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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

CO2 Emissions - Namibia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Africa Namibia CO2 Emissions from Namibia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Namibia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

2

Namibia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Namibia: Energy Resources Namibia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-22,"lon":17,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

Category:Seattle, WA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seattle, WA Seattle, WA Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Seattle, WA" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Seattle WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 60 KB SVHospital Seattle WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVHospital Seattle WA ... 58 KB SVLargeHotel Seattle WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVLargeHotel Seattle W... 57 KB SVLargeOffice Seattle WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVLargeOffice Seattle ... 57 KB SVMediumOffice Seattle WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVMediumOffice Seattle... 61 KB SVMidriseApartment Seattle WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Sea... 58 KB SVOutPatient Seattle WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVOutPatient Seattle W... 63 KB

4

WA_02_042_GENERAL_MOTORS_POWER_TRAIN_DIV_Waiver_of_Domestic_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA02042GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA02042GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA02042GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverof...

5

WA_00_026_WASTE_MANAGEMENT_AND_PROC_INC_and_TEXACO_Waiver_of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA99018TEXACOENERGYSYSTEMSWaiverofDomesticandForei.pdf WA1993023TEXACOEXPLORATIONANDPRODUCTIONWaiverofDome.pdf WA1994001TEXACOEXPLORATIONANDPRODUCTIO...

6

Category:Yakima, WA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yakima, WA Yakima, WA Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Yakima, WA" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 61 KB SVHospital Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVHospital Yakima WA P... 58 KB SVLargeHotel Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVLargeHotel Yakima WA... 58 KB SVLargeOffice Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVLargeOffice Yakima W... 58 KB SVMediumOffice Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVMediumOffice Yakima ... 57 KB SVMidriseApartment Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Yak... 59 KB SVOutPatient Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVOutPatient Yakima WA... 63 KB SVPrimarySchool Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png

7

Namibia-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Namibia-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services Namibia-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Namibia-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services Name Namibia-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ), Global Green Growth Knowledge Platform (GGKP), Green Jobs Initiative, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area People and Policy Topics Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Country Namibia Southern Africa References UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services[1] Overview "UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services consist of policy advice, technical

8

WA_97_032_CHEMICAL_INDUSTRY_ENVIROMENTAL_TECHNOLOGY_PROJECTS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA97032CHEMICALINDUSTRYENVIROMENTALTECHNOLOGYPROJECTS.pdf WA97032CHEMICALINDUSTRYENVIROMENTALTECHNOL...

9

WA_97_038_FORD_MOTOR_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA97038FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA97038FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA97038FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomestican...

10

WA_01_007_SOLAR_TURBINES_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_pate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA07012BOEINGCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate.pdf WA1993004SOLARTURBINEINCWaivero...

11

WA_99_018_TEXACO_ENERGY_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Forei...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA03037MERIDIANAUTOSYSTEMSWaiverofDomesticandForei.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate.pdf WA01019GENERALELECTRICCORPWaiver...

12

WA_1994_009_SAINT-BOBAIN-NORTON_INDUSTRIAL_CERAMICS_CORPORAT...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA1993022NORTONCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeignRi.pdf WA97009DETROITDIESELCORPORATIONWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA1994007KYOCERAINDUSTRIALCERAMIC...

13

WA_1995_025_AMOCO_PRODUCTION_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA1995025AMOCOPRODUCTIONCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA1995025AMOCOPRODUCTIONCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA1995025AMOCOPRODUCTIONCOMPANYWaiverofDom...

14

WA_99_022_AIR_PRODUCTS_AND_CHEMICAL_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_F...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA99022AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALWaiverofDomesticandF.pdf WA99022AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALWaiverofDomesticandF.pdf WA99022AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALWaiverofDome...

15

WA_04_054_ECR_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_to_Inven...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA04039HONEYWELLINTERNATIONALWaiverofPatentRightsUn.pdf WA06016BPSOLARINTERNATIONALWaiverofPatentRightsUnd.pdf WA07040GRAFTECHINTERNATIONALLTDW...

16

WA_07_016_OSRAM_SYLVANIA_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_DOE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA04016MACKTRUCKSWaiverofPatentRightsunderNRELSub.pdf WA06016BPSOLARINTERNATIONALWaiverofPatentRightsUnd.pdf WA05031OSRAMSYLVANIAPRODUCTSWaiv...

17

WA_05_006_ABENGOA_BIOENERGY_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Domestic_a...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

06ABENGOABIOENERGYCORPORATIONWaiverofDomestica.pdf WA05006ABENGOABIOENERGYCORPORATIONWaiverofDomestica.pdf WA05006ABENGOABIOENERGYCORPORATIONWaiverofDomesti...

18

WA_97_009_DETROIT_DIESEL_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09DETROITDIESELCORPORATIONWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA97009DETROITDIESELCORPORATIONWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA97009DETROITDIESELCORPORATIONWaiverofDomestica...

19

WA_97_010_DETROIT_DIESEL_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Domestice_and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0DETROITDIESELCORPORATIONWaiverofDomesticeand.pdf WA97010DETROITDIESELCORPORATIONWaiverofDomesticeand.pdf WA97010DETROITDIESELCORPORATIONWaiverofDomesticea...

20

WA_03_043_GENERAL_ELECTRIC_POWER_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Domestic_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3043GENERALELECTRICPOWERSYSTEMSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03043GENERALELECTRICPOWERSYSTEMSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03043GENERALELECTRICPOWERSYSTEMSWaiverofDom...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

WA_03_050_GENERAL_ELECTRIC__POWER_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Domestic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50GENERALELECTRICPOWERSYSTEMSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03050GENERALELECTRICPOWERSYSTEMSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03050GENERALELECTRICPOWERSYSTEMSWaiverofDomes...

22

WA_03_016_GENE_ELEC_HYBRID_POWER_GENERATION_SYSTEMS_Waiver_o...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA03016GENEELECHYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMSWaivero.pdf WA03016GENEELECHYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMS...

23

WA_00_007_COMBUSTION_ENGINEERING_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07COMBUSTIONENGINEERINGINCWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA00007COMBUSTIONENGINEERINGINCWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA00007COMBUSTIONENGINEERINGINCWaiverofDomestica...

24

WA_1995_046_EASTMAN_CHEMICAL_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46EASTMANCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA1995046EASTMANCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA1995046EASTMANCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticand...

25

WA_1995_015_EASTMAN_CHEMICAL_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15EASTMANCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA1995015EASTMANCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA1995015EASTMANCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticand...

26

WA_05_022_DOW_CHEMICAL_COMPANY_Waiver_of_domestic_and_Foreig...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2DOWCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofdomesticandForeig.pdf WA05022DOWCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofdomesticandForeig.pdf WA05022DOWCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofdomesticandFore...

27

WA_04_057_CHEMICAL_RESEARCH_AND_LICENSING_CO_Waiver_of_Paten...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7CHEMICALRESEARCHANDLICENSINGCOWaiverofPaten.pdf WA04057CHEMICALRESEARCHANDLICENSINGCOWaiverofPaten.pdf WA04057CHEMICALRESEARCHANDLICENSINGCOWaiverofPat...

28

WA_02_042_GENERAL_MOTORS_POWER_TRAIN_DIV_Waiver_of_Domestic_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA02042GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA02042GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverofDomest...

29

WA_06_034_ENERGY_CONVERSION_DEVICES_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_a...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

06034ENERGYCONVERSIONDEVICESINCWaiverofDomestica.pdf WA06034ENERGYCONVERSIONDEVICESINCWaiverofDomestica.pdf WA06034ENERGYCONVERSIONDEVICESINCWaiverofDom...

30

WA_1993_028_ALLIANCE_ELECTRIC_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2MARTINMARIETTACORPORATIONKNOWASGENERALDYNA.pdf WA1994013GENERALELECTRICCOMPANYCORPORATERESEARCHAND.pdf WA1993023TEXACOEXPLORATIONANDPRODUCTIONWaiverofDome...

31

WA_1995_026_CHEVRON_PRODUCTION_COMPNAY_Waiver_of_Domestic_an...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UCTIONCOMPNAYWaiverofDomestican.pdf More Documents & Publications WA1993023TEXACOEXPLORATIONANDPRODUCTIONWaiverofDome.pdf WA1993028ALLIANCEELECTRICCOMPANYWaiver...

32

WA_1994_012_MARTIN_MARIETTA_CORPORATION_KNOW_AS_GENERAL_DYNA...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3GENERALELECTRICCOMPANYCORPORATERESEARCHAND.pdf WA1993028ALLIANCEELECTRICCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA1993023TEXACOEXPLORATIONANDPRODUCTIONWaiverofDome...

33

WA_1994_001_TEXACO_EXPLORATION_AND_PRODUCTION_Waiver_of_Dome...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01TEXACOEXPLORATIONANDPRODUCTIONWaiverofDome.pdf WA1994001TEXACOEXPLORATIONANDPRODUCTIONWaiverofDome.pdf WA1994001TEXACOEXPLORATIONANDPRODUCTIONWaiverofDom...

34

WA_1993_023_TEXACO_EXPLORATION_AND_PRODUCTION_Waiver_of_Dome...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23TEXACOEXPLORATIONANDPRODUCTIONWaiverofDome.pdf WA1993023TEXACOEXPLORATIONANDPRODUCTIONWaiverofDome.pdf WA1993023TEXACOEXPLORATIONANDPRODUCTIONWaiverofDom...

35

WA_97_018_INTERNATIONAL_FUEL_CELLS_CORPS_Waiver_of_Domestic_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7018INTERNATIONALFUELCELLSCORPSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA97018INTERNATIONALFUELCELLSCORPSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA97018INTERNATIONALFUELCELLSCORPSWaiverofDom...

36

WA_02_050_SPECIALIZED_TECHNOLOGY_RESOURCES_Waiver_of_Patent_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50SPECIALIZEDTECHNOLOGYRESOURCESWaiverofPatent.pdf WA02050SPECIALIZEDTECHNOLOGYRESOURCESWaiverofPatent.pdf WA02050SPECIALIZEDTECHNOLOGYRESOURCESWaiverofPate...

37

WA_04_076_CHEVRONTEXACO_TECHNOLOGY_VENTURES_Waiver_of_Patent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6CHEVRONTEXACOTECHNOLOGYVENTURESWaiverofPatent.pdf WA04076CHEVRONTEXACOTECHNOLOGYVENTURESWaiverofPatent.pdf WA04076CHEVRONTEXACOTECHNOLOGYVENTURESWaiverofPate...

38

WA_04_028_AIR_PRODUCTS_AND_CHEMICALS_Waiver_of_patent_Rights...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4028AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofpatentRights.pdf WA04028AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofpatentRights.pdf WA04028AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofpatent...

39

WA_1994_021_ATLANTA_GAS_LIGHT_AND_ABSORBENT_RESEARCH_Waiver_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4021ATLANTAGASLIGHTANDABSORBENTRESEARCHWaiver.pdf WA1994021ATLANTAGASLIGHTANDABSORBENTRESEARCHWaiver.pdf WA1994021ATLANTAGASLIGHTANDABSORBENTRESEARCHWai...

40

WA_05_060_SHELL_SOLAR_INDUSTRIES_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_fore...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60SHELLSOLARINDUSTRIESWaiverofDomesticandfore.pdf WA05060SHELLSOLARINDUSTRIESWaiverofDomesticandfore.pdf WA05060SHELLSOLARINDUSTRIESWaiverofDomesticandf...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

WA_1995_012_ENGELHARDT_INSTITUTE_OF_MOLECULAR_BIOLOGY_Waiver...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12ENGELHARDTINSTITUTEOFMOLECULARBIOLOGYWaiver.pdf WA1995012ENGELHARDTINSTITUTEOFMOLECULARBIOLOGYWaiver.pdf WA1995012ENGELHARDTINSTITUTEOFMOLECULARBIOLOGYWaive...

42

WA-TRIBE-STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE OF INDIANS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA-TRIBE-STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE OF INDIANS WA-TRIBE-STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE OF INDIANS Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe WA-TRIBE- STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE OF INDIANS WA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Stillaguamish Tribe proposes to expand its Stillaguamish Tribe Transit Services (STTS). For the past three years, the STTS has employed 14-passenger buses to transport clients to and from the tribal medical, dental, behavioral health and massage clinics. Often the demand-response requests that come to STTS are for one to three passengers at a time; therefore, funds are being requested to purchase a hybrid sedan to transport clients. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A1, B1.32, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

43

Identifying and representing elements of local contexts in namibia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an attempt to represent local context in a 3D visualisation for rural elders in Namibia we have found major differences in the conceptualization of this context between external and local partners in the co-creation process. Through the evaluation ... Keywords: context, context-aware, indigenous knowledge, participatory design, re-contextualization

Kasper Rodil, Kasper Lvborg Jensen, Matthias Rehm, Heike Winschiers-Theophilus

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

WA_05_046_GENERAL_MOTORS_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_domestic_and_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications WA04070GENERALMOTORSCORPORATIONWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA02042GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverofDomestic.pdf Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-031...

45

WA_01_023_BP_NORTH_AMERICAN_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_I...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-002 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-016 WA1993023TEXACOEXPLORATIONANDPRODUCTIONWaiverofDome...

46

WA_01_029_GENERAL_ELECTRIC_R_and_D_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_under...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA01029GENERALELECTRICRandDWaiverofPatentRightsunder.pdf WA01029GENERALELECTRICRandDWaiverofPatentRightsunder.pdf WA01029GENERALELECTRICRandDWaiver...

47

Changes related to "Category:Seattle, WA" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Category:Seattle, WA" Category:Seattle, WA Jump to: navigation, search This is a list of changes...

48

MHK Projects/GPP Namibia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GPP Namibia GPP Namibia < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-22.9576,"lon":18.4904,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

RECIPIENT:WA Dept. of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT SEP ARRA SIRTI -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA Dept. of Commerce STATE: WA WA Dept. of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT SEP ARRA SIRTI - Demand Energy - Energy Storage System Tied to Solar on Commercial Facility TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number DE-FOA-0000052 DE-EEOOO0139 GFO-o000139-031 Based on my review ofthe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4S1.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and demand studies), and dissemination (including, but not limited to, document mailings, publication, and distribution;

50

WA_1994_027_FORD_MOTOR_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreig...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4027FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeig.pdf WA1994027FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeig.pdf WA1994027FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandFo...

51

WA_99_015_FORD_MOTOR_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

99015FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA99015FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA99015FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandF...

52

WA_1993_032_FORD_MOTOR_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreig...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

32FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeig.pdf WA1993032FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeig.pdf WA1993032FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForei...

53

WA_1993_004_SOLAR_TURBINE_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

04SOLARTURBINEINCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA1993004SOLARTURBINEINCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA1993004SOLARTURBINEINCWaiverofDomesticandForeig...

54

WA_00_012_3M_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Rights_u...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DomesticandForeignRightsu.pdf More Documents & Publications WA99008DUPONTSUPERCONDUCTIVITYWaiverofUSandForeign.pdf WA03046INTERMAGNETICSGENERALCORPWaiverofDo...

55

WA_99_008_DUPONT_SUPERCONDUCTIVITY_Waiver_of_US_and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9008DUPONTSUPERCONDUCTIVITYWaiverofUSandForeign.pdf WA99008DUPONTSUPERCONDUCTIVITYWaiverofUSandForeign.pdf WA99008DUPONTSUPERCONDUCTIVITYWaiverofUSandFo...

56

WA_07_012_BOEING_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Pate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THEBOEINGCOMPANYWaiverofdomesticandForeign.pdf WA01007SOLARTURBINESWaiverofDomesticandForeignpate.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate...

57

WA_04-001_AMENDED_SILICATES_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_I...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PHILLIPSPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA00001PRAXAIRINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignInventi.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate...

58

WA_03_015_HYBRID_POWER_GENERATION_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Domestic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA03015HYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03015HYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMS...

59

WA_07_022_SIEMENS_POWER_GENERATION_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA07022SIEMENSPOWERGENERATIONINCWaiverofPatentRigh.pdf WA07022SIEMENSPOWERGENERATIONINCWaiv...

60

WA_1994_022_CUMMINS_POWER_GENERATION_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA1994022CUMMINSPOWERGENERATIONWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA1994022CUMMINSPOWERGENERATIONWaivero...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

WA_03_017_HYBRID_POWER_GENERATION_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Domestic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA03017HYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03017HYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMS...

62

WA_1993_006_CUMMINS_POWER_GENERATION_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA1993006CUMMINSPOWERGENERATIONINCWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA1993006CUMMINSPOWERGENERATIONINCWaiv...

63

WA_98_006_WESTINGHOUSE_POWER_GENERATION_A_FORMER_DIVISION_OF...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA98006WESTINGHOUSEPOWERGENERATIONAFORMERDIVISIONOF.pdf WA98006WESTINGHOUSEPOWERGENERATIONAFORMER...

64

WA_04_017_CUMMINS_POWER_GENERATION_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fo...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA04017CUMMINSPOWERGENERATIONWaiverofDomesticandFo.pdf WA04017CUMMINSPOWERGENERATIONWaivero...

65

WA_1995_035_ABB_POWER_GENERATION_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA1995035ABBPOWERGENERATIONINCWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA1995035ABBPOWERGENERATIONINCWaiv...

66

WA_04_080_HYBRID_POWER_GENERATION_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Patent_R...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA04080HYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMSWaiverofPatentR.pdf WA04080HYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMS...

67

WA_98_005_WESTINGHOUSE_POWER_GENERATION_A_FORMER_DIVISION_OF...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA98005WESTINGHOUSEPOWERGENERATIONAFORMERDIVISIONOF.pdf WA98005WESTINGHOUSEPOWERGENERATIONAFORMER...

68

WA_03_014_HYBRID_POWER_GENERATION_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Domestic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA03014HYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03014HYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMS...

69

WA_02_011_BP_AMOCO_CHEMICAL_CO_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreig...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1BPAMOCOCHEMICALCOWaiverofDomesticandForeig.pdf WA02011BPAMOCOCHEMICALCOWaiverofDomesticandForeig.pdf WA02011BPAMOCOCHEMICALCOWaiverofDomesticandFore...

70

WA_1993_036_DOW_CHEMICAL_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

36DOWCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf WA1993036DOWCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf WA1993036DOWCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandFor...

71

WA_01_032_DOW_CHEMICAL_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_foreign_Patent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1032DOWCHEMICALWaiverofDomesticandforeignPatent.pdf WA01032DOWCHEMICALWaiverofDomesticandforeignPatent.pdf WA01032DOWCHEMICALWaiverofDomesticandforeign...

72

WA_06_019_NALCO_CHEMICAL_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19NALCOCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf WA06019NALCOCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf WA06019NALCOCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandF...

73

WA_03_033_GE_WIND_ENERGY_LLC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3GEWINDENERGYLLCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA03033GEWINDENERGYLLCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA03033GEWINDENERGYLLCWaiverofDomesticandForeig...

74

WA_03_013_ANADARKO_PETROLEUM_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3013ANADARKOPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA03013ANADARKOPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA03013ANADARKOPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandFo...

75

WA_-01_001_PHILLIPS_PETROLEUM_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-01001PHILLIPSPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA-01001PHILLIPSPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA-01001PHILLIPSPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticand...

76

WA_04_036_HRL_Laboratories_LLC_.Waiver_pof_dDomestic_fand_Fo...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9GENERALMOTORSCORPWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA02042GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03044CATERPILLARINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignR...

77

WA_04_026_ENERGY_CONVERSION_DEVICES_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_F...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6ENERGYCONVERSIONDEVICESWaiverofDomesticandF.pdf WA04026ENERGYCONVERSIONDEVICESWaiverofDomesticandF.pdf WA04026ENERGYCONVERSIONDEVICESWaiverofDomesticand...

78

WA_1993_018_CONSOLIDATION_COAL_CO_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_For...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18CONSOLIDATIONCOALCOWaiverofDomesticandFor.pdf WA1993018CONSOLIDATIONCOALCOWaiverofDomesticandFor.pdf WA1993018CONSOLIDATIONCOALCOWaiverofDomesticandFo...

79

WA_04_034_NUVERA_FUEL_CELLS_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Forei...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4NUVERAFUELCELLSINCWaiverofDomesticandForei.pdf WA04034NUVERAFUELCELLSINCWaiverofDomesticandForei.pdf WA04034NUVERAFUELCELLSINCWaiverofDomesticandFor...

80

WA_04_041_NUVERA_FUEL_CELLS_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Forei...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41NUVERAFUELCELLSINCWaiverofDomesticandForei.pdf WA04041NUVERAFUELCELLSINCWaiverofDomesticandForei.pdf WA04041NUVERAFUELCELLSINCWaiverofDomesticandFo...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

WA_03_054_HEIL_TRAILER_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADVANCEDTECHNLOGYMATERIALSWaiverofDomestican.pdf WA04054ECRINTERNATIONALWaiverofPatentRightstoInven.pdf WA02035BPSOLARINTERNATIONALWaiverofDomesticandFore...

82

WA_04_055_BALLARD_POWER_SYSTEMS_CORP_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications WA02055PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA99014UNITEDSOLARSYSTEMSCORPWaiverofDomesticandF.pdf...

83

WA_04_083_AIR_PRODUCTS_AND_CHEMICALS_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA04083AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA04083AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofPatentRigh...

84

WA_00_027_HONEYWELL_POWER_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights.pdf...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7HONEYWELLPOWERSYSTEMSWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA00027HONEYWELLPOWERSYSTEMSWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA00027HONEYWELLPOWERSYSTEMSWaiverofPatentRights.pdf...

85

WA_05_062_UNITED_TECHNOLOGIES_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Patent_R...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5062UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESCORPORATIONWaiverofPatentR.pdf WA05062UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESCORPORATIONWaiverofPatentR.pdf WA05062UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESCORPORATIONWaiverofPa...

86

WA_04_082_DELPHI_AUTOMOTIVE_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4082DELPHIAUTOMOTIVESYSTEMSWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA04082DELPHIAUTOMOTIVESYSTEMSWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA04082DELPHIAUTOMOTIVESYSTEMSWaiverofPatentR...

87

WA_02_015_AIR_PRODUCTS_AND_CHEMICALS_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Ri...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSINCWaiverofPatentRi.pdf WA02015AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSINCWaiverofPatentRi.pdf WA02015AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSINCWaiverofPatent...

88

WA_07_040_GRAFTECH_INTERNATIONAL_LTD_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40GRAFTECHINTERNATIONALLTDWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA07040GRAFTECHINTERNATIONALLTDWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA07040GRAFTECHINTERNATIONALLTDWaiverofPatentRig...

89

WA_06_032_HONEYWELL_TURBO_TECHNOLOGIES_Waiver_of_Patent_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2HONEYWELLTURBOTECHNOLOGIESWaiverofPatentRigh.pdf WA06032HONEYWELLTURBOTECHNOLOGIESWaiverofPatentRigh.pdf WA06032HONEYWELLTURBOTECHNOLOGIESWaiverofPatentRi...

90

WA_04_040_HONEYWELL_INTERNATIONAL_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Right...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0HONEYWELLINTERNATIONALINCWaiverofPatentRight.pdf WA04040HONEYWELLINTERNATIONALINCWaiverofPatentRight.pdf WA04040HONEYWELLINTERNATIONALINCWaiverofPatentRig...

91

WA_06_005_AIR_PRODUCTS_AND_CHEMICALS_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA06005AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA06005AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofPatentRigh...

92

WA_04_012_MACK_TRUCK_INC_Waiver_of_patent_Rights_under_NREL_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2MACKTRUCKINCWaiverofpatentRightsunderNREL.pdf WA04012MACKTRUCKINCWaiverofpatentRightsunderNREL.pdf WA04012MACKTRUCKINCWaiverofpatentRightsunderNRE...

93

WA_04_025_AIR_LIQUIDE_AMERICA_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_under_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25AIRLIQUIDEAMERICAWaiverofPatentRightsunder.pdf WA04025AIRLIQUIDEAMERICAWaiverofPatentRightsunder.pdf WA04025AIRLIQUIDEAMERICAWaiverofPatentRightsund...

94

WA_04_043_UNITED_TECHNOLOGIES_CORP_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_t...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

43UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESCORPWaiverofPatentRightst.pdf WA04043UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESCORPWaiverofPatentRightst.pdf WA04043UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESCORPWaiverofPatentRight...

95

WA_05_037_UNITED_TECHNOLOGIES_CORP_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_t...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESCORPWaiverofPatentRightst.pdf WA05037UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESCORPWaiverofPatentRightst.pdf WA05037UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESCORPWaiverofPatentRights...

96

WA_05_033_EASTMAN_CHEMICAL_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_t...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

33EASTMANCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightst.pdf WA05033EASTMANCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightst.pdf WA05033EASTMANCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRight...

97

WA_04_063_AIR_PRODUCTS_AND_CHEMICALS_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA04063AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA04063AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofPatentRigh...

98

WA_01_005__PRAXAIR_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_patent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5PRAXAIRINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignpatent.pdf WA01005PRAXAIRINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignpatent.pdf WA01005PRAXAIRINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignpate...

99

WA_05_029_AIR_PRODUCTS_AND_CHEMICALS_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA05029AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA05029AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofPatentRigh...

100

WA_05_025_GE_NUCLEAR_ENERGY_Waiver_of_patent_Rights_Under_a_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5025GENUCLEARENERGYWaiverofpatentRightsUndera.pdf WA05025GENUCLEARENERGYWaiverofpatentRightsUndera.pdf WA05025GENUCLEARENERGYWaiverofpatentRightsUn...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

WA_03_048_AMERICAN_SUPERCONDUCTOR_CORP_Waiver_of_Patent_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

48AMERICANSUPERCONDUCTORCORPWaiverofPatentRigh.pdf WA03048AMERICANSUPERCONDUCTORCORPWaiverofPatentRigh.pdf WA03048AMERICANSUPERCONDUCTORCORPWaiverofPatentR...

102

WA_03_021_DELPHI_AUTOMOTIVE_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1DELPHIAUTOMOTIVESYSTEMSWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA03021DELPHIAUTOMOTIVESYSTEMSWaiverofPatentRights.pdf WA03021DELPHIAUTOMOTIVESYSTEMSWaiverofPatentRight...

103

WA_06_033_PARKER_HANNIFIN_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Patent_Right...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3PARKERHANNIFINCORPORATIONWaiverofPatentRight.pdf WA06033PARKERHANNIFINCORPORATIONWaiverofPatentRight.pdf WA06033PARKERHANNIFINCORPORATIONWaiverofPatentRig...

104

WA_07_015_UNITED_TECHNOLOGIES_CORP_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_t...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESCORPWaiverofPatentRightst.pdf WA07015UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESCORPWaiverofPatentRightst.pdf WA07015UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESCORPWaiverofPatentRight...

105

WA_04_072_UNITED_TECHNOLOGIES_CORP_Waiverof_Patent_Rights_to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESCORPWaiverofPatentRightsto.pdf WA04072UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESCORPWaiverofPatentRightsto.pdf WA04072UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESCORPWaiverofPatentRights...

106

WA_1995_047_BLACK_CLAWSON_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_For...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7BLACKCLAWSONCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandFor.pdf WA1995047BLACKCLAWSONCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandFor.pdf WA1995047BLACKCLAWSONCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandFor...

107

WA_98_020_THERMO_BLACK_CLAWSON_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fo...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0THERMOBLACKCLAWSONINCWaiverofDomesticandFo.pdf WA98020THERMOBLACKCLAWSONINCWaiverofDomesticandFo.pdf WA98020THERMOBLACKCLAWSONINCWaiverofDomesticand...

108

WA_01_014_VOITH_FABRICS_APPLETON_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1014VOITHFABRICSAPPLETONWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf WA01014VOITHFABRICSAPPLETONWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf WA01014VOITHFABRICSAPPLETONWaiverofDomestican...

109

WA_98_019_SIEMENS_SOLAR_INDUSTRIES_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fo...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8019SIEMENSSOLARINDUSTRIESWaiverofDomesticandFo.pdf WA98019SIEMENSSOLARINDUSTRIESWaiverofDomesticandFo.pdf WA98019SIEMENSSOLARINDUSTRIESWaiverofDomestic...

110

WA_1995_030_GOLDEN_PHOTON_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30GOLDENPHOTONINCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA1995030GOLDENPHOTONINCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA1995030GOLDENPHOTONINCWaiverofDomesticandForeig...

111

WA_05_059_SHELL_SOLAR_INDUSTRIES_LP_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_F...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

59SHELLSOLARINDUSTRIESLPWaiverofDomesticandF.pdf WA05059SHELLSOLARINDUSTRIESLPWaiverofDomesticandF.pdf WA05059SHELLSOLARINDUSTRIESLPWaiverofDomestican...

112

WA_1995_002_SIEMENS_SOLAR_INDUSTRIES_Waiver_of_US_and_Foreig...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

02SIEMENSSOLARINDUSTRIESWaiverofUSandForeig.pdf WA1995002SIEMENSSOLARINDUSTRIESWaiverofUSandForeig.pdf WA1995002SIEMENSSOLARINDUSTRIESWaiverofUSandForei...

113

WA_00_028_LOUISIANA_PACIFIC_CORP_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0028LOUISIANAPACIFICCORPWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf WA00028LOUISIANAPACIFICCORPWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf WA00028LOUISIANAPACIFICCORPWaiverofDomestican...

114

WA_03_010_SHELL_SOLAR_INDUSTRIES_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10SHELLSOLARINDUSTRIESWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf WA03010SHELLSOLARINDUSTRIESWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf WA03010SHELLSOLARINDUSTRIESWaiverofDomesticandF...

115

WA_98_008_GENERAL_ELECTRIC_COMPANY_Waiver_Under_a_Subcontrac...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA98008GENERALELECTRICCOMPANYWaiverUnderaSubcontrac.pdf WA98008GENERALELECTRICCOMPANYWaiverUnderaSubcontrac.pdf More Documents & Publications...

116

WA_01_019_GENERAL_ELECTRIC_CORP_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Forei...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA01019GENERALELECTRICCORPWaiverofDomesticandForei.pdf WA01019GENERALELECTRICCORPWaiverofDomesticandForei.pdf More Documents & Publications...

117

WA_04_020_GENERAL_ELECTRIC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_In...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA04020GENERALELECTRICWaiverofDomesticandForeignIn.pdf WA04020GENERALELECTRICWaiverofDomesticandForeignIn.pdf More Documents & Publications...

118

WA_03_019_GENERAL_MOTORS_CORP_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCORPWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf More Documents & Publications WA01019GENERALELECTRICCORPWaiverofDomesticandForei.pdf WA1993020GENERALMOTORSWaiverofDomest...

119

WA_04_075_VARIAN_MEDICAL_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

75VARIANMEDICALSYSTEMSWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf WA04075VARIANMEDICALSYSTEMSWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf WA04075VARIANMEDICALSYSTEMSWaiverofDomesticandF...

120

WA_1993_041_ROCKETDYNE_AND_LLNL_Waiver_of_the_Governments_U.pdf...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1ROCKETDYNEANDLLNLWaiveroftheGovernmentsU.pdf WA1993041ROCKETDYNEANDLLNLWaiveroftheGovernmentsU.pdf WA1993041ROCKETDYNEANDLLNLWaiveroftheGovernmentsU.pd...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

WA_97_027_GENERAL_ATOMICS__CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Domestic_an...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EDSOLARSYSTEMSCORPWaiverofDomesticandF.pdf WA01034INGERSOLL-RANDENERGYSYSTEMSWaiverofDomestica.pdf WA00003DUKESOLARENERGYWaiverofDomesticandForeignP.pdf...

122

BayWa Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BayWa Group BayWa Group Jump to: navigation, search Name BayWa Group Place Munich, Germany Zip 81925 Sector Services, Solar Product Germany-based company with international operations specialised in wholesale and retail and in providing services. The company is also active in the biofuel and solar sectors. Coordinates 48.136415°, 11.577531° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.136415,"lon":11.577531,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

123

,"Sumas, WA Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Sumas, WA Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","172014" ,"Next...

124

Fourth Annual SECA Meeting - Seattle, WA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fourth Annual SECA Meeting - Seattle, WA Fourth Annual SECA Meeting - Seattle, WA April 15-16, 2003 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Expanded Applications of SECA Fuel Cells SECA Industrial Team Reports Military Applications of Fuel Cells Technology Highlights Environmental Considerations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

125

Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility | National Nuclear Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility January 16, 1943 Hanford, WA

126

RECIPIENT:WA Department of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of5 of5 RECIPIENT:WA Department of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number DE-EE0000139 GF0-10-604 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA CompUance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the foUowing determination: cx, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and demand studies), and dissemination (including, but not limited to, document mailings, publication, and distribution;

127

WA_00_013_GENECOR_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_US_Competitiveness...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications WA01008NOVOZYMEBIOTECHWaiverofDomesticandForeignPa.pdf WA05006ABENGOABIOENERGYCORPORATIONWaiverofDomestica.pdf Class Patent Waiver W(C)2012-004...

128

WA_01-012_DETROIT_DIESEL_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-012DETROITDIESELWaiverofDomesticandForeignRigh.pdf WA01-012DETROITDIESELWaiverofDomesticandForeignRigh.pdf WA01-012DETROITDIESELWaiverofDomesticandForeign...

129

WA_1995_039_USABC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Rights_Unde...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ofDomesticandForeignRightsUnde.pdf More Documents & Publications WA1993032FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeig.pdf WA97038FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomes...

130

WA_01-016_FORD_MOTOR_CO_Waive_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Invent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-016FORDMOTORCOWaiveofDomesticandForeignInvent.pdf WA01-016FORDMOTORCOWaiveofDomesticandForeignInvent.pdf WA01-016FORDMOTORCOWaiveofDomesticandForeign...

131

Pages that link to "Category:Seattle, WA" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Category:Seattle, WA" Category:Seattle, WA Jump to: navigation, search What links here Page:...

132

WA_03_046_INTERMAGNETICS_GENERAL_CORP_Waiver_of_Domestic_and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IGC-SUPERPOWERLLCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA03028SUPERPOWERINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOE.pdf WA99008DUPONTSUPERCONDUCTIVITYWaiverofUSandForeign...

133

WA_03_001_CHEVRON_TEXACO_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Pate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignP...

134

WA_1993_043_DETROIT_DEISEL_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_U.S._and_Fo...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

43DETROITDEISELCORPORATIONWaiverofU.S.andFo.pdf WA1993043DETROITDEISELCORPORATIONWaiverofU.S.andFo.pdf WA1993043DETROITDEISELCORPORATIONWaiverofU.S.andF...

135

WA_1993_034_CONSOLIDATED_NATURAL_GAS_(CNG)_Waiver_of_Domesti...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1993034CONSOLIDATEDNATURALGAS(CNG)WaiverofDomesti.pdf WA1993034CONSOLIDATEDNATURALGAS(CNG)WaiverofDomesti.pdf WA1993034CONSOLIDATEDNATURALGAS(CNG)Waiverof...

136

WA_02_032_DOW_CHEMICAL_CO_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Pat...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

32DOWCHEMICALCOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPat.pdf WA02032DOWCHEMICALCOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPat.pdf WA02032DOWCHEMICALCOWaiverofDomesticandForeign...

137

WA_1993_007_DOW_CHEMICAL_COMPANY_Waiver_of_U.S._and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1993007DOWCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofU.S.andForeign.pdf WA1993007DOWCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofU.S.andForeign.pdf WA1993007DOWCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofU.S.andF...

138

WA_01_002_CREE_LIGHTING_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Inven...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2CREELIGHTINGWaiverofDomesticandForeignInven.pdf WA01002CREELIGHTINGWaiverofDomesticandForeignInven.pdf WA01002CREELIGHTINGWaiverofDomesticandForeignInv...

139

WA_02_005_LUMILEDS_LIGHTING_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_I...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2005LUMILEDSLIGHTINGWaiverofDomesticandForeignI.pdf WA02005LUMILEDSLIGHTINGWaiverofDomesticandForeignI.pdf WA02005LUMILEDSLIGHTINGWaiverofDomesticandFor...

140

WA_02_009_CONSOL_ENERGY_Multi_Pollutant_Emissions_Control-CL...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

02009CONSOLENERGYMultiPollutantEmissionsControl-CL.pdf WA02009CONSOLENERGYMultiPollutantEmissionsControl-CL.pdf WA02009CONSOLENERGYMultiPollutantEmissionsCon...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

WA_06_021_UTC_FUEL_CELLS_LLC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1UTCFUELCELLSLLCWaiverofPatentRightsUndera.pdf WA06021UTCFUELCELLSLLCWaiverofPatentRightsUndera.pdf WA06021UTCFUELCELLSLLCWaiverofPatentRightsUnder...

142

WA_02_039_SHELL_SOLAR_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

39SHELLSOLARSYSTEMSWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA02039SHELLSOLARSYSTEMSWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA02039SHELLSOLARSYSTEMSWaiverofPatentRightsUnd...

143

WA_04_032_CARGILL_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_under_PLATFORM_CHE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CARGILLINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderACoopA.pdf WA04033CARGILLWaiverofPatentRightstoCARGILLDOWNL.pdf WA03032RWESCHOTTSOLARINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnder...

144

WA_03_032_RWE_SCHOTT_SOLAR_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

32RWESCHOTTSOLARINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA03032RWESCHOTTSOLARINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA03032RWESCHOTTSOLARINCWaiverofPatentRightsUn...

145

WA_06_016_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Und...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6BPSOLARINTERNATIONALWaiverofPatentRightsUnd.pdf WA06016BPSOLARINTERNATIONALWaiverofPatentRightsUnd.pdf WA06016BPSOLARINTERNATIONALWaiverofPatentRightsU...

146

WA_05_061_CATERPILLAR_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rihts_to_Inventio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61CATERPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRihtstoInventio.pdf WA05061CATERPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRihtstoInventio.pdf WA05061CATERPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRihtstoInven...

147

WA_04_007_OSHKOSH_TRUCK_CORP_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_N...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07OSHKOSHTRUCKCORPWaiverofPatentRightsUnderN.pdf WA04007OSHKOSHTRUCKCORPWaiverofPatentRightsUnderN.pdf WA04007OSHKOSHTRUCKCORPWaiverofPatentRightsUnde...

148

WA_02_055_PRAXAIR_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA02055PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA02055PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRi...

149

WA_04_067_CATRPILLAR_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_to_Inventio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

67CATRPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRightstoInventio.pdf WA04067CATRPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRightstoInventio.pdf WA04067CATRPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRightstoInven...

150

WA_03_022_DELPHI_AUTO_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_to_Inv...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2DELPHIAUTOSYSTEMSWaiverofPatentRightstoInv.pdf WA03022DELPHIAUTOSYSTEMSWaiverofPatentRightstoInv.pdf WA03022DELPHIAUTOSYSTEMSWaiverofPatentRightstoI...

151

WA_02_043_EMCORE_CORP_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_A_Subcon...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3EMCORECORPWaiverofPatentRightsUnderASubcon.pdf WA02043EMCORECORPWaiverofPatentRightsUnderASubcon.pdf WA02043EMCORECORPWaiverofPatentRightsUnderASubc...

152

WA_02_051_AQUA_CHEM_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_A_Subc...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1AQUACHEMINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderASubc.pdf WA02051AQUACHEMINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderASubc.pdf WA02051AQUACHEMINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderASu...

153

WA_00_008_PLUG_POWER_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_in_Performance_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0008PLUGPOWERWaiverofPatentRightsinPerformance.pdf WA00008PLUGPOWERWaiverofPatentRightsinPerformance.pdf WA00008PLUGPOWERWaiverofPatentRightsinPerfor...

154

WA_05_026_GE_NUCLEAR_ENERGY_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6GENUCLEARENERGYWaiverofPatentRightsUndera.pdf WA05026GENUCLEARENERGYWaiverofPatentRightsUndera.pdf WA05026GENUCLEARENERGYWaiverofPatentRightsUnder...

155

WA_05_041_MACK_TRUCKS_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_to_Inventi...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1MACKTRUCKSINCWaiverofPatentRightstoInventi.pdf WA05041MACKTRUCKSINCWaiverofPatentRightstoInventi.pdf WA05041MACKTRUCKSINCWaiverofPatentRightstoInven...

156

WA_03_027_SUPERPOWER_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_DOE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7SUPERPOWERINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOE.pdf WA03027SUPERPOWERINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOE.pdf WA03027SUPERPOWERINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaD...

157

WA_04_058_SOLUTIA_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_DOE_Co...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8SOLUTIAINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOECo.pdf WA04058SOLUTIAINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOECo.pdf WA04058SOLUTIAINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOE...

158

WA_04_031_ROHM_AND_HAAS_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_under_NEW_SU...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31ROHMANDHAASWaiverofPatentRightsunderNEWSU.pdf WA04031ROHMANDHAASWaiverofPatentRightsunderNEWSU.pdf WA04031ROHMANDHAASWaiverofPatentRightsunderNEW...

159

WA_05_009_LUCENT_TECHNOLOGIES_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Un...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09LUCENTTECHNOLOGIESINCWaiverofPatentRightsUn.pdf WA05009LUCENTTECHNOLOGIESINCWaiverofPatentRightsUn.pdf WA05009LUCENTTECHNOLOGIESINCWaiverofPatentRights...

160

WA_04_061_ROHM_AND_HAAS_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Unde...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61ROHMANDHAASCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUnde.pdf WA04061ROHMANDHAASCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUnde.pdf WA04061ROHMANDHAASCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsU...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

WA_06_009_UNIVERSITY_OF_MINNESOTA_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights--W...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9UNIVERSITYOFMINNESOTAWaiverofPatentRights--W.pdf WA06009UNIVERSITYOFMINNESOTAWaiverofPatentRights--W.pdf WA06009UNIVERSITYOFMINNESOTAWaiverofPatentRights-...

162

WA_02_047_SOUTHWIRE_CO_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_A_Coope...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2047SOUTHWIRECOWaiverofPatentRightsUnderACoope.pdf WA02047SOUTHWIRECOWaiverofPatentRightsUnderACoope.pdf WA02047SOUTHWIRECOWaiverofPatentRightsUnderA...

163

WA_04_064_VELOCYS_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rgiths_Under_a_DOE_Co...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

64VELOCYSINCWaiverofPatentRgithsUnderaDOECo.pdf WA04064VELOCYSINCWaiverofPatentRgithsUnderaDOECo.pdf WA04064VELOCYSINCWaiverofPatentRgithsUnderaDOE...

164

WA_00_031_HONEYWELL_Waiver_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_Right...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31HONEYWELLWaiverDomesticandForeignPatentRight.pdf WA00031HONEYWELLWaiverDomesticandForeignPatentRight.pdf WA00031HONEYWELLWaiverDomesticandForeignPatentRi...

165

WA_98_010_SOLAREX_Waiver_of_of_Patent_Rights_Under_an_NREL_S...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8010SOLAREXWaiverofofPatentRightsUnderanNRELS.pdf WA98010SOLAREXWaiverofofPatentRightsUnderanNRELS.pdf WA98010SOLAREXWaiverofofPatentRightsUnderan...

166

WA_07_020_GENERAL_ELECTRIC_CO_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0GENERALELECTRICCOWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA07020GENERALELECTRICCOWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA07020GENERALELECTRICCOWaiverofPatentRightsUnde...

167

WA_05_021_UNITED_TECHNOLOGIES_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA05021UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA05021UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESWaiverofPatentRightsUnde...

168

WA_06_015_PPG_INDUSTRIES_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_DOE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5PPGINDUSTRIESWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOE.pdf WA06015PPGINDUSTRIESWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOE.pdf WA06015PPGINDUSTRIESWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaD...

169

WA_04_029_UOP_LLC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_under_DISCOVERY_OF...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9UOPLLCWaiverofPatentRightsunderDISCOVERYOF.pdf WA04029UOPLLCWaiverofPatentRightsunderDISCOVERYOF.pdf WA04029UOPLLCWaiverofPatentRightsunderDISCOVERY...

170

WA_04_033_CARGILL_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_to_CARGILL_DOWN_L.pdf...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3CARGILLWaiverofPatentRightstoCARGILLDOWNL.pdf WA04033CARGILLWaiverofPatentRightstoCARGILLDOWNL.pdf WA04033CARGILLWaiverofPatentRightstoCARGILLDOWNL....

171

WA_03_004_CARGILL_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_A_Coop_A...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

04CARGILLINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderACoopA.pdf WA03004CARGILLINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderACoopA.pdf WA03004CARGILLINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderACoo...

172

WA_04_047_CATERPILLAR_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_to_Inventi...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

47CATERPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRightstoInventi.pdf WA04047CATERPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRightstoInventi.pdf WA04047CATERPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRightstoInve...

173

WA_04_044_GENERAL_MOTORS_CORP_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

44GENERALMOTORSCORPWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA04044GENERALMOTORSCORPWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA04044GENERALMOTORSCORPWaiverofPatentRightsUnd...

174

WA_05_027_WESTINGHOUSE_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_Subco...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7WESTINGHOUSEWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaSubco.pdf WA05027WESTINGHOUSEWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaSubco.pdf WA05027WESTINGHOUSEWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaSub...

175

WA_04_037_VELOCCYS_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_DOE_C...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37VELOCCYSINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOEC.pdf WA04037VELOCCYSINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOEC.pdf WA04037VELOCCYSINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDO...

176

WA_99_012_AIR_PRODUCTS_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_AN_NVO_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9012AIRPRODUCTSWaiverofPatentRightsUnderANNVO.pdf WA99012AIRPRODUCTSWaiverofPatentRightsUnderANNVO.pdf WA99012AIRPRODUCTSWaiverofPatentRightsUnderA...

177

WA_03_002_3M_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_A_DOE_Coo...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30023MCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUnderADOECoo.pdf WA030023MCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUnderADOECoo.pdf WA030023MCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUnderAD...

178

WA_04_038_3M_COMPANY__Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_DOE_Co...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83MCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOECo.pdf WA040383MCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOECo.pdf WA040383MCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOE...

179

WA_07_001_EASTMAN_KODAK_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Unde...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01EASTMANKODAKCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUnde.pdf WA07001EASTMANKODAKCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUnde.pdf WA07001EASTMANKODAKCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsU...

180

WA_04_071_CATERPILLAR_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_to_Inventi...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1CATERPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRightstoInventi.pdf WA04071CATERPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRightstoInventi.pdf WA04071CATERPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRightstoInven...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

WA_03_031_UNITED_TECHNOLOGIES_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3031UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA03031UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA03031UNITEDTECHNOLOGIESWaiverofPatentRights...

182

WA_04_081_GENERAL_ELECTRIC_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_U...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1GENERALELECTRICCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsU.pdf WA04081GENERALELECTRICCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsU.pdf WA04081GENERALELECTRICCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRights...

183

WA_06_026_CREE_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_Subcontra...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6CREEINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaSubcontra.pdf WA06026CREEINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaSubcontra.pdf WA06026CREEINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaSubcont...

184

WA_03_028_SUPERPOWER_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_DOE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8SUPERPOWERINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOE.pdf WA03028SUPERPOWERINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOE.pdf WA03028SUPERPOWERINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaD...

185

WA_01_030_GENERAL_ELECTRIC_CO_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0GENERALELECTRICCOWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA01030GENERALELECTRICCOWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA01030GENERALELECTRICCOWaiverofPatentRightsUnde...

186

WA_02_048_EATON_CORPORATION_Waviver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_A...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2048EATONCORPORATIONWaviverofPatentRightsUnderA.pdf WA02048EATONCORPORATIONWaviverofPatentRightsUnderA.pdf WA02048EATONCORPORATIONWaviverofPatentRightsU...

187

WA_00_009_ARTHUR_D_LITTLE_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_in_Perform...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9ARTHURDLITTLEWaiverofPatentRightsinPerform.pdf WA00009ARTHURDLITTLEWaiverofPatentRightsinPerform.pdf WA00009ARTHURDLITTLEWaiverofPatentRightsinPerfo...

188

WA_05_052_CATERPILLAR_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_to_Inventi...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

52CATERPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRightstoInventi.pdf WA05052CATERPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRightstoInventi.pdf WA05052CATERPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRightstoInve...

189

WA_02_029_CUMMINS_ENGINE_CO_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_DO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29CUMMINSENGINECOWaiverofPatentRightsUnderDO.pdf WA02029CUMMINSENGINECOWaiverofPatentRightsUnderDO.pdf WA02029CUMMINSENGINECOWaiverofPatentRightsUnder...

190

WA_04_011_KENNAMETAL_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_Subco...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11KENNAMETALINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderSubco.pdf WA04011KENNAMETALINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderSubco.pdf WA04011KENNAMETALINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderSu...

191

WA_06_027_EASTMAN_KODAK_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Unde...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7EASTMANKODAKCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUnde.pdf WA06027EASTMANKODAKCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUnde.pdf WA06027EASTMANKODAKCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUn...

192

WA_2006_007_SOLVEY_OLEXIS_SpA_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2006007SOLVEYOLEXISSpAWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA2006007SOLVEYOLEXISSpAWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA2006007SOLVEYOLEXISSpAWaiverofPatentRights...

193

WA_06_014_PPG_INDUSTRIES_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4PPGINDUSTRIESINCWaiverofPatentRightsUndera.pdf WA06014PPGINDUSTRIESINCWaiverofPatentRightsUndera.pdf WA06014PPGINDUSTRIESINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnder...

194

WA_05_030_BOC_GROUP_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_DOE_Co-O...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0BOCGROUPWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOECo-O.pdf WA05030BOCGROUPWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOECo-O.pdf WA05030BOCGROUPWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDOECo...

195

WA_04_008_GENERAL_MOTORS_CORP_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08GENERALMOTORSCORPWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA04008GENERALMOTORSCORPWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA04008GENERALMOTORSCORPWaiverofPatentRightsUnd...

196

WA_04_016_MACK_TRUCKS_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_under_NREL_Sub...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16MACKTRUCKSWaiverofPatentRightsunderNRELSub.pdf WA04016MACKTRUCKSWaiverofPatentRightsunderNRELSub.pdf WA04016MACKTRUCKSWaiverofPatentRightsunderNREL...

197

WA_03_035_CATERPILLAR_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_DO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3035CATERPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDO.pdf WA03035CATERPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaDO.pdf WA03035CATERPILLARINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnde...

198

WA_04_079_PRAXAIR_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_Subcon...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

79PRAXAIRINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaSubcon.pdf WA04079PRAXAIRINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaSubcon.pdf WA04079PRAXAIRINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaSub...

199

WA_00_020_PRAXAIR_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA00020PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA00020PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentR...

200

WA_04_062_ROHM_AND_HAAS_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Unde...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2ROHMANDHAASCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUnde.pdf WA04062ROHMANDHAASCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUnde.pdf WA04062ROHMANDHAASCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsUn...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

WA_04_039_HONEYWELL_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Un...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9HONEYWELLINTERNATIONALWaiverofPatentRightsUn.pdf WA04039HONEYWELLINTERNATIONALWaiverofPatentRightsUn.pdf WA04039HONEYWELLINTERNATIONALWaiverofPatentRights...

202

WA_06_018_GENERAL_ELECTRIC_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_U...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8GENERALELECTRICCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsU.pdf WA06018GENERALELECTRICCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRightsU.pdf WA06018GENERALELECTRICCOMPANYWaiverofPatentRights...

203

WA_01_039_PRAXAIR_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9PRAXAIRINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatent.pdf WA01039PRAXAIRINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatent.pdf WA01039PRAXAIRINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignPaten...

204

WA_03_026_EI_DUPONT_DENEMOURS_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26EIDUPONTDENEMOURSWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA03026EIDUPONTDENEMOURSWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA03026EIDUPONTDENEMOURSWaiverofPatentRightsUnd...

205

WA_04_027_GENERAL_ELECTRIC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_for_DISTR...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7GENERALELECTRICWaiverofPatentRightsforDISTR.pdf WA04027GENERALELECTRICWaiverofPatentRightsforDISTR.pdf WA04027GENERALELECTRICWaiverofPatentRightsforDIS...

206

WA_02_033_GENERAL_ELECTRIC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_DOE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

33GENERALELECTRICWaiverofPatentRightsUnderDOE.pdf WA02033GENERALELECTRICWaiverofPatentRightsUnderDOE.pdf WA02033GENERALELECTRICWaiverofPatentRightsUnder...

207

WA_06_020_ARIZONA_PUBLIC_SERVICE_Waivier_of_Patent_Rights_Un...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0ARIZONAPUBLICSERVICEWaivierofPatentRightsUn.pdf WA06020ARIZONAPUBLICSERVICEWaivierofPatentRightsUn.pdf WA06020ARIZONAPUBLICSERVICEWaivierofPatentRights...

208

WA_06_029_GENSCAPE_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_Subco...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9GENSCAPEINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaSubco.pdf WA06029GENSCAPEINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaSubco.pdf WA06029GENSCAPEINCWaiverofPatentRightsUnderaSub...

209

WA_98_007_SOLAREX_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7SOLAREXWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA98007SOLAREXWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA98007SOLAREXWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRi...

210

WA_03_011_ROCKWELL_AUTOMATION_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3011ROCKWELLAUTOMATIONWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA03011ROCKWELLAUTOMATIONWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA03011ROCKWELLAUTOMATIONWaiverofPatentRights...

211

WA_04_059_EATON_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9EATONCORPORATIONWaiverofPatentRightsUndera.pdf WA04059EATONCORPORATIONWaiverofPatentRightsUndera.pdf WA04059EATONCORPORATIONWaiverofPatentRightsUnder...

212

WA_06_013_McDERMOTT_TECHNOLOGY_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_t...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3McDERMOTTTECHNOLOGYINCWaiverofPatentRightst.pdf WA06013McDERMOTTTECHNOLOGYINCWaiverofPatentRightst.pdf WA06013McDERMOTTTECHNOLOGYINCWaiverofPatentRights...

213

WA_02_030_OXFORD_INSTRUMENTS_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_under_D...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30OXFORDINSTRUMENTSWaiverofPatentRightsunderD.pdf WA02030OXFORDINSTRUMENTSWaiverofPatentRightsunderD.pdf WA02030OXFORDINSTRUMENTSWaiverofPatentRightsunde...

214

WA_1993_020_GENERAL_MOTORS_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Ri...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ORSWaiverofDomesticandForeignRi.pdf More Documents & Publications WA04020GENERALELECTRICWaiverofDomesticandForeignIn.pdf WA03019GENERALMOTORSCORPWaiverofDom...

215

WA_00_003_DUKE_SOLAR_ENERGY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_P...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0003DUKESOLARENERGYWaiverofDomesticandForeignP.pdf WA00003DUKESOLARENERGYWaiverofDomesticandForeignP.pdf WA00003DUKESOLARENERGYWaiverofDomesticandFor...

216

WA_1993_038_TEXAS_INSTRUMENTS_INC_Waiver_of_U.S._and_Foreign...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8TEXASINSTRUMENTSINCWaiverofU.S.andForeign.pdf WA1993038TEXASINSTRUMENTSINCWaiverofU.S.andForeign.pdf WA1993038TEXASINSTRUMENTSINCWaiverofU.S.andForeign...

217

W(A)94-022 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

W(A)94-022 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS Request by Cummins Power Generation, Inc., for an Advance Waiver of Domestic and Foreign Patent Rights to Inventions made under a contract...

218

BayWa Sunways JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

JV that specialises in developing, planning and realizing medium-sized to large photovoltaic systems and solar plants. References BayWa & Sunways JV1 LinkedIn Connections...

219

Isotopic Studies of Contaminant Transport at the Hanford Site, WA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MR-0132. Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland WA. Bretz,in recharge at the Hanford Site. Northwest Science. 66:237-M.J. , ed. 2000. Hanford Site groundwater Monitoring

Christensen, J.N.; Conrad, M.E.; DePaolo, D.J.; Dresel, P.E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

WA S C2 0 01 Handbook of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WA S C2 0 01 Handbook of Accreditation #12;The Western Association of Schools and Colleges be terminated, or when the Commission formally acts to terminate accreditation. This Handbook of Accreditation associations and related bodies, see pages 118­119. #12;HANDBOOK OF ACCREDITATION Standards Addressing Core

California at Santa Cruz, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of Washington - WA 0-01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Washington - WA 0-01 Washington - WA 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON (WA.0-01) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Seattle , Washington WA.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 WA.0-01-1 Site Operations: Research activities involving small quantities of radioactive materials in a controlled environment. WA.0-01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual radioactive contamination considered remote - Operating under active NRC license WA.0-01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated WA.0-01-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Also see

222

EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project...

223

WA_06_017_Waiver_of_The_Govt_US_and_Foreign_Patent_Rights_fo...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7WaiverofTheGovtUSandForeignPatentRightsfo.pdf WA06017WaiverofTheGovtUSandForeignPatentRightsfo.pdf WA06017WaiverofTheGovtUSandForeignPatentRights...

224

DWPF SB6 INITIAL CPC FLOWSHEET TESTING SB6-1 TO SB6-4L TESTS OF SB6-A AND SB6-B SIMULANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing to Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) processing in late fiscal year 2010. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB6 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processes. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2008-0043, Rev.0 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB6 composition at the time of the study. This composition assumed a blend of 101,085 kg of Tank 4 insoluble solids and 179,000 kg of Tank 12 insoluble solids. The current plans are to subject Tank 12 sludge to aluminum dissolution. Liquid Waste Operations assumed that 75% of the aluminum would be dissolved during this process. After dissolution and blending of Tank 4 sludge slurry, plans included washing the contents of Tank 51 to {approx}1M Na. After the completion of washing, the plan assumes that 40 inches on Tank 40 slurry would remain for blending with the qualified SB6 material. There are several parameters that are noteworthy concerning SB6 sludge: (1) This is the second batch DWPF will be processing that contains sludge that has had a significant fraction of aluminum removed through aluminum dissolution; (2) The sludge is high in mercury, but the projected concentration is lower than SB5; (3) The sludge is high in noble metals, but the projected concentrations are lower than SB5; and(4) The sludge is high in U and Pu - components that are not added in sludge simulants. Six DWPF process simulations were completed in 4-L laboratory-scale equipment using two projections of the SB6 blend simulant composition (Tank 40 simulant after Tank 51 transfer is complete). The more washed simulant (SB6-A) had a set of four SRAT and SME simulations at varying acid stoichiometry levels (90%, 100%, 120% and 150%) using the Koopman Acid Prediction Calculation. Two additional SRAT simulations were made using SB6-B blend simulant at 100% and 120% of acid stoichiometry. SME cycles were noted performed for the SB6B simulants to allow the SRAT products to be used for melt rate testing.

Lambert, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Best, D.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

225

File:INL-geothermal-wa.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

wa.pdf wa.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Washington Geothermal Resources Size of this preview: 699 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(4,835 × 4,147 pixels, file size: 3.28 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Washington Geothermal Resources Sources Idaho National Laboratory Authors Patrick Laney; Julie Brizzee Related Technologies Geothermal Creation Date 2003-11-01 Extent State Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Washington File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:45, 16 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 12:45, 16 December 2010 4,835 × 4,147 (3.28 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated upload from NREL's "mapsearch" data

226

GRR/Section 15-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit 5-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit 15-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies WAC 173-400-110 WAC 173-400-111 WAC 173-400-171 Triggers None specified This flowchart illustrates the process for obtaining an Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit. The Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE) oversees the permitting process under WAC 173-400. 15-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit.pdf 15-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit.pdf 15-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit.pdf

227

GRR/Section 9-WA-b - State Environmental Review | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 9-WA-b - State Environmental Review GRR/Section 9-WA-b - State Environmental Review < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 9-WA-b - State Environmental Review 9-WA-b - State Environmental Review.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Once the lead agency is determined they are responsible for continuing forward with environmental review. In Washington, environmental review is effectuated through the developer completing an Environmental Checklist which assists the lead agency in determining whether the proposal will likely result in negative impacts on the environment. 9-WA-b - State Environmental Review.pdf 9-WA-b - State Environmental Review.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

228

AlGaAsSb/GaSb Distributed Bragg Reflectors Grown by Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

The first AlGaAsSb/GaSb quarter-wave distributed Bragg reflectors grown by metallic vapor phase epitaxy are reported. The peak reflectance is 96% for a 10-period structure.

C.A. Wang; C.J. Vineis; D.R. Calawa

2002-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

229

ESH100.2.SB.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety & Health Procedure Number ESH100.2.SB.2 Procedure Title Ensure Nuclear Criticality Safety Procedure Manager COFFING, STEPHEN A. Status Active Subject Matter Expert...

230

Method of making an InAsSb/InAsSbP diode lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

InAsSb/InAsSbP/InAs Double Heterostructures (DH) and Separate Confinement Heterostructure Multiple Quantum Well (SCH-MQW) structures are taught wherein the ability to tune to a specific wavelength within 3 .mu.m to 5 .mu.m is possible by varying the ratio of As:Sb in the active layer.

Razeghi, Manijeh (Wilmette, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

GRR/Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit GRR/Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Regulations & Policies WAC 232-12-064 Triggers None specified In Washington, it is unlawful to take wildlife from the wild without permission from the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The WDFW issues Live Wildlife Taking Permits under WAC 232-12-064. 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

232

Fisher & Paykel Appliances: ENERGY STAR Referral (WA42T26GW1) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fisher & Paykel Appliances: ENERGY STAR Referral (WA42T26GW1) Fisher & Paykel Appliances: ENERGY STAR Referral (WA42T26GW1) Fisher & Paykel Appliances: ENERGY STAR Referral (WA42T26GW1) June 12, 2013 DOE referred the matter of Fisher & Paykel Appliances residential clothes washer, model WA42T26GW1, to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, brand manager for the ENERGY STAR Program, for appropriate action after DOE testing showed that the model does not meet the ENERGY STAR specification. Fisher & Paykel Appliances: ENERGY STAR Referral (WA42T26GW1) More Documents & Publications Regulatory Burden RFI DOE response to questions from AHAM on the supplemental proposed test procedure for residential clothes washers Scoping Study to Evaluate Feasibility of National Databases for EM&V Documents and Measure Savings: Appendices

233

EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for a project proposed by NRG Energy, Inc (NRG). DOE selected NRG's proposed W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project for a financial assistance award through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative Program. NRG would design, construct and operate a commercial-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture facility at its existing W.A. Parish Generating Station in Fort Bend County, Texas; deliver the CO2 via a new pipeline to the existing West Ranch oil field in Jackson

234

GRR/Section 3-WA-b - Land Access Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-WA-b - Land Access Overview GRR/Section 3-WA-b - Land Access Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-WA-b - Land Access Overview 3-WA-b - Land Access Overview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Natural Resources Triggers None specified Any developer that needs access to or through state lands must obtain the appropriate permit or lease. The developer will obtain such permit or lease through the Washington State Department of Natural Resources. 3-WA-b - Land Access Overview.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

235

EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

73: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration 73: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for a project proposed by NRG Energy, Inc (NRG). DOE selected NRG's proposed W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project for a financial assistance award through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative Program. NRG would design, construct and operate a commercial-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture facility at its existing W.A. Parish Generating Station in Fort Bend County, Texas; deliver the CO2 via a new pipeline to the existing West Ranch oil field in Jackson

236

W(A)94-022 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-022 4-022 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS Request by Cummins Power Generation, Inc., for an Advance Waiver of Domestic and Foreign Patent Rights to Inventions made under a contract entitled "Utility Scale Joint Venture Project," between Cummins Power Generation, Inc. and Sandia National Laboratories (Contract No. AB- 8717B) under Management and Operations Contract DE-AL04-84AL85000, DOE Docket No. W(A)94-022. The petitioner, Cummins Power Generation, Inc., (CPG) has requested a waiver of all domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions which it may conceive or first actually reduce to practice in the course of work under the Utility Scale Joint Venture Project between Petitioner and Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) under contract No. AB- 8717B. Sandia is operated by Sandia Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

237

W(A)93-013 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13 13 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS Request by AlliedSignal, Inc. for Waiver of Domestic and Foreign Patent Rights to inventions that may arise under Contract No. DE-FC04-93AL94462 between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and AlliedSignal, Inc. DOE Docket: W(A)93-013 The Petitioner, AlliedSignal, Inc. (AlliedSignal), has requested a waiver of all domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions which it may conceive or reduce to practice in the course of work under Contract No. DE-FC04-93AL94462, a Cooperative Agreement with DOE. The project period is May 14, 1993 through May 13, 1996. The Cooperative Agreement covers work in designing a biological/chemical production process for caprolactam using microbial bioprocesses that convert cyclohexane to

238

W(A)93-039 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

39 39 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS Request by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. for Waiver of Domestic and Foreign Patent Rights to inventions that may arise under Contract No. DE-FC04-93AL94461 between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. DOE Docket: W(A)93-039. The Petitioner, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., (Air Products) has requested a waiver of all domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions which it may conceive or reduce to practice in the course of work under Contract No. DE-FC04-93AL94461 a Cooperative Agreement with DOE. The contract covers a four phase development program for a recently patented technology developed at Air Products entitled "Novel Selective Surface Flow (SSF T ) Membranes for the

239

Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) Washing and Settling Demonstration  

Generate test slurry Wash per SB7 plan Quantify settling vs wash cycle and time Sampling and analysis. SB7 Washing and Settling Demonstration 5 ...

240

Microbial community changes during sustained Cr(VI) reduction at the 100H site in Hanford, WA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the 100H site in Hanford, WA Romy Chakraborty 1 , Eoin Lcontaminated aquifer at the Hanford (WA) 100H site in 2004.Cr(VI) reduction at Hanford, and a comparison of the

Chakraborty, Romy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EIS-0467: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA 7: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA EIS-0467: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA Summary This EIS will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to enter into a contract with a licensed natural gas supplier in Washington State to construct, operate, and maintain a natural gas pipeline. The pipeline would deliver natural gas to support the Waste Treatment Plant and the 242-A Evaporator operations in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Douglas Chapin, NEPA Document Manager U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office P.O. Box 550, MSIN A5-11 Richland, WA 99352 Documents Available for Download January 23, 2012 EIS-0467: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and

242

GRR/Section 9-WA-c - State Environmental Impact Statement | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 9-WA-c - State Environmental Impact Statement GRR/Section 9-WA-c - State Environmental Impact Statement < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 9-WA-c - State Environmental Impact Statement 9-WA-c - State Environmental Impact Statement.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified The primary purpose of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is to ensure that the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) policies are an integral part of the ongoing programs and actions of state and local government. An EIS must provide impartial discussion of significant environmental impacts and must inform decision makers and the public of reasonable alternatives, including mitigation measures that would avoid or minimize adverse impacts or enhance environmental quality. WAC 197-11-400.

243

GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington 90.44.100 Revised Code of Washington 18.104.048 Washington Administrative Code 173-160-151 Triggers None specified A developer seeking to use ground water for an activity may need to drill a new well in a different location than a previous well, drill an additional well at an existing location, or drill a replacement well at the same

244

GRR/Section 11-WA-a - State Cultural Considerations Overview | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 11-WA-a - State Cultural Considerations Overview GRR/Section 11-WA-a - State Cultural Considerations Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-WA-a - State Cultural Considerations Overview 11-WA-a - State Cultural Considerations Overview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified The developer will be required to comply with Washington state law when human remains or other cultural resources are discovered on a project site. Cultural resources include both historic and archaeological resources and sites. The discovery of cultural resources may require obtaining a permit and providing public notice and notice to Indian Tribes. Once the necessary procedures have been followed, the developer may continue with the project.

245

GRR/Section 18-WA-a - Underground Storage Tank Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-WA-a - Underground Storage Tank Process GRR/Section 18-WA-a - Underground Storage Tank Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-WA-a - Underground Storage Tank Process 18-WA-a - Underground Storage Tank Process.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington Chapter 90.76 Washington Administrative Code Chapter 173-360 Triggers None specified Washington has a federally-approved state Underground Storage Tank (UST) program regulated by the Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE) under Revised Code of Washington Chapter 90.76 and Washington Administrative Code Chapter 173-360. Washington defines an "Underground

246

GRR/Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development 5-WA-a.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies Geothermal Act 78.60 RCW Geothermal Rules 332-17 WAC Triggers None specified In Washington geothermal drilling and well development are regulated by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WSDNR). Geothermal production wells and core holes deeper than 750ft require the developer go through the whole WSDNR permitting process (which requires a public hearing) and require that the developer complete the State Environmental

247

GRR/Section 3-WA-e - State Right of Way Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-WA-e - State Right of Way Process GRR/Section 3-WA-e - State Right of Way Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-WA-e - State Right of Way Process 3-WA-e - State Right of Way Process.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies RCW 79-36-350 RCW 79-36-520 RCW 79-36-530 Triggers None specified This flowchart illustrates the process for obtaining a right of way over state lands in Washington. The right of way process is overseen by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WSDNR). The right of way process is regulated under Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 79-36-350. The developer may apply for an easement, permit or license for a right of

248

GRR/Section 14-WA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-WA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-WA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-WA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14-WA-d - 401 Water Quality Certification.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies U S Army Corps of Engineers Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Statute of Washington Chapter 90.48 Washington Administrative Code Chapter 173-201A Washington Administrative Code 173-225-030 Triggers None specified Developers requiring a Section 404 Dredge and Fill Permit from the U S Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) are required to obtain a Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the state of Washington. The Washington State

249

GRR/Section 19-WA-d - Water Conservancy Board Transfer or Change of Water  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-WA-d - Water Conservancy Board Transfer or Change of Water 19-WA-d - Water Conservancy Board Transfer or Change of Water Right < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-d - Water Conservancy Board Transfer or Change of Water Right 19-WA-d - Water Conservancy Board Transfer or Change of Water Right.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington Chapter 90.80 RCW 90.03.380 90.03.390 RCW 90.44.100 Triggers None specified In 1997, the Washington Legislature authorized the creation of water conservancy boards through the enactment of Revised Code of Washington Chapter 90.80 to expedite the administrative process for voluntary water right transfers within individual counties. In counties where a water

250

GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington 18.104.048 Washington Administrative Code 173-160-151 Triggers None specified A developer seeking to use ground water for an activity may need to drill a new well to access the ground water. When a developer needs to drill a new well, the developer must complete the Notice of Intent (NOI) to Drill a Well form and submit the form to the Washington State Department of Ecology

251

GRR/Section 14-WA-b - State NPDES Permitting Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-WA-b - State NPDES Permitting Process GRR/Section 14-WA-b - State NPDES Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-WA-b - State NPDES Permitting Process 14-WA-b - State NPDES Permitting Process.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies Clean Water Act Chapter 90.48 RCW Chapter 173-216 WAC Triggers None specified Section 402 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) required the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to establish the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) to regulate discharge of pollutants from point sources. In Washington, the EPA has delegated responsibility of NPDES to

252

GRR/Section 4-WA-a - State Exploration Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 4-WA-a - State Exploration Process GRR/Section 4-WA-a - State Exploration Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-WA-a - State Exploration Process 4-WA-a State Exploration Process.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies Geothermal Act 78.60 RCW Geothermal Rules 332-17 WAC Triggers None specified Geothermal exploration in Washington requires a Geothermal Exploration Permit from the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WSDNR) for invasive exploration or drilling. Operations that require an exploration or drilling permit will also require the developer to initiate the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). In Washington geothermal resources are regulated under Chapter 78.60 RCW

253

GRR/Section 3-WA-d - State Land Lease | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-WA-d - State Land Lease GRR/Section 3-WA-d - State Land Lease < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-WA-d - State Land Lease 3-WA-d - State Land Lease.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies RCW 79-13-020 RCW 79-13-140 RCW 79-13-150 WAC 332-22-030 WAC 332-22-105 WAC 332-22-110 Triggers None specified This flowchart illustrates the process used to lease state lands in Washington. The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WSDNR) oversees the land leasing process through the Commissioner of Public Lands ("commissioner"). The WSDNR may lease state lands for purposes it deems advisable, including commercial, industrial, residential, agricultural, and

254

GRR/Section 3-WA-c - Utility Franchise or Permit Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-WA-c - Utility Franchise or Permit Process GRR/Section 3-WA-c - Utility Franchise or Permit Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-WA-c - Utility Franchise or Permit Process 3-WA-c - Utility Franchise or Permit Process (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Transportation Regulations & Policies WAC 468-34-060 WAC 468-34-080 WAC 468-34-110 WAC 468-34-160 WAC 468-34-170 Triggers None specified This flowchart illustrates the process of obtaining a franchise or permit through a state highway right of way in Washington State. A utility permit or franchise is required for occupancy of a highway right of way by utility facilities, including private lines. WAC 468-34-160. The process is

255

GRR/Section 19-WA-b - New Water Right Permit Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-WA-b - New Water Right Permit Process GRR/Section 19-WA-b - New Water Right Permit Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-b - New Water Right Permit Process 19-WA-b - New Water Right Permit Process.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington Chapter 90.03 Revised Code of Washington Chapter 90.44 Triggers None specified Washington uses a prior appropriation system for the distribution of both surface water and ground water rights in which water users receive the right to use water on a "first in time, first in right" basis. Under Washington law, the waters of Washington belong collectively to the public

256

GRR/Section 19-WA-c - Transfer or Change of Water Right | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9-WA-c - Transfer or Change of Water Right 9-WA-c - Transfer or Change of Water Right < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-c - Transfer or Change of Water Right 19-WA-c - Transfer or Change of Water Right.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington 90.03.380 Revised Code of Washington 90.44.100 Revised Code of Washington Chapter 90.80 Triggers None specified Much of Washington's public waters have been accounted for through water right claims, permits, or certificates. As a result, many individuals seeking water rights try to acquire existing water rights already in use or change the use of a current water right they already hold. Certain elements

257

GRR/Section 3-WA-a - State Geothermal Lease | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-WA-a - State Geothermal Lease GRR/Section 3-WA-a - State Geothermal Lease < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-WA-a - State Geothermal Lease 3-WA-a State Geothermal Lease.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies Chapter 79.14 RCW Chapter 344-12 WAC Triggers None specified The State of Washington is still in the process of developing and finalizing the rules and regulations related to geothermal leases on state lands; however, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WSDNR) expects the process to be similar to the process for leasing state lands for oil and natural gas development. The rules and regulations for

258

GRR/Section 11-WA-c - Archaeological Resource Discovery Process | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 11-WA-c - Archaeological Resource Discovery Process GRR/Section 11-WA-c - Archaeological Resource Discovery Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-WA-c - Archaeological Resource Discovery Process 11-WA-c - Archaeological Resource Discovery Process.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified In the state of Washington, cultural resource concerns are integrated as early as possible into the planning for capital projects and are protected if discovered during construction. Washington defines "Cultural resources" as archeological and historical sites and artifacts, and traditional areas or items of religious, ceremonial and social uses to affected tribes. Washington defines an "Archaeological resource" as any

259

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-005 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-005 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by...

260

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-013 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-018 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-018 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by...

262

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-031 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-031 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by...

263

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-004 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

04 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-004 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by...

264

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-002 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-002 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by...

265

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-033 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-033 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by...

266

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-029 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-029 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by...

267

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-030 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-030 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by...

268

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-016 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-016 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by...

269

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-019 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-019 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by...

270

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-032 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

32 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-032 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by...

271

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-007 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-007 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by...

272

WA_1994_004_ALUMINUM_COMPANY_OF_AMERICA_Waiver_of_Domestic_a...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MPANYOFAMERICAWaiverofDomestica.pdf More Documents & Publications WA1993034CONSOLIDATEDNATURALGAS(CNG)WaiverofDomesti.pdf ClassWaiverWC-2000-004.pdf DOE M 483.1-1...

273

GRR/Section 19-WA-d - Water Conservancy Board Transfer or Change...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-WA-d - Water Conservancy Board Transfer or Change of Water Right < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of...

274

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-069 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09-069 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-069 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to...

275

Fisher & Paykel Appliances: ENERGY STAR Referral (WA42T26GW1)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE referred the matter of Fisher & Paykel Appliances residential clothes washer, model WA42T26GW1, to the EPA for appropriate action after DOE testing showed that the model does not meet the ENERGY STAR specification.

276

GRR/Section 14-WA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-WA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit GRR/Section 14-WA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-WA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14-WA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Chapter 173-218 WAC Non-endangerment Standard Triggers None specified The Safe Drinking Water Act requires Washington to implement technical criteria and standards to protect underground sources of drinking water from contamination. Under Chapter 173-218 WAC, the Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE) regulates and permits underground injection control (UIC) wells in Washington. The Environmental Protection Agency

277

GRR/Section 19-WA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Overview | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9-WA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Overview 9-WA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Overview 19-WA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Overview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington Chapter 90.03 Revised Code of Washington Chapter 90.44 RCW 90.44.050 Triggers None specified Similar to many western states, only a small amount of water is available for appropriation in Washington. As a result, Washington has developed a comprehensive regulatory scheme for the distribution of water rights and use of water in the state. Washington employs a prior appropriation or

278

Lattice-matched epitaxial GaInAsSb/GaSb thermophotovoltaic devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The materials development of Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} alloys for lattice-matched thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices is reported. Epilayers with cutoff wavelength 2--2.4 {micro}m at room temperature and lattice-matched to GaSb substrates were grown by both low-pressure organometallic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy. These layers exhibit high optical and structural quality. For demonstrating lattice-matched thermophotovoltaic devices, p- and n-type doping studies were performed. Several TPV device structures were investigated, with variations in the base/emitter thicknesses and the incorporation of a high bandgap GaSb or AlGaAsSb window layer. Significant improvement in the external quantum efficiency is observed for devices with an AlGaAsSb window layer compared to those without one.

Wang, C.A.; Choi, H.K.; Turner, G.W.; Spears, D.L.; Manfra, M.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Lexington, MA (United States). Lincoln Lab.; Charache, G.W. [Lockheed Martin, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Performance improvement of Ge-Sb-Te material by GaSb doping for phase change memory  

SciTech Connect

Effects of GaSb doping on phase change characteristics of Ge-Sb-Te material are investigated by in situ resistance and x-ray diffraction measurement, optical spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The crystallization temperature and data retention of Ge-Sb-Te material increase significantly by the addition of GaSb, which results from the high thermal stability of amorphous GaSb. In addition, GaSb-doped Ge-Sb-Te material exhibits faster crystallization speed due to the change in electronic states as a result of the formation of chemical bonds with Ga element. Incorporation of GaSb is highly effective way to enhance the comprehensive performance of Ge-Sb-Te material for phase change memory.

Lu, Yegang [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Faculty of Information Science and Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Zhonghua; Song, Sannian; Cheng, Limin; Song, Zhitang [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Shen, Xiang; Wang, Guoxiang; Dai, Shixun [Faculty of Information Science and Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China)] [Faculty of Information Science and Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China)

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

280

DWPF simulant CPC studies for SB8  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) accepted a technical task request (TTR) from Waste Solidification Engineering to perform simulant tests to support the qualification of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) and to develop the flowsheet for SB8 in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). These efforts pertained to the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Separate studies were conducted for frit development and glass properties (including REDOX). The SRNL CPC effort had two primary phases divided by the decision to drop Tank 12 from the SB8 constituents. This report focuses on the second phase with SB8 compositions that do not contain the Tank 12 piece. A separate report will document the initial phase of SB8 testing that included Tank 12. The second phase of SB8 studies consisted of two sets of CPC studies. The first study involved CPC testing of an SB8 simulant for Tank 51 to support the CPC demonstration of the washed Tank 51 qualification sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells facility. SB8-Tank 51 was a high iron-low aluminum waste with fairly high mercury and moderate noble metal concentrations. Tank 51 was ultimately washed to about 1.5 M sodium which is the highest wash endpoint since SB3-Tank 51. This study included three simulations of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle with the sludge-only flowsheet at nominal DWPF processing conditions and three different acid stoichiometries. These runs produced a set of recommendations that were used to guide the successful SRNL qualification SRAT/SME demonstration with actual Tank 51 washed waste. The second study involved five SRAT/SME runs with SB8-Tank 40 simulant. Four of the runs were designed to define the acid requirements for sludge-only processing in DWPF with respect to nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. The fifth run was an intermediate acid stoichiometry demonstration of the coupled flowsheet for SB8. These runs produced a set of processing recommendations for DWPF along with some data related to Safety Class documentation at DWPF. Some significant observations regarding SB8 follow: Reduced washing in Tank 51 led to an increase in the wt.% soluble solids of the DWPF feed. If wt.% total solids for the SRAT and SME product werent adjusted upward to maintain insoluble solids levels similar to past sludge batches, then the rheological properties of the slurry went below the low end of the DWPF design bases for the SRAT and SME. Much higher levels of dissolved manganese were found in the SRAT and SME products than in recent sludge batches. Closed crucible melts were more reduced than expected. The working hypothesis is that the soluble Mn is less oxidizing than assumed in the REDOX calculations. A change in the coefficient for Mn in the REDOX equation was recommended in a separate report. The DWPF (Hsu) stoichiometric acid equation was examined in detail to better evaluate how to control acid in DWPF. The existing DWPF equation can likely be improved without changing the required sample analyses through a paper study using existing data. The recommended acid stoichiometry for initial SB8 SRAT batches is 115-120% stoichiometry until some processing experience is gained. The conservative range (based on feed properties) of stoichiometric factors derived in this study was from 110-147%, but SRNL recommends using only the lower half of this range, 110-126% even after initial batches provide processing experience. The stoichiometric range for sludge-only processing appears to be suitable for coupled operation based on results from the run in the middle of the range. Catalytic hydrogen was detectable (>0.005 vol%) in all SRAT and SME cycles. Hydrogen reached 30-35% of the SRAT and SME limits at the mid-point of the stoichiometry window (bounding noble metals and acid demand).

Koopman, D. C.; Zamecnik, J. R.

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Ballard Library and Neighborhood Service Center - Seattle, WA by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Architects [EDRA/Places Awards 2008 -- Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Architects / Ballard Library 2008WA Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Architects Seattle residents loveService Center, the architects, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson,

Merlino, Kathryn Rogers

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Electronic and thermoelectric properties of CoSbS and FeSbS  

SciTech Connect

We present a combined theoretical and experimental study of the potential thermoelectric performance of three transition metal antimonide sulfides, CoSbS, FeSbS and NiSbS. From theory we find that NiSbS is metallic and hence of little interest regarding thermoelectric performance. CoSbS and FeSbS are both semiconductors with rather heavy valence and conduction bands, whose thermopower can exceed 200 $\\mu$V/K at temperatures of 900 K and carrier concentrations of 10$^{21}$cm$^{-3}$, which is similar to the $n$-type high performance thermoelectric filled skutterudites. The experimental results on several non-optimized $n$-type CoSbS samples confirm its semiconducting nature and indicate a potential for good high temperature thermoelectric performance, finding a ZT for two of the samples of 0.35 at 773 K. Substantially higher ZT values may be possible if the lattice thermal conductivity can be reduced by alloying and the effects of extrinsic scattering, which appear to be substantial in the experimental results, are reduced.

Parker, David S [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

GRR/Section 15-WA-b - Air Operating Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 15-WA-b - Air Operating Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-WA-b - Air Operating Permit 15-WA-b - Air Operating Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies WAC 173-401-500 WAC 173-401-800 WAC 173-401-810 WAC 173-401-735 WAC 173-401-610 Triggers None specified This flowchart illustrates the process for obtaining an Air Operating Permit in Washington State. The Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE) issues Air Operating Permit under WAC 173-401. An Air Operating Permit is required if a facility has the potential to emit

284

GRR/Section 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Regulations & Policies RCW 80.50.60(1) WAC 463-60 RCW 80.50.090(2) WAC 463-30-270 WAC 463-30-320 Triggers None specified Under RCW 80.50.60(1) a developer may not begin construction of a new energy facility site until they obtain Energy Facility Siting certification

285

GRR/Section 11-WA-b - Human Remains Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 11-WA-b - Human Remains Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-WA-b - Human Remains Process 11-WA-b - Human Remains Process (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified This flowchart illustrates the necessary procedure when a developer discovers human remains on a project site. In Washington, every person has the duty to notify the coroner upon the discovery of any human remains in the most expeditious manner possible. The Washington Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation (DAHP) handles the disposition of non-forensic remains, while the county coroner handles the disposition of

286

EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

49: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA 49: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA SUMMARY This EA analyzes the potential environmental effects of a proposal by the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snowhomish County, Washington to construct and operate the Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project. The proposed 680-kilowatt project would be located on the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington, about 1 kilometer west of Whidbey Island, entirely within Island County, Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the lead agency. DOE is a cooperating agency. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 9, 2013 EA-1949: FERC Notice of Availability Errata Sheet

287

GRR/Section 9-WA-a - State Environmental Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 9-WA-a - State Environmental Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 9-WA-a - State Environmental Overview 9-WA-a - State Environmental Overview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified The Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), chapter 43.21 RCW, requires all governmental agencies to consider the environmental impacts of a proposal before making decisions. Washington uses an Environmental Checklist and Environmental Review (ER) to provide information to help government agencies identify impacts from their proposals and determine whether an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is necessary.

288

MEMORANDUM : APPROVAL TO MODIFY ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS W(A)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: APPROVAL TO MODIFY ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS W(A) : APPROVAL TO MODIFY ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS W(A) 2009-047 GRANTED FOR US SOLAR HOLDINGS LLC UNDER AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC36-08G018 155 US Solar Holdings LLC ("US Solar") has requested that the Department of Energy ("DOE") modify or clarify the cost share requirements set forth in the statement of considerations for the granted advance patent waiver W(A) 2009-047. Specifically, the statement of considerations, as originally granted, states the following: The total cost of the award is approximately $4 million with the Petitioner providing about 50% cost sharing. This waiver is contingent upon the Petitioner maintaining, in aggregate, the above cost sharing percentage over the course of the agreement. Rather than just provide an aggregate cost share requirement of 50% for the agreement, US Solar

289

Role of Sb Compositions on the Properties of InAs/GaAsSb Quantum Dots (QDs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

QD size, uniformity and density in InAs/GaAsSb material system for increasing Sb content are studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). AFM results show that QD density and uniformity improve with Sb content increase. The improvement of QD uniformity is ensured by the narrowing of the analysis of AFM scans. To obtain minimum VBO, InAs/GaAsSb with various Sb compositions is investigated by PL and TRPL measurements. PL data shows a blue-shift as excitation power increases as evidence of a type II band structure. Since the PL peak of 8 and 13 % Sb samples did not shift while that of 15 % Sb sample is blue-shifted with increasing the excitation power it is concluded that InAs QDs/GaAs0.86Sb0.14 would have minimum valence band offset. This tendency is supported by the change of a carrier lifetime estimated from TRPL data.

Ban, K. Y.; Bremner, S. P.; Kuciauskas, D.; Dahal, S. N.; Honsberg, C. B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Donor behavior of Sb in ZnO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical behavior of Sb in ZnO:Sb layers doped in a wide concentration range was studied using temperature dependent Hall effect measurements. The layers were grown by plasma-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy, and the Sb concentration was changed by varying the Sb flux, resulting in electron concentrations in the range of 10{sup 16} to nearly 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. Upon annealing, the electron concentration increased slightly and more notable was that the electron mobility significantly improved, reaching a room-temperature value of 110 cm{sup 2}/V s and a low-temperature value of 145 cm{sup 2}/V s, close to the maximum of {approx}155 cm{sup 2}/V s set by ionized impurity scattering. Hall data and structural data suggest that Sb predominantly occupies Zn sublattice positions and acts as a shallow donor in the whole concentration range studied. In the layers with high Sb content ({approx}1 at. %), acceptor-type compensating defects (possibly Sb on oxygen sites and/or point-defect complexes involving Sb{sub O}) are formed. The increase of electron concentration with increasing oxygen pressure and the increase in ZnO:Sb lattice parameter at high Sb concentrations suggest that acceptors involving Sb{sub O} rather than Sb{sub Zn}-2V{sub Zn} complexes are responsible for the compensation of the donors.

Liu, H. Y.; Izyumskaya, N.; Avrutin, V.; Oezguer, Ue.; Morkoc, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Yankovich, A. B.; Kvit, A. V.; Voyles, P. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Type I Mid-Infrared MQW Lasers using AlInAsSb barriers and InAsSb wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Type I Mid-Infrared MQW Lasers using AlInAsSb barriers and InAsSb wells Leslie G. Vaughn*a , L and interband lasers, Shockley-Read-Hall losses increase. The simplest structure is Type-I multiple quantum well. One such system with InAsSb wells and AlInAsSb barriers has been unable to exceed 175K under CW

New Mexico, University of

292

GRR/Section 18-WA-b - Dangerous Waste Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-WA-b - Dangerous Waste Permit GRR/Section 18-WA-b - Dangerous Waste Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-WA-b - Dangerous Waste Permit 18-WA-b - Dangerous Waste Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies WAC 173-303-020 WAC 173-303-060 WAC 173-303-070 WAC 173-303-071 WAC 173-303-072 WAC 173-303-081 WAC 173-303-082 WAC 173-303-090 WAC 173-303-100 WAC 173-303-110 WAC 173-303-140 WAC 173-303-220 WAC 173-303-281 WAC 173-303-282 WAC 173-303-803 WAC 173-303-845 Triggers None specified The Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE) oversees the permitting process for dangerous and solid waste. In Washington, a developer must obtain a permit if they handle dangerous waste and solid waste and are

293

W(A)-02-009, CONSOL ENERGY, INC. CLOSED PER INSTRUCTIONS FROM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-02-009, CONSOL ENERGY, INC. CLOSED PER INSTRUCTIONS FROM MIKE HOFFMAN ON 8262003. SEE W(A)-02-053. JPN 08 2002 07:00 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 2779 TO AGCP-HQ P.1010 * * Hi Katie,...

294

Qi-Wa, a problem that has plagued Chinese scrolls for millenniums  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Qi-Wa refers to the up curl on the lengths of handscrolls and hanging scrolls, which has troubled Chinese artisans and emperors for as long as the art of painting and calligraphy exists. This warp is unwelcomed not only for aesthetic reasons, but its potential damage to the fiber and ink. Although it is generally treated as a part of the cockling and curling due to climate, mounting procedures, and conservation conditions, we emphasize that the intrinsic curvature incurred from the storage is in fact the main cause of Qi-Wa. The Qi-Wa height is determined by experiments to obey scaling relations with the length, width, curvature, and thickness of the scroll, which are supported by Molecular Dynamics Simulation and theoretic derivations. This understanding helps us come up with plausible remedies to mitigate Qi-Wa. All proposals are tested on real mounted paper and in simulations. Due to the general nature of this warp, we believe the lessons learnt from studying ancient Chinese scrolls can be applied to moder...

Chou, Ming-Han; Wang, Yi-Ping; Hong, Sun-Hsin; Hong, Tzay-Ming

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Recent progress in InGaAsSb/GaSb TPV devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

AstroPower is developing InGaAsSb thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices. This photovoltaic cell is a two-layer epitaxial InGaAsSb structure formed by liquid-phase epitaxy on a GaSb substrate. The (direct) bandgap of the In{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} alloy is 0.50 to 0.55 eV, depending on its exact alloy composition (x,y); and is closely lattice-matched to the GaSb substrate. The use of the quaternary alloy, as opposed to a ternary alloy--such as, for example InGaAs/InP--permits low bandgap devices optimized for 1,000 to 1,500 C thermal sources with, at the same time, near-exact lattice matching to the GaSb substrate. Lattice matching is important since even a small degree of lattice mismatch degrades device performance and reliability and increases processing complexity. Internal quantum efficiencies as high as 95% have been measured at a wavelength of 2 microns. At 1 micron wavelengths, internal quantum efficiencies of 55% have been observed. The open-circuit voltage at currents of 0.3 A/cm{sup 2} is 0.220 volts and 0.280 V for current densities of 2 A/cm{sup 2}. Fill factors of 56% have been measured at 60 mA/cm{sup 2}. However, as current density increases there is some decrease in fill factor. The results to date show that the GaSb-based quaternary compounds provide a viable and high performance energy conversion solution for thermophotovoltaic systems operating with 1,000 to 1,500 C source temperatures.

Shellenbarger, Z.A.; Mauk, M.G.; DiNetta, L.C. [AstroPower, Inc., Newark, DE (United States); Charache, G.W. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

GaInSb and GaInAsSb thermophotovoltaic device fabrication and characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices have been fabricated using epitaxial ternary and quaternary layers grown on GaSb substrates. The GaInSb layers were grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) and the InGaAsSb lattice-matched layers were grown by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE). Device fabrication steps include unannealed p-type ohmic contacts, annealed Sn/Au n-type ohmic contacts, and a thick Ag top-surface contact using a lift-off process. Devices are characterized primarily by dark I-V, photo I-V, and quantum efficiency measurements, which are correlated to microscopic and macroscopic material properties. Particular emphasis has been on material enhancements to increase quantum efficiency and decrease dark saturation current density. TPV device performance is presently limited by the base diffusion length, typically 1 to 2 microns.

Hitchcock, C.; Gutmann, R.; Borrego, J.; Ehsani, H.; Bhat, I. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Freeman, M.; Charache, G. [Lockheed Martin, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

DWPF SIMULANT CPC STUDIES FOR SB8  

SciTech Connect

Prior to processing a Sludge Batch (SB) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), flowsheet studies using simulants are performed. Typically, the flowsheet studies are conducted based on projected composition(s). The results from the flowsheet testing are used to 1) guide decisions during sludge batch preparation, 2) serve as a preliminary evaluation of potential processing issues, and 3) provide a basis to support the Shielded Cells qualification runs performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). SB8 was initially projected to be a combination of the Tank 40 heel (Sludge Batch 7b), Tank 13, Tank 12, and the Tank 51 heel. In order to accelerate preparation of SB8, the decision was made to delay the oxalate-rich material from Tank 12 to a future sludge batch. SB8 simulant studies without Tank 12 were reported in a separate report.1 The data presented in this report will be useful when processing future sludge batches containing Tank 12. The wash endpoint target for SB8 was set at a significantly higher sodium concentration to allow acceptable glass compositions at the targeted waste loading. Four non-coupled tests were conducted using simulant representing Tank 40 at 110-146% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Hydrogen was generated during high acid stoichiometry (146% acid) SRAT testing up to 31% of the DWPF hydrogen limit. SME hydrogen generation reached 48% of of the DWPF limit for the high acid run. Two non-coupled tests were conducted using simulant representing Tank 51 at 110-146% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Hydrogen was generated during high acid stoichiometry SRAT testing up to 16% of the DWPF limit. SME hydrogen generation reached 49% of the DWPF limit for hydrogen in the SME for the high acid run. Simulant processing was successful using previously established antifoam addition strategy. Foaming during formic acid addition was not observed in any of the runs. Nitrite was destroyed in all runs and no N2O was detected during SME processing. Mercury behavior was consistent with that seen in previous SRAT runs. Mercury was stripped below the DWPF limit on 0.8 wt% for all runs. Rheology yield stress fell within or below the design basis of 1-5 Pa. The low acid Tank 40 run (106% acid stoichiometry) had the highest yield stress at 3.78 Pa.

Newell, J.

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

298

Testing Buda-Lund hydro model on particle correlations and spectra in NA44, WA93 and WA98 heavy ion experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytic and numerical approximations to a hydrodynamical model describing longitudinally expanding, cylindrically symmetric, finite systems are fitted to preliminary NA44 data measured in 200 AGeV central $S + Pb$ reactions. The model describes the measured spectra and HBT radii of pions, kaons and protons, simultaneously. The source is characterized by a central freeze-out temperature of T_0 = 154 +/- 8 +/- 11 MeV, a "surface" temperature of T_r = 107 +/- 28 +/- 18 MeV and by a well-developed transverse flow, = 0.53 +/- 0.17 +/- 0.11. The transverse geometrical radius and the mean freeze-out time are found to be R_G = 5.4 +/- 0.9 +/- 0.7 fm and tau_0 = 5.1 +/- 0.3 +/- 0.3 fm/c, respectively. Fits to preliminary WA93 200 AGeV S + Au and WA98 158 AGeV Pb + Pb data dominated by pions indicate similar model parameters. The absolute normalization of the measured particle spectra together with the experimental determination of both the statistical and the systematic errors were needed to obtain successful fits.

A. Ster; T. Csorgo; B. Lorstad

1998-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

299

AlSb/InAs HIGH ELECTRON MOBILITY TRANSISTORS - Energy ...  

The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed materials growth and fabrication technology for the manufacture of high-speed, low power AlSb/InAs high electron ...

300

Bulk growth of GaSb and Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}Sb  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GaSb and InGaSb have been demonstrated to be suitable choices for high efficiency thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells. Synthesis and growth of bulk GaSb single crystals and GaInSb polycrystals have been carried out by the vertical Bridgman technique, with a baffle immersed in the melt and by complete encapsulation of the melt by low melting temperature alkali halides or oxides. The critical roles of the baffle and the encapsulation are discussed. Efforts in obtaining device grade GaSb with superior structural and electrical properties and compositionally homogeneous GaInSb are described, emphasizing the key steps in the growth cycle developed to obtain good crystalline quality.

Dutta, P.S.; Ostrogorsky, A.G.; Gutmann, R.J.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Anemometer Data (Wind Speed, Direction) for Quinault #3, WA (2004 - 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quinault #3, WA (2004 - 2005) Quinault #3, WA (2004 - 2005) Dataset Summary Description Wind data collected from Quinault Indian Reservation in Washington from an anemometer as part of the Native American anemometer loan program. Monthly mean wind speed is available for 2004 through 2005, as is wind direction and turbulence data. Data is reported from a height of 20 m. The data was originally made available by Wind Powering America, a DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) program. A dynamic map displaying all available data from DOE anemometer loan programs is available http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/anemometerloans/projects.asp. Source EERE Date Released December 02nd, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated December 02nd, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords wind

302

EA-1855: Creston-Bell Rebuild Project, Spokane and Lincoln Counties, WA |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

855: Creston-Bell Rebuild Project, Spokane and Lincoln 855: Creston-Bell Rebuild Project, Spokane and Lincoln Counties, WA EA-1855: Creston-Bell Rebuild Project, Spokane and Lincoln Counties, WA Summary This EA (also known as DOE/EA-4406 or DOE/BP-4406) evaluates the potential environmental impacts from rebuilding the Creston-Bell No. 1 115-kV transmission line, including the replacement of wood poles and associated structural components and conductor and access road improvements. The 54-mile long, wood pole line extends from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Creston substation to the BPA Bell substation near Spokane in Lincoln and Spokane Counties, Washington. Additional information about this project is available on the BPA website. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download

303

Intelligent Sootblowing Demonstration at Texas Glenco's W.A. Parish Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intelligent sootblowing (ISB) optimizes the cleaning of the walls and convection passes of fossil-fired power plants to maintain high heat transfer while keeping steam temperatures and pressures as constant as possible and minimizing erosion or corrosion of tubes. This document is the second in a series of interim reports on the five-year ISB system test and demonstration project at Texas Genco's W.A. Parish plant. It summarizes ISB performance test results, outage inspection findings, and potential enha...

2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

304

Effect of antimony nano-scale surface-structures on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector  

SciTech Connect

Effects of antimony crystallization on the surface of GaSb during low temperature molecular beam epitaxy growth are investigated. The geometry of these structures is studied via transmission electron and atomic force microscopies, which show the surface metal forms triangular-shaped, elongated nano-wires with a structured orientation composed entirely of crystalline antimony. By depositing antimony on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector, the field is localized within the antimony layer. Polarization dependent transmission measurements are carried out on these nano-structures deposited on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector. It is shown that the antimony-based structures at the surface favor transmission of light polarized perpendicular to the wires.

Husaini, S.; Shima, D.; Ahirwar, P.; Rotter, T. J.; Hains, C. P.; Dang, T.; Bedford, R. G.; Balakrishnan, G. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Sensors Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States)] [Air Force Research Laboratory, Sensors Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States)

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

305

Intelligent Sootblowing Demonstration at Texas Genco's W.A. Parish Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intelligent sootblowing (ISB) optimizes the cleaning of the walls and convection passes of fossil-fired power plants to maintain high heat transfer while keeping steam temperatures and pressures as constant as possible and minimizing erosion or corrosion of tubes. This document is the third in a series of interim reports on the five-year ISB system test and demonstration project at Texas Genco's W.A. Parish plant. Work in 2004 focused on quantifying cost savings associated with the long-term operation of...

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

File:EIA-Eastern-OR-WA-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eastern-OR-WA-BOE.pdf Eastern-OR-WA-BOE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Eastern Oregon and Washington By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 460 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Eastern Oregon and Washington By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Oregon, Washington File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:00, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:00, 20 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (460 KB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

307

File:06-WA-b - Washington Construction Storm Water Permit.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

File File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:06-WA-b - Washington Construction Storm Water Permit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:06-WA-b - Washington Construction Storm Water Permit.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 60 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 15:28, 6 December 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 15:28, 6 December 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (60 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 15:25, 6 December 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 15:25, 6 December 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (60 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs)

308

SB Electronics Breaks Ground on New Factory | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SB Electronics Breaks Ground on New Factory SB Electronics Breaks Ground on New Factory SB Electronics Breaks Ground on New Factory April 29, 2010 - 5:22pm Addthis U.S. Rep. Peter Welch (from left), Vermont Lt. Gov. Brian Dubie, SBE board member Win Hunter, SBE board chair Stan Fishkin, Assi U.S. Rep. Peter Welch (from left), Vermont Lt. Gov. Brian Dubie, SBE board member Win Hunter, SBE board chair Stan Fishkin, Assi Paul Lester Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy A Vermont company broke ground on a new factory that will produce cutting-edge technology for electric and hybrid cars and create more than 100 jobs. The event ushering in SB Electronics' power ring capacitor facility in Barre was attended by Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas and federal, state and local

309

Modeling of InGaSb thermophotovoltaic cells and materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A closed form computer program has been developed for the simulation and optimization of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}Sb thermophotovoltaic cells operating at room temperature. The program includes material parameter models of the energy bandgap, optical absorption constant, electron and hole mobility, intrinsic carrier concentration and index of refraction for any composition of GaInSb alloys.

Zierak, M.; Borrego, J.M.; Bhat, I.; Gutmann, R.J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Charache, G. [Lockheed Martin, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Structural and optical studies of nitrogen incorporation into GaSb-based GaInSb quantum wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the incorporation of nitrogen into (Ga,In)Sb grown on GaSb and report room temperature photoluminescence from GaInSb(N) quantum wells. X-ray diffraction and channeling nuclear reaction analysis, together with Rutherford backscattering, were employed to identify the optimal molecular beam epitaxial growth conditions that minimized the incorporation of non-substitutional nitrogen into GaNSb. Consistent with this hypothesis, GaInSb(N) quantum wells grown under the conditions that minimized non-substitutional nitrogen exhibited room temperature photoluminescence, indicative of significantly improved radiative efficiency. Further development of this material system could enable type-I laser diodes emitting throughout the (3-5 {mu}m) wavelength range.

Nair, Hari P.; Crook, Adam M.; Bank, Seth R. [Microelectronics Research Center, Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 10100 Burnet Rd, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Yu, Kin M. [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

311

DOE Challenge Home Case Study TC Legend, Seattle, WA, Custom Home  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TC Legend TC Legend Homes Seattle, WA BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

312

Recipient: County of Kitsap, WA ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

it: EE 000 0853 it: EE 000 0853 Recipient: County of Kitsap, WA ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination/ Categorical Exclusion Reviewer's Specific Instructions and Rationale (Restrictions and Allowable Activity) Kitsap Built Green Projects B5.1 Waste Stream, Engineering, and Historic Preservation clauses. Kitsap County Building Retrofits and Energy Efficiency Upgrades (Green Jobs Initiative) B5.1 except geothermal Waste Stream, Engineering, and Historic Preservation clauses. Prohibited: Any implementation of geothermal projects/construction activities without NEPA approval from DOE. Geothermal projects are to be provided to DOE for analysis. Energy Efficiency Implementation and Strategy A9, All, B5.1 None Energy Services Corps A9, All, B5.1

313

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, Dwell Development, Seattle, WA, Systems Home  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dwell Dwell Development Seattle, WA BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

314

Microsoft Word - CX-AccessRoads-KingCoWA-FY13_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2013 22, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Covington SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Rick Ross Engineer - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Covington District Culvert Replacements Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): Appendix B1.3, Routine Maintenance Location: King County, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to replace existing culverts at 12 access road stream crossings that present barriers to fish passage. These improvements will be made on BPA easement access roads within DNR owned and managed lands. BPA will make these improvements by installing new fish friendly culverts and/or bridges at each stream crossing. The current stream crossings do not meet DNR fish passage standards that will be in

315

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, Clifton View Homes, Coupeville, WA, Systems Home  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clifton View Clifton View Homes Coupeville, WA BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

316

Measurements of Turbulence at Two Tidal Energy Sites in Puget Sound, WA  

SciTech Connect

Field measurements of turbulence are pre- sented from two sites in Puget Sound, WA (USA) that are proposed for electrical power generation using tidal current turbines. Rapidly sampled data from multiple acoustic Doppler instruments are analyzed to obtain statistical mea- sures of fluctuations in both the magnitude and direction of the tidal currents. The resulting turbulence intensities (i.e., the turbulent velocity fluctuations normalized by the harmonic tidal currents) are typically 10% at the hub- heights (i.e., the relevant depth bin) of the proposed turbines. Length and time scales of the turbulence are also analyzed. Large-scale, anisotropic eddies dominate the energy spectra, which may be the result of proximity to headlands at each site. At small scales, an isotropic turbulent cascade is observed and used to estimate the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy. Data quality and sampling parameters are discussed, with an emphasis on the removal of Doppler noise from turbulence statistics.

Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav; Richmond, Marshall C.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

317

Phase equilibrium and intermediate phases in the Eu-Sb system  

SciTech Connect

Rapid heating rate thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, fluorescence spectrometry, and differential dissolution method were used to study the high-temperature phase equilibrium in the Eu-Sb system within the composition range between 37 and 96 at% Sb. The techniques were effective in determination of the vapor-solid-liquid equilibrium since intermediate phases except Eu{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} evaporated incongruently after melting. A thermal procedure was developed to determine the liquidus and solidus lines of the T-x diagram. Six stable phases were identified: two phases, EuSb{sub 2} and Eu{sub 4}Sb{sub 3}, melt congruently at 1045{+-}10 deg. C and 1600{+-}15 deg. C, the Eu{sub 2}Sb{sub 3}, Eu{sub 11}Sb{sub 10}, Eu{sub 5}Sb{sub 4}, and Eu{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} phases melt incongruently at 850{+-}8 deg. C, 950{+-}10 deg. C, 1350{+-}15 deg. C, and 1445{+-}15 deg. C, respectively. The exact composition shifting of Sb-rich decomposable phases towards Eu{sub 4}Sb{sub 3}, the most refractory compound, was determined. The topology of the Eu-Sb phase diagram was considered together with that of the Yb-Sb system. - Graphical abstract: The high-temperature range of the T-x phase diagram for the Eu-Sb system. Highlights: > The phase relations in the Eu-Sb system were studied over a large composition and temperature scale. > The liquidus and solidus lines of the T-x diagram were well established using effective techniques. > In the system, six binary phases are stable and they melt incongruently except EuSb{sub 2} and Eu{sub 4}Sb{sub 3}. > Incongruent evaporation was found to be typical of all the phases besides Eu{sub 4}Sb{sub 3}.

Abdusalyamova, M.N. [Institute of Chemistry of Tajik Academy of Sciences, Ajni Str. 299/2, 734063 Dushanbe (Tajikistan); Vasilyeva, I.G., E-mail: kamarz@niic.nsc.ru [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Lavrentiev Avenue, 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Effect of Sb on the Properties of GaInP Top Cells (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The summary of this report is that: (1) Sb can be used to increase V{sub oc} of a GaInP top cell; (2) the photovoltaic quality of GaInP is relatively unaffected by the presence of Sb; and (3) Sb-doped GaInP/GaAs tandem cells show promise for achieving efficiencies over 32%.

Olson, J. M.; McMahon, W. E.; Kurtz, S.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Low cost high power GaSB photovoltaic cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High power density and high capacity factor are important attributes of a thermophotovoltaics (TPV) system and GaSb cells are enabling for TPV systems. A TPV cogeneration unit at an off grid site will compliment solar arrays producing heat and electricity on cloudy days with the solar arrays generating electricity on sunny days. Herein

Lewis M. Fraas; Han X. Huang; Shi-Zhong Ye; She Hui; James Avery; Russell Ballantyne

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Low cost high power GaSb thermophotovoltaic cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High power density and high capacity factor are important attributes of a TPV system and GaSb cells are enabling for TPV systems. A TPV cogeneration unit at an off grid site will compliment solar arrays producing heat and electricity on cloudy days with the solar arrays generating electricity on sunny days. Herein

Lewis M. Fraas; Han X. Huang; Shi-Zhong Ye; James Avery; Russell Ballantyne

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Application of a modified denitrifying bacteria method for analyzing groundwater and vadose zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA. Woods,and Conrad, Mark The Hanford Site in southern WashingtonL have been reported for Hanford groundwaters, where nitrate

Woods, Katharine N.; Singleton, Michael J.; Conrad, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY POSTDOCTORAL POSITION FOR WORK AT LIGO HANFORD, WA Applications are invited for a postdoctoral position in the Gravity Group at the Department of Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY POSTDOCTORAL POSITION FOR WORK AT LIGO HANFORD, WA Applications characterization for the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) at the Hanford site characterization at the LIGO Hanford observatory. Familiarity with data analysis pipelines for searching

Collins, Gary S.

323

TANK 40 FINAL SB7B CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

A sample of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) was taken from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB7b WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals and fissile constituents, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as SB7b. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB7b sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle over the weekend. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 558 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon{reg_sign} vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass - 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB7b supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH{sup -}/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses, and Cs-137 gamma scan. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH{sup -}/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method developed by SRNL AD and previously described. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results reported here: (1) The ratios of the major elements for the SB7b WAPS sample are different from those measured for the SB7a WAPS sample. There is less Al and Mn relative to Fe than the previous sludge batch. (2) The elemental composition of this sample and the analyses conducted here are reasonable and consistent with DWPF batch data measurements in light of DWPF pre-sample concentration and SRAT product heel contributions to the DWPF SRAT receipt analyses. The element ratios for Al/Fe, Ca/Fe, Mn/Fe, and U/Fe agree within 10% between this work and the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt analyses. (3) Sulfur in the SB7b WAPS sample is 82% soluble, slightly less than results reported for SB3, SB4, and SB6 samples but unlike the 50% insoluble sulfur observed in the SB5 WAPS sample. In addition, 23% of the soluble sulfur is not present as sulfate in SB7b. (4) The average activities of the fissile isotopes of interest in the SB7b WAPS sample are (in {mu}Ci/g of total dried solids): 4.22E-02 U-233, 6.12E-04 U-235, 1.08E+01 Pu-239, and 5.09E+01 Pu-241. The full radionuclide composition will be reported in a future document. (5) The fission product noble metal and Ag concentrations appear to have largely peaked in previous DWPF sludge batches, with the exception of Ru, which still shows a slight increase in SB7b.

Bannochie, C.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Magnetic properties of MnSb inclusions formed in GaSb matrix directly during molecular beam epitaxial growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite of intensive search for the proper semiconductor base materials for spintronic devices working at room temperature no appropriate material based on ferromagnetic semiconductors has been found so far. We demonstrate that the phase segregated system with MnSb hexagonal inclusions inside the GaSb matrix, formed directly during the molecular beam epitaxial growth reveals the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature and is a good candidate for exploitation in spintronics. Furthermore, the MnSb inclusions with only one crystalline structure were identified in this GaMn:MnSb granular material. The SQUID magnetometry confirmed that this material exhibits ferromagnetic like behavior starting from helium up to room temperature. Moreover, the magnetic anisotropy was found which was present also at room temperature, and it was proved that by choosing a proper substrate it is possible to control the direction of easy axis of inclusions' magnetization moment between in-plane and out-of-plane; the latter is important in view of potential applications in spintronic devices.

Lawniczak-Jablonska, Krystyna; Wolska, Anna; Klepka, Marcin T.; Kret, Slawomir; Kurowska, Boguslawa; Kowalski, Bogdan J. [Institute of Physics PAS, al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Gosk, Jacek [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Twardowski, Andrzej; Wasik, Dariusz; Kwiatkowski, Adam [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Sadowski, Janusz [Institute of Physics PAS, al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); MAX-Lab, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

GaSb substrates with extended IR wavelength for advanced space based applications  

SciTech Connect

GaSb substrates have advantages that make them attractive for implementation of a wide range of infrared (IR) detectors with higher operating temperatures for stealth and space based applications. A significant aspect that would enable widespread commercial application of GaSb wafers for very long wavelength IR (VLWIR) applications is the capability for transmissivity beyond 15 m. Due largely to the GaSb (antisite) defect and other point defects in undoped GaSb substrates, intrinsic GaSb is still slightly p-type and strongly absorbs in the VLWIR. This requires backside thinning of the GaSb substrate for IR transmissivity. An extremely low n-type GaSb substrate is preferred to eliminate thinning and provide a substrate solution for backside illuminated VLWIR devices. By providing a more homogeneous radial distribution of the melt solute to suppress GaSb formation and controlling the cooling rate, ultra low doped n:GaSb has been achieved. This study examines the surface properties and IR transmission spectra of ultra low doped GaSb substrates at both room and low temperatures. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), homoepitaxy by MBE, and infrared Fourier transform (FTIR) analysis was implemented to examine material quality. As compared with standard low doped GaSb, the ultra low doped substrates show over 50% transmission and consistent wavelength transparency past 23 m with improved %T at low temperature. Homoepitaxy and AFM results indicate the ultra low doped GaSb has a low thermal desorbtion character and qualified morphology. In summary, improvements in room temperature IR transmission and extended wavelength characteristics have been shown consistently for ultra low doped n:GaSb substrates.

Allen, Lisa P.; Flint, Patrick; Dallas, Gordon; Bakken, Daniel; Blanchat, Kevin; Brown, Gail J.; Vangala, Shivashankar R.; Goodhue, William D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Substrate misorientation effects on epitaxial GaInAsSb  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of substrate misorientation on the growth of GaInAsSb was studied for epilayers grown lattice-matched to GaSb substrates by low-pressure organometallic vapor phase epitaxy. The substrates were (100) misoriented 2 or 6{degree} toward (110), (111)A, or (111)B. The surface is mirror-like and featureless for layers grown with a 6{degree} toward (111)B misorientation, while, a slight texture was observed for layers grown on all other misorientations. The optical quality of layers, as determined by the full width at half-maximum of photoluminescence spectra measured at 4K, is significantly better for layers grown on substrates with a 6{degree} toward (111)B misorientation. The incorporation of Zn as a p-type dopant in GaInAsSb is about 1.5 times more efficient on substrates with 6{degree} toward (111)B misorientation compared to 2{degree} toward (110) misorientation. The external quantum efficiency of thermophotovoltaic devices is not, however, significantly affected by substrate misorientation.

Wang, C.A.; Choi, H.K.; Oakley, D.C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Lexington, MA (United States). Lincoln Lab.; Charache, G.W. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Method of making AlInSb by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing aluminum-indium-antimony materials by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This invention provides a method of producing Al.sub.X In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials by MOCVD wherein an Al source material, an In source material and an Sb source material are supplied as a gas to a heated substrate in a chamber, said Al source material, In source material, and Sb source material decomposing at least partially below 525.degree. C. to produce Al.sub.x In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials wherein x is greater than 0.002 and less than one.

Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Baucom, Kevin C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0473)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

W.A. W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Summary February 2013 DOE/EIS-0473 Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK COVER SHEET Responsible Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0473) Location: Southeastern Texas, including Fort Bend, Wharton, and Jackson counties Contacts: For further information about this Environmental Impact Statement, contact: For general information on the DOE process for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act, contact: Mark W. Lusk U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 (304) 285-4145 or Mark.Lusk@netl.doe.gov

329

W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0473)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NRG W.A. PARISH PCCS PROJECT NRG W.A. PARISH PCCS PROJECT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT APPENDIX H. BEG MODELING REPORT APPENDIX H BEG MODELING REPORT DOE/EIS-0473 NRG W.A. PARISH PCCS PROJECT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT APPENDIX H. BEG MODELING REPORT INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 1 Reservoir modeling and simulation for estimating migration extents of injectate-CO 2 in support of West Ranch oilfield NEPA/EIS Gulf Coast Carbon Center, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin May 4, 2012 Summary It is anticipated that anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2-A) will be injected into the deep (5,000-6,000 ft below sea level) subsurface for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) at the West Ranch oilfield beginning in early 2015. The purpose of this report is to present reservoir modeling and simulation

330

Temperature dependence of the dielectric response of AlSb  

SciTech Connect

Spectroscopic ellipometry was used to determine the optical response of an intrinsic AlSb film as a function of temperature. The 1.5 {mu}m thick film was grown on a (001) GaAs substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. Measurements were done at temperatures from 300 K to the growth temperature of 800 K over a spectral range of 0.7 to 5.0 eV. To avoid oxidation artifacts, measurements were done with the film in situ. The data were analyzed using a parametric semiconductor model for its temperature dependence.

Jung, Y. W.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, Y. D. [Nano-Optical Property Laboratory and Department of Physics, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, S. H.; Kim, S. Y.; Song, J. D. [Center for Spintronics Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

331

Tank 40 Final SB7b Chemical Characterization Results  

SciTech Connect

A sample of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) was taken from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB7b WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals and fissile constituents. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB7b sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle over the weekend. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 558 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon? vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass ? 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma ? atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma ? mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB7b supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH{sup -}/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses, and Cs-137 gamma scan. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH-/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method.

Bannochie, C. J.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

332

Key results from SB8 simulant flowsheet studies  

SciTech Connect

Key technically reviewed results are presented here in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) acceptance of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). This report summarizes results from simulant flowsheet studies of the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Results include: Hydrogen generation rate for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles of the CPC on a 6,000 gallon basis; Volume percent of nitrous oxide, N2O, produced during the SRAT cycle; Ammonium ion concentrations recovered from the SRAT and SME off-gas; and, Dried weight percent solids (insoluble, soluble, and total) measurements and density.

Koopman, D. C.

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

333

AlGaAsSb buffer/barrier on GaAs substrate for InAs channel devices with high electron mobility and practical reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: AlGaAsSb, Hall elements, InAs, Sb, buffer/barriers, deep quantum well, field effect transistors, reliability

S. Miya; S. Muramatsu; N. Kuze; K. Nagase; T. Iwabuchi; A. Ichii; M. Ozaki; I. Shibasaki

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Structural studies and optical and electrical properties of novel Gd3+-doped Sb2Se3 nanorods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gd3+-doped Sb2Se3 nanorods were synthesized by coreduction method at 180C and pH = 12 for 48 h. Powder XRD patterns indicate that the GdxSb2-xSe3 crystals (x ...

Abdolali Alemi; Younes Hanifehpour; Sang Woo Joo; Bong-Ki Min; Tae Hwan Oh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

GaSb/GaP compliant interface for high electron mobility AlSb/InAs heterostructures on (001) GaP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the epitaxial growth of an AlSb/InAs heterostructure on a (001) GaP substrate. We investigate the conditions for the most efficient relaxation of GaSb islands on GaP. In particular, we show that the GaP surface treatment and the growth temperature are crucial for the formation of a two-dimensional periodic array of 90 deg. misfit dislocations at the episubstrate interface. With this relaxation process, an AlSb/InAs heterostructure exhibiting a room temperature mobility of 25 500 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} on GaP is demonstrated. This result paves the way to the integration of Sb-based devices on Si substrates through the use of GaP/Si templates.

El Kazzi, S.; Desplanque, L.; Coinon, C.; Wallart, X. [Institut d'Electronique, de Microelectronique, et de Nanotechnologie, UMR-CNRS 8520, BP 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France); Wang, Y.; Ruterana, P. [CIMAP UMR 6252 CNRS-ENSICAEN-CEA-UCBN, 6, Boulevard du Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex (France)

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

336

Observation of Band Alignment Transition in InAs/GaAsSb Quantum Dots by Photoluminescence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The band alignment of InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded in GaAsSb barriers with various Sb compositions is investigated by photoluminescence (PL) measurements. InAs/GaAsSb samples with 13% and 15% Sb compositions show distinct differences in emission spectra as the PL excitation power increases. Whilst no discernible shift is seen for the 13% sample, a blue-shift of PL spectra following a 1/3 exponent of the excitation power is observed for the 15% sample suggesting a transition from a type I to type II band alignment. Time-resolved PL data show a significant increase in carrier lifetime as the Sb composition increases between 13% and 15% implying that the transformation from a type I to type II band alignment occurs between 13% and 15% Sb compositions. These results taken together lead to the conclusion that a zero valence band offset (VBO) can be achieved for the InAs/GaAsSb system in the vicinity of 14% Sb composition.

Ban, K. Y.; Kuciauskas, D.; Bremner, S. P.; Honsberg, C. B.

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

SB 4 Interim Well Stimulation Treatment Regulations Notice of Proposed Emergency Rulemaking Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SB 4 Interim Well Stimulation Treatment Regulations Notice of Proposed Emergency Rulemaking Action Page 1 of 10 SB 4 INTERIM WELL STIMULATION TREATMENT REGULATIONS NOTICE OF PROPOSED EMERGENCY that the California Department of Conservation (Department) proposes to adopt emergency regulations necessary

338

GaInAsSb materials for thermophotovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} (0.06 < x < 0.2, 0.05 < y < 0.18) epilayers were grown lattice-matched to GaSb substrates by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). For lattice-matched alloys, mirror-like surface morphologies were obtained by both OMVPE and MBE. The 4K photoluminescence (PL) of all layers had a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of less than 10 meV for PL peak emission < 1.9 {micro}m. PL FWHM increased to 30 meV for peak emission {approximately}2.12 {micro}m for OMVPE-grown layers. Nominally undoped layers are p-type with typical 300 K hole concentration of {approximately}9 {times} 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} and hole mobility {approximately}450 to 580 cm{sup 2}/V-s for OMVPE-grown layers, p- and n-type doping is reported for layers grown with either technique. The ideality factor of diode structures is {approximately}2 for both techniques.

Wang, C.A.; Turner, G.W.; Manfra, M.J.; Choi, H.K.; Spears, D.L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Lexington, MA (United States). Lincoln Lab.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Event:Sustainable Biomass for Electricity Conference (SB4E) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass for Electricity Conference (SB4E) Biomass for Electricity Conference (SB4E) Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Sustainable Biomass for Electricity Conference (SB4E): on 2012/05/02 The Conference on Sustainable Biomass for Electricity (SB4E), organized by UN-Energy in cooperation with the Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP) and other partners, will consider the role of biomass technologies in decarbonizing the global energy system. Acknowledging the readily available and cost effective potential for emission reductions that could be achieved through the large-scale deployment of sustainable biomass for electricity production, the SB4E Conference will provide an opportunity for governments, international organizations and the private sector to share knowledge, lessons, best practices and experiences and to join efforts

340

The quantum efficiency of InGaAsSb thermophotovoltaic diodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Uncoated InGaAsSb/GaSb thermophotovoltaic (TPV) diodes with 0.56 eV (2.2 {micro}m) bandgaps exhibit external quantum efficiencies of 59% at 2 {micro}m, which corresponds to an internal quantum efficiency of 95%. The structures were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The devices have electron diffusion lengths as long as 29 {micro}m in 8-{micro}m-wide p-InGaAsSb layers and hole diffusion lengths of 3 {micro}m in 6-{micro}m-wide n-InGaAsSb layers. The electron and hole diffusion lengths appear to increase with increasing p- and n-layer widths, respectively. These excellent minority carrier transport properties of InGaAsSb are well-suited to efficient TPV diode operation.

Martinelli, R.U.; Garbuzov, D.Z.; Lee, H.; Morris, N.; Odubanjo, T.; Taylor, G.C.; Connolly, J.C. [Sarnoff Corp., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Arrival time and magnitude of airborne fission products from the Fukushima, Japan, reactor incident as measured in Seattle, WA, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results of air monitoring started due to the recent natural catastrophe on 11 March 2011 in Japan and the severe ensuing damage to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex. On 17-18 March 2011, we registered the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131-I, 132-I, 132-Te, 134-Cs, and 137-Cs in Seattle, WA, USA, by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. We measured the evolution of the activities over a period of 23 days at the end of which the activities had mostly fallen below our detection limit. The highest detected activity amounted to 4.4 +/- 1.3 mBq/m^3 of 131-I on 19-20 March.

J. Diaz Leon; D. A. Jaffe; J. Kaspar; A. Knecht; M. L. Miller; R. G. H. Robertson; A. G. Schubert

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

342

GaSb/GaAs quantum dot formation and demolition studied with cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy study of GaSb/GaAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Various nanostructures are observed as a function of the growth parameters. During growth, relaxation of the high local strain fields of the nanostructures plays an important role in their formation. Pyramidal dots with a high Sb content are often accompanied by threading dislocations above them. GaSb ring formation is favored by the use of a thin GaAs first cap layer and a high growth temperature of the second cap layer. At these capping conditions, strain-driven Sb diffusion combined with As/Sb exchange and Sb segregation remove the center of a nanostructure, creating a ring. Clusters of GaSb without a well defined morphology also appear regularly, often with a highly inhomogeneous structure which is sometimes divided up in fragments.

Smakman, E. P.; Garleff, J. K.; Rambabu, P.; Koenraad, P. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven 5612 AZ (Netherlands); Young, R. J.; Hayne, M. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

343

DWPF SIMULANT CPC STUDIES FOR SB7B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab-scale DWPF simulations of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) processing were performed. Testing was performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory - Aiken County Technology Laboratory (SRNL-ACTL). The primary goal of the simulations was to define a likely operating window for acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). In addition, the testing established conditions for the SRNL Shielded Cells qualification simulation of SB7b-Tank 40 blend, supported validation of the current glass redox model, and validated the coupled process flowsheet at the nominal acid stoichiometry. An acid window of 105-140% by the Koopman minimum acid (KMA) equation (107-142% DWPF Hsu equation) worked for the sludge-only flowsheet. Nitrite was present in the SRAT product for the 105% KMA run at 366 mg/kg, while SME cycle hydrogen reached 94% of the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle limit in the 140% KMA run. The window was determined for sludge with added caustic (0.28M additional base, or roughly 12,000 gallons 50% NaOH to 820,000 gallons waste slurry). A suitable processing window appears to be 107-130% DWPF acid equation for sludge-only processing allowing some conservatism for the mapping of lab-scale simulant data to full-scale real waste processing including potentially non-conservative noble metal and mercury concentrations. This window should be usable with or without the addition of up to 7,000 gallons of caustic to the batch. The window could potentially be wider if caustic is not added to SB7b. It is recommended that DWPF begin processing SB7b at 115% stoichiometry using the current DWPF equation. The factor could be increased if necessary, but changes should be made with caution and in small increments. DWPF should not concentrate past 48 wt.% total solids in the SME cycle if moderate hydrogen generation is occurring simultaneously. The coupled flowsheet simulation made more hydrogen in the SRAT and SME cycles than the sludge-only run with the same acid stoichiometric factor. The slow acid addition in MCU seemed to alter the reactions that consumed the small excess acid present such that hydrogen generation was promoted relative to sludge-only processing. The coupled test reached higher wt.% total solids, and this likely contributed to the SME cycle hydrogen limit being exceeded at 110% KMA. It is clear from the trends in the SME processing GC data, however, that the frit slurry formic acid contributed to driving the hydrogen generation rate above the SME cycle limit. Hydrogen generation rates after the second frit addition generally exceeded those after the first frit addition. SRAT formate loss increased with increasing acid stoichiometry (15% to 35%). A substantial nitrate gain which was observed to have occurred after acid addition (and nitrite destruction) was reversed to a net nitrate loss in runs with higher acid stoichiometry (nitrate in SRAT product less than sum of sludge nitrate and added nitric acid). Increased ammonium ion formation was also indicated in the runs with nitrate loss. Oxalate loss on the order 20% was indicated in three of the four acid stoichiometry runs and in the coupled flowsheet run. The minimum acid stoichiometry run had no indicated loss. The losses were of the same order as the official analytical uncertainty of the oxalate concentration measurement, but were not randomly distributed about zero loss, so some actual loss was likely occurring. Based on the entire set of SB7b test data, it is recommended that DWPF avoid concentrating additional sludge solids in single SRAT batches to limit the concentrations of noble metals to SB7a processing levels (on a grams noble metal per SRAT batch basis). It is also recommended that DWPF drop the formic acid addition that accompanies the process frit 418 additions, since SME cycle data showed considerable catalytic activity for hydrogen generation from this additional acid (about 5% increase in stoichiometry occurred from the frit formic acid). Frit 418 also does not appear to need formic acid addition to prevent gel formation in

Koopman, D.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

DWPF SIMULANT CPC STUDIES FOR SB7B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lab-scale DWPF simulations of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) processing were performed. Testing was performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory - Aiken County Technology Laboratory (SRNL-ACTL). The primary goal of the simulations was to define a likely operating window for acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). In addition, the testing established conditions for the SRNL Shielded Cells qualification simulation of SB7b-Tank 40 blend, supported validation of the current glass redox model, and validated the coupled process flowsheet at the nominal acid stoichiometry. An acid window of 105-140% by the Koopman minimum acid (KMA) equation (107-142% DWPF Hsu equation) worked for the sludge-only flowsheet. Nitrite was present in the SRAT product for the 105% KMA run at 366 mg/kg, while SME cycle hydrogen reached 94% of the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle limit in the 140% KMA run. The window was determined for sludge with added caustic (0.28M additional base, or roughly 12,000 gallons 50% NaOH to 820,000 gallons waste slurry). A suitable processing window appears to be 107-130% DWPF acid equation for sludge-only processing allowing some conservatism for the mapping of lab-scale simulant data to full-scale real waste processing including potentially non-conservative noble metal and mercury concentrations. This window should be usable with or without the addition of up to 7,000 gallons of caustic to the batch. The window could potentially be wider if caustic is not added to SB7b. It is recommended that DWPF begin processing SB7b at 115% stoichiometry using the current DWPF equation. The factor could be increased if necessary, but changes should be made with caution and in small increments. DWPF should not concentrate past 48 wt.% total solids in the SME cycle if moderate hydrogen generation is occurring simultaneously. The coupled flowsheet simulation made more hydrogen in the SRAT and SME cycles than the sludge-only run with the same acid stoichiometric factor. The slow acid addition in MCU seemed to alter the reactions that consumed the small excess acid present such that hydrogen generation was promoted relative to sludge-only processing. The coupled test reached higher wt.% total solids, and this likely contributed to the SME cycle hydrogen limit being exceeded at 110% KMA. It is clear from the trends in the SME processing GC data, however, that the frit slurry formic acid contributed to driving the hydrogen generation rate above the SME cycle limit. Hydrogen generation rates after the second frit addition generally exceeded those after the first frit addition. SRAT formate loss increased with increasing acid stoichiometry (15% to 35%). A substantial nitrate gain which was observed to have occurred after acid addition (and nitrite destruction) was reversed to a net nitrate loss in runs with higher acid stoichiometry (nitrate in SRAT product less than sum of sludge nitrate and added nitric acid). Increased ammonium ion formation was also indicated in the runs with nitrate loss. Oxalate loss on the order 20% was indicated in three of the four acid stoichiometry runs and in the coupled flowsheet run. The minimum acid stoichiometry run had no indicated loss. The losses were of the same order as the official analytical uncertainty of the oxalate concentration measurement, but were not randomly distributed about zero loss, so some actual loss was likely occurring. Based on the entire set of SB7b test data, it is recommended that DWPF avoid concentrating additional sludge solids in single SRAT batches to limit the concentrations of noble metals to SB7a processing levels (on a grams noble metal per SRAT batch basis). It is also recommended that DWPF drop the formic acid addition that accompanies the process frit 418 additions, since SME cycle data showed considerable catalytic activity for hydrogen generation from this additional acid (about 5% increase in stoichiometry occurred from the frit formic acid). Frit 418 also does not appear to need formic acid addition to prevent gel formation in

Koopman, D.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Relaxation of photoinduced spins and carriers in ferromagnetic InMnSb films  

SciTech Connect

The authors report time resolved measurements and control of photoinduced spin and carrier relaxations in InMnSb ferromagnetic films with 2% Mn content (grown by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy) using femtosecond laser pulses, and compare them to analogous measurements on InBeSb and InSb films. In this work, magneto-optical Kerr effect and standard pump-probe techniques provided a direct measure of the photoexcited spin and carrier lifetimes, respectively. They observe decrease in relaxations times in the high laser fluence regime and an absence of temperature dependence of the relaxation times.

Nontapot, K.; Kini, R. N.; Gifford, A.; Merritt, T. R.; Khodaparast, G. A.; Wojtowicz, T.; Liu, X.; Furdyna, J. K. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2007-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

346

Hydrothermal synthesis of Sb2S3nanorods using iodine via redox mechanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crystalline antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) with nanorods morphology was successfully prepared via hydrothermal method by the reaction of elemental sulfur, antimony, and iodine as starting materials with high yield at 180C for 24 ...

Abdolali Alemi; Sang Woo Joo; Younes Hanifehpour; Aliakbar Khandar; Ali Morsali; Bong-Ki Min

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Structure and Magnetic Properties of the RScSb Compounds (R ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

They crystallize in the tetragonal CeScSi-type structure (tI12, I4/ mmm, an ordered variant of the La2Sb-type). The lattice...

348

Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)  

SciTech Connect

Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel [National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines); Que, Christopher T. [Physics Department, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila 1004 (Philippines); Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Glass-like thermal transport in AgSbTe2 | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glass-like thermal transport in AgSbTe2: nano-scale insights to improve thermoelectric efficiency May 16, 2013 Inelastic neutron scattering data showing the phonon dispersions...

350

Cu2Sb thin film electrodes prepared by pulsed laser deposition f or lithium batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin films of Cu2Sb, prepared on stainless steel and copper substrates with a pulsed laser deposition technique at room temperature, have been evaluated as electrodes in lithium cells. The electrodes operate by a lithium insertion/copper extrusion reaction mechanism, the reversibility of which is superior when copper substrates are used, particularly when electrochemical cycling is restricted to the voltage range 0.65-1.4 V vs. Li/Li+. The superior performance of Cu2Sb films on copper is attributed to the more active participation of the extruded copper in the functioning of the electrode. The continual and extensive extrusion of copper on cycling the cells leads to the isolation of Li3Sb particles and a consequent formation of Sb. Improved cycling stability of both types of electrodes was obtained when cells were cycled between 0.65 and 1.4 V. A low-capacity lithium-ion cell with Cu2Sb and LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 electrodes, laminated from powders, shows excellent cycling stability over the voltage range 3.15 - 2.2 V, the potential difference corresponding to approximately 0.65-1.4 V for the Cu2Sb electrode vs. Li/Li+. Chemical self-discharge of lithiated Cu2Sb electrodes by reaction with the electrolyte was severe when cells were allowed to relax on open circuit after reaching a lower voltage limit of 0.1 V. The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer formed on Cu2Sb electrodes after cells had been cycled between 1.4 and 0.65 V vs. Li/Li+ was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy; the SEI layer contributes to the large irreversible capacity loss on the initial cycle of these cells. The data contribute to a better understanding of the electrochemical behavior of intermetallic electrodes in rechargeable lithium batteries.

Song, Seung-Wan; Reade, Ronald P.; Cairns, Elton J.; Vaughey, Jack T.; Thackeray, Michael M.; Striebel, Kathryn A.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Ab-Initio Determination of Novel Crystal Structures of the Thermoelectric Material MgAgSb  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials with the half-Heusler structure possess interesting electrical and magnetic properties, including potential for thermoelectric applications. MgAgSb is compositionally and structurally related to many half-Heusler materials, but has not been extensively studied. This work presents the high-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis of MgAgSb between 27 and 420 C, complemented with thermoelectric property measurements. MgAgSb is found to exist in three different structures in this temperature region, taking the half-Heusler structure at high temperatures, a Cu2Sb-related structure at intermediate temperatures, and a previously unreported tetragonal structure at room temperature. All three structures are related by a distorted Mg-Sb rocksalt-type sublattice, differing primarily in the Ag location among the available tetrahedral sites. Transition temperatures between the three phases correlate well with discontinuities in the Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity; the best performance occurs with the novel room temperature phase. For application of MgAgSb as a thermoelectric material, it may be desirable to develop methods to stabilize the room temperature phase at higher temperatures.

Kirkham, Melanie J [ORNL; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Sharp, Jeff W. [Marlow Industries, Inc; Thompson, Alan [Marlow Industries, Inc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Sb(III) and Sb(V) Sorption onto Al-Rich Phases: Hydrous Al Oxide and the Clay Minerals Kaolinite KGa-1b and Oxidized and Reduced Nontronite NAu-1  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the immobilization of Sb(III) and Sb(V) by Al-rich phases - hydrous Al oxide (HAO), kaolinite (KGa-1b), and oxidized and reduced nontronite (NAu-1) - using batch experiments to determine the uptake capacity and the kinetics of adsorption and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) Spectroscopy to characterize the molecular environment of adsorbed Sb. Both Sb(III) and Sb(V) are adsorbed in an inner-sphere mode on the surfaces of the studied substrates. The observed adsorption geometry is mostly bidentate corner-sharing, with some monodentate complexes. The kinetics of adsorption is relatively slow (on the order of days), and equilibrium adsorption isotherms are best fit using the Freundlich model. The oxidation state of the structural Fe within nontronite affects the adsorption capacity: if the clay is reduced, the adsorption capacity of Sb(III) is slightly decreased, while Sb(V) uptake is increased significantly. This may be a result of the presence of dissolved Fe(II) in the reduced nontronite suspensions or associated with the structural rearrangements in nontronite due to reduction. These research findings indicate that Sb can be effectively immobilized by Al-rich phases. The increase in Sb(V) uptake in response to reducing structural Fe in clay can be important in natural settings since Fe-rich clays commonly go through oxidation-reduction cycles in response to changing redox conditions.

Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Trainor, Thomas P. (Alaska Fairbanks)

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

353

Magnetic order near 270 K in mineral and synthetic Mn 2 FeSbO 6 ilmenite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structural and magnetic properties of Mn 2 FeSbO 6 single-crystalline mineral and ceramic samples synthesized under thermobaric treatment have been investigated

R. Mathieu; S. A. Ivanov; G. V. Bazuev; M. Hudl; P. Lazor; I. V. Solovyev; P. Nordblad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Structure and Magnetic Properties of Cu3Ni2SbO6 and Cu3Co2SbO6 Delafossites with Honeycomb Lattices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The crystal structures of two Delafossites, Cu3Ni2SbO6 and Cu3Co2SbO6, are determined by high resolution synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction. The Ni and Co are ordered with respect to Sb in the layer of edge sharing octahedra, forming magnetic layers with honeycomb geometry. High-resolution electron microscopy confirms ordering, and selected-area electron diffraction patterns identify examples of the stacking polytypes. Low temperature synthetic treatments result in disordered stacking of the layers, but heating just below their melting points results in nearly fully ordered stacking variants. The major variant in both cases is a monoclinic distortion of a 6-layer Delafossite polytype, but a significant amount of a 2-layer polytype is also present for the Ni case. The antiferromagnetic ordering with transitions, at 22.3 and 18.5 K for Ni and Co variants, respectively, is investigated by temperature and field dependent magnetization, as well as specific heat. The sharp magnetic transitions support the presence of well developed 2:1 ordering of the Co:Sb or Ni:Sb ions in the honeycomb layers. Neutron diffraction measurements at 4 K are used to determine the magnetic structures. For both the Ni and Co phases, the propagation vector is k = [100], and can be described as alternating ferromagnetic chains in the metal-oxide plane giving an overall antiferromagntic zigzag alignment. While orientation of the magnetic moments of the Co is along the b-axis, the Ni moments are in the ac plane, approximately parallel to the stacking direction. Bulk magnetization properties are discussed in terms of their magnetic structures.

Roudebush, J. H. [Princeton University; Andersen, N. [Technical University of Denmark; Ramlau, R. [Max Planck Institute for the Chemical Physics of Solids; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL; Toft-Petersen, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Norby, P. [Technical University of Denmark; Schneider, R. [Laboratory for Electron Microscopy, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology; Hay, J. N. [Princeton University; Cava, R J [Princeton University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Performance Study of K2CsSb Photocathode Inside a DC High Voltage Gun  

SciTech Connect

In the past decade, there has been considerable interest in the generation of tens of mA average current in a photoinjector. Until recently, GaAs:Cs cathodes and K{sub 2}CsSb cathodes have been tested successfully in DC and RF injectors respectively for this application. Our goal is to test the K{sub 2}CsSb photocathode inside a DC gun. Since the multialkali cathode is a compound with constant characteristics over its entire thickness, we anticipate that the lifetime issues seen in GaAs:Cs due to surface damage by ion bombardment would be minimized. Hence successful operation of the K{sub 2}CsSb cathode in a DC gun could lead to a relatively robust electron source capable of delivering ampere level currents. In order to test the performance of a K{sub 2}CsSb cathode in a DC gun, we have designed and built a load lock system that allows the fabrication of the cathode at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and its testing at Jefferson Lab (JLab). In this paper, we will present the performance of the K{sub 2}CsSb photocathode in the preparation chamber and in the DC gun.

McCarter J. L.; Rao T.; Smedley, J.; Grames, J.; Mammei, R.; Poelker, M.; Suleiman, R.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Element-specific study of the temperature dependent magnetization of Co-Mn-Sb thin films  

SciTech Connect

Magnetron sputtered thin Co-Mn-Sb films were investigated with respect to their element-specific magnetic properties. Stoichiometric Co{sub 1}Mn{sub 1}Sb{sub 1} crystallized in the C1{sub b} structure has been predicted to be half-metallic and is therefore of interest for spintronics applications. It should show a characteristic antiferromagnetic coupling of the Mn and Co magnetic moments and a transition temperature T{sub C} of about 480K. Although the observed transition temperature of our 20nm thick Co{sub 32.4}Mn{sub 33.7}Sb{sub 33.8}, Co{sub 37.7}Mn{sub 34.1}Sb{sub 28.2} and Co{sub 43.2}Mn{sub 32.6}Sb{sub 24.2} films is in quite good agreement with the expected value, we found a ferromagnetic coupling of the Mn and Co magnetic moments which indicates that the films do not crystallize in the C1{sub b} structure and are probably not fully spin-polarized. The ratio of the Co and Mn moments does not change up to the transition temperature and the temperature dependence of the magnetic moments can be well described by the mean field theory.

Schmalhorst, J.; Ebke, D.; Meinert, M.; Thomas, A.; Reiss, G.; Arenholz, E.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor structure. The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3-1.6 .mu.m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation.

Spahn, Olga B. (Albuquerque, NM); Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Lattice-registered growth of GaSb on Si (211) with molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A GaSb film was grown on a Si(211) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy indicating full lattice relaxation as well as full lattice registration and dislocation-free growth in the plane perpendicular to the [01 - 1]-direction. Heteroepitaxy of GaSb on a Si(211) substrate is dominated by numerous first order and multiple higher order micro-twins. The atomic-resolved structural study of GaSb films by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy reveals that slight tilt, along with twinning, favors the lattice registry to Si(211) substrates. Preferential bonding of impinging Ga and Sb atoms at the interface due to two distinctive bonding sites on the Si(211) surface enables growth that is sublattice-ordered and free of anti-phase boundaries. The role of the substrate orientation on the strain distribution of GaSb epilayers is further elucidated by investigating the local change in the lattice parameter using the geometric phase analysis method and hence effectiveness of the lattice tilting in reducing the interfacial strain was confirmed further.

Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Botton, G. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Ghanad-Tavakoli, S. [Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Preston, J. S.; Kleiman, R. N. [Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

20121114 Riverton drinking wa...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Where Does My Drinking Water Come From? Where Does My Drinking Water Come From? Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site F A C T S H E E T ENERGY Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF This fact sheet provides information about the Alternative Water Supply System and domestic wells at the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site at Riverton, Wyoming. The Riverton site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Where Is the Riverton Site? The former Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site is in Fremont County, 2 miles southwest of the town of Riverton and within the boundaries of the Wind River Indian Reservation (Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone). Why Is It a "Site"? A uranium- and vanadium-ore-processing mill operated on the property from 1958 to 1963. Milling operations created

360

Structural Characterization of Doped GaSb Single Crystals by X-ray Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We characterized GaSb single crystals containing different dopants (Al, Cd and Te), grown by the Czochralski method, by x-ray topography and high angular resolution x-ray diffraction. Lang topography revealed dislocations parallel and perpendicular to the crystal's surface. Double-crystal GaSb 333 x-ray topography shows dislocations and vertical stripes than can be associated with circular growth bands. We compared our high-angular resolution x-ray diffraction measurements (rocking curves) with the findings predicted by the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction. These measurements show that our GaSb single crystals have a relative variation in the lattice parameter ({Delta}d/d) on the order of 10{sup -5}. This means that they can be used as electronic devices (detectors, for example) and as x-ray monochromators.

Honnicke, M.G.; Mazzaro, I.; Manica, J.; Benine, E.; M da Costa, E.; Dedavid, B. A.; Cusatis, C.; Huang, X. R.

2009-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Electron Scattering in InSb Quantum Wells due to Micro-twin Defects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport electron scattering due to micro-twin (MT) defects in InSb quantum wells (QWs) has been investigated at room temperature (RT). A linear-regression-based scattering analysis showed that Matthiessen's rule is applicable to the RT electron mobility in 20-nm-thick InSb QWs that contain MTs (whose density is 5.6x10{sup 2}-1.2x10{sup 4} /cm) and threading dislocations (8.7x10{sup 8}-3.2x10{sup 9} /cm{sup 2}) as dominant structural defects. For such an InSb QW whose local electron mobility in its non-MT regions is 2.8x10{sup 4}-4.5x10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}/(Vs), the MT-originated energy barrier against the electron transport is deduced to be 0.081-0.093 eV at RT.

Mishima, T. D.; Santos, M. B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Center for Semiconductor Physics in Nanostructure University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

362

Spiral growth of topological insulator Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanoplates  

SciTech Connect

Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanoplates synthesized by vapor phase deposition method have been systemically investigated employing atomic force microscopy, which exhibit regular spiral structures on the surface. The height of spiral steps is determined to be 1 nm corresponding to one quintuple layer, with an inter-step separation ranging from 500 nm to 1 {mu}m. Growth mechanism of spiral structures on the Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanoplate surface is elucidated, which can be applied to other layered materials with van der Waals epitaxy growth. The electrostatic properties of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanoplates with spiral structures are also simultaneously characterized.

Hao Guolin; Qi Xiang; Fan Yinping; Xue Lin; Peng Xiangyang; Wei Xiaolin; Zhong Jianxin [Hunan Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Energy Materials and Devices, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China) and Laboratory for Quantum Engineering and Micro-Nano Energy Technology and Faculty of Materials and Optoelectronic Physics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)] [Hunan Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Energy Materials and Devices, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China) and Laboratory for Quantum Engineering and Micro-Nano Energy Technology and Faculty of Materials and Optoelectronic Physics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

363

Thermoelectric performance of electron and hole doped PtSb2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the thermoelectric properties of electron and hole doped PtSb2. Our results show that for doping of 0.04 holes per unit cell (1:5 1020 cm 3) PtSb2 shows a high Seebeck coefficient at room temperature, which can also be achieved at other temperatures by controlling the carrier concentration (both electron and hole). The electrical conductivity becomes temperature independent when the doping exceeds some 0.2 electrons/holes per unit cell. The figure of merit at 800 K in electron and hole doped PtSb2 is comparatively low at 0.13 and 0.21, respectively, but may increase significantly with As alloying due to the likely opening of a band gap and reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity

Saeed, Yasir [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Singh, Nirprenda [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Schwingenschlogl, Udo [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Parker, David S [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Cu2Sb thin films as anode for Na-ion batteries  

SciTech Connect

Cu2Sb thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering are evaluated as an anode material for Na-ion batteries. The starting material is composed of nanocrystallites with the desired tetragonal P4/nmm structure. The study of the reaction mechanism reveals the formation of an amorphous/nanocrystalline phase of composition close to Na3Sb as the final reaction product. The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) material is mostly composed of carbonates (Na2CO3, NaCO3R). The Cu2Sb anode possesses moderate capacity retention with a reversible storage capacity (250 mAh/g) close to the theoretical value (323 mAh/g), an average reaction potential of around 0.55 V vs. Na/Na+, and a high rate performance (10 C-rate).

Baggetto, Loic [ORNL; Allcorn, Eric [University of Texas, Austin; Manthiram, Arumugam [University of Texas, Austin; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Formulation and Characterization of LX-17-2 from new FK 800 binder and WA, ATK, and BAE TATBs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently LLNL has no Kel-F 800 or wet-aminated TATB reserves for formulation. Although both materials are soon to be commercially available, their synthesis processes have changed and the explosive must be re-evaluated. In 2000 3M phased out the uses of perfluorooctanoyl (C8) derivatives due to environmental persistence and bioaccumulation issues. A C8 derivative was used as an emulsifier for making Kel F-800. In 2001 Kel F-800 was scheduled to be discontinued and the last Kel F-800 run was made in early 2002. LANL ordered 2M$ worth of Kel-F 800 for reserves and Pantex purchased several hundred pounds to satisfy mock needs. After four years, 3M has decided to introduce a Kel-F 800-like polymer based on a new emulsifier using the same chlorotrifluoroethylene and vinylidene fluoride monomers and emulsion polymerization process. They have produced 3 batches and claim the 'new' FK-800 is indistinguishable from the 'old' Kel-F 800 in any of their testing parameters. In June-July 2006 3M scaled up a batch of about 800 pounds and have test quantities available. We have samples of the new FK-800 for evaluation. Neither wet nor dry-aminated TATB has been synthesized in the US in any significant quantity since about 1985 and significant quantities of LX-17-1 has not been formulated since about 1990. Over the last few years as part of a DOD MANTECH, ATK Thiokol and BAE Holston Army Ammunition Plant (HAAP) have produced moderate quantities of TATB ({approx}5 kg batches) with plans to scale up for DOD applications. Thiokol TATB is polycrystalline with an average particle size of about 40 m (similar to WA TATB) but HAAP TATB is only 5-6 {micro}m (similar to ultrafine). We have obtained small quantities of these materials for evaluation. The project (1) compares new FK-800 with old Kel-F 800 and FK-800 lots currently available at LLNL, (2) compares and characterizes new TATB with old TATB, (3) formulates new FK-800 with wet-aminated TATB and new TATBs in according to HAAP slurry coating procedure into LX-17-2, and (4) evaluates the mechanical and detonation performance characteristics of this insensitive high explosive (IHE). Priorities are to prove that these new materials can be formulated, pressed to density and machined; and that they contain no impurities which might cause compatibility issues. Since 3M, LANL, Pantex and AWE are currently evaluating the new FK-800, we plan to share data rather than repeating their work. Our effort is described.

DePiero, S C; Hoffman, D M

2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

366

Adhesion effect of interface layers on pattern fabrication with GeSbTe as laser thermal lithography film  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adhesion of pattern structures is a very important issue in laser thermal lithography. In this paper, Si"3N"4 and ZnS-SiO"2 were investigated as interface layers to improve patterns' adhesion to substrate on pattern fabrication with Ge"2Sb"2Te"5 as laser ... Keywords: Adhesion, GeSbTe, Interface layers, Thermal lithography, Thin films, Wet etching

Changmeng Deng; Yongyou Geng; Yiqun Wu; Yang Wang; Jinsong Wei

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Crystallization Behavior of Stochiometric and Off-stochiometric Ga-Sb-Te Materials for Phase-Change Memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stoichiometric Ga{sub 4}Sb{sub 6}Te{sub 3} and Ga-Sb materials were systematically studied. The alloy Ga{sub 4}Sb{sub 6}Te{sub 3} shows a fast crystallization speed, very high crystallization temperature, T{sub x}, and high electrical contrast. Although stoichiometric GaSb has similar performance and even faster crystallization speed, the electrical contrast is much lower. The other off-stoichiometric compounds we studied all have higher T{sub x} than Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} indicating a good amorphous stability. By raising the Sb/Te ratio with GaSb incorporation, T{sub x} and the recrystallization time of melt-quenched, amorphous samples can be effectively increased. The stoichiometric Ga{sub 4}Sb{sub 6}Te{sub 3} with less likelihood of phase-segregation compared to nonstoichiometric compounds is a promising candidate for phase-change memory.

H Cheng; S Raoux; J Jordan-Sweet

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PU Kenya KE Lesotho LT Liberia LI Libya LY Madagascar MA Malawi MI Mali ML Mauritania MR Mauritius MP Morocco MO Mozambique MZ Namibia WA Niger NG Nigeria NI Reunion ...

369

Wa s h i n g t o n Ma r r i o t t e n Me t r o C e...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wa s h i n g t o n Ma r r i o t t e n Me t r o C e n t e r F a c u l t a d d e D e r e c h o d e l a U n i v e r s i d a d d e H o w a r d C o n f e r e n c i a y P r o g r a ma d...

370

Microstructural stability in LPE Ga{sub x}In{sub (1{minus}x)}As{sub y}Sb{sub (1{minus}y)}/GaSb heterostructures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The morphological and structural characteristics associated with the growth of lattice matched In{sub x}Ga{sub (1{minus}x)}As{sub y}Sb{sub (1{minus}y)}/GaSb (100) heterostructures is presented. The experiments focused on studying the effect of growth on vicinal surfaces tilted from the exact (100) orientation as well as variations in epilayer chemistry. It was found that variations in these process parameters had very strong effects on both the nucleation characteristics of the epilayer and the atomistic scale homogeneity of the alloy. The <100> and <110> variants in compositional modulation/phase separation were detected, as well as the evolution of weak (110) ordering. These results are discussed in the context of other studies on phase stability in III-V epitaxial structures, especially in terms of surface reconstruction and kinetic effects near conditions of spinodal decomposition.

Chen, C.Y.; Bucklen, V.; Rajan, K. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Freeman, M.; Cardines, R.P. [Lockheed-Martin, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Great thermoelectric power factor enhancement of CoSb{sub 3} through the lightest metal element filling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium, the lightest metal element with a small ionic radius, is successfully filled into the voids of CoSb{sub 3} by utilizing the high pressure synthesis technique. The synthesized Li{sub 0.4}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} shows the largest thermoelectric power factor of 6000 {mu}W m{sup -1} K{sup -2} among all elemental filled CoSb{sub 3} materials. This significantly enhanced thermoelectric power factor is attributed to the large carrier mobility of Li{sub 0.4}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}, 61 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, featuring a good electron crystal property for the Li-filled CoSb{sub 3} samples.

Zhang Jianjun; Xu Bo; Wang Limin; Yu Dongli; Liu Zhongyuan; He Julong; Tian Yongjun [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China)

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

372

A novel approach for the improvement of open circuit voltage and fill factor of InGaAsSb/GaSb thermophotovoltaic cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heterojunction n-Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}As{sub 0.02}Sb{sub 098}/p-In{sub 0.16}Ga{sub 0.84}As{sub 0.04}Sb{sub 0.96} thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on n-GaSb-substrates. In the spectral range from 1 {micro}m to 2.1 {micro}m these cells, as well as homojunction n-p-In{sub 0.16}Ga{sub 0.84}As{sub 0.04}Sb{sub 0.96} cells, have demonstrated internal quantum efficiencies exceeding 80%, despite about a 200 meV barrier in the conduction band at the heterointerface. Estimation shows that the thermal emission of the electrons photogenerated in p-region over this barrier can provide high efficiency for hetero-cells if the electron recombination time in p-In{sub 0.16}Ga{sub 0.84}As{sub 0.04}Sb{sub 0.96}is longer than 10 ns. Keeping the same internal efficiency as homojunction cells, hetero-cells provide a unique opportunity to decrease the dark forward current and thereby increase open circuit voltage (V{sub {proportional_to}}) and fill factor at a given illumination level. It is shown that the decrease of the forward current in hetero-cells is due to the lower recombination rate in n-type wider-bandgap space-charge region and to the suppression of the hole component of the forward current. The improvement in V{sub {proportional_to}} reaches 100% at illumination level equivalent to 1 mA/cm{sup 2} and it decreases to 5% at the highest illumination levels (2--3 A/cm{sup 2}), where the electron current component dominates in both the homo- and heterojunction cells. Values of V{sub {proportional_to}} as high as 310 meV have been obtained for a hetero-cell at illumination levels of 3 A/cm{sup 2}. Under this condition, the expected fill factor value is about 72% for a hetero-cell with improved series resistance. The heterojunction concept provides excellent prospects for further reduction of the dark forward current in TPV cells.

Garbuzov, D.Z.; Martinelli, R.U.; Khalfin, V.; Lee, H.; Morris, N.A.; Taylor, G.C.; Connolly, J.C. [Sarnoff Corp., Princeton, NJ (United States); Charache, G.W.; DePoy, D.M. [Lockheed-Martin, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

STATEM!NT''OF CONSIDEAAT10NS REQUEST n:~!:)lHi/",!!,'fCORPORArIQN FO~ ANADVANClWA1VER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATEM!NT''OF CONSIDEAAT10NS STATEM!NT''OF CONSIDEAAT10NS REQUEST n:~!:)lHi/",!!,'fCORPORArIQN FO~ ANADVANClWA1VER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN DOE PROPOSAL NO.OE-EE0000412 W(A} 2009-:060 The OhlipC1'!ve of this project Is the and comt'nercialization of a two-phase soluttofrfQf USe with The 1 lM,C'l_""""P H'tn(;lPI'" PJJ1'l.nn""". refrig1':'rant tooling solution provides certain improvements compared to conventional air-<:ooling syslems and water-cooling systems, The totalantfetpated cost the is $901,678 with the Petitl(};l)er approximately 19.% cost sm:tre, $262,191. Thiswaive(is contingent upo.n the Petitioner rrH~intaining the foregoing cost over tneCQUfse the grant As in its wai'\l\;f petition, the ~etitfoner isa leading global supplier of air conditioning and

374

UCOP Office of Research SB 13 Notice October 10, 2005 Page 1 FACT SHEET: Chaptered Legislation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research proposals before state agencies are permitted to disclose personal information to researchers. I identifiable data from California state agencies; · UC officials who work with researchers on data security? · SB 13 places new restrictions on the circumstances under which state agencies are permitted

Russell, Lynn

375

Structural evolution and characterization of heteroepitaxial GaSb thin films on Si(111) substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the structural evolution and characterization of heteroepitaxial GaSb thin films on Si(111) substrates. The growth process used a combination of atomic sources which included the rf sputtering of Sb and the thermal effusion of Ga. The formation of crystalline GaSb thin films required that initially a monolayer thick Sb buffer layer be applied directly to a clean H-passivated Si(111) substrate surface. The resulting film was characterized by high resolution x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM images were taken from the material after several periods of growth to determine the evolution of crystal structure with thickness. Atomic force microscopy images of the film surface showed that the heteroepitaxial layers were formed via the Stranski-Krastanov growth mechanism. This result is consistent with the heteroepitaxial growth of systems representing large differences in lattice constant. The hole mobility and carrier concentration in the deposited material were determined by the Hall measurement, performed at room temperature and on a 140 nm thick sample, to be 66 cm{sup 2}/V sec and 3x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, respectively. The carrier mobility was relatively low as expected for measurements taken at room temperature.

Nguyen, Thang; Varhue, Walter; Cross, Michael; Pino, Robinson; Adams, Edward; Lavoie, Mark; Lee, Jaichan [School of Engineering, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States); IBM Corporation, Essex Junction, Vermont 05452 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sung Kyun Kwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Development of InAsSb-based light emitting diodes for chemical sensing systems  

SciTech Connect

Mid-infrared (3--6 {micro}m) LED`s are being developed for use in chemical sensor systems. As rich, InAsSb heterostructures are particularly suited for optical emitters in the mid-infrared region. The authors are investigating both InAsSb-InAs multiple quantum well (MQW) and InAsSb-InAsP strained layer superlattice (SLS) structures for use as the active region for light emitting diodes (LED`s). The addition of phosphorus to the InAs barriers increases the light and heavy hole splitting and hence reduces non-radiative Auger recombination and provides for better electron and hole confinement in the InAsSb quantum well. Low temperature (< 20 K) photoluminescence (PL) emission from MQW structures is observed between 3.2 to 6.0 {micro}m for InAsSb wells between 70 to 100 {angstrom} and antimony mole fractions between 0.04 to 0.18. Room temperature PL has been observed to 6.4 {micro}m in MQW structures. The additional confinement by InAsP barriers results in low temperature PL being observed over a narrower range (3.2 to 5.0 {micro}m) for the similar well thicknesses with antimony mole fractions between 0.10 to 0.24. Room temperature photoluminescence was observed to 5.8 {micro}m in SLS structures. The addition of a p-AlAsSb layer between the n-type active region (MQW or SLS) and a p-GaAsSb contact layer improves electron confinement of the active region and increases output power by a factor of 4. Simple LED emitters have been fabricated which exhibit an average power at room temperature of > 100 {micro}W at 4.0 {micro}m for SLS active regions. These LED`s have been used to detect CO{sub 2} concentrations down to 24 ppm in a first generation, non-cryogenic sensor system. They will report on the development of novel LED device designs that are expected to lead to further improvements in output power.

Allerman, A.A.; Kurtz, S.R.; Biefeld, R.M.; Baucom, K.C.; Burkhatt, J.H.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Crystal structure and chemical bonding of the intermetallic Zintl phase Yb[subscript 11]AlSb[subscript 9  

SciTech Connect

High resolution single crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data measured at 15(2) K were used to solve the structure of the complex intermetallic Zintl phase, Yb{sub 11}AlSb{sub 9} (space group Iba2), made up of Yb cations and polyanions along with isolated Sb anions. The 15(2) K cell parameters are a = 11.7383(4) {angstrom}, b = 12.3600(4) {angstrom}, c = 16.6796(6) {angstrom}. The temperature dependence of the structure was investigated through high resolution synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) data measured from 90 K to 1000 K. Rietveld refinements of the crystal structure revealed near linear thermal expansion of Yb{sub 11}AlSb{sub 9} with expansion coefficients of 1.49(2) x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1}, 1.71(3) x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1}, 1.13(1) x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1} for a, b and c, respectively. The chemical bonding in Yb{sub 11}AlSb{sub 9} was analyzed using atomic Hirshfeld surfaces, and the analysis supports the presence of the structural elements of Yb cations, [AlSb{sub 4}]{sup 9-} tetrahedra, [Sb{sub 2}]{sup 4-} dimers and isolated Sb{sup 3-} anions. However, indications of interatomic interactions between the Zintl anions and the Yb cations were also observed.

Kastbjerg, Sofie; Uvarov, Catherine A.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Nishibori, Eiji; Spackman, Mark A.; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt (Aarhus); (UWA); (UCD); (UC); (Nagoya)

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

378

High pressure transport characteristics of Bi[subscript 2]Te[subscript 3], Sb[subscript 2]Te[subscript 3], and BiSbTe[subscript 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents ambient and high pressure measurements of transport properties of the Bi2Te3-Sb2Te3 series of materials. The electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient have been measured on both end compounds and the direct solid solution of the two at pressure up to 10 GPa. An additional discussion involving the high pressure structure will be presented. From this, it was determined that these materials undergo at least two structural phase transitions between 0 and 20 GPa and a discussion is presented regarding this and the changes in the transport properties.

Jacobsen, M.K.; Sinogeikin, S.V.; Kumar, R.S.; Cornelius, A.L. (UNLV); (CIW)

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

379

Optical anisotropy of GaSb type-II nanorods on vicinal (111)B GaAs  

SciTech Connect

We form self-assembled GaSb type-II nanorods on a vicinal (111)B GaAs substrate by molecular beam epitaxy and study their optical anisotropy. The GaSb nanorods are elongated and aligned along the [-1 0 1] direction, where the average length, width, and height are about 84, 30, and 2.5 nm. In polarized photoluminescence (PL) measurements, the peak of the GaSb nanorods is observed at about 1.1 eV, where the PL intensity is largest for the [-1 0 1] polarization and smallest for the polarization perpendicular to it. The degree of polarization is more than 20% and depends on the recombination energy. By comparing with a theoretical model based on 4 x 4 Luttinger-Kohn Hamiltonian, we find that the experimental results are explained by considering the Sb/As inter-diffusion and the nanorod height distribution.

Kawazu, Takuya; Noda, Takeshi; Mano, Takaaki; Sakuma, Yoshiki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Akiyama, Yoshihiro [Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Sakaki, Hiroyuki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya (Japan)

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

380

Coherent optical phonon spectroscopy studies of femtosecond-laser modified Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We performed time-resolved reflectivity measurements to monitor changes in optical phonon modes in Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films under femtosecond laser irradiation. We found that a phonon mode at 3.64 THz appears after high-fluence laser irradiation, in addition to the phonon modes of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. We determined that the additional mode is due to Te segregation as a result of laser-induced decomposition of the Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film. This experiment clearly illustrates the irreversible effects of femtosecond laser irradiation during the measurement of coherent optical phonon dynamics in Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}.

Li Yuwei; Wang Guoyu [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion, University of Michigan, Michigan 48109 (United States); Stoica, Vladimir A. [Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion, University of Michigan, Michigan 48109 (United States); Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Endicott, Lynn [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Uher, Ctirad; Clarke, Roy [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion, University of Michigan, Michigan 48109 (United States); Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Molecular beam epitaxial growth of metamorphic AlInSb/GaInSb high-electron-mobility-transistor structures on GaAs substrates for low power and high frequency applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on molecular beam epitaxial growth of AlInSb/GaInSb metamorphic high-electron-mobility-transistor structures for low power, high frequency applications on 4 in. GaAs substrates. The structures consist of a Ga{sub 0.4}In{sub 0.6}Sb channel embedded in Al{sub 0.4}In{sub 0.6}Sb barrier layers which are grown on top of an insulating metamorphic buffer, which is based on the linear exchange of Ga versus In and a subsequent exchange of As versus Sb. Precise control of group V fluxes and substrate temperature in the Al{sub 0.4}In{sub 0.6}As{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} buffer is essential to achieve high quality device structures. Good morphological properties were achieved demonstrated by the appearance of crosshatching and root mean square roughness values of 2.0 nm. Buffer isolation is found to be >100 k{Omega}/{open_square} for optimized growth conditions. Hall measurements at room temperature reveal electron densities of 2.8x10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} in the channel at mobility values of 21.000 cm{sup 2}/V s for single-sided Te volume doping and 5.4x10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} and 17.000 cm{sup 2}/V s for double-sided Te {delta}-doping, respectively.

Loesch, R.; Aidam, R.; Kirste, L.; Leuther, A. [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid-State Physics (IAF), Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Glass-like phonon scattering from a spontaneous nanostructure in AgSbTe2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials with very low thermal conductivity are of high interest for both thermoelectric and optical phase-change applications. Synthetic nanostructuring is most promising to suppress thermal conductivity by scattering phonons, but challenges remain in producing bulk samples. We show that in crystalline AgSbTe2, a spontaneously-forming nanostructure leads to a suppression of thermal conductivity to a glass-like level. Our mappings of phonon mean-free-paths provide a novel bottom- up microscopic account of thermal conductivity, and also reveal intrinsic anisotropies associated with the nanostructure. Ground-state degeneracy in AgSbTe2 leads to the natural formation of nanoscale domains with different orderings on the cation sublattice, and correlated atomic displacements, which efficiently scatter phonons. This mechanism is general and points to a new avenue in nano- scale engineering of materials, to achieve low thermal conductivities for efficient thermoelectric converters and phase-change memory devices.

Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Ehlers, Georg [ORNL; Huq, Ashfia [ORNL; Ma, Jie [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Hong, Tao [ORNL; Tian, Wei [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Mid-infrared InAs/AlGaSb superlattice quantum-cascade lasers  

SciTech Connect

We report on the demonstration of mid-infrared InAs/AlGaSb superlattice quantum-cascade lasers operating at 10 {mu}m. The laser structures are grown on n-InAs (100) substrate by solid-source molecular-beam epitaxy. An InAs/AlGaSb chirped superlattice structure providing a large oscillator strength and fast carrier depopulation is employed as the active part. The observed minimum threshold current density at 80 K is 0.7 kA/cm{sup 2}, and the maximum operation temperature in pulse mode is 270 K. The waveguide loss of an InAs plasmon waveguide is estimated, and the factors that determine the operation temperature are discussed.

Ohtani, K.; Fujita, K.; Ohno, H. [Laboratory for Nanoelectronics and Semiconductor Spintronics, Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan)

2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

384

Time resolved magneto-optical studies of ferromagnetic InMnSb films  

SciTech Connect

We report time resolved magneto-optical measurements in InMnSb ferromagnetic films with 2% and 2.8% Mn contents grown by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy. In order to probe a possible interaction between the spins of photoexcited carriers and the Mn ions, we measured spin dynamics before and after aligning the Mn ions by applying an external magnetic field at temperatures above and below the samples' Curie temperatures. We observed no significant temperature or magnetic field dependence in the relaxation times and attribute the observed dynamics entirely to the relaxation of photoexcited electrons in the conduction band where the s-d coupling with the localized Mn ions is significantly weaker compared to the p-d exchange coupling. We observed several differences in the optical response of our InMnSb samples which could have been influenced mainly by the samples' growth conditions.

Frazier, M.; Kini, R. N.; Nontapot, K.; Khodaparast, G. A. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Wojtowicz, T. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Liu, X.; Furdyna, J. K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

385

Relating x-ray attenuation measurements to water content and distribution in SB-15D core  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Making improved estimates of the water content of The Geysers reservoir is fundamental to efficient and economic long term production of steam power from the resource. A series of coordinated physical properties measurements form core recovered from the SB-15D, reported in this volume in a series of papers, have been made to better understand water storage and to relate water content and distribution to observable geophysical properties such as electrical conductivity and seismic velocities. A principal objective here is to report new interpretations of x-ray scans made within 72 hours of core recovery from SB-15D, which suggest, taking advantage of preliminary measurements of capillary suction for metagraywacke, that water content was low in much of the preserved core.

Bonner, B.P.; Roberts, J.J.; Schneberk, D.J

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Type-I superconductivity in YbSb2 single crystals  

SciTech Connect

We present evidence of type-I superconductivity in YbSb2 single crystals from dc and ac magnetization, heat capacity, and resistivity measurements. The critical temperature and critical field are determined to be Tc? 1.3 K and Hc? 55 Oe. A small Ginzburg-Landau parameter ?= 0.05, together with typical magnetization isotherms of type-I superconductors, small critical field values, a strong differential paramagnetic effect signal, and a field-induced change from second- to first-order phase transition, confirms the type-I nature of the superconductivity in YbSb2. A possible second superconducting state is observed in the radio-frequency susceptibility measurements, with Tc(2)? 0.41 K and Hc(2)? 430 Oe.

Zhao, Liang L.; Lausberg, Stefan; Kim, Hyunsoo; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Brando, Manuel; Prozorov, Ruslan; Morosan, E.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

387

Time-course analysis of the Shewanella amazonensis SB2B proteome in response to sodium chloride shock  

SciTech Connect

Organisms in the genus Shewanella have become models for response to environmental stress. One of the most important environmental stresses is change in osmolarity. In this study, we experimentally determine the response mechanisms of Shewanella amazonensis SB2B during osmotic stress. Osmotic stress in SB2B was induced through exposure to NaCl, and the time-course proteomics response was measured using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Protein trends were qualitatively compared to gene expression trends and to phenotypic characterization. Osmotic stress affects motility, and has also been associated with a change in the membrane fatty acid composition (due to induction of branched chain amino acid degradation pathways); however, we show this is not the case for SB2B. Although proteins and genes involved with branched chain amino acid degradation are induced, fatty acid degradation pathways are not induced and no change in the fatty acid profile occurs in SB2B as a result of osmotic shock. The most extensive response of SB2B over the time course of acclimation to high salt involves an orchestrated sequence of events comprising increased expression of signal transduction associated with motility and restricted cell division and DNA replication. After SB2B has switched to increased branched chain amino acid degradation, motility, and cellular replication proteins return to pre-perturbed levels.

Parnell, John J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Rompato, Giovanni; Nicora, Carrie D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Williamson, Ashley; Pfrender, Michael E.

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

388

Subpicosecond spin relaxation in GaAsSb multiple quantum wells K. C. Hall,a)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subpicosecond spin relaxation in GaAsSb multiple quantum wells K. C. Hall,a) S. W. Leonard, and H quantum wells are measured at 295 K using time-resolved circular dichroism induced by 1.5 m, 100 fs pulses times shorter than those in InGaAs and InGaAsP wells with similar band gaps. The shorter relaxation

Van Driel, Henry M.

389

Elastic Properties of the Zintl Ferromagnet Yb14MnSb11  

SciTech Connect

We report measurements of the elastic moduli as a function of temperature (5-300) K and magnetic field (0-2 T) for the Zintl ferromagnet Yb{sub 14}MnSb{sub 11}, which is believed to be a rare example of an underscreened Kondo lattice. The elastic moduli measured below the Curie temperature in this complex ferromagnet exhibit unusual lattice stiffening that is independent of the magnetic field and can be adequately modeled using the Landau theory.

Bhattacharya, Sriparna [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Marinescu, D. C. [Clemson University; Morris, James R [ORNL; Sergienko, Ivan A [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL; Mandrus, D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Keppens, V. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Tool development and application: pressure, temperature, spectral gamma ray logging of the SB-15 well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia`s involvement with downhole instrumentation dates from the mid 1970s when work was centered on the development of a high-temperature acoustic borehole televiewer, and the establishment of a list of high- temperature component parts such as resistors, integrated circuits, and sensors. This work evolved into the development of memory logging devices for the US Continental Scientific Drilling Program. These tools were of low cost and very easy to use. Their deployment resulted in scientific advancement in understanding geothermal formations, and a thrust of the current program is to move memory tools from the scientific realm to the commercial environment. The tools developed and utilized in the SB-15 well among other field tests are completely self- contained in that power is obtained from batteries and data are stored in an electronic memory system. Three memory tools form the backbone of the initial Sandia tool suite. Pressure/temperature measurements are necessary for the evaluation of geothermal reservoirs, and they are relatively simple to make. Thus, the initial Sandia program concentrated on such a tool, and it has been successfully used in SB-15. This tool will form the basis for future tools since many engineering principles were proven in its evolution. This pressure/temperature tool combination is very useful in characterizing the geothermal reservoir. Another tool in the Sandia suite measures the natural gamma rays from the formation. This spectral gamma ray tool is useful in defining lithology, paleoflows, and certain clays. SB-15 well logging history and a preliminary interpretation of the data is presented in this report.

Sattler, A.R.; Norman, R.; Henfling, J.A.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Pairing phenomenon in doubly odd neutron rich {sup 136}Sb nucleus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on p-n and n-n pairing gap energies giving by K. Kaneko et al. (2003), we make modifications on the kh5082 interaction. Calculations and study of some nuclear properties for {sup 136}Sb nucleus are developed in the framework of the nuclear shell model by means of OXBASH structure code. We get the same energetic sequence as the recent experimental values of single particle energies. The effective charge values e{sub p}=1.35e and e{sub n}=0.9e, and factors given by V. I. Isakov are used to evaluate multipole electromagnetic moments.

Laouet, N.; Benrachi, F. [Laboratoire de Physique Mathematique et Subatomique Mentouri University, Constantine (Algeria)

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

392

Grain refinement and texture development of cast bi90sb10 alloy via severe plastic deformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to study learn about grain refinement mechanisms and texture development in cast n-type Bi90Sb10 alloy caused by severe plastic deformation. The practical objective is to produce a fine grained and textured microstructure in Bi90Sb10 alloy with enhanced thermoelectric performance and mechanical strength. In the study, twelve millimeter diameter cast bars of Bi90Sb10 alloy were encapsulated in square cross section aluminum 6061 alloy containers. The composite bars were equal channel angular (ECAE) extruded through a 90 degree angle die at high homologous temperature. Various extrusion conditions were studied including punch speed (0.1, 0.3 and 0.6 in/min), extrusion temperature (220, 235 and 250oC), number of extrusion passes (1, 2 and 4), route (A, BC and C), and exit channel area reduction ratio (half and quarter area of inlet channel). The affect of an intermediate long term heat treatment (for 100 hours at 250oC under 10-3 torr vacuum) was explored. Processed materials were characterized by optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, wavelength dispersive spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Texture was analyzed using the {006} reflection plane to identify the orientation of the basal poles in processed materials. The cast grains were irregularly shaped, had a grain size of hundreds-of-microns to millimeters, and showed inhomogeneous chemical composition. Severe plastic deformation refines the cast grains through dynamic recrystallization and causes the development of a bimodal microstructure consisting of fine grains (5-30 micron) and coarse grains (50-300 micron). ECAE processing of homogenizied Bi-Sb alloy causes grain refinement and produces a more uniform microstructure. Texture results show that ECAE route C processing gives a similar or slightly stronger texture than ECAE route A processing. In both cases, the basal-plane poles become aligned with the shear direction. Reduction area exit channel extrusion is more effective for both grain refinement and texture enhancement than simple ECAE processing.

Im, Jae-taek

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Characterization of the environmental fate of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kaurstaki (Btk) after pest eradication efforts in Seattle, WA and Fairfax county, VA  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the fate of biological agents in the environment will be critical to recovery and restoration efforts after a biological attack. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is conducting experiments in the Seattle, WA and Fairfax County, VA areas to study agent fate in urban environments. As part of their gypsy moth suppression efforts, Washington State and Fairfax County have sprayed Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Btk), a common organic pesticide for decades. Many of the spray zones have been in or near urban areas. LANL has collected surface and bulk samples from historical Seattle spray zones to characterize how long Btk persists at detectable levels in the environment, and how long it remains viable in different environmental matrices. This work will attempt to address three questions. First, how long does the agent remain viable at detectable levels? Second, what is the approximate magnitude and duration of resuspension? And third, does the agent transport into buildings? Data designed to address the first question will be presented. Preliminary results indicate Btk remains viable in the environment for at least two years.

Ticknor, Lawrence [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Van Cuyk, Sheila M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Deshpande, Alina [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Omberg, Kristin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Growth of an {alpha}-Sn film on an InSb(111) A-(2x2) surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated the initial growth process of {alpha}-Sn films on the In-terminated InSb(111)A-(2x2) surface using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and high-resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy. Taking the LEED observation and the Sn coverage-dependent integrated intensities of the In 4d, Sb 4d, and Sn 4d core-level spectra into account, we conclude that the {alpha}-Sn film grows epitaxially by a bilayer mode and that there is no interdiffusion of the substrate atoms as suggested in the literature. Furthermore, the coverage-dependent In 4d and Sn 4d core levels indicate that the In vacancy site of InSb(111)A-(2x2) surface is not the preferable Sn absorption site.

Kondo, Daiyu; Sakamoto, Kazuyuki; Shima, Masahide; Takeyama, Wakaba [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Nakamura, Kenya; Ono, Kanta; Oshima, Masaharu [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kasukabe, Yoshitaka [Department of Electronic Engineering/International Student Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Intersubband Transitions in Narrow InAs/AlSb Quantum Wells D. C. Larrabee, J. Tang, M. Liang, G. A. Khodaparast, J. Kono  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intersubband Transitions in Narrow InAs/AlSb Quantum Wells D. C. Larrabee, J. Tang, M. Liang, G. A investigated intersubband transitions (ISBTs) in InAs/AlSb multiple quantum wells with well widths from 2.1 to 10 nm. The ISBT energy increased with decreasing well width and temperature. To explain these well

Kono, Junichiro

396

Electrodeposition of Ni5Sb2 nanowires array and its application as a high-performance anode material for lithium ion batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single crystal Ni"5Sb"2 nanowires array is synthesized by direct-current electrodeposition technique. The initial specific discharge and charge capacity of the as-produced Ni"5Sb"2 nanowires array electrode as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries ... Keywords: Anode, Array structure, Charge/discharge capacity, Lithium-ion batteries, Nanowires

You-Wen Yang; Tian-Ying Li; Fei Liu; Wen-Bin Zhu; Xue-Liang Li; Yu-Cheng Wu; Ming-Guang Kong

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

GaSb-based Type-I QW LEDs and addressable arrays operated at wavelengths up to 3.66 m  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sb-based quantum wells (QW) light emitting diodes (LED) and LED arrays operating at room temperature at wavelengths. Kipshidze, D.Westerfeld, D. Snyder, M.Johnson, G. Belenky, "GaSb-Based Type I Quantum Well Light Emitting Diode Addressable Array Operated at Wavelengths up to 3.66 µm", IEEE Photonics Technol. Lett. 21, 1087

398

Magnetic order near 270 K in mineral and synthetic Mn{sub 2}FeSbO{sub 6} ilmenite  

SciTech Connect

The structural and magnetic properties of Mn{sub 2}FeSbO{sub 6} single-crystalline mineral and ceramic samples synthesized under thermobaric treatment have been investigated, and compared to theoretical predictions based on first-principles electronic structure calculations. This ilmenite system displays a sharp magnetic transition just below the room temperature related to a ferrimagnetic ordering of the Mn{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} cations, which makes Mn{sub 2}FeSbO{sub 6} a promising candidate for designing functional magnetic materials.

Mathieu, R.; Hudl, M.; Nordblad, P. [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Ivanov, S. A. [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Inorganic Materials, Karpov' Institute of Physical Chemistry, Vorontsovo pole, 10 105064, Moscow K-64 (Russian Federation); Bazuev, G. V. [Institute of Solid-State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, 620999, Ekaterinburg GSP-145 (Russian Federation); Lazor, P. [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villavaegen 16, SE-75236 Uppsala (Sweden); Solovyev, I. V. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

399

Design and fabrication of 6.1-.ANG. family semiconductor devices using semi-insulating A1Sb substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For the first time, an aluminum antimonide (AlSb) single crystal substrate is utilized to lattice-match to overlying semiconductor layers. The AlSb substrate establishes a new design and fabrication approach to construct high-speed, low-power electronic devices while establishing inter-device isolation. Such lattice matching between the substrate and overlying semiconductor layers minimizes the formation of defects, such as threaded dislocations, which can decrease the production yield and operational life-time of 6.1-.ANG. family heterostructure devices.

Sherohman, John W. (Livermore, CA); Coombs, III, Arthur W. (Patterson, CA); Yee, Jick Hong (Livermore, CA); Wu, Kuang Jen J. (Cupertino, CA)

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

400

In-situ Reflectance Monitoring of GaSb Substrate Oxide Desorption  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of specular reflectance to monitor GaSb substrate oxide desorption in-situ is reported. Substrates were loaded into the organometallic vapor phase epitaxy reactor either as-received (epi-ready) or after receiving a solvent degrease, acid etch and rinse. A variety of surface preparations and anneal conditions were investigated. HCL was used as the etchant, and in certain cases was followed by an additional etch in Br{sub 2}-HCl-HNO{sub 3}-CH{sub 3}COOH for comparison. Rinse comparisons included 2-propanol, methanol, and deionized water. Substrates were heated to either 525, 550, or 575 C. Features observed in the in-situ reflectance associated with the oxide desorption process were interpreted based on the starting oxide chemistry and thickness. Based on in-situ reflectance and ex-situ atomic force microscopy data, a recommendation on a reproducible GaSb substrate preparation technique suitable for high-quality epitaxial growth is suggested.

C.J. Vineis; C.A. Wang; K.F. Jensen

2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Thermoelectric and thermodynamic properties of half-Heulser alloy YPdSb from first principles calculations  

SciTech Connect

The structural, electronic, thermoelectric and thermodynamic properties of ternary half-Heusler compound YPdSb are investigated using the first principle calculations. It is found that YPdSb is an indirect semiconductor. The calculated band gap is 0.161 eV with spin-orbital coupling including and 0.235 eV without spin-orbital coupling including, respectively. The electronic transport properties are obtained via Boltzman transport theory. The predicted Seebeck coefficient is 240 {mu}V/K and the thermoelectric performance can be optimized by n-type doping at room temperature. Moreover, the lattice dynamical results regarding the phonon dispersion curves, phonon density of states and thermodynamic properties are reported. Thermodynamics (heat capacity and Debye temperature) as well as mean phonon free path and the thermal conductivity in a temperature range of 0-300 K are determined. - Graphical Abstract: (a) The dependence of the Seebeck coefficient on chemical potential at 300 K. (b) The dependence of the thermopower factor on chemical potential at 300 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Seebeck coefficient and the thermopower factor are calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lattice dynamics and thermodynamic properties are obtained.

Kong, Fanjie, E-mail: fanjiekong@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China)] [Department of Physics, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Hu, Yanfei [School of Science, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China)] [School of Science, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Hou, Haijun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Liu, Yanhua [School of information engineering, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China)] [School of information engineering, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Wang, Baolin [Department of Physics, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China)] [Department of Physics, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Wang, Lili [Computer Application Institute of CAEP, Academy of Engineering Physics of China, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Computer Application Institute of CAEP, Academy of Engineering Physics of China, Mianyang 621900 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Optical anisotropy of InAs/GaSb broken-gap quantum wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate in detail the optical anisotropy of absorption of linearly polarized light in InAs/GaSb quantum wells grown on GaSb along the [001] direction, which can be used as an active region of different laser structures. The energy level positions, the wave functions, the optical matrix elements, and the absorption coefficients are calculated using the eight-band k {center_dot} p model and the Burt-Foreman envelope function theory. In these calculations, the Schroedinger and Poisson equations are solved self-consistently taking the lattice-mismatched strain into account. We find that a realistic Hamiltonian, which has the C{sub 2v} symmetry, results in considerable anisotropy of optical matrix elements for different directions of light polarization and different directions of the initial-state in-plane wave vector, including low-symmetry directions. We trace how the optical matrix elements and absorption are modified when spin-orbit interaction and important symmetry breaking mechanisms are taken into account (structural inversion asymmetry, bulk inversion asymmetry, and interface Hamiltonian). These mechanisms result in an almost 100% anisotropy of the absorption coefficients as the light polarization vector rotates in the plane of the structure and in a plane normal to the interfaces.

Zakharova, A. A., E-mail: anna.alex.zakharova@gmail.com; Semenikhin, I. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation); Chao, K. A. [Lund University, Department of Physics (Sweden)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

SeZnSb alloy and its nano tubes, graphene composites properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Composite can alter the individual element physical property, could be useful to define the specific use of the material. Therefore, work demonstrates the synthesis of a new composition Se{sub 96}-Zn{sub 2}-Sb{sub 2} and its composites with 0.05% multi-walled carbon nano tubes and 0.05% bilayer graphene, in the glassy form. The diffused amorphous structure of the multi walled carbon nano tubes and bilayer gaphene in the Se{sub 96}-Zn{sub 2}-Sb{sub 2} alloy have been analyzed by using the Raman, X-ray photoluminescence spectroscopy, Furrier transmission infrared spectra, photoluminescence, UV/visible absorption spectroscopic measurements. The diffused prime Raman bands (G and D) have been appeared for the multi walled carbon nano tubes and graphene composites, while the X-ray photoluminescence core energy levels peak shifts have been observed for the composite materials. Subsequently the photoluminescence property at room temperature and a drastic enhancement (upto 80%) in infrared transmission percentage has been obtained for the bilayer graphene composite, along with optical energy band gaps for these materials have been evaluated 1.37, 1.39 and 1.41 eV.

Singh, Abhay Kumar [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Physics, Bangalore-560012 (India)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on GaSb using in situ hydrogen plasma exposure  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we study the effectiveness of hydrogen plasma surface treatments for improving the electrical properties of GaSb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfaces. Prior to atomic layer deposition of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectric, p-GaSb surfaces were exposed to hydrogen plasmas in situ, with varying plasma powers, exposure times, and substrate temperatures. Good electrical interfaces, as indicated by capacitance-voltage measurements, were obtained using higher plasma powers, longer exposure times, and increasing substrate temperatures up to 250 Degree-Sign C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the most effective treatments result in decreased SbO{sub x}, decreased Sb, and increased GaO{sub x} content at the interface. This in situ hydrogen plasma surface preparation improves the semiconductor/insulator electrical interface without the use of wet chemical pretreatments and is a promising approach for enhancing the performance of Sb-based devices.

Ruppalt, Laura B.; Cleveland, Erin R.; Champlain, James G.; Prokes, Sharka M.; Brad Boos, J.; Park, Doewon; Bennett, Brian R. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

405

Ba{sub 5}Ti{sub 12}Sb{sub 19+x}, a polar intermetallic compound with a stuffed gamma-brass structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The polar intermetallic compound Ba{sub 5}Ti{sub 12}Sb{sub 19+x} (xbrass type with a primitive cell. A complex three-dimensional framework of Ti atoms, in the form of linked planar Ti{sub 9} clusters, is stuffed within the gamma-brass-type Ba-Sb substructure. Notwithstanding its relationship to the gamma-brass structure, the compound does not appear to conform to the Hume-Rothery electron concentration rules. Band structure calculations on an idealized Ba{sub 5}Ti{sub 12}Sb{sub 19} model suggest that the availability of bonding states above the Fermi level is responsible for the partial occupation, but only to a limited degree, of an additional Sb site within the structure. Magnetic measurements indicated Pauli paramagnetic behaviour. - A gamma-brass substructure built up of Ba-Sb clusters is stuffed with planar Ti{sub 9} clusters.

Bie Haiying [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G2 (Canada); Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.c [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G2 (Canada)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Hole mobility enhancement in In0.41 Ga0.59 Sb quantum-well field-effect transistors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact of ?110? uniaxial strain on the characteristics of p-channel In[subscript 0.41]Ga[subscript 0.59]Sb quantum-well field-effect transistors (QW-FETs) is studied through chip-bending experiments. Uniaxial strain ...

Xia, Ling

407

Effects of filling in CoSb[subscript 3]: Local structure, band gap, and phonons from first principles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use ab initio computations to investigate the effect of filler ions on the properties of CoSb3 skutterudites. We analyze global and local structural effects of filling, using the Ba-filled system as an example. We show ...

Kozinsky, Boris

408

High capacity, reversible alloying reactions in SnSb/C nanocomposites for Na-ion battery applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new SnSb/C nanocomposite based on Na alloying reactions is demonstrated as anode for Na-ion battery applications. The electrode can achieve an exceptionally high capacity (544 mA h g{sup -1}, almost double that of intercalation carbon materials), good rate capacity and cyclability (80% capacity retention over 50 cycles) for Na-ion storage.

Xiao, Lifen; Cao, Yuliang; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Wei; Kovarik, Libor; Nie, Zimin; Liu, Jun

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

409

SLUDGE BATCH 7 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION: RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB7 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL  

SciTech Connect

Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Seven (SB7) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB7 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB6. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter qualification sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-10-125) received on September 18, 2010. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. With consultation from the Liquid Waste Organization, the qualification sample was then modified by several washes and decants, which included addition of Pu from H Canyon and sodium nitrite per the Tank Farm corrosion control program. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task III.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB7 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. The results presented in this report are those necessary for DWPF to assess if the Tank 51 SB7 sample prepared at SRNL meets the requirements for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program. Concentrations are given for thirty-four radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated.

Pareizs, J.; Hay, M.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

410

AlSb thin films as negative electrodes for Li-ion and Na-ion batteries  

SciTech Connect

The electrochemical reactions between Li and Na with amorphous/nanocrystalline AlSb thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering are reported for the first time. The films are composed of AlSb and Sb nanoparticles embedded into an amorphous matrix with an overall Sb/Al ratio of 1.13. The reaction with Li proceeds with an average reaction potential of 0.65 V, a reversible capacity of 750 mAh g-1, and very fast reaction kinetics. For instance, a storage capacity close to 500 mAh g-1, corresponding to 70% of the maximum capacity, is achieved at 125 C-rate. In addition, there is only a small increase in overpotentials with increasing current: ~0.15 V at 12 C and ~0.7 V at 125 C. In contrast, the reaction with Na results in average reaction potential of 0.5 V and a storage capacity of 500 mAh g-1 obtained at low currents. The capacity retention and reaction kinetics are presently not satisfactory with pronounced capacity losses upon cycling and large overpotentials with increasing current. The capacity retention can be improved by using fluoroethylene carbonate additive in the Na-ion electrolyte, which highlights that the Solid Electrolyte Interphase plays an important role for the electrode cycling stability. The reaction kinetics is relatively poor and an increase in overpotentials of about 0.9 V at 2 C is observed (retained capacity of about 350 mAh g-1 or 66% of the maximum). The study of the reaction mechanism on thick films (3-5 m) by X-ray diffraction reveals that the electrode material remains amorphous at all potentials. The presence of broad humps, located at the positions expected for Li-Al and Li-Sb line compounds, suggests that during the reaction with Li the atomic short range ordering is similar to the expected phases.

Baggetto, Loic [ORNL; Marszewski, Michal [Kent State University; Gorka, Joanna [ORNL; Jaroniec, Mietek [Kent State University; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Ab initio calculations and synthesis of the off-stoichiometric half-Heusler phase Ni{sub 1-x}Mn{sub 1+x}Sb  

SciTech Connect

We perform a combined theoretical and experimental study of the phase stability and magnetism of the off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 1-x}Mn{sub 1+x}Sb in the half-Heusler crystal phase. Our work is motivated by the need for strategies to engineer the magnetism of potentially half-metallic materials, such as NiMnSb, for improved performance at elevated temperatures. By means of ab initio calculations we investigate Ni{sub 1-x}Mn{sub 1+x}Sb over the whole composition range 0{<=}x{<=}1 of Ni replacing Mn and show that at relevant temperatures, the half-Heusler phase should be thermodynamically stable up to at least x=0.20 with respect to the competing C38 structure of Mn{sub 2}Sb. Furthermore we find that half-Heusler Ni{sub 1-x}Mn{sub 1+x}Sb retains half-metallic band structure over the whole concentration range and that the magnetic moments of substitutional Mn{sub Ni} atoms display magnetic exchange interactions an order of magnitude larger than the Ni-Mn interaction in NiMnSb. We also demonstrate experimentally that the alloys indeed can be created by synthesizing off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 1-x}Mn{sub 1+x}Sb films on MgO substrates by means of magnetron sputtering.

Ekholm, M.; Larsson, P.; Alling, B.; Helmersson, U.; Abrikosov, I. A. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linkoeping University, SE-58183 Linkoeping (Sweden)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Spectroscopy and capacitance measurements of tunneling resonances in an Sb-implanted point contact.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We fabricated a split-gate defined point contact in a double gate enhancement mode Si-MOS device, and implanted Sb donor atoms using a self-aligned process. E-beam lithography in combination with a timed implant gives us excellent control over the placement of dopant atoms, and acts as a stepping stone to focused ion beam implantation of single donors. Our approach allows us considerable latitude in experimental design in-situ. We have identified two resonance conditions in the point contact conductance as a function of split gate voltage. Using tunneling spectroscopy, we probed their electronic structure as a function of temperature and magnetic field. We also determine the capacitive coupling between the resonant feature and several gates. Comparison between experimental values and extensive quasi-classical simulations constrain the location and energy of the resonant level. We discuss our results and how they may apply to resonant tunneling through a single donor.

Wendt, Joel Robert; Rahman, Rajib; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Eng, Kevin; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Young, Ralph Watson; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Stalford, Harold Lenn; Bishop, Nathaniel; Bielejec, Edward Salvador

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Lattice dynamics and anomalous softening in the YbFe4Sb12 skutterudite  

SciTech Connect

The lattice dynamics of the filled skutterudite YbFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} was studied by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and an anomalous softening in the temperature dependence of the elastic constants at {approx}50 K was observed. This anomaly can not be explained by the dynamics of the filler, in contrast to other filled skutterudites. We have further investigated the origin of this anomaly using macroscopic and microscopic measurements. A rearrangement of the spectral weight of the Yb phonon states was observed in the temperature dependence of the density of phonon states, obtained by inelastic neutron scattering. We suggest that the anomaly is due to a change of the Yb valence state and that the anomaly and the phonon spectral weight rearrangement have the same origin.

Mochel, A. [Julich Center for Neutron Science, Julich, Germany; Sergueev, I. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF); Wille, H. -C. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF); Voigt, J. [Julich Center for Neutron Science, Julich, Germany; Prager, M. [Julich Center for Neutron Science, Julich, Germany; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL; Guguchia, Z. [Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia; Shengelaya, A. [Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia; Keppens, V. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hermann, Raphael P. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

MBE growth of GaInAsSb p/n junction diodes for thermophotovoltaic applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports recent progress in the development of quaternary III-V thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices based on MBE grown Ga{sub x}In{sub 1{minus}x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y}. TPV is of great interest for a variety of applications. The objective of this work is to develop a TPV cell which is tunable to the emission spectrum of a heated blackbody, at temperatures in the range of 1200--1473 K. One aspect of this tuning is to match the band gap, E{sub gap}, of the photovoltaic device to the peak output of the heat source., An advantage of the quarternary III-V semiconductor systems is that devices can be fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy on a suitable binary substrate, such as GaSb or InAs, and the band gap and lattice constant can be adjusted more or less independently, to match requirements. Quarternary cells, with band-gaps in the 0.5 to 0.72 eV range, have been fabricated and tested. For 0.54 eV devices the authors obtained V{sub oc} = 0.3 V and I{sub sc} = 1.5 amperes/cm{sup 2} under infrared illumination of a 1200 K blackbody. Under high illumination levels the V{sub oc} and I{sub sc} ranged from 0.5 V at 3 amperes/cm{sup 2} for 0.72 eV devices to 0.31 V at 1.2 amperes/cm{sup 2} for 0.5 eV devices, indicating good photovoltaic device characteristics over the range of bandgaps. The diode ideality factor for 0.54 eV devices ranged from 2.45 at low illumination indicating tunneling-dominated dark current, to 1.7 at high illumination intensity indicating recombination-generation dominated dark currents.

Uppal, P.N. [Lockheed Martin Labs., Baltimore, MD (United States); Charache, G.; Baldasaro, P.; Campbell, B. [Lockheed Martin, Schenectady, NY (United States); Loughin, S. [Lockheed Martin Astro Space, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Svensson, S. [ARL, Adelphi, MD (United States); Gill, D. [National Semiconductor, Annapolis Junction, MD (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Electronic and optical properties of TiCoSb under different pressures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electronic structure and optical properties of TiCoSb are studied by the first-principles calculation. It is found that the band gaps increase with the pressure increasing. It is noted that the increase of the band gap is due to the electrons of Ti 3d and Co 3d of the valence band (VB) shifting away from the Fermi level. Our calculation indicates that TiCoSb has the large density of state near the Fermi level; moreover, the changes of the density of states near the Fermi level mainly are caused by Ti 3d and Co 3d under the different pressures. It is noted that the absorption edge increases with an increase of pressure. As pressure increases, the static dielectric constants {epsilon}{sub 1}(0) decrease. All peaks of the imaginary part of the dielectric function {epsilon}{sub 2}({omega}) move towards higher energies within increasing pressure. - Graphical abstract: The first peak positions of the absorption spectrum increase and shift the high energy with an increase of pressure. The buleshift of the absorption edge could be observed. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is noted that the increase of the band gap is due to the electrons of Ti 3d and Co 3d of VB moving away from the Fermi level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is noted that the absorption edge increases with an increase of pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As pressure increases, the static dielectric constant {epsilon}{sub 1}(0) decreases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All peaks of the imaginary part of the dielectric function {epsilon}{sub 2}({omega}) move to wards higher energies within creasing pressure.

Xu Bin, E-mail: hnsqxb@163.com [Department of Mathematics and Information Sciences, North China Institute of Water Conservancy and Hydroelectric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Zhang Jing [Department of Mathematics and Information Sciences, North China Institute of Water Conservancy and Hydroelectric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Liang Jianchu [Department of electronic science, Huizhou University, Guangdong 516001 (China); Gao Guoying; Yi Lin [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Lattice constant grading in the Al.sub.y Ca.sub.1-y As.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x alloy system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Liquid phase epitaxy is employed to grow a lattice matched layer of GaAsSb on GaAs substrates through the compositional intermediary of the III-V alloy system AlGaAsSb which acts as a grading layer. The Al constituent reaches a peak atomic concentration of about 6% within the first 2.5.mu.m of the transition layer, then decreases smoothly to about 1% to obtain a lattice constant of 5.74 A. In the same interval the equilibrium concentration of Sb smoothly increases from 0 to about 9 atomic percent to form a surface on which a GaAsSb layer having the desired energy bandgap of 1.1 ev for one junction of an optimized dual junction photovoltaic device. The liquid phase epitaxy is accomplished with a step cooling procedure whereby dislocation defects are more uniformly distributed over the surface of the growing layer.

Moon, Ronald L. (Palo Alto, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Lattice constant grading in the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y As.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x alloy system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Liquid phase epitaxy is employed to grow a lattice matched layer of GaAsSb on GaAs substrates through the compositional intermediary of the III-V alloy system AlGaAsSb which acts as a grading layer. The Al constituent reaches a peak atomic concentration of about 6% within the first 2.5 .mu.m of the transition layer, then decreases smoothly to about 1% to obtain a lattice constant of 5.74 A. In the same interval the equilibrium concentration of Sb smoothly increases from 0 to about 9 atomic percent to form a surface on which a GaAsSb layer having the desired energy bandgap of 1.1 ev for one junction of an optimized dual junction photolvoltaic device. The liquid phase epitaxy is accomplished with a step cooling procedure whereby dislocation defects are more uniformly distributed over the surface of growing layer.

Moon, Ronald L. (Palo Alto, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

CdSe/CdTe type-II superlattices grown on GaSb (001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

CdSe/CdTe superlattices are grown on GaSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray diffraction measurements and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images indicate high crystalline quality. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements show the effective bandgap varies with the superlattice layer thicknesses and confirm the CdSe/CdTe heterostructure has a type-II band edge alignment. The valence band offset between unstrained CdTe and CdSe is determined as 0.63 {+-} 0.06 eV by fitting the measured PL peak positions using the envelope function approximation and the Kronig-Penney model. These results suggest that CdSe/CdTe superlattices are promising candidates for multi-junction solar cells and other optoelectronic devices based on GaSb substrates.

Li Jingjing; Liu Shi; Wang Shumin; Ding Ding; Johnson, Shane R.; Zhang Yonghang [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Liu Xinyu; Furdyna, Jacek K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Smith, David J. [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

419

Methods for chemical recovery of non-carrier-added radioactive tin from irradiated intermetallic Ti-Sb targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a method of chemical recovery of no-carrier-added radioactive tin (NCA radiotin) from intermetallide TiSb irradiated with accelerated charged particles. An irradiated sample of TiSb can be dissolved in acidic solutions. Antimony can be removed from the solution by extraction with dibutyl ether. Titanium in the form of peroxide can be separated from tin using chromatography on strong anion-exchange resin. In another embodiment NCA radiotin can be separated from iodide solution containing titanium by extraction with benzene, toluene or chloroform. NCA radiotin can be finally purified from the remaining antimony and other impurities using chromatography on silica gel. NCA tin-117m can be obtained from this process. NCA tin-117m can be used for labeling organic compounds and biological objects to be applied in medicine for imaging and therapy of various diseases.

Lapshina, Elena V. (Troitsk, RU); Zhuikov, Boris L. (Troitsk, RU); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Ermolaev, Stanislav V. (Obninsk, RU); Togaeva, Natalia R. (Obninsk, RU)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

420

Growth and characterization of In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}Sb device structures using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}Sb epitaxial layers and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) device structures have been grown on GaSb and GaAs substrates by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Control of the n-type doping up to 1 {times} 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3} was achieved using diethyltellurium (DETE) as the dopant source. A Hall mobility of greater than 8,000 cm{sup 2}/Vs at 77 K was obtained for a 3 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3} doped In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}Sb layer grown on high-resistivity GaSb substrate. The In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}Sb epilayers directly grown on GaSb substrates were tilted with respect to the substrates, with the amount of tilt increasing with the layer thickness. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the layers showed the presence of dislocation networks across the epilayers parallel to the interface at different distances from the interface, but the layers above this dislocation network were virtually free of dislocations. A strong correlation between epilayer tilt and TPV device properties was found, with layers having more tilt providing better devices. The results suggest that the dislocations moving parallel to the interface cause lattice tilt, and control of this layer tilt may enable the fabrication of better quality device structures.

Ehsani, H.; Bhat, I.; Hitchcock, C.; Gutmann, R. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Charache, G.; Freeman, M. [Lockheed Martin Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

The growth of InAsSb/InAsP strained-layer superlattices for use in infrared emitters  

SciTech Connect

We describe the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth of InAsSb/InAsP strained-layer superlattice (SLS) active regions for use in mid-infrared emitters. These SLSs were grown at 500{degrees}C, and 200 torr in a horizontal quartz reactor using TMIn, TESb, AsH{sub 3},and PH{sub 3}. By changing the layer thickness and composition we have prepared structures with low temperature ({le}20K) photoluminescence wavelengths ranging from 3.2 to 4.4 {mu}m. Excellent performance was observed for an SLS LED and both optically pumped and electrically injected SLS lasers. An optically pumped, double heterostructure laser emitted at 3.86 {mu}m with a maximum operating temperature of 240 K and a characteristic temperature of 33 K. We have also made electrically injected lasers and LEDs utilizing a GaAsSb/InAs semi-metal injection scheme. The semi-metal injected, broadband LED emitted at 4 {mu}m with 80 {mu}W of power at 300K and 200 mA average current. The InAsSb/InAsP SLS injection laser emitted at 3.6 gm at 120 K.

Biefeld, R.M.; Allerman, A.A.; Kurtz, S.R. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Atomic-resolution study of polarity reversal in GaSb grown on Si by scanning transmission electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The atomic-resolved reversal of the polarity across an antiphase boundary (APB) was observed in GaSb films grown on Si by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). The investigation of the interface structure at the origin of the APB reveals that coalescence of two domains with Ga-prelayer and Sb-prelayer causes the sublattice reversal. The local strain and lattice rotation distributions of the APB, attributed to the discordant bonding length at the APB with the surrounding GaSb lattice, were further studied using the geometric phase analysis technique. The crystallographic characteristics of the APBs and their interaction with other planar defects were observed with HAADF-STEM. The quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated images confirms the observed polarities in the acquired HAADF-STEM data. The self-annihilation mechanism of the APBs is addressed based on the rotation induced by anti-site bonds and APBs' faceting.

Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Woo, S. Y.; Botton, G. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Brockhouse Institute for Material Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Ghanad-Tavakoli, S. [Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Kleiman, R. N.; Preston, J. S. [Brockhouse Institute for Material Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

BETA-DECAY MATRIX ELEMENTS IN Sb$sup 12$$sup 2$  

SciTech Connect

An electronic computer has been used to investigate the six nuclear matrix elements which enter into the 2/sup -/ to 2/sup +/ 1.40-Mev beta transition in the decay of Sb/sup 122/. Data from beta-gamma angular correlation, beta-circularly polarized gamma angular correlation, nuclear orientation, and nuclear resonance experiments were used in this analysis. As a further aid, the Feenberg-Ahrens relations between certain of the nuclear matrix elements were employed to catalog the solutions and to simplify the search problem. In order to discover how the remaining ambiguity of these solutions could most easily be reduced, for each of the solutions calculations were made of the predicted results of all possible experiments on this beta transition. These calculations show how sufficient experimental data can be obtained to determine unambiguously all six nuclear matrix elements. In an appendix all the theoretical formulas which give the experimental observables for a first forbidden 2/sup -/ to S/sup +/ beta transition in terms of the nuclear matrix ele

Pipkin, F.M.; Sanderson, J.; Weyhmann, W.

1963-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

425

Thermochemical and kinetic aspects of the sulfurization of Cu-Sb and Cu-Bi thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CuSbS{sub 2} and Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} are being investigated as part of a search for new absorber materials for photovoltaic devices. Thin films of these chalcogenides were produced by conversion of stacked and co-electroplated metal precursor layers in the presence of elemental sulfur vapour. Ex-situ XRD and SEM/EDS analyses of the processed samples were employed to study the reaction sequence with the aim of achieving compact layer morphologies. A new 'Time-Temperature-Reaction' (TTR) diagram and modified Pilling-Bedworth coefficients have been introduced for the description and interpretation of the reaction kinetics. For equal processing times, the minimum temperature required for CuSbS{sub 2} to appear is substantially lower than for Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3}, suggesting that interdiffusion across the interfaces between the binary sulfides is a key step in the formation of the ternary compounds. The effects of the heating rate and sulfur partial pressure on the phase evolution as well as the potential losses of Sb and Bi during the processes have been investigated experimentally and the results related to the equilibrium pressure diagrams obtained via thermochemical computation. - Graphical Abstract: Example of 3D plot showing the equilibrium pressure surfaces of species potentially escaping from chalcogenide films as a function of temperature and sulfur partial pressure. Bi{sub (g)}, Bi{sub 2(g)}, and BiS{sub (g)} are the gaseous species in equilibrium with solid Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3(s)} considered in this specific example. The pressure threshold plane corresponds to the pressure limit above which the elemental losses from 1 {mu}m thick films exceeds 10% of the original content per cm{sup 2} area of film and dm{sup 3} capacity of sulfurization furnace under static atmosphere conditions. The sulfurization temperature/sulfur partial pressure boundaries required to minimise the elemental losses below a given value can be easily read from the 2D projection of the intersection curves into the T-p{sub S2} plane. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Sulfurization of Sb-Cu and Bi-Cu metal precursors for thin film PV applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Kinetics shows the rate determining step to be the interdiffusion of binary sulfides. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Phase evolution is consistent with Pilling-Bedworth coefficients of Cu, Sb and Bi. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Elemental losses can be minimised via the use of equilibrium pressure diagrams.

Colombara, Diego, E-mail: dc326@bath.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Peter, Laurence M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Rogers, Keith D.; Hutchings, Kyle [Centre for Materials Science and Engineering, Cranfield University, Shrivenham, SN6 8LA (United Kingdom)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Defect assistant band alignment transition from staggered to broken gap in mixed As/Sb tunnel field effect transistor heterostructure  

SciTech Connect

The compositional dependence of effective tunneling barrier height (E{sub beff}) and defect assisted band alignment transition from staggered gap to broken gap in GaAsSb/InGaAs n-channel tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) structures were demonstrated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). High-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the active layers are internally lattice matched. The evolution of defect properties was evaluated using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The defect density at the source/channel heterointerface was controlled by changing the interface properties during growth. By increasing indium (In) and antimony (Sb) alloy compositions from 65% to 70% in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As and 60% to 65% in GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} layers, the E{sub beff} was reduced from 0.30 eV to 0.21 eV, respectively, with the low defect density at the source/channel heterointerface. The transfer characteristics of the fabricated TFET device with an E{sub beff} of 0.21 eV show 2 Multiplication-Sign improvement in ON-state current compared to the device with E{sub beff} of 0.30 eV. On contrary, the value of E{sub beff} was decreased from 0.21 eV to -0.03 eV due to the presence of high defect density at the GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65}/In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As heterointerface. As a result, the band alignment was converted from staggered gap to broken gap, which leads to 4 orders of magnitude increase in OFF-state leakage current. Therefore, a high quality source/channel interface with a properly selected E{sub beff} and well maintained low defect density is necessary to obtain both high ON-state current and low OFF-state leakage in a mixed As/Sb TFET structure for high-performance and lower-power logic applications.

Zhu, Y.; Jain, N.; Vijayaraghavan, S.; Hudait, M. K. [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Mohata, D. K.; Datta, S. [Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania-16802 (United States); Lubyshev, D.; Fastenau, J. M.; Liu, Amy K. [IQE Inc., Bethlehem, Pennsylvania-18015 (United States); Monsegue, N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

SLUDGE BATCH 5 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL  

SciTech Connect

Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Five (SB5) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Part of this SB5 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40 to complete the formation of SB5. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB4. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry taken on March 21, 2008. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by five washes, six decants, an addition of Pu/Be from Canyon Tank 16.4, and an addition of NaNO2. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Ta Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task 2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task 5) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB5 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. Data presented in this report represents the measured or estimated radionuclide concentrations obtained from several standard and special analytical methods performed by Analytical Development (AD) personnel within SRNL. The method for I-129 measurement in sludge is described in detail. Most of these methods were performed on solutions resulting from the dissolutions of the slurry samples. Concentrations are given for twenty-nine radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated. Results also indicate that 98% of the Tc-99 and 92% of the I-129 that could have been in this sludge batch have been removed by chemical processing steps in the SRS Canyons or Tank Farm.

Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

428

Magnetoresistance of Ce{sub 3}Cu{sub 3}Sb{sub 4}: Ferromagnetic semiconductor (abstract)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ferromagnetic semiconductors are an interesting class of materials. The first one, CrBr{sub 3} was discovered only in 1960. Magnetic semiconductors usually show a prominent peak in the resistivity and a very large negative magnetoresistance (MR) in the vicinity of T{sub c}, which is not well understood. Recently, we have reported Ce{sub 3}Cu{sub 3}Sb{sub 4} to be a ferromagnetic semiconductor with a T{sub c} of 10 K. To our knowledge, this is the first Ce system of this type and is a further addition to the rich varieties of ground states exhibited by Ce systems. Here, we report the MR studies on Ce{sub 3}Cu{sub 3}Sb{sub 4} in magnetic fields up to 8 T in the temperature range 4.2{endash}300 K. The resistivity of Ce{sub 3}Cu{sub 3}Sb{sub 4} shows a rise with decrease in temperature from 300 K exhibiting a peak at 19 K followed by a drastic fall at low temperatures. An activation type fit to the data gives a band-gap energy of 84 K. The resistivity peak is broadened considerably in a field of 8 T and the peak is found to shift to higher temperatures by about 10 K. The MR is small and negative ({lt}0.5{percent}) down to about 60 K and then gradually peaks to a large value of {minus}30{percent} at 12 K. The increased conduction in the vicinity of T{sub c} shows that the conduction band is influenced by the magnetic spins presumably due to s{endash}f interactions. The band-gap energy is found to remain constant even in a field as high as 8 T. This may rule out the magnetic polarons to be the cause of activation type of resistivity behavior. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Paulose, P.L.; Patil, S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (Mumbai)-5 (India)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Particulate Contacts to Si and CdTe: Al, Ag, Hg-Cu-Te, and Sb-Te  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our team has been investigating the use of particle-based contacts in both Si and CdTe solar cell technologies. First, in the area of contacts to Si, powders of Al and Ag prepared by an electroexplosion process have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), TEM elemental determination X-ray spectroscopy (TEM-EDS), and TEM electron diffraction (TEM-ED). These Al and Ag particles were slurried and tested as contacts to p- and n-type silicon wafers, respectively. Linear current-voltage (I-V) was observed for Ag on n-type Si, indicative of an ohmic contact, whereas the Al on p-type Si sample was non-ideal. A wet-chemical surface treatment was performed on one Al sample and TEM-EDS indicated a substantial decrease in the O contaminant level. The treated Al on p-type Si films exhibited linear I-V after annealing. Second, in the area of contacts to CdTe, particles of Hg-Cu-Te and Sb-Te have been applied as contacts to CdTe/CdS/SnO2 heterostructures prepared by the standard NREL protocol. First, Hg-Cu-Te and Sb-Te were prepared by a metathesis reaction. After CdCl2 treatment and NP etch of the CdTe layer, particle contacts were applied. The Hg-Cu-Te contacted cells exhibited good electrical characteristics, with Voc > 810 mV and efficiencies > 11.5 % for most cells. Although Voc > 800 mV were observed for the Sb-Te contacted cells, efficiencies in these devices were limited to 9.1%, presumably by a large series resistance (>20 {Omega}) observed in all samples.

Schulz, D. L.; Ribelin, D.; Curtis, C. J.; Ginley, D. S.

1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

430

Detection of THz radiation with devices made from wafers with HgTe and InSb quantum wells  

SciTech Connect

In this study we present measurements of the Terahertz (THz) photoconductivity of 2D electron system realized at HgTe/HgCdTe and AlInSb/InSb/AlInSb quantum wells (QWs) in Corbino geometry (inner and outer radius: 500 {mu}m and 1500 {mu}m) with different mobilities and electron densities. To characterize the devices, the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) effect up to magnetic fields B of 7T and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics at various magnetic fields were measured. The THz radiation is provided by a p-Ge laser which operates with a magnetic field and a high voltage for the electrical pumping. The stimulated emission is caused by transitions between Landau levels of light holes [1]. The laser is tunable in the range between 1.7 to 2.5 THz (corresponding to wavelengths between 120 to 180 {mu}m or energies of 7 to 12 meV). The laser is pulsed with a pulse rate of 1 Hz and pulse lengths of about 1 {mu}s with low switching times (about 20 ns). The monochromatic THz radiation is transferred to our samples via a 0.32m long brass waveguide immersed in liquid Helium. The detection of a change in the conductivity of the sample due to absorption of THz-radiation (photoresponse) requires a low-noise circuit. For the Corbino-shaped samples the photoresponse (PR) is measured via a resistor R{sub V} of 1 k{Omega}. The signal is transferred via in a high-frequency cable and detected with a digital oscilloscope.

Gouider, F.; Nachtwei, G. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Vasilyev, Yu. B.; Koenemann, J. [A. F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RU-194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Buckle, P. D. [QinetiQ Ltd, Malvern WR14 3PS (United Kingdom); Bruene, C.; Buhmann, H. [Julius-Maximilians-University Wuerzburg, D-97074 (Germany)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

431

The microstructure network and thermoelectric properties of bulk (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report small-angle neutron scattering studies on the microstructure network in bulk (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} synthesized by the melt-spinning (MS) and the spark-plasma-sintering (SPS) process. We find that rough interfaces of multiscale microstructures generated by the MS are responsible for the large reduction of both lattice thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. Our study also finds that subsequent SPS forms a microstructure network of {approx}10 nm thick lamellae and smooth interfaces between them. This nanoscale microstructure network with smooth interfaces increases electrical conductivity while keeping a low thermal conductivity, making it an ideal microstructure for high thermoelectric efficiency.

Xie Wenjie [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Hitchcock, Dale A.; Kang, Hye J.; He Jian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Tang Xinfeng [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Laver, Mark [Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Nano-Science Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Kobenhavn (Denmark); Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Hammouda, Boualem [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

432

Band gap tuning and optical absorption in type-II InAs/GaSb mid infrared short period superlattices: 14 bands K Dot-Operator p study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MBE growth of short-period InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice structures, varied around 20.5 A InAs/24 A GaSb were [J. Applied physics, 96, 2580 (2004)] carried out by Haugan et al. These SLs were designed to produce devices with an optimum mid-infrared photoresponse and a sharpest photoresponse cutoff. We have used a realistic and reliable 14-band k.p formalism description of the superlattice electronic band structure to calculate the absorption coefficient in such short-period InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices. The parameters for this formalism are known from fitting to independent experiments for the bulk materials. The band-gap energies are obtained without any fitting parameters, and are in good agreement with experimental data.

AbuEl-Rub, Khaled M. [Department of Applied Physical Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology Irbid, 21141 (Jordan)

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

433

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C4, supplLment au no 4, Tome 40, avril 1979, page C4-66 Magnetization behaviour and the valence of uranium in (U,Th,-,)Sb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

behaviour and the valence of uranium in (U,Th,-,)Sb B. R. Cooper and 0. Vogt (*) Dept. of Physics, W for uranium in USb, and strongly points toward a 5f3ionic state (U3'). With this in mind, the results of our for interaction between uranium ions. Thus at high thorium concentration, (U,.,Th,.,)Sb is paramagnetic down to 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

434

First-principles calculation of the effect of atomic disorder on the electronic structure of the half-metallic ferromagnet NiMnSb  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electronic structure of the half-metallic ferromagnet NiMnSb with three different types of atomic disorder is calculated using the layer Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method in conjunction with the coherent potential approximation. Results indicate the presence of minority-spin states at the Fermi energy for degrees of disorder as low as a few percent. The resulting spin polarization below 100{percent} is discussed in the light of experimental difficulties confirming the half-metallic property of NiMnSb thin films directly. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

Orgassa, D.; Fujiwara, H. [Center for Materials for Information Technolgy (MINT), The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487-0209 (United States); Schulthess, T.C.; Butler, W.H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6114 (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Charge Lifetime Study of K2CsSb Photocathode Inside a JLAB DC High Voltage Gun  

SciTech Connect

Two photocathodes are frequently considered for generating high average current electron beams and/or beams with high brightness for current and future accelerator applications: GaAs:Cs and K2CsSb. Each photocathode has advantages and disadvantages, and need to demonstrate performance at 'production' accelerator facilities. To this end a K2CsSb photocathode was manufactured at Brookhaven National Lab and delivered to Jefferson Lab within a compact vacuum apparatus at pressure {approx} 5 x 10{sup -11} Torr. This photocathode was installed inside a dc high voltage photogun biased at voltages up to 200 kV, and illuminated with laser light at 440 or 532 nm, to generate beams up to 20 mA. Photocathode charge lifetime measurements indicate that under some conditions this cathode has exceptionally high charge lifetime, without measurable QE decay, even from the center of the photocathode where operation using GaAs photocathodes is precluded due to ion bombardment. These studies also suggest a complex QE decay mechanism likely related to chemistry and localized heating via the laser beam.

Mammei, R.; Rao, T.; Suleiman, R.; Poelker, M.; Smedley, J.; McCarter, J.L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Electrochemical lithium insertion in the solid solution Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}-Sb{sub 2}WO{sub 6} with Aurivillius framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the structural evolution of the Aurivillius crystalline framework in the solid solution Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}-Sb{sub 2}WO{sub 6} we have carried out an electrochemical lithium insertion study in this system. A slight loss of the specific capacity of the electrochemical cell was observed as amount of Sb was increased. In general, the different compositions within solid solution Bi{sub 2-x}Sb{sub x}WO{sub 6} (0.25 {<=} x {<=} 0.75) exhibited a similar behaviour featured mainly by two semiconstant potential regions located at 1.7 and 0.8 V versus Li{sup +}/Li{sup o}. The oxide Sb{sub 2}WO{sub 6} with Autivillius structure but without Bi was tested as cathode too. The maximum amount of lithium inserted, 13.5 lithium atoms per formula, is the same amount inserted in its homologous bismuth oxide Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}.

Martinez-de la Cruz, A. [Division de Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 66451, San Nicolas de los Garza, NL (Mexico)], E-mail: azmartin@gama.fime.uanl.mx; Longoria Rodriguez, F.E. [Departamento de Quimica, Campus Universitario Los Guaritos, Universidad de Oriente, Av. Universidad, CP 6203 Monagas (Venezuela)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

437

Flat Plate PV Module Eligibility Listing Procedure Updated 6/28/12 Senate Bill 1 (SB1) defines the solar incentive programs for California, and flat plate PV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the solar incentive programs for California, and flat plate PV modules1 must be listed on the SB1 compliant programs for investor owned utility (IOU) territories, the California Solar Initiative (CSI) and the New module list to be eligible for incentives in California. Senate Bill 1 encompasses two staterun

438

Confirmatory Survey Report for Area B1S/B2S at the Chevron Mining Washington Remediation Project, Washington, PA  

SciTech Connect

During the period of October 2 and 3, 2007, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performed confirmatory radiological survey activities which included gamma surface scans within Area B1S/B2S and the collection of soil samples from these areas.

W. C. Adams

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

439

Measurement and modeling of infrared nonlinear absorption coefficients and laser-induced damage thresholds in Ge and GaSb  

SciTech Connect

Using a simultaneous fitting technique to extract nonlinear absorption coefficients from data at two pulse widths, we measure two-photon and free-carrier absorption coefficients for Ge and GaSb at 2.05 and 2.5 {mu}m for the first time, to our knowledge. Results agreed well with published theory. Single-shot damage thresholds were also measured at 2.5 {mu}m and agreed well with modeled thresholds using experimentally determined parameters including nonlinear absorption coefficients and temperature dependent linear absorption. The damage threshold for a single-layer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} anti-reflective coating on Ge was 55% or 35% lower than the uncoated threshold for picosecond or nanosecond pulses, respectively.

Wagner, T. J.; Bohn, M. J.; Coutu, R. A. Jr. [Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Gonzalez, L. P.; Murray, J. M.; Guha, S. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Schepler, K. L. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Sensors Directorate, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Lattice dynamics and anomalous softening in the YbFe[subscript 4]Sb[subscript 12] skutterudite  

SciTech Connect

The lattice dynamics of the filled skutterudite YbFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} was studied by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and an anomalous softening in the temperature dependence of the elastic constants at {approx} 50 K was observed. This anomaly can not be explained by the dynamics of the filler, in contrast to other filled skutterudites. We have further investigated the origin of this anomaly using macroscopic and microscopic measurements. A rearrangement of the spectral weight of the Yb phonon states was observed in the temperature dependence of the density of phonon states, obtained by inelastic neutron scattering. We suggest that the anomaly is due to a change of the Yb valence state and that the anomaly and the phonon spectral weight rearrangement have the same origin.

Mchel, A.; Sergueev, I.; Wille, H.-C.; Voigt, J.; Prager, M.; Stone, M.B.; Sales, B.C.; Guguchia, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keppens, V.; Hermann, R.P. (DESY); (Tennessee-K); (Julich); (ORNL); (Tbilisi); (ESRF)

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Electronic structure and magnetism in BaMn2As2 and BaMn2Sb2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the properties of ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure BaMn{sub 2}As{sub 2} and BaMn{sub 2}Sb{sub 2} using density functional calculations of the electronic and magnetic properties as well as experimental measurements on single crystal samples of BaMn{sub 2}As{sub 2}. These materials are local moment magnets with moderate band gap antiferromagnetic semiconducting ground states. The electronic structures show substantial Mn-pnictogen hybridization, which stabilizes an intermediate spin configuration for the nominally d{sup 5} Mn. The results are discussed in the context of possible thermoelectric applications and the relationship with the corresponding iron/cobalt/nickel compounds Ba(Fe,Co,Ni){sub 2}As{sub 2}.

An, Jiming [ORNL; Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL; Du, Mao-Hua [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Improved Thermoelectric Performance of p-type Skutterudite YbxFe4-yPtySb12 (0.8 x 1, y = 1 and 0.5)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermoelectric performance of p-type skutterudites currently lags that of the corresponding n-type materials and improvement of this important class of materials have become the focus of considerable research effort world-wide. Recent calculations find promising band structural features in p-type skutterudite materials of the type AeFe3NiSb12 ( Ae = Ca, Sr, or Ba) which could potentially lead to excellent thermoelectric properties. Recent work on the Yb- filled analog of the these formulations (YbFe3NiSb12) however finds that the onset of intrinsic conduction at lower than expected temperatures deteriorates the performance above 500 K leading to poor performance in the temperature range of interest for automotive waste heat recovery applications. We therefore seek a way to increase the band gap in order to find a way to minimize the deleterious effects of intrinsic conduction. Here we present ab initio band structure calculations and the synthesis and thermoelectric properties of YbxFe4-yPtySb12 (0.8 x 1, y = 1 and 0.5). Ab initio calculations find that the band gap increases for YbFe3PtSb12 as compared to the Ni-containing analog, though no such increase in the band gap energy was found for as compared to YbFe3.5Ni0.5Sb12. The y = 1 samples shows a characteristic transition to intrinsic conduction with a decrease in the Seebeck coefficient at temperatures above 700 K. The increased carrier concentration in y = 0.5 virtually eliminates any evidence of intrinsic conduction and the Seebeck coefficients for these samples increase monotonically up to 750 K, resulting in power factors approaching 27 W/cm K2 at 750 K. These power factors combined with low thermal conductivity result in a ZT = 0.9 at 750 K for Yb0.95Fe3.5Pt0.5Sb12.

Cho, Jung Y [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Ye, Zuxin [GM Research and Development Center; Tessema, Misle [GM Research and Development Center; Salvador, James R. [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Waldo, Richard [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Yang, Jiong [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Zhang, Weiqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yang, Jihui [University of Washington; Cai, Wei [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Above room-temperature operation of InAs/AlGaSb superlattice quantum cascade lasers emitting at 12 {mu}m  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on above-room-temperature operation of InAs/AlGaSb quantum cascade lasers emitting at 12 {mu}m. The laser structures are grown on a n-InAs (100) substrate using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. An InAs/AlGaSb superlattice is used as an active part and an InAs double plasmon waveguide is used for optical confinement. Results show that increased doping concentration in the injection part of the active region expands the current operation range of the devices, allowing laser operation at and above room temperature. The observed threshold current density is 4.0 kA/cm{sup 2} at 300 K; the maximum operation temperature is 340 K.

Ohtani, K.; Moriyasu, Y.; Ohnishi, H.; Ohno, H. [Laboratory for Nanoelectronics and Semiconductor Spintronics, Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

444

Composites of Bi{sub 2-x}Sb{sub x}Te{sub 3} nanocrystals and fullerene molecules for thermoelectricity  

SciTech Connect

New nanocomposite thermoelectric material composed from nanocrystallites of Bi-Sb-Te alloys covered by C{sub 60} molecules has been synthesized and studied. An increase of fullerene content leads to the growth of hole concentration in p-type materials and reduction of electron concentration in n-type materials. The fullerene molecules provide additional scattering of phonons reducing lattice heat conductivity. Reduction of heat conductivity exceeds the reduction of electrical conductivity for fullerene content less than 0.5 volume % and essential enhances the thermoelectric figure of merit. The maximum value of thermoelectric figure of merit equals to 1.17 at 450 K was observed in Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} composite containing 0.5 volume % C{sub 60} molecules. The experimental results were analyzed in a frame of the model based on the Boltzmann equation. The analysis considers light and heavy electrons and holes and accounts the intervalley scattering of charge carriers. The calculations of the kinetic coefficients shows that the improvement of the thermoelectric figure of merit originates from the reduction of the lattice heat conductivity caused by fullerene molecules. The dependencies of the thermoelectric figure of merit on the acceptor concentration were calculated. - Graphical abstract: New nanocomposite thermoelectric material composed from nanocrystallites of Bi-Sb-Te alloys covered by C{sub 60} molecules has been synthesized and studied. An increase of fullerene content leads to the growth of hole concentration in p-type materials and reduction of electron concentration in n-type materials. The fullerene molecules provide additional scattering of phonons reducing lattice heat conductivity and enhances the thermoelectric figure of merit. The maximum value of thermoelectric figure of merit equal to 1.17 at 450 K was observed in Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} composite containing 0.5 volume % fullerene molecules. Simulations of thermoelectric properties were made in frame of four bands, 12 valleys Boltzmann equation approach. Simulated and measured temperature dependencies of thermoelectric properties were compared to get unknown model parameters. These parameters were used to calculate dependencies of thermoelectric properties on acceptor concentration. Calculated dependencies of thermoelectric figure of merit on acceptor concentration are presented in the figure for p-type composites with 0 vol.% C{sub 60} (solid lines) and 0.5 vol.% C{sub 60} (dashed lines). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C{sub 60} doping of Bi-Sb-Te has acceptor effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fullerene molecules prevent recrystallization in Bi-Sb-Te nanocomposites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C{sub 60} in Bi-Sb-Te nanocomposites essentially reduces lattice thermal conductivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermoelectric figure of merit in nanocomposite C{sub 60}-Bi-Sb-Te enhanced.

Kulbachinskii, V.A., E-mail: kulb@mig.phys.msu.ru [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Leninskie Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 GSP-1 (Russian Federation); Kytin, V.G. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Leninskie Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 GSP-1 (Russian Federation)] [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Leninskie Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 GSP-1 (Russian Federation); Popov, M.Yu.; Buga, S.G.; Stepanov, P.B.; Blank, V.D. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, Troitsk, Moscow Region 142190 (Russian Federation)] [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, Troitsk, Moscow Region 142190 (Russian Federation)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Li6La3SnMO12 (M = Sb, Nb, Ta), a Family of Lithium Garnets with High Li-Ion Conductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to investigate the influence of covalent bonding within the garnet framework on the conductivity of Li+ in the interstitial space, the Li+ conductivities in the family of Sn-based compounds Li6La3 SnMO12 (M = Sb, Nb, Ta) have been obtained and are compared with those of Li6La3ZrMO12. Refinement of the neutron diffraction pattern of Li6La3 SnNbO12shows that the interstitial tetrahedral sites (24d ) are about half-occupied and most of the Li in the interstitial bridging octahedral sites are displaced from the center position (48g ). The Sb-based compound has the largest lattice parameter while the Ta-based compound has the highest Li+-ion conductivity of 0.42 10 4 Scm 1.

Bridges, Craig A [ORNL; Goodenough, J. B. [University of Texas, Austin; Gupta, Dr Asha [University of Texas, Austin; Nakanishi, Masahiro [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL; Bi, Zhonghe [ORNL; Li, Yutao [University of Texas, Austin; Han, Jiantao [University of Texas, Austin; Dong, Youzhong [South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, PR China; Wang, Long [University of Texas, Austin; Xu, Maowen [University of Texas, Austin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

SLUDGE BATCH 7 (SB7) WASHING DEMONSTRATION TO DETERMINE SULFATE/OXALATE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY AND SETTLING BEHAVIOR  

SciTech Connect

To support Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) washing, a demonstration of the proposed Tank Farm washing operation was performed utilizing a real-waste test slurry generated from Tank 4, 7, and 12 samples. The purpose of the demonstration was twofold: (1) to determine the settling time requirements and washing strategy needed to bring the SB7 slurry to the desired endpoint; and (2) to determine the impact of washing on the chemical and physical characteristics of the sludge, particularly those of sulfur content, oxalate content, and rheology. Seven wash cycles were conducted over a four month period to reduce the supernatant sodium concentration to approximately one molar. The long washing duration was due to the slow settling of the sludge and the limited compaction. Approximately 90% of the sulfur was removed through washing, and the vast majority of the sulfur was determined to be soluble from the start. In contrast, only about half of the oxalate was removed through washing, as most of the oxalate was initially insoluble and did not partition to the liquid phase until the latter washes. The final sulfur concentration was 0.45 wt% of the total solids, and the final oxalate concentration was 9,900 mg/kg slurry. More oxalate could have been removed through additional washing, although the washing would have reduced the supernatant sodium concentration.The yield stress of the final washed sludge (35 Pa) was an order of magnitude higher than that of the unwashed sludge ({approx}4 Pa) and was deemed potentially problematic. The high yield stress was related to the significant increase in insoluble solids that occurred ({approx}8 wt% to {approx}18 wt%) as soluble solids and water were removed from the slurry. Reduction of the insoluble solids concentration to {approx}14 wt% was needed to reduce the yield stress to an acceptable level. However, depending on the manner that the insoluble solids adjustment was performed, the final sodium concentration and extent of oxalate removal would be prone to change. As such, the strategy for completing the final wash cycle is integral to maintaining the proper balance of chemical and physical requirements.

Reboul, S.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

447

Electroforming of Bi(1-x)Sb(x) nanowires for high-efficiency micro-thermoelectric cooling devices on a chip.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Active cooling of electronic systems for space-based and terrestrial National Security missions has demanded use of Stirling, reverse-Brayton, closed Joule-Thompson, pulse tube and more elaborate refrigeration cycles. Such cryocoolers are large systems that are expensive, demand large powers, often contain moving parts and are difficult to integrate with electronic systems. On-chip, solid-state, active cooling would greatly enhance the capabilities of future systems by reducing the size, cost and inefficiencies compared to existing solutions. We proposed to develop the technology for a thermoelectric cooler capable of reaching 77K by replacing bulk thermoelectric materials with arrays of Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires. Furthermore, the Sandia-developed technique we will use to produce the oriented nanowires occurs at room temperature and can be applied directly to a silicon substrate. Key obstacles include (1) optimizing the Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} alloy composition for thermoelectric properties; (2) increasing wire aspect ratios to 3000:1; and (3) increasing the array density to {ge} 10{sup 9} wires/cm{sup 2}. The primary objective of this LDRD was to fabricate and test the thermoelectric properties of arrays of Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires. With this proof-of-concept data under our belts we are positioned to engage National Security systems customers to invest in the integration of on-chip thermoelectric coolers for future missions.

Overmyer, Donald L.; Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III (,; ); Siegal, Michael P.; Yelton, William Graham

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Resistivity During Boiling in the SB-15-D Core from the Geysers Geothermal Field: The Effects of Capillarity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a laboratory study of cores from borehole SB-15-D in The Geysers geothermal area, we measured the electrical resistivity of metashale with and without pore-pressure control, with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures between 20 and 150 C, to determine how the pore-size distribution and capillarity affected boiling. We observed a gradual increase in resistivity when the downstream pore pressure or confining pressure decreased below the phase boundary of free water. For the conditions of this experiment, boiling, as indicated by an increase in resistivity, is initiated at pore pressures of approximately 0.5 to 1 bar (0.05 to 0.1 MPa) below the free-water boiling curve, and it continues to increase gradually as pressure is lowered to atmospheric. A simple model of the effects of capillarity suggests that at 145 C, less than 15% of the pore water can boil in these rocks. If subsequent experiments bear out these preliminary observations, then boiling within a geothermal reservoir is controlled not just by pressure and temperature but also by pore-size distribution. Thus, it may be possible to determine reservoir characteristics by monitoring changes in electrical resistivity as reservoir conditions change.

Roberts, J.; Duba, A.; Bonner, B.; Kasameyer, P.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

PRO-WA MTM Window Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...........................47 BRINGUP Tickler File and Appointment Book .....................51 Table of Contents - iii - Table

Mann, Tim

450

Highlight about Davis's WaPo recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... While solid-state lighting promises to reduce the Nation's consumption of energy for lighting by half, there are barriers to implementation. ...

2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

451

Sumas, WA Natural Gas Exports to Canada  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

254,086 300,453 309,516 332,358 313,922 312,236 1996-2012 Pipeline Prices 6.61 8.19 3.99 4.22 3.96 2.72 1996...

452

IMPACT OF SB4 TANK 40 DECANT AND ARP/MCU ADDITIONS WITH/WITHOUT ADDED CAUSTIC ON DWPF CPC PERFORMANCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to investigate the impact of decanting supernate from the Sludge Batch four (SB4) feed in Tank 40. The specific questions concerned the potential impact on the stoichiometric acid window determined for SB4 with respect to overall hydrogen generation rates, nitrite destruction in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the rheology of the sludge, SRAT product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product slurries. The scope included considering an addition of sodium hydroxide to Tank 40 to partially offset the sodium lost during decanting as well as considering the impact of bounding quantities of Actinide Removal Process (ARP) feed and Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) feed on these same parameters. Simulated SB4 waste was first adjusted to match the dilution that has occurred in Tank 40 during the initial period of SB4 operations in the DWPF. The adjusted simulant was decanted an equivalent of 100,000 gallons relative to 413,740 gallons projected supernate volume. The decanted simulant was divided into two equal parts. One part received an addition of sodium hydroxide to increase the Na{sub 2}O content of the calcined sludge solids by about 3%. The baseline decanted simulant and caustic adjusted simulant were each tested in three pairs of DWPF process simulations of the SRAT and SME cycles. The simulations were at the nominal SB4 acid stoichiometry of 130% with and without bounding ARP/MCU additions and at 170% of acid without ARP/MCU. The 170% case without ARP/MCU was considered bounding relative to 170% with ARP/MCU based on calculated acid requirements. No significant negative impacts on the proposed acid operating window for the SRAT and SME cycles were noted in the simulations. Nitrite was successfully destroyed and mercury reduced in all six SRAT cycles. Hydrogen was produced in all six SRAT and SME cycles, but the levels were below the DWPF SRAT and SME cycle limits in all cases. Relatively insignificant rheological changes were noted other than the previously established thinning from higher acid additions. SRAT and SME processing at 130% acid stoichiometry with and without ARP/MCU additions were very similar. MCU nitric acid content, however, shifted the normal acid addition prior to boiling toward more formic acid and less nitric acid than without MCU. SRNL found no technical issues processing the proposed Tank 40 decant (with or without added NaOH) from the standpoint of the impact on the DWPF SRAT and SME cycles subject to the inherent uncertainties in modeling the ARP noble metal concentrations. The noble metals in the ARP were set to the same weight percents in the total solids that they were measured at in the SB4 waste, which was considered likely to be bounding on the actual noble metal content of the ARP transfer to DWPF. Assumptions for formate loss and nitrite to nitrate conversion can be left at the current levels.

Koopman, D; David Best, D; Frances Williams, F

2008-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

453

Fabrication and characterization of GaSb based thermophotovoltaic cells using Zn diffusion from a doped spin-on glass source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The GaInSb material system is attractive for application in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells since its band gap can be tuned to match the radiation of the emitter. At present, most of the TPV cells are fabricated using epitaxial layers and hence are expensive. To reduce the cost, Zn diffusion using elemental vapors in a semi-closed diffusion system is being pursued by several laboratories. In this paper, the authors present studies carried out on Zn diffusion into n-type (Te-doped) GaSb substrates in an open tube diffusion furnace. The dopant precursor was a 2,000 {angstrom} thick, zinc doped spin-on glass. The diffusion was carried out at temperatures ranging from 550 to 600 C, for times from 1 to 10 hours. The diffused layers were characterized by Hall measurements using step-and-repeat etching by anodic oxidation, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements and TPV device fabrication. For diffusion carried out at 600 C, the junction depth was 0.3 {micro}m, and the hole concentration near the surface was 5 {times} 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3}. The external quantum efficiency, measured without any anti-reflection coating, of the TPV cells fabricated using mesa-etching had a maximum value of 38%. Masked diffusion was also carried out by opening windows in a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated, GaSb wafer. TPV cells fabricated on these structures had similar quantum efficiency, but lower dark current.

Dakshinamurthy, S.; Shetty, S.; Bhat, I.; Hitchcock, C.; Gutmann, R. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Charache, G.; Freeman, M. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Pressure tunes electrical resistivity by four orders of magnitude in amorphous Ge[subscript 2]Sb[subscript 2]Te[subscript 5] phase-change memory alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ge-Sb-Te-based phase-change memory is one of the most promising candidates to succeed the current flash memories. The application of phase-change materials for data storage and memory devices takes advantage of the fast phase transition (on the order of nanoseconds) and the large property contrasts (e.g., several orders of magnitude difference in electrical resistivity) between the amorphous and the crystalline states. Despite the importance of Ge-Sb-Te alloys and the intense research they have received, the possible phases in the temperature-pressure diagram, as well as the corresponding structure-property correlations, remain to be systematically explored. In this study, by subjecting the amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (a-GST) to hydrostatic-like pressure (P), the thermodynamic variable alternative to temperature, we are able to tune its electrical resistivity by several orders of magnitude, similar to the resistivity contrast corresponding to the usually investigated amorphous-to-crystalline (a-GST to rock-salt GST) transition used in current phase-change memories. In particular, the electrical resistivity drops precipitously in the P = 0 to 8 GPa regime. A prominent structural signature representing the underlying evolution in atomic arrangements and bonding in this pressure regime, as revealed by the ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, is the reduction of low-electron-density regions, which contributes to the narrowing of band gap and delocalization of trapped electrons. At P > 8 GPa, we have observed major changes of the average local structures (bond angle and coordination numbers), gradually transforming the a-GST into a high-density, metallic-like state. This high-pressure glass is characterized by local motifs that bear similarities to the body-centered-cubic GST (bcc-GST) it eventually crystallizes into at 28 GPa, and hence represents a bcc-type polyamorph of a-GST.

Xu, M.; Cheng, Y.Q.; Wang, L.; Sheng, H.W.; Meng, Y.; Yang, W.G.; Hang, X.D.; Ma, E. (Beijing U); (JHU); (CIW); (George Mason)

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

455

2 {mu}m laterally coupled distributed-feedback GaSb-based metamorphic laser grown on a GaAs substrate  

SciTech Connect

We report a type-I GaSb-based laterally coupled distributed-feedback (DFB) laser grown on a GaAs substrate operating continuous wave at room temperature. The laser structure was designed to operate near a wavelength of 2 {mu}m and was grown metamorphically with solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The device was fabricated using a 6th-order deep etch grating structure as part of the sidewalls of the narrow ridge waveguide. The DFB laser emits total output power of up to 40 mW in a single longitudinal mode operation at a heat-sink temperature of 20 Degree-Sign C.

Apiratikul, P.; He, L.; Richardson, C. J. K. [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, 8050 Greenmead Drive, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)] [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, 8050 Greenmead Drive, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

456

Synthesis and crystal structure of [(C{sub 7}H{sub 10}N){sub 2}]{sup 2+} [Sb{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}]{sup 2-1}  

SciTech Connect

The reaction of 2,6-dimethylpyridine with SbCl{sub 3} and HCl affords the title compound, the structure of which is ascertained by X-ray diffraction. The unit cell consists of one bridged Sb{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}{sup 2-} anion and two 2,6-dimethylpyridinium cations. The trivalent antimony ion is bonded not only directly to chlorine anions, but also is coordinated with chlorine anions by secondary bonds. In the crystal, there exists infinite coordinated chains of [Sb{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}]{sub n}{sup 2n-} anions running along the a axis, which link 2,6-dimethylpyridinium cations by N-H-Cl hydrogen bonds.

Guo Yun, E-mail: apharm@sina.com; Zhang Miao [Zhejiang University of Technology, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences (China); Shen Liang [Hangzhou Normal University, College of Material Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Jin Yingying; Jin Zhimin [Zhejiang University of Technology, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences (China)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 Topological Insulators on GaAs (111) Substrates: A Potential Route to Fabricate Topological Insulator p-n Junction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High quality Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 topological insulators films were epitaxially grown on GaAs (111) substrate using solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Their growth and behavior on both vicinal and non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrates were investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is found that non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrate is better than a vicinal substrate to provide high quality Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 films. Hall and magnetoresistance measurements indicate that p type Sb2Te3 and n type Bi2Te3 topological insulator films can be directly grown on a GaAs (111) substrate, which may pave a way to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction on the same substrate, compatible with the fabrication process of present semiconductor optoelectronic devices.

Zhaoquan Zeng; Timothy A. Morgan; Dongsheng Fan; Chen Li; Yusuke Hirono; Xian Hu; Yanfei Zhao; Joon Sue Lee; Zhiming M. Wang; Jian Wang; Shuiqing Yu; Michael E. Hawkridge; Mourad Benamara; Gregory J. Salamo

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

458

29171 SB Indian Summer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tribe Ben Rinehart Consulting EngineerScientist Indian Summer VI Cultural diversity is like an orchestra. Each cultural group, like each instrument, retains its...

459

SbCuLielectrochromicmirrors  

2500nmrecordedattheextremesofswitchingareshowninFig.6(a).Theglass substrates absorb strongly below 340nm, affecting both transmittance and

460

Inverter Eligibility Listing Procedure for Solar Electric Incentive Programs Updated 8/24/11 Senate Bill 1 (SB1) defines the solar incentive programs for California, and inverters must be listed on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/24/11 Senate Bill 1 (SB1) defines the solar incentive programs for California, and inverters must be listed two staterun programs, the California Solar Initiative and the New Solar Homes Partnership, as well as solar incentive programs administered by publicly owned utilities. The California Solar Initiative

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

RECIPIENT:WA Dept. of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT SEP ARRA SIRTI...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

modifying and implementing hardware and software that integrate the storage solution with solar panels that allow power generated by solar PV systems to be directed to and utilized...

462

RECIPIENT:WA Department of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT Van Dyk...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

digester would be routed to the combined heat and power (CHP) unit consisting of a biogas-fired reciprocating engine and generator capable of producing 425 kW of electrical...

463

International Capital in Namibia: Tsumeb and the CDM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and Gas Company of the us. Nord Mining Corporation of the US (SWA subsidiary Nord Mining and Exploration (

Ferreira, Eduardo de Sousa

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Millennial Development: A Case Study of Namibia's Vision 2030.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis analyzes the neoliberal governmentalities of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and how they shape the policies, practices, and perceptions of poverty within (more)

Connoy, Laura

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Namibia Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Destination  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

466

Dielectric response of AlSb from 0.7 to 5.0 eV determined by in situ ellipsometry  

SciTech Connect

We present pseudodielectric function data <{epsilon}>=<{epsilon}{sub 1}>+i<{epsilon}{sub 2}> from 0.7 to 5.0 eV of oxide-free AlSb that are the closest representation to date of the intrinsic bulk dielectric response {epsilon} of the material. Measurements were done on a 1.5 {mu}m thick film grown on (001) GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. Data were obtained with the film in situ to avoid oxidation artifacts. Overlapping critical-point (CP) structures in the E{sub 2} energy region were identified by means of band-structure calculations done with the linear augmented Slater-type orbital method. Calculated CP energies agree well with those obtained from data, confirming the validity of the calculations.

Jung, Y. W.; Ghong, T. H.; Byun, J. S.; Kim, Y. D. [Department of Physics and Nano-Optical Property Laboratory, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H. J.; Chang, Y. C. [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan and Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois 61801 (United States); Shin, S. H.; Song, J. D. [Center for Spintronics Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

467

Sb[subscript 2]Te[subscript 3] and Bi[subscript 2]Te[subscript 3] Thin Films Grown by Room-Temperature MBE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sb{sub 2}Te3 and Bi{sub 2}Te3 thin films were grown on SiO{sub 2} and BaF{sub 2} substrates at room temperature using molecular beam epitaxy. Metallic layers with thicknesses of 0.2 nm were alternately deposited at room temperature, and the films were subsequently annealed at 250 C for 2 h. x-Ray diffraction and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with high-accuracy energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry revealed stoichiometric films, grain sizes of less than 500 nm, and a texture. High-quality in-plane thermoelectric properties were obtained for Sb{sub 2}Te3 films at room temperature, i.e., low charge carrier density (2.6 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, large thermopower (130 {micro}V K{sup -1}), large charge carrier mobility (402 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}), and resulting large power factor (29 {micro}W cm{sup -1} K{sup -2}). Bi{sub 2}Te3 films also showed low charge carrier density (2.7 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}), moderate thermopower (-153 {micro}V K{sup -1}), but very low charge carrier mobility (80 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}), yielding low power factor (8 {micro}W cm{sup -1} K{sup -2}). The low mobilities were attributed to Bi-rich grain boundary phases identified by analytical energy-filtered TEM.

Aabdin, Z.; Peranio, N.; Winkler, M.; Bessas, D.; Knig, J.; Hermann, R.P.; Bttner, H.; Eibl, O. (Julich); (Tubingen); (Fraunhofer)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

468

Temperature-Dependent Young's modulus, shear modulus and Poisson's ratio of p-type Ce0.9Fe3.5Co0.5Sb12 and n-type Co0.95Pd0.05Te0.05Sb3 Skutterudite Thermoelectric Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective models of the mechanical behavior of thermoelectric materials under device conditions require knowledge of the temperature-dependent elastic properties.Between room temperature and 600 K, Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) measurements of the Young s and shear moduli of three skutterudite thermoelectric materials, n-type Co0.95Pd0.05Te0.05Sb3(both with and without 0.1 atomic % cerium dopant) and p-type Ce0.9Fe3.5Co0.5Sb12, decreased linearly with temperature at a rate between -0.011 GPa/K and -0.013 GPa/K. In contrast the Poisson s ratio was approximately 0.22 for the three materials and was relatively insensitive to temperature.For temperatures > 600 K, the elastic moduli decreased more rapidly and resonance peaks broadened indicating the onset of viscoelastic behavior.The viscoelastic relaxation of the moduli was least for Ce-doped n-type material, for which grain boundary precipitates may inhibit grain boundary sliding which in turn has important implications concerning creep resistance. In addition, powder processing of the n- and p-type materials should be done cautiously since submicron-sized powders of both the n- and p-type powders were pyrophoric

Schmidt, Robert [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Case, Eldon D [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Ni, Jennifer E. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Trejo, Rosa M [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Cluster Chemistry in Electron-Poor Ae-Pt-Cd Systems (Ae=Ca, Sr, Ba): (Sr,Ba)Pt2Cd4, Ca6Pt8Cd16, and Its Known Antitype Er6Pd16Sb8  

SciTech Connect

Three new ternary polar intermetallic compounds, cubic Ca6Pt8Cd16, and tetragonal (Sr, Ba)Pt2Cd4 have been discovered during explorations of the AePtCd systems. Cubic Ca6Pt8Cd16 (Fm-3m, Z = 4, a = 13.513(1) ) contains a 3D array of separate Cd8 tetrahedral stars (TS) that are both face capped along the axes and diagonally bridged by Pt atoms to generate the 3D anionic network Cd8[Pt(1)]6/2[Pt(2)]4/8. The complementary cationic surface of the cell consists of a face-centered cube of Pt(3)@Ca6 octahedra. This structure is an ordered ternary variant of Sc11Ir4 (Sc6Ir8Sc16), a stuffed version of the close relative Na6Au7Cd16, and a network inverse of the recent Er6Sb8Pd16 (compare Ca6Pt8Cd16). The three groups of elements each occur in only one structural version. The new AePt2Cd4, Ae = Sr, Ba, are tetragonal (P42/mnm,Z = 2, a ? 8.30 , c ? 4.47 ) and contain chains of edge-sharing Cd4 tetrahedra along c that are bridged by four-bonded Ba/Sr. LMTO-ASA and ICOHP calculation results and comparisons show that the major bonding (Hamilton) populations in Ca6Pt8Cd16 and Er6Sb8Pd16 come from polar PtCd and PdSb interactions, that Pt exhibits larger relativistic contributions than Pd, that characteristic size and orbital differences are most evident for Sb 5s, Pt8, and Pd16, and that some terms remain incomparable, CaCd versus ErPd.

Samal, Saroj L. [Ames Laboratory; Gulo, Fakhili [Ames Laboratory; Corbett, John D. [Ames Laboratory

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

470

GaSb molecular beam epitaxial growth on p-InP(001) and passivation with in situ deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate oxide  

SciTech Connect

The integration of high carrier mobility materials into future CMOS generations is presently being studied in order to increase drive current capability and to decrease power consumption in future generation CMOS devices. If III-V materials are the candidates of choice for n-type channel devices, antimonide-based semiconductors present high hole mobility and could be used for p-type channel devices. In this work we first demonstrate the heteroepitaxy of fully relaxed GaSb epilayers on InP(001) substrates. In a second part, the properties of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaSb interface have been studied by in situ deposition of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} high-{kappa} gate dielectric. The interface is abrupt without any substantial interfacial layer, and is characterized by high conduction and valence band offsets. Finally, MOS capacitors show well-behaved C-V with relatively low D{sub it} along the bandgap, these results point out an efficient electrical passivation of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaSb interface.

Merckling, C.; Brammertz, G.; Hoffmann, T. Y.; Caymax, M.; Dekoster, J. [Interuniversity Microelectronics Center (IMEC vzw), Kapeldreef 75, 3001, Leuven (Belgium); Sun, X. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnelaan 200D, 3001, Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8284 (United States); Alian, A.; Heyns, M. [Interuniversity Microelectronics Center (IMEC vzw), Kapeldreef 75, 3001, Leuven (Belgium); Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnelaan 200D, 3001, Leuven (Belgium); Afanas'ev, V. V. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnelaan 200D, 3001, Leuven (Belgium)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Nanosecond in situ transmission electron microscope studies of the reversible Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} crystalline <==> amorphous phase transformation  

SciTech Connect

Chalcogenide-based phase-change materials have wide use in optical recording media and are growing in importance for use in non-volatile electronic memory. For both applications, rapid switching between the amorphous and crystalline phases is necessary, and understanding the changes during rapidly driven phase transitions is of scientific and technological significance. Laser-induced crystallization and amorphization occur rapidly and changes in atomic structure, microstructure, and temperature are difficult to observe experimentally and determine computationally. We have used nanosecond-scale time-resolved diffraction with intense electron pulses to study Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} during laser crystallization. Using a unique and unconventional specimen geometry, cycling between the amorphous and crystalline phases was achieved, enabling in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) study of both microstructural and crystallographic changes caused by repeated switching. Finite element analysis was used to simulate interactions of the laser with the nano-structured specimens and to model the rapidly changing specimen temperature. Such time-resolved experimental methods combined with simulation of experimentally inaccessible physical characteristics will be fundamental to advancing the understanding of rapidly driven phase transformations.

Santala, M. K.; Reed, B. W.; LaGrange, T.; Campbell, G. H.; Browning, N. D. [Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Topuria, T. [IBM Research Division, Almaden Research Center, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Raoux, S. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Meister, S. [Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Cui, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ARP PRODUCT SIMULANT AND SB4 TANK 40 SLUDGE SLURRY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The radioactive startup of two new SRS processing facilities, the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side-Solvent-Extraction Unit (MCU) will add two new waste streams to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The ARP will remove actinides from the 5.6 M salt solution resulting in a sludge-like product that is roughly half monosodium titanate (MST) insoluble solids and half sludge insoluble solids. The ARP product will be added to the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) at boiling and dewatered prior to pulling a SRAT receipt sample. The cesium rich MCU stream will be added to the SRAT at boiling after both formic and nitric acid have been added and the SRAT contents concentrated to the appropriate endpoint. A concern was raised by an external hydrogen review panel that the actinide loaded MST could act as a catalyst for hydrogen generation (Mar 15, 2007 report, Recommendation 9). Hydrogen generation, and it's potential to form a flammable mixture in the off-gas, under SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processing conditions has been a concern since the discovery that noble metals catalyze the decomposition of formic acid. Radiolysis of water also generates hydrogen, but the radiolysis rate is orders of magnitude lower than the noble metal catalyzed generation. As a result of the concern raised by the external hydrogen review panel, hydrogen generation was a prime consideration in this experiment. Testing was designed to determine whether the presence of the irradiated ARP simulant containing MST caused uncontrolled or unexpected hydrogen production during experiments simulating the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) due to activation of titanium. A Shielded Cells experiment, SC-5, was completed using SB4 sludge from Tank 405 combined with an ARP product produced from simulants by SRNL researchers. The blend of sludge and MST was designed to be prototypic of planned DWPF SRAT and SME cycles. As glass quality was not an objective in this experiment, no vitrification of the SME product was completed. The results from this experiment were compared to the results from experiment SC-1, a similar experiment with SB4 sludge without added ARP product. This report documents: (1) The preparation and subsequent composition of the ARP product. (2) The preparation and subsequent compositional characterization of the SRAT Receipt sample. Additional details will be presented concerning the noble metal concentration of the ARP product and the SRAT receipt sample. Also, calculations related to the amount of formic and nitric acid added during SRAT processing will be presented as excess formic acid will lead to additional hydrogen generation. (3) Highlights from processing during the SRAT cycle and SME cycle (CPC processing). Hydrogen generation will be discussed since this was the prime objective for this experiment. (4) A comparison of CPC processing between SC-1 (without ARP simulant) and SC-5. This work was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP)6, and analyses were guided by an Analytical Sample Support Matrix (ASSM)7. This Research and Development (R&D) was completed to support operation of DWPF.

Lambert, D; John Pareizs, J; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Stone, M; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Kim Crapse, K; David Hobbs, D

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

473

Room-temperature MBE deposition, thermoelectric properties, and advanced structural characterization of binary Bi[subscript 2]Te[subscript 3] and Sb[subscript 2]Te[subscript 3] thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films were grown at room temperature on SiO{sub 2} and BaF{sub 2} substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. A layer-by-layer growth was achieved such that metallic layers of the elements with 0.2 nm thickness were deposited. The layer structure in the as-deposited films was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and was seen more clearly in Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films. Subsequent annealing was done at 250 C for 2 h and produced the Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} crystal structure as confirmed by high-energy X-ray diffraction. This preparation process is referred to as nano-alloying and it was demonstrated to yield single-phase thin films of these compounds. In the thin films a significant texture could be identified with the crystal c axis being almost parallel to the growth direction for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and tilted by about 30{sup o} for Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films. In-plane transport properties were measured for the annealed films at room temperature. Both films yielded a charge carrier density of about 2.6 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. The Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films were p-type, had a thermopower of +130 {micro}V K{sup -1}, and surprisingly high mobilities of 402 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films were n-type, showed a thermopower of -153 {micro}V K{sup -1}, and yielded significantly smaller mobilities of 80 cm2 V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The chemical composition and microstructure of the films were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on cross sections of the thin films. The grain sizes were about 500 nm for the Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and 250 nm for the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films. In the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film, energy-filtered TEM allowed to image a Bi-rich grain boundary phase, several nanometers thick. This secondary phase explains the poor mobilities of the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film. With these results the high potential of the nano-alloying deposition technique for growing films with a more complex layer architecture is demonstrated.

Peranio, N.; Winkler, M.; Bessas, D.; Aabdin, Z.; Knig, J.; Bttner, H.; Hermann, R.P.; Eibl, O. (Julich); (Tubingen); (Fraunhofer)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

474

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by JOHNSON MATTNEY FUEL CELLS INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG36-07GO17019

475

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-018  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by 3M COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-07GO17006

476

Title: Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-041  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by GENERAL MOTOR for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC36-08GO28308.

477

W(A)93-039 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

monolith support and concludes with design, construction and operation of a 100 square-foot membrane area in a mobile prototype test facility on an actual waste stream. The...

478

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-039  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by 3M COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG36-08GO18134.

479

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-027  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by DAIMIER TRUCKS NORTH AMERICA for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003348.

480

Isotopic Studies of Contaminant Transport at the Hanford Site, WA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secretary of the Office of Environmental Management,Office of Science and Technology, under the Environmental Management

Christensen, J.N.; Conrad, M.E.; DePaolo, D.J.; Dresel, P.E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wa namibia sb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

carleton university ottaWa, canaDa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Carleton's greatest assets is its location in Ottawa, the nation's capital. A cosmopolitan city of close

482

EIS-0467: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE announces its intent to prepare an EIS for the Acquisition of a Natural Gas Pipeline and Natural Gas Utility Service at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Natural Gas Pipeline or NGP EIS), and initiate a 30-day public scoping period.

483

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by AE SOLAR for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005340.

484

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-022  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by ABENGOA BIOENERGY BIOMASS OF KANSAS, LLC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC3607017028

485

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-024  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by SIEMENS ENERGY, INC. for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005493.

486

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-015  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by GENERAL ELECTRIC GLOBAL REARCH for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FE0005859.

487

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by RAYMOND TINNERMAN MANUFACTURING INC. for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005438.

488

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by CREE for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FOA-0000439.

489

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-034  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by CORNING INCORPORATED for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005757.

490

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-065  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by OWENS CORNING for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005338.

491

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by GENERAL ELECTRICC GLOBAL RESEARCH for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FE0000784

492

EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA analyzes the potential environmental effects of a proposal by the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snowhomish County, Washington to construct and operate the Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project. The proposed 680-kilowatt project would be located on the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington, about 1 kilometer west of Whidbey Island, entirely within Island County, Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the lead agency. DOE is a cooperating agency.

493

Anemometer Data (Wind Speed, Direction) for Quinault #3, WA ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powering America, a DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) program. A dynamic map displaying all available data from DOE anemometer loan programs...

494

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-025  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by Grace Davison Company for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-05GO085006

495

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-020  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

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496

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497

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498

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500

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