shed light on the applications of optical microcavities.

  11. Application of object oriented programming techniques in front end computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skelly, J.F. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). AGS Dept.

    1997-11-01

    The Standard Model for accelerator control systems describes two levels of computers, often called Console Level Computers (CLCs) and Front End Computers (FECs), joined by a network. The Front End Computer (FEC) environment imposes special demands on software, beyond real time performance and robustness. FEC software must manage a diverse inventory of devices with individualistic timing requirements and hardware interfaces. It must implement network services which export device access to the control system at large, interpreting a uniform network communications protocol into the specific control requirements of the individual devices. Object oriented languages provide programming techniques which neatly address these challenges, and also offer benefits in terms of maintainability and flexibility. Applications are discussed which exhibit the use of inheritance, multiple inheritance and inheritance trees, and polymorphism to address the needs of FEC software.

  12. End states, ladder compounds, and domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Creutz

    1999-09-01

    A magnetic field applied to a cross linked ladder compound can generate isolated electronic states bound to the ends of the chain. After exploring the interference phenomena responsible, I discuss a connection to the domain wall approach to chiral fermions in lattice gauge theory. The robust nature of the states under small variations of the bond strengths is tied to chiral symmetry and the multiplicative renormalization of fermion masses.

  13. REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-01

    This document summarizes all of the work conducted as part of the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. There were several distinct objectives set, as the study developed over time: (1) Demonstration of a Refinery Accepting Coal Liquids; (2) Emissions Screening of Indirect Diesel; (3) Biomass Gasification F-T Modeling; and (4) Updated Gas to Liquids (GTL) Baseline Design/Economic Study.

  14. The Faint End of the Luminosity Function in the Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jon Loveday

    1998-05-19

    I review the current observational status of the faint end of the optical luminosity function of field galaxies at low redshift. There is growing evidence for an excess number of dwarf galaxies that is not well fit by a single Schechter function. These dwarf galaxies tend to be of late morphological and spectral type, blue in colour, of low surface brightness and currently undergoing significant star formation.

  15. CRITICAL ISSUES IN HIGH END COMPUTING - FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corones, James

    2013-09-23

    High-End computing (HEC) has been a driver for advances in science and engineering for the past four decades. Increasingly HEC has become a significant element in the national security, economic vitality, and competitiveness of the United States. Advances in HEC provide results that cut across traditional disciplinary and organizational boundaries. This program provides opportunities to share information about HEC systems and computational techniques across multiple disciplines and organizations through conferences and exhibitions of HEC advances held in Washington DC so that mission agency staff, scientists, and industry can come together with White House, Congressional and Legislative staff in an environment conducive to the sharing of technical information, accomplishments, goals, and plans. A common thread across this series of conferences is the understanding of computational science and applied mathematics techniques across a diverse set of application areas of interest to the Nation. The specific objectives of this program are: Program Objective 1. To provide opportunities to share information about advances in high-end computing systems and computational techniques between mission critical agencies, agency laboratories, academics, and industry. Program Objective 2. To gather pertinent data, address specific topics of wide interest to mission critical agencies. Program Objective 3. To promote a continuing discussion of critical issues in high-end computing. Program Objective 4.To provide a venue where a multidisciplinary scientific audience can discuss the difficulties applying computational science techniques to specific problems and can specify future research that, if successful, will eliminate these problems.

  16. Down-hole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

    1982-10-28

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  17. Property:TimePeriod | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report Url JumpTechnology Jump to: navigation, search ThisTimePeriod

  18. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports for the period October 1, 1992 to March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s eighth Semiannual Report to Congress to be submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General (IG) that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on IG audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1992, to March 31, 1993, the Department took final action on six contract and financial assistance audit reports. At the end of the period only four reports awaited final action. With regard to operational, financial, and preaward audits, final action was taken on 15 reports, resulting in 95 audit reports needing final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first outlines significant audit accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on IG audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of these reports.

  19. Electromagnetic Siegert states for periodic dielectric structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friends R. Ndangali; Sergei V. Shabanov

    2011-08-09

    The formalism of Siegert states to describe the resonant scattering in quantum theory is extended to the resonant scattering of electromagnetic waves on periodic dielectric arrays. The excitation of electromagnetic Siegert states by an incident wave packet and their decay is studied. The formalism is applied to develop a theory of coupled electromagnetic resonances arising in the electromagnetic scattering problem for two such arrays separated by a distance 2h (or, generally, when the physical properties of the scattering array depend on a real coupling parameter h). Analytic properties of Siegert states as functions of the coupling parameter h are established by the Regular Perturbation Theorem which is an extension the Kato-Rellich theorem to the present case. By means of this theorem, it is proved that if the scattering structure admits a bound state in the radiation continuum at a certain value of the coupling parameter h, then there always exist regions within the structure in which the near field can be amplified as much as desired by adjusting the value of h. This establishes a rather general mechanism to control and amplify optical nonlinear effects in periodically structured planar structures possessing a nonlinear dielectric susceptibility.

  20. Low voltage supply system for the very front end readout electronics of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lustermann, W; Denes, P; Djambazov, L; Dröge, M; Faure, J L; Iliev, Bozhidar Z; Nanov, I; Raykov, P; Shivarov, N

    1999-01-01

    Low voltage supply system for the very front end readout electronics of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

  1. Lorentz Force Accelerator with an Open-ended Lithium Heat E.Y. Choueiri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choueiri, Edgar

    Lorentz Force Accelerator with an Open-ended Lithium Heat Pipe E.Y. Choueiri , V. Chiravalle by an open-ended heat pipe, was designed and built. The open-ended heat pipe provides a novel alternative to the complex propellant feeding systems previously used with lithium-fed thrusters. The closed end of the heat

  2. A field expansions method for scattering by periodic multilayered media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malcolm, Alison E.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of acoustic and electromagnetic waves with periodic structures plays an important role

  3. Equilibrium quasi-periodic configurations with resonant frequencies in quasi-periodic media I: perturbative expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xifeng Su; Lei Zhang; Rafael de la Llave

    2015-03-11

    We consider 1-D quasi-periodic Frenkel-Kontorova models (describing, for example, deposition of materials in a quasi-periodic substratum). We study the existence of equilibria whose frequency (i.e. the inverse of the density of deposited material) is resonant with the frequencies of the substratum. We study perturbation theory for small potential. We show that there are perturbative expansions to all orders for the quasi-periodic equilibria with resonant frequencies. Under very general conditions, we show that there are at least two such perturbative expansions for equilibria for small values of the parameter. We also develop a dynamical interpretation of the equilibria in these quasi-periodic media. We show that the dynamical system has very unusual properties. Using these, we obtain results on the Lyapunov exponents of the resonant quasi-periodic solutions. In a companion paper, we develop a rather unusual KAM theory (requiring new considerations) which establishes that the perturbative expansions converge when the perturbing potentials satisfy a one-dimensional constraint.

  4. Sync your library with EndNote Web Information Services 2 February 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Sync your library with EndNote Web EndNote X6 #12;Information Services 2 February 2013 Introduction When you Sync your EndNote library with your library in EndNoteWeb, the two libraries will be compared, and · references that are in your EndNoteWeb library but not in the desktop library will be sent to your desktop

  5. Single-periodic-film optical bandpass filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niraula, Manoj; Magnusson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Resonant periodic surfaces and films enable new functionalities with wide applicability in practical optical systems. Their material sparsity, ease of fabrication, and minimal interface count provide environmental and thermal stability and robustness in applications. Here we report an experimental bandpass filter fashioned in a single patterned layer on a substrate. Its performance corresponds to bandpass filters requiring perhaps 30 traditional thin-film layers as shown by an example. We demonstrate an ultra-narrow, high-efficiency bandpass filter with extremely wide, flat, and low sidebands. This class of devices is designed with rigorous solutions of the Maxwell equations while engaging the physical principles of resonant waveguide gratings. The proposed technology is integration-friendly and opens doors for further development in various disciplines and spectral regions where thin-film solutions are traditionally applied.

  6. Quasi-periodic oscillations of perturbed tori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthasarathy, Varadarajan; Kluzniak, Wlodek

    2015-01-01

    We performed axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of perturbed tori orbiting a black hole. The tori in equilibrium were constructed with a constant distribution of angular momentum in a pseudo-Newtonian potential (Klu{\\'z}niak-Lee). Epicyclic motions were triggered by adding sub-sonic velocity fields: radial, vertical and diagonal to the tori in equilibrium. As the perturbed tori evolved in time, we measured $L_{2}$ norm of density and obtained the power spectrum of $L_{2}$ norm which manifested eigenfrequencies of tori modes. We observe a pair of modes which occur in an approximate 3:2 ratio. Results from our simulations are relevant in the context of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HF QPOs) observed in stellar-mass black hole binaries.

  7. Periodic Arrays of M2-Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imtak Jeon; Neil Lambert; Paul Richmond

    2012-11-29

    We consider periodic arrays of M2-branes in the ABJM model in the spirit of a circle compactification to D2-branes in type IIA string theory. The result is a curious formulation of three-dimensional maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory in terms of fermions, seven transverse scalars, a non-dynamical gauge field and an additional scalar `dual gluon'. Upon further T-duality on a transverse torus we obtain a non-manifest-Lorentz-invariant description of five-dimensional maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills. Here the additional scalar field can be thought of as the components of a two-form along the torus. This action can be viewed as an M-theory description of M5-branes on ${\\mathbb T}^3$.

  8. United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shehabi, Arman; Morrow, William R.; Masanet, Eric

    2012-05-11

    The United States Department of Energy’s (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) conducts the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) to provide detailed data on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector. The survey is a sample of approximately 15,000 manufacturing establishments selected from the Economic Census - Manufacturing Sector. MECS provides statistics on the consumption of energy by end uses (e.g., boilers, process, electric drives, etc.) disaggregated by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) categories. The manufacturing sector (NAICS Sector 31-33) consists of all manufacturing establishments in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. According to the NAICS, the manufacturing sector comprises establishments engaged in the mechanical, physical, or chemical transformation of materials, substances, or components into new products. The establishments are physical facilities such as plants, factories, or mills. For many of the sectors in the MECS datasets, information is missing because the reported energy use is less than 0.5 units or BTUs, or is withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual establishments, or is withheld because the standard error is greater than 50%. We infer what the missing information likely are using several approximations techniques. First, much of the missing data can be easily calculated by adding or subtracting other values reported by MECS. If this is not possible (e.g. two data are missing), we look at historic MECS reports to help identify the breakdown of energy use in the past and assume it remained the same for the current MECS. Lastly, if historic data is also missing, we assume that 3 digit NAICS classifications predict energy use in their 4, 5, or 6 digit NAICS sub-classifications, or vice versa. Along with addressing data gaps, end use energy is disaggregated beyond the specified MECS allocations using additional industry specific energy consumption data. The result is a completed table of energy end use by sector with mechanical drives broken down by pumps, fans, compressed air, and drives.

  9. Widget:ExpandableBoxEnd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:Meadow Lake,Maine: EnergyWickliffe,ExpandableBoxEnd

  10. An estimate for the location of QCD critical end point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy A. Lacey; N. N. Ajitanand; J. M. Alexander; P. Chung; J. Jia; A. Taranenko; P. Danielewicz

    2008-05-09

    It is proposed that a study of the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density $\\frac{\\eta}{s}$ as a function of the baryon chemical potential $\\mu_B$, and temperature T, provides a dynamic probe for the critical end point (CEP) in hot and dense QCD matter. An initial estimate from an elliptic flow excitation function gives $\\mu^{\\text{cep}}_B \\sim 150-180$ MeV and $T_{\\text{cep}} \\sim 165 - 170$ MeV for the location of the the CEP. These values place the CEP in the range for "immediate" validation at RHIC.

  11. The faint end of the luminosity function in clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Trentham

    1998-04-01

    I review recent measurements of the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function in galaxy clusters. Evidence is presented that the luminosity function of galaxies in the central parts of clusters is remarkably constant between clusters and that this luminosity function is steep at bright and faint magnitudes and shallow in-between. The curvature is highly significant -- neither a power-law nor a Schechter function is consistent with the data. At no magnitude does alpha=-1 fit the data well. The faintest galaxies in all clusters that have been studied are dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  12. APPLICATION OF OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES IN FRONT END COMPUTERS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SKELLY,J.F.

    1997-11-03

    The Front End Computer (FEC) environment imposes special demands on software, beyond real time performance and robustness. FEC software must manage a diverse inventory of devices with individualistic timing requirements and hardware interfaces. It must implement network services which export device access to the control system at large, interpreting a uniform network communications protocol into the specific control requirements of the individual devices. Object oriented languages provide programming techniques which neatly address these challenges, and also offer benefits in terms of maintainability and flexibility. Applications are discussed which exhibit the use of inheritance, multiple inheritance and inheritance trees, and polymorphism to address the needs of FEC software.

  13. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of Fuel

  14. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of Fuel3.

  15. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of Fuel3.4.

  16. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of Fuel3.4.1

  17. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of

  18. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612. End Uses of3

  19. Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses of Fuel

  20. Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses of

  1. Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses of5

  2. Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses of57

  3. Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses of578

  4. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 -- Executive

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul1998,(Million CubicEnd Use:‹Home

  5. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul1998,(Million CubicEnd

  6. Front-end utility rate updates | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpAFlex FuelsEnergyInc| Open EnergyFront-end utility

  7. Property:Geothermal/ProjectEndDate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation,PropertyPartner7Website Jump to: navigation,ProjectEndDate Jump

  8. North End Of Tenakee Inlet Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd| OpenInformation 9thNorth CentralNorthNorth End

  9. Property:Estimated End Date | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, searchEnvironmentalMitigation Jump to: navigation,Estimated End

  10. Property:ExpActivityDateEnd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation,Property Edit with form History Property:ExpActivityDateEnd Jump

  11. EERE Web Site Year-End Report FY08

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5 Peer ReviewUse of HeAgenda EEREEERE Web Site Year-End

  12. EERE Web Site Year-End Report: 2006

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5 Peer ReviewUse of HeAgenda EEREEERE Web Site Year-End2006

  13. End of War | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.EmilioDaveAdvanced MaterialsC) 00End of

  14. Development of a focussing-crystal spectrograph for x-rays from laser-fusion targets. Final report for the period ending September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaakobi, B.; Burek, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    The report is arranged in five major sections, Section II describes the measurements of mica and lithium fluoride crystal properties before and after the cylindrical bending required for a Von-Hamos spectrograph. It also describes the property of mosaic focussing and the measurements of the spatial as well as spectral resolutions of bent crystals. Section III describes the imaging calculations which relate the instrument focussing capability to source misalignment. These calculations demonstrate the necessity to maintain fabrication and alignment precision which is about equal to the radiation source size, if the full potential of the instrument is to be realized. Section IV shows x-ray spectra obtained on the OMEGA 24 laser facility at LLE. The targets used were plastic shells, coated with copper either on the outside or the inside surface, germania shells, and krytpon-filled glass shells. The data indicate deeper heat penetration on the target surface, than predicted by a flux-limited heat transport model. In Section V, we list new spectral lines involving multiple electron excitation, which are observed here for the first time and whose wavelengths are calculated using Hartrer-Fock methods.

  15. (Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center): Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1987. [Advanced Coal Research and Technology Development Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-02-01

    Research programs on coal and coal liquefaction are presented. Topics discussed are: coal science, combustion, kinetics, surface science; advanced technology projects in liquefaction; two stage liquefaction and direct liquefaction; catalysts of liquefaction; Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and thermodynamics; alternative fuels utilization; coal preparation; biodegradation; advanced combustion technology; flue gas cleanup; environmental coordination, and technology transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base. (CBS)

  16. Gas-cooled reactor programs: high-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    Information is presented concerning HTGR chemistry; fueled graphite development; irradiation services for General Atomic Company; prestressed concrete pressure vessel development; HTGR structural materials; graphite development; high-temperature reactor physics studies; shielding studies; component flow test loop studies; core support performance test; and application and project assessments.

  17. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Materials Program semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkins, R.R.; Cole, N.C. (comps.)

    1992-04-01

    The objective of the Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The Program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. Research is outlined in four areas: Ceramics, New Alloys, Corrosion and Erosion Research, and Technology Development and Transfer. (VC)

  18. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR&TD) Materials Program semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1991. Fossil Energy Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkins, R.R.; Cole, N.C. [comps.

    1992-04-01

    The objective of the Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The Program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. Research is outlined in four areas: Ceramics, New Alloys, Corrosion and Erosion Research, and Technology Development and Transfer. (VC)

  19. Field testing of an automated wood-combustion system and development of business plan for commercialization of production. Final report for period ending August 1, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1983-05-24

    A tunnel burner for burning wood chips has been installed and tested at a school building in Durham, NC. The test revealed many problems which did not exist while testing a prototype in laboratories. Controls were found to work reliably. A business plan was developed and is appended. (LEW)

  20. SPACE-R Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System: Design and Technology Demonstration Program. Semiannual technical progress report for period ending March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This Semiannual Technical Progress Report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments for the Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System (TI-SNPS) Design and Technology Demonstration Program of the Prime Contractor, Space Power Incorporated (SPI), its subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories during the first half of the Government Fiscal Year (GFY) 1993. SPI`s subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories include: Babcock & Wilcox for the reactor core and externals; Space Systems/Loral for the spacecraft integration; Thermocore for the radiator heat pipes and the heat exchanger; INERTEK of CIS for the TFE, core elements and nuclear tests; Argonne National Laboratories for nuclear safety, physics and control verification; and Oak Ridge National laboratories for materials testing. Parametric trade studies are near completion. However, technical input from INERTEK has yet to be provided to determine some of the baseline design configurations. The INERTEK subcontract is expected to be initiated soon. The Point Design task has been initiated. The thermionic fuel element (TFE) is undergoing several design iterations. The reactor core vessel analysis and design has also been started.

  1. FLUID TRANSIENTS IN A PIPELINE WITH ONE END OPEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R

    2008-06-09

    Water hammer during multi-phase flow is rather complex, but in some cases an upper limit to the pressure surge magnitude during water hammer can be estimated. In the case considered here, a two mile long pipeline with a single high point was permitted to partially drain. Due to gravitational effects, air bubbles up through the pipe line to its highest point, but the time required for air to reach the top of the pipe is rather long. Consequently, some transients caused by valve operations are affected by air entrapment and some are not. The intent of this research was to investigate the complex interactions between air, water vapor, and liquid during water hammer in a long pipe with one end of the pipe open to atmospheric conditions. To understand the system dynamics, experimental data was obtained from a long pipeline with an open end and also from a short, transparent tube. Transient calculations were performed for valve closures and pump operations as applicable. The limitations of available calculation techniques were considered in detail.

  2. Periodic relativity: basic framework of the theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vikram H. Zaveri

    2014-11-25

    An alternative gravity theory is proposed which does not rely on Riemannian geometry and geodesic trajectories. The theory named periodic relativity (PR) does not use the weak field approximation and allows every two body system to deviate differently from the flat Minkowski metric. PR differs from general relativity (GR) in predictions of the proper time intervals of distant objects. PR proposes a definite connection between the proper time interval of an object and gravitational frequency shift of its constituent particles as the object travels through the gravitational field. PR is based on the dynamic weak equivalence principle which equates the gravitational mass with the relativistic mass. PR provides very accurate solutions for the Pioneer anomaly and the rotation curves of galaxies outside the framework of general relativity. PR satisfies Einstein's field equations with respect to the three major GR tests within the solar system and with respect to the derivation of Friedmann equation in cosmology. This article defines the underlying framework of the theory.

  3. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in radiation therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallas, Raya R; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy, so-called "end-to-end" tests are intended to cover all steps from therapy planning to follow-up to fulfill the high demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gains growing importance in the treatment process and established phantoms (such as the Alderson head) cannot be used for those tests, novel multimodality phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study for such a customizable multimodality head phantom. We used a set of patient CT images as the basis for the anthropomorphic head shape. The recipient - consisting of an epoxy resin - was produced using rapid prototyping (3D printing). The phantom recipient includes a nasal air cavity, two soft tissues volumes and cranial bone. Additionally a spherical tumor volume was positioned in the center. The volumes were filled with dipotassium phosphate-based cranial bone surrogate, agarose gel, and distilled water. The tumor volume was filled with normoxic dosimetr...

  4. Robotic end gripper with a band member to engage object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pollard, R.E.; Robinson, S.C.; Thompson, W.F.; Couture, S.A.; Sutton, B.J.

    1994-05-10

    An end effector for use with robotic arms and like devices is described that utilizes a flexible band to draw an object against an anvil having a concave surface. One typical convex surface is created by a V-block, with an apex of the V being centrally located. If an object to be grasped is fragile, the contour of the concave surface closely matches the surface of the object. Typically the movement of the band is effected by a linear actuator, with the anvil remaining fixed relative to a support base. Several embodiments are described that utilize variations in drawing the band toward the anvil, with one of these embodiments described in detail in the form of a fabricated unit. One embodiment includes a cover element that can be moved over an object after the grasping thereof, with this cover potentially serving various functions. Movement of the cover can be effected with a second linear actuator. 8 figures.

  5. Robotic end gripper with a band member to engage object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pollard, Roy E. (Maryville, TN); Robinson, Samuel C. (Knoxville, TN); Thompson, William F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Couture, Scott A. (Knoxville, TN); Sutton, Bill J. (Powell, TN)

    1994-01-01

    An end effector for use with robotic arms and like devices that utilizes a flexible band to draw an object against an anvil having a concave surface. One typical convex surface is created by a V-block, with an apex of the V being centrally located. If an object to be grasped is fragile, the contour of the concave surface closely matches the surface of the object. Typically the movement of the band is effected by a linear actuator, with the anvil remaining fixed relative to a support base. Several embodiments are described that utilize variations in drawing the band toward the anvil, with one of these embodiments described in detail in the form of a fabricated unit. One embodiment includes a cover element that can be moved over an object after the grasping thereof, with this cover potentially serving various functions. Movement of the cover can be effected with a second linear actuator.

  6. Current conducting end plate of fuel cell assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, Michael M. (Fairfield, CT)

    1999-01-01

    A fuel cell assembly has a current conducting end plate with a conductive body formed integrally with isolating material. The conductive body has a first surface, a second surface opposite the first surface, and an electrical connector. The first surface has an exposed portion for conducting current between a working section of the fuel cell assembly and the electrical connector. The isolating material is positioned on at least a portion of the second surface. The conductive body can have support passage(s) extending therethrough for receiving structural member(s) of the fuel cell assembly. Isolating material can electrically isolate the conductive body from the structural member(s). The conductive body can have service passage(s) extending therethrough for servicing one or more fluids for the fuel cell assembly. Isolating material can chemically isolate the one or more fluids from the conductive body. The isolating material can also electrically isolate the conductive body from the one or more fluids.

  7. Retrievable fuel pin end member for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosa, Jerry M. (Los Gatos, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A bottom end member (17b) on a retrievable fuel pin (13b) secures the pin (13b) within a nuclear reactor (12) by engaging on a transverse attachment rail (18) with a spring clip type of action. Removal and reinstallation if facilitated as only axial movement of the fuel pin (13b) is required for either operation. A pair of resilient axially extending blades (31) are spaced apart to define a slot (24) having a seat region (34) which receives the rail (18) and having a land region (37), closer to the tips (39) of the blades (31) which is normally of less width than the rail (18). Thus an axially directed force sufficient to wedge the resilient blades (31) apart is required to emplace or release the fuel pin (13b) such force being greater than the axial forces on the fuel pins (13b) which occur during operation of the reactor (12).

  8. Lab 7: Fourier analysis and synthesis Fourier series (periodic phenomena)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    Lab 7: Fourier analysis and synthesis · Fourier series (periodic phenomena) · Fourier transform (aperiodic phenomena) · Fast Fourier transform (FFT) The Fourier Transform and its Applications Brad G A powerful analytic tool that has many applications.... #12;Applications of Fourier analysis Periodic

  9. Entrainment control of chaos near unstable periodic orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Mettin

    1996-10-16

    It is demonstrated that improved entrainment control of chaotic systems can maintain periodic goal dynamics near unstable periodic orbits without feedback. The method is based on the optimization of goal trajectories and leads to small open-loop control forces.

  10. Metastable Radioxenon Verification Laboratory (MRVL) Year-End Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Matthew W.; Hayes, James C.; Lidey, Lance S.

    2014-11-07

    This is the year end report that is due to the client. The MRVL system is designed to measure multiple radioxenon isotopes (135Xe, 133Xe, 133mXe and 133mXe) simultaneously. The system has 12 channels to load samples and make nuclear measurements. Although the MRVL system has demonstrated excellent stability in measurements of Xe-133 and Xe-135 over the year of evaluation prior to delivery, there has been concern about system stability over measurements performed on samples with orders of magnitude different radioactivity, and samples containing multiple isotopes. To address these concerns, a series of evaluation test have been performed at the end-user laboratory. The evaluation was performed in two separate phases. Phase 1 made measurements on isotopically pure Xe-133 from high radioactivity down to the system background levels of activity, addressing the potential count rate dependencies when activities change from extreme high to very low. The second phase performed measurements on samples containing multiple isotopes (Xe-135, Xe-133 and Xe-133m), and addressed concerns about the dependence of isotopic concentrations on the presence of additional isotopes. The MRVL showed a concentration dependence on the Xe-133 due to the amount of Xe-133m that was in the sample. The dependency is due to the decay of Xe-133m into Xe-133. This document focuses on the second phase and will address the analysis used to account for ingrowth of Xe-133 from Xe-133m.

  11. PERIODIC STRUCTURE IN THE MEGAPARSEC-SCALE JET OF PKS 0637-752

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godfrey, L. E. H.; Ekers, R.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Bicknell, G. V.; Jauncey, D. L.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D. M.; Schwartz, D. A.; Marshall, H. L.; Gelbord, J.; Perlman, E. S.; Georganopoulos, M.

    2012-10-20

    We present 18 GHz Australia Telescope Compact Array imaging of the megaparsec-scale quasar jet PKS 0637-752 with angular resolution {approx}0.''58. We draw attention to a spectacular train of quasi-periodic knots along the inner 11'' of the jet, with average separation {approx}1.1 arcsec (7.6 kpc projected). We consider two classes of model to explain the periodic knots: those that involve a static pattern through which the jet plasma travels (e.g., stationary shocks) and those that involve modulation of the jet engine. Interpreting the knots as re-confinement shocks implies the jet kinetic power Q{sub jet} {approx} 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, but the constant knot separation along the jet is not expected in a realistic external density profile. For models involving modulation of the jet engine, we find that the required modulation period is 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} yr < {tau} < 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} yr. The lower end of this range is applicable if the jet remains highly relativistic on kiloparsec scales, as implied by the IC/CMB model of jet X-ray emission. We suggest that the periodic jet structure in PKS 0637-752 may be analogous to the quasi-periodic jet modulation seen in the microquasar GRS 1915+105, believed to result from limit cycle behavior in an unstable accretion disk. If variations in the accretion rate are driven by a binary black hole, the predicted orbital radius is 0.7 pc {approx}< a {approx}< 30 pc, which corresponds to a maximum angular separation of {approx}0.1-5 mas.

  12. Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konopacki, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    4. Figure 5-5. 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by EndkWh/ft ) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Useof Total) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use

  13. The Impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on Industrial End...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    about the impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on industrial end users of electric motor-driven systems. The Impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on Industrial End Users...

  14. HTGR generic technology program. Semiannual report ending March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Generic Technology Program at General Atomic during the first half of FY-80. It covers a period when the design direction of the National HTGR Program is in the process of an overall review. The HTGR Generic Technology Program activities have continued so as to provide the basic technology required for all HTGR applications. The activities include the need to develop an MEU fuel and the need to qualify materials and components for the higher temperatures of the gas turbine and process heat plants.

  15. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henrique Barreta, Marcos; Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS ; Garziera Gasperin, Bernardo; Braga Rissi, Vitor; Cesaro, Matheus Pedrotti de; Ferreira, Rogerio; Oliveira, Joao Francisco de; Goncalves, Paulo Bayard Dias; Bordignon, Vilceu

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  16. PRELUDE TO SUSTAINABILIT Y: ENDING OVERFISHING IN U.S. FISHERIES FEATURE ARTICLE 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Sustainability: Ending Overfishing in u.S. fisheries Feature Article 1 GALEN R. TROMBLE DEBRA M. LAMBERT LEE R

  17. Christopher Viton Fiscal YearEnd Information and Important Cutoff Dates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    Christopher Viton Fiscal YearEnd Information and Important Cutoff Dates 1 Purchasing Date: March 19, 2015 Re: Fiscal YearEnd Information and Important Cutoff Dates information and cutoff dates to be followed for the end of fiscal year 2015. While many managers are familiar

  18. SCIPP-04/03 Characterization the Front-End electronics in order to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    SCIPP-04/03 Characterization the Front-End electronics in order to Calibrate the PTSM Completed by-End electronics of the PTSM, data was collected on the gain of the system. This was done using known quantities a value known as Time Over Threshold (TOT). The TOT is measured by the PTSM Front-End (FE) electronics

  19. Cooling air recycling for gas turbine transition duct end frame and related method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cromer, Robert Harold (Johnstown, NY); Bechtel, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Sutcu, Maz (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A method of cooling a transition duct end frame in a gas turbine includes the steps of a) directing cooling air into the end frame from a region external of the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve; and b) redirecting the cooling air from the end frame into the annulus between the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve.

  20. Classical Propagation of Light in Spatio-Temporal Periodic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrov, B S; Findikoglu, A T; Bishop, A R; Kostadinov, I Z

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the propagation of electromagnetic waves in media where the dielectric constants undergo rapid temporal periodic modulation. Both spatially homogeneous and periodic media are studied. Fast periodic temporal modulation of the dielectric constant of a homogeneous medium leads to existence of photonic band-gap like phenomena. In the presence of both spatial and tem- poral periodicity the electromagnetic spectrum is described in a four-dimensional cube, defining an effective Brillouin zone. In the case of incommensurability between space and time periodicities, completely dispersed point spectra exist.

  1. Winter fuels report, week ending October 20, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    Weekly estimates of distillate stocks (131.6 MMB) are now 2.1 MMB below the lower bound of the three year average, and the current rate of increase is also lower than the average of the past three years. Heating fuels are 48% of the total inventory and have fallen 1.3 MMB during the past week. Distillate production dipped while demand increased. The supply of propane for the current week declined 1.5 MMB from the prior reporting period but is in the normal range for the time of the year. The natural gas supply available for distribution in August 1995 was estimated to be 1,795 BCF, which was almost unchanged from the previous year. The August 1995 consumption of 1,502 BCF was 6% greater than the previous year. This gas volume included 276 BCF injected into underground storage and 16 BCF exported. In July 1995, major gas pipeline companies paid an average of $1.91/KCF for gas purchased from domestic producers, which was a decrease from $2.03 in the previous month. The price for imported gas was $1.10/KCF. Heating oil prices showed little movement during this period, as did propane prices.

  2. Optimal control of end-user energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van de Ven, Peter M; Massoulie, Laurent; Salonidis, Theodoros

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of retail energy markets exhibit price fluctuations and provide customers such as data centers and residential users the opportunity to buy energy at lower than average prices. Such cost savings however are hard to obtain in practice because they require users to observe the price fluctuations and shift their consumption to low price periods. We propose to use energy storage to allow users to satisfy demand at times when prices are high with energy previously bought during low-price periods. We investigate how to control the battery to minimize energy costs, subject to fluctuating prices and user demand. We formulate this problem as a Markov Decision Process and show that the optimal policy has a threshold structure. We then numerically compute the thresholds using real-world traces from existing energy markets. We show that energy storage using this policy leads to significant cost savings, and study the impact of the battery size on the optimal policy and the potential savings.

  3. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin

    2012-11-21

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation & decommissioning (D&D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites.

  4. Winter fuels report, week ending February 24, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-02

    The Winter Fuels Report for the week ending February 24, 1995 is intended to provide concise timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplies on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6--10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  5. Winter fuels report, week ending March 10, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-16

    The Winter Fuels Report for the week ending March 10, 1995 is intended to provide concise timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplies on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6--10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  6. Winter fuels report, week ending March 24, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-30

    The Winter Fuels Report for the week ending March 24, 1995 is intended to provide concise timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplies on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6--10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  7. End region effects upon the performance of a magnetohydrodynamic channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.Y.; Smith, J.M.

    1982-11-01

    Results presented in this paper apply only to plants of the size of 200 MW /SUB e/ and to MHD channels whose design requirements specify cooling with low-pressure, low-temperature boiler feedwater. The sensitivity of various channel parameters (maximum B-field, diffuser recovery coefficient, generator load parameter, Mach number, and combustor pressure) are examined under the constraints of a maximum axial electric field of 2.5kV/m, a maximum transverse current of 10 kA/m/sup 2/, and a maximum transverse electric field of 4 kV/m. In addition to voltage drop calculations, the channel code utilizes tabulated chemical equilibrium properties which are computed separately. Tables give operating conditions, electric stress constraints, and performance of the 16-m channel with end regions. Graphs show axial profiles of B-field, electric field, transverse current, load coefficient, and combustion pressure; and thermodynamic efficiency vs. Mach number for maximum B-field. Study of the MHD channel for a 540 MW /SUB th/ plant suggests that best performance is obtained in the supersonic mode; lowering B /SUB max/ to 5T does not severely lower performance and could result in a reduction of the magnet size of up to 40%; and overall performance is not too sensitive to diffuser pressure recovery coefficient.

  8. Biogas end-use in the European community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constant, M.; Naveau, H.; Nyns, E.J. ); Ferrero, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    In Europe over the past few years the generation of biogas for energy and environmental purposes has been gaining in importance. Industrial wastewaters, cattle manure, sewage sludges, urban wastes, crop residues, algae and aquatic biomass are all typical of the materials being utilized. In contrast to the extensive inventory of biomethanation processes which has been carried out within the EEC, until recently a detailed, up-to-date investigation of the end-sues of biogas had not been undertaken. To supply the necessary information, the Commission of the European Communities and the Belgian Science Policy Office jointly entrusted a study to the Unit of Bioengineering at the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. This book is record of the study and has the following key features: it gives a broad overview of the ongoing use of biogas in Europe; it summarizes available data on storage, purification and engines using biogas; it draws several conclusions concerning the technical and economic viability of the processes; it discusses the problems of using biogas; and it outlines recommendations and future R and D and demonstration projects in the field.

  9. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McNeil, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-03-30

    Integrated economic models have been used to project both baseline and mitigation greenhouse gas emissions scenarios at the country and the global level. Results of these scenarios are typically presented at the sectoral level such as industry, transport, and buildings without further disaggregation. Recently, a keen interest has emerged on constructing bottom up scenarios where technical energy saving potentials can be displayed in detail (IEA, 2006b; IPCC, 2007; McKinsey, 2007). Analysts interested in particular technologies and policies, require detailed information to understand specific mitigation options in relation to business-as-usual trends. However, the limit of information available for developing countries often poses a problem. In this report, we have focus on analyzing energy use in India in greater detail. Results shown for the residential and transport sectors are taken from a previous report (de la Rue du Can, 2008). A complete picture of energy use with disaggregated levels is drawn to understand how energy is used in India and to offer the possibility to put in perspective the different sources of end use energy consumption. For each sector, drivers of energy and technology are indentified. Trends are then analyzed and used to project future growth. Results of this report provide valuable inputs to the elaboration of realistic energy efficiency scenarios.

  10. Centrifugal contactor modified for end stage operation in a multistage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jubin, Robert T. (Powell, TN)

    1990-01-01

    A cascade formed of a plurality of centrifugal contactors useful for countercurrent solvent extraction processes such as utilizable for the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuels is modified to permit operation in the event one or both end stages of the cascade become inoperative. Weir assemblies are connected to each of the two end stages by suitable conduits for separating liquids discharged from an inoperative end stage based upon the weight of the liquid phases uses in the solvent extraction process. The weir assembly at one end stage is constructed to separate and discharge the heaviest liquid phase while the weir assembly at the other end stage is constructed to separate and discharge the lightest liquid phase. These weir assemblies function to keep the liquid discharge from an inoperative end stages on the same weight phase a would occur from an operating end stage.

  11. Periodicals collection management using a decision support system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compton, M.L.; Moser, E.C.

    1993-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram national laboratory established in 1949. The Library currently uses DOBIS for its automated system, including the Periodicals Control function for periodical check-in. DOBIS performs processing and control functions adequately, but could not meet our reporting needs. Therefore the Library`s Periodicals Decision Team decided that they needed another ``system`` for collection management. A Periodicals Decision Support System was created using information downloaded from DOBIS and uploaded into dBASE IV. The Periodical Decision Support System functions as an information-processing system that has aided us in making collection management decisions for periodicals. It certainly allows us to do interactive ad-hoc analysis; although there are no modeling tools currently incorporated in the system. We hope that these modeling tools will come later. We have been gathering information and developing needed reports to achieve this goal.

  12. End-of-life flows of multiple cycle consumer products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsiliyannis, C.A.

    2011-11-15

    Explicit expressions for the end-of-life flows (EOL) of single and multiple cycle products (MCPs) are presented, including deterministic and stochastic EOL exit. The expressions are given in terms of the physical parameters (maximum lifetime, T, annual cycling frequency, f, number of cycles, N, and early discard or usage loss). EOL flows are also obtained for hi-tech products, which are rapidly renewed and thus may not attain steady state (e.g. electronic products, passenger cars). A ten-step recursive procedure for obtaining the dynamic EOL flow evolution is proposed. Applications of the EOL expressions and the ten-step procedure are given for electric household appliances, industrial machinery, tyres, vehicles and buildings, both for deterministic and stochastic EOL exit, (normal, Weibull and uniform exit distributions). The effect of the physical parameters and the stochastic characteristics on the EOL flow is investigated in the examples: it is shown that the EOL flow profile is determined primarily by the early discard dynamics; it also depends strongly on longevity and cycling frequency: higher lifetime or early discard/loss imply lower dynamic and steady state EOL flows. The stochastic exit shapes the overall EOL dynamic profile: Under symmetric EOL exit distribution, as the variance of the distribution increases (uniform to normal to deterministic) the initial EOL flow rise becomes steeper but the steady state or maximum EOL flow level is lower. The steepest EOL flow profile, featuring the highest steady state or maximum level, as well, corresponds to skew, earlier shifted EOL exit (e.g. Weibull). Since the EOL flow of returned products consists the sink of the reuse/remanufacturing cycle (sink to recycle) the results may be used in closed loop product lifecycle management operations for scheduling and sizing reverse manufacturing and for planning recycle logistics. Decoupling and quantification of both the full age EOL and of the early discard flows is useful, the latter being the target of enacted legislation aiming at increasing reuse.

  13. Single Event Effect Hardness for the Front-end ASICs Applied in BGO Calorimeter of DAMPE Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Shan-Shan; Feng, Chang-Qing; Xi, Kai; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a Chinese scientific satellite designed for cosmic ray study with a primary scientific goal of indirect search of dark matter particles. As a crucial sub-detector, BGO calorimeter measures the energy spectrum of cosmic rays in the energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. In order to implement high-density front-end electronics (FEE) with the ability to measure 1848 signals from 616 photomultiplier tubes on the strictly constrained satellite platform, two kinds of 32-channel front-end ASICs, VA160 and VATA160, are customized. However, a space mission period of more than 3 years makes single event effect (SEE) a probable threat to reliability. In order to evaluate the SEE sensitivity of the chips and verify the effectiveness of mitigation methods, a series of laser-induced and heavy ion-induced SEE tests were performed. Benefiting from the single event latch-up (SEL) protection circuit for power supply, the triple module redundancy (TMR) technology for the configuration regist...

  14. Multilevel interference lithography--fabricating sub-wavelength periodic nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chih-Hao, 1980-

    2008-01-01

    Periodic nanostructures have many exciting applications, including high-energy spectroscopy, patterned magnetic media, photonic crystals, and templates for self-assembly. Interference lithography (IL) is an attractive ...

  15. Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment Period...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment Period on National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment...

  16. Extension of Comment Period on the Draft Integrated, Interagency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Comment Period on the Draft Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application (IIP) Process for Electric Transmission Projects Requiring Federal Authorizations Extension of Comment...

  17. Analysis of Periodic GrowthDisturbance Models Timothy C. Reluga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reluga, Tim

    and may include forest fires, volcanic eruptions, and hurricanes, occur quickly, perhaps over a period succession around disturbances like forest fires. Andrewartha and Birch (1978) proposed that disturbances

  18. EIS-0431: Extension of Public Comment Period | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comment Period Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, CA The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published...

  19. Quality of monitoring of stochastic events by periodic and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David K. Y. Yau, Nung Kwan Yip, Chris Y. T. Ma, Nageswara S. V. Rao, Mallikarjun Shankar

    2010-08-28

    sensor monitoring a PoI may be periodically turned off to conserve energy, thereby ... In traditional public safety work, policemen or security guards are on.

  20. Quality of Monitoring of Stochastic Events by Periodic & Proportional ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-12-09

    be periodically turned off to conserve energy, thereby .... ing resources to the different parts in proportion ... riodically turn off the sensor to conserve energy, so.

  1. EIS-0431: Extension of public comment period; Notice of public...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EIS-0431: Extension of public comment period; Notice of public hearing; Correction Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and...

  2. Pulse vaccination in the periodic infection rate SIR epidemic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhen Jin; Mainul Haque; Quanxing Liu

    2006-06-09

    A pulse vaccination SIR model with periodic infection rate $\\beta (t)$ have been proposed and studied. The basic reproductive number $R_0$ is defined. The dynamical behaviors of the model are analyzed with the help of persistence, bifurcation and global stability. It has been shown that the infection-free periodic solution is globally stable provided $R_0 1$. Standard bifurcation theory have been used to show the existence of the positive periodic solution for the case of $R_0 \\to1^+$. Finally, the numerical simulations have been performed to show the uniqueness and the global stability of the positive periodic solution of the system.

  3. CEQ Extends Comment Period on Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Effects of Climate Change in NEPA Reviews CEQ Extends Comment Period on Revised Draft Guidance on...

  4. DOE Extends Public Comment Period for Uranium Program Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Uranium Program Environmental Impact Statement DOE Extends Public Comment Period for Uranium Program Environmental Impact Statement April 18, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Contractor, Bob...

  5. Guidance on the Required Period for Grantees to Obligate Funds...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on the Required Period for Grantees to Obligate Funds and the Procedures for Reporting of Obligated Funds for the Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program...

  6. Pressure-driven reconnection and quasi periodical oscillations in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paccagnella, R., E-mail: roberto.paccagnella@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX and Istituto Gas Ionizzati del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Padova (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents a model for an ohmically heated plasma in which a feedback exists between thermal conduction and transport, on one side, and the magneto-hydro-dynamical stability of the system, on the other side. In presence of a reconnection threshold for the magnetic field, a variety of periodical or quasi periodical oscillations for the physical quantities describing the system are evidenced. The model is employed to interpret the observed quasi periodical oscillations of electron temperature and perturbed magnetic field around the so called “Single Helical” state in the reversed field pinch, but its relevance for other periodical phenomena observed in magnetic confinement systems, especially in tokamaks, is suggested.

  7. Controlled-force end seal arrangement for an air press of a papermaking machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beck, David A.

    2003-07-08

    An air press for pressing a fiber web includes a plurality of rolls and a pair of end seal arrangements. Of the plurality of rolls, each pair of adjacent rolls forms a nip therebetween. Further, each roll has a pair of roll ends, the plurality of rolls together forming two sets of roll ends. Each end seal arrangement coacts with one set of roll ends, the plurality of rolls and the pair of end seal arrangements together defining an air press chamber having an air chamber pressure. Each end seal arrangement is composed of at least one roll seal, including a first roll seal, and an adjustable bias mechanism. Each roll seal forms a seal with at least one roll end, and one side of the first roll seal being exposed to the air chamber pressure. The adjustable bias mechanism is configured for controlling a position of each roll seal relative to a respective at least one roll end and for adjusting a seal force between the roll seal and the respective at least one roll end.

  8. Winter fuels report. Week ending, January 26, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-23

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: (1) distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a U.S. level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a U.S. level; (2) propane net production, imports and stocks on a U.S. level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; (3) natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the U.S. and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; (4) residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; (5) crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the U.S. and selected cities; and (6) a 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and U.S. total heating degree-days by city. The distillate fuel oil and propane supply data are collected and published weekly. The data are based on company submissions for the week ending 7:00 a.m. for the preceding Friday. Weekly data for distillate fuel oil are also published in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report. Monthly data for distillate fuel oil and propane are published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly. The residential pricing information is collected by the EIA and the State Energy Offices on a semimonthly basis for the EIA/State Heating Oil and Propane Program. The wholesale price comparison data are collected daily and are published weekly. Residential heating fuel prices are derived from price quotes for home delivery of No. 2 fuel oil and propane. As such, they reflect prices in effect on the dates shown. Wholesale heating oil and propane prices are estimates using a sample of terminal quotes to represent average State prices on the dates given.

  9. Influence of zinc on growth and bone maturation in children with end stage renal disease (ESRD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagan, D.; Fleischmann, L.; Schemmel, R.A.

    1986-03-05

    Children with ESRD, age 5-19 years, were supplemented with zinc acetate (2 mg/kg BW, maximum 40 mg/da/child) to determine if zinc supplements (ZS) would improve growth and bone maturation. Twelve children completed the study. Three of the 12 did not receive ZS. Seven of the 9 ZS children were followed for 1 year pre- and 1 yr during-ZS. Two subjects were followed for shorter periods of time. Heights, weights, and hand wrist radiographs were taken at the beginning of the study, just pre-ZS, and at the end of the study. Blood was analyzed for serum alkaline phosphatase and albumin monthly. Alkaline phosphatase was elevated in 7 of 12 subjects pre-ZS and in 5 of 9 subjects post-ZS. Albumin levels were below normal in 7 subjects pre-ZS and 4 subjects post-ZS. Mean plasma Zn and Cu levels, 97+/-17 and 164+/-42 mcg/dl, pre-ZS, and 102+/-30 and 173+/-46 mcg/dl post-ZS, respectively, were similar. Growth velocity in males (4.1+/-2.2 cm/yr, 3.0+/-2.3 cm/yr) and females (3.9+/-0.7, 3.3+/-2.1 cm/yr) pre- and post-ZS, respectively, were similar. Bone maturation per chronological age improved after ZS in 4 of 6 subjects, 1 matured at the same rate, and one at a slower rate. It appears that ZS of children with ESRD increased the rate of bone maturation but not linear growth.

  10. Et introduksjonskurs EndNote X6 introduksjon Liv Brynhild Aspaas og Jo Forthun -NTNU UB, jan. 2013 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malinnikova, Eugenia

    ..................................................................................................................................... 11 Eksempel 3: ISI Web of Science.................................................................................................................................. 19 EndNote Web (http://myendnoteweb.com/) ............................................................................ 20 Eks) Fra ISI Web of Science til EndNote Web

  11. Dual periodicities in the rotational modulation of Saturn narrowband emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    Dual periodicities in the rotational modulation of Saturn narrowband emissions S.Y. Ye,1 D. A emissions is examined, restricting the spacecraft location to either the northern or the southern hemisphere of Saturn. It is found that in both hemispheres, the modulation period of 5 kHz narrowband emissions has two

  12. Homogenization of linear spatially periodic electronic Michel Lenczner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homogenization of linear spatially periodic electronic circuits Michel Lenczner January 20, 2006 Abstract: In this paper we establish a simplified model of general spatially periodic linear electronic is reported. 1 Introduction It is well known that when the size of an analog electronic network increases too

  13. Efficient Mining of Partial Periodic Patterns in Time Series Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Guozhu

    Efficient Mining of Partial Periodic Patterns in Time Series Database In ICDE 99 Jiawei Han \\Lambda peri­ odic patterns in time­series databases, is an interesting data mining problem. Previous studies several algorithms for efficient mining of par­ tial periodic patterns, by exploring some interesting

  14. Multivariate periodic wavelet analysis Dirk Langemann, Jurgen Prestin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prestin, Jürgen

    Multivariate periodic wavelet analysis Dirk Langemann, J¨urgen Prestin University of L¨ubeck, Institute of Mathematics, Wallstr. 40, D-23560 L¨ubeck, Germany Abstract General multivariate periodic are generalized to multivariate shift invariant spaces on non-tensor-product pat- terns. In particular

  15. Saving and Using Encountered Information: Implications for Electronic Periodicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Cathy

    Saving and Using Encountered Information: Implications for Electronic Periodicals Catherine C of a focus on electronic publications, we undertook an exploratory study of how people saved and used study participants had examples of materials they had deliberately saved from periodicals, ranging from

  16. Optical characterization of periodically-poled KTiOPO4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exter, Martin van

    Optical characterization of periodically-poled KTiOPO4 W. H. Peeters and M. P. van Exter Huygens-conversion(SPDC) give a direct visualization of the poling quality of a periodically-poled crystal. Identical Maker with small and slowly-varying deformations of the poling structure. Our theoretical model, based on a Fourier

  17. Quantum coherent switch utilizing commensurate nanoelectrode and charge density periodicities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrison; Neil (Santa Fe, NM), Singleton; John (Los Alamos, NM), Migliori; Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

    2008-08-05

    A quantum coherent switch having a substrate formed from a density wave (DW) material capable of having a periodic electron density modulation or spin density modulation, a dielectric layer formed onto a surface of the substrate that is orthogonal to an intrinsic wave vector of the DW material; and structure for applying an external spatially periodic electrostatic potential over the dielectric layer.

  18. Unstable periodic orbits in a chaotic meandering jet flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uleysky, M Yu; Prants, S V; 10.1088/1751-8113/41/21/215102

    2012-01-01

    We study the origin and bifurcations of typical classes of unstable periodic orbits in a jet flow that was introduced before as a kinematic model of chaotic advection, transport and mixing of passive scalars in meandering oceanic and atmospheric currents. A method to detect and locate the unstable periodic orbits and classify them by the origin and bifurcations is developed. We consider in detail period-1 and period-4 orbits playing an important role in chaotic advection. We introduce five classes of period-4 orbits: western and eastern ballistic ones, whose origin is associated with ballistic resonances of the fourth order, rotational ones, associated with rotational resonances of the second and fourth orders, and rotational-ballistic ones associated with a rotational-ballistic resonance. It is a new kind of nonlinear resonances that may occur in chaotic flow with jets and/or circulation cells. Varying the perturbation amplitude, we track out the origin and bifurcations of the orbits for each class.

  19. Unstable periodic orbits in a chaotic meandering jet flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Yu. Uleysky; M. V. Budyansky; S. V. Prants

    2007-12-25

    We study the origin and bifurcations of typical classes of unstable periodic orbits in a jet flow that was introduced before as a kinematic model of chaotic advection, transport and mixing of passive scalars in meandering oceanic and atmospheric currents. A method to detect and locate the unstable periodic orbits and classify them by the origin and bifurcations is developed. We consider in detail period-1 and period-4 orbits playing an important role in chaotic advection. We introduce five classes of period-4 orbits: western and eastern ballistic ones, whose origin is associated with ballistic resonances of the fourth order, rotational ones, associated with rotational resonances of the second and fourth orders, and rotational-ballistic ones associated with a rotational-ballistic resonance. It is a new kind of nonlinear resonances that may occur in chaotic flow with jets and/or circulation cells. Varying the perturbation amplitude, we track out the origin and bifurcations of the orbits for each class.

  20. End point estimates for Radon transform of radial functions on Non-Euclidean spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ashisha

    2012-01-01

    We prove end point estimate for Radon transform of radial functions on affine Grasamannian and real hyperbolic space. We also discuss analogs of these results on the sphere.

  1. Initial data sets with ends of cylindrical type: I. The Lichnerowicz equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr T. Chru?ciel; Rafe Mazzeo

    2014-10-07

    We construct large classes of vacuum general relativistic initial data sets, possibly with a cosmological constant Lambda, containing ends of cylindrical type.

  2. All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. S. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Cain; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Dorsher; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr?czi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; W. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; M. R. Ganija; J. Garcia; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; I. Kamaretsos; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; D. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; M. Kinsey; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak

    2011-10-02

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long-period binary companion.

  3. Cementitious Barriers Partnership FY2013 End-Year Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G. P.; Langton, C. A.; Burns, H. H.; Smith, F. G.; Kosson, D. S.; Brown, K. G.; Samson, E.; Meeussen, J. C.L.; van der Sloot, H. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2013-11-01

    In FY2013, the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) demonstrated continued tangible progress toward fulfilling the objective of developing a set of software tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long?term structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. In November 2012, the CBP released “Version 1.0” of the CBP Software Toolbox, a suite of software for simulating reactive transport in cementitious materials and important degradation phenomena. In addition, the CBP completed development of new software for the “Version 2.0” Toolbox to be released in early FY2014 and demonstrated use of the Version 1.0 Toolbox on DOE applications. The current primary software components in both Versions 1.0 and 2.0 are LeachXS/ORCHESTRA, STADIUM, and a GoldSim interface for probabilistic analysis of selected degradation scenarios. The CBP Software Toolbox Version 1.0 supports analysis of external sulfate attack (including damage mechanics), carbonation, and primary constituent leaching. Version 2.0 includes the additional analysis of chloride attack and dual regime flow and contaminant migration in fractured and non?fractured cementitious material. The LeachXS component embodies an extensive material property measurements database along with chemical speciation and reactive mass transport simulation cases with emphasis on leaching of major, trace and radionuclide constituents from cementitious materials used in DOE facilities, such as Saltstone (Savannah River) and Cast Stone (Hanford), tank closure grouts, and barrier concretes. STADIUM focuses on the physical and structural service life of materials and components based on chemical speciation and reactive mass transport of major cement constituents and aggressive species (e.g., chloride, sulfate, etc.). THAMES is a planned future CBP Toolbox component focused on simulation of the microstructure of cementitious materials and calculation of resultant hydraulic and constituent mass transfer parameters needed in modeling. Two CBP software demonstrations were conducted in FY2013, one to support the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) at SRS and the other on a representative Hanford high?level waste tank. The CBP Toolbox demonstration on the SDF provided analysis on the most probable degradation mechanisms to the cementitious vault enclosure caused by sulfate and carbonation ingress. This analysis was documented and resulted in the issuance of a SDF Performance Assessment Special Analysis by Liquid Waste Operations this fiscal year. The two new software tools supporting chloride attack and dual?regime flow will provide additional degradation tools to better evaluate performance of DOE and commercial cementitious barriers. The CBP SRNL experimental program produced two patent applications and field data that will be used in the development and calibration of CBP software tools being developed in FY2014. The CBP software and simulation tools varies from other efforts in that all the tools are based upon specific and relevant experimental research of cementitious materials utilized in DOE applications. The CBP FY2013 program involved continuing research to improve and enhance the simulation tools as well as developing new tools that model other key degradation phenomena not addressed in Version 1.0. Also efforts to continue to verify the various simulation tools through laboratory experiments and analysis of field specimens are ongoing and will continue into FY2014 to quantify and reduce the uncertainty associated with performance assessments. This end?year report summarizes FY2013 software development efforts and the various experimental programs that are providing data for calibration and validation of the CBP developed software.

  4. Italian WEEE management system and treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments for CFCs removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sansotera, M., E-mail: maurizio.sansotera@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Navarrini, W. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Talaeemashhadi, S.; Venturini, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Italian data about WEEE management in the period 2005–2010 have been reported. • In 2001–2004 CFC release was monitored and Po Valley resulted as main source region. • The Italian directive on WEEE management was enacted in 2005 but took effect in 2008. • The CFC analytic procedures of the audit assessments have been discussed. - Abstract: This study presents and analyzes the data of the Italian system for take-back and recovery of waste electrical and electronic equipments (WEEEs) in the start-up period 2008–2010. The analysis was focused particularly on the data about the treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments. In fact, the wastes of cooling and freezing equipments have a high environmental impact. Indeed, in their compressor oil and insulation polyurethane (PU) foams chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) ozone-depleting gases are still present. In the period 2001–2004 Northern Italy resulted the main source in Europe of CFCs. The European Directive on WEEE management was enacted in 2002, but in Italy it was implemented by the legislative Decree in 2005 and it became operational in 2008. Actually, in 2008 the national WEEE Coordination Centre was founded in order to organize the WEEE pick-up process and to control collection, recovery and recycling targets. As a result, in 2010 the average WEEE collection per capita exceeded the threshold of more than 4 kg per inhabitant, as well as cooling and freezing appliances represented more than one fourth of the Italian WEEE collection stream. During the treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments, CFCs were recovered and disposed principally by burner methods. The analyses of defined specimens collected in the treatment facilities were standardized to reliably determine the amount of recovered CFCs. Samples of alkaline solid salt, alkaline saline solution, polyurethane matrix and compressor oil collected during the audit assessment procedure were analyzed and the results were discussed. In particular, the analysis of PU samples after the shredding and the warm pressing procedures measured a residual CFCs content around 500–1300 mg/kg of CFCs within the foam matrix.

  5. Planar resonant periodic orbits in Kuiper belt dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Voyatzis; Thomas Kotoulas

    2005-02-28

    In the framework of the planar restricted three body problem we study a considerable number of resonances associated to the Kuiper Belt dynamics and located between 30 and 48 a.u. Our study is based on the computation of resonant periodic orbits and their stability. Stable periodic orbits are surrounded by regular librations in phase space and in such domains the capture of trans-Neptunian object is possible. All the periodic orbits found are symmetric and there is evidence for the existence of asymmetric ones only in few cases. In the present work first, second and third order resonances are under consideration. In the planar circular case we found that most of the periodic orbits are stable. The families of periodic orbits are temporarily interrupted by collisions but they continue up to relatively large values of the Jacobi constant and highly eccentric regular motion exists for all cases. In the elliptic problem and for a particular eccentricity value of the primary bodies the periodic orbits are isolated. The corresponding families, where they belong to, bifurcate from specific periodic orbits of the circular problem and seem to continue up to the rectilinear problem. Both stable and unstable orbits are obtained for each case. In the elliptic problem the unstable orbits found are associated with narrow chaotic domains in phase space. The evolution of the orbits, which are located in such chaotic domains, seems to be practically regular and bounded for long time intervals.

  6. Enhanced entrainability of genetic oscillators by period mismatch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshihiko Hasegawa; Masanori Arita

    2013-01-12

    Biological oscillators coordinate individual cellular components so that they function coherently and collectively. They are typically composed of multiple feedback loops, and period mismatch is unavoidable in biological implementations. We investigated the advantageous effect of this period mismatch in terms of a synchronization response to external stimuli. Specifically, we considered two fundamental models of genetic circuits: smooth- and relaxation oscillators. Using phase reduction and Floquet multipliers, we numerically analyzed their entrainability under different coupling strengths and period ratios. We found that a period mismatch induces better entrainment in both types of oscillator; the enhancement occurs in the vicinity of the bifurcation on their limit cycles. In the smooth oscillator, the optimal period ratio for the enhancement coincides with the experimentally observed ratio, which suggests biological exploitation of the period mismatch. Although the origin of multiple feedback loops is often explained as a passive mechanism to ensure robustness against perturbation, we study the active benefits of the period mismatch, which include increasing the efficiency of the genetic oscillators. Our findings show a qualitatively different perspective for both the inherent advantages of multiple loops and their essentiality.

  7. Development of Seismic Isolation Systems Using Periodic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Yiqun; Mo, Yi-Lung; Menq, Farn-Yuh; Stokoe, II, Kenneth H.; Perkins, Judy; Tang, Yu

    2014-12-10

    Advanced fast nuclear power plants and small modular fast reactors are composed of thin-walled structures such as pipes; as a result, they do not have sufficient inherent strength to resist seismic loads. Seismic isolation, therefore, is an effective solution for mitigating earthquake hazards for these types of structures. Base isolation, on which numerous studies have been conducted, is a well-defined structure protection system against earthquakes. In conventional isolators, such as high-damping rubber bearings, lead-rubber bearings, and friction pendulum bearings, large relative displacements occur between upper structures and foundations. Only isolation in a horizontal direction is provided; these features are not desirable for the piping systems. The concept of periodic materials, based on the theory of solid-state physics, can be applied to earthquake engineering. The periodic material is a material that possesses distinct characteristics that prevent waves with certain frequencies from being transmitted through it; therefore, this material can be used in structural foundations to block unwanted seismic waves with certain frequencies. The frequency band of periodic material that can filter out waves is called the band gap, and the structural foundation made of periodic material is referred to as the periodic foundation. The design of a nuclear power plant, therefore, can be unified around the desirable feature of a periodic foundation, while the continuous maintenance of the structure is not needed. In this research project, three different types of periodic foundations were studied: one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional. The basic theories of periodic foundations are introduced first to find the band gaps; then the finite element methods are used, to perform parametric analysis, and obtain attenuation zones; finally, experimental programs are conducted, and the test data are analyzed to verify the theory. This procedure shows that the periodic foundation is a promising and effective way to mitigate structural damage caused by earthquake excitation.

  8. Evolution of the periodicities in 2S 0114+650

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravi Sood; Sean Farrell; Paul O'Neill; Ravi Manchanda; N. M. Ashok

    2006-03-01

    We have analysed nine years of data from the All Sky Monitor on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer for 2S 0114+650 to study the evolution of its spin, binary and super-orbital periods. The spin history of the neutron star in this system exhibits torque reversals lasting ~1 yr. The newly discovered super-orbital period has remained stable over the 9-yr span, making 2S 0114+650 the fourth known system to exhibit stable super-orbital modulation. We compare its super-orbital period evolution with those of the other three such systems.

  9. A NEW SUB-PERIOD-MINIMUM CATACLYSMIC VARIABLE WITH PARTIAL HYDROGEN DEPLETION AND EVIDENCE OF SPIRAL DISK STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Littlefield, C.; Garnavich, P.; Magno, K.; Applegate, A.; Pogge, R.; Irwin, J.; Marion, G. H.; Kirshner, R.; Vinko, J.

    2013-06-15

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy and photometry of CSS 120422:111127+571239 (=SBS 1108+574), a recently discovered SU UMa-type dwarf nova whose 55 minute orbital period is well below the cataclysmic variable (CV) period minimum of {approx}78 minutes. In contrast with most other known CVs, its spectrum features He I emission of comparable strength to the Balmer lines, implying a hydrogen abundance less than 0.1 of long-period CVs-but still at least 10 times higher than that in AM CVn stars. Together, the short orbital period and remarkable helium-to-hydrogen ratio suggest that mass transfer in CSS 120422 began near the end of the donor star's main-sequence lifetime, meaning that this CV is a strong candidate progenitor of an AM CVn system as described by Podsiadlowski et al. Moreover, a Doppler tomogram of the H{alpha} line reveals two distinct regions of enhanced emission. While one is the result of the stream-disk impact, the other is probably attributable to spiral disk structure generated when material in the outer disk achieves a 2:1 orbital resonance with respect to the donor.

  10. Stochastic Shortest Path MDPs with Dead Ends Andrey Kolobov Mausam Daniel S. Weld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mausam

    Stochastic Shortest Path MDPs with Dead Ends Andrey Kolobov Mausam Daniel S. Weld {akolobov, mausam, weld}@cs.washington.edu Dept of Computer Science and Engineering University of Washington Seattle, USA algorithms that are aware of the possible presence of dead-end states (Kolobov, Mausam, and Weld 2010

  11. Optimization of purge cycle for dead-ended anode fuel cell Jixin Chen a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Optimization of purge cycle for dead-ended anode fuel cell operation Jixin Chen a, *, Jason B 9 March 2013 Keywords: Dead-ended anode Fuel cell optimization Hydrogen loss Carbon corrosion, University of Michigan, 2350 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA b Fuel Cell Stack Research, Research

  12. CISC 327 -Fall 2014 ! Course Project Assignment #5 -Back End Unit Testing!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordy, James R.

    CISC 327 - Fall 2014 ! ! Course Project Assignment #5 - Back End Unit Testing! !Due Wednesday Nov 19! !In this assignment, you will practice (partial) white box testing of the Back Office you cases on your Back End! !! (v) make a table of the failures uncovered by your tests (if any

  13. Integration of IC Industry Feature Sizes with University Back-End-of-Line Post Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, R. Jacob

    Integration of IC Industry Feature Sizes with University Back-End-of-Line Post Processing: Example., Boise, Idaho 83725 Abstract-- We have demonstrated that back-end-of-line (BEOL) processing can. With this capability, new device technologies and materials can be explored at the university level, where the basic

  14. GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF THE MUON COLLIDER/NEUTRINO FACTORY FRONT END

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF THE MUON COLLIDER/NEUTRINO FACTORY FRONT END HISHAM SAYED BROOKHAVEN MEETING 10 September 2013 #12;GLOBALLY OPTIMIZING MUON TARGET & FRONT END 9/10/13 2 in bunches #12;INTRODUCTION & LAYOUT Ã? High performance Optimization Tools on NERSC Ã? Target: Ã?

  15. Activity based End-User-Development for Smart Homes: Relevance and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Activity based End-User-Development for Smart Homes: Relevance and Challenges Alexandre Demeurea to unleash the potential of Smart Homes. The obstacle is no more about hardware concerns but lies in how inhabitants can build, configure and control their Smart Home. In this paper, we defend the idea that End

  16. Tuesday November 9, 06:21 PM Nuclear project talks end in Vienna without agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , safe, inexhaustible energy source of the future. The project, emulating the sun's nuclear fusion) - The latest round of six-party talks on a revolutionary nuclear energy project ended in ViennaTuesday November 9, 06:21 PM Nuclear project talks end in Vienna without agreement VIENNA (AFP

  17. Accepted Manuscript Superconductivity in Entirely End-bonded Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Accepted Manuscript Superconductivity in Entirely End-bonded Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes I, Superconductivity in Entirely End-bonded Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes, Physica C (2007), doi: 10.1016/ j.physc.2007 disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain. #12;ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT Physica C 1 Superconductivity

  18. Heat transfer in a pulsating heat pipe with open end Yuwen Zhang 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuwen

    Heat transfer in a pulsating heat pipe with open end Yuwen Zhang 1 , Amir Faghri * Department and condenser sections of a pulsating heat pipe (PHP) with open end is modeled by analyzing thin ®lm evaporation and condensation. The heat transfer solutions are applied to the thermal model of the pulsating heat pipe

  19. RESEARCH Open Access Accuracy and precision of end-expiratory lung-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESEARCH Open Access Accuracy and precision of end-expiratory lung- volume measurements , Gilles Bernardin2 and Laurent Brochard1,9,10 Abstract Introduction: End-expiratory lung volume (EELV in lung volume above functional residual capacity measured with passive spirometry (PEEP

  20. Presidential Address 2007: The end-Permian mass extinction events on land in Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    Presidential Address 2007: The end-Permian mass extinction ­ events on land in Russia Michael J. Benton BENTON, M. J. 2008. The end-Permian mass extinction ­ events on land in Russia. Proceedings dioxide ­ a greenhouse gas ­ as well as acid rain, which killed plants and led to stripping of soils