National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wa namibia sb

  1. Bicon Namibia Consulting Engineers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Bicon Namibia Consulting Engineers Place: Windhoek, Namibia Sector: Wind energy Product: Windhoek-based engineering consultancy firm. Provides design and supervision of...

  2. Namibia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Unexpected > operator. SWERA logo.png SWERA View the Solar and Wind Energy Resource Atlas for Namibia. 5 Programs Namibia-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services National Action...

  3. Category:Seattle, WA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seattle, WA Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Seattle, WA" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total....

  4. BayWa Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BayWa Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: BayWa Group Place: Munich, Germany Zip: 81925 Sector: Services, Solar Product: Germany-based company with international operations...

  5. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-006 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WA05022DOWCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofdomesticandForeig.pdf WA04033CARGILLWaiverofPatentRightstoCARGILLDOWNL.pdf WA00022CARGILLDOWPOLYMERSLLCWaiverofDomest...

  6. MHK Projects/GPP Namibia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Namibia utility, GPP (subsidiary of Southern African Utility SELCo), for a 1.5 MW unit. Once this unit reaches its agreed performance criteria, it will be followed by a further 10...

  7. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2002-023 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2-023 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2002-023 PDF icon Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2002-023 More Documents & Publications Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2006-028 WA05056IBMWATSONRESEARCH...

  8. WA_00_022_CARGILL_DOW_POLYMERS_LLC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fo...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    22CARGILLDOWPOLYMERSLLCWaiverofDomesticandFo.pdf WA00022CARGILLDOWPOLYMERSLLCWaiverofDomesticandFo.pdf PDF icon WA00022CARGILLDOWPOLYMERSLLCWaiverofDom...

  9. WA_98_001_REYNOLDS_METALS_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_For...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8001REYNOLDSMETALSCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandFor.pdf WA98001REYNOLDSMETALSCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandFor.pdf PDF icon WA98001REYNOLDSMETALSCOMPANYWaiverofD...

  10. WA_02_035_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INTERNATIONALWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf More Documents & Publications WA06016BPSOLARINTERNATIONALWaiverofPatentRightsUnd.pdf WA02034BPSOLARINTERNATIONALLLCW...

  11. WA_03_010_SHELL_SOLAR_INDUSTRIES_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INDUSTRIESWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf More Documents & Publications WA02039SHELLSOLARSYSTEMSWaiverofPatentRightsUnder.pdf WA05059SHELLSOLARINDUSTRIESLPWaive...

  12. SB 1149 Schools Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon's retail electricity restructuring law, SB 1149, includes a requirement for the state's two largest utilities, Pacific Power and Portland General Electric, to collect a 3% public purpose...

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/19-WA-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well (19-WA-e) A...

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/11-WA-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Human Remains Process (11-WA-b) This flowchart...

  15. RAPID/Roadmap/5-WA-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Drilling and Well Development (5-WA-a) In Washington geothermal drilling and well development are regulated by the...

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/14-WA-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Underground Injection Control Permit (14-WA-c) The Safe Drinking Water Act requires Washington to implement...

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/18-WA-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Dangerous Solid Waste Permit (18-WA-b) The Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE) oversees the...

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/14-WA-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RAPIDRoadmap14-WA-b < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal...

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/15-WA-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Air Quality Permit - Notice of Construction Permit (15-WA-a) This flowchart illustrates...

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/15-WA-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Air Quality Permit - Operating Permit (15-WA-b) This flowchart illustrates the process for...

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/12-WA-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us State Trust Lands Habitat Conservation Plan Compliance (12-WA-b) The State of Washington has a Habitat Conservation Plan...

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/19-WA-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Water Conservancy Board Transfer or Change of Water Right (19-WA-d) In 1997, the Washington...

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/19-WA-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Transfer or Change of Water Right (19-WA-c) Much of Washington's public waters have been accounted for through...

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/19-WA-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us New Water Right Permit Process (19-WA-b) Washington uses a prior appropriation system for the...

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hanford Engineer Works - WA 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hanford Engineer Works - WA 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hanford Engineer Works (WA.01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see http://www.hanford.gov/ Documents Related to Hanford Engineer Works

  6. WA_06_016_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Und...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    06016BPSOLARINTERNATIONALWaiverofPatentRightsUnd.pdf WA06016BPSOLARINTERNATIONALWaiverofPatentRightsUnd.pdf PDF icon WA06016BPSOLARINTERNATIONALWaiverofP...

  7. WA_04_033_CARGILL_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_to_CARGILL_DOWN_L.pdf...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    33CARGILLWaiverofPatentRightstoCARGILLDOWNL.pdf WA04033CARGILLWaiverofPatentRightstoCARGILLDOWNL.pdf PDF icon WA04033CARGILLWaiverofPatentRightstoCARGI...

  8. WA_02_034_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_LLC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    verofDomesticand.pdf More Documents & Publications WA02035BPSOLARINTERNATIONALWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf WA06016BPSOLARINTERNATIONALWaiverofPatentRightsUnd...

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/6-WA-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the Washington Administrative Code. 6-WA-a - Oversize-Overweight Load Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number...

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/3-WA-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Washington State Department of Natural Resources. 3-WA-b - Land Access Overview.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number...

  11. Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Production Facility Hanford, WA Groves selects Hanford, Washington, as site for full-scale plutonium production and separation facilities. Three reactors--B, D, and F--are built....

  12. BayWa Sunways JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JV that specialises in developing, planning and realizing medium-sized to large photovoltaic systems and solar plants. References: BayWa & Sunways JV1 This article is a stub....

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/19-WA-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Water Access and Water Rights Overview (19-WA-a) Pursuant to RCW 78.60.060, developers that...

  14. WA_1994_003_GOLDEN_PHOTOCON_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Forei.pdf |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy WA_1994_003_GOLDEN_PHOTOCON_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Forei.pdf WA_1994_003_GOLDEN_PHOTOCON_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Forei.pdf PDF icon WA_1994_003_GOLDEN_PHOTOCON_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Forei.pdf More Documents & Publications WA_1995_030_GOLDEN_PHOTON_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign.pdf WA_1993_033_GOLDEN_PHOTON_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign.pdf WA_03_010_SHELL_SOLAR_INDUSTRIES_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore.pdf

  15. Sumas, WA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Sumas, WA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 5 2015 4 4 2 1 2016 1 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Sumas, WA LNG Imports from All Countries

  16. Climate Action Champions: Seattle, WA | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Seattle, WA Climate Action Champions: Seattle, WA The City of Seattle has long been at the leading edge of environmental innovation. Seattle has been recycling for over 25 years and today has one of the highest recycling and composting rates nationwide. In 2005, Seattle City Light became the first electric utility in the nation to be carbon neutral. Recently, Seattle was recognized as the “most sustainable city in the nation” by STAR communities with a 5-STAR rating and the highest

  17. Microsoft Word - WA Parish_MAP_Final.docx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project U. S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory June 2013 INTRODUCTION: The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) issued a final environmental impact statement (EIS; DOE/EIS-0473) for the W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project (Parish PCCS Project) in March 2013. DOE announced its decision to provide $167 million in cost-shared funding to NRG Energy, Inc. (NRG) for the

  18. File:06-WA-b - Washington Construction Storm Water Permit.pdf...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6-WA-b - Washington Construction Storm Water Permit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:06-WA-b - Washington Construction Storm Water...

  19. Mechanism of somatic hypermutation at the WA motif by human DNA...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at the WA motif by human DNA polymerase eta Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mechanism of somatic hypermutation at the WA motif by human DNA polymerase eta Authors: ...

  20. CRAD, NNSA- Safety Basis (SB)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CRAD for Safety Basis (SB). Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used to conduct a well-organized and thorough assessment of elements of safety and health programs.

  1. EIS-0397: Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to modify funding to the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, WA. The proposed project would help BPA meet its off-site mitigation responsibilities for anadromous fish affected by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System and increase overall fish production in the Columbia Basin.

  2. WA_01_018_IBM_Waiver_of_Governement_US_and_Foreign_Patent_Ri.pdf |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy 1_018_IBM_Waiver_of_Governement_US_and_Foreign_Patent_Ri.pdf WA_01_018_IBM_Waiver_of_Governement_US_and_Foreign_Patent_Ri.pdf PDF icon WA_01_018_IBM_Waiver_of_Governement_US_and_Foreign_Patent_Ri.pdf More Documents & Publications WA_04_053_IBM_CORP_Waiver_of_the_Government_U.S._and_Foreign.pdf WA_00_015_COMPAQ_FEDERAL_LLC_Waiver_Domestic_and_Foreign_Pat.pdf Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2002-023

  3. WA_04_047_CATERPILLAR_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_to_Inventi.pdf |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy 47_CATERPILLAR_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_to_Inventi.pdf WA_04_047_CATERPILLAR_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_to_Inventi.pdf PDF icon WA_04_047_CATERPILLAR_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_to_Inventi.pdf More Documents & Publications WA_04_046_CATERPILLAR_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_to_Inventi.pdf WA_04_071_CATERPILLAR_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_to_Inventi.pdf Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-052

  4. WA_04_069__EATON_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_.pdf |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy 69__EATON_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_.pdf WA_04_069__EATON_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_.pdf PDF icon WA_04_069__EATON_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_.pdf More Documents & Publications WA_04_059_EATON_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_.pdf WA_02_048_EATON_CORPORATION_Waviver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_A.pdf WA_04_074_EATON_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_I.pdf

  5. DWPF SB6 INITIAL CPC FLOWSHEET TESTING SB6-1 TO SB6-4L TESTS OF SB6-A AND SB6-B SIMULANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Best, D.

    2009-09-09

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing to Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) processing in late fiscal year 2010. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB6 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processes. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2008-0043, Rev.0 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB6 composition at the time of the study. This composition assumed a blend of 101,085 kg of Tank 4 insoluble solids and 179,000 kg of Tank 12 insoluble solids. The current plans are to subject Tank 12 sludge to aluminum dissolution. Liquid Waste Operations assumed that 75% of the aluminum would be dissolved during this process. After dissolution and blending of Tank 4 sludge slurry, plans included washing the contents of Tank 51 to {approx}1M Na. After the completion of washing, the plan assumes that 40 inches on Tank 40 slurry would remain for blending with the qualified SB6 material. There are several parameters that are noteworthy concerning SB6 sludge: (1) This is the second batch DWPF will be processing that contains sludge that has had a significant fraction of aluminum removed through aluminum dissolution; (2) The sludge is high in mercury, but the projected concentration is lower than SB5; (3) The sludge is high in noble metals, but the projected concentrations are lower than SB5; and(4) The sludge is high in U and Pu - components that are not added in sludge simulants. Six DWPF process simulations were completed in 4-L laboratory-scale equipment using two projections of the SB6 blend simulant composition (Tank 40 simulant after Tank 51 transfer is complete). The more washed simulant (SB6-A) had a set of four SRAT and SME simulations at varying acid stoichiometry levels (90%, 100%, 120% and 150%) using the Koopman Acid Prediction Calculation. Two additional SRAT simulations were made using SB6-B blend simulant at 100% and 120% of acid stoichiometry. SME cycles were noted performed for the SB6B simulants to allow the SRAT products to be used for melt rate testing.

  6. Scavenging Elemental Sb Through Addition of NbSb to Mm0.9Fe3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scavenging Elemental Sb Through Addition of NbSb to Mm0.9Fe3.5Co0.5S12 Skutterudites Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scavenging Elemental Sb Through Addition of NbSb to ...

  7. ERSUG Meeting: January 12 - 13, 1995 (Richland, WA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ERSUG Meeting: January 12 - 13, 1995 (Richland, WA) Dates January 12th & 13th, 1995 Location Pacific Northwest Laboratory Richland, Washington Presentations Summary of ERSUG Meeting January 12 - 13, 1995, Richland, Washington The latest Energy Research Supercomputer Users Group (ERSUG) meeting was held at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Richland, Washington, on January 12 - 13, 1995. Some of the talks are summarized below. The View from Washington (Tom Kitchens) Tom Kitchens presented the

  8. WA_97_027_GENERAL_ATOMICS__CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Domestic_an.pdf |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy 97_027_GENERAL_ATOMICS__CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Domestic_an.pdf WA_97_027_GENERAL_ATOMICS__CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Domestic_an.pdf PDF icon WA_97_027_GENERAL_ATOMICS__CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Domestic_an.pdf More Documents & Publications WA_99_014_UNITED_SOLAR_SYSTEMS_CORP_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_F.pdf Class Patent Waiver W(C)2004-001 WA_97_006_MOTOROLA_MANUFACTURING_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Patent_Ri

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bellingham, WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Bellingham, WA, that achieves HERS 43 without PV or HERS 13 with 3.2 kW of PV. The 1,055-ft2 two-story production home has 6-in. SIP walls, a 10-in. SIP roof, and ICF foundation walls with R-20 high-density rigid EPS foam under the slab. A single ductless heat pump heats

  10. AlGaAsSb/GaSb Distributed Bragg Reflectors Grown by Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Wang; C.J. Vineis; D.R. Calawa

    2002-02-13

    The first AlGaAsSb/GaSb quarter-wave distributed Bragg reflectors grown by metallic vapor phase epitaxy are reported. The peak reflectance is 96% for a 10-period structure.

  11. Method of making an InAsSb/InAsSbP diode lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Razeghi, M.

    1997-08-19

    InAsSb/InAsSbP/InAs Double Heterostructures (DH) and Separate Confinement Heterostructure Multiple Quantum Well (SCH-MQW) structures are taught wherein the ability to tune to a specific wavelength within 3 {micro}m to 5 {micro}m is possible by varying the ratio of As:Sb in the active layer. 9 figs.

  12. Method of making an InAsSb/InAsSbP diode lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Razeghi, Manijeh

    1997-01-01

    InAsSb/InAsSbP/InAs Double Heterostructures (DH) and Separate Confinement Heterostructure Multiple Quantum Well (SCH-MQW) structures are taught wherein the ability to tune to a specific wavelength within 3 .mu.m to 5 .mu.m is possible by varying the ratio of As:Sb in the active layer.

  13. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2006-028 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6-028 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2006-028 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by COLONY PROJECT under agreement SUBC-B555909, as the DOE has determined that granting such a waiver best serves the interests of the United States and the general public. PDF icon Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2006-028 More Documents & Publications Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-048 2011_INCITE_Fact_Sheets.pdf

  14. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-021 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2-021 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-021 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by USEC, INC. under agreement DE-NE0000488, as the DOE has determined that granting such a waiver best serves the interests of the United States and the general public. PDF icon Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-021 More Documents & Publications WA_1993_042_UNITED_TECHNOLOGIES_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_the_Go.pdf

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Coupeville, WA,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems Home | Department of Energy Coupeville, WA, Systems Home DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Coupeville, WA, Systems Home Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home on Whidbey Island, WA, that scored HERS 45 without PV. This 2,908-square-foot custom/system home has a SIP roof and walls, R-20 rigid foam under slab, triple-pane windows, ground source heat pump for radiant floor heat, and a unique balanced ventilation system using separate exhaust fans to bring

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Dwell Development, Seattle, WA,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems Home | Department of Energy Dwell Development, Seattle, WA, Systems Home DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Dwell Development, Seattle, WA, Systems Home Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Seattle, WA, that scored HERS 34 without PV. This 2,000-square-foot system home has R-45 double-stud walls, an unvented flat roof with 2 inches of spray foam plus 18 inches blown cellulose, R-42 XPS under slab, triple-pane windows, and a ductless mini-split heat pump. PDF icon Dwell

  17. Fisher & Paykel Appliances: ENERGY STAR Referral (WA42T26GW1) | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Fisher & Paykel Appliances: ENERGY STAR Referral (WA42T26GW1) Fisher & Paykel Appliances: ENERGY STAR Referral (WA42T26GW1) June 12, 2013 DOE referred the matter of Fisher & Paykel Appliances residential clothes washer, model WA42T26GW1, to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, brand manager for the ENERGY STAR Program, for appropriate action after DOE testing showed that the model does not meet the ENERGY STAR specification. PDF icon Fisher & Paykel Appliances:

  18. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-006 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-006 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by ...

  19. Best Practices Case Study: Devoted Builders, LLC, Mediterrtanean Villas, Pasco,WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-12-01

    Devoted Builders of Kennewick, WA worked with Building America's BIRA team to achieve the 50% Federal tax credit level energy savings on 81 homes at its Mediterranean Villas community in eastern Washington.

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Bellingham, WA, that achieves HERS 43 without PV or HERS 13 with 3.2 kW of PV.

  1. SbSI nanocrystal formation in AsSbSI glass under laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azhniuk, Yu.M.; Stoyka, V.; Petryshynets, I.; Rubish, V.M.; Guranich, O.G.; Gomonnai, A.V.; Zahn, D.R.T.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ? AsSbSI glasses are obtained by co-melting of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} and SbSI. ? The glass structure and composition are confirmed by SEM, EDX, and Raman studies. ? Laser-induced crystallization of SbSI from the glass is observed by Raman spectroscopy. -- Abstract: AsSbSI glasses are obtained by co-melting of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} and SbSI in a broad compositional interval. Their structure and composition are confirmed by the studies of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and micro-Raman scattering. Laser-induced crystallization of SbSI crystallites from the glass matrix is observed in the course of the micro-Raman measurement as a result of local laser beam heating.

  2. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-006 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8-006 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-006 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by CATERPILLAR, INC under agreement DE-FC26-00AL67017, as the DOE has determined that granting such a waiver best serves the interests of the United States and the general public. PDF icon Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-006 More Documents & Publications

  3. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-037 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-037 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by ALCATEL-LUCENT USA INC. under agreement DE-EE0002895, as the DOE has determined that granting such a waiver best serves the interests of the United States and the general public. PDF icon Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-037 More Documents & Publications A

  4. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-038 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-038 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by ALCATEL-LUCENT USA INC. under agreement DE-EE0002887, as the DOE has determined that granting such a waiver best serves the interests of the United States and the general public. PDF icon Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-038 More Documents & Publications A

  5. Growth mechanisms of GaSb heteroepitaxial films on Si with an AlSb buffer layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vajargah, S. Hosseini; Botton, G. A.; Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1; Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 ; Ghanad-Tavakoli, S.; Preston, J. S.; Kleiman, R. N.; Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7; Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7

    2013-09-21

    The initial growth stages of GaSb epilayers on Si substrates and the role of the AlSb buffer layer were studied by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). Heteroepitaxy of GaSb and AlSb on Si both occur by Volmer-Weber (i.e., island mode) growth. However, the AlSb and GaSb islands have distinctly different characteristics as revealed through an atomic-resolution structural study using Z-contrast of HAADF-STEM imaging. While GaSb islands are sparse and three dimensional, AlSb islands are numerous and flattened. The introduction of 3D island-forming AlSb buffer layer facilitates the nucleation of GaSb islands. The AlSb islands-assisted nucleation of GaSb islands results in the formation of drastically higher quality planar film at a significantly smaller thickness of films. The interface of the AlSb and GaSb epilayers with the Si substrate was further investigated with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry to elucidate the key role of the AlSb buffer layer in the growth of GaSb epilayers on Si substrates.

  6. Lattice-matched epitaxial GaInAsSb/GaSb thermophotovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.A.; Choi, H.K.; Turner, G.W.; Spears, D.L.; Manfra, M.J.; Charache, G.W.

    1997-05-01

    The materials development of Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} alloys for lattice-matched thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices is reported. Epilayers with cutoff wavelength 2--2.4 {micro}m at room temperature and lattice-matched to GaSb substrates were grown by both low-pressure organometallic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy. These layers exhibit high optical and structural quality. For demonstrating lattice-matched thermophotovoltaic devices, p- and n-type doping studies were performed. Several TPV device structures were investigated, with variations in the base/emitter thicknesses and the incorporation of a high bandgap GaSb or AlGaAsSb window layer. Significant improvement in the external quantum efficiency is observed for devices with an AlGaAsSb window layer compared to those without one.

  7. DWPF simulant CPC studies for SB8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D. C.; Zamecnik, J. R.

    2013-06-25

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) accepted a technical task request (TTR) from Waste Solidification Engineering to perform simulant tests to support the qualification of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) and to develop the flowsheet for SB8 in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). These efforts pertained to the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Separate studies were conducted for frit development and glass properties (including REDOX). The SRNL CPC effort had two primary phases divided by the decision to drop Tank 12 from the SB8 constituents. This report focuses on the second phase with SB8 compositions that do not contain the Tank 12 piece. A separate report will document the initial phase of SB8 testing that included Tank 12. The second phase of SB8 studies consisted of two sets of CPC studies. The first study involved CPC testing of an SB8 simulant for Tank 51 to support the CPC demonstration of the washed Tank 51 qualification sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells facility. SB8-Tank 51 was a high iron-low aluminum waste with fairly high mercury and moderate noble metal concentrations. Tank 51 was ultimately washed to about 1.5 M sodium which is the highest wash endpoint since SB3-Tank 51. This study included three simulations of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle with the sludge-only flowsheet at nominal DWPF processing conditions and three different acid stoichiometries. These runs produced a set of recommendations that were used to guide the successful SRNL qualification SRAT/SME demonstration with actual Tank 51 washed waste. The second study involved five SRAT/SME runs with SB8-Tank 40 simulant. Four of the runs were designed to define the acid requirements for sludge-only processing in DWPF with respect to nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. The fifth run was an intermediate acid stoichiometry demonstration of the coupled flowsheet for SB8. These runs produced a set of processing recommendations for DWPF along with some data related to Safety Class documentation at DWPF. Some significant observations regarding SB8 follow: Reduced washing in Tank 51 led to an increase in the wt.% soluble solids of the DWPF feed. If wt.% total solids for the SRAT and SME product werent adjusted upward to maintain insoluble solids levels similar to past sludge batches, then the rheological properties of the slurry went below the low end of the DWPF design bases for the SRAT and SME. Much higher levels of dissolved manganese were found in the SRAT and SME products than in recent sludge batches. Closed crucible melts were more reduced than expected. The working hypothesis is that the soluble Mn is less oxidizing than assumed in the REDOX calculations. A change in the coefficient for Mn in the REDOX equation was recommended in a separate report. The DWPF (Hsu) stoichiometric acid equation was examined in detail to better evaluate how to control acid in DWPF. The existing DWPF equation can likely be improved without changing the required sample analyses through a paper study using existing data. The recommended acid stoichiometry for initial SB8 SRAT batches is 115-120% stoichiometry until some processing experience is gained. The conservative range (based on feed properties) of stoichiometric factors derived in this study was from 110-147%, but SRNL recommends using only the lower half of this range, 110-126% even after initial batches provide processing experience. The stoichiometric range for sludge-only processing appears to be suitable for coupled operation based on results from the run in the middle of the range. Catalytic hydrogen was detectable (>0.005 vol%) in all SRAT and SME cycles. Hydrogen reached 30-35% of the SRAT and SME limits at the mid-point of the stoichiometry window (bounding noble metals and acid demand).

  8. Sumas, WA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Sumas, WA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 5 2015 4 4 2 1 2016 1 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Sumas, WA Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Canada

  9. W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture and Sequestration Project

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Phase 1 Definition (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture and Sequestration Project Phase 1 Definition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture and Sequestration Project Phase 1 Definition For a secure and sustainable energy future, the United States (U.S.) must reduce its dependence on imported oil and reduce its emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2})

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Whidbey Island, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home on Whidbey Island, WA, that scores HERS 37 without PV or HERS -13 with 10 kW PV, enough to power the home and an electric car. The two-story custom home...

  11. DWPF Simulant CPC Studies For SB8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, J. D.

    2013-09-25

    Prior to processing a Sludge Batch (SB) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), flowsheet studies using simulants are performed. Typically, the flowsheet studies are conducted based on projected composition(s). The results from the flowsheet testing are used to 1) guide decisions during sludge batch preparation, 2) serve as a preliminary evaluation of potential processing issues, and 3) provide a basis to support the Shielded Cells qualification runs performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). SB8 was initially projected to be a combination of the Tank 40 heel (Sludge Batch 7b), Tank 13, Tank 12, and the Tank 51 heel. In order to accelerate preparation of SB8, the decision was made to delay the oxalate-rich material from Tank 12 to a future sludge batch. SB8 simulant studies without Tank 12 were reported in a separate report.1 The data presented in this report will be useful when processing future sludge batches containing Tank 12. The wash endpoint target for SB8 was set at a significantly higher sodium concentration to allow acceptable glass compositions at the targeted waste loading. Four non-coupled tests were conducted using simulant representing Tank 40 at 110-146% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Hydrogen was generated during high acid stoichiometry (146% acid) SRAT testing up to 31% of the DWPF hydrogen limit. SME hydrogen generation reached 48% of of the DWPF limit for the high acid run. Two non-coupled tests were conducted using simulant representing Tank 51 at 110-146% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Hydrogen was generated during high acid stoichiometry SRAT testing up to 16% of the DWPF limit. SME hydrogen generation reached 49% of the DWPF limit for hydrogen in the SME for the high acid run. Simulant processing was successful using previously established antifoam addition strategy. Foaming during formic acid addition was not observed in any of the runs. Nitrite was destroyed in all runs and no N2O was detected during SME processing. Mercury behavior was consistent with that seen in previous SRAT runs. Mercury was stripped below the DWPF limit on 0.8 wt% for all runs. Rheology yield stress fell within or below the design basis of 1-5 Pa. The low acid Tank 40 run (106% acid stoichiometry) had the highest yield stress at 3.78 Pa.

  12. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend, Seattle, WA, Custom Home

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Seattle, WA, that scored HERS 37 without PV, HERS -1 with PV. This 1,915-square-foot custom home has SIP walls and roof, R-20 XPS under the slab, triple-pane windows, an air to water heat pump for radiant heat, and balanced ventilation with timer-controlled fans to bring in and exhaust air.

  13. Fragile structural transition in Mo3Sb7

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, Jiaqiang -Q.; McGuire, Michael A; May, Andrew F; Parker, David S.; Mandrus, D. G.; Sales, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    Mo3Sb7 single crystals lightly doped with Cr, Ru, or Te are studied in order to explore the interplay between superconductivity, magnetism, and the cubic-tetragonal structural transition. The structural transition at 53 K is extremely sensitive to Ru or Te substitution which introduces additional electrons, but robust against Cr substitution. We observed no sign of a structural transition in superconducting Mo2.91Ru0.09Sb7 and Mo3Sb6.975Te0.025. In contrast, 3 at.% Cr doping only slightly suppresses the structural transition to 48 K while leaving no trace of superconductivity above 1.8 K. Analysis of magnetic properties suggests that the interdimer interaction in Mo3Sb7 is near amore » critical value and essential for the structural transition. Futhermore, all dopants suppress the superconductivity of Mo3Sb7. The tetragonal structure is not necessary for superconductivity.« less

  14. The reaction mechanism of SnSb and Sb thin film anodes for Na-ion batteries studied by X-ray diffraction, 119Sn and 121Sb M ssbauer spectroscopies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baggetto, Loic; Hah, Hien-Yoong; Jumas, Dr. Jean-Claude; Johnson, Prof. Dr. Charles E.; Johnson, Jackie A.; Keum, Jong Kahk; Bridges, Craig A; Veith, Gabriel M

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical reaction of Sb and SnSb anode materials with Na results in the formation of amorphous materials. To understand the resulting phases and electrochemical capacities we studied the reaction products local order using 119Sn and 121Sb M ssbauer spectroscopies in conjunction with measurements performed on model powder compounds of Na-Sn and Na-Sb to further clarify the reactions steps. For pure Sb the discharge (sodiation) starts with the formation of an amorphous phase composed of atomic environments similar to those found in NaSb, and proceeds further by the formation of environments similar to that present in Na3Sb. The reversible reactionmore » takes place during a large portion of the charge process. At full charge the anode material still contains a substantial fraction of Na, which explains the lack of recrystallization into crystalline Sb. The reaction of SnSb yields Na3Sb crystalline phase at full discharge at higher temperatures (65 and 95 C) while the room temperature reaction yields amorphous compounds. The electrochemically-driven, solid-state amorphization reaction occurring at room temperature is governed by the simultaneous formation of Na-coordinated Sn and Sb environments, as monitored by the decrease (increase) of the 119Sn (121Sb) M ssbauer isomer shifts. Overall, the monitoring of the hyperfine parameters enables to correlate the changes in Na content to the individual Sn and Sb local chemical environments.« less

  15. The reaction mechanism of SnSb and Sb thin film anodes for Na-ion batteries studied by X-ray diffraction, 119Sn and 121Sb Mössbauer spectroscopies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baggetto, Loïc; Hah, Hien-Yoong; Jumas, Jean-Claude; Johnson, Charles E.; Johnson, Jacqueline A.; Keum, Jong K.; Bridges, Craig A.; Veith, Gabriel M.

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical reaction of Sb and SnSb anode materials with Na results in the formation of amorphous materials. To understand the resulting phases and electrochemical capacities we studied the reaction products local order using 119Sn and 121Sb Mössbauer spectroscopies in conjunction with measurements performed on model powder compounds of Na-Sn and Na-Sb to further clarify the reactions steps. For pure Sb the discharge (sodiation) starts with the formation of an amorphous phase composed of atomic environments similar to those found in NaSb, and proceeds further by the formation of environments similar to that present in Na3Sb. The reversible reaction takesmore » place during a large portion of the charge process. At full charge the anode material still contains a substantial fraction of Na, which explains the lack of recrystallization into crystalline Sb. The reaction of SnSb yields Na3Sb crystalline phase at full discharge at higher temperatures (65 and 95°C) while the room temperature reaction yields amorphous compounds. The electrochemically-driven, solid-state amorphization reaction occurring at room temperature is governed by the simultaneous formation of Na-coordinated Sn and Sb environments, as monitored by the decrease (increase) of the 119Sn (121Sb) Mössbauer isomer shifts. Overall, the monitoring of the hyperfine parameters enables to correlate the changes in Na content to the individual Sn and Sb local chemical environments.« less

  16. Anisotropic giant magnetoresistance in NbSb?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Kefeng [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Graf, D. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Li, Lijun [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wang, Limin [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Petrovic, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-12-05

    We report large transverse magnetoreistance (the magnetoresistant ratio ~ 1.3 10?% in 2 K and 9 T field, and 4.3 10?% in 0.4 K and 32 T field, without saturation) and field-induced metal semiconductor-like transition in NbSb?. Magnetoresistance is significantly suppressed but the metal-semiconductor-like transition persists when the current is along the ac-plane. The sign reversal of the Hall resistivity and Seebeck coefficient in the field, plus the electronic structure reveal the coexistence of a small number of holes with very high mobility and a large number of electrons with low mobility. The large MR is attributed to the change of the Fermi surface induced by the magnetic field in addition to the high mobility metal.

  17. Enhanced optical property in quaternary GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Chien-Hung Lee, Chien-Ping

    2014-10-21

    High quality GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb quantum wells (QWs) have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy using proper interface treatments. By controlling the group-V elements at interfaces, we obtained excellent optical quality QWs, which were free from undesired localized trap states, which may otherwise severely affect the exciton recombination. Strong and highly efficient exciton emissions up to room temperature with a wavelength of 2.2 μm were observed. A comprehensive investigation on the QW quality was carried out using temperature dependent and power dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The PL emission intensity remains nearly constant at low temperatures and is free from the PL quenching from the defect induced localized states. The temperature dependent emission energy had a bulk-like behavior, indicating high quality well/barrier interfaces. Because of the uniformity of the QWs and smooth interfaces, the low temperature limit of inhomogeneous line width broadening is as small as 5 meV.

  18. TANK 40 FINAL SB6 CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.

    2010-08-13

    A sample of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) was taken from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS), and a portion of the sample was designated for SB6 processing studies. The SB6 WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals and fissile composition, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to DWPF as SB6. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB6 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene vessel and solids were allowed to settle overnight. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 485 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples.

  19. The reaction mechanism of SnSb and Sb thin film anodes for Na-ion batteries studied by X-ray diffraction, 119Sn and 121Sb Mössbauer spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baggetto, Loïc; Hah, Hien-Yoong; Jumas, Jean-Claude; Johnson, Charles E.; Johnson, Jacqueline A.; Keum, Jong K.; Bridges, Craig A.; Veith, Gabriel M.

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical reaction of Sb and SnSb anode materials with Na results in the formation of amorphous materials. To understand the resulting phases and electrochemical capacities we studied the reaction products local order using 119Sn and 121Sb Mössbauer spectroscopies in conjunction with measurements performed on model powder compounds of Na-Sn and Na-Sb to further clarify the reactions steps. For pure Sb the discharge (sodiation) starts with the formation of an amorphous phase composed of atomic environments similar to those found in NaSb, and proceeds further by the formation of environments similar to that present in Na3Sb. The reversible reaction takes place during a large portion of the charge process. At full charge the anode material still contains a substantial fraction of Na, which explains the lack of recrystallization into crystalline Sb. The reaction of SnSb yields Na3Sb crystalline phase at full discharge at higher temperatures (65 and 95°C) while the room temperature reaction yields amorphous compounds. The electrochemically-driven, solid-state amorphization reaction occurring at room temperature is governed by the simultaneous formation of Na-coordinated Sn and Sb environments, as monitored by the decrease (increase) of the 119Sn (121Sb) Mössbauer isomer shifts. Overall, the monitoring of the hyperfine parameters enables to correlate the changes in Na content to the individual Sn and Sb local chemical environments.

  20. Quaternary InGaAsSb Thermophotovoltaic Diode Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Dashiell; J Beausang; H Ehsani; G Nichols; D DePoy; L Danielson; P Talamo; K Rahner; E Brown; S Burger; P Fourspring; W Topper; P Baldasaro; C Wang; R Huang; M Connors; G Turner; Z Shellenbarger; G Taylor; Jizhong Li; R Martinelli; D Donetski; S Anikeev; G Belenky; S Luryl

    2005-01-26

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) diodes fabricated from InGaAsSb alloys lattice-matched to GaSb substrates are grown by Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV diodes utilizing front-surface spectral control filters have been tested in a vacuum cavity and a TPV thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency ({eta}{sub TPV}) and a power density (PD) of {eta}{sub TPV} = 19% and PD=0.58 W/cm{sup 2} were measured for T{sub radiator} = 950 C and T{sub diode} = 27 C. Recombination coefficients deduced from minority carrier measurements and the theory reviewed in this article predict a practical limit to the maximum achievable conversion efficiency and power density for 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV. The limits for the above operating temperatures are projected to be {eta}{sub TPV} = 26% and PD = 0.75 W/cm{sup 2}. These limits are extended to {eta}{sub TPV} = 30% and PD = 0.85W/cm{sup 2} if the diode active region is bounded by a reflective back surface to enable photon recycling and a two-pass optical path length. The internal quantum efficiency of the InGaAsSb TPV diode is close to the theoretically predicted limits, with the exception of short wavelength absorption in GaSb contact layers. Experiments show that the open circuit voltage of the 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV diodes is not strongly dependent on the device architectures studied in this work where both N/P and P/N double heterostructure diodes have been grown with various acceptor and donor doping levels, having GaSb and AlGaAsSb confinement, and also partial back surface reflectors. Lattice matched InGaAsSb TPV diodes were fabricated with bandgaps ranging from 0.6 to 0.5eV without significant degradation of the open circuit voltage factor, quantum efficiency, or fill factor as the composition approached the miscibility gap. The key diode performance parameter which is limiting efficiency and power density below the theoretical limits in InGaAsSb TPV devices is the open circuit voltage. The open circuit voltages of state-of-the-art 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV diode are {approx}10% lower than the predicted semi-empirical limit to open circuit voltage for a device having absorbing substrate; the voltages are {approx}17% below that for an Auger-limited device having back surface reflector and two-pass optical design.

  1. Chemical ordering rather than random alloying in SbAs (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chemical ordering rather than random alloying in SbAs Title: Chemical ordering rather than random alloying in SbAs Authors: Shoemaker, Daniel P. ; Chasapis, Thomas C. ; Do, Dat ; ...

  2. Structural transformations in amorphous ↔ crystalline phase change of Ga-Sb alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T. G.; Sen, S.; Hung, I.; Gan, Z.; Kalkan, B.; Raoux, S.

    2013-12-21

    Ga-Sb alloys with compositions ranging between ∼12 and 50 at. % Ga are promising materials for phase change random access memory applications. The short-range structures of two such alloys with compositions Ga{sub 14}Sb{sub 86} and Ga{sub 46}Sb{sub 54} are investigated, in their amorphous and crystalline states, using {sup 71}Ga and {sup 121}Sb nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The Ga and Sb atoms are fourfold coordinated in the as-deposited amorphous Ga{sub 46}Sb{sub 54} with nearly 40% of the constituent atoms being involved in Ga-Ga and Sb-Sb homopolar bonding. This necessitates extensive bond switching and elimination of homopolar bonds during crystallization. On the other hand, Ga and Sb atoms are all threefold coordinated in the as-deposited amorphous Ga{sub 14}Sb{sub 86}. Crystallization of this material involves phase separation of GaSb domains in Sb matrix and a concomitant increase in the Ga coordination number from 3 to 4. Results from crystallization kinetics experiments suggest that the melt-quenching results in the elimination of structural “defects” such as the homopolar bonds and threefold coordinated Ga atoms in the amorphous phases of these alloys, thereby rendering them structurally more similar to the corresponding crystalline states compared to the as-deposited amorphous phases.

  3. EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for a project proposed by NRG Energy, Inc (NRG). DOE selected NRG’s proposed W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project for a financial assistance award through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative Program. NRG would design, construct and operate a commercial-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture facility at its existing W.A. Parish Generating Station in Fort Bend County, Texas; deliver the CO2 via a new pipeline to the existing West Ranch oil field in Jackson County, Texas, for use in enhanced oil recovery operations; and demonstrate monitoring techniques to verify the permanence of geologic CO2 storage.

  4. Electronic inhomogeneity and Ag:Sb imbalance of Ag1-yPb18Sb1+zTe20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high-performance thermoelectrics elucidated by 125Te and 207Pb NMR | Energy Frontier Research Centers Electronic inhomogeneity and Ag:Sb imbalance of Ag1-yPb18Sb1+zTe20 high-performance thermoelectrics elucidated by 125Te and 207Pb NMR Home Author: E.M. Levin, B.A. Cook, K. Ahn, M.G. Kanatzidis, K. Schmidt-Rohr Year: 2009 Abstract: Using magic-angle spinning 125Te and 207Pb NMR, we have discovered the presence of two phases of approximately tenfold different free-electron concentration, n,

  5. Origin State>> CA ID ID ID IL KY NV NY NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NV NY NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant National Security Technologies Brookhaven National Laboratory West Valley Environmental Services Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12 Plant Materials & Energy Corporation

  6. Origin State>> CA ID ID ID IL MD NM NM NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Argonne National Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground Sandia National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12 Plant Materials & Energy Corporation (M&EC) Perma-Fix

  7. Origin State>> CA ID ID ID IL NM NM OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NM NM OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Argonne National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12 Plant Materials & Energy Corporation (M&EC) Perma-Fix Nuclear Fuels Services Wastren Advantage, Inc.

  8. Origin State>> CA ID ID IL IL KY NM NM NV NY OH TN TN TN, WA,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IL IL KY NM NM NV NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Energx Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Sandia National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory National Security Technologies West Valley Environmental Services Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12 Plant

  9. Low temperature thermoelectric properties of Co0.9Fe0.1Sb3-based

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    skutterudite nanocomposites with FeSb2 nanoinclusions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Low temperature thermoelectric properties of Co0.9Fe0.1Sb3-based skutterudite nanocomposites with FeSb2 nanoinclusions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low temperature thermoelectric properties of Co0.9Fe0.1Sb3-based skutterudite nanocomposites with FeSb2 nanoinclusions Bulk thermoelectric nanocomposite materials have great potential to exhibit higher ZT due to effects arising from their

  10. Thermoelectric properties of Co0.9Fe0.1Sb3-based skutterudite

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nanocomposites with FeSb2 nanoinclusions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Thermoelectric properties of Co0.9Fe0.1Sb3-based skutterudite nanocomposites with FeSb2 nanoinclusions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermoelectric properties of Co0.9Fe0.1Sb3-based skutterudite nanocomposites with FeSb2 nanoinclusions Bulk thermoelectric nanocomposite materials have great potential to exhibit higher figure of merit due to effects arising from the nanostructure. In this paper, we report

  11. Spintronic properties of Li1.5Mn0.5Z (Z=As, Sb) compounds in the Cu2Sb

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    structure (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: Spintronic properties of Li1.5Mn0.5Z (Z=As, Sb) compounds in the Cu2Sb structure This content will become publicly available on January 26, 2017 « Prev Next » Title: Spintronic properties of Li1.5Mn0.5Z (Z=As, Sb) compounds in the Cu2Sb structure Authors: Damewood, L. ; Fong, C. Y. ; Klein, B. M. ; Yang, L. H. ; Felser, C. Publication Date: 2015-03-01 OSTI Identifier: 1249897 Grant/Contract Number: AC52-07NA27344

  12. Spintronic properties of Li1.5Mn0.5Z (Z=As, Sb) compounds in the Cu2Sb

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    structure (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Spintronic properties of Li1.5Mn0.5Z (Z=As, Sb) compounds in the Cu2Sb structure Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on January 26, 2017 Title: Spintronic properties of Li1.5Mn0.5Z (Z=As, Sb) compounds in the Cu2Sb structure Authors: Damewood, L. ; Fong, C. Y. ; Klein, B. M. ; Yang, L. H. ; Felser, C. Publication Date: 2015-03-01 OSTI Identifier: 1249897 Grant/Contract Number: AC52-07NA27344 Type:

  13. Scavenging Elemental Sb Through Addition of NbSb to Mm0.9Fe3.5Co0.5S12

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Skutterudites (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Scavenging Elemental Sb Through Addition of NbSb to Mm0.9Fe3.5Co0.5S12 Skutterudites Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scavenging Elemental Sb Through Addition of NbSb to Mm0.9Fe3.5Co0.5S12 Skutterudites Authors: Zhang, Long ; Zhou, Chen ; Morelli, Donald T ; Sakamoto, Jeffrey Publication Date: 2012-02-07 OSTI Identifier: 1066320 DOE Contract Number: SC0001054 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of

  14. Quaternary InGaAsSb Thermophotovoltaic Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MW Dashiell; JF Beausang; H Ehsani; GJ Nichols; DM Depoy; LR Danielson; P Talamo; KD Rahner; EJ Brown; SR Burger; PM Foruspring; WF Topper; PF Baldasaro; CA Wang; R Huang; M Connors; G Turner; Z Shellenbarger; G Taylor; J Li; R Martinelli; D Donetski; S Anikeev; G Belenky; S Luryi

    2006-03-09

    In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1-y} thermophotovoltaic (TPV) diodes were grown lattice-matched to GaSb substrates by Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE) in the bandgap range of E{sub G} = 0.5 to 0.6eV. InGaAsSb TPV diodes, utilizing front-surface spectral control filters, are measured with thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency and power density of {eta}{sub TPV} = 19.7% and PD =0.58 W/cm{sup 2} respectively for a radiator temperature of T{sub radiator} = 950 C, diode temperature of T{sub diode} = 27 C, and diode bandgap of E{sub G} = 0.53eV. Practical limits to TPV energy conversion efficiency are established using measured recombination coefficients and optical properties of front surface spectral control filters, which for 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV energy conversion is {eta}{sub TPV} = 28% and PD = 0.85W/cm{sup 2} at the above operating temperatures. The most severe performance limits are imposed by (1) diode open-circuit voltage (VOC) limits due to intrinsic Auger recombination and (2) parasitic photon absorption in the inactive regions of the module. Experimentally, the diode V{sub OC} is 15% below the practical limit imposed by intrinsic Auger recombination processes. Analysis of InGaAsSb diode electrical performance vs. diode architecture indicate that the V{sub OC} and thus efficiency is limited by extrinsic recombination processes such as through bulk defects.

  15. TANK 40 FINAL SB7B CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-03-15

    A sample of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) was taken from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB7b WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals and fissile constituents, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as SB7b. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB7b sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle over the weekend. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 558 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon{reg_sign} vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass - 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB7b supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH{sup -}/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses, and Cs-137 gamma scan. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH{sup -}/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method developed by SRNL AD and previously described. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results reported here: (1) The ratios of the major elements for the SB7b WAPS sample are different from those measured for the SB7a WAPS sample. There is less Al and Mn relative to Fe than the previous sludge batch. (2) The elemental composition of this sample and the analyses conducted here are reasonable and consistent with DWPF batch data measurements in light of DWPF pre-sample concentration and SRAT product heel contributions to the DWPF SRAT receipt analyses. The element ratios for Al/Fe, Ca/Fe, Mn/Fe, and U/Fe agree within 10% between this work and the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt analyses. (3) Sulfur in the SB7b WAPS sample is 82% soluble, slightly less than results reported for SB3, SB4, and SB6 samples but unlike the 50% insoluble sulfur observed in the SB5 WAPS sample. In addition, 23% of the soluble sulfur is not present as sulfate in SB7b. (4) The average activities of the fissile isotopes of interest in the SB7b WAPS sample are (in {mu}Ci/g of total dried solids): 4.22E-02 U-233, 6.12E-04 U-235, 1.08E+01 Pu-239, and 5.09E+01 Pu-241. The full radionuclide composition will be reported in a future document. (5) The fission product noble metal and Ag concentrations appear to have largely peaked in previous DWPF sludge batches, with the exception of Ru, which still shows a slight increase in SB7b.

  16. Influence of substituting Sn for Sb on the thermoelectric transport properties of CoSb{sub 3}-based skutterudites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hui, Si; Nielsen, Michele D.; Homer, Mark R.; Medlin, Douglas L.; Tobola, Janusz; Salvador, James R.; Heremans, Joseph P.; Pipe, Kevin P.; Uher, Ctirad

    2014-03-14

    Band structure calculations that incorporate impurity effects suggest that a band resonant state may be formed in p-type CoSb{sub 3}-based skutterudites by replacing Sb atoms with Sn dopant atoms. Such resonant states have the potential to greatly improve thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency by increasing the density of states variation near the Fermi level, thereby increasing the Seebeck coefficient at a given carrier concentration. Through transport measurements of the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and Hall coefficient, we show that a practical band resonant state is not achieved by Sn doping. Compared to undoped CoSb{sub 3}, the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) in Sn-doped CoSb{sub 3} is enhanced slightly at high temperatures to a value of 0.2, mostly due to a reduction in thermal conductivity. The Fermi level is calculated not to reach the band resonant state induced by Sn impurity atoms within the range of Sn concentrations examined here.

  17. Magnetic properties of MnSb inclusions formed in GaSb matrix directly during molecular beam epitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, Krystyna; Wolska, Anna; Klepka, Marcin T.; Kret, Slawomir; Kurowska, Boguslawa; Kowalski, Bogdan J.; Twardowski, Andrzej; Wasik, Dariusz; Kwiatkowski, Adam; Sadowski, Janusz

    2011-04-01

    Despite of intensive search for the proper semiconductor base materials for spintronic devices working at room temperature no appropriate material based on ferromagnetic semiconductors has been found so far. We demonstrate that the phase segregated system with MnSb hexagonal inclusions inside the GaSb matrix, formed directly during the molecular beam epitaxial growth reveals the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature and is a good candidate for exploitation in spintronics. Furthermore, the MnSb inclusions with only one crystalline structure were identified in this GaMn:MnSb granular material. The SQUID magnetometry confirmed that this material exhibits ferromagnetic like behavior starting from helium up to room temperature. Moreover, the magnetic anisotropy was found which was present also at room temperature, and it was proved that by choosing a proper substrate it is possible to control the direction of easy axis of inclusions' magnetization moment between in-plane and out-of-plane; the latter is important in view of potential applications in spintronic devices.

  18. Phase transitions in Ge-Sb phase change materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raoux, Simone; Virwani, Kumar; Hitzbleck, Martina; Salinga, Martin; Madan, Anita; Pinto, Teresa L.

    2009-03-15

    Thin films of the phase change material Ge-Sb with Ge concentrations between 7.3 and 81.1 at. % were deposited by cosputtering from elemental targets. Their crystallization behavior was studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, x-ray reflectivity, profilometry, optical reflectivity, and resistivity versus temperature measurements. It was found that the crystallization temperature increases with Ge content. Calculations of the glass transition temperature (which is a lower limit for the crystallization temperature T{sub x}) also show an increase with Ge concentration closely tracking the measured values of T{sub x}. For low Ge content samples, Sb x-ray diffraction peaks occurred during a heating ramp at lower temperature than Ge diffraction peaks. The appearance of Ge peaks is related to Ge precipitation and agglomeration. For Ge concentrations of 59.3 at. % and higher, Sb and Ge peaks occurred at the same temperature. Upon crystallization, film mass density and optical reflectivity increase as well as electrical contrast (ratio of resistivity in amorphous phase to crystalline phase) all showed a maximum for the eutectic alloy (14.5 at. % Ge). For the alloy with 59.3 at. % Ge there was very little change in any of these parameters, while the alloy with 81.1 at. % Ge behaved opposite to a typical phase change alloy and showed reduced mass density and reflectivity and increased resistivity.

  19. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham Power House, Bellingham, WA

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bellingham Power House Bellingham, WA DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to

  20. Analyses of soils at commercial radioactive-waste-disposal sites. [Barnwell, SC; Richland, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Shea, C.E.; Barletta, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory, in order to provide technical assistance to the NRC, has measured a number of physical and chemical characteristics of soils from two currently operating commercial radioactive waste disposal sites; one at Barnwell, SC, and the other near Richland, WA. Soil samples believed to be representative of the soil that will contact the buried waste were collected and analyzed. Earth resistivities (field measurements), from both sites, supply information to identify variations in subsurface material. Barnwell soil resistivities (laboratory measurements) range from 3.6 x 10/sup 5/ ohm-cm to 8.9 x 10/sup 4/ ohm-cm. Soil resistivities of the Hanford sample vary from 3.0 x 10/sup 5/ ohm-cm to 6.6 x 10/sup 3/ ohm-cm. The Barnwell and Hanford soil pH ranges from 4.8 to 5.4 and from 4.0 to 7.2 respectively. The pH of a 1:2 mixture of soil to 0.01 M CaCl/sub 2/ resulted in a pH for the Barnwell samples of 3.9 +- 0.1 and for the Hanford samples of 7.4 +- 0.2. These values are comparable to the pH measurements of the water extract of the soils used for the analyses of soluble ion content of the soils. The exchange acidity of the soils was found to be approximately 7 mg-eq per 100 g of dry soil for clay material from Barnwell, whereas the Hanford soils showed an alkaline reaction. Aqueous extracts of saturated pastes were used to determine the concentrations of the following ions: Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, HCO/sub 3//sup -/, SO/sub 4//sup =/, and Cl/sup -/. The sulfide content of each of the soils was measured in a 1:2.5 mixture of soil to an antioxidant buffer solution. The concentrations of soluble ions found in the soils from both sites are consistent with the high resistivities.

  1. Short-wave infrared barriode detectors using InGaAsSb absorption material lattice matched to GaSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, A. P.; Percy, B.; Marshall, A. R. J.; Jain, M.; Wicks, G.; Hossain, K.; Golding, T.; McEwan, K.; Howle, C.

    2015-05-18

    Short-wave infrared barriode detectors were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. An absorption layer composition of In{sub 0.28}Ga{sub 0.72}As{sub 0.25}Sb{sub 0.75} allowed for lattice matching to GaSb and cut-off wavelengths of 2.9 μm at 250 K and 3.0 μm at room temperature. Arrhenius plots of the dark current density showed diffusion limited dark currents approaching those expected for optimized HgCdTe-based detectors. Specific detectivity figures of around 7×10{sup 10} Jones and 1×10{sup 10} Jones were calculated, for 240 K and room temperature, respectively. Significantly, these devices could support focal plane arrays working at higher operating temperatures.

  2. Comparative analysis of hole transport in compressively strained InSb and Ge quantum well heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Ashish; Barth, Michael; Madan, Himanshu; Datta, Suman; Lee, Yi-Jing; Lin, You-Ru; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Ko, Chih-Hsin; Wann, Clement H.; Loubychev, Dmitri; Liu, Amy; Fastenau, Joel; Lindemuth, Jeff

    2014-08-04

    Compressively strained InSb (s-InSb) and Ge (s-Ge) quantum well heterostructures are experimentally studied, with emphasis on understanding and comparing hole transport in these two-dimensional confined heterostructures. Magnetotransport measurements and bandstructure calculations indicate 2.5 lower effective mass for s-InSb compared to s-Ge quantum well at 1.9??10{sup 12}?cm{sup 2}. Advantage of strain-induced m* reduction is negated by higher phonon scattering, degrading hole transport at room temperature in s-InSb quantum well compared to s-Ge heterostructure. Consequently, effective injection velocity is superior in s-Ge compared to s-InSb. These results suggest s-Ge quantum well heterostructure is more favorable and promising p-channel candidate compared to s-InSb for future technology node.

  3. Ab initio study of structural, electronic, magnetic alloys: XTiSb (X = Co, Ni and Fe)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibrir, M. Berri, S.; Lakel, S.; Alleg, S.; Bensalem, R.

    2015-03-30

    Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of three semi-Heusler compounds of CoTiSb, NiTiSb and FeTiSb were calculated by the method (FP-LAPW) which is based on the DFT code WIEN2k. We used the generalized gradient approximation (GGA (06)) for the term of the potential exchange and correlation (XC) to calculate structural properties, electronic properties and magnetic properties. Structural properties obtained as the lattice parameter are in good agreement with the experimental results available for the electronic and magnetic properties was that: CoTiSb is a semiconductor NiTiSb is a metal and FeTiSb is a half-metal ferromagnetic.

  4. Chemical ordering rather than random alloying in SbAs (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Chemical ordering rather than random alloying in SbAs Authors: Shoemaker, Daniel P. ; Chasapis, Thomas C. ; Do, Dat ; Francisco, Melanie C. ; Chung, Duck Young ; Mahanti, S. ...

  5. Method of making AlInSb by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Baucom, Kevin C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A method for producing aluminum-indium-antimony materials by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This invention provides a method of producing Al.sub.X In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials by MOCVD wherein an Al source material, an In source material and an Sb source material are supplied as a gas to a heated substrate in a chamber, said Al source material, In source material, and Sb source material decomposing at least partially below 525.degree. C. to produce Al.sub.x In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials wherein x is greater than 0.002 and less than one.

  6. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine Drive and Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock WA

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Homes Marine Drive and Port Hadlock Coupeville, WA Port Hadlock, WA DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced

  7. High-temperature luminescence in an n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb/p-AlGaAsSb light-emitting heterostructure with a high potential barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petukhov, A. A., E-mail: andrey-rus29@rambler.ru; Zhurtanov, B. E.; Kalinina, K. V.; Stoyanov, N. D.; Salikhov, H. M.; Mikhailova, M. P.; Yakovlev, Yu. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    The electroluminescent properties of an n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb/p-AlGaAsSb heterostructure with a high potential barrier in the conduction band (large conduction-band offset) at the n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb type-II heterointerface ({Delta}E{sub c} = 0.79 eV) are studied. Two bands with peaks at 0.28 and 0.64 eV at 300 K, associated with radiative recombination in n-InGaAsSb and n-GaSb, respectively, are observed in the electroluminescence (EL) spectrum. In the entire temperature range under study, T = 290-480 K, additional electron-hole pairs are formed in the n-InGaAsSb active region by impact ionization with hot electrons heated as a result of the conduction-band offset. These pairs contribute to radiative recombination, which leads to a nonlinear increase in the EL intensity and output optical power with increasing pump current. A superlinear increase in the emission power of the long-wavelength band is observed upon heating in the temperature range T = 290-345 K, and a linear increase is observed at T > 345 K. This work for the first time reports an increase in the emission power of a light-emitting diode structure with increasing temperature. It is shown that this rise is caused by a decrease in the threshold energy of the impact ionization due to narrowing of the band gap of the active region.

  8. Probing the Mechanism of Sodium Ion Insertion into Copper Antimony Cu2 Sb Anodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baggetto, Loïc; Carroll, Kyler J.; Hah, Hien-Yoong; Johnson, Charles E.; Mullins, David R.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Johnson, Jacqueline A.; Meng, Ying Shirley; Veith, Gabriel M.

    2014-03-25

    Cycling Cu2Sb films with fluoroethylene carbonate additive drastically improves the capacity retention of the electrode compared to cycling in pure PC with about 250 mAh g-1 retained capacity for about two hundred cycles. TEM photographs reveal that the pristine films are formed of nanoparticles of 5-20 nm diameters. XRD results highlight that during the first discharge the reaction leads to the formation of Na3Sb via an intermediate amorphous phase. During charge, Na3Sb crystallites convert into an amorphous phase, which eventually crystallizes into Cu2Sb at full charge, indicating a high degree of structural reversibility. The subsequent discharge is marked by amore » new plateau around 0.5 V at low Na/Sb content which does not correspond to the formation of a crystalline phase. XAS data show that the fully discharged electrode material has interatomic distances matching those expected for the coexistence of Cu and Na3Sb nanodomains. At 1 V charge, the structure somewhat differs from that of Cu2Sb whereas at 2 V charge, when all Na is removed, the structure is significantly closer to that of the starting material. 121Sb Mössbauer spectroscopy isomer shifts of Cu2Sb powder (-9.67 mm s-1) and thin films (-9.65 mm s-1) are reported for the first time, and agree with the value predicted theoretically. At full discharge, an isomer shift (-8.10 mm s-1) rather close to that of a Na3Sb reference powder (-8.00 mm s-1) is measured, in agreement with the formation of Na3Sb domains evidenced by XRD and XAS data. The isomer shift at 1 V charge (-9.29 mm s-1) is close to that of the pristine material and the higher value is in agreement with the lack of full desodiation at 1 V.« less

  9. The reaction mechanism of FeSb2 as anode for sodium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baggetto, Loic; Hah, Hien-Yoong; Johnson, Prof. Dr. Charles E.; Bridges, Craig A; Johnson, Jackie A.; Veith, Gabriel M

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical reaction of FeSb2 with Na is reported for the first time. The first discharge (sodiation) potential profile of FeSb2 is characterized by a gentle slope centered at 0.25 V. During charge (Na removal) and the subsequent discharge, the main reaction takes place near 0.7 V and 0.4 V, respectively. The reversible storage capacity amounts to 360 mA h g1, which is smaller than the theoretical value of 537 mA h g1. The reaction, studied by ex situ and in situ X-ray diffraction, is found to proceed by the consumption of crystalline FeSb2 to form an amorphous phase. Uponmore » further sodiation, the formation of nanocrystalline Na3Sb domains is evidenced. During desodiation, Na3Sb domains convert into an amorphous phase. The chemical environment of Fe, probed by 57Fe Mo ssbauer spectroscopy, undergoes significant changes during the reaction. During sodiation, the well-resolved doublet of FeSb2 with an isomer shift around 0.45 mm s1 and a quadrupole splitting of 1.26 mm s1 is gradually converted into a doublet line centered at about 0.15 mm s1 along with a singlet line around 0 mm s1. The former signal results from the formation of a Fe-rich FexSb alloy with an estimated composition of Fe4Sb while the latter signal corresponds to superparamagnetic Fe due to the formation of nanosized pure Fe domains. Interestingly the signal of Fe4Sb remains unaltered during desodiation. This mechanism is substantially different than that observed during the reaction with Li. The irreversible formation of a Fe-rich Fe4Sb alloy and the absence of full desodiation of Sb domains explain the lower than theoretical practical storage capacity.« less

  10. Probing the mechanism of sodium ion insertion into copper antimony Cu2Sb anodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baggetto, Loic; Carroll, Kyler J.; Hah, Hien -Yoong; Johnson, Charles E.; Mullins, David R.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Johnson, Jacqueline A.; Meng, Ying Shirley; Veith, Gabriel M.

    2014-03-25

    Cycling Cu2Sb films with fluoroethylene carbonate additive drastically improves the capacity retention of the electrode compared to cycling in pure PC with about 250 mAh g-1 retained capacity for about two hundred cycles. TEM photographs reveal that the pristine films are formed of nanoparticles of 5-20 nm diameters. XRD results highlight that during the first discharge the reaction leads to the formation of Na3Sb via an intermediate amorphous phase. During charge, Na3Sb crystallites convert into an amorphous phase, which eventually crystallizes into Cu2Sb at full charge, indicating a high degree of structural reversibility. The subsequent discharge is marked by amore » new plateau around 0.5 V at low Na/Sb content which does not correspond to the formation of a crystalline phase. XAS data show that the fully discharged electrode material has interatomic distances matching those expected for the coexistence of Cu and Na3Sb nanodomains. At 1 V charge, the structure somewhat differs from that of Cu2Sb whereas at 2 V charge, when all Na is removed, the structure is significantly closer to that of the starting material. 121Sb Mössbauer spectroscopy isomer shifts of Cu2Sb powder (-9.67 mm s-1) and thin films (-9.65 mm s-1) are reported for the first time, and agree with the value predicted theoretically. At full discharge, an isomer shift (-8.10 mm s-1) rather close to that of a Na3Sb reference powder (-8.00 mm s-1) is measured, in agreement with the formation of Na3Sb domains evidenced by XRD and XAS data. As a result, the isomer shift at 1 V charge (-9.29 mm s-1) is close to that of the pristine material and the higher value is in agreement with the lack of full desodiation at 1 V.« less

  11. Temperature dependence of the dielectric response of AlSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Y. W.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, Y. D.; Shin, S. H.; Kim, S. Y.; Song, J. D.

    2011-12-23

    Spectroscopic ellipometry was used to determine the optical response of an intrinsic AlSb film as a function of temperature. The 1.5 {mu}m thick film was grown on a (001) GaAs substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. Measurements were done at temperatures from 300 K to the growth temperature of 800 K over a spectral range of 0.7 to 5.0 eV. To avoid oxidation artifacts, measurements were done with the film in situ. The data were analyzed using a parametric semiconductor model for its temperature dependence.

  12. Tank 40 Final SB7b Chemical Characterization Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2012-11-06

    A sample of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) was taken from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB7b WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals and fissile constituents. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB7b sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle over the weekend. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 558 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon? vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass ? 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma ? atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma ? mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB7b supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH{sup -}/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses, and Cs-137 gamma scan. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH-/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method.

  13. Facile synthesis of one-dimensional peapod-like Sb@C submicron-structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, W; Lorger, S; Wang, B; Bommier, C; Ji, XL

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel synthetic route to fabricate a one-dimensional peapod-like Sb@C structure with disperse Sb submicron-particles encapsulated in carbon submicron-tubes. The synthetic route may well serve as a general methodology for fabricating carbon/metallic fine structures by thermally reducing their carbon-coated metal oxide composites.

  14. Development of an electronic device quality aluminum antimonide (AlSb) semiconductor for solar cell applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherohman, John W; Yee, Jick Hong; Combs, III, Arthur W

    2014-11-11

    Electronic device quality Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb)-based single crystals produced by controlled atmospheric annealing are utilized in various configurations for solar cell applications. Like that of a GaAs-based solar cell devices, the AlSb-based solar cell devices as disclosed herein provides direct conversion of solar energy to electrical power.

  15. Interface Reactions and Electrical Characteristics of Au/GaSb Contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Ehsani; R.J. Gutmann; G.W. Charache

    2000-07-07

    The reaction of Au with GaSb occurs at a relatively low temperature (100 C). Upon annealing, a AuSb{sub 2} compound and several Au-Ga phases are produced. Phase transitions occur toward higher Ga concentration with increasing annealing temperatures. Furthermore, the depth of the contact also increases with increased annealing temperature. They found that the AuSb{sub 2} compound forms on the GaSb surface, with the compound crystal partially ordered with respect to the substrate. The transition of Schottky- to ohmic-contact behavior in Au/n-type GaSb occurs simultaneously with the formation of the AuGa compound at about a 250 C annealing temperature. This ohmic contact forms without the segregation of dopants at the metallic compound/GaSb interface. Therefore it is postulated that transition from Schottky- to ohmic-contact behavior is obtained through a series of tunneling transitions of electrons through defects in the depletion region in the Au/n-type GaSb contacts. Contact resistivities of 6-7 x 10{sup -6} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} were obtained with the annealing temperature between 300 and 350 C for 30 seconds. In Au/p-type GaSb contacts, the resistivity was independent of the annealing temperature. This suggested that the carrier transport in p-type contact dominated by thermionic emission.

  16. In-situ crystallization of GeTe\\GaSb phase change memory stacked films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velea, A.; Borca, C. N.; Grolimund, D.; Socol, G.; Galca, A. C.; Popescu, M.; Bokhoven, J. A. van

    2014-12-21

    Single and double layer phase change memory structures based on GeTe and GaSb thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Their crystallization behavior was studied using in-situ synchrotron techniques. Electrical resistance vs. temperature investigations, using the four points probe method, showed transition temperatures of 138 °C and 198 °C for GeTe and GaSb single films, respectively. It was found that after GeTe crystallization in the stacked films, Ga atoms from the GaSb layer diffused in the vacancies of the GeTe crystalline structure. Therefore, the crystallization temperature of the Sb-rich GaSb layer is decreased by more than 30 °C. Furthermore, at 210 °C, the antimony excess from GaSb films crystallizes as a secondary phase. At higher annealing temperatures, the crystalline Sb phase increased on the expense of GaSb crystalline phase which was reduced. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at the Ga and Ge K-edges revealed changes in their local atomic environments as a function of the annealing temperature. Simulations unveil a tetrahedral configuration in the amorphous state and octahedral configuration in the crystalline state for Ge atoms, while Ga is four-fold coordinated in both as-deposited and annealed samples.

  17. Ab initio calculation of the thermodynamic properties of InSb under intense laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, ShiQuan; Cheng, XinLu; Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 ; Zhao, JianLing; Zhang, Hong

    2013-07-28

    In this paper, phonon spectra of InSb at different electronic temperatures are presented. Based on the phonon dispersion relationship, we further perform a theoretical investigation of the thermodynamic properties of InSb under intense laser irradiation. The phonon entropy, phonon heat capacity, and phonon contribution to Helmholtz free energy and internal energy of InSb are calculated as functions of temperature at different electronic temperatures. The abrupt change in the phonon entropy- temperature curve from T{sub e} = 0.75 to 1.0 eV provides an indication of InSb undergoing a phase transition from solid to liquid. It can be considered as a collateral evidence of non-thermal melting for InSb under intense electronic excitation effect.

  18. Illinois SB 1987: the Clean Coal Portfolio Standard Law

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-15

    On January 12, 2009, Governor Rod Blagojevich signed SB 1987, the Clean Coal Portfolio Standard Law. The legislation establishes emission standards for new coal-fueled power plants power plants that use coal as their primary feedstock. From 2009-2015, new coal-fueled power plants must capture and store 50 percent of the carbon emissions that the facility would otherwise emit; from 2016-2017, 70 percent must be captured and stored; and after 2017, 90 percent must be captured and stored. SB 1987 also establishes a goal of having 25 percent of electricity used in the state to come from cost-effective coal-fueled power plants that capture and store carbon emissions by 2025. Illinois is the first state to establish a goal for producing electricity from coal-fueled power plants with carbon capture and storage (CCS). To support the commercial development of CCS technology, the legislation guarantees purchase agreements for the first Illinois coal facility with CCS technology, the Taylorville Energy Center (TEC); Illinois utilities are required to purchase at least 5 percent of their electricity supply from the TEC, provided that customer rates experience only modest increases. The TEC is expected to be completed in 2014 with the ability to capture and store at least 50 percent of its carbon emissions.

  19. Effect of arsenic on the optical properties of GaSb-based type II quantum wells with quaternary GaInAsSb layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janiak, F. Motyka, M.; S?k, G.; Dyksik, M.; Ryczko, K.; Misiewicz, J.; Weih, R.; Hfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Patriarche, G.

    2013-12-14

    Optical properties of molecular beam epitaxially grown type II W shaped GaSb/AlSb/InAs/GaIn(As)Sb/InAs/AlSb/GaSb quantum wells (QWs) designed for the active region of interband cascade lasers have been investigated. Temperature dependence of Fourier-transformed photoluminescence and photoreflectance was employed to probe the effects of addition of arsenic into the original ternary valence band well of GaInSb. It is revealed that adding arsenic provides an additional degree of freedom in terms of band alignment and strain tailoring and allows enhancing the oscillator strength of the active type II transition. On the other hand, however, arsenic incorporation apparently also affects the structural and optical material quality via generating carrier trapping states at the interfaces, which can deteriorate the radiative efficiency. These have been evidenced in several spectroscopic features and are also confirmed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images. While arsenic incorporation into type II QWs is a powerful heterostructure engineering tool for optoelectronic devices, a compromise has to be found between ideal band structure properties and high quality morphological properties.

  20. Evaluation of contaminant flux rates from sediments of Sinclair Inlet, WA, using a benthic flux sampling device. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, D.B.; Lieberman, S.H.; Reimers, C.E.; Young, D.

    1993-02-01

    A Benthic Flux Sampling Device (BFSD) was demonstrated on site to determine the mobility of contaminants in sediments off the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS) in Sinclair Inlet, WA. Quantification of toxicant flux from the sediments will support ongoing assessment studies and facilitate the design of appropriate remediation strategies, if required. In general, where release of contaminants was found, the measured rates do not represent a significant source relative to other major inputs such as sewer discharges, nonpoint source runoff, and marinas. They may, however, represent an exposure pathway for benthic biota with a subsequent potential for toxicological effects and/or bioaccumulation. Environmental assessment, CIVAPP:Toxicity, CIVAPP:Marine chemistry, Hazardous waste.

  1. Electrochemical studies of CNT/Si–SnSb nanoparticles for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nithyadharseni, P.; Reddy, M.V.; Nalini, B.; Ravindran, T.R.; Pillai, B.C.; Kalpana, M.; Chowdari, B.V.R.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Si added SnSb and CNT exhibits very low particle size of below 30 nm • A strong PL quenching due to the addition of Si to SnSb. • Electrochemical studies show CNT added SnSb shows good capacity retention. - Abstract: Nano-structured SnSb, SnSb–CNT, Si–SnSb and Si–SnSb–CNT alloys were synthesized from metal chlorides of Sn, Sb and Si via reductive co-precipitation technique using NaBH{sub 4} as reducing agent. The as prepared compounds were characterized by various techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Raman, Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The electrochemical performances of the compounds were characterized by galvanostatic cycling (GC) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The Si–SnSb–CNT compound shows a high reversible capacity of 1200 mAh g{sup −1}. However, the rapid capacity fading was observed during cycling. In contrast, SnSb–CNT compound showed a high reversible capacity of 568 mAh g{sup −1} at 30th cycles with good cycling stability. The improved reversible capacity and cyclic performance of the SnSb–CNT compound could be attributed to the nanosacle dimension of SnSb particles and the structural advantage of CNTs.

  2. Pressure dependence of donor excitation spectra in AlSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, L.; McCluskey, M.D.; Haller, E.E.

    2002-01-16

    We have investigated the behavior of ground to bound excited-state electronic transitions of Se and Te donors in AlSb as a function of hydrostatic pressure. Using broadband far-infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, we observe qualitatively different behaviors of the electronic transition energies of the two donors. While the pressure derivative of the Te transition energy is small and constant, as might be expected for a shallow donor, the pressure derivatives of the Se transition energies are quadratic and large at low pressures, indicating that Se is actually a deep donor. In addition, at pressures between 30 and 50 kbar, we observe evidence of an anti-crossing between one of the selenium electronic transitions and a two-phonon mode.

  3. Nucleation of AgInSbTe films employed in phase-change media (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Nucleation of AgInSbTe films employed in phase-change media Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nucleation of AgInSbTe films employed in phase-change media In phase-change technology small volumes of a chalcogenide material are switched between amorphous and crystalline states by local heating with a short laser or current pulses. AgInSbTe is an alloy frequently used in optical data storage, which could also be applied in electronic data storage. For those

  4. CaMn2Sb2: Spin waves on a frustrated antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect CaMn2Sb2: Spin waves on a frustrated antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CaMn2Sb2: Spin waves on a frustrated antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice We present inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the antiferromagnetic insulator CaMn2Sb2:, which consists of corrugated honeycomb layers of Mn. The dispersion of magnetic excitations has been measured along the H and L directions in reciprocal space, with a

  5. Ultrafast terahertz-induced response of GeSbTe phase-change materials

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect terahertz-induced response of GeSbTe phase-change materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast terahertz-induced response of GeSbTe phase-change materials The time-resolved ultrafast electric field-driven response of crystalline and amorphous GeSbTe films has been measured all-optically, pumping with single-cycle terahertz pulses as a means of biasing phase-change materials on a sub-picosecond time-scale. Utilizing the near-band-gap

  6. DWPF SIMULANT CPC STUDIES FOR SB7B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.

    2011-11-01

    Lab-scale DWPF simulations of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) processing were performed. Testing was performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory - Aiken County Technology Laboratory (SRNL-ACTL). The primary goal of the simulations was to define a likely operating window for acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). In addition, the testing established conditions for the SRNL Shielded Cells qualification simulation of SB7b-Tank 40 blend, supported validation of the current glass redox model, and validated the coupled process flowsheet at the nominal acid stoichiometry. An acid window of 105-140% by the Koopman minimum acid (KMA) equation (107-142% DWPF Hsu equation) worked for the sludge-only flowsheet. Nitrite was present in the SRAT product for the 105% KMA run at 366 mg/kg, while SME cycle hydrogen reached 94% of the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle limit in the 140% KMA run. The window was determined for sludge with added caustic (0.28M additional base, or roughly 12,000 gallons 50% NaOH to 820,000 gallons waste slurry). A suitable processing window appears to be 107-130% DWPF acid equation for sludge-only processing allowing some conservatism for the mapping of lab-scale simulant data to full-scale real waste processing including potentially non-conservative noble metal and mercury concentrations. This window should be usable with or without the addition of up to 7,000 gallons of caustic to the batch. The window could potentially be wider if caustic is not added to SB7b. It is recommended that DWPF begin processing SB7b at 115% stoichiometry using the current DWPF equation. The factor could be increased if necessary, but changes should be made with caution and in small increments. DWPF should not concentrate past 48 wt.% total solids in the SME cycle if moderate hydrogen generation is occurring simultaneously. The coupled flowsheet simulation made more hydrogen in the SRAT and SME cycles than the sludge-only run with the same acid stoichiometric factor. The slow acid addition in MCU seemed to alter the reactions that consumed the small excess acid present such that hydrogen generation was promoted relative to sludge-only processing. The coupled test reached higher wt.% total solids, and this likely contributed to the SME cycle hydrogen limit being exceeded at 110% KMA. It is clear from the trends in the SME processing GC data, however, that the frit slurry formic acid contributed to driving the hydrogen generation rate above the SME cycle limit. Hydrogen generation rates after the second frit addition generally exceeded those after the first frit addition. SRAT formate loss increased with increasing acid stoichiometry (15% to 35%). A substantial nitrate gain which was observed to have occurred after acid addition (and nitrite destruction) was reversed to a net nitrate loss in runs with higher acid stoichiometry (nitrate in SRAT product less than sum of sludge nitrate and added nitric acid). Increased ammonium ion formation was also indicated in the runs with nitrate loss. Oxalate loss on the order 20% was indicated in three of the four acid stoichiometry runs and in the coupled flowsheet run. The minimum acid stoichiometry run had no indicated loss. The losses were of the same order as the official analytical uncertainty of the oxalate concentration measurement, but were not randomly distributed about zero loss, so some actual loss was likely occurring. Based on the entire set of SB7b test data, it is recommended that DWPF avoid concentrating additional sludge solids in single SRAT batches to limit the concentrations of noble metals to SB7a processing levels (on a grams noble metal per SRAT batch basis). It is also recommended that DWPF drop the formic acid addition that accompanies the process frit 418 additions, since SME cycle data showed considerable catalytic activity for hydrogen generation from this additional acid (about 5% increase in stoichiometry occurred from the frit formic acid). Frit 418 also does not appear to need formic acid addition to prevent gel formation in

  7. Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials Citation Details In-Document ... Publication Date: 2014-07-08 OSTI Identifier: 1136695 Report ...

  8. Thermoelectric properties of AgSbTe? from first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezaei, Nafiseh; Akbarzadeh, Hadi; Hashemifar, S. Javad

    2014-09-14

    The structural, electronic, and transport properties of AgSbTe? are studied by using full-relativistic first-principles electronic structure calculation and semiclassical description of transport parameters. The results indicate that, within various exchange-correlation functionals, the cubic Fd3?m and trigonal R3?m structures of AgSbTe? are more stable than two other considered structures. The computed Seebeck coefficients at different values of the band gap and carrier concentration are accurately compared with the available experimental data to speculate a band gap of about 0.10.35 eV for AgSbTe? compound, in agreement with our calculated electronic structure within the hybrid HSE (Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof) functional. By calculating the semiclassical Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and electronic part of thermal conductivity, we present the theoretical upper limit of the thermoelectric figure of merit of AgSbTe? as a function of temperature and carrier concentration.

  9. The tin impurity in Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 alloys

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Extends work on tin to p-type thermoelectric alloys of formula Bi(2-x)Sb(x)Te(3) doped with Sn. Both single crystals and polycrystals prepared using powder metallurgical techniques are studied and properties reported.

  10. Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel; Que, Christopher T.; Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko

    2012-12-15

    Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

  11. Ultrafast terahertz-induced response of GeSbTe phase-change materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Ultrafast terahertz-induced response of GeSbTe phase-change materials The time-reso... pulses as a means of biasing phase-change materials on a sub-picosecond time-scale. ...

  12. Material and device characteristics of InAs/GaAsSb sub-monolayer quantum dot solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Yeongho; Ban, Keun-Yong Zhang, Chaomin; Honsberg, Christiana B.

    2015-10-12

    We have studied the material and photovoltaic characteristics of InAs/GaAsSb sub-monolayer quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) with different Sb contents of 0%, 5%, 15%, and 20%. All QDSCs exhibit an extended external quantum efficiency (EQE) response in the wavelength range of 960–1000 nm that corresponds to sub-bandgap photon absorption. As Sb content increases from 5% to 20%, the cutoff wavelength in the EQE extends towards longer wavelength whilst the EQE in the wavelength region of 300–880 nm is lowered due to increased defect density. Compared to the QDSC (Sb 0%), an Sb incorporation of 5% enhances the short-circuit current density from 20.65 to 22.15 mA/cm{sup 2} induced by Sb surfactant effect. Since the open-circuit voltage and fill factor of the QDSC (Sb 5%) are comparable to those of the QDSC (Sb 0%), an enhancement in solar cell efficiency (10.5%) of the QDSC (Sb 5%) is observed. Further increasing Sb content to 15% and 20% results in the degradation of solar cell performance due to increased nonradiative recombination and large valence band offset in a type-II band line-up.

  13. Self-Assembled ErSb Nanostructures with Optical Applications in Infrared

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Terahertz (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Self-Assembled ErSb Nanostructures with Optical Applications in Infrared and Terahertz Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Self-Assembled ErSb Nanostructures with Optical Applications in Infrared and Terahertz Authors: Lu, Hong ; Ouellette, Daniel G. ; Preu, Sascha ; Watts, Justin D. ; Zaks, Benjamin ; Burke, Peter G. ; Sherwin, Mark S. ; Gossard, Arthur C. Publication Date: 2014-03-12 OSTI Identifier: 1160953 DOE Contract Number:

  14. Structure and magnetic properties of LnMnSbO ( Ln=La and Ce)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Qiang; Kumar, C. M. N.; Tian, Wei; Dennis, Kevin W.; Goldman, Alan I.; Vaknin, David

    2016-03-11

    Here, a neutron powder diffraction (NPD) study of LnMnSbO (Ln = La or Ce) reveals differences between the magnetic ground state of the two compounds due to the strong Ce-Mn coupling compared to La-Mn. The two compounds adopt the P4/nmm space group down to 2 K, and whereas magnetization measurements do not show obvious anomaly at high temperatures, NPD reveals a C-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) order below TN = 255K for LaMnSbO and 240 K for CeMnSbO. While the magnetic structure of LaMnSbO is preserved to base temperature, a sharp transition at TSR = 4.5K is observed in CeMnSbO due tomore » a spin-reorientation (SR) transition of the Mn2+ magnetic moments from pointing along the c axis to the ab plane. The SR transition in CeMnSbO is accompanied by a simultaneous long-range AFM ordering of the Ce moments, which indicates that the Mn SR transition is driven by the Ce-Mn coupling. The ordered moments are found to be somewhat smaller than those expected for Mn2+ (S = 5/2) in insulators, but large enough to suggest that these compounds belong to the class of local-moment antiferromagnets. The lower TN found in these two compounds compared to the As-based counterparts (TN = 317 for LaMnAsO, TN = 347K for CeMnAsO) indicates that the Mn-Pn (Pn=As or Sb) hybridization that mediates the superexchange Mn-Pn-Mn coupling is weaker for the Sb-based compounds.« less

  15. Diluted magnetic semiconductors based on Sb2-xVxTe3 | Energy Frontier

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Centers Diluted magnetic semiconductors based on Sb2-xVxTe3 Home Author: J. S. Dyck, P. Hajek, P. Lostak, C. Uher Year: 2002 Abstract: We report on a diluted magnetic semiconductor based on the Sb2Te3 tetradymite structure doped with very low concentrations of vanadium (1-3 at. %). The anomalous transport behavior and robust magnetic hysteresis loops observed in magnetotransport and magnetic measurements are experimental manifestations of the ferromagnetic state in these materials.

  16. AlSb/InAs HIGH ELECTRON MOBILITY TRANSISTORS - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search AlSb/InAs HIGH ELECTRON MOBILITY TRANSISTORS Naval Research Laboratory Contact NRL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed materials growth and fabrication technology for the manufacture of high-speed, low power AlSb/InAs high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) that exhibit state-of-the-art low-power

  17. Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials Authors: Shu, Michael J. ; Zalden, Peter ; Chen, Frank ; Weems, Ben ; Chatzakis, Ioannis ; Xiong, Feng ; Jeyasingh, Rakesh ; Hoffmann, Matthias C. ; Pop, Eric ; Wong, H.-S.Philip ; Wuttig, Matthias ; Lindenberg, Aaron M. Publication Date: 2014-07-08 OSTI Identifier: 1136695 Report

  18. Wa s h i n g t o n U n i v e r s i t y i n S t . L o...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wa s h i n g t o n U n i v e r s i t y i n S t . L o u i s - - P A R C ' s H o s t & A d mi n s t r a t i v e H o me - B o b B l a n k e n s h i p , P A R C D i r e c t o r - D e ...

  19. Antiferromagnetic ordering in the doped Kondo insulator CeRhSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, L.; Malik, S.K.

    1997-06-01

    CeRhSb, the so-called {open_quotes}Kondo insulator,{close_quotes} is a mixed-valent compound showing a gap formation in the electronic density of states. On the other hand, CePdSb is ferromagnetically ordered with a Curie temperature of {approximately}17 K. We have carried out magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistivity measurements on CeRh{sub 1{minus}x}Pd{sub x}Sb (0{le}x{le}1.0), to study the ground-state properties of this system. For small Pd doping in CeRhSb, up to 20{percent}, the gap continually diminishes and no magnetic ordering is observed down to 2 K. In the region 0.3{le}x{le}0.4, as soon as the gap is suppressed, an antiferromagnetic ground state is observed. In the region 0.5{le}x{lt}0.7, the compounds are not single phase. At the CePdSb end, in the region 0.7{le}x{le}1, the ground state is ferromagnetic. The observation of an antiferromagnetic phase in the phase diagram of CeRh{sub 1{minus}x}Pd{sub x}Sb, where neither end is antiferromagnetic, is interesting and is discussed in the light of some recent theoretical models. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. The magnetic structure of EuCu2Sb2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ryan, D. H.; Cadogan, J. M.; Anand, V. K.; Johnston, D. C.; Flacau, R.

    2015-05-06

    Antiferromagnetic ordering of EuCu2Sb2 which forms in the tetragonal CaBe2Ge2-type structure (space group P4/nmm #129) has been studied using neutron powder diffraction and 151Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy. The room temperature 151Eu isomer shift of –12.8(1) mm/s shows the Eu to be divalent, while the 151Eu hyperfine magnetic field (Bhf) reaches 28.7(2) T at 2.1 K, indicating a full Eu2+ magnetic moment. Bhf(T) follows a smoothmore » $$S=\\frac{7}{2}$$ Brillouin function and yields an ordering temperature of 5.1(1) K. Refinement of the neutron diffraction data reveals a collinear A-type antiferromagnetic arrangement with the Eu moments perpendicular to the tetragonal c-axis. As a result, the refined Eu magnetic moment at 0.4 K is 7.08(15) μB which is the full free-ion moment expected for the Eu2+ ion with $$S=\\frac{7}{2}$$ and a spectroscopic splitting factor of g = 2.« less

  1. Solvothermal synthesis of graphene-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} composite and the degradation activity under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wenguang; Chang, Jiuli; Wu, Dapeng; Gao, Zhiyong; Duan, Xiaoli; Xu, Fang; Engineering Technology Research Center of Motive Power and Key Materials, Henan, 453007 ; Jiang, Kai; Engineering Technology Research Center of Motive Power and Key Materials, Henan, 453007

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Graphene-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} composites were synthesized through a facile solvothermal method. ? Hydroxyl radicals are the main species responsible for the photodegradation activity. ? Graphene-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} demonstrated dramatically improved visible light degradation activity. -- Abstract: Novel graphene-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} (G-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}) composites were synthesized via a facile solvothermal method with graphene oxide (GO), SbCl{sub 3} and thiourea as the reactants. GO played an important role in controlling the size and the distribution of the formed Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoparticles on the graphene sheets with different density. Due to the negative surface charge, smaller Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} particles size and efficient electrons transfer from Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} to graphene, the composites demonstrated improved photodegradation activity on rhodamine B (RhB). Among these composites, the product G-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} 0.1, which was synthesized with the GO concentration of 0.1 mg/mL, exhibited the highest photodegradation activity owing to the considerable density of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoparticles onto graphene sheet free of aggregation. Hydroxyl radicals (OH) derived from conduction band (CB) electrons of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} is suggested to be responsible for the photodegradation of RhB. The high visible light degradation activity and the satisfactory cycling stability made the as-prepared G-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} 0.1 an applicable photocatalyst.

  2. Lattice-registered growth of GaSb on Si (211) with molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Botton, G. A.; Ghanad-Tavakoli, S.; Preston, J. S.; Kleiman, R. N.

    2012-11-01

    A GaSb film was grown on a Si(211) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy indicating full lattice relaxation as well as full lattice registration and dislocation-free growth in the plane perpendicular to the [01 - 1]-direction. Heteroepitaxy of GaSb on a Si(211) substrate is dominated by numerous first order and multiple higher order micro-twins. The atomic-resolved structural study of GaSb films by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy reveals that slight tilt, along with twinning, favors the lattice registry to Si(211) substrates. Preferential bonding of impinging Ga and Sb atoms at the interface due to two distinctive bonding sites on the Si(211) surface enables growth that is sublattice-ordered and free of anti-phase boundaries. The role of the substrate orientation on the strain distribution of GaSb epilayers is further elucidated by investigating the local change in the lattice parameter using the geometric phase analysis method and hence effectiveness of the lattice tilting in reducing the interfacial strain was confirmed further.

  3. Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spahn, Olga B.; Lear, Kevin L.

    1998-01-01

    A semiconductor structure. The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3-1.6 .mu.m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation.

  4. Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spahn, O.B.; Lear, K.L.

    1998-03-10

    The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g., Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3--1.6 {mu}m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation. 10 figs.

  5. Fragile structural transition in Mo3Sb7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Jiaqiang -Q.; McGuire, Michael A; May, Andrew F; Parker, David S.; Mandrus, D. G.; Sales, Brian C.

    2015-08-10

    Mo3Sb7 single crystals lightly doped with Cr, Ru, or Te are studied in order to explore the interplay between superconductivity, magnetism, and the cubic-tetragonal structural transition. The structural transition at 53 K is extremely sensitive to Ru or Te substitution which introduces additional electrons, but robust against Cr substitution. We observed no sign of a structural transition in superconducting Mo2.91Ru0.09Sb7 and Mo3Sb6.975Te0.025. In contrast, 3 at.% Cr doping only slightly suppresses the structural transition to 48 K while leaving no trace of superconductivity above 1.8 K. Analysis of magnetic properties suggests that the interdimer interaction in Mo3Sb7 is near a critical value and essential for the structural transition. Futhermore, all dopants suppress the superconductivity of Mo3Sb7. The tetragonal structure is not necessary for superconductivity.

  6. Superconductivity in strong spin orbital coupling compound Sb2Se3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kong, P. P.; Sun, F.; Xing, L. Y.; Zhu, J.; Zhang, S. J.; Li, W. M.; Liu, Q. Q.; Wang, X. C.; Feng, S. M.; Yu, X. H.; et al

    2014-10-20

    Recently, A2B3 type strong spin orbital coupling compounds such as Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3 and Sb2Te3 were theoretically predicated to be topological insulators and demonstrated through experimental efforts. The counterpart compound Sb2Se3 on the other hand was found to be topological trivial, but theoretical studies indicated that the pressure might induce Sb2Se3 into a topological nontrivial state. We report on the discovery of superconductivity in Sb2Se3 single crystal induced via pressure. Our experiments indicated that Sb2Se3 became superconductive at high pressures above 10 GPa proceeded by a pressure induced insulator to metal like transition at ~3 GPa which should be related tomore » the topological quantum transition. The superconducting transition temperature (TC) increased to around 8.0 K with pressure up to 40 GPa while it keeps ambient structure. As a result, high pressure Raman revealed that new modes appeared around 10 GPa and 20 GPa, respectively, which correspond to occurrence of superconductivity and to the change of TC slop as the function of high pressure in conjunction with the evolutions of structural parameters at high pressures.« less

  7. Performance Study of K2CsSb Photocathode Inside a DC High Voltage Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarter J. L.; Rao T.; Smedley, J.; Grames, J.; Mammei, R.; Poelker, M.; Suleiman, R.

    2011-09-01

    In the past decade, there has been considerable interest in the generation of tens of mA average current in a photoinjector. Until recently, GaAs:Cs cathodes and K{sub 2}CsSb cathodes have been tested successfully in DC and RF injectors respectively for this application. Our goal is to test the K{sub 2}CsSb photocathode inside a DC gun. Since the multialkali cathode is a compound with constant characteristics over its entire thickness, we anticipate that the lifetime issues seen in GaAs:Cs due to surface damage by ion bombardment would be minimized. Hence successful operation of the K{sub 2}CsSb cathode in a DC gun could lead to a relatively robust electron source capable of delivering ampere level currents. In order to test the performance of a K{sub 2}CsSb cathode in a DC gun, we have designed and built a load lock system that allows the fabrication of the cathode at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and its testing at Jefferson Lab (JLab). In this paper, we will present the performance of the K{sub 2}CsSb photocathode in the preparation chamber and in the DC gun.

  8. Natural nanostructure and superlattice nanodomains in AgSbTe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, Christopher E.; De Armas, Ricardo; Shao-Horn, Yang E-mail: shaohorn@mit.edu; Ma, Jie; May, Andrew F.; Delaire, Olivier E-mail: shaohorn@mit.edu

    2014-04-14

    AgSbTe{sub 2} has long been of interest for thermoelectric applications because of its favorable electronic properties and its low lattice thermal conductivity of ?0.7?W/mK. In this work, we report new findings from a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study revealing two nanostructures in single crystal Ag{sub 1?x}Sb{sub 1+x}Sb{sub 2+x} (with x?=?0, 0.1, 0.2); (i) a rippled natural nanostructure with a period of ?2.55?nm and (ii) superlattice ordered nanodomains consistent with cation ordering predicted in previous density functional theory studies. These nanostructures, combined with point-defects, probably serve as sources of scattering for phonons, thereby yielding a low lattice thermal conductivity over a wide temperature range.

  9. Evaluation Of Glass Density To Support The Estimation Of Fissile Mass Loadings From Iron Concentrations In SB8 Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.; Kot, W. K.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.

    2013-04-30

    The Department of Energy Savannah River (DOE-SR) has provided direction to Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3}. In support of that guidance, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a technical basis and a supporting Microsoft Excel spreadsheet for the evaluation of fissile loading in Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) glass based on the iron (Fe) concentration in glass as determined by the measurements from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) acceptability analysis. SRR has since requested that the necessary density information be provided to allow SRR to update the Excel spreadsheet so that it may be used to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3} during the processing of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). One of the primary inputs into the fissile loading spreadsheet includes an upper bound for the density of SB8-based glasses. Thus, these bounding density values are to be used to assess the fissile concentration in this glass system. It should be noted that no changes are needed to the underlying structure of the Excel-based spreadsheet to support fissile assessments for SB8. However, SRR should update the other key inputs to the spreadsheet that are based on fissile and Fe concentrations reported from the SB8 Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) sample.

  10. In-situ TEM study of sodiation and failure mechanism of Sb anodes.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect In-situ TEM study of sodiation and failure mechanism of Sb anodes. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: In-situ TEM study of sodiation and failure mechanism of Sb anodes. Abstract not provided. Authors: XueHai Tan ; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh ; Mook, William ; David Mitlin Publication Date: 2014-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1241666 Report Number(s): SAND2014-18008D 537710 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference

  11. Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and

  12. Nanoscale structure in AgSbTe2 determined by diffuse elastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Ma, Jie [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Budai, John D [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL; Karapetrova, Evguenia A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse elastic neutron scattering measurements confirm that AgSbTe2 has a hierarchical structure, with defects on length scales from nanometers to microns. While scattering from mesoscale structure is consistent with previously-proposed structures in which Ag and Sb order on a NaCl lattice, more diffuse scattering from nanoscale structure suggests a structural rearrangement in which hexagonal layers form a combination of (ABC), (ABA), and (AAB) stacking sequences. The AgCrSe2 structure is the best-fitting model for the local atomic arrangements.

  13. Franklin PUD, Pasco WA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have been replaced by Hans Berg (State of Washington, Wid Ritchie (Idaho Falls) and Shawn Collins (The Energy Project). A few participants reported new LIEE activities, due at...

  14. Microstructural stability in LPE Ga{sub x}In{sub (1{minus}x)}As{sub y}Sb{sub (1{minus}y)}/GaSb heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.Y.; Bucklen, V.; Rajan, K.; Freeman, M.; Cardines, R.P.

    1998-06-01

    The morphological and structural characteristics associated with the growth of lattice matched In{sub x}Ga{sub (1{minus}x)}As{sub y}Sb{sub (1{minus}y)}/GaSb (100) heterostructures is presented. The experiments focused on studying the effect of growth on vicinal surfaces tilted from the exact (100) orientation as well as variations in epilayer chemistry. It was found that variations in these process parameters had very strong effects on both the nucleation characteristics of the epilayer and the atomistic scale homogeneity of the alloy. The <100> and <110> variants in compositional modulation/phase separation were detected, as well as the evolution of weak (110) ordering. These results are discussed in the context of other studies on phase stability in III-V epitaxial structures, especially in terms of surface reconstruction and kinetic effects near conditions of spinodal decomposition.

  15. Properties of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} thin films obtained by pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virt, I. S.; Rudyj, I. O.; Kurilo, I. V.; Lopatynskyi, I. Ye.; Linnik, L. F.; Tetyorkin, V. V.; Potera, P.; Luka, G.

    2013-07-15

    The properties of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} thin films of variable thickness deposited onto Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Si, and KCl substrates are investigated by the method of pulsed laser ablation. The samples are obtained at a substrate temperature of 180 Degree-Sign C in a vacuum chamber with a residual pressure of 10{sup -5} Torr. The thickness of the films amounted to 40-1500 nm. The structure of the bulk material of the targets and films is investigated by the methods of X-ray diffraction and transmission high-energy electron diffraction, respectively. The electrical properties of the films are investigated in the temperature range of 253-310 K. It is shown that the films have semiconductor properties. The structural features of the films determine their optical parameters.

  16. High resolution InSb quantum well ballistic nanosensors for room temperature applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbertson, Adam; Cohen, L. F.; Lambert, C. J.; Solin, S. A.

    2013-12-04

    We report the room temperature operation of a quasi-ballistic InSb quantum well Hall sensor that exhibits a high frequency sensitivity of 560nT/?Hz at 20uA bias current. The device utilizes a partitioned buffer layer design that suppresses leakage currents through the mesa floor and can sustain large current densities.

  17. The radiation chemistry of Cs-7SB, a solvent modifier used in Cs and Sr extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mincher, B.J.; Martin, L.R.; Elias, G.; Mezyk, S.P.

    2008-07-01

    The solvent modifier 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoro-propoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol, (Cs- 7SB) is used in conjunction with calixarenes and crown ethers dissolved in alkane diluents for the extraction of Cs and Sr from highly radioactive solutions. Its purpose is to solvate the ligands and the resulting ligand-metal complexes in the organic phase. Given this role, and its relatively high concentration in the formulations used for solvent extraction, radiolytic degradation of Cs-7SB might decrease the extraction efficiency of these elements as the solvent accumulates absorbed radiation dose. This work presents the results of studies of Cs-7SB using post-radiolysis gas chromatography with electron-capture detection and solvent-extraction distribution-ratio measurements. Also presented is the kinetic analysis of the bimolecular rate constant for the modifier's reaction with nitrogen trioxide and nitrogen dioxide radicals, major radiolytically-produced radical species in irradiated aqueous nitric acid. Although Cs-7SB was found to undergo reactions with nitrogen-centered radicals, little decrease in extraction efficiency was found. It is concluded the modifier, always present at concentrations much higher than the ligands, acts as a radical scavenger, protecting ligands from radiolytic attack. (authors)

  18. Structural phase transition and phonon instability in Cu12Sb4S13

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    May, Andrew F.; Delaire, Olivier A.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Susner, Michael A.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Kirkham, Melanie J.; McGuire, Michael A.

    2016-02-08

    In this study, a structural phase transition has been discovered in the synthetic tetrahedrite Cu12Sb4S13 at approximately 88 K. Upon cooling, the material transforms from its known cubic symmetry to a tetragonal unit cell that is characterized by an in-plane ordering that leads to a doubling of the unit cell volume. Specific heat capacity measurements demonstrate a hysteresis of more than two degrees in the associated anomaly. A similar hysteresis was observed in powder x-ray diffraction measurements, which also indicate a coexistence of the two phases, and together these results suggest a first-order transition. This structural transition coincides with amore » recently-reported metal-insulator transition, and the structural instability is related to the very low thermal conductivity κ in these materials. Inelastic neutron scattering was used to measure the phonon density of states in Cu12Sb4S13 and Cu10Zn2Sb4S13, both of which possess a localized, low-energy phonon mode associated with strongly anharmonic copper displacements that suppress κ. In Cu12Sb4S13, signatures of the phase transition are observed in the temperature dependence of the localized mode, which disappears at the structural transition. In contrast, in the cubic Zn-doped material, the mode is at slightly higher-energy but observable for all temperatures, though it softens upon cooling.« less

  19. Performance Study of K2CsSb Photocathode inside a DC High Voltage Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Rao, J. Smedley, J.M. Grames, R. Mammei, J.L. McCarter, M. Poelker, R. Suleiman

    2011-03-01

    In the past decade, there has been considerable interest in the generation of tens of mA average current in a photoinjector. Until recently, GaAs:Cs cathodes and K2CsSb cathodes have been tested successfully in DC and RF injectors respectively for this application. Our goal is to test the GaAs:Cs in RF injector and the K2CsSb cathode in the DC gun in order to widen our choices. Since the multialkali cathode is a compound with uniform stochiometry over its entire thickness, we anticipate that the life time issues seen in GaAs:Cs due surface damage by ion bombardment would be minimized with this material. Hence successful operation of the K2CsSb cathode in DC gun could lead to a relatively robust electron source capable of delivering ampere level currents. In order to test the performance of K2CsSb cathode in a DC gun, we have designed and built a load lock system that would allow the fabrication of the cathode at BNL and its testing at JLab. In this paper, we will present the design of the load-lock system, cathode fabrication, and the cathode performance in the preparation chamber and in the DC gun.

  20. Structural phase transition and phonon instabilities in Cu12Sb4S13

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    May, Andrew F.; Delaire, Olivier A.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Susner, Michael A.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Kirkham, Melanie J.; McGuire, Michael A.

    2016-02-08

    In this study, a structural phase transition has been discovered in the synthetic tetrahedrite Cu12Sb4S13 at approximately 88 K. Upon cooling, the material transforms from its known cubic symmetry to a tetragonal unit cell that is characterized by an in-plane ordering that leads to a doubling of the unit cell volume. Specific heat capacity measurements demonstrate a hysteresis of more than two degrees in the associated anomaly. A similar hysteresis was observed in powder x-ray diffraction measurements, which also indicate a coexistence of the two phases, and together these results suggest a first-order transition. This structural transition coincides with amore » recently-reported metal-insulator transition, and the structural instability is related to the very low thermal conductivity κ in these materials. Inelastic neutron scattering was used to measure the phonon density of states in Cu12Sb4S13 and Cu10Zn2Sb4S13, both of which possess a localized, low-energy phonon mode associated with strongly anharmonic copper displacements that suppress κ. In Cu12Sb4S13, signatures of the phase transition are observed in the temperature dependence of the localized mode, which disappears at the structural transition. In contrast, in the cubic Zn-doped material, the mode is at slightly higher-energy but observable for all temperatures, though it softens upon cooling.« less

  1. TANK 40 FINAL SB5 CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS PRIOR TO NP ADDITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Click, D.

    2010-01-06

    A sample of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) was pulled from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). This sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals. Prior to radionuclide inventory analyses, a final sample of the H-canyon Np stream will be added to bound the Np addition anticipated for Tank 40. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to DWPF as SB5. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB5 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene vessel and solids allowed to settle overnight. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 239 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon{reg_sign} vessels and four in Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Due to the use of Zr crucibles and Na in the peroxide fusions, Na and Zr cannot be determined from this preparation. Additionally, other alkali metals, such as Li and K that may be contaminants in the Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} are not determined from this preparation. Three Analytical Reference Glass - 14 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. The ARG-1 glass allows for an assessment of the completeness of each digestion. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis of masses 81-209 and 230-252, and cold vapor atomic absorption (CV-AA) analysis for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the peroxide fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB5 supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for ion chromatography (IC), total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC), and total base analyses. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results reported here: (1) The elemental ratios of the major elements for the SB5 WAPS sample, whose major Tank 51 Qualification sample component underwent Al dissolution, are similar to those measured for the SB4 WAPS sample. (2) The elemental composition of this sample and the analyses conducted here are reasonable and consistent with DWPF batch data measurements in light of DWPF pre-sample concentration and SRAT product heel contributions to the DWPF SRAT receipt analyses. (3) Fifty percent of the sulfur in the SB5 WAPS sample is insoluble, and this represents a significantly larger fraction than that observed in previous sludge batches. (4) The noble metal and Ag concentrations predicted from the measured values for the Tank 51 Confirmation sample and Tank 40 SB4 WAPS sample using a two-thirds Tank 51, one-third Tank 40 heel blend ratio used to arrive at the final SB5 composition, agree with the values for the Tank 40 SB5 WAPS sample measured for this report.

  2. Direct Evidence for Abrupt Postcrystallization Germanium Precipitation in Thin Phase-Change Films of Sb-15 at. % Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral,C.; Krusin-Elbaum, L.; Bruley, J.; Raoux, S.; Deline, V.; Madan, A.; Pinto, T.

    2008-01-01

    We present evidence for the instability in the crystalline (metallic) state of binary Te-free phase-change Ge-Sb thin films considered for integration into nonvolatile nanosized memory cells. We find that while the amorphous (semiconducting) phase of eutectic Sb-15 at. % Ge is very robust until Sb crystallization at 240 C, at about 350 C, germanium rapidly precipitates out. Ge precipitation, visualized directly with transmission electron microscopy, is exothermic and is found to affect the films' reflectivity, resistance, and stress. It converts melting into a two-step process, which may seriously impact the switching reliability of a device.

  3. Electronically- and crystal-structure-driven magnetic structures and physical properties of RScSb (R = rare earth) compounds. A neutron diffraction, magnetization and heat capacity study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, C; Dhar, S K; Kulkarni, R; Provino, A; Paudyal, Durga; Manfrinetti, Pietro; Gschneidner, Karl A

    2014-08-14

    The synthesis of the new equiatomic RScSb ( R = La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu, Y) compounds has been recently reported. These rare earth compounds crystallize in two different crystal structures, adopting the CeScSi-type ( I 4/ mmm) for the lighter R (La-Nd, Sm) and the CeFeSi-type (P4 /nmm) structure for the heavier R ( R = Gd-Tm, Lu, Y). Here we report the results of neutron diffraction, magnetization and heat capacity measurements on some of these compounds ( R = Ce, Pr, Nd, Gd and Tb). Band structure calculations have also been performed on CeScSb and GdScGe (CeScSi-type), and on GdScSb and TbScSb (CeFeSi-type) to compare and understand the exchange interactions in CeScSi and CeFeSi structure types. The neutron diffraction investigation shows that all five compounds order magnetically, with the highest transition temperature of 66 K in TbScSb and the lowest of about 9 K in CeScSb. The magnetic ground state is simple ferromagnetic (τ = [0 0 0]) in CeScSb, as well in NdScSb for 32 >T > 22 K. Below 22 K a second magnetic transition, with propagation vector τ = [¼ ¼ 0], appears in NdScSb. PrScSb has a magnetic structure within, determined by mostly ferromagnetic interactions and antiferromagnetic alignment of the Pr-sites connected through the I-centering ( τ = [1 0 0]). A cycloidal spiral structure with a temperature dependent propagation vector τ = [δ δ ½] is found in TbScSb. The results of magnetization and heat capacity lend support to the main conclusions derived from neutron diffraction. As inferred from a sharp peak in magnetization, GdScSb orders antiferromagnetically at 56 K. First principles calculations show lateral shift of spin split bands towards lower energy from the Fermi level as the CeScSi-type structure changes to the CeFeSi-type structure. This rigid shift may force the system to transform from exchange split ferromagnetic state to the antiferromagnetic state in RScSb compounds (as seen for example in GdScSb and TbScSb) and is proposed to explain the change-over from a ferromagnetic structure as found in the CeScSi-type compounds CeScSb and NdScSb to the antiferromagnetic state as found in TbScSb and GdScSb.

  4. Temperature-dependent structural property and power factor of n type thermoelectric Bi{sub 0.90}Sb{sub 0.10} and Bi{sub 0.86}Sb{sub 0.14} alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, K.; Das, Diptasikha; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Banerjee, Aritra; Center for Research in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Calcutta, JD-2, Sector-III, Saltlake City, Kolkata 700 098 ; Mandal, P.; Srihari, Velaga

    2013-12-09

    Thermal variation of structural property, linear thermal expansion coefficient (?), resistivity (?), thermopower (S), and power factor (PF) of polycrystalline Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} (x?=?0.10 and 0.14) samples are reported. Temperature-dependent powder diffraction experiments indicate that samples do not undergo any structural phase transition. Rietveld refinement technique has been used to perform detailed structural analysis. Temperature dependence of ? is found to be stronger for Bi{sub 0.90}Sb{sub 0.10}. Also, PF for direct band gap Bi{sub 0.90}Sb{sub 0.10} is higher as compared to that for indirect band gap Bi{sub 0.86}Sb{sub 0.14}. Role of electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering on ?, S, and PF has been discussed.

  5. Carrier localization and in-situ annealing effect on quaternary Ga{sub 1-x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1-y}/GaAs quantum wells grown by Sb pre-deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, Jiri; Huyet, Guillaume; Tyndall National Institute, UCC, Lee Maltings, Cork ; Liang, Baolai; Huffaker, Diana L.; Lewis, Liam; Hegarty, Stephen P.

    2013-03-18

    Using temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy, we have investigated and compared intrinsic InGaAs, intrinsic GaInAsSb, and p-i-n junction GaInAsSb quantum wells (QWs) embedded in GaAs barriers. Strong carrier localization inside the intrinsic GaInAsSb/GaAs QW has been observed together with its decrease inside the p-i-n sample. This is attributed to the effect of an in-situ annealing during the top p-doped AlGaAs layer growth at an elevated temperature of 580 Degree-Sign C, leading to Sb-atom diffusion and even atomic redistribution. High-resolution X-ray diffraction measurements and the decrease of both maximum localization energy and full delocalization temperature in the p-i-n QW sample further corroborated this conclusion.

  6. Impact of stress relaxation in GaAsSb cladding layers on quantum dot creation in InAs/GaAsSb structures grown on GaAs (001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bremner, S. P.; Ban, K.-Y.; Faleev, N. N.; Honsberg, C. B.; Smith, D. J.

    2013-09-14

    We describe InAs quantum dot creation in InAs/GaAsSb barrier structures grown on GaAs (001) wafers by molecular beam epitaxy. The structures consist of 20-nm-thick GaAsSb barrier layers with Sb content of 8%, 13%, 15%, 16%, and 37% enclosing 2 monolayers of self-assembled InAs quantum dots. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction results indicate the onset of relaxation of the GaAsSb layers at around 15% Sb content with intersected 60 dislocation semi-loops, and edge segments created within the volume of the epitaxial structures. 38% relaxation of initial elastic stress is seen for 37% Sb content, accompanied by the creation of a dense net of dislocations. The degradation of In surface migration by these dislocation trenches is so severe that quantum dot formation is completely suppressed. The results highlight the importance of understanding defect formation during stress relaxation for quantum dot structures particularly those with larger numbers of InAs quantum-dot layers, such as those proposed for realizing an intermediate band material.

  7. Irreversible altering of crystalline phase of phase-change Ge-Sb thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krusin-Elbaum, L.; Shakhvorostov, D.; Cabral, C. Jr.; Raoux, S.; Jordan-Sweet, J. L.

    2010-03-22

    The stability of the crystalline phase of binary phase-change Ge{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x} films is investigated over a wide range of Ge content. From Raman spectroscopy we find the Ge-Sb crystalline structure irreversibly altered after exposure to a laser beam. We show that with increasing beam intensity/temperature Ge agglomerates and precipitates out in the amount growing with x. A simple empirical relation links Ge precipitation temperature T{sub Ge}{sup p} to the rate of change dT{sub cryst}/dx of crystallization, with the precipitation easiest on the mid-range x plateau, where T{sub cryst} is nearly constant. Our findings point to a preferable 15% < or approx. x < 50% window, that may achieve the desired cycling/archival properties of a phase-change cell.

  8. InAs quantum dot morphology after capping with In, N, Sb alloyed thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keizer, J. G.; Koenraad, P. M.; Ulloa, J. M.; Utrilla, A. D.

    2014-02-03

    Using a thin capping layer to engineer the structural and optical properties of InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) has become common practice in the last decade. Traditionally, the main parameter considered has been the strain in the QD/capping layer system. With the advent of more exotic alloys, it has become clear that other mechanisms significantly alter the QD size and shape as well. Larger bond strengths, surfactants, and phase separation are known to act on QD properties but are far from being fully understood. In this study, we investigate at the atomic scale the influence of these effects on the morphology of capped QDs with cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy. A broad range of capping materials (InGaAs, GaAsSb, GaAsN, InGaAsN, and GaAsSbN) are compared. The QD morphology is related to photoluminescence characteristics.

  9. Two-dimensional topological crystalline insulator phase in Sb/Bi planar honeycomb with tunable Dirac gap

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hsu, Chia -Hsiu; Huang, Zhi -Quan; Crisostomo, Christian P.; Yao, Liang -Zi; Chuang, Feng -Chuan; Liu, Yu -Tzu; Wang, Baokai; Hsu, Chuang -Han; Lee, Chi -Cheng; Lin, Hsin; et al

    2016-01-14

    We predict planar Sb/Bi honeycomb to harbor a two-dimensional (2D) topological crystalline insulator (TCI) phase based on first-principles computations. Although buckled Sb and Bi honeycombs support 2D topological insulator (TI) phases, their structure becomes planar under tensile strain. The planar Sb/Bi honeycomb structure restores the mirror symmetry, and is shown to exhibit non-zero mirror Chern numbers, indicating that the system can host topologically protected edge states. Our computations show that the electronic spectrum of a planar Sb/Bi nanoribbon with armchair or zigzag edges contains two Dirac cones within the band gap and an even number of edge bands crossing themore » Fermi level. Lattice constant of the planar Sb honeycomb is found to nearly match that of hexagonal-BN. As a result, the Sb nanoribbon on hexagonal-BN exhibits gapped edge states, which we show to be tunable by an out-of the-plane electric field, providing controllable gating of edge state important for device applications.« less

  10. Time-course analysis of the Shewanella amazonensis SB2B proteome in response to sodium chloride shock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parnell, John J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Rompato, Giovanni; Nicora, Carrie D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Williamson, Ashley; Pfrender, Michael E.

    2011-06-29

    Organisms in the genus Shewanella have become models for response to environmental stress. One of the most important environmental stresses is change in osmolarity. In this study, we experimentally determine the response mechanisms of Shewanella amazonensis SB2B during osmotic stress. Osmotic stress in SB2B was induced through exposure to NaCl, and the time-course proteomics response was measured using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Protein trends were qualitatively compared to gene expression trends and to phenotypic characterization. Osmotic stress affects motility, and has also been associated with a change in the membrane fatty acid composition (due to induction of branched chain amino acid degradation pathways); however, we show this is not the case for SB2B. Although proteins and genes involved with branched chain amino acid degradation are induced, fatty acid degradation pathways are not induced and no change in the fatty acid profile occurs in SB2B as a result of osmotic shock. The most extensive response of SB2B over the time course of acclimation to high salt involves an orchestrated sequence of events comprising increased expression of signal transduction associated with motility and restricted cell division and DNA replication. After SB2B has switched to increased branched chain amino acid degradation, motility, and cellular replication proteins return to pre-perturbed levels.

  11. Absorption properties of type-II InAs/InAsSb superlattices measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.; Steenbergen, E. H.

    2015-02-09

    Strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb superlattices offer access to the mid- to long-wavelength infrared region with what is essentially a ternary material system at the GaSb lattice constant. The absorption coefficients of InAs/InAsSb superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates are measured at room temperature over the 30 to 800?meV photon energy range using spectroscopic ellipsometry, and the miniband structure of each superlattice is calculated using a Kronig-Penney model. The InAs/InAsSb conduction band offset is used as a fitting parameter to align the calculated superlattice ground state transition energy to the measured absorption onset at room temperature and to the photoluminescence peak energy at low temperature. It is observed that the ground state absorption coefficient and transition strength are proportional to the square of the wavefunction overlap and the ground state absorption coefficient approaches a maximum value of around 5780?cm{sup ?1} as the wavefunction overlap approaches 100%. The absorption analysis of these samples indicates that the optical joint density of states is weakly dependent on the period thickness and Sb content of the superlattice, and that wavefunction overlap is the principal design parameter in terms of obtaining strong absorption in these structures.

  12. Interband magneto-spectroscopy in InSb square and parabolic quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasturiarachchi, T.; Edirisooriya, M.; Mishima, T. D.; Doezema, R. E.; Santos, M. B.; Saha, D.; Pan, X.; Sanders, G. D.; Stanton, C. J.

    2015-06-07

    We measure the magneto-optical absorption due to intersubband optical transitions between conduction and valence subband Landau levels in InSb square and parabolic quantum wells. InSb has the narrowest band gap (0.24 eV at low temperature) of the III–V semiconductors leading to a small effective mass (0.014 m{sub 0}) and a large g–factor (−51). As a result, the Landau level spacing is large at relatively small magnetic fields (<8 T), and one can observe spin-splitting of the Landau levels. We examine two structures: (i) a multiple-square-well structure and (ii) a structure containing multiple parabolic wells. The energies and intensities of the strongest features are well explained by a modified Pidgeon-Brown model based on an 8-band k•p model that explicitly incorporates pseudomorphic strain. The strain is essential for obtaining agreement between theory and experiment. While modeling the square well is relatively straight-forward, the parabolic well consists of 43 different layers of various thickness to approximate a parabolic potential. Agreement between theory and experiment for the parabolic well validates the applicability of the model to complicated structures, which demonstrates the robustness of our model and confirms its relevance for developing electronic and spintronic devices that seek to exploit the properties of the InSb band structure.

  13. Gain and tuning characteristics of mid-infrared InSb quantum dot diode lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Q.; Zhuang, Q.; Hayton, J.; Yin, M.; Krier, A.

    2014-07-21

    There have been relatively few reports of lasing from InSb quantum dots (QDs). In this work, type II InSb/InAs QD laser diodes emitting in the mid-infrared at 3.1??m have been demonstrated and characterized. The gain was determined to be 2.9?cm{sup ?1} per QD layer, and the waveguide loss was ?15?cm{sup ?1} at 4?K. Spontaneous emission measurements below threshold revealed a blue shift of the peak wavelength with increasing current, indicating filling of ground state heavy hole levels in the QDs. The characteristic temperature, T{sub 0}?=?101?K below 50?K, but decreased to 48?K at higher temperatures. The emission wavelength of these lasers showed first a blue shift followed by a red shift with increasing temperature. A hybrid structure was used to fabricate the laser by combining a liquid phase epitaxy grown p-InAs{sub 0.61}Sb{sub 0.13}P{sub 0.26} lower cladding layer and an upper n{sup +} InAs plasmon cladding layer which resulted in a maximum operating temperature (T{sub max}) of 120?K in pulsed mode, which is the highest reported to date.

  14. Microstructural evaluation of Sb-adjusted Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} buffer layer systems for IR applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, E.; Paine, D.C.; Uppal, P.; Ahearn, J.S.; Nichols, K.; Charache, G.W.

    1998-06-01

    The authors report on a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of Sb-adjusted quaternary Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} buffer-layers grown on <001> GaAs substrates. A series of structures were grown by MBE at 470 C that utilize a multilayer grading scheme in which the Sb content of Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} buffer-layers grown on <001> GaAs substrates. A series of structures were grown by MBe at 470 C that utilize a multilayer grading scheme in which the Sb content of Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} is successively increased in a series of 125 nm thick layers. Post growth analysis using conventional bright field and weak beam dark field imaging of these buffer layers in cross-section reveals that the interface misfit dislocations are primarily of the 60{degree} type and are distributed through out the interfaces of the buffer layer. When optimized, the authors have shown, using plan view and cross-sectional TEM, that this approach can reduce the threading defect density to below the detectability limit of TEM (< 10{sup 5}/cm{sup 2}) and preserve growth surface planarity. The Sb-graded approach was used to fabricate two 2.2 {micro}m power converter structures fabricated using InGaAs grown on Sb-based buffer layers on GaAs substrates. A microstructural and electrical characterization was performed on these device structures and the results are contrasted with a sample in which InP was selected as the substrate. Microstructure, defect density and device performance in these not-yet-optimized Sb-based buffer layers compares favorably to equivalent devices fabricated using InP substrates.

  15. Investigation of high hole mobility In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb quantum well structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Juan; Xing, Jun-Liang; Xiang, Wei; Wang, Guo-Wei; Xu, Ying-Qiang; Ren, Zheng-Wei; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2014-02-03

    Modulation-doped In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb quantum-well (QW) structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy studies show high crystalline quality and smooth surface morphology. X-ray diffraction investigations confirm 1.94% compressive strain within In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb channel. High room temperature hole mobility with high sheet density of 1000 cm{sup 2}/Vs, 0.877??10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}, and 965 cm{sup 2}/Vs, 1.112??10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2} were obtained with different doping concentrations. Temperature dependent Hall measurements show different scattering mechanisms on hole mobility at different temperature range. The sheet hole density keeps almost constantly from 300?K to 77?K. This study shows great potential of In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb QW for high-hole-mobility device applications.

  16. High thermal stability Sb{sub 3}Te-TiN{sub 2} material for phase change memory application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Xinglong; Zhou, Wangyang; Wu, Liangcai Zhu, Min; Rao, Feng; Song, Zhitang; Cao, Liangliang; Feng, Songlin

    2015-01-12

    For phase change memory (PCM) applications, it has been widely accepted that δ phase Sb-Te has fast operation speed and good phase stability. However, the fast growth crystallization mechanism will cause poor amorphous phase stability and overlarge grain size. We introduce TiN{sub 2} into δ phase Sb-Te (Sb{sub 3}Te) to enhance the amorphous thermal stability and refine the grain size. With TiN{sub 2} incorporating, the temperature for 10-year data retention increases from 79 °C to 124 °C. And the grain size decreases to dozens of nanometers scale. Based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy results, we knew that nitrogen atoms bond with titanium, forming disorder region at the grain boundary of Sb{sub 3}Te-TiN{sub 2} (STTN). Thus, STTN has a quite different crystallization mechanism from Sb{sub 3}Te. Furthermore, PCM device based on STTN can realize reversible phase change under 20 ns electrical pulse.

  17. Characterization of Cr-rich Cr-Sb multilayer films: Syntheses of a new metastable phase using modulated elemental reactants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regus, Matthias; Mankovsky, Sergiy; Polesya, Svitlana; Kuhn, Gerhard; Ditto, Jeffrey; Schürmann, Ulrich; Jacquot, Alexandre; Bartholomé, Kilian; Näther, Christian; Winkler, Markus; König, Jan D.; Böttner, Harald; Kienle, Lorenz; Johnson, David C.; Ebert, Hubert; Bensch, Wolfgang

    2015-10-15

    The new metastable compound Cr{sub 1+x}Sb with x up to 0.6 has been prepared via a thin film approach using modulated elemental reactants and investigated by in-situ X-ray reflectivity, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, energy dispersive X-ray analysis as well as transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The new Cr-rich antimonide crystallizes in a structure related to the Ni{sub 2}In-type structure, where the crystallographic position (1/3, 2/3, 3/4) is partially occupied by excess Cr. The elemental layers of the pristine material interdiffused significantly before Cr{sub 1+x}Sb crystallized. A change in the activation energy was observed for the diffusion process when crystal growth starts. First-principles electronic structure calculations provide insight into the structural stability, magnetic properties and resistivity of Cr{sub 1+x}Sb. - Graphical abstract: 1 amorphous multilayered film 2 interdiffused amorphous film 3 metastable crystalline phase 4 thermodynamic stable phase (and by-product). - Highlights: • Interdiffusion of amorphous Cr and Sb occurs before crystallization. • Crystallization of a new metastable phase Cr{sub 1.6}Sb in Ni{sub 2}In-type structure. • The new Cr-rich phase shows half-metallic behavior.

  18. Unusual magnetic hysteresis and the weakened transition behavior induced by Sn substitution in Mn{sub 3}SbN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Ying, E-mail: sunying@buaa.edu.cn [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Guo, Yanfeng; Li, Jun; Wang, Xia [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Yoshihiro [Materials Processing Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Wang, Cong [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Feng, Hai L.; Sathish, Clastin I.; Yamaura, Kazunari, E-mail: yamaura.kazunari@nims.go.jp [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Matsushita, Yoshitaka [Analysis Station, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-01-28

    Substitution of Sb with Sn was achieved in ferrimagnetic antiperovskite Mn{sub 3}SbN. The experimental results indicate that with an increase in Sn concentration, the magnetization continuously decreases and the crystal structure of Mn{sub 3}Sb{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}N changes from tetragonal to cubic phase at around x of 0.8. In the doping series, step-like anomaly in the isothermal magnetization was found and this behavior was highlighted at x?=?0.4. The anomaly could be attributed to the magnetic frustration, resulting from competition between the multiple spin configurations in the antiperovskite lattice. Meantime, H{sub c} of 18 kOe was observed at x?=?0.3, which is probably the highest among those of manganese antiperovskite materials reported so far. With increasing Sn content, the abrupt change of resistivity and the sharp peak of heat capacity in Mn{sub 3}SbN were gradually weakened. The crystal structure refinements indicate the weakened change at the magnetic transition is close related to the change of c/a ratio variation from tetragonal to cubic with Sn content. The results derived from this study indicate that the behavior of Mn{sub 3}Sb{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}N could potentially enhance its scientific and technical applications, such as spin torque transfer and hard magnets.

  19. Superconductivity in strong spin orbital coupling compound Sb2Se3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, P. P.; Sun, F.; Xing, L. Y.; Zhu, J.; Zhang, S. J.; Li, W. M.; Liu, Q. Q.; Wang, X. C.; Feng, S. M.; Yu, X. H.; Zhu, J. L.; Yu, R. C.; Yang, W. G.; Shen, G. Y.; Zhao, Y. S.; Ahuja, R.; Mao, H. K.; Jin, C. Q.

    2014-10-20

    Recently, A2B3 type strong spin orbital coupling compounds such as Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3 and Sb2Te3 were theoretically predicated to be topological insulators and demonstrated through experimental efforts. The counterpart compound Sb2Se3 on the other hand was found to be topological trivial, but theoretical studies indicated that the pressure might induce Sb2Se3 into a topological nontrivial state. We report on the discovery of superconductivity in Sb2Se3 single crystal induced via pressure. Our experiments indicated that Sb2Se3 became superconductive at high pressures above 10 GPa proceeded by a pressure induced insulator to metal like transition at ~3 GPa which should be related to the topological quantum transition. The superconducting transition temperature (TC) increased to around 8.0 K with pressure up to 40 GPa while it keeps ambient structure. As a result, high pressure Raman revealed that new modes appeared around 10 GPa and 20 GPa, respectively, which correspond to occurrence of superconductivity and to the change of TC slop as the function of high pressure in conjunction with the evolutions of structural parameters at high pressures.

  20. Photoluminescence studies of individual and few GaSb/GaAs quantum rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Roberts, J.; Noori, Y. J.; Noble, M. T.; Krier, A.; Hayne, M.; Young, R. J.; Smakman, E. P.; Koenraad, P. M.

    2014-11-15

    We present optical studies of individual and few GaSb quantum rings embedded in a GaAs matrix. Contrary to expectation for type-II confinement, we measure rich spectra containing sharp lines. These lines originate from excitonic recombination and are observed to have resolution-limited full-width at half maximum of 200 ?eV. The detail provided by these measurements allows the characteristic type-II blueshift, observed with increasing excitation power, to be studied at the level of individual nanostructures. These findings are in agreement with hole-charging being the origin of the observed blueshift.

  1. Hybridized Nature of Pseudogap in Kondo Insulators CeRhSb and CeRhAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumigashira, H.; Takahashi, T.; Yoshii, S.; Kasaya, M.

    2001-08-06

    We studied the electronic structure of Kondo insulators CeRhSb and CeRhAs using high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy. We found that the 4f -derived density of states shows a depletion (pseudogap) at E{sub F} in contrast to metallic Kondo materials. It was found that the size of the f pseudogap is smaller than that of conduction electrons (c pseudogap) while both scale well with the Kondo temperature. The present results indicate that the hybridization between 4f and conduction electrons near E{sub F} is essential for the Kondo gap in the Ce-based compounds.

  2. Production and properties of Si-SiO2-In Sb structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padalko, A.G.; Kotov, B.A.; Lazarev, V.B.; Sukharev, V.I.; Volkov, V.V.

    1985-10-01

    When MIS structures are formed by pyrolysis of silane with subsequent thermal oxidation of the film of polycrystalline silicon on sapphire and with oriented crystallization of thin layers of an indium antimonide melt on the produced structures, the highly doped silicon-silicon dioxide-InSb has a concentration of majority charge carriers of (2-5) . 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -9/ with a density of surface states of (2-8) . 10/sup 11/ ev/sup -1/ . cm/sup -2/.

  3. Hybrid Back Surface Reflector GaInAsSb Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RK Huang; CA Wang; MK Connors; GW Turner; M Dashiell

    2004-05-11

    Back surface reflectors have the potential to improve thermophotovoltaic (TPV) device performance though the recirculation of infrared photons. The ''hybrid'' back-surface reflector (BSR) TPV cell approach allows one to construct BSRs for TPV devices using conventional, high efficiency, GaInAsSb-based TPV material. The design, fabrication, and measurements of hybrid BSR-TPV cells are described. The BSR was shown to provide a 4 mV improvement in open-circuit voltage under a constant shortcircuit current, which is comparable to the 5 mV improvement theoretically predicted. Larger improvements in open-circuit voltage are expected in the future with materials improvements.

  4. Long wavelength, high gain InAsSb strained-layer superlattice photoconductive detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biefeld, Robert M.; Dawson, L. Ralph; Fritz, Ian J.; Kurtz, Steven R.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    A high gain photoconductive device for 8 to 12 .mu.m wavelength radiation including an active semiconductor region extending from a substrate to an exposed face, the region comprising a strained-layer superlattice of alternating layers of two different InAs.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x compounds having x>0.75. A pair of spaced electrodes are provided on the exposed face, and changes in 8 to 12 .mu.m radiation on the exposed face cause a large photoconductive gain between the spaced electrodes.

  5. SB6.0: The 6th International meeting on Synthetic Biology, July 9-11, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahl, Linda J.

    2015-04-23

    The Synthetic Biology conference series (SBx.0) is the preeminent academic meeting in synthetic biology. Organized by the BioBricks Foundation, the SBx.0 conference series brings together leading researchers, students, industry executives, and policy makers from around the world to share, consider, debate, and plan efforts to make biology easier to engineer. Historically held every two years, the SBx.0 conferences are held in alternating locations in the United States, Europe, and Asia to encourage global participation and collaboration so that the ramifications of synthetic biology research and development are most likely to be safe ethical, and beneficial. On 9-11 July 2013, the 6th installment of the synthetic biology conference series (SB6.0) was held on the campus of Imperial College London (http://sb6.biobricks.org). The SB6.0 conference was attended by over 700 people, and many more were able to participate via video digital conference (http://sb6.biobricks.org/digital-conference/). Over the course of three days, the SB6.0 conference agenda included plenary sessions, workshops, and poster presentations covering topics ranging from the infrastructure needs arising when “Systematic Engineering Meets Biological Complexity” and design-led considerations for “Connecting People and Technologies” to discussions on “Engineering Biology for New Materials,” “Assessing Risk and Managing Biocontainment,” and “New Directions for Energy and Sustainability.” The $10,150 grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-SC0010233) to the BioBricks Foundation was used to provide partial reimbursement for the travel expenses of leading researchers from the United States to speak at the SB6.0 conference. A total of $9,450 was used to reimburse U.S. speakers for actual expenses related to the SB6.0 conference, including airfare (economy or coach only), ground transportation, hotel, and registration fees. In addition, $700 of the grant was used to offset direct administrative costs associated with selecting speakers (preparing announcements, evaluating abstract submissions) and handling travel arrangements. Leading U.S. researchers selected to speak at the SB6.0 conference included: Adam Arkin, Ph.D. Division Director of the Physical Biosciences Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at UC Berkeley Jay Keasling, Ph.D. Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at Berkeley, Senior Faculty Scientist and Associate Laboratory Director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Chief Executive Officer of the Joint BioEnergy Institute. Debra Mathews, Ph.D. Assistant Director for Science Programs for the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, and Affiliate Faculty in the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Richard Murray, Ph.D. Thomas E. and Doris Everhart Professor of Control & Dynamical Systems and Bioengineering at Caltech. Sarah Richardson, Ph.D. Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow in Genomics at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute. and others (for a complete listing of speakers presenting at the SB6.0 conference see http://sb6.biobricks.org/speakers/) The SB6.0 conference was the largest synthetic biology conference to date, and highlights of the SB6.0 conference have been published in a special issue of ACS Synthetic Biology (http://pubs.acs.org/toc/asbcd6/3/3). The BioBricks Foundation appreciates the support of the U.S. Department of Energy in helping to make this most influential and important conference in the field of synthetic biology a success.

  6. Room-temperature mid-infrared "M"-type GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum well

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    lasers on InP substrate (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Room-temperature mid-infrared "M"-type GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum well lasers on InP substrate Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Room-temperature mid-infrared "M"-type GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum well lasers on InP substrate We have demonstrated experimentally the InP-based "M"-type GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum-well (QW) laser lasing at 2.41 μm at room temperature by optical pumping. The threshold power density

  7. Depth-dependent magnetism in epitaxial MnSb thin films: effects of surface passivation and cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldous J. D.; Sanchez-Hanke C.; Burrows, C.W.; Maskery, I.; Brewer, M.S.; Hase, T.P.A.; Duffy, J.A.; Lees, M. Rs; Decoster, T.; Theis, W.; Quesada, A.; Schmid, A.K.; Bell, G.R.

    2012-03-15

    Depth-dependent magnetism in MnSb(0001) epitaxial films has been studied by combining experimental methods with different surface specificities: polarized neutron reflectivity, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), x-ray resonant magnetic scattering and spin-polarized low energy electron microscopy (SPLEEM). A native oxide {approx}4.5 nm thick covers air-exposed samples which increases the film's coercivity. HCl etching efficiently removes this oxide and in situ surface treatment of etched samples enables surface magnetic contrast to be observed in SPLEEM. A thin Sb capping layer prevents oxidation and preserves ferromagnetism throughout the MnSb film. The interpretation of Mn L{sub 3,2} edge XMCD data is discussed.

  8. Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Li1.5Mn0.5As Alloys in the Cu2Sb

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structure (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Li1.5Mn0.5As Alloys in the Cu2Sb Structure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Li1.5Mn0.5As Alloys in the Cu2Sb Structure Authors: Fong, C Y ; Damewood, L ; Yang, L H ; Felser, C Publication Date: 2012-12-03 OSTI Identifier: 1072409 Report Number(s): LLNL-PROC-606953 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference:

  9. Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Li1.5Mn0.5As Alloys in the Cu2Sb

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structure (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Li1.5Mn0.5As Alloys in the Cu2Sb Structure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Li1.5Mn0.5As Alloys in the Cu2Sb Structure × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize

  10. Design and fabrication of 6.1-.ANG. family semiconductor devices using semi-insulating A1Sb substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherohman, John W.; Coombs, III, Arthur W.; Yee, Jick Hong; Wu, Kuang Jen J.

    2007-05-29

    For the first time, an aluminum antimonide (AlSb) single crystal substrate is utilized to lattice-match to overlying semiconductor layers. The AlSb substrate establishes a new design and fabrication approach to construct high-speed, low-power electronic devices while establishing inter-device isolation. Such lattice matching between the substrate and overlying semiconductor layers minimizes the formation of defects, such as threaded dislocations, which can decrease the production yield and operational life-time of 6.1-.ANG. family heterostructure devices.

  11. Antiferromagnetism in EuCu2As2 and EuCu1.82Sb2 single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anand, V. K.; Johnston, D. C.

    2015-05-07

    Single crystals of EuCu2As2 and EuCu2Sb2 were grown from CuAs and CuSb self-flux, respectively. The crystallographic, magnetic, thermal, and electronic transport properties of the single crystals were investigated by room-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD), magnetic susceptibility χ versus temperature T, isothermal magnetization M versus magnetic field H, specific heat Cp(T), and electrical resistivity ρ(T) measurements. EuCu2As2 crystallizes in the body-centered tetragonal ThCr2Si2-type structure (space group I4/mmm), whereas EuCu2Sb2 crystallizes in the related primitive tetragonal CaBe2Ge2-type structure (space group P4/nmm). The energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and XRD data for the EuCu2Sb2 crystals showed the presence of vacancies on the Cu sites, yielding themore » actual composition EuCu1.82Sb2. The ρ(T) and Cp(T) data reveal metallic character for both EuCu2As2 and EuCu1.82Sb2. Antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering is indicated from the χ(T),Cp(T), and ρ(T) data for both EuCu2As2 (TN = 17.5 K) and EuCu1.82Sb2 (TN = 5.1 K). In EuCu1.82Sb2, the ordered-state χ(T) and M(H) data suggest either a collinear A-type AFM ordering of Eu+2 spins S = 7/2 or a planar noncollinear AFM structure, with the ordered moments oriented in the tetragonal ab plane in either case. This ordered-moment orientation for the A-type AFM is consistent with calculations with magnetic dipole interactions. As a result, the anisotropic χ(T) and isothermal M(H) data for EuCu2As2, also containing Eu+2 spins S = 7/2, strongly deviate from the predictions of molecular field theory for collinear AFM ordering and the AFM structure appears to be both noncollinear and noncoplanar.« less

  12. Investigation of high hole mobility In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb quantum well structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Investigation of high hole mobility In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb quantum well structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Investigation of high hole mobility In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb quantum well structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy Modulation-doped In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub

  13. VolmerWeber InAs quantum dot formation on InP (113)B substrates under the surfactant effect of Sb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yu Bertru, Nicolas; Folliot, Herv; Rohel, Tony; Mauger, Samuel J. C.; Koenraad, Paul M.

    2014-07-21

    We report on Sb surfactant growth of InAs nanostructures on GaAs{sub 0.51}Sb{sub 0.49} layers deposited on InP (001) and on (113)B oriented substrates. On the (001) orientation, the presence of Sb significantly favors the two-dimensional growth regime. Even after the deposition of 5 mono-layers of InAs, the epitaxial film remains flat and InAs/GaAs{sub 0.51}Sb{sub 0.49} type-II quantum wells are achieved. On (113)B substrates, same growth runs resulted in formation of high density InAs islands. Microscopic studies show that wetting layer is missing on (113)B substrates, and thus, a Volmer-Weber growth mode is concluded. These different behaviors are attributed to the surface energy changes induced by Sb atoms on surface.

  14. The Role of Anti-Phase Domains in InSb-Based Structures Grown on On-Axis and Off-Axis Ge Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debnath, M. C.; Mishima, T. D.; Santos, M. B.; Hossain, K.; Holland, O. W.

    2011-12-26

    Anti-phase domains form in InSb epilayers and InSb/Al{sub 0.20}In{sub 0.80}Sb single quantum wells when grown upon on-axis (001) Ge substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Domain formation is partially suppressed through growth on Ge substrates with surfaces that are several degrees off the (001) or (211) axis. By using off-axis Ge substrates, room-temperature electron mobilities increased to {approx}60,000 cm{sup 2}/V-s and {approx}14,000 cm{sup 2}/V-s for a 4.0-{mu}m-thick InSb epilayer and a 25-nm InSb quantum well, respectively.

  15. Electrodeposition of InSb branched nanowires: Controlled growth with structurally tailored properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Suprem R.; Mohammad, Asaduzzaman; Janes, David B.; Akatay, Cem; Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Alam, Muhammad A.; Maeda, Kosuke; Deacon, Russell S.; Ishibashi, Koji; Chen, Yong P.; Sands, Timothy D.

    2014-08-28

    In this article, electrodeposition method is used to demonstrate growth of InSb nanowire (NW) arrays with hierarchical branched structures and complex morphology at room temperature using an all-solution, catalyst-free technique. A gold coated, porous anodic alumina membrane provided the template for the branched NWs. The NWs have a hierarchical branched structure, with three nominal regions: a “trunk” (average diameter of 150 nm), large branches (average diameter of 100 nm), and small branches (average diameter of sub-10 nm to sub-20 nm). The structural properties of the branched NWs were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. In the as-grown state, the small branches of InSb NWs were crystalline, but the trunk regions were mostly nanocrystalline with an amorphous boundary. Post-annealing of NWs at 420 °C in argon produced single crystalline structures along 〈311〉 directions for the branches and along 〈111〉 for the trunks. Based on the high crystallinity and tailored structure in this branched NW array, the effective refractive index allows us to achieve excellent antireflection properties signifying its technological usefulness for photon management and energy harvesting.

  16. Minority carrier lifetimes in very long-wave infrared InAs/GaInSb superlattices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olson, Benjamin Varberg; Haugan, Heather J.; Brown, Gail J.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Kim, Jin K.; Shaner, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, significantly improved carrier lifetimes in very-long wave infrared InAs/GaInSb superlattice(SL) absorbers are demonstrated by using time-resolved microwave reflectance (TMR) measurements. A nominal 47.0 Å InAs/21.5 Å Ga0.75In0.25Sb SLstructure that produces an approximately 25 μm response at 10 K has a minority carrier lifetime of 140 ± 20 ns at 18 K, which is markedly long for SL absorber with such a narrow bandgap. This improvement is attributed to the strain-engineered ternary design. Such SL employs a shorter period with reduced gallium in order to achieve good optical absorption and epitaxial advantages, which ultimately leads to the improvements in themore » minority carrier lifetime by reducing Shockley–Read–Hall (SRH) defects. By analyzing the temperature-dependence of TMR decay data, the recombination mechanisms and trap states that currently limit the performance of this SL absorber have been identified. The results show a general decrease in the long-decay lifetime component, which is dominated by the SRH recombination at temperature below ~30 K, and by Auger recombination at temperatures above ~45 K.« less

  17. Minority carrier lifetimes in very long-wave infrared InAs/GaInSb superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Benjamin Varberg; Haugan, Heather J.; Brown, Gail J.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Kim, Jin K.; Shaner, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, significantly improved carrier lifetimes in very-long wave infrared InAs/GaInSb superlattice(SL) absorbers are demonstrated by using time-resolved microwave reflectance (TMR) measurements. A nominal 47.0 Å InAs/21.5 Å Ga0.75In0.25Sb SLstructure that produces an approximately 25 μm response at 10 K has a minority carrier lifetime of 140 ± 20 ns at 18 K, which is markedly long for SL absorber with such a narrow bandgap. This improvement is attributed to the strain-engineered ternary design. Such SL employs a shorter period with reduced gallium in order to achieve good optical absorption and epitaxial advantages, which ultimately leads to the improvements in the minority carrier lifetime by reducing Shockley–Read–Hall (SRH) defects. By analyzing the temperature-dependence of TMR decay data, the recombination mechanisms and trap states that currently limit the performance of this SL absorber have been identified. The results show a general decrease in the long-decay lifetime component, which is dominated by the SRH recombination at temperature below ~30 K, and by Auger recombination at temperatures above ~45 K.

  18. CaMn2Sb2: Spin waves on a frustrated antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McNally, D. E.; Simonson, J. W.; Kistner-Morris, J. J.; Smith, G. J.; Hassinger, J. E.; DeBeer-Schmidt, L.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Zaliznyak, I.; Aronson, M. C.

    2015-05-22

    We present inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the antiferromagnetic insulator CaMn2Sb2:, which consists of corrugated honeycomb layers of Mn. The dispersion of magnetic excitations has been measured along the H and L directions in reciprocal space, with a maximum excitation energy of ≈ 24 meV. These excitations are well described by spin waves in a Heisenberg model, including first and second neighbor exchange interactions, J1 and J2, in the Mn plane and also an exchange interaction between planes. The determined ratio J2/J1 ≈ 1/6 suggests that CaMn2Sb2: is the first example of a compound that lies very close to themore » mean field tricritical point, known for the classical Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice, where the N´eel phase and two different spiral phases coexist. The magnitude of the determined exchange interactions reveal a mean field ordering temperature ≈ 4 times larger than the reported N´eel temperature TN = 85 K, suggesting significant frustration arising from proximity to the tricritical point.« less

  19. Thermoelectric device including an alloy of GeTe and AgSbTe as the P-type element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skrabek, Emanuel Andrew; Trimmer, Donald Smith

    1976-01-01

    Improved alloys suitable for thermoelectric applications and having the general formula: (AgSbTe.sub.2).sub.1.sub.-x + (GeTe).sub.x wherein x has a value of about 0.80 and 0.85, have been found to possess unexpectedly high thermoelectric properties such as efficiency index, as well as other improved physical properties.

  20. Integration of atomic layer deposited high-k dielectrics on GaSb via hydrogen plasma exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruppalt, Laura B. Cleveland, Erin R.; Champlain, James G.; Bennett, Brian R.; Prokes, Sharka M.

    2014-12-15

    In this letter we report the efficacy of a hydrogen plasma pretreatment for integrating atomic layer deposited (ALD) high-k dielectric stacks with device-quality p-type GaSb(001) epitaxial layers. Molecular beam eptiaxy-grown GaSb surfaces were subjected to a 30 minute H{sub 2}/Ar plasma treatment and subsequently removed to air. High-k HfO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/HfO{sub 2} bilayer insulating films were then deposited via ALD and samples were processed into standard metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. The quality of the semiconductor/dielectric interface was probed by current-voltage and variable-frequency admittance measurements. Measurement results indicate that the H{sub 2}-plamsa pretreatment leads to a low density of interface states nearly independent of the deposited dielectric material, suggesting that pre-deposition H{sub 2}-plasma exposure, coupled with ALD of high-k dielectrics, may provide an effective means for achieving high-quality GaSb MOS structures for advanced Sb-based digital and analog electronics.

  1. SLUDGE BATCH 7 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION: RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB7 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.; Hay, M.

    2011-02-22

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Seven (SB7) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB7 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB6. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter qualification sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-10-125) received on September 18, 2010. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. With consultation from the Liquid Waste Organization, the qualification sample was then modified by several washes and decants, which included addition of Pu from H Canyon and sodium nitrite per the Tank Farm corrosion control program. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task III.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB7 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. The results presented in this report are those necessary for DWPF to assess if the Tank 51 SB7 sample prepared at SRNL meets the requirements for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program. Concentrations are given for thirty-four radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated.

  2. High thermoelectric performance of In, Yb, Ce multiple filled CoSb{sub 3} based skutterudite compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballikaya, Sedat; Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 ; Uzar, Neslihan; Yildirim, Saffettin; Salvador, James R.; Uher, Ctirad

    2012-09-15

    Filling voids with rare earth atoms is an effective way to lowering thermal conductivity which necessarily enhances thermoelectric properties of skutterudite compounds. Yb atom is one of the most effective species among the rare earth atoms for filling the voids in the skutterudite structure due to a large atomic mass, radius and it is intermediate valence state. In this work, we aim to find the best filling partners for Yb using different combinations of Ce and In as well as to optimize actual filling fraction in order to achieve high values of ZT. The traditional method of synthesis relying on melting-annealing and followed by spark plasma sintering was used to prepare all samples. The thermoelectric properties of four samples of Yb{sub 0.2}In{sub 0.2}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}, Yb{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.15}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}, Yb{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.15}In{sub 0.2}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}, and Yb{sub 0.3}Ce{sub 0.15}In{sub 0.2}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} (nominal) were examined based on the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and Hall coefficient. Hall coefficient and Seebeck coefficient signs confirm that all samples are n-type skutterudite compounds. Carrier density increases with the increasing Yb+Ce content. A high power factor value of 57.7 {mu}W/K{sup 2}/cm for Yb{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.15}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and a lower thermal conductivity value of 2.82 W/m/K for Yb{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.15}In{sub 0.2}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} indicate that small quantities of Ce with In may be a good partner to Yb to reduce the thermal conductivity further and thus enhance the thermoelectric performance of skutterudites. The highest ZT value of 1.43 was achieved for Yb{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.15}In{sub 0.2}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} triple-filled skutterudite at 800 K. - Graphical abstract: Thermoelectric figure of merit of Yb{sub x}In{sub y}Ce{sub z}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} (0{<=}x,y,z{<=}0.18 actual) compounds versus temperature. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TE properties of Yb,In,Ce multiple-filled Yb{sub x}In{sub y}Ce{sub z}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} skutterudites were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal conductivity is strongly suppressed by multiple filling of Yb, Ce and In. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small amounts of Ce and In with Yb are beneficial for the enhancement of TE performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest ZT=1.43 was achieved with Yb{sub 0.07}In{sub 0.094}Ce{sub 0.065}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 11.92} at 800 K.

  3. Photocapacitance study of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum ring solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R.; Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A.

    2014-01-07

    In this study, the density of states associated with the localization of holes in GaSb/GaAs quantum rings are determined by the energy selective charging of the quantum ring distribution. The authors show, using conventional photocapacitance measurements, that the excess charge accumulated within the type-II nanostructures increases with increasing excitation energies for photon energies above 0.9?eV. Optical excitation between the localized hole states and the conduction band is therefore not limited to the ?(k?=?0) point, with pseudo-monochromatic light charging all states lying within the photon energy selected. The energy distribution of the quantum ring states could consequently be accurately related from the excitation dependence of the integrated photocapacitance. The resulting band of localized hole states is shown to be well described by a narrow distribution centered 407?meV above the GaAs valence band maximum.

  4. Structural and optical properties of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanocrystals in glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Rakesh K. Kashyap, Raman Vedeshwar, A. G. Tandon, R. P.

    2014-04-24

    In this work conventional solid state precipitation method is adopted to fabricate Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanocrystals in glass. The glass composition is optimized for proper host glass matrix to grow antimony trisulphide semiconductor quantum dots. The dot size is modified by heat treatment of glass samples in the temperature range from 550°C to 700°C for various time durations. Structural studies are carried out by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy and nanoparticles with size ranges from 8 nm to 70 nm are obtained. Quantum dots so grown were further characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy and a blue shift is observed for absorption edge energy that conform the quantum confinement effect.

  5. Ultrafast dynamics of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komolibus, K.; Piwonski, T.; Gradkowski, K.; Reyner, C. J.; Liang, B.; Huffaker, D. L.; Huyet, G.; Houlihan, J.

    2015-01-19

    In this paper, room temperature two-colour pump-probe spectroscopy is employed to study ultrafast carrier dynamics in type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots. Our results demonstrate a strong dependency of carrier capture/escape processes on applied reverse bias voltage, probing wavelength and number of injected carriers. The extracted timescales as a function of both forward and reverse bias may provide important information for the design of efficient solar cells and quantum dot memories based on this material. The first few picoseconds of the dynamics reveal a complex behaviour with an interesting feature, which does not appear in devices based on type-I materials, and hence is linked to the unique carrier capture/escape processes possible in type-II structures.

  6. Evaluation of electron mobility in InSb quantum wells by means of percentage-impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, T. D.; Edirisooriya, M.; Santos, M. B.

    2014-05-15

    In order to quantitatively analyze the contribution of each scattering factor toward the total carrier mobility, we use a new convenient figure-of-merit, named a percentage impact. The mobility limit due to a scattering factor, which is widely used to summarize a scattering analysis, has its own advantage. However, a mobility limit is not quite appropriate for the above purpose. A comprehensive understanding of the difference in contribution among many scattering factors toward the total carrier mobility can be obtained by evaluating percentage impacts of scattering factors, which can be straightforwardly calculated from their mobility limits and the total mobility. Our percentage impact analysis shows that threading dislocation is one of the dominant scattering factors for the electron transport in InSb quantum wells at room temperature.

  7. Spectroscopy and capacitance measurements of tunneling resonances in an Sb-implanted point contact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Rahman, Rajib; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Eng, Kevin; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Young, Ralph Watson; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Stalford, Harold Lenn; Bishop, Nathaniel; Bielejec, Edward Salvador

    2010-08-01

    We fabricated a split-gate defined point contact in a double gate enhancement mode Si-MOS device, and implanted Sb donor atoms using a self-aligned process. E-beam lithography in combination with a timed implant gives us excellent control over the placement of dopant atoms, and acts as a stepping stone to focused ion beam implantation of single donors. Our approach allows us considerable latitude in experimental design in-situ. We have identified two resonance conditions in the point contact conductance as a function of split gate voltage. Using tunneling spectroscopy, we probed their electronic structure as a function of temperature and magnetic field. We also determine the capacitive coupling between the resonant feature and several gates. Comparison between experimental values and extensive quasi-classical simulations constrain the location and energy of the resonant level. We discuss our results and how they may apply to resonant tunneling through a single donor.

  8. Ultrafast terahertz-induced response of GeSbTe phase-change materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, Michael J.; Zalden, Peter; Chen, Frank; Weems, Ben; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Xiong, Feng; Jeyasingh, Rakesh; Pop, Eric; Philip Wong, H.-S.; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Wuttig, Matthias; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2014-06-23

    The time-resolved ultrafast electric field-driven response of crystalline and amorphous GeSbTe films has been measured all-optically, pumping with single-cycle terahertz pulses as a means of biasing phase-change materials on a sub-picosecond time-scale. Utilizing the near-band-gap transmission as a probe of the electronic and structural response below the switching threshold, we observe a field-induced heating of the carrier system and resolve the picosecond-time-scale energy relaxation processes and their dependence on the sample annealing condition in the crystalline phase. In the amorphous phase, an instantaneous electroabsorption response is observed, quadratic in the terahertz field, followed by field-driven lattice heating, with Ohmic behavior up to 200 kV/cm.

  9. Evaluation of the two-photon absorption characteristics of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R.; Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A.

    2014-07-28

    The optical parameters describing the sub-bandgap response of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings solar cells have been obtained from photocurrent measurements using a modulated pseudo-monochromatic light source in combination with a second, continuous photo-filling source. By controlling the charge state of the quantum rings, the photoemission cross-sections describing the two-photon sub-bandgap transitions could be determined independently. Temperature dependent photo-response measurements also revealed that the barrier for thermal hole emission from the quantum rings is significantly below the quantum ring localisation energy. The temperature dependence of the sub-bandgap photo-response of the solar cell is also described in terms of the photo- and thermal-emission characteristics of the quantum rings.

  10. Electronic and optical properties of TiCoSb under different pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Bin; Zhang Jing; Liang Jianchu; Gao Guoying; Yi Lin

    2012-08-15

    The electronic structure and optical properties of TiCoSb are studied by the first-principles calculation. It is found that the band gaps increase with the pressure increasing. It is noted that the increase of the band gap is due to the electrons of Ti 3d and Co 3d of the valence band (VB) shifting away from the Fermi level. Our calculation indicates that TiCoSb has the large density of state near the Fermi level; moreover, the changes of the density of states near the Fermi level mainly are caused by Ti 3d and Co 3d under the different pressures. It is noted that the absorption edge increases with an increase of pressure. As pressure increases, the static dielectric constants {epsilon}{sub 1}(0) decrease. All peaks of the imaginary part of the dielectric function {epsilon}{sub 2}({omega}) move towards higher energies within increasing pressure. - Graphical abstract: The first peak positions of the absorption spectrum increase and shift the high energy with an increase of pressure. The buleshift of the absorption edge could be observed. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is noted that the increase of the band gap is due to the electrons of Ti 3d and Co 3d of VB moving away from the Fermi level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is noted that the absorption edge increases with an increase of pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As pressure increases, the static dielectric constant {epsilon}{sub 1}(0) decreases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All peaks of the imaginary part of the dielectric function {epsilon}{sub 2}({omega}) move to wards higher energies within creasing pressure.

  11. Climate Leadership Conference (Seattle, WA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sustainability leaders from the private, public, academic, and non-profit communities meet to explore market transformation, carbon management, and building climate resilience on an annual basis.

  12. Improvement of reliability and power consumption for SnSb{sub 4} phase change film composited with Ga{sub 3}Sb{sub 7} by superlattice-like method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Yifeng; Zhai, Jiwei; Zeng, Huarong; Song, Sannian; Song, Zhitang

    2015-05-07

    Superlattice-like (SLL) SnSb{sub 4}/Ga{sub 3}Sb{sub 7} (SS/GS) thin films were investigated through in-situ film resistance measurement. The optical band gap was derived from the transmittance spectra by using a UV-visible-NIR (ultraviolet-visible-near infrared) spectrophotometer. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe the micro-structure before and after annealing. Phase change memory cells based on the SLL [SS(3 nm)/GS(4.5 nm)]{sub 7} thin films were fabricated to test and verify the operation consumption and switching endurance. The scanning thermal microscopy was used to probe the nanoscale thermal property.

  13. The effects of surface bond relaxation on electronic structure of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nano-films by first-principles calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C. Zhao, Y. F.; Fu, C. X.; Gong, Y. Y.; Chi, B. Q.; Sun, C. Q.

    2014-10-15

    The effects of vertical compressive stress on Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nano-films have been investigated by the first principles calculation, including stability, electronic structure, crystal structure, and bond order. It is found that the band gap of nano-film is sensitive to the stress in Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nano-film and the critical thickness increases under compressive stress. The band gap and band order of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film has been affected collectively by the surface and internal crystal structures, the contraction ratio between surface bond length of nano-film and the corresponding bond length of bulk decides the band order of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film.

  14. Influence of in-situ annealing ambient on p-type conduction in dual ion beam sputtered Sb-doped ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandey, Sushil Kumar; Kumar Pandey, Saurabh; Awasthi, Vishnu; Mukherjee, Shaibal; Gupta, M.; Deshpande, U. P.

    2013-08-12

    Sb-doped ZnO (SZO) films were deposited on c-plane sapphire substrates by dual ion beam sputtering deposition system and subsequently annealed in-situ in vacuum and in various proportions of O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2} + N{sub 2})% from 0% (N{sub 2}) to 100% (O{sub 2}). Hall measurements established all SZO films were p-type, as was also confirmed by typical diode-like rectifying current-voltage characteristics from p-ZnO/n-ZnO homojunction. SZO films annealed in O{sub 2} ambient exhibited higher hole concentration as compared with films annealed in vacuum or N{sub 2} ambient. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis confirmed that Sb{sup 5+} states were more preferable in comparison to Sb{sup 3+} states for acceptor-like Sb{sub Zn}-2V{sub Zn} complex formation in SZO films.

  15. Lattice constant grading in the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y As.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x alloy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moon, Ronald L.

    1980-01-01

    Liquid phase epitaxy is employed to grow a lattice matched layer of GaAsSb on GaAs substrates through the compositional intermediary of the III-V alloy system AlGaAsSb which acts as a grading layer. The Al constituent reaches a peak atomic concentration of about 6% within the first 2.5 .mu.m of the transition layer, then decreases smoothly to about 1% to obtain a lattice constant of 5.74 A. In the same interval the equilibrium concentration of Sb smoothly increases from 0 to about 9 atomic percent to form a surface on which a GaAsSb layer having the desired energy bandgap of 1.1 ev for one junction of an optimized dual junction photolvoltaic device. The liquid phase epitaxy is accomplished with a step cooling procedure whereby dislocation defects are more uniformly distributed over the surface of growing layer.

  16. Lattice constant grading in the Al.sub.y Ca.sub.1-y As.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x alloy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moon, Ronald L.

    1981-01-01

    Liquid phase epitaxy is employed to grow a lattice matched layer of GaAsSb on GaAs substrates through the compositional intermediary of the III-V alloy system AlGaAsSb which acts as a grading layer. The Al constituent reaches a peak atomic concentration of about 6% within the first 2.5.mu.m of the transition layer, then decreases smoothly to about 1% to obtain a lattice constant of 5.74 A. In the same interval the equilibrium concentration of Sb smoothly increases from 0 to about 9 atomic percent to form a surface on which a GaAsSb layer having the desired energy bandgap of 1.1 ev for one junction of an optimized dual junction photovoltaic device. The liquid phase epitaxy is accomplished with a step cooling procedure whereby dislocation defects are more uniformly distributed over the surface of the growing layer.

  17. Atomistic modeling and HAADF investigations of misfit and threading dislocations in GaSb/GaAs hetero-structures for applications in high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruterana, Pierre Wang, Yi Chen, Jun Chauvat, Marie-Pierre; El Kazzi, S.; Deplanque, L.; Wallart, X.

    2014-10-06

    A detailed investigation on the misfit and threading dislocations at GaSb/GaAs interface has been carried out using molecular dynamics simulation and quantitative electron microscopy techniques. The sources and propagation of misfit dislocations have been elucidated. The nature and formation mechanisms of the misfit dislocations as well as the role of Sb on the stability of the Lomer configuration have been explained.

  18. Soft chemical synthesis of Ag{sub 3}SbS{sub 3} with efficient and recyclable visible light photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gusain, Meenakshi; Rawat, Pooja; Nagarajan, Rajamani

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: Highly crystalline Ag{sub 3}SbS{sub 3} synthesized using soft chemical approach. First time report of photocatalytic activity of Ag{sub 3}SbS{sub 3}. Ag{sub 3}SbS{sub 3} degraded the harmful organic dyes rapidly under visible radiation. Pseudo first order kinetics have been followed in these sets of reactions. Up to 90% of Methylene Blue degraded even after 4th cycle of catalyst reuse. Structure of catalyst is intact after reuse. As the catalyst is heavy, its separation after use is quite simple. - Abstract: Application of Ag{sub 3}SbS{sub 3}, obtained by soft chemical approach involving rapid reaction of air stable metalthiourea complexes in ethylene glycol medium, as visible light photocatalyst for the degradation of dye solutions was investigated. Ag{sub 3}SbS{sub 3} was confirmed by high resolution powder X-ray diffraction pattern and its no defined morphology was present in SEM images. From UVvis spectroscopy measurements, optical band gap of 1.77 eV was deduced for Ag{sub 3}SbS{sub 3}. Rapid degradation kinetics and recyclability was exhibited by Ag{sub 3}SbS{sub 3} towards Methylene Blue, Methyl Orange, Malachite Green, and Rhodamine 6G dye solutions under visible radiation. All these processes followed pseudo first order kinetics. High surface area (6.39 m{sup 2}/g), with mesopores (3.81 nm), arising from solvent mediated synthesis of Ag{sub 3}SbS{sub 3} has been correlated to its catalytic activity.

  19. Methods for chemical recovery of non-carrier-added radioactive tin from irradiated intermetallic Ti-Sb targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lapshina, Elena V.; Zhuikov, Boris L.; Srivastava, Suresh C.; Ermolaev, Stanislav V.; Togaeva, Natalia R.

    2012-01-17

    The invention provides a method of chemical recovery of no-carrier-added radioactive tin (NCA radiotin) from intermetallide TiSb irradiated with accelerated charged particles. An irradiated sample of TiSb can be dissolved in acidic solutions. Antimony can be removed from the solution by extraction with dibutyl ether. Titanium in the form of peroxide can be separated from tin using chromatography on strong anion-exchange resin. In another embodiment NCA radiotin can be separated from iodide solution containing titanium by extraction with benzene, toluene or chloroform. NCA radiotin can be finally purified from the remaining antimony and other impurities using chromatography on silica gel. NCA tin-117m can be obtained from this process. NCA tin-117m can be used for labeling organic compounds and biological objects to be applied in medicine for imaging and therapy of various diseases.

  20. Studies of scattering mechanisms in gate tunable InAs/(Al,Ga)Sb two dimensional electron gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shojaei, B.; McFadden, A.; Schultz, B. D.; Shabani, J.; Palmstrøm, C. J.

    2015-06-01

    A study of scattering mechanisms in gate tunable two dimensional electron gases confined to InAs/(Al,Ga)Sb heterostructures with varying interface roughness and dislocation density is presented. By integrating an insulated gate structure the evolution of the low temperature electron mobility and single-particle lifetime was determined for a previously unexplored density regime, 10{sup 11}–10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}, in this system. Existing theoretical models were used to analyze the density dependence of the electron mobility and single particle lifetime in InAs quantum wells. Scattering was found to be dominated by charged dislocations and interface roughness. It was demonstrated that the growth of InAs quantum wells on nearly lattice matched GaSb substrate results in fewer dislocations, lower interface roughness, and improved low temperature transport properties compared to growth on lattice mismatched GaAs substrates.

  1. Phase transitions in double perovskite Sr{sub 2}ScSbO{sub 6}: An Ab-initio study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Rajyavardhan; Kumar, Uday; Sinha, T. P.

    2014-04-24

    First Principles study of the electronic properties of recently synthesized double perovskite Sr{sub 2}ScSbO{sub 6} have been performed using density functional theory. With increasing temperature, the Sr compound undergoes three structural phase transitions at 400K, 550K and 650K approximately, leading to the following sequence of phases: P21/n ? I2/m ? I4/m ? Fm-3m. Starting from the monoclinic phase P21/n at room temperature, resulting from the Sc/Sb ordering, the electronic structure for the tetragonal I4/m at 613K and cubic Fm-3m for T?660K has been studied in terms of the density of states and band-structure. Presence of large band gap, both direct and indirect, has been reported and analyzed.

  2. Effect of antimony on the deep-level traps in GaInNAsSb thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islam, Muhammad Monirul Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Takeaki; Akimoto, Katsuhiro

    2014-09-15

    Admittance spectroscopy has been performed to investigate the effect of antimony (Sb) on GaInNAs material in relation to the deep-level defects in this material. Two electron traps, E1 and E2 at an energy level 0.12 and 0.41?eV below the conduction band (E{sub C}), respectively, were found in undoped GaInNAs. Bias-voltage dependent admittance confirmed that E1 is an interface-type defect being spatially localized at the GaInNAs/GaAs interface, while E2 is a bulk-type defect located around mid-gap of GaInNAs layer. Introduction of Sb improved the material quality which was evident from the reduction of both the interface and bulk-type defects.

  3. Demonstration of long minority carrier lifetimes in very narrow bandgap ternary InAs/GaInSb superlattices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olson, Benjamin Varberg; Kim, Jin K.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Shaner, Eric A.; Haugan, Heather J.; Brown, Gail J.

    2015-09-28

    Minority carrier lifetimes in very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) InAs/GaInSb superlattices (SLs) are reported using time-resolved microwave reflectance measurements. A strain-balanced ternary SL absorber layer of 47.0 Å InAs/21.5 Å Ga0.75In0.25Sb, corresponding to a bandgap of ~50 meV, is found to have a minority carrier lifetime of 140 ± 20 ns at ~18 K. This lifetime is extraordinarily long, when compared to lifetime values previously reported for other VLWIR SL detector materials. As a result, this enhancement is attributed to the strain-engineered ternary design, which offers a variety of epitaxial advantages and ultimately leads to a reduction of defect-mediated recombinationmore » centers.« less

  4. CdSe/CdTe type-II superlattices grown on GaSb (001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Jingjing; Liu Shi; Wang Shumin; Ding Ding; Johnson, Shane R.; Zhang Yonghang; Liu Xinyu; Furdyna, Jacek K.; Smith, David J.

    2012-03-19

    CdSe/CdTe superlattices are grown on GaSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray diffraction measurements and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images indicate high crystalline quality. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements show the effective bandgap varies with the superlattice layer thicknesses and confirm the CdSe/CdTe heterostructure has a type-II band edge alignment. The valence band offset between unstrained CdTe and CdSe is determined as 0.63 {+-} 0.06 eV by fitting the measured PL peak positions using the envelope function approximation and the Kronig-Penney model. These results suggest that CdSe/CdTe superlattices are promising candidates for multi-junction solar cells and other optoelectronic devices based on GaSb substrates.

  5. Demonstration of long minority carrier lifetimes in very narrow bandgap ternary InAs/GaInSb superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Benjamin Varberg; Kim, Jin K.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Shaner, Eric A.; Haugan, Heather J.; Brown, Gail J.

    2015-09-28

    Minority carrier lifetimes in very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) InAs/GaInSb superlattices (SLs) are reported using time-resolved microwave reflectance measurements. A strain-balanced ternary SL absorber layer of 47.0 Å InAs/21.5 Å Ga0.75In0.25Sb, corresponding to a bandgap of ~50 meV, is found to have a minority carrier lifetime of 140 ± 20 ns at ~18 K. This lifetime is extraordinarily long, when compared to lifetime values previously reported for other VLWIR SL detector materials. As a result, this enhancement is attributed to the strain-engineered ternary design, which offers a variety of epitaxial advantages and ultimately leads to a reduction of defect-mediated recombination centers.

  6. Atomic-resolution study of polarity reversal in GaSb grown on Si by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Woo, S. Y.; Botton, G. A.; Ghanad-Tavakoli, S.; Kleiman, R. N.; Preston, J. S.

    2012-11-01

    The atomic-resolved reversal of the polarity across an antiphase boundary (APB) was observed in GaSb films grown on Si by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). The investigation of the interface structure at the origin of the APB reveals that coalescence of two domains with Ga-prelayer and Sb-prelayer causes the sublattice reversal. The local strain and lattice rotation distributions of the APB, attributed to the discordant bonding length at the APB with the surrounding GaSb lattice, were further studied using the geometric phase analysis technique. The crystallographic characteristics of the APBs and their interaction with other planar defects were observed with HAADF-STEM. The quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated images confirms the observed polarities in the acquired HAADF-STEM data. The self-annihilation mechanism of the APBs is addressed based on the rotation induced by anti-site bonds and APBs' faceting.

  7. Impact of thermal annealing on bulk InGaAsSbN materials grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, T. W.; Mawst, L. J.; Kim, K.; Lee, J. J.; Kuech, T. F.; Wells, N. P.; LaLumondiere, S. D.; Sin, Y.; Lotshaw, W. T.; Moss, S. C.

    2014-02-03

    Two different thermal annealing techniques (rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and in-situ post-growth annealing in the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) chamber) were employed to investigate their impact on the optical characteristics of double-heterostructures (DH) of InGaAsSbN/GaAs and on the performance of single-junction solar cell structures, all grown by MOVPE. We find that an optimized RTA procedure leads to a similar improvement in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity compared with material employing a multi-step optimized anneal within the MOVPE reactor. Time-resolved photoluminescence techniques at low temperature (LT) and room temperature (RT) were performed to characterize the carrier dynamics in bulk InGaAsSbN layers. Room temperature carrier lifetimes were found to be similar for both annealing methods, although the LT-PL (16?K) measurements of the MOVPE-annealed sample found longer lifetimes than the RTA-annealed sample (680?ps vs. 260?ps) for the PL measurement energy of 1.24?eV. InGaAsSbN-based single junction solar cells processed with the optimized RTA procedure exhibited an enhancement of the electrical performance, such as improvements in open circuit voltage, short circuit current, fill factor, and efficiency over solar cells subjected to the in-situ MOVPE annealing technique.

  8. Synthesis of nanocrystalline thin films of gold on the surface of GaSb by swift heavy ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jadhav, Vidya; Dubey, S. K.; Yadav, A. D.; Singh, A.

    2013-02-05

    Thin films of gold ({approx}100 nm thick) were deposited on p-type GaSb substrates. These samples were irradiated with 100 MeV Fe{sup 7+}ions for the fluence of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} ions cm{sup -2}. After irradiation, samples were characterized using AFM, UV-VIS -NIR, X-Ray Diffraction techniques. AFM studies showed the presence of clusters on the surface of GaSb. R.M.S. roughness of the sample was found to increase w.r.t ion fluence. Absorption coefficient obtained from the Ultra violet - Visible NIR (UV-VIS -NIR) spectra of the samples irradiated with various fluences compared with non irradiated GaSb. The annealing experiment showed a significant improvement in the absorption coefficient after rapid thermal annealing at temperature of 400 Degree-Sign C. X-Ray Diffraction study reveals different orientations of Au film.

  9. Electron interactions and Dirac fermions in graphene-Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sa, Baisheng; Sun, Zhimei

    2014-06-21

    Graphene based superlattices have been attracted worldwide interest due to the combined properties of the graphene Dirac cone feature and all kinds of advanced functional materials. In this work, we proposed a novel series of graphene-Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} superlattices based on the density functional theory calculations. We demonstrated the stability in terms of energy and lattice dynamics for such kind of artificial materials. The analysis of the electronic structures unravels the gap opening nature at Dirac cone of the insert graphene layer. The Dirac fermions in the graphene layers are strongly affected by the electron spin orbital coupling in the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers. The present results show the possible application in phase-change data storage of such kind of superlattice materials, where the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers exhibit as the phase-change data storage media and the graphene layer works as the electrode, probe, and heat conductor.

  10. The magnetic structure of EuCu2Sb2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, D. H.; Cadogan, J. M.; Anand, V. K.; Johnston, D. C.; Flacau, R.

    2015-05-06

    Antiferromagnetic ordering of EuCu2Sb2 which forms in the tetragonal CaBe2Ge2-type structure (space group P4/nmm #129) has been studied using neutron powder diffraction and 151Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy. The room temperature 151Eu isomer shift of –12.8(1) mm/s shows the Eu to be divalent, while the 151Eu hyperfine magnetic field (Bhf) reaches 28.7(2) T at 2.1 K, indicating a full Eu2+ magnetic moment. Bhf(T) follows a smooth $S=\\frac{7}{2}$ Brillouin function and yields an ordering temperature of 5.1(1) K. Refinement of the neutron diffraction data reveals a collinear A-type antiferromagnetic arrangement with the Eu moments perpendicular to the tetragonal c-axis. As a result, the refined Eu magnetic moment at 0.4 K is 7.08(15) μB which is the full free-ion moment expected for the Eu2+ ion with $S=\\frac{7}{2}$ and a spectroscopic splitting factor of g = 2.

  11. The magnetic structure of EuCu2Sb2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, D. H.; Cadogan, J. M.; Anand, V. K.; Johnston, D. C.; Flacau, R.

    2015-05-06

    Antiferromagnetic ordering of EuCu2Sb2 which forms in the tetragonal CaBe2Ge2-type structure (space group P4/nmm #129) has been studied using neutron powder diffraction and 151Eu Mssbauer spectroscopy. The room temperature 151Eu isomer shift of 12.8(1) mm/s shows the Eu to be divalent, while the 151Eu hyperfine magnetic field (Bhf) reaches 28.7(2) T at 2.1 K, indicating a full Eu2+ magnetic moment. Bhf(T) follows a smooth $S=\\frac{7}{2}$ Brillouin function and yields an ordering temperature of 5.1(1) K. Refinement of the neutron diffraction data reveals a collinear A-type antiferromagnetic arrangement with the Eu moments perpendicular to the tetragonal c-axis. As a result, the refined Eu magnetic moment at 0.4 K is 7.08(15) ?B which is the full free-ion moment expected for the Eu2+ ion with $S=\\frac{7}{2}$ and a spectroscopic splitting factor of g = 2.

  12. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in room-temperature ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Taylor, Alice E; Berlijn, Tom; Hahn, Steven E; May, Andrew F; Williams, Travis J; Poudel, Lekhanath N; Calder, Stuart A; Fishman, Randy Scott; Stone, Matthew B; Aczel, Adam A; et al

    2015-01-01

    We report elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb. Measurements were performed on a large, TC = 434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of delta=0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (Hmore » K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2n+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. The results show that the influence of the int« less

  13. Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

    2009-06-10

    Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

  14. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in room-temperature ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Alice E; Berlijn, Tom; Hahn, Steven E; May, Andrew F; Williams, Travis J; Poudel, Lekhanath N; Calder, Stuart A; Fishman, Randy Scott; Stone, Matthew B; Aczel, Adam A; Cao, Huibo; Lumsden, Mark D; Christianson, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    We report elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb. Measurements were performed on a large, TC = 434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of delta=0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (H K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2n+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. The results show that the influence of the int

  15. Thermochemical and kinetic aspects of the sulfurization of Cu-Sb and Cu-Bi thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colombara, Diego; Peter, Laurence M.; Rogers, Keith D.; Hutchings, Kyle

    2012-02-15

    CuSbS{sub 2} and Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} are being investigated as part of a search for new absorber materials for photovoltaic devices. Thin films of these chalcogenides were produced by conversion of stacked and co-electroplated metal precursor layers in the presence of elemental sulfur vapour. Ex-situ XRD and SEM/EDS analyses of the processed samples were employed to study the reaction sequence with the aim of achieving compact layer morphologies. A new 'Time-Temperature-Reaction' (TTR) diagram and modified Pilling-Bedworth coefficients have been introduced for the description and interpretation of the reaction kinetics. For equal processing times, the minimum temperature required for CuSbS{sub 2} to appear is substantially lower than for Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3}, suggesting that interdiffusion across the interfaces between the binary sulfides is a key step in the formation of the ternary compounds. The effects of the heating rate and sulfur partial pressure on the phase evolution as well as the potential losses of Sb and Bi during the processes have been investigated experimentally and the results related to the equilibrium pressure diagrams obtained via thermochemical computation. - Graphical Abstract: Example of 3D plot showing the equilibrium pressure surfaces of species potentially escaping from chalcogenide films as a function of temperature and sulfur partial pressure. Bi{sub (g)}, Bi{sub 2(g)}, and BiS{sub (g)} are the gaseous species in equilibrium with solid Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3(s)} considered in this specific example. The pressure threshold plane corresponds to the pressure limit above which the elemental losses from 1 {mu}m thick films exceeds 10% of the original content per cm{sup 2} area of film and dm{sup 3} capacity of sulfurization furnace under static atmosphere conditions. The sulfurization temperature/sulfur partial pressure boundaries required to minimise the elemental losses below a given value can be easily read from the 2D projection of the intersection curves into the T-p{sub S2} plane. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Sulfurization of Sb-Cu and Bi-Cu metal precursors for thin film PV applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Kinetics shows the rate determining step to be the interdiffusion of binary sulfides. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Phase evolution is consistent with Pilling-Bedworth coefficients of Cu, Sb and Bi. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Elemental losses can be minimised via the use of equilibrium pressure diagrams.

  16. SLUDGE BATCH 5 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

    2008-07-28

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Five (SB5) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Part of this SB5 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40 to complete the formation of SB5. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB4. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry taken on March 21, 2008. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by five washes, six decants, an addition of Pu/Be from Canyon Tank 16.4, and an addition of NaNO2. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Ta Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task 2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task 5) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB5 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. Data presented in this report represents the measured or estimated radionuclide concentrations obtained from several standard and special analytical methods performed by Analytical Development (AD) personnel within SRNL. The method for I-129 measurement in sludge is described in detail. Most of these methods were performed on solutions resulting from the dissolutions of the slurry samples. Concentrations are given for twenty-nine radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated. Results also indicate that 98% of the Tc-99 and 92% of the I-129 that could have been in this sludge batch have been removed by chemical processing steps in the SRS Canyons or Tank Farm.

  17. SLUDGE BATCH 6 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION: RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB6 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, D.

    2010-05-21

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Six (SB6) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB6 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB5. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB6 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-09-110) taken on October 8, 2009. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under the direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by eight washes, nine decants, an addition of Pu from Canyon Tank 16.3, and an addition of NaNO{sub 2}. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB6 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2009-0014. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task II.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB6 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. The results presented in this report are those necessary for DWPF to assess if the Tank 51 SB6 sample prepared at SRNL meets the requirements for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program. The sample is the same as that on which the chemical composition was reported. Concentrations are given for thirty-four radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated. Results also indicate that 99% of the Tc-99 and at least 90% of the I-129 that could have been in this sludge batch have been removed by chemical processing steps in the SRS Canyons or Tank Farm.

  18. Phase equilibria, formation, crystal and electronic structure of ternary compounds in Ti-Ni-Sn and Ti-Ni-Sb ternary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romaka, V.V.; Rogl, P.; Romaka, L.; Stadnyk, Yu.; Melnychenko, N.; Grytsiv, A.; Falmbigl, M.; Skryabina, N.

    2013-01-15

    The phase equilibria of the Ti-Ni-Sn and Ti-Ni-Sb ternary systems have been studied in the whole concentration range by means of X-ray and EPM analyses at 1073 K and 873 K, respectively. Four ternary intermetallic compounds TiNiSn (MgAgAs-type), TiNi{sub 2-x}Sn (MnCu{sub 2}Al-type), Ti{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Sn (U{sub 2}Pt{sub 2}Sn-type), and Ti{sub 5}NiSn{sub 3} (Hf{sub 5}CuSn{sub 3}-type) are formed in Ti-Ni-Sn system at 1073 K. The TiNi{sub 2}Sn stannide is characterized by homogeneity in the range of 50-47 at% of Ni. The Ti-Ni-Sb ternary system at 873 K is characterized by formation of three ternary intermetallic compounds, Ti{sub 0.8}NiSb (MgAgAs-type), Ti{sub 5}Ni{sub 0.45}Sb{sub 2.55} (W{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type), and Ti{sub 5}NiSb{sub 3} (Hf{sub 5}CuSn{sub 3}-type). The solubility of Ni in Ti{sub 0.8}NiSb decreases number of vacancies in Ti site up to Ti{sub 0.91}Ni{sub 1.1}Sb composition. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal section of the Ti-Ni-Sn phase diagram and DOS distribution in hypothetical TiNi{sub 1+x}Sn solid solution. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti-Ni-Sn phase diagram was constructed at 1073 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four ternary compounds are formed: TiNiSn, TiNi{sub 2-x}Sn, Ti{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Sn, and Ti{sub 5}NiSn{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three ternary compounds exist in Ti-Ni-Sb system at 873 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TiNi{sub 2}Sb compound is absent.

  19. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of the structural, electronic and optical properties of Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} in hexagonal and cubic phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arghavani Nia, Borhan; Sedighi, Matin; Shahrokhi, Masoud; Moradian, Rostam

    2013-11-15

    A density functional theory study of structural, electronical and optical properties of Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} compound in hexagonal and cubic phases is presented. In the exchangecorrelation potential, generalized gradient approximation (PBE-GGA) has been used to calculate lattice parameters, bulk modulus, cohesive energy, dielectric function and energy loss spectra. The electronic band structure of this compound has been calculated using the above two approximations as well as another form of PBE-GGA, proposed by Engle and Vosko (EV-GGA). It is found that the hexagonal phase of Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} has an indirect gap in the ??N direction; while in the cubic phase there is a direct-gap at the ? point in the PBE-GGA and EV-GGA. Effects of applying pressure on the band structure of the system studied and optical properties of these systems were calculated. - Graphical abstract: A density functional theory study of structural, electronic and optical properties of Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} compound in hexagonal and cubic phases is presented. Display Omitted - Highlights: Physical properties of Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} in hexagonal and cubic phases are investigated. It is found that the hexagonal phase is an indirect gap semiconductor. Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} is a direct-gap semiconductor at the ? point in the cubic phase. By increasing pressure the semiconducting band gap and anti-symmetry gap are decreased.

  20. High quality HfO{sub 2}/p-GaSb(001) metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with 0.8?nm equivalent oxide thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, Michael; Datta, Suman; Bruce Rayner, G.; McDonnell, Stephen; Wallace, Robert M.; Bennett, Brian R.; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2014-12-01

    We investigate in-situ cleaning of GaSb surfaces and its effect on the electrical performance of p-type GaSb metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) using a remote hydrogen plasma. Ultrathin HfO{sub 2} films grown by atomic layer deposition were used as a high permittivity gate dielectric. Compared to conventional ex-situ chemical cleaning methods, the in-situ GaSb surface treatment resulted in a drastic improvement in the impedance characteristics of the MOSCAPs, directly evidencing a much lower interface trap density and enhanced Fermi level movement efficiency. We demonstrate that by using a combination of ex-situ and in-situ surface cleaning steps, aggressively scaled HfO{sub 2}/p-GaSb MOSCAP structures with a low equivalent oxide thickness of 0.8?nm and efficient gate modulation of the surface potential are achieved, allowing to push the Fermi level far away from the valence band edge high up into the band gap of GaSb.

  1. Femtosecond laser-induced crystallization of amorphous Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film and coherent phonon spectroscopy characterization and optical injection of electron spins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Simian; Huang Huan; Wang Yang; Wu Yiqun; Gan Fuxi; Zhu Weiling; Wang Wenfang; Chen Ke; Yao Daoxin; Lai Tianshu

    2011-09-01

    A femtosecond laser-irradiated crystallizing technique is tried to convert amorphous Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film into crystalline film. Sensitive coherent phonon spectroscopy (CPS) is used to monitor the crystallization of amorphous Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film at the original irradiation site. The CPS reveals that the vibration strength of two phonon modes that correspond to the characteristic phonon modes (A{sub 1g}{sup 1} and E{sub g}) of crystalline Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} enhances with increasing laser irradiation fluence (LIF), showing the rise of the degree of crystallization with LIF and that femtosecond laser irradiation is a good post-treatment technique. Time-resolved circularly polarized pump-probe spectroscopy is used to investigate electron spin relaxation dynamics of the laser-induced crystallized Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film. Spin relaxation process indeed is observed, confirming the theoretical predictions on the validity of spin-dependent optical transition selection rule and the feasibility of transient spin-grating-based optical detection scheme of spin-plasmon collective modes in Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}-like topological insulators.

  2. Structural properties and band offset determination of p-channel mixed As/Sb type-II staggered gap tunnel field-effect transistor structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Y.; Jain, N.; Hudait, M. K.; Mohata, D. K.; Datta, S.; Lubyshev, D.; Fastenau, J. M.; Liu, A. K.

    2012-09-10

    The structural properties and band offset determination of p-channel staggered gap In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As/GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65} heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) were investigated. High resolution x-ray diffraction revealed that the active layers are strained with respect to 'virtual substrate.' Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry confirmed an abrupt junction profile at the In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As/GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65} heterointerface and minimal level of intermixing between As and Sb atoms. The valence band offset of 0.37 {+-} 0.05 eV was extracted from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A staggered band lineup was confirmed at the heterointerface with an effective tunneling barrier height of 0.13 eV. Thus, MBE-grown staggered gap In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As/GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65} TFET structures are a promising p-channel option to provide critical guidance for the future design of mixed As/Sb type-II based complementary logic and low power devices.

  3. Structural, electronic and optical properties of La{sub x}Sc{sub 1-x}Sb alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghezali, M.

    2015-03-30

    We present calculations of the structural, electronic and optic properties of LaxSc1-xSb ternary alloys for 0?x?1, by using the first principle full potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FPLMTO) method based on the local density approximation (LDA). the lattice constant, bulk modulus, electronic band structures, density of state and optical properties such as dielectric functions, refractive index and extinction coefficient are calculated and discussed for (x=0.25, 0.5 and 0.75). Our results agree well with the available data in the literature.

  4. Cyclotron resonance in InAs/AlSb quantum wells in magnetic fields up to 45 T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spirin, K. E. Krishtopenko, S. S.; Sadofyev, Yu. G.; Drachenko, O.; Helm, M.; Teppe, F.; Knap, W.; Gavrilenko, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance in InAs/AlSb heterostructures with quantum wells of various widths in pulsed magnetic fields up to 45 T are investigated. Our experimental cyclotron energies are in satisfactory agreement with the results of theoretical calculations performed using the eight-band kp Hamiltonian. The shift of the cyclotron resonance (CR) line, which corresponds to the transition from the lowest Landau level to the low magnetic-field region, is found upon varying the electron concentration due to the negative persistent photoconductivity effect. It is shown that the observed shift of the CR lines is associated with the finite width of the density of states at the Landau levels.

  5. Hybrid type-I InAs/GaAs and type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dot structure with enhanced photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Hai-Ming; Liang, Baolai Simmonds, Paul J.; Juang, Bor-Chau; Yang, Tao; Young, Robert J.; Huffaker, Diana L.

    2015-03-09

    We investigate the photoluminescence (PL) properties of a hybrid type-I InAs/GaAs and type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structure grown in a GaAs matrix by molecular beam epitaxy. This hybrid QD structure exhibits more intense PL with a broader spectral range, compared with control samples that contain only InAs or GaSb QDs. This enhanced PL performance is attributed to additional electron and hole injection from the type-I InAs QDs into the adjacent type-II GaSb QDs. We confirm this mechanism using time-resolved and power-dependent PL. These hybrid QD structures show potential for high efficiency QD solar cell applications.

  6. Calculation of the electron spin relaxation times in InSb and InAs by the projection-reduction method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Nam Lyong

    2014-12-07

    The electron spin relaxation times in a system of electrons interacting with piezoelectric phonons mediated through spin-orbit interactions were calculated using the formula derived from the projection-reduction method. The results showed that the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the relaxation times in InSb and InAs were similar. The piezoelectric material constants obtained by a comparison with the reported experimental result were P{sub pe}=4.0×10{sup 22} eV/m for InSb and P{sub pe}=1.2×10{sup 23} eV/m for InAs. The result also showed that the relaxation of the electron spin by the Elliot-Yafet process is more relevant for InSb than InAs at a low density.

  7. Growth and transport properties of epitaxial lattice matched half Heusler CoTiSb/InAlAs/InP(001) heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawasaki, Jason K.; Johansson, Linda I. M.; Schultz, Brian D.; Palmstrm, Chris J.

    2014-01-13

    We demonstrate the integration of the lattice matched single crystal epitaxial Half Heusler compound CoTiSb with In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As/InP(001) heterostructures using molecular beam epitaxy. CoTiSb belongs to the subset of Half Heusler compounds that is expected to be semiconducting, despite being composed entirely of metallic constituents. The lattice matching and epitaxial alignment of the CoTiSb films were confirmed by reflection high energy electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction. Temperature dependent transport measurements indicate semiconducting-like behavior, with a room temperature Hall mobility of 530 cm{sup 2}/Vs and background Hall carrier density of 9.0??10{sup 17}?cm{sup ?3}, which is comparable to n-Si with similar carrier density. Below 100?K, the films show a large negative magnetoresistance, and possible origins of this negative magnetoresistance are discussed.

  8. Influence of Sn on the thermoelectric properties of (Bi{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulbachinskii, V.A.; Kytin, V.G.; Kudryashov, A.A.; Lunin, R.A.

    2012-09-15

    The influence of tin on the thermoelectric properties of p-(Bi{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} single crystals (x=0; 0.25; 0.5) has been investigated. The temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient S, the electrical conductivity {sigma}, the heat conductivity k and the thermoelectric figure of merit of p-(Bi{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} single crystals were measured in the temperature range 7-300 K. By an increase the Sn content, the hole concentration increases in p-(Bi{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x}){sub 2-y}Sn{sub y}Te{sub 3}. The heat conductivity k of the p-(Bi{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x}){sub 2-y}Sn{sub y}Te{sub 3} crystals decreases due to the Sn doping, while the electrical conductivity {sigma} increases in the temperature interval about 200Sb{sub 1-x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} single crystals (x=0; 0.25; 0.5) has been investigated. Temperature dependence of Seebeck coefficient S, electrical conductivity {sigma}, thermal conductivity k and figure of merit of p-(Bi{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} single crystals were measured in the temperature range 7-300 K. Electrical conductivity increases in the temperature interval 150KSb{sub 1-x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} as shown in figure. By increasing the Sn content, the hole concentration increases in p-(Bi{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x}){sub 2-y}Sn{sub y}Te{sub 3}. The thermal conductivity k of the p-(Bi{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x}){sub 2-y}Sn{sub y}Te{sub 3} crystals decreases due to Sn doping. The Seebeck coefficient S for all compositions is positive and decreases due to Sn doping in the whole temperature range due to increase of the hole concentration under Sn doping. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer thermoelectric figure of merit for p-(Bi{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} investigated at 7-300 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer preferential scattering is ionized impurity scattering in Sn doped samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer electrical conductivity increases at 150 KSb{sub 1-x}){sub 2-y}Sn{sub y}Te{sub 3} with Sn doping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer the thermal conductivity of (Bi{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x}){sub 2-y}Sn{sub y}Te{sub 3} decreases due to Sn doping.

  9. Anisotropic magnetization and transport properties of RAgSb{sub 2} (R=Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Kenneth D.

    1999-11-08

    This study of the RAgSb{sub 2} series of compounds arose as part of an investigation of rare earth intermetallic compounds containing antimony with the rare earth in a position with tetragonal point symmetry. Materials with the rare earth in a position with tetragonal point symmetry frequently manifest strong anisotropies and rich complexity in the magnetic properties, and yet are simple enough to analyze. Antimony containing intermetallic compounds commonly possess low carrier densities and have only recently been the subject of study. Large single grain crystals were grown of the RAgSb{sub 2} (R=Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm) series of compounds out of a high temperature solution. This method of crystal growth, commonly known as flux growth is a versatile method which takes advantage of the decreasing solubility of the target compound with decreasing temperature. Overall, the results of the crystal growth were impressive with the synthesis of single crystals of LaAgSb{sub 2} approaching one gram. However, the sample yield diminishes as the rare earth elements become smaller and heavier. Consequently, no crystals could be grown with R=Yb or Lu. Furthermore, EuAgSb{sub 2} could not be synthesized, likely due to the divalency of the Eu ion. For most of the RAgSb{sub 2} compounds, strong magnetic anisotropies are created by the crystal electric field splitting of the Hund's rule ground state. This splitting confines the local moments to lie in the basal plane (easy plane) for the majority of the members of the series. Exceptions to this include ErAgSb{sub 2} and TmAgSb{sub 2}, which have moments along the c-axis (easy axis) and CeAgSb{sub 2}, which at intermediate temperatures has an easy plane, but exchange coupling at low temperatures is anisotropic with an easy axis. Additional anisotropy is also observed within the basal plane of DyAgSb{sub 2}, where the moments are restricted to align along one of the {l_angle}110{r_angle} axes. Most of the RAgSb{sub 2} compounds containing magnetic rare earths, antiferromagnetically ordered at low temperatures. The ordering temperatures of these compounds are approximately proportional to the de Gennes factor, which suggests that the RKKY interaction is the dominant exchange interaction between local moments. Although metamagnetic transitions were observed in many members of the series, the series of sharp step-like transitions in DyAgSb{sub 2} are impressive. In this compound, up to 11 different magnetic states are stable depending on the magnitude and direction of the applied field. The saturated magnetization of these states and the critical fields needed to induce a phase transition vary with the direction of the applied field. Through detailed study of the angular dependence of the magnetization and critical fields, the net distribution of magnetic moments was determined for most, of the metamagnetic states. In DyAgSb{sub 2}, the crystal electric field (CEF) splitting of the Hund's rule ground state creates a strong anisotropy where the local Dy{sup 3+} magnetic moments are constrained to one of the equivalent {l_angle}110{r_angle} directions within the basal plane. The four position clock model was introduced to account for this rich metamagnetic system. Within this model, the magnetic moments are constrained to one of four equivalent orientations within the basal plane and interactions are calculated for up third nearest neighbors. The theoretical phase diagram, generated from the coupling constants is in excellent agreement with the experimental phase diagram. Further investigation of this compound using magnetic X-ray or neutron diffraction would be extremely useful to verify the net distributions of moments and determine the wave vectors of each of the ordered states.

  10. Electron-phonon coupling and thermal transport in the thermoelectric compound Mo3Sb7–xTex

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bansal, Dipanshu; Li, Chen W.; Said, Ayman H.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Yan, Jiaqiang; Delaire, Olivier A.

    2015-12-07

    Phonon properties of Mo3Sb7–xTex (x = 0, 1.5, 1.7), a potential high-temperature thermoelectric material, have been studied with inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering, and with first-principles simulations. The substitution of Te for Sb leads to pronounced changes in the electronic struc- ture, local bonding, phonon density of states (DOS), dispersions, and phonon lifetimes. Alloying with tellurium shifts the Fermi level upward, near the top of the valence band, resulting in a strong suppression of electron-phonon screening, and a large overall stiffening of interatomic force- constants. The suppression in electron-phonon coupling concomitantly increases group velocities and suppresses phonon scattering rates, surpassingmore » the effects of alloy-disorder scattering, and re- sulting in a surprising increased lattice thermal conductivity in the alloy. We also identify that the local bonding environment changes non-uniformly around different atoms, leading to variable perturbation strengths for different optical phonon branches. The respective roles of changes in phonon group velocities and phonon lifetimes on the lattice thermal conductivity are quantified. Lastly, our results highlight the importance of the electron-phonon coupling on phonon mean-free-paths in this compound, and also estimates the contributions from boundary scattering, umklapp scattering, and point-defect scattering.« less

  11. Ground-state wave function of plutonium in PuSb as determined via x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Janoschek, M.; Haskel, D.; Fernandez-Rodriguez, J.; van Veenendaal, M.; Rebizant, J.; Lander, G. H.; Zhu, J. -X.; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, E. D.

    2015-01-14

    Measurements of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the Pu M₄,₅ edges of the ferromagnet PuSb are reported. Using bulk magnetization measurements and a sum rule analysis of the XMCD spectra, we determine the individual orbital [μL = 2.8(1)μB/Pu] and spin moments [μS = –2.0(1)μB/Pu] of the Pu 5f electrons for the first time. Atomic multiplet calculations of the XMCD and XANES spectra reproduce well the experimental data and are consistent with the experimental value of the spin moment. These measurements of Lz and Sz are in excellent agreement with the values thatmore » have been extracted from neutron magnetic form factor measurements, and confirm the local character of the 5f electrons in PuSb. We demonstrate that a split M₅ as well as a narrow M₄ XMCD signal may serve as a signature of 5f electron localization in actinide compounds.« less

  12. Ground-state wave function of plutonium in PuSb as determined via x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janoschek, M.; Haskel, D.; Fernandez-Rodriguez, J.; van Veenendaal, M.; Rebizant, J.; Lander, G. H.; Zhu, J. -X.; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, E. D.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the Pu M?,? edges of the ferromagnet PuSb are reported. Using bulk magnetization measurements and a sum rule analysis of the XMCD spectra, we determine the individual orbital [?L = 2.8(1)?B/Pu] and spin moments [?S = ?2.0(1)?B/Pu] of the Pu 5f electrons for the first time. Atomic multiplet calculations of the XMCD and XANES spectra reproduce well the experimental data and are consistent with the experimental value of the spin moment. These measurements of ?Lz? and ?Sz? are in excellent agreement with the values that have been extracted from neutron magnetic form factor measurements, and confirm the local character of the 5f electrons in PuSb. Finally, we demonstrate that a split M? as well as a narrow M? XMCD signal may serve as a signature of 5f electron localization in actinide compounds.

  13. Analytical electron microscopy investigation of elemental composition and bonding structure at the Sb-doped Ni-fully-silicide/SiO{sub 2} interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawasaki, Naohiko; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Otsuka, Yuji; Hashimoto, Hideki; Kurata, Hiroki; Isoda, Seiji

    2011-03-15

    It is very important to control the elemental composition and bonding structure at the gate electrode/gate dielectrics interface in metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor devices because this determines the threshold voltage of the gate electrode. In this study, we investigated the structure at the interface between the antimony (Sb)-doped nickel-fully-silicide gate electrode and SiO{sub 2} dielectrics by employing high-spatial resolution techniques such as energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy using a scanning transmission electron microscope. In one region, we found a thin nickel layer at the NiSi/SiO{sub 2} interface originating from the migration of native oxide at the face of the poly-silicon. In another region, a Sb pileup was detected at the NiSi/SiO{sub 2} interface where the Ni L{sub 3}-edge spectrum showed Ni-Sb bonding, then it was suggested that Sb atoms exist at the bottom of NiSi, substituting for Si atoms in NiSi.

  14. Band offset determination of mixed As/Sb type-II staggered gap heterostructure for n-channel tunnel field effect transistor application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Y.; Jain, N.; Hudait, M. K.; Mohata, D. K.; Datta, S.; Lubyshev, D.; Fastenau, J. M.; Liu, A. K.

    2013-01-14

    The experimental study of the valence band offset ({Delta}E{sub v}) of a mixed As/Sb type-II staggered gap GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65}/In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As heterostructure used as source/channel junction of n-channel tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) grown by molecular beam epitaxy was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cross-sectional transmission electron micrograph shows high crystalline quality at the source/channel heterointerface. XPS results demonstrate a {Delta}E{sub v} of 0.39 {+-} 0.05 eV at the GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65}/In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As heterointerface. The conduction band offset was calculated to be {approx}0.49 eV using the band gap values of source and channel materials and the measured valence band offset. An effective tunneling barrier height of 0.21 eV was extracted, suggesting a great promise for designing a metamorphic mixed As/Sb type-II staggered gap TFET device structure for low-power logic applications.

  15. Observation and modeling of polycrystalline grain formation in Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, Geoffrey W.; Tchoulfian, Pierre; Topuria, Teya; Nyffeler, Clemens; Virwani, Kumar; Padilla, Alvaro; Shelby, Robert M.; Eskandari, Mona; Jackson, Bryan; Lee, Bong-Sub

    2012-05-15

    The relationship between the polycrystalline nature of phase change materials (such as Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}) and the intermediate resistance states of phase change memory (PCM) devices has not been widely studied. A full understanding of such states will require knowledge of how polycrystalline grains form, how they interact with each other at various temperatures, and how the differing electrical (and thermal) characteristics within the grains and at their boundaries combine through percolation to produce the externally observed electrical (and thermal) characteristics of a PCM device. We address the first of these tasks (and introduce a vehicle for the second) by studying the formation of fcc polycrystalline grains from the as-deposited amorphous state in undoped Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}. We perform ex situ transmission electron microscopy membrane experiments and then match these observations against numerical simulation. Ramped-anneal experiments show that the temperature ramp-rate strongly influences the median grain size. By truncating such ramped-anneal experiments at various peak temperatures, we convincingly demonstrate that the temperature range over which these grains are established is quite narrow. Subsequent annealing at elevated temperature appears to change these established distributions of grain sizes only slightly. Our numerical simulator--which models nuclei formation through classical nucleation theory and then tracks the subsequent time- and temperature-dependent growth of these grains--can match these experimental observations of initial grain distributions and crystallization temperature both qualitatively and quantitatively. These simulations show that the particular narrow temperature range over which crystallization occurs shifts as a function of temperature ramp-rate, which allows us to quantify the lower portions of the time-temperature-transformation map for Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}. Future experiments and extensions of the simulator to investigate temperature-dependent interactions between neighboring grains, and to study nucleation from within the melt-quenched amorphous state, are discussed.

  16. Effect of magnetic fields on the Kondo insulator CeRhSb: Magnetoresistance and high-field heat capacity measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, S.K.; Menon, L.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    The compound CeRhSb is a mixed valent Ce-based compound which shows a gap in the electronic density of states at low temperatures. The gap manifests by a rise in electrical resistivity{emdash}below about 8 K from which the gap energy is estimated to be about 4 K. We have carried out heat capacity measurements on this compound in various applied fields up to 9.85 T. The magnetic contribution to the heat capacity, {Delta}C, is found to have a maximum in {Delta}C/T vs T at 10 K, below which {Delta}C/T is linear with T. This is attributed to the fact that below this temperature, in the gapped state, the electronic density of states decreases linearly with decreasing temperature. On application of a magnetic field, the electronic specific heat coefficient {gamma} in the gapped state increases by {approximately}4mJ/molK{sup 2}. The maximum in {Delta}C/T vs T is observed in all fields, which shifts to lower temperatures {approximately}1K at 5.32 T and raises again at 9.85 T to about the same values as at H=0T. This suggests that the gap exists for all fields up to 9.85 T. Above 10 K, in the mixed-valent state, {Delta}C/T vs T decreases with increasing temperature in zero field. There is hardly any effect of application of field in the mixed-valent state. We have also carried out magnetoresistance measurements on CeRhSb up to fields of 5.5 T at 2, 4.5, 10, 20, and 30 K. The magnetoresistance in CeRhSb is positive at temperatures of 4.5 K and above, in applied fields up to 5.5 T. At 5.5 T, the magnetoresistance is maximum at 4.5 K (6{percent}) and decreases with increasing temperature. The observation of the maximum is consistent with the observation of a maximum in {Delta}C/T vs T and is due to a change in the density of states. At a temperature of 2 K, a negative magnetoresistance is observed for magnetic fields greater than {approximately}3.5T which suggests reduction in the gap. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Properties of the Solid–Solution Zintl Phase Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx (x < 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazem, Nasrin; Xie, Weiwei; Ohno, Saneyuki; Zevalkink, Alexandra; Miller, Gordon J; Snyder, G Jeffrey; Kauzlarich, Susan M

    2014-02-11

    Zintl phases are compounds that have shown promise for thermoelectric applications. The title solid–solution Zintl compounds were prepared from the elements as single crystals using a tin flux for compositions x = 0, 1, 2, and 3. Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx (x < 3) crystallize isostructurally in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group C2/m (no. 12, Z = 2) as the Sr11Cd6Sb12 structure type (Pearson symbol mC58). Efforts to make the As compositions for x exceeding ~3 resulted in structures other than the Sr11Cd6Sb12 structure type. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction indicates that As does not randomly substitute for Sb in the structure but is site specific for each composition. The amount of As determined by structural refinement was verified by electron microprobe analysis. Electronic structures and energies calculated for various model structures of Eu11Cd6Sb10As2 (x = 2) indicated that the preferred As substitution pattern involves a mixture of three of the six pnicogen sites in the asymmetric unit. In addition, As substitution at the Pn4 site opens an energy gap at the Fermi level, whereas substitution at the other five pnicogen sites remains semimetallic with a pseudo gap. Thermoelectric properties of these compounds were measured on hot-pressed, fully densified pellets. Samples show exceptionally low lattice thermal conductivities from room temperature to 775 K: 0.78–0.49 W/mK for x = 0; 0.72–0.53 W/mK for x = 1; and 0.70–0.56 W/mK for x = 2. Eu11Cd6Sb12 shows a high p-type Seebeck coefficient (from +118 to 153 μ V/K) but also high electrical resistivity (6.8 to 12.8 mΩ·cm). The value of zT reaches 0.23 at 774 K. The properties of Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx are interpreted in discussion with the As site substitution.

  18. Characteristics of GaAsSb single quantum well lasers emitting near 1.3 {micro}m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SPAHN,OLGA B.; KLEM,JOHN F.

    2000-02-17

    The authors report data on GaAsSb single quantum well lasers grown on GaAs substrates. Room temperature pulsed emission at 1.275 {micro}m in a 1,250 {micro}m-long device has been observed. Minimum threshold current densities of 535 A/cm{sup 2} were measured in 2000 {micro}m long lasers. The authors also measured internal losses of 2--5 cm{sup {minus}1}, internal quantum efficiencies of 30-38% and characteristic temperature T{sub 0} of 67--77 C. From these parameters a gain constant G{sub 0} of 1,660 cm{sup {minus}1} and a transparency current density J{sub tr} of 134 A/cm{sup 2} were calculated. The results indicate the potential for fabricating 1.3 {micro}m VCSELs from these materials.

  19. Direct minority carrier transport characterization of InAs/InAsSb superlattice nBn photodetectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zuo, Daniel; Liu, Runyu; Wasserman, Daniel; Mabon, James; He, Zhao -Yu; Liu, Shi; Zhang, Yong -Hang; Kadlec, Emil A.; Olson, Benjamin V.; Shaner, Eric A.

    2015-02-18

    We present an extensive characterization of the minority carrier transport properties in an nBn mid-wave infrared detector incorporating a Ga-free InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattice as the absorbing region. Using a modified electron beam induced current technique in conjunction with time-resolved photoluminescence, we were able to determine several important transport parameters of the absorber region in the device, which uses a barrier layer to reduce dark current. For a device at liquid He temperatures we report a minority carrier diffusion length of 750 nm and a minority carrier lifetime of 202 ns, with a vertical diffusivity of 2.78 x 10–2 cm2/s. Wemore » also report on the device's optical response characteristics at 78 K.« less

  20. Direct minority carrier transport characterization of InAs/InAsSb superlattice nBn photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo, Daniel; Liu, Runyu; Wasserman, Daniel; Mabon, James; He, Zhao -Yu; Liu, Shi; Zhang, Yong -Hang; Kadlec, Emil A.; Olson, Benjamin V.; Shaner, Eric A.

    2015-02-18

    We present an extensive characterization of the minority carrier transport properties in an nBn mid-wave infrared detector incorporating a Ga-free InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattice as the absorbing region. Using a modified electron beam induced current technique in conjunction with time-resolved photoluminescence, we were able to determine several important transport parameters of the absorber region in the device, which uses a barrier layer to reduce dark current. For a device at liquid He temperatures we report a minority carrier diffusion length of 750 nm and a minority carrier lifetime of 202 ns, with a vertical diffusivity of 2.78 x 102 cm2/s. We also report on the device's optical response characteristics at 78 K.

  1. Measurement and modeling of infrared nonlinear absorption coefficients and laser-induced damage thresholds in Ge and GaSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, T. J.; Bohn, M. J.; Coutu, R. A. Jr.; Gonzalez, L. P.; Murray, J. M.; Guha, S.; Schepler, K. L.

    2010-10-15

    Using a simultaneous fitting technique to extract nonlinear absorption coefficients from data at two pulse widths, we measure two-photon and free-carrier absorption coefficients for Ge and GaSb at 2.05 and 2.5 {mu}m for the first time, to our knowledge. Results agreed well with published theory. Single-shot damage thresholds were also measured at 2.5 {mu}m and agreed well with modeled thresholds using experimentally determined parameters including nonlinear absorption coefficients and temperature dependent linear absorption. The damage threshold for a single-layer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} anti-reflective coating on Ge was 55% or 35% lower than the uncoated threshold for picosecond or nanosecond pulses, respectively.

  2. Structural characterization of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} as a function of temperature using neutron powder diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansour, A. N.; Wong-Ng, W.; Huang, Q.; Tang, W.; Thompson, A.; Sharp, J.

    2014-08-28

    The structure of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material (SRM™ 3451)) and the related phase Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} have been characterized as a function of temperature using the neutron powder diffraction (NPD) and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. The neutron structural studies were carried out from 20 K to 300 K for Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and from 10 K to 298 K for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The EXAFS technique for studying the local structure of the two compounds was conducted from 19 K to 298 K. Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} are isostructural, with a space group of R3{sup ¯}m. The structure consists of repeated quintuple layers of atoms, Te2-M-Te1-M-Te2 (where M = Bi or Sb) stacking along the c-axis of the unit cell. EXAFS was used to examine the bond distances and static and thermal disorders for the first three shells of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} as a function of temperature. The temperature dependencies of thermal disorders were analyzed using the Debye and Einstein models for lattice vibrations. The Debye and Einstein temperatures for the first two shells of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} are similar to those of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} within the uncertainty in the data. However, the Debye and Einstein temperatures for the third shell of Bi-Bi are significantly lower than those of the third shell of Sb-Sb. The Einstein temperature for the third shell is consistent with a soft phonon mode in both Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The lower Einstein temperature of Bi-Bi relative to Sb-Sb is consistent with the lower value of thermal conductivity of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} relative to Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}.

  3. Improved Thermoelectric Performance of p-type Skutterudite YbxFe4-yPtySb12 (0.8 x 1, y = 1 and 0.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Jung Y; Ye, Zuxin; Tessema, Misle; Salvador, James R.; Waldo, Richard; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Weiqing; Yang, Jihui; Cai, Wei; Wang, Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Thermoelectric performance of p-type skutterudites currently lags that of the corresponding n-type materials and improvement of this important class of materials have become the focus of considerable research effort world-wide. Recent calculations find promising band structural features in p-type skutterudite materials of the type AeFe3NiSb12 ( Ae = Ca, Sr, or Ba) which could potentially lead to excellent thermoelectric properties. Recent work on the Yb- filled analog of the these formulations (YbFe3NiSb12) however finds that the onset of intrinsic conduction at lower than expected temperatures deteriorates the performance above 500 K leading to poor performance in the temperature range of interest for automotive waste heat recovery applications. We therefore seek a way to increase the band gap in order to find a way to minimize the deleterious effects of intrinsic conduction. Here we present ab initio band structure calculations and the synthesis and thermoelectric properties of YbxFe4-yPtySb12 (0.8 x 1, y = 1 and 0.5). Ab initio calculations find that the band gap increases for YbFe3PtSb12 as compared to the Ni-containing analog, though no such increase in the band gap energy was found for as compared to YbFe3.5Ni0.5Sb12. The y = 1 samples shows a characteristic transition to intrinsic conduction with a decrease in the Seebeck coefficient at temperatures above 700 K. The increased carrier concentration in y = 0.5 virtually eliminates any evidence of intrinsic conduction and the Seebeck coefficients for these samples increase monotonically up to 750 K, resulting in power factors approaching 27 W/cm K2 at 750 K. These power factors combined with low thermal conductivity result in a ZT = 0.9 at 750 K for Yb0.95Fe3.5Pt0.5Sb12.

  4. Investigation of arsenic and antimony capping layers, and half cycle reactions during atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on GaSb(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhernokletov, Dmitry M.; Dong, Hong; Brennan, Barry; Kim, Jiyoung; Wallace, Robert M.; Yakimov, Michael; Tokranov, Vadim; Oktyabrsky, Serge

    2013-11-15

    In-situ monochromatic x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, ion scattering spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy are used to examine the GaSb(100) surfaces grown by molecular beam epitaxy after thermal desorption of a protective As or Sb layer and subsequent atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. An antimony protective layer is found to be more favorable compared to an arsenic capping layer as it prevents As alloys from forming with the GaSb substrate. The evolution of oxide free GaSb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface is investigated by “half-cycle” ALD reactions of trimethyl aluminum and deionized water.

  5. Spectral behavior of the optical constants in the visible/near infrared of GeSbSe chalcogenide thin films grown at glancing angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin-Palma, R. J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Pantano, C. G.

    2007-04-23

    GeSbSe chalcogenide thin films were deposited using glancing angle deposition onto transparent glass substrates for the determination of the spectral behavior of the optical constants (index of refraction n and extinction coefficient k) in the visible and near infrared ranges (400-2500 nm) as a function of the deposition angle. Computational simulations based on the matrix method were employed to determine the values of the optical constants of the different films from the experimental reflectance and transmittance spectra. A significant dependence of the overall optical behavior on the deposition angle is found. Furthermore, the band gap of the GeSbSe thin films was calculated. The accurate determination of the optical constants of films grown at glancing angle will enable the development of sculptured thin film fiber-optic chemical sensors and biosensors.

  6. Explosive boiling of Ge{sub 35}Sb{sub 10}S{sub 55} glass induced by a CW laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knotek, P.; Tichy, L.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Interaction of the CW 785 nm laser with chalcogenide GeSbS glass. First demonstration of the explosive boiling induced by CW laser in glass. Different processes as photo-induced oxidation, expansion, and viscosity-flow observed. Applied diagnostics SEM, DHM, AFM, force spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Damage threshold determined at 1.2 10{sup 24}s{sup ?1} cm{sup ?3} of absorbed photons. - Abstract: The response of bulk Ge{sub 35}Sb{sub 10}S{sub 55} glass to illumination by a continuous wave (CW) laser, sub-band-gap photons, was studied specifically with an atomic force microscopy including a force spectroscopy, with a digital holographic microscopy and with a scanning electron microscopy. Depending on the number of photons absorbed, photo-expansion, photo-oxidation and explosive boiling were observed.

  7. Reverse Monte Carlo simulation of Se{sub 80}Te{sub 20} and Se{sub 80}Te{sub 15}Sb{sub 5} glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdel-Baset, A. M.; Rashad, M.; Moharram, A. H.

    2013-12-16

    Two-dimensional Monte Carlo of the total pair distribution functions g(r) is determined for Se{sub 80}Te{sub 20} and Se{sub 80}Te{sub 15}Sb{sub 5} alloys, and then it used to assemble the three-dimensional atomic configurations using the reverse Monte Carlo simulation. The partial pair distribution functions g{sub ij}(r) indicate that the basic structure unit in the Se{sub 80}Te{sub 15}Sb{sub 5} glass is di-antimony tri-selenide units connected together through Se-Se and Se-Te chain. The structure of Se{sub 80}Te{sub 20} alloys is a chain of Se-Te and Se-Se in addition to some rings of Se atoms.

  8. Long-wavelength shift and enhanced room temperature photoluminescence efficiency in GaAsSb/InGaAs/GaAs-based heterostructures emitting in the spectral range of 1.01.2??m due to increased charge carrier's localization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kryzhkov, D. I. Yablonsky, A. N.; Morozov, S. V.; Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Krasilnik, Z. F.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Vikhrova, O. V.

    2014-11-28

    In this work, a study of the photoluminescence (PL) temperature dependence in quantum well GaAs/GaAsSb and double quantum well InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs heterostructures grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition with different parameters of GaAsSb and InGaAs layers has been performed. It has been demonstrated that in double quantum well InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs heterostructures, a significant shift of the PL peak to a longer-wavelength region (up to 1.2??m) and a considerable reduction in the PL thermal quenching in comparison with GaAs/GaAsSb structures can be obtained due to better localization of charge carriers in the double quantum well. For InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs heterostructures, an additional channel of radiative recombination with participation of the excited energy states in the quantum well, competing with the main ground-state radiative transition, has been revealed.

  9. Electron density distribution in BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} superconducting oxides studied by double nuclear magnetic resonance methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piskunov, Yu. V. Ogloblichev, V. V.; Arapova, I. Yu.; Sadykov, A. V.; Gerashchenko, A. P.; Verkhovskii, S. V.

    2011-11-15

    The effect of charge disorder on the formation of an inhomogeneous state of the electron system in the conduction band in BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} superconducting oxides is investigated experimentally by NMR methods. The NMR spectra of {sup 17}O are measured systematically, and the contributions from {sup 17}O atoms with different cation nearest surroundings are identified. It is found that microscopic regions with an elevated spin density of charge carriers are formed within two coordination spheres near antimony ions. Nuclei of the superconducting phase of the oxide (regions with an elevated antimony concentration) microscopically distributed over the sample are detected in compounds with x = 0.25 and 0.33. Experiments in which a double resonance signal of the spin echo of {sup 17}O-{sup 207}Pb and {sup 17}O-{sup 121}Sb are measured in the metal phase of BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} oxides are carried out for the first time. The constants of indirect heteronuclear spin-spin {sup 17}O-{sup 207}Pb interaction are determined as functions of the local Knight shift {sub 207}Ks. The estimates of the constants of the indirect interaction between the nuclei of the nearest neighbors (O-Pb and Pb-Pb atoms) and analysis of evolution of the NMR spectra of {sup 17}O upon a change in the antimony concentration are convincing evidence in favor of the development of a microscopically inhomogeneous state of the electron system in the metal phase of BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} oxides.

  10. Record figure of merit values of highly stoichiometric Sb2Te3 porous bulk synthesized from tailor-made molecular precursors in ionic liquids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heimann, Stefan; Schulz, Stephan; Schaumann, Julian; Mudring, Anja; Stötzel, Julia; Maculewicz, Franziska; Schierning, Gabi

    2015-08-06

    We report on the synthesis of Sb2Te3 nanoparticles with record-high figure of merit values of up to 1.5. The central thermoelectric parameters, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient, were independently optimized. Critical influence of porosity for the fabrication of highly efficient thermoelectric materials is firstly demonstrated, giving a strong guidance for the optimization of other thermoelectric materials.

  11. SLUDGE BATCH 7 (SB7) WASHING DEMONSTRATION TO DETERMINE SULFATE/OXALATE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY AND SETTLING BEHAVIOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.

    2010-12-10

    To support Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) washing, a demonstration of the proposed Tank Farm washing operation was performed utilizing a real-waste test slurry generated from Tank 4, 7, and 12 samples. The purpose of the demonstration was twofold: (1) to determine the settling time requirements and washing strategy needed to bring the SB7 slurry to the desired endpoint; and (2) to determine the impact of washing on the chemical and physical characteristics of the sludge, particularly those of sulfur content, oxalate content, and rheology. Seven wash cycles were conducted over a four month period to reduce the supernatant sodium concentration to approximately one molar. The long washing duration was due to the slow settling of the sludge and the limited compaction. Approximately 90% of the sulfur was removed through washing, and the vast majority of the sulfur was determined to be soluble from the start. In contrast, only about half of the oxalate was removed through washing, as most of the oxalate was initially insoluble and did not partition to the liquid phase until the latter washes. The final sulfur concentration was 0.45 wt% of the total solids, and the final oxalate concentration was 9,900 mg/kg slurry. More oxalate could have been removed through additional washing, although the washing would have reduced the supernatant sodium concentration.The yield stress of the final washed sludge (35 Pa) was an order of magnitude higher than that of the unwashed sludge ({approx}4 Pa) and was deemed potentially problematic. The high yield stress was related to the significant increase in insoluble solids that occurred ({approx}8 wt% to {approx}18 wt%) as soluble solids and water were removed from the slurry. Reduction of the insoluble solids concentration to {approx}14 wt% was needed to reduce the yield stress to an acceptable level. However, depending on the manner that the insoluble solids adjustment was performed, the final sodium concentration and extent of oxalate removal would be prone to change. As such, the strategy for completing the final wash cycle is integral to maintaining the proper balance of chemical and physical requirements.

  12. Electroforming of Bi(1-x)Sb(x) nanowires for high-efficiency micro-thermoelectric cooling devices on a chip.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III; Siegal, Michael P.; Yelton, William Graham

    2006-11-01

    Active cooling of electronic systems for space-based and terrestrial National Security missions has demanded use of Stirling, reverse-Brayton, closed Joule-Thompson, pulse tube and more elaborate refrigeration cycles. Such cryocoolers are large systems that are expensive, demand large powers, often contain moving parts and are difficult to integrate with electronic systems. On-chip, solid-state, active cooling would greatly enhance the capabilities of future systems by reducing the size, cost and inefficiencies compared to existing solutions. We proposed to develop the technology for a thermoelectric cooler capable of reaching 77K by replacing bulk thermoelectric materials with arrays of Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires. Furthermore, the Sandia-developed technique we will use to produce the oriented nanowires occurs at room temperature and can be applied directly to a silicon substrate. Key obstacles include (1) optimizing the Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} alloy composition for thermoelectric properties; (2) increasing wire aspect ratios to 3000:1; and (3) increasing the array density to {ge} 10{sup 9} wires/cm{sup 2}. The primary objective of this LDRD was to fabricate and test the thermoelectric properties of arrays of Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires. With this proof-of-concept data under our belts we are positioned to engage National Security systems customers to invest in the integration of on-chip thermoelectric coolers for future missions.

  13. Resistivity During Boiling in the SB-15-D Core from the Geysers Geothermal Field: The Effects of Capillarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J.; Duba, A.; Bonner, B.; Kasameyer, P.

    1997-01-01

    In a laboratory study of cores from borehole SB-15-D in The Geysers geothermal area, we measured the electrical resistivity of metashale with and without pore-pressure control, with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures between 20 and 150 C, to determine how the pore-size distribution and capillarity affected boiling. We observed a gradual increase in resistivity when the downstream pore pressure or confining pressure decreased below the phase boundary of free water. For the conditions of this experiment, boiling, as indicated by an increase in resistivity, is initiated at pore pressures of approximately 0.5 to 1 bar (0.05 to 0.1 MPa) below the free-water boiling curve, and it continues to increase gradually as pressure is lowered to atmospheric. A simple model of the effects of capillarity suggests that at 145 C, less than 15% of the pore water can boil in these rocks. If subsequent experiments bear out these preliminary observations, then boiling within a geothermal reservoir is controlled not just by pressure and temperature but also by pore-size distribution. Thus, it may be possible to determine reservoir characteristics by monitoring changes in electrical resistivity as reservoir conditions change.

  14. EIS-0346: Salmon Creek Project, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's proposal to fund activities that would restore sufficient water flows to Salmon Creek and rehabilitate its streambed as necessary to provide adequate passage for summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and possibly spring chinook (O. tshawytscha).

  15. DOE Climate Change Adaptation Training (Richland, WA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This free training is a primer on climate science, identifying climate hazards, conducting vulnerability assessments, leveraging climate change data and tools and understanding the energy-water-food nexus.

  16. 2715-WA_Carpenter's_Shop_Refurbishment.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  17. Sumas, WA LNG Imports from Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    12,530 7,769 9,768 6,016 10,409 3,547 1996-2014 Pipeline Prices 5.55 4.81 4.47 3.87 4.02 5.05 1996...

  18. p-type conduction from Sb-doped ZnO thin films grown by dual ion beam sputtering in the absence of oxygen ambient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar Pandey, Sushil; Kumar Pandey, Saurabh; Awasthi, Vishnu; Kumar, Ashish; Mukherjee, Shaibal; Deshpande, Uday P.; Gupta, Mukul

    2013-10-28

    Sb-doped ZnO (SZO) thin films were deposited on c-plane sapphire substrates by dual ion beam sputtering deposition system in the absence of oxygen ambient. The electrical, structural, morphological, and elemental properties of SZO thin films were studied for films grown at different substrate temperatures ranging from 200 °C to 600 °C and then annealed in situ at 800 °C under vacuum (pressure ∼5 × 10{sup −8} mbar). Films grown for temperature range of 200–500 °C showed p-type conduction with hole concentration of 1.374 × 10{sup 16} to 5.538 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3}, resistivity of 66.733–12.758 Ω cm, and carrier mobility of 4.964–8.846 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} at room temperature. However, the film grown at 600 °C showed n-type behavior. Additionally, current-voltage (I–V) characteristic of p-ZnO/n-Si heterojunction showed a diode-like behavior, and that further confirmed the p-type conduction in ZnO by Sb doping. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that all SZO films had (002) preferred crystal orientation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the formation of Sb{sub Zn}–2V{sub Zn} complex caused acceptor-like behavior in SZO films.

  19. Current flow and potential efficiency of solar cells based on GaAs and GaSb p-n junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreev, V. M.; Evstropov, V. V.; Kalinovsky, V. S. Lantratov, V. M.; Khvostikov, V. P.

    2009-05-15

    Dependence of the efficiency of single-junction and multijunction solar cells on the mechanisms of current flow in photoactive p-n junctions, specifically on the form of the dark current-voltage characteristic J-V, has been studied. The resistanceless J-V{sub j} characteristic (with the series resistance disregarded) of a multijunction solar cell has the same shape as the characteristic of a single-junction cell: both feature a set of exponential portions. This made it possible to develop a unified analytical method for calculating the efficiency of singlejunction and multijunction solar cells. The equation relating the efficiency to the photogenerated current at each portion of the J-V{sub j} characteristic is derived. For p-n junctions in GaAs and GaSb, the following characteristics were measured: the dark J-V characteristic, the dependence of the open-circuit voltage on the illumination intensity P-V{sub OC}, and the dependence of the luminescence intensity on the forward current L-J. Calculated dependences of potential efficiency (under idealized condition for equality to unity of external quantum yield) on the photogenerated current for single-junction GaAs and GaSb solar cells and a GaAs/GaSb tandem are plotted. The form of these dependences corresponds to the shape of J-V{sub j} characteristics: there are the diffusion- and recombination-related portions; in some cases, the tunneling-trapping portion is also observed. At low degrees of concentration of solar radiation (C < 10), an appreciable contribution to photogenerated current is made by recombination component. It is an increase in this component in the case of irradiation with 6.78-MeV protons or 1-MeV electrons that brings about a decrease in the efficiency of conversion of unconcentrated solar radiation.

  20. Effects of localization on hot carriers in InAs/AlAs{sub x}Sb{sub 1–x} quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, J.; Whiteside, V. R.; Esmaielpour, H.; Vijeyaragunathan, S.; Mishima, T. D.; Santos, M. B.; Sellers, I. R.

    2015-02-09

    The temperature dependence of a InAs/AlAs{sub 0.84}Sb{sub 0.16} multi-quantum-well sample is studied using continuous wave photoluminescence. An “s-shape” shift in peak energy is observed and attributed to low energy localization states. High incident power density photoluminescence measurements were performed to probe the nature of such localization. The results opposed the possibility of a type-II band structure and supported the idea of low energy localization states. The effect of such localization on hot carriers in our system was studied and an improvement in their stability due to hole mobility at elevated temperature is presented.

  1. Synthesis and crystal structure of [(C{sub 7}H{sub 10}N){sub 2}]{sup 2+} [Sb{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}]{sup 2-1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Yun Zhang Miao; Shen Liang; Jin Yingying; Jin Zhimin

    2010-12-15

    The reaction of 2,6-dimethylpyridine with SbCl{sub 3} and HCl affords the title compound, the structure of which is ascertained by X-ray diffraction. The unit cell consists of one bridged Sb{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}{sup 2-} anion and two 2,6-dimethylpyridinium cations. The trivalent antimony ion is bonded not only directly to chlorine anions, but also is coordinated with chlorine anions by secondary bonds. In the crystal, there exists infinite coordinated chains of [Sb{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}]{sub n}{sup 2n-} anions running along the a axis, which link 2,6-dimethylpyridinium cations by N-H-Cl hydrogen bonds.

  2. Direct imaging of crystal structure and defects in metastable Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} by quantitative aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Ulrich; Lotnyk, Andriy Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2014-03-24

    Knowledge about the atomic structure and vacancy distribution in phase change materials is of foremost importance in order to understand the underlying mechanism of fast reversible phase transformation. In this Letter, by combining state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with image simulations, we are able to map the local atomic structure and composition of a textured metastable Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin film deposited by pulsed laser deposition with excellent spatial resolution. The atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy investigations display the heterogeneous defect structure of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase. The obtained results are discussed. Highly oriented Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin films appear to be a promising approach for further atomic-resolution investigations of the phase change behavior of this material class.

  3. Impact of substrate temperature on the structural and optical properties of strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Shi; Li, Hua; Cellek, Oray O.; Ding, Ding; Lin, Zhi-Yuan; Steenbergen, Elizabeth H.; He, Zhao-Yu; Johnson, Shane R.; Zhang, Yong-Hang; Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 ; Shen, Xiao-Meng; School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 ; Fan, Jin; Smith, David J.; Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 ; Lu, Jing

    2013-02-18

    Molecular beam epitaxial growth of strain-balanced InAs/InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} type-II superlattices on GaSb substrates has been investigated for substrate temperatures from 400 Degree-Sign C to 450 Degree-Sign C. The Sb composition is found to vary linearly with substrate temperature at constant V/III ratios. For samples grown at the optimized substrate temperature (410 Degree-Sign C), superlattice zero-order peak full-width at half-maximums are routinely less than 25 arc sec using high-resolution X-ray diffraction. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images show the absence of any visible defects. Strong photoluminescence covers a wavelength range from 5.5 to 13 {mu}m at 12 K. Photoluminescence linewidth simulations show satisfactory agreement with experiments.

  4. Two dimensional electron transport in modulation-doped In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/AlAs{sub 0.56}Sb{sub 0.44} ultrathin quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Cheng-Ying Law, Jeremy J. M.; Rodwell, Mark J. W.; Lu, Hong; Gossard, Arthur C.; Jena, Debdeep

    2014-03-28

    We have investigated the growth and electron transport in In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/AlAs{sub 0.56}Sb{sub 0.44} two dimensional electron gases (2DEG) and compared their properties with In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As 2DEGs. For 10?nm thick InGaAs wells, the electron mobility of InGaAs/AlAsSb 2DEGs is comparable to that of InGaAs/InAlAs 2DEGs. Upon thinning the wells to 3?nm, the 2DEG mobility is degraded quickly and stronger interface roughness scattering is observed for InGaAs/AlAsSb heterointerfaces than for InGaAs/InAlAs heterointerfaces. Changing the group-V exposure between As and Sb during growth interruptions at the InGaAs/AlAsSb interfaces did not significantly change the 2DEG mobility. With the insertion of a two monolayer InAlAs at the InGaAs/AlAsSb interfaces, the interface roughness scattering is reduced and the mobility greatly increased. The room temperature 2DEG mobility shows 66% improvement from 1.63??10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/Vs to 2.71??10{sup 3}?cm{sup 2}/Vs for a 3?nm InGaAs well.

  5. Kondo Lattice Behavior in the Ordered Dilute Magnetic Semiconductor Yb14-xLaxMnSb11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sales, Brian C; Khalifah, Peter; Enck, Thomas P; Nagler, Evan J; Sykora, Richard E; Jin, Rongying; Mandrus, David

    2005-01-01

    We report Hall, magnetic, heat capacity, and doping studies from single crystals of Yb{sub 14}MnSb{sub 11} and Yb{sub 13.3}La{sub 0.7}MnSb{sub 11}. These heavily doped semiconducting compounds are ferromagnetic below 53 and 39 K, respectively. The renormalization of the carrier mass from 2m{sub 3} near room temperature to 20m{sub e} at 5 K, plus the magnetic evidence for partial screening of the Mn magnetic moments suggest that these compounds represent rare examples of an underscreened Kondo lattice with T{sub K} {approx} 285 K.

  6. Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}; as-deposited amorphous, crystalline, and laser-reamorphized

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, Jan H. Tominaga, Junji; Fons, Paul; Kolobov, Alex V.; Ueda, Shigenori; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Ishimaru, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    2014-02-10

    We have investigated the electronic structure of as-deposited, crystalline, and laser-reamorphized Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} using high resolution, hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. A shift in the Fermi level as well as a broadening of the spectral features in the valence band and the Ge 3d level between the amorphous and crystalline state is observed. Upon amorphization, Ge 3d and Sb 4d spectra show a surprisingly small breaking of resonant bonds and changes in the bonding character as evidenced by the very similar density of states in all cases.

  7. Evaluation of stacking faults and associated partial dislocations in AlSb/GaAs (001) interface by aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, C.; Ge, B. H.; Cui, Y. X.; Li, F. H.; Zhu, J.; Yu, R.; Cheng, Z. Y.

    2014-11-15

    The stacking faults (SFs) in an AlSb/GaAs (001) interface were investigated using a 300 kV spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The structure and strain distribution of the single and intersecting (V-shaped) SFs associated with partial dislocations (PDs) were characterized by the [110] HRTEM images and geometric phase analysis, respectively. In the biaxial strain maps ?{sub xx} and ?{sub yy}, a SF can be divided into several sections under different strain states (positive or negative strain values). Furthermore, the strain state for the same section of a SF is in contrast to each other in ?{sub xx} and ?{sub yy} strain maps. The modification in the strain states was attributed to the variation in the local atomic displacements for the SF in the AlSb film on the GaAs substrate recorded in the lattice image. Finally, the single SF was found to be bounded by two 30 PDs. A pair of 30 PDs near the heteroepitaxial interface reacted to form a Lomer-Cottrell sessile dislocation located at the vertices of V-shaped SFs with opposite screw components. The roles of misfit dislocations, such as the PDs, in strain relaxation were also discussed.

  8. Thermoelectric Properties of P-type Skutterudites YbxFe3.5Ni0.5Sb12 (0.8 x 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Jung Y; Ye, Zuxin; Tessema, M.; Waldo, R.A.; Salvador, James R.; Yang, Jihui; Cai, Wei; Wang, Hsin

    2012-01-01

    P-type skutterudites, with nominal compositions YbxFe3.5Ni0.5Sb12 (0.8 x 1), have been synthesized by induction melting with subsequent annealing, and their thermoelectric properties evaluated from 3.5 K to 745 K to assess their suitability for thermoelectric based waste heat recovery applications. We report results for the synthesis and measurements of Seebeck coefficient (S), electrical resistivity ( ), thermal conductivity ( ), Hall coefficient (RH), and effective mass (m*/m0) of YbxFe3.5Ni0.5Sb12 (0.8 x 1). Powder x-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) show that this system has a narrow filling fraction range of x ~ 0.84 to 0.86 for Yb in the crystallographic voids. All samples show positive RH for the entire temperature range studied with carrier concentrations ranging from 9.6 1020 to 2.8 1021 cm-3 at room temperature. Relatively high values of S result in high power factors up to 17 Wcm-1K-2 at room temperature. However, large values of and a sharp reduction in the S at high temperature due to bipolar conduction prevent the attainment of high thermoelectric figure of merit.

  9. Electron-phonon coupling and thermal transport in the thermoelectric compound Mo3Sb7–xTex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bansal, Dipanshu; Li, Chen W.; Said, Ayman H.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Yan, Jiaqiang; Delaire, Olivier A.

    2015-12-07

    Phonon properties of Mo3Sb7–xTex (x = 0, 1.5, 1.7), a potential high-temperature thermoelectric material, have been studied with inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering, and with first-principles simulations. The substitution of Te for Sb leads to pronounced changes in the electronic struc- ture, local bonding, phonon density of states (DOS), dispersions, and phonon lifetimes. Alloying with tellurium shifts the Fermi level upward, near the top of the valence band, resulting in a strong suppression of electron-phonon screening, and a large overall stiffening of interatomic force- constants. The suppression in electron-phonon coupling concomitantly increases group velocities and suppresses phonon scattering rates, surpassing the effects of alloy-disorder scattering, and re- sulting in a surprising increased lattice thermal conductivity in the alloy. We also identify that the local bonding environment changes non-uniformly around different atoms, leading to variable perturbation strengths for different optical phonon branches. The respective roles of changes in phonon group velocities and phonon lifetimes on the lattice thermal conductivity are quantified. Lastly, our results highlight the importance of the electron-phonon coupling on phonon mean-free-paths in this compound, and also estimates the contributions from boundary scattering, umklapp scattering, and point-defect scattering.

  10. Ordered and disordered polymorphs of Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O₂: Honeycomb-ordered cathodes for Na-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Jeffrey; Wu, Lijun; Bo, Shou -Hang; Khalifah, Peter G.; Grey, Clare P.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-04-14

    Na-ion batteries are appealing alternatives to Li-ion battery systems for large-scale energy storage applications in which elemental cost and abundance are important. Although it is difficult to find Na-ion batteries which achieve substantial specific capacities at voltages above 3 V (vs Na⁺/Na), the honeycomb-layered compound Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O₂ can deliver up to 130 mAh/g of capacity at voltages above 3 V with this capacity concentrated in plateaus at 3.27 and 3.64 V. Comprehensive crystallographic studies have been carried out in order to understand the role of disorder in this system which can be prepared in both “disordered” and “ordered” forms, depending onmore » the synthesis conditions. The average structure of Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O₂ is always found to adopt an O3-type stacking sequence, though different structures for the disordered (R3¯m, #166, a = b = 3.06253(3) Å and c = 16.05192(7) Å) and ordered variants (C2/m, #12, a = 5.30458(1) Å, b = 9.18432(1) Å, c = 5.62742(1) Å and β = 108.2797(2)°) are demonstrated through the combined Rietveld refinement of synchrotron X-ray and time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data. However, pair distribution function studies find that the local structure of disordered Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O₂ is more correctly described using the honeycomb-ordered structural model, and solid state NMR studies confirm that the well-developed honeycomb ordering of Ni and Sb cations within the transition metal layers is indistinguishable from that of the ordered phase. The disorder is instead found to mainly occur perpendicular to the honeycomb layers with an observed coherence length of not much more than 1 nm seen in electron diffraction studies. When the Na environment is probed through ²³Na solid state NMR, no evidence is found for prismatic Na environments, and a bulk diffraction analysis finds no evidence of conventional stacking faults. The lack of long range coherence is instead attributed to disorder among the three possible choices for distributing Ni and Sb cations into a honeycomb lattice in each transition metal layer. It is observed that the full theoretical discharge capacity expected for a Ni³⁺/²⁺ redox couple (133 mAh/g) can be achieved for the ordered variant but not for the disordered variant (~110 mAh/g). The first 3.27 V plateau during charging is found to be associated with a two-phase O3 ↔ P3 structural transition, with the P3 stacking sequence persisting throughout all further stages of desodiation.« less

  11. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Properties of the Solid-Solution Zintl Phase Eu11Cd6Sb12-xAsx (x < 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazem, Nasrin; Xie, Weiwei; Ohno, Saneyuki; Zevalkink, Alexandra; Miller, Gordon J.; Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2014-02-20

    Zintl phases are compounds that have shown promise for thermoelectric applications. The title solid–solution Zintl compounds were prepared from the elements as single crystals using a tin flux for compositions x = 0, 1, 2, and 3. Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx (x < 3) crystallize isostructurally in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group C2/m (no. 12, Z = 2) as the Sr11Cd6Sb12 structure type (Pearson symbol mC58). Efforts to make the As compositions for x exceeding ~3 resulted in structures other than the Sr11Cd6Sb12 structure type. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction indicates that As does not randomly substitute for Sb in the structure but is site specific for each composition. The amount of As determined by structural refinement was verified by electron microprobe analysis. Electronic structures and energies calculated for various model structures of Eu11Cd6Sb10As2 (x = 2) indicated that the preferred As substitution pattern involves a mixture of three of the six pnicogen sites in the asymmetric unit. In addition, As substitution at the Pn4 site opens an energy gap at the Fermi level, whereas substitution at the other five pnicogen sites remains semimetallic with a pseudo gap. Thermoelectric properties of these compounds were measured on hot-pressed, fully densified pellets. Samples show exceptionally low lattice thermal conductivities from room temperature to 775 K: 0.78–0.49 W/mK for x = 0; 0.72–0.53 W/mK for x = 1; and 0.70–0.56 W/mK for x = 2. Eu11Cd6Sb12 shows a high p-type Seebeck coefficient (from +118 to 153 μ V/K) but also high electrical resistivity (6.8 to 12.8 mΩ·cm). The value of zT reaches 0.23 at 774 K. The properties of Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx are interpreted in discussion with the As site substitution.

  12. Namibia-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  13. Surface and interfacial reaction study of half cycle atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} on chemically treated GaSb surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhernokletov, D. M.; Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Kim, J.; Yakimov, M.; Tokranov, V.; Oktyabrsky, S.; Wallace, R. M.; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080

    2013-04-01

    An in situ half-cycle atomic layer deposition/X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study was conducted in order to investigate the evolution of the HfO{sub 2} dielectric interface with GaSb(100) surfaces after sulfur passivation and HCl etching, designed to remove the native oxides. With the first pulses of tetrakis(dimethylamido)hafnium(IV) and water, a decrease in the concentration of antimony oxide states present on the HCl-etched surface is observed, while antimony sulfur states diminished below the XPS detection limit on sulfur passivated surface. An increase in the amount of gallium oxide/sulfide is seen, suggesting oxygen or sulfur transfers from antimony to gallium during antimony oxides/sulfides decomposition.

  14. Neutron Scattering Investigation of Phonon Scattering Rates in Ag1-xSb1+xTe2+x (x = 0, 0.1, and 0.2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Budai, John D [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Ehlers, Georg [ORNL; Hong, Tao [ORNL; Karapetrova, Evguenia A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ma, Jie [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Specht, Eliot D [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The phonon dispersions and scattering rates of the thermoelectric material AgSbTe$_{2}$ were measured as a function of temperature with inelastic neutron scattering. The results show that phonon scattering rates are large and weakly dependent on temperature. The lattice thermal conductivity was calculated from the measured phonon lifetimes and group velocities, providing good agreement with bulk transport measurements. The measured phonon scattering rates and their temperature dependence are compared with models of phonon scattering by anharmonicity and point defect. We find that these processes cannot account for the large total phonon scattering rates observed, and their lack of temperature dependence. Neutron and synchrotron diffraction measurements on single crystals revealed an extensive nanostructure from cation ordering, which is likely responsible for the strong phonon scattering.

  15. Growth, steady-state, and time-resolved photoluminescence study of CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures on InSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiNezza, Michael J.; Liu, Shi; Kirk, Alexander P.; Zhang, Yong-Hang; School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 ; Zhao, Xin-Hao; School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287

    2013-11-04

    CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures (DHs) are grown on InSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy and reveal strong photoluminescence with over double the intensity of a GaAs/AlGaAs DH with an identical layer structure design grown on GaAs. Time-resolved photoluminescence of the CdTe/MgCdTe DH gives a Shockley-Read-Hall recombination lifetime of 86 ns, which is more than one order of magnitude longer than that of typical polycrystalline CdTe films. These findings indicate that monocrystalline CdTe/MgCdTe DHs effectively reduce surface recombination, have limited nonradiative interface recombination, and are promising for solar cells that could reach power conversion efficiencies similar to that of GaAs.

  16. Intrinsic Rashba-like splitting in asymmetric Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}/Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} heterogeneous topological insulator films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaofei; Guo, Wanlin

    2014-08-25

    We show by density functional theory calculations that asymmetric hetero-stacking of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}/Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films can modulate the topological surface states. Due to the structure inversion asymmetry, an intrinsic Rashba-like splitting of the conical surface bands is aroused. While such splitting in homogeneous Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}-class topological insulators can be realized in films with more than three quintuple layers under external electric fields, the hetero-stacking breaks the limit of thickness for preserving the topological nature into the thinnest two quintuple layers. These results indicate that the hetero-stacking can serve as an efficient strategy for spin-resolved band engineering of topological insulators.

  17. Oxidized crystalline (3 1)-O surface phases of InAs and InSb studied by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuominen, M. E-mail: pekka.laukkanen@utu.fi; Lng, J.; Dahl, J.; Yasir, M.; Mkel, J.; Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Laukkanen, P. E-mail: pekka.laukkanen@utu.fi; Kokko, K.; Kuzmin, M.; Osiecki, J. R.; Schulte, K.

    2015-01-05

    The pre-oxidized crystalline (31)-O structure of InAs(100) has been recently found to significantly improve insulator/InAs junctions for devices, but the atomic structure and formation of this useful oxide layer are not well understood. We report high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of (31)-O on InAs(100) and InSb(100). The findings reveal that the atomic structure of (31)-O consists of In atoms with unexpected negative (between ?0.64 and ?0.47?eV) and only moderate positive (In{sub 2}O type) core-level shifts; highly oxidized group-V sites; and four different oxygen sites. These fingerprint shifts are compared to those of previously studied oxides of III-V to elucidate oxidation processes.

  18. Minority carrier lifetime and dark current measurements in mid-wavelength infrared InAs0.91Sb0.09 alloy nBn photodetectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olson, B. V.; Kim, J. K.; Kadlec, E. A.; Klem, J. F.; Hawkins, S. D.; Leonhardt, D.; Coon, W. T.; Fortune, T. R.; Cavaliere, M. A.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; et al

    2015-11-03

    Carrier lifetime and dark current measurements are reported for a mid-wavelength infrared InAs 0.91Sb0.09 alloy nBn photodetector. Minority carrier lifetimes are measured using a non-contact time-resolved microwave technique on unprocessed portions of the nBn wafer and the Auger recombination Bloch function parameter is determined to be |F1F2|=0.292. Moreover, the measured lifetimes are also used to calculate the expected diffusion dark current of the nBn devices and are compared with the experimental dark current measured in processed photodetector pixels from the same wafer. As a result, excellent agreement is found between the two, highlighting the important relationship between lifetimes and diffusionmore » currents in nBn photodetectors.« less

  19. Electrical performance of phase change memory cells with Ge{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 6} deposited by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boschker, Jos E.; Riechert, Henning; Calarco, Raffaella; Boniardi, Mattia; Redaelli, Andrea

    2015-01-12

    Here, we report on the electrical characterization of phase change memory cells containing a Ge{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 6} (GST) alloy grown in its crystalline form by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). It is found that the high temperature growth on the amorphous substrate results in a polycrystalline film exhibiting a rough surface with a grain size of approximately 80150?nm. A detailed electrical characterization has been performed, including I-V characteristic curves, programming curves, set operation performance, crystallization activation at low temperature, and resistance drift, in order to determine the material related parameters. The results indicate very good alignment of the electrical parameters with the current state-of-the-art GST, deposited by physical vapor deposition. Such alignment enables a possible employment of the MBE deposition technique for chalcogenide materials in the phase change memory technology, thus leading to future studies of as-deposited crystalline chalcogenides as integrated in electrical vehicles.

  20. Intensity- and temperature- dependent carrier recombination in InAs/In(As1-xSbx) type-II superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Benjamin Varberg; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Kim, Jin K.; Klem, John F.; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Shaner, Eric A.; Flatte, Michael E.

    2015-04-17

    Our time-resolved measurements for carrier recombination are reported as a midwave infrared InAs/InAs0.66Sb0.34 type-II superlattice (T2SL) function of pump intensity and sample temperature. By including the T2SL doping level in the analysis, the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH), radiative, and Auger recombination components of the carrier lifetime are uniquely distinguished at each temperature. SRH is the limiting recombination mechanism for excess carrier densities less than the doping level (the low-injection regime) and temperatures less than 175 K. A SRH defect energy of 95 meV, either below the T2SL conduction-band edge or above the T2SL valence-band edge, is identified. Auger recombination limits the carrier lifetimes for excess carrier densities greater than the doping level (the high-injection regime) for all temperatures tested. Additionally, at temperatures greater than 225 K, Auger recombination also limits the low-injection carrier lifetime due to the onset of the intrinsic temperature range and large intrinsic carrier densities. Radiative recombination is found to not have a significant contribution to the total lifetime for all temperatures and injection regimes, with the data implying a photon recycling factor of 15. Using the measured lifetime data, diffusion currents are calculated and compared to calculated Hg1-xCdxTe dark current, indicating that the T2SL can have a lower dark current with mitigation of the SRH defect states. Our results illustrate the potential for InAs/InAs1-xSbx T2SLs as absorbers in infrared photodetectors.

  1. Cr-doped Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} for ultra-long data retention phase change memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qing; Xia, Yangyang; Zheng, Yonghui; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Bo Song, Sannian; Cheng, Yan; Song, Zhitang; Feng, Songlin; Huo, Ruru

    2015-11-30

    Phase change memory is regarded as one of the most promising candidates for the next-generation non-volatile memory. Its storage medium, phase change material, has attracted continuous exploration. Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (GST) is the most popular phase change material, but its thermal stability needs to be improved when used in some fields at high temperature (more than 120 °C). In this paper, we doped Cr atoms into GST and obtained Cr{sub 10}(Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}){sub 90} (labeled as Cr-GST) with high thermal stability. For Cr-GST film, the sheet resistance ratio between amorphous and crystalline states is high up to 3 orders of magnitude. The crystalline Cr-GST film inherits the phase structure of GST, with metastable face-centered cubic phase and/or stable hexagonal phase. The doped Cr atoms not only bond with other atoms but also help to improve the anti-oxidation property of Cr-GST. As for the amorphous thermal stability, the calculated temperature for 10-year-data-retention of Cr-GST film, based on the Arrhenius equation, is about 180 °C. The threshold current and threshold voltage of a cell based on Cr-GST are about 6 μA and 2.7 V. The cell could be operated by suitable voltages for more than 40 000 cycles. Thus, Cr-GST is proved to be a promising phase change material with ultra-long data retention.

  2. Enhancement of spin polarization via Fermi level tuning in Co{sub 2}MnSn{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x} (x = 0, 0.25. 0.5, 0.75, 1) Heusler alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Mukhtiyar Thakur, Jyoti; Kashyap, Manish K.; Saini, Hardev S.

    2014-04-24

    Full potential approach has been employed to tune Fermi level in Co{sub 2}MnSn{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x} (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1) Heulser alloys for enhancement of spin polarization and finding signature of half metallicity. Present density functional theory (DFT) based calculation indicates that stoichoimetric Heusler alloy, Co{sub 2}MnSn is not a half-metallic ferromagnet but the doping of Sb in it results in the shifting of E{sup F} in well-defined energy gap which leads the 100% spin polarization in the resultant alloys. The magnetism in present alloys is governed by localized moment on Mn atom mainly. The tuning of half-metallicity using doping can be proved as an ideal technique to search the new materials which can accomplish the need of spintronics.

  3. On photo-expansion and microlens formation in (GeS{sub 2}){sub 0.74}(Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub 0.26} chalcogenide glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knotek, P.; Tichy, L.

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Photo-expansion induced by sub-band-gap photons in GeSbS glass. ? One-step microlens formation. ? The topography of the microlenses detected by AFM and DHM. ? The good mechanical characteristics of the microlenses were obtained. ? Local light-induced overheating of the glass. -- Abstract: Photo-expansion of the bulk of (GeS{sub 2}){sub 0.74}(Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub 0.26} glass induced by sub-gap photons is studied employing specifically atomic force microscopy (AFM) namely an atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) and a force spectroscopy and digital holographic microscopy. The results are discussed with respect to the possible role of light induced overheating in the process of photo-expansion.

  4. A high-pressure route to thermoelectrics with low thermal conductivity: The solid solution series AgIn{sub x}Sb{sub 1?x}Te{sub 2} (x=0.10.6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrder, Thorsten; Rosenthal, Tobias; Souchay, Daniel; Petermayer, Christian; Grott, Sebastian; Scheidt, Ernst-Wilhelm; Gold, Christian; Scherer, Wolfgang; Oeckler, Oliver

    2013-10-15

    Metastable rocksalt-type phases of the solid solution series AgIn{sub x}Sb{sub 1?x}Te{sub 2} (x=0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6) were prepared by high-pressure synthesis at 2.5 GPa and 400 C. In these structures, the coordination number of In{sup 3+} is six, in contrast to chalcopyrite ambient-pressure AgInTe{sub 2} with fourfold In{sup 3+} coordination. Transmission electron microscopy shows that real-structure phenomena and a certain degree of short-range order are present, yet not very pronounced. All three cations are statistically disordered. The high degree of disorder is probably the reason why AgIn{sub x}Sb{sub 1?x}Te{sub 2} samples with 0.4SbTe{sub 2} (? ?0.6 W/K m). The highest ZT value (0.15 at 300 K) is observed for AgIn{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 0.5}Te{sub 2}, mainly due to its high Seebeck coefficient of 160 V/K. Temperature-dependent X-ray powder patterns indicate that the solid solutions are metastable at ambient pressure. At 150 C, the quaternary compounds decompose into chalcopyrite-type AgInTe{sub 2} and rocksalt-type AgSbTe{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: Reaction scheme, temperature characteristics of the ZT value and a selected-area electron diffraction pattern (background) of AgIn{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 0.5}Te{sub 2}, which crystallizes in a rocksalt-type structure with statistical cation disorder. Display Omitted - Highlights: High-pressure synthesis yields the novel solid solution series AgIn{sub x}Sb{sub 1?x}Te{sub 2}. In contrast to AgInTe{sub 2}, the compounds are inert at ambient pressure. HRTEM shows no pronounced short-range order in the disordered NaCl-type structure. The metastable phases exhibit very low total thermal conductivities <0.5 W/K m. ZT values of 0.15 at room temperature were measured for AgIn{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 0.5}Te{sub 2}.

  5. Substitution effect on magnetic and electrical properties of half-Heusler alloy Ni{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}Mn{sub 1−y}Fe{sub y}Sb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kushwaha, Varun Sharma, Himanshu Dixit, Dinesh Tomy, C. V.; Tulapurkar, Ashwin

    2014-04-24

    We have studied the effects of Co and Fe doping on the magnetic and electrical properties of half-Heusler compound NiMnSb. The alloys were prepared by arc-melting method in the presence of Argon gas. The powder X-ray diffraction of the each alloy was performed in air at room temperature. The magnetic and electrical properties were performed in the temperature range 2–400 K and in magnetic field up to 1 T.

  6. Synthesis, characterization and physical properties of the skutterudites Yb{sub x}Fe{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Sb{sub 12} (0{<=}x{<=}0.4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaltzoglou, Andreas; Vaqueiro, Paz; Knight, Kevin S.; Powell, Anthony V.

    2012-09-15

    The skutterudites Yb{sub x}Fe{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Sb{sub 12} (0{<=}x{<=}0.4) have been prepared by solid-state reaction and characterised by powder X-ray diffraction. The compounds crystallise in the cubic space group Im3{sup Macron} (a Almost-Equal-To 9.1 A) with Yb atoms partially filling the voids in the skutterudite framework. A neutron time-of-flight diffraction experiment for Fe{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Sb{sub 12} confirms the disorder of Fe and Ni atoms on the transition-metal site. Electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity measurements indicate that the thermoelectric performance of the skutterudites shows a marked dependence on the Yb content. Magnetic measurements over the temperature range 2{<=}T/K{<=}300 show paramagnetic behaviour for all compounds. Decomposition studies under an oxidising atmosphere at elevated temperatures have also been carried out by thermogravimetric analysis. - Graphical abstract: The filled skutterudites Yb{sub x}Fe{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Sb{sub 12} have been prepared by solid-state reaction and characterised by powder X-ray diffraction. The thermoelectric performance depends strongly on the Yb content. The physical properties and thermal stability of the compounds are further discussed in comparison with the current state-of-the art thermoelectric skutterudites. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new series of skutterudites has been prepared and characterised. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical properties are affected by the degree of Yb filling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest thermoelectric performance is found for Yb{sub 0.15}Fe{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Sb{sub 12}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The skutterudites decompose in air above 550 K.

  7. Record figure of merit values of highly stoichiometric Sb2Te3 porous bulk synthesized from tailor-made molecular precursors in ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heimann, Stefan; Schulz, Stephan; Schaumann, Julian; Mudring, Anja; Stötzel, Julia; Maculewicz, Franziska; Schierning, Gabi

    2015-08-06

    We report on the synthesis of Sb2Te3 nanoparticles with record-high figure of merit values of up to 1.5. The central thermoelectric parameters, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient, were independently optimized. Critical influence of porosity for the fabrication of highly efficient thermoelectric materials is firstly demonstrated, giving a strong guidance for the optimization of other thermoelectric materials.

  8. Construction integrity assessment report (ETN-98-0005) S-Farm overground transfer (OGT) system valve pit 241-S-B to valve pit 241-S-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HICKS, D.F.

    1999-08-12

    The S-Farm overground transfer (OGT) line will bypass the existing line(s), between valve pits 241-S-B and 241-S-D that no longer meet system requirements. The new OGT line will provide a waste transfer pipeline between these valve pits in support of saltwell pumping activities. The length of the OGT line is approximately 180 ft from pit to pit. The primary pipe is nominal 1-in. diameter stainless steel (SST) braided Ethylene-propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) hose. The encasement pipe is a nominal 3-in., flanged, SST pipe made up of several different length pipe spool pieces (drawing H-2-829564, sh. 1 and sh. 2). The OGT line slopes from valve pit 241-S-B toward valve pit 241-S-D. At each end, the primary and encasement pipe connect to a pit entry spool piece. The pit entry spool pieces are constructed of prefabricated SST materials. These spool pieces allow for the separation of the primary and encasement pipelines after the pipes have entered the valve pits (drawing H-2-818280, sh. 2). The pit entry spool pieces also allow for leak detection of the encasement pipe at each end (drawing H-2-829564, sh. 2). The OGT encasement pipeline is supported above ground by adjustable height unistrut brackets and precast concrete bases (drawing H-2-829654, sh. 1). The pipeline is heat-traced and insulated. The heat tracing and insulation supply and retain latent heat that prevents waste solidification during transfers and provides freeze protection. The total length of the pipeline is above ground, thereby negating the need for cathodic corrosion protection. This Construction Integrity Assessment Report (CIAR) is prepared by Fluor Daniel Northwest for Numatec Hanford Corporation/Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, the operations contractor, and the U. S. Department of Energy, the system owner. The CIAR is intended to verify that construction was performed in accordance with the provisions of Washington Administrative Code, WAC-173-303-640 (3) (c), (e), (f) and (h).

  9. GaSb molecular beam epitaxial growth on p-InP(001) and passivation with in situ deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merckling, C.; Brammertz, G.; Hoffmann, T. Y.; Caymax, M.; Dekoster, J.; Sun, X.; Alian, A.; Heyns, M.; Afanas'ev, V. V.

    2011-04-01

    The integration of high carrier mobility materials into future CMOS generations is presently being studied in order to increase drive current capability and to decrease power consumption in future generation CMOS devices. If III-V materials are the candidates of choice for n-type channel devices, antimonide-based semiconductors present high hole mobility and could be used for p-type channel devices. In this work we first demonstrate the heteroepitaxy of fully relaxed GaSb epilayers on InP(001) substrates. In a second part, the properties of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaSb interface have been studied by in situ deposition of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} high-{kappa} gate dielectric. The interface is abrupt without any substantial interfacial layer, and is characterized by high conduction and valence band offsets. Finally, MOS capacitors show well-behaved C-V with relatively low D{sub it} along the bandgap, these results point out an efficient electrical passivation of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaSb interface.

  10. Phonon renormalization and Raman spectral evolution through amorphous to crystalline transitions in Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Secor, Jeff; Zhao, Lukas; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia; Harris, Matt A.; Deng, Haiming; Raoux, Simone

    2014-06-02

    A symmetry specific phonon mode renormalization is observed across an amorphous to crystalline phase transformation in thin films of the topological material Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} using Raman spectroscopy. We present evidence for local crystalline symmetry in the amorphous state, eventhough, the q?=?0 Raman selection rule is broken due to strong structural disorder. At crystallization, the in-plane polarized (E{sub g}{sup 2}) mode abruptly sharpens while the out-of-plane polarized (A{sub 1g}) modes are only weakly effected. This effect unique to the E{sub g} symmetry is exceptional considering that polarized spectra and comparison of the single phonon density of states between the amorphous and crystalline phases suggest that short range order of the amorphous phase is, on the average, similar to that of the crystalline material while electrical transport measurements reveal a sharp insulator-to-metal transition. Our findings point to the important role of anisotropic disorder affecting potential applications of topological and phase-change based electronics.

  11. Evidence for a defect level above the conduction band edge of InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices for applications in efficient infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prins, A. D.; Lewis, M. K.; Bushell, Z. L.; Sweeney, S. J.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.

    2015-04-27

    We report pressure-dependent photoluminescence (PL) experiments under hydrostatic pressures up to 2.16?GPa on a mid-wave infrared InAs/InAs{sub 0.86}Sb{sub 0.14} type-II superlattice (T2SL) structure at different pump laser excitation powers and sample temperatures. The pressure coefficient of the T2SL transition was found to be 93??2?meVGPa{sup ?1}. The integrated PL intensity increases with pressure up to 1.9?GPa then quenches rapidly indicating a pressure induced level crossing with the conduction band states at ?2?GPa. Analysis of the PL intensity as a function of excitation power at 0, 0.42, 1.87, and 2.16?GPa shows a clear change in the dominant photo-generated carrier recombination mechanism from radiative to defect related. From these data, evidence for a defect level situated at 0.18??0.01?eV above the conduction band edge of InAs at ambient pressure is presented. This assumes a pressure-dependent energy shift of ?11?meVGPa{sup ?1} for the valence band edge and that the defect level is insensitive to pressure, both of which are supported by an Arrhenius activation energy analysis.

  12. Imaging dirac-mass disorder from magnetic dopant-atoms in the ferromagnetic topological insulator Crx(Bi?.?Sb?.?)??xTe?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Inhee; Kim, Chung Koo; Lee, Jinho; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Zhong, Ruidan D.; Schneeloch, John A.; Liu, Tiansheng S.; Valla, Tonica; Tranquada, John M.; Gu, Genda; et al

    2015-01-20

    To achieve and use the most exotic electronic phenomena predicted for the surface states of 3D topological insulators (TIs), it is necessary to open a Dirac-mass gap in their spectrum by breaking time-reversal symmetry. Use of magnetic dopant atoms to generate a ferromagnetic state is the most widely applied approach. However, it is unknown how the spatial arrangements of the magnetic dopant atoms influence the Dirac-mass gap at the atomic scale or, conversely, whether the ferromagnetic interactions between dopant atoms are influenced by the topological surface states. Here we image the locations of the magnetic (Cr) dopant atoms in themoreferromagnetic TI Cr?.??(Bi?.?Sb?.?)?.??Te?. Simultaneous visualization of the Dirac-mass gap ?(r) reveals its intense disorder, which we demonstrate is directly related to fluctuations in n(r), the Cr atom areal density in the termination layer. We find the relationship of surface-state Fermi wavevectors to the anisotropic structure of ?(r) not inconsistent with predictions for surface ferromagnetism mediated by those states. Moreover, despite the intense Dirac-mass disorder, the anticipated relationship ?(r)?n(r) is confirmed throughout and exhibits an electrondopant interaction energy J* = 145 meVnm. These observations reveal how magnetic dopant atoms actually generate the TI mass gap locally and that, to achieve the novel physics expected of time-reversal symmetry breaking TI materials, control of the resulting Dirac-mass gap disorder will be essential.less

  13. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD3.1 with the LSTF SB-SG-06 experiment simulating a steam generator tube rupture transient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seul, K.W.; Bang, Y.S.; Lee, S.; Kim, H.J.

    1996-09-01

    The objective of the present work is to identify the predictability of RELAP5/MOD3.1 regarding thermal-hydraulic behavior during a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR). To evaluate the computed results, LSTF SB-SG-06 test data simulating the SGTR that occurred at the Mihama Unit 2 in 1991 are used. Also, some sensitivity studies of the code change in RELAP5, the break simulation model, and the break valve discharge coefficient are performed. The calculation results indicate that the RELAP5/MOD3.1 code predicted well the sequence of events and the major phenomena during the transient, such as the asymmetric loop behavior, reactor coolant system (RCS) cooldown and heat transfer by natural circulation, the primary and secondary system depressurization by the pressurizer auxiliary spray and the steam dump using the intact loop steam generator (SG) relief valve, and so on. However, there are some differences from the experimental data in the number of the relief valve cycling in the affected SG, and the flow regime of the hot leg with the pressurizer, and the break flow rates. Finally, the calculation also indicates that the coolant in the core could remain in a subcooled state as a result of the heat transfer caused by the natural circulation flow even if the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) turned off and that the affected SG could be properly isolated to minimize the radiological release after the SGTR.

  14. Surface collective modes in the topological insulators Bi2Se3 and Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3-xSex

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kogar, A.; Gu, G.; Vig, S.; Thaler, A.; Wong, M. H.; Xiao, Y.; Reig-i-Plessis, D.; Cho, G. Y.; Valla, T.; Pan, Z.; et al

    2015-12-15

    In this study, we used low-energy, momentum-resolved inelastic electron scattering to study surface collective modes of the three-dimensional topological insulators Bi2Se3 and Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3-xSex. Our goal was to identify the “spin plasmon” predicted by Raghu and co-workers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 116401 (2010)]. Instead, we found that the primary collective mode is a surface plasmon arising from the bulk, free carriers in these materials. This excitation dominates the spectral weight in the bosonic function of the surface χ''(q,ω) at THz energy scales, and is the most likely origin of a quasiparticle dispersion kink observed in previous photoemission experiments. Our study suggestsmore » that the spin plasmon may mix with this other surface mode, calling for a more nuanced understanding of optical experiments in which the spin plasmon is reported to play a role.« less

  15. Electrical and thermal properties of Fe substituted double-filled Ba{sub x}Yb{sub y}Fe{sub z}Co{sub 4-z}Sb{sub 12} skutterudites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballikaya, Sedat; Uzar, Neslihan; Yildirim, Saffettin; Salvador, James R.

    2013-01-15

    Fe-substituted double-filled Ba{sub x}Yb{sub y}Fe{sub z}Co{sub 4-z}Sb{sub 12} (x=0.1, y=0.2 and z=0.0-0.4 nominal) compounds were synthesized using a melting-annealing-spark plasma sintering (SPS) method. Their thermoelectric properties were assessed by measuring the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and the Hall coefficient. The sign of the Hall coefficient indicates that electrons are the dominant carriers in all compounds except Ba{sub 0.1}Yb{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.4}Co{sub 3.6}Sb{sub 12}. The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity and the carrier concentration reflect the transition from extrinsic to intrinsic behavior depending on the amount of Fe substituted for Co. Jonker and Ioffe analyses are applied to Fe-substituted double-filled Ba{sub x}Yb{sub y}Fe{sub z}Co{sub 4-z}Sb{sub 12} compounds in order to evaluate the range of minimum and maximum power factors achievable in n-type filled skutterudite compounds at room temperature (300 K). The predicted maximum room temperature power factor values in the range of 15-45 {mu}W/K{sup 2} cm are comparable to experimentally reported values of n-type skutterudite compounds. - Graphical abstract: Room temperature Jonker plot of Ba{sub x}Yb{sub y}Fe{sub z}Co{sub 4-z}Sb{sub 12} samples. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TE properties of Ba{sub x}Yb{sub y}Fe{sub z}Co{sub 4-z}Sb{sub 12} compounds were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Jonker and Ioffe analysis applied in order to predict the range of power factor achievable at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermal conductivity is strongly suppressed with increasing of Fe substitution on Co site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We see that small quantities of Fe on Co site is beneficial on enhancement ZT value.

  16. Synthesis, crystal structures, and physical properties of the new Zintl phases A{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}Pn{sub 18} (A=Ca, Eu; Pn=As, Sb)—Versatile arrangements of [ZnPn{sub 4}] tetrahedra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suen, Nian-Tzu; Wang, Yi; Bobev, Svilen

    2015-07-15

    Four new Zintl phases, Ca{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}As{sub 18}, Ca{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 18}, Eu{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}As{sub 18} and Eu{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 18} have been synthesized by metal flux reactions. Their structures have been established from single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Despite the similar chemical makeup and the identical formulae, the structures of the four compounds are not the same—Ca{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}As{sub 18}, Ca{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 18} and Eu{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}As{sub 18} crystallize in the monoclinic space group C2/m (No. 12, Z=4) with the β-Ca{sub 21}Mn{sub 4}Sb{sub 18} structure type, while Eu{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 18} adopts the Ba{sub 21}Cd{sub 4}Sb{sub 18} structure type with the orthorhombic space group Cmce (No. 64, Z=8). Both structures are based on ZnAs{sub 4} or ZnSb{sub 4} tetrahedra, linked in slightly different ways, and Ca{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 2+} cations that fill the space between them. The structural relationships between the title compounds and other known ternary phases with intricate structures are discussed. Electrical resistivity measurement on single-crystalline Eu{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 18} suggests an intrinsic semiconductor behavior with a band gap of ca. 0.2 eV. The temperature dependent DC magnetization measurement on the same material indicates Curie–Weiss paramagnetism in the high-temperature regime, and a spontaneous antiferromagnetic ordering below 8 K. The calculated effective moments of Eu confirm the divalent Eu{sup 2+} ground state, as expected from the Zintl–Klemm concept. - Graphical abstract: The four new Zintl phases—Ca{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}As{sub 18}, Ca{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 18}, Eu{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}As{sub 18}, and Eu{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 18}—crystallize in two structure types, showing the versatility in the arrangements of ZnAs{sub 4} and ZnSb{sub 4} tetrahedra. - Highlights: • Ca{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}As{sub 18}, Ca{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 18}, Eu{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}As{sub 18}, and Eu{sub 21}Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 18} are new compounds in the respective ternary phase diagrams. • They form with structure types, showing the versatility in the arrangements of ZnAs{sub 4} and ZnSb{sub 4} tetrahedra. • For both structures, the valence electron count follows the Zintl–Klemm rules.

  17. Syntheses, structure and rare earth metal photoluminescence of new and known isostructural A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Ce, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohitkar, Shrikant A.; Kalpana, G.; Vidyasagar, K.

    2011-04-15

    Nine new A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) compounds have been synthesized by solid-state reactions. They are isostructural with six reported analogues of yttrium and other lanthanides and the monoclinic unit cell parameters of all fifteen of them vary linearly with the size of A{sup 3+} ion. Single crystal X-ray structures of eight A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Ce, Pr, Eu, Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds have been determined. Neat A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Pr, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds exhibit characteristic rare earth metal photoluminescence. -- Graphical abstract: Among the fifteen isostructural A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=rare earth metal) molybdoantimonites, eight (A=Pr, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds exhibit neat characteristic lanthanide photoluminescence in the 200-800 nm range at room temperature. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Syntheses of nine new A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) compounds. {yields} X-ray structures of eight A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Ce, Pr, Eu, Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds. {yields} Photoluminescence of neat A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Pr, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds.

  18. DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ARP PRODUCT SIMULANT AND SB4 TANK 40 SLUDGE SLURRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D; John Pareizs, J; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Stone, M; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Kim Crapse, K; David Hobbs, D

    2008-05-14

    The radioactive startup of two new SRS processing facilities, the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side-Solvent-Extraction Unit (MCU) will add two new waste streams to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The ARP will remove actinides from the 5.6 M salt solution resulting in a sludge-like product that is roughly half monosodium titanate (MST) insoluble solids and half sludge insoluble solids. The ARP product will be added to the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) at boiling and dewatered prior to pulling a SRAT receipt sample. The cesium rich MCU stream will be added to the SRAT at boiling after both formic and nitric acid have been added and the SRAT contents concentrated to the appropriate endpoint. A concern was raised by an external hydrogen review panel that the actinide loaded MST could act as a catalyst for hydrogen generation (Mar 15, 2007 report, Recommendation 9). Hydrogen generation, and it's potential to form a flammable mixture in the off-gas, under SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processing conditions has been a concern since the discovery that noble metals catalyze the decomposition of formic acid. Radiolysis of water also generates hydrogen, but the radiolysis rate is orders of magnitude lower than the noble metal catalyzed generation. As a result of the concern raised by the external hydrogen review panel, hydrogen generation was a prime consideration in this experiment. Testing was designed to determine whether the presence of the irradiated ARP simulant containing MST caused uncontrolled or unexpected hydrogen production during experiments simulating the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) due to activation of titanium. A Shielded Cells experiment, SC-5, was completed using SB4 sludge from Tank 405 combined with an ARP product produced from simulants by SRNL researchers. The blend of sludge and MST was designed to be prototypic of planned DWPF SRAT and SME cycles. As glass quality was not an objective in this experiment, no vitrification of the SME product was completed. The results from this experiment were compared to the results from experiment SC-1, a similar experiment with SB4 sludge without added ARP product. This report documents: (1) The preparation and subsequent composition of the ARP product. (2) The preparation and subsequent compositional characterization of the SRAT Receipt sample. Additional details will be presented concerning the noble metal concentration of the ARP product and the SRAT receipt sample. Also, calculations related to the amount of formic and nitric acid added during SRAT processing will be presented as excess formic acid will lead to additional hydrogen generation. (3) Highlights from processing during the SRAT cycle and SME cycle (CPC processing). Hydrogen generation will be discussed since this was the prime objective for this experiment. (4) A comparison of CPC processing between SC-1 (without ARP simulant) and SC-5. This work was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP)6, and analyses were guided by an Analytical Sample Support Matrix (ASSM)7. This Research and Development (R&D) was completed to support operation of DWPF.

  19. Crystal structure of fluorite-related Ln{sub 3}SbO{sub 7} (Ln=LaDy) ceramics studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siqueira, K.P.F.; Borges, R.M.; Granado, E.; Malard, L.M.; Paula, A.M. de; Moreira, R.L.; Bittar, E.M.; Dias, A.

    2013-07-15

    Ln{sub 3}SbO{sub 7} (Ln=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb and Dy) ceramics were synthesized by solid-state reaction in optimized conditions of temperature and time to yield single-phase ceramics. The crystal structures of the obtained ceramics were investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction, second harmonic generation (SHG) and Raman scattering. All samples exhibited fluorite-type orthorhombic structures with different oxygen arrangements as a function of the ionic radius of the lanthanide metal. For ceramics with the largest ionic radii (LaNd), the ceramics crystallized into the Cmcm space group, while the ceramics with intermediate and smallest ionic radii (SmDy) exhibited a different crystal structure belonging to the same space group, described under the Ccmm setting. The results from SHG and Raman scattering confirmed these settings and ruled out any possibility for the non-centrosymmetric C222{sub 1} space group describing the structure of the small ionic radii ceramics, solving a recent controversy in the literature. Besides, the Raman modes for all samples are reported for the first time, showing characteristic features for each group of samples. - Graphical abstract: Raman spectrum for La{sub 3}SbO{sub 7} ceramics showing their 22 phonon modes adjusted through Lorentzian lines. According to synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering, this material belongs to the space group Cmcm. - Highlights: Ln{sub 3}SbO{sub 7} ceramics belonging to the space groups Cmcm and Ccmm are synthesized. SXRD, SHG and Raman scattering confirmed the orthorhombic structures. Ccmm instead of C222{sub 1} is the correct one based on SHG and Raman data.

  20. Synthesis and structural and magnetic characterization of the frustrated magnetic system La{sub 2}Ni{sub 4/3?x}Co{sub x}Sb{sub 2/3}O{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franco, D.G.; Carbonio, R.E.; Nieva, G.

    2013-11-15

    We report the synthesis of double perovskites La{sub 2}Ni{sub 4/3?x}Co{sub x}Sb{sub 2/3}O{sub 6} with x=0, 1/3, 2/3 and 1 by a solid state method. Rietveld refinements of X-ray and neutron powder diffraction data show that all samples crystallize in space group P2{sub 1}/n, with almost perfect occupation of the 2d octahedral site with the transition metals, while all Sb{sup 5+} are randomly distributed in a 2c octahedral site. The saturation magnetization in hysteresis loops indicates that the samples are ferrimagnetic throughout all the series. Virgin magnetization curves lie outside hysteresis loops at low temperatures and thermal evolution of H{sub m} defined as the inflection point of these curves follows the de AlmeidaThouless dependence for x?0. This spin glass like behavior below 30 K is also supported by thermal evolution of the coercivity, which follows an exponential law typical of magnetic clusters, not found in the pure Ni{sup 2+} perovskite, x=0 extreme. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Author-Highlights: We synthesized new double perovskites: La{sub 2}Ni{sub 4/3?x}Co{sub x}SbO{sub 6} (x=1/3, 2/3, 1). The cations occupying octahedral sites are highly ordered in all samples. Magnetic transition occurs as a consequence of superexchange paths. Frustration is found and attributed to competition between different interactions.

  1. Spin glass transitions in the absence of chemical disorder for the pyrochlores A{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 7} (A=Mn, Co, Ni)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, H.D.; Wiebe, C.R.; Janik, J.A.; Vogt, B.; Harter, A.; Dalal, N.S.; Gardner, J.S.

    2010-04-15

    The pyrochlores in the series A{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 7} have been synthesized and characterized as exhibiting spin glass transitions at T{sub SG}=41, 4.5, and 2.6 K (for A=Mn{sup 2+}S=5/2 , Co{sup 2+}S=3/2 and Ni{sup 2+}S=1, respectively) despite the lack of chemical disorder. Since the Curie-Weiss temperature remains essentially constant for all members in the series ({theta}{approx}-40K), the frustration index for these materials increases significantly as the moment size is reduced from f=|theta|/T{sub SG}=1.1 (Mn{sup 2+}), to 9.3 (Co{sup 2+}) to 14.6 (Ni{sup 2+}). There is also a corresponding change in the spin dynamics measured by the shift in the AC susceptibility signal as a function of frequency. These new materials provide an avenue to investigate the effect of quantum fluctuations on the Heisenberg pyrochlore lattice in the low spin limit, and show there is a dramatic change in the spin dynamics as the quantum regime is approached. - A comparison of the spin glass ordering temperature, T{sub SG}, and the frustration index f as a function of the spin for the pyrochlore series A{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 7}. In the limit of low spin, the frustration index increases by an order of magnitude.

  2. Structural, electrical, and thermoelectrical properties of (Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Se{sub 3} alloys prepared by a conventional melting technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shokr, E. Kh.; Ibrahim, E. M. M. Abdel Hakeem, A. M.; Adam, A. M.

    2013-01-15

    Polycrystalline solid solutions of (Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Se{sub 3} (x = 0, 0.025, 0.050, 0.075, 0.100) were prepared using a facile method based on the conventional melting technique followed by annealing process. X-ray analysis and Raman spectroscopical measurements revealed formation of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} in single phase. The electrical and thermoelectric properties have been studied on the bulk samples in the temperature range 100-420 K. The electrical conductivity measurements show that the activation energy and room-temperature electrical conductivity dependences on the Sb content respectively exhibit minimum and maximum values at x = 0.05. The thermoelectric power exhibited a maximum value near the room temperature suggesting promising materials for room-temperature applications. The highest power factor value was found to be 13.53 {mu}W K{sup -2} cm{sup -1} and recorded for the x = 0.05 compound.

  3. Ordered and disordered polymorphs of Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O?: Honeycomb-ordered cathodes for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Jeffrey; Wu, Lijun; Bo, Shou -Hang; Khalifah, Peter G.; Grey, Clare P.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-04-14

    Na-ion batteries are appealing alternatives to Li-ion battery systems for large-scale energy storage applications in which elemental cost and abundance are important. Although it is difficult to find Na-ion batteries which achieve substantial specific capacities at voltages above 3 V (vs Na?/Na), the honeycomb-layered compound Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O? can deliver up to 130 mAh/g of capacity at voltages above 3 V with this capacity concentrated in plateaus at 3.27 and 3.64 V. Comprehensive crystallographic studies have been carried out in order to understand the role of disorder in this system which can be prepared in both disordered and ordered forms, depending on the synthesis conditions. The average structure of Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O? is always found to adopt an O3-type stacking sequence, though different structures for the disordered (R3m, #166, a = b = 3.06253(3) and c = 16.05192(7) ) and ordered variants (C2/m, #12, a = 5.30458(1) , b = 9.18432(1) , c = 5.62742(1) and ? = 108.2797(2)) are demonstrated through the combined Rietveld refinement of synchrotron X-ray and time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data. However, pair distribution function studies find that the local structure of disordered Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O? is more correctly described using the honeycomb-ordered structural model, and solid state NMR studies confirm that the well-developed honeycomb ordering of Ni and Sb cations within the transition metal layers is indistinguishable from that of the ordered phase. The disorder is instead found to mainly occur perpendicular to the honeycomb layers with an observed coherence length of not much more than 1 nm seen in electron diffraction studies. When the Na environment is probed through Na solid state NMR, no evidence is found for prismatic Na environments, and a bulk diffraction analysis finds no evidence of conventional stacking faults. The lack of long range coherence is instead attributed to disorder among the three possible choices for distributing Ni and Sb cations into a honeycomb lattice in each transition metal layer. It is observed that the full theoretical discharge capacity expected for a Ni?/? redox couple (133 mAh/g) can be achieved for the ordered variant but not for the disordered variant (~110 mAh/g). The first 3.27 V plateau during charging is found to be associated with a two-phase O3 ? P3 structural transition, with the P3 stacking sequence persisting throughout all further stages of desodiation.

  4. Ordered and disordered polymorphs of Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O₂: Honeycomb-ordered cathodes for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Jeffrey; Wu, Lijun; Bo, Shou -Hang; Khalifah, Peter G.; Grey, Clare P.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-04-14

    Na-ion batteries are appealing alternatives to Li-ion battery systems for large-scale energy storage applications in which elemental cost and abundance are important. Although it is difficult to find Na-ion batteries which achieve substantial specific capacities at voltages above 3 V (vs Na⁺/Na), the honeycomb-layered compound Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O₂ can deliver up to 130 mAh/g of capacity at voltages above 3 V with this capacity concentrated in plateaus at 3.27 and 3.64 V. Comprehensive crystallographic studies have been carried out in order to understand the role of disorder in this system which can be prepared in both “disordered” and “ordered” forms, depending on the synthesis conditions. The average structure of Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O₂ is always found to adopt an O3-type stacking sequence, though different structures for the disordered (R3¯m, #166, a = b = 3.06253(3) Å and c = 16.05192(7) Å) and ordered variants (C2/m, #12, a = 5.30458(1) Å, b = 9.18432(1) Å, c = 5.62742(1) Å and β = 108.2797(2)°) are demonstrated through the combined Rietveld refinement of synchrotron X-ray and time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data. However, pair distribution function studies find that the local structure of disordered Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O₂ is more correctly described using the honeycomb-ordered structural model, and solid state NMR studies confirm that the well-developed honeycomb ordering of Ni and Sb cations within the transition metal layers is indistinguishable from that of the ordered phase. The disorder is instead found to mainly occur perpendicular to the honeycomb layers with an observed coherence length of not much more than 1 nm seen in electron diffraction studies. When the Na environment is probed through ²³Na solid state NMR, no evidence is found for prismatic Na environments, and a bulk diffraction analysis finds no evidence of conventional stacking faults. The lack of long range coherence is instead attributed to disorder among the three possible choices for distributing Ni and Sb cations into a honeycomb lattice in each transition metal layer. It is observed that the full theoretical discharge capacity expected for a Ni³⁺/²⁺ redox couple (133 mAh/g) can be achieved for the ordered variant but not for the disordered variant (~110 mAh/g). The first 3.27 V plateau during charging is found to be associated with a two-phase O3 ↔ P3 structural transition, with the P3 stacking sequence persisting throughout all further stages of desodiation.

  5. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-062

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

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  20. EIS-0325: Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA proposes to construct a new 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in central Washington. This project would increase transmission system capacity north of Hanford.

  1. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-015

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  3. RAPID/Roadmap/6-WA-b | Open Energy Information

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    water information; Location of discharge into surface waterbody; State Environmental Policy Act Requirements; Public notice requirements; and Certification of the developer...

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    Use Lease Developers interested in conducting non-drilling exploration activities must consult with the WSDNR and negotiate the terms of a Land Use License. As there is no formal...

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    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by GE ENERGY for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FE0007902.

  17. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-018

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by GE ENERGY for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FE0007859.

  18. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-064

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS, LLC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005342.

  19. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-048

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-08NT0005310

  20. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-026

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by US SYNTHETIC CORPORATION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003633.

  1. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2007-014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by DONALDSON COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-06NT42861

  2. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-021

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by PHILIPS LUMILEDS for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003249

  3. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-047

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by APPLIED MATERIALS, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003331

  4. Sumas, WA Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    332,358 313,922 312,236 333,050 359,343 429,642 1996-2015 Pipeline Prices 4.22 3.96 2.72 3.62 4.32 2.36 1996-2015 Liquefied Natural Gas Volumes 0 5 11 2013-2015 Liquefied Natural Gas Prices -- 8.42 6.22 2013

  5. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-068

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by United Solar Systems Corp. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-07GO17053

  6. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-027

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by ALCOA, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-08GO180278

  7. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-059

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by CARLISLE CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005435.

  8. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-020

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by HALOTECHNICS, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-08GO18144

  9. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2007-012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by BOEING for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-06GO17052

  10. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-030

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by EATON CORPORATION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003911.

  11. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2013-027

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by ELECTRICORE INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005968

  12. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-025

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by EATON CORPORATION for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-OE0000592.

  13. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-032

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by EATON CORPORATION for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005665.

  14. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-051

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by CATERPILLAR, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement De-FC26-02AL67974

  15. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-065

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by OWENS CORNING for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005338.

  16. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORP for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-05CH11231

  17. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-038

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by A123 SYSTEMS, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0001187.

  18. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-035

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by POET RESEARCH, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-08GO88033

  19. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-020

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by CLIPPER WINDPOWER LLC for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005141.

  20. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-034

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by LUMINATION, LLC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003232

  1. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-061

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by CATERPILLAR for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-05NT42412.

  2. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-052

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by CATERPILLAR, INC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-05NT42423.

  3. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2006-019

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by NALCO CHEMICAL CORPORATION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-06FT42721

  4. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by GENERAL MOTORS CORP for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG36-07GO17018

  5. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2006-021

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UTC FUEL CELLS, LLC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG36-06GO86042

  6. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-028

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by ARKEMA for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-PS36-08GO98009

  7. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-049

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by PRAXAIR, INC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-07NT43088

  8. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-040

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by CORNING INCORPORATED for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-05NT42461.

  9. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-024

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by EASTMAN CHEMICAL COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-05NT42469

  10. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-049

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003916.

  11. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-016

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by LINDE, INC. for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FE0007453.

  12. EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA analyzes the potential environmental effects of a proposal by the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County, Washington to construct and operate the Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project. The proposed 680-kilowatt project would be located on the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington, about 1 kilometer west of Whidbey Island, entirely within Island County, Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the lead agency. The DOE NEPA process for this project has been canceled.

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/14-WA-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    wastewater pollutants to land must apply for a State Wastewater Discharge Permit. Industrial facilities that discharge wastewater to privately or publicly owned wastewater...

  14. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by GENERAL ELECTRIC GLOBAL REARCH for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FE0005859.

  15. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-048

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by IBM BLUEGENE/P DESIGN, PHASE III for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement W-7405-ENG-48.

  16. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-028

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by ARKEMA for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-08NT01582

  17. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-053

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by ALLEGHENY TECHNLOGIES WAH CHANG DIVISION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-05NT42513.

  18. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-062

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-05NT42626.

  19. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-061

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by PPG INDUSTRIES for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-NT0003894

  20. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-064

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by ROLLS ROYCE FUEL SYSTEMS for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FE0000303

  1. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-054

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-PS36-08GO98010

  2. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by SCHLUMBERGER TECHNOLOGY CORP for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG36-08GO18184

  3. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-036

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by LIGNOL INNOVATIONS, LTD. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-08GO18047

  4. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-044

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by FORD MOTOR COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-09GO19002

  5. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-046

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by EATON CORPORATION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG36-08GO18131

  6. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-018

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by BOEING COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG36-08GO18055

  7. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-047

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by US SOLAR HOLDINGS LLP for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG36-08GO18155

  8. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-031

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by PARKER HANNIFIN CORPORATION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FE0005508.

  9. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-035

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by GE GLOBAL RESEARCH for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003251

  10. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by FORD MOTOR COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-07NT43276

  11. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-036

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by POVAIR CORPORATION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-02AL67627.

  12. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-017

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by FORD MOTOR COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG36-08GO18128

  13. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by JOHNSON MATTNEY FUEL CELLS INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG36-07GO17019

  14. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-025

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by GENERAL ELECTRIC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-08NT05868

  15. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by SCHOTT NORTH AMERICA, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG36-07GO17001

  16. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-036

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by HONEYWELL LABORATORIES for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-OE0000544.

  17. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by CERAMATEC, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0000395.

  18. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-024

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by SCHWEITZER ENGINEERING LAB INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-OE0000538.

  19. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by AE SOLAR for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005340.

  20. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-057

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by 3M COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003837.

  1. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-027

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by VARIAN ASSOCIATES, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0004737.

  2. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-048

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by ROBERT BOSCH, LLC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-07NT43274

  3. Best Practices Case Study: Quadrant Homes - Kentlake Highlands, Kent, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-09-01

    Case study of Quadrant Homes, a Seattle area builder who, despite the recession, sold three homes a day in the first half of 2009, by letting buyers choose from 300 floor plans and 10,000 options, including an energy efficiency package designed with help from DOEs Building America that cut energy use by 50% over a code-built home.

  4. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-046

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by NUVERA FUEL CELLS, INC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG36-07GO17014

  5. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-023

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by HEADWATER for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-04NT42448.

  6. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2007-001

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by EASTMAN KODAK CO. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-06NT42933

  7. EIS-0189: Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), Richland, WA (Programmatic)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental impact statement evaluates the Department of Energy (DOE)'s, in cooperation with the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), decisions on how to properly manage and dispose of Hanford Site tank waste and encapsulated cesium and strontium to reduce existing and potential future risk to the public, Site workers, and the environment. The waste includes radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste currently stored in 177 underground storage tanks, approximately 60 other smaller active and inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (MUSTs), and additional Site waste likely to be added to the tank waste, which is part of the tank farm system. In addition, DOE proposes to manage and dispose of approximately 1,930 cesium and strontium capsules that are by-products of tank waste. The tank waste and capsules are located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

  8. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-051

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC05-00OR22725

  9. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-040

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by SYPRIS ELECTRONICS for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-OE0000543.

  10. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-049

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by AMERICAN AIR LIQUIDE for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-02NT41586.

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/11-WA-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    may require obtaining a permit and providing public notice and notice to Indian Tribes. Once the necessary procedures have been followed, the developer may continue with the...

  12. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by APPLIED MATERIALS, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003838.

  13. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-045

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by LUMMUS COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003457

  14. Title: Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-041

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by GENERAL MOTOR for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC36-08GO28308.

  15. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-068

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by GE GLOBAL RESEARCHH CENTER for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-08NT05870.

  16. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by HUNTSMAN ADVANCED MATERIALS AMERICANS, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG36-07GO17012

  17. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-022

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by FORD MOTOR COMPANY for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FOA-0000421.

  18. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-030

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by BALDOR ELECTRIC COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG36-08GO18132

  19. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-037

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS, LLC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0000478.

  20. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by CHEMTURA CORPORATION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003986.

  1. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by ROBERT BOSCH, LLC for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003533.

  2. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by NOVOZYMES NORTH AMERICA, INC. for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FE0007741.

  3. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-058

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005143.

  4. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by BAYER MATERIALSCIENCE LLC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0004571.

  5. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-031

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORP for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-09GO19006

  6. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-036

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by GE GLOBAL RESEARCH for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003251

  7. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-029

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by OSRAM SYLVANI for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003241

  8. EIS-0244: Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization, Hanford Site, Richland, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the impacts on the human environment of: Stabilization of residual, plutonium-bearing materials at the PFP Facility to a form suitable for interim storage at the PFP Facility. Immobilization of residual plutonium-bearing materials at the PFP Facility. Removal of readily retrievable, plutonium-bearing materials left behind in process equipment, process areas, and air and liquid waste management systems as a result of historic uses.

  9. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2007-015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORP for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-07NT43055

  10. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by NAVISTAR for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003303.

  11. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-046

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by ALSTOM GRID INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-OE0000551.

  12. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-052

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by A123 SYSTEMS, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE003513

  13. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-058

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by ASTRONAUTICS CORPORATION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-03NT1948.

  14. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-005

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by AMERICAN SUPERCONDUCTOR CORPORATION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-07NT43243

  15. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-043

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by AMERICAN SUPERCONDUCTOR CORPORATION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-07NT43240

  16. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-027

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORPORATION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC07-05ID14636.

  17. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-052

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by 3M COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0000456.

  18. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-052

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by 3M COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-08GO18027

  19. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2006-014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by PPG INDUSTRIES, INC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-04GO14044

  20. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-049

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by SPX COOLING TECHNOLOGIESS for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-NT0005647

  1. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-069

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by ENVIRON INTERNATIOAL CORPORATION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0000069

  2. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-057

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003840

  3. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by BAKER HUGHES OILFIELD OPERATIONS, INC. for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005505.

  4. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by BAKER HUGHES for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG08-GO18186

  5. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by DSM lnnovation, Inc. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-PS36-06GO97034

  6. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-007

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by 3M COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0000650

  7. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by BAKER HUGHES INTERNATIONAL for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-05NT15488.

  8. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by CAMBRIOS TECHNOLOGIES CORP. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003254.

  9. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-044

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by ALSTOM POWER, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-07NT43095

  10. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-005

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by CONOCO PHILIPS for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-08NT0006553

  11. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2013-011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS, LLC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005752.

  12. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-032

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by CUMMINS, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-07NT43279

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/9-WA-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the DNS and environmental checklist to agencies with jurisdiction, the department of ecology, and affected tribes and each local agency or political subdivision whose public...

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/8-WA-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the proposed project. Topics for discussion must include, but are not limited to: The nature of the project, the contents of the pre-application request and the status of the...

  15. RAPID/Roadmap/7-WA-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Commerce, Department of Ecology, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Department of Natural Resources, and Utilities and Transportation Commission. Through this certification,...

  16. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-030

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by RED ACQUISITION, LLC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003364

  17. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-059

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by PPG INDUSTRIES for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0000167

  18. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-021

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by CUMMINS, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0004125.

  19. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-054

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UNITED TECHNOLOGIE for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-NT003894

  20. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-029

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by BALLARD POWER SYSTEM, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-07GO17017

  1. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2006-027

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-06NT42864

  2. Petra Nova - W.A. Parish Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries' (MHI) CO2 capture technology at an existing coal-fired power plant. ... in financial assistance through the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Round ...

  3. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH CENTER for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003955.

  4. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-041

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by W.L. GORE & ASSOCIATES for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0000465

  5. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-040

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by W. L. GORE & ASSOCIATES, INC, for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-08GO18052

  6. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-065

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by DRESSER WAUKESHA for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0004016

  7. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES, INC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG02-04ER46118.

  8. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-030

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by SRI INTERNATIONAL for a DOE Advance patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FE0000896.

  9. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-021

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by CARGILL, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-07GO17055

  10. Issaquah Highlands Zero Energy Affordable Housing (WA) - YWCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom, Vincent; DeRobbio, Wendy; Hall, Linda

    2012-04-30

    The YWCA Family Village at Issaquah, Net Zero Energy Approach Project provides a compelling model for how the nation can seriously respond to the critical need for affordable housing while advancing environmental standards and reducing economic inequities. Affordable housing developments for vulnerable members of the community and in today's workforce cannot overlook issues, such as climate impact, energy security and water conservation. This project's advanced building design was based on the goal of creating a 100 year building that could achieve net zero energy usage if funding had been available to support the final pieces of energy generation. The team worked closely with community stakeholders to ensure the baseline components of high quality and efficient building envelopes along with efficient systems were in place to set the stage for future incorporation of energy generating systems such as solar panels. As built, these 146 homes, large child care center and community services areas are proving the value of investing upfront for the benefit of future generations by reducing ongoing utility and maintenance costs with an eye toward environmental stewardship and community/resident education. The DOE award helped fund two critical energy conservation features for the YWCA Family Village at Issaquah campus: 1) super-insulated roof assembly with a continuous air barrier and 2) domestic hot water preheat system. The roof system at the YWCA Family Village at Issaquah project was built to include 6" of Polyiso rigid insulation (R-38) on top of the roof sheathing to provide a super-insulated roof in line with the other green features of the project. Placing the rigid insulation on top of the roof sheathing allows the building to have a continuous layer of insulation and provides a continuous air barrier. The domestic hot water preheat system includes flat panel arrays on roofs of the buildings that heat the water using solar power, which reduces the amount of heating needed from the gas-fired boilers. The flat-plate panels on the roof of the building heats the water using solar power. A heat exchanger transfers heat from water warmed by the panels to potable water for the units. The warmed potable water mixes with the tap water supply to create hot water for the buildings. This boost of water warmed by the solar panels reduces the heating costs for eh project by reducing the need to heat the water via gas-fired boilers. Both of these energy upgrades were chosen because they significantly improve the energy efficiency for the life of the building and are reducing monthly utility costs for both the residents and the owners. Since the owner is a not-for-profit dedicated to long-term ownership and serving households with very-low and low-incomes, the costs savings will ultimately benefit current and future residents as the dollars saved will either be realized directly by the resident or be invested in the project. Technically, the design of these systems is easily understood and the principles could be applied to other projects. The incremental costs depend largely on the existing market rate of the components-none of which are considered "cutting edge" so a market does currently exist.

  11. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-069

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by NAVISTAR for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0003303.

  12. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-038

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by PHILLIPS ELECTRONIC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-05NT42342.

  13. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-021

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by PHILIPS LUMILEDS for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-08NT01583

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/3-WA-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    payments as determined by WSDNR, or as agreed on by the lessee and WSDNR; and Other terms and conditions as WSDNR deems advisable. RCW 79.13.030. WSDNR may enter into a lease,...

  15. EIS-0467: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has postponed preparation of this EIS to better align the completion of the EIS with planned future operations of facilities on Hanford’s Central Plateau (such as Hanford’s Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant).

  16. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-053

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by VOLVO TECHNOLOGY OF AMERICA, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0004125.

  17. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-023

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by SCHWEITZER ENGINEERING LAB INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-OE0000537.

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/11-WA-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sites and artifacts, and traditional areas or items of religious, ceremonial and social uses to affected tribes. Washington defines an "Archaeological resource" as any...

  19. EIS-0330: Wallula Power Project, Walla Walla County, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6) conversion facilities, at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky.

  20. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-071

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by THE DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005434.