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1

VT Nuclear Services ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

VT Nuclear Services ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: VT Nuclear Services ltd Place: Warrington, United Kingdom Zip: WA4 4BP Sector: Services Product: VT Nuclear Services...

2

Listing of Virginia Tech Internal Vendors VT Academic Enrichment & Excellence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Wildlife VT Fisheries & Wildlife Copier Charges VT Forestry Vehicles Service Center VT FourDesign VT Fralin VT Soil Testing Lab Fertility Analysis for VCE Clients VT Stability Wind Tunnel VT Student Affairs

Buehrer, R. Michael

3

Category:Burlington, VT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

VT VT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Burlington, VT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Burlington VT Central Vermont Pub Serv Corp.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 67 KB SVMidriseApartment Burlington VT Central Vermont Pub Serv Corp.png SVMidriseApartment Bur... 68 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Burlington VT Central Vermont Pub Serv Corp.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 68 KB SVStandAloneRetail Burlington VT Central Vermont Pub Serv Corp.png SVStandAloneRetail Bur... 68 KB SVHospital Burlington VT Central Vermont Pub Serv Corp.png SVHospital Burlington ... 64 KB SVLargeHotel Burlington VT Central Vermont Pub Serv Corp.png SVLargeHotel Burlingto... 63 KB SVLargeOffice Burlington VT Central Vermont Pub Serv Corp.png

4

VT PowerPoint Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EMBEDDED ACTIVE FIBER OPTIC SENSING EMBEDDED ACTIVE FIBER OPTIC SENSING NETWORK FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING IN HARSH ENVIRONMENTS DE-FE0007405 Anbo Wang, Cheng Ma Virginia Tech Center for Photonics Technology Blacksburg, VA 24061 awang@vt.edu, cma1@vt.edu http://photonics.ece.vt.edu/ 1 Advanced Research Sensor and Controls Project Review Meeting DOE NETL Morgantown, WV 03/12/2012 Outline * Motivation, Overview & Objectives * Background and Fundamentals of Proposed Technology * Project Scope and Work Plan 2 MOTIVATION AND OBJECTIVES 3 Motivation * Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of structural health in advanced energy systems. Examples: * Ultra Supercritical (USC) systems: * Steam temperature 760 o C, pressure 5000 psi. * Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC):

5

VT PowerPoint Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DISTRIBUTED FIBER OPTIC SENSOR FOR DISTRIBUTED FIBER OPTIC SENSOR FOR ON-LINE MONITORING OF COAL GASIFIER REFRACTORY HEALTH DE-FE0005703 Anbo Wang, Cheng Ma Virginia Tech Center for Photonics Technology Blacksburg, VA 24061 awang@vt.edu, cma1@vt.edu http://photonics.ece.vt.edu/ 1 Advanced Research Sensor and Controls Project Review Meeting DOE NETL Morgantown, WV 03/12/2012 Outline * Motivation, Overview & Objectives * Background and Fundamentals of Proposed Technology * Project Scope and Work Plan * Project Progress 2 MOTIVATION AND OBJECTIVES 3 Motivation * Refractory health monitoring in slagging coal gasifiers: * Rapid corrosion of refractory materials. * High-temperature reducing environment. * Difficult to predict remaining refractory life. * Localized thinning, spallation, cracking.

6

VT PowerPoint Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SINGLE-CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SINGLE-CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR DE-FC26-99FT40685 Anbo Wang, Gary Pickrell, Ke Wang, Cheng Ma, Brian Scott Virginia Tech Center for Photonics Technology Blacksburg, VA 24061 awang@vt.edu http://photonics.ece.vt.edu/ 1 Advanced Research Sensor and Controls Project Review Meeting DOE NETL Morgantown, WV 03/12/2012 Outline * Motivation & Objective * Background and Fundamentals of Proposed Technology * Project Scope and Work Plan * Project Progress 2 MOTIVATION AND OBJECTIVE 3 Motivation 4 * Temperature sensor for harsh-environments: * Coal gasifier (major focus of prior work). * Gas turbine. * Temperature measurement is critical for: * Gasifier start-up. * Process optimization. * Event/failure detection.

7

Guidelines for Vocal Tract Development Lab (VT Lab) team members to access the VT Lab WebSpace via the VT Lab website  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guidelines for Vocal Tract Development Lab (VT Lab) team members to access the VT Lab WebSpace via the VT Lab website The VTLab WebSpace is a new and improved mechanism for VT lab team members to share files. We are replacing the former Member Login section of our website with MyWeb Space (developed by Do

Vorperian, Houri K.

8

Parallel MATLAB at VT Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM -ecliff@vt.edu )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parallel MATLAB at VT Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff@vt.edu ) Justin Krometis (ARC/ICAM - jkrometis Mathematics 1 / 35 #12;MATLAB Parallel Computing Introduction Programming Models Execution Example: Quadrature Conclusion 2 / 35 #12;INTRO: Parallel MATLAB Parallel MATLAB is an extension of MATLAB that takes advantage

Crawford, T. Daniel

9

VT Electric Services VTES 601 Energy Dr.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VT Electric Services Location VTES 601 Energy Dr. Blacskburg, VA 24061 (540) 231-6437 Office Hours Electric Services is to provide adequate, reliable and economical electric service to the buildings; Street & Sidewalk Illumination Annual Operating Budget $38 million (approx.) Electric Services

Buehrer, R. Michael

10

Parallel MATLAB at VT: Parallel For Loops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parallel MATLAB at VT: Parallel For Loops John Burkardt (FSU) Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff Research Computing ICAM: Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics 1 / 72 #12;MATLAB Parallel Example ODE SWEEP Example FMINCON Example Conclusion 2 / 72 #12;INTRO: Parallel MATLAB Parallel MATLAB

Crawford, T. Daniel

11

Parallel MATLAB at VT: Parallel For Loops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parallel MATLAB at VT: Parallel For Loops John Burkardt (FSU) Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff Research Computing ICAM: Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics 1 / 71 #12;MATLAB Parallel Example ODE SWEEP Example FMINCON Example Conclusion 2 / 71 #12;INTRO: Parallel MATLAB Parallel MATLAB

Crawford, T. Daniel

12

Parallel MATLAB at VT: Parallel For Loops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parallel MATLAB at VT: Parallel For Loops John Burkardt (FSU) Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff Research Computing ICAM: Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics 1 / 56 #12;Matlab Parallel ODE SWEEP Example MD Example Conclusion 2 / 56 #12;INTRO: Parallel Matlab In a previous lecture we

Crawford, T. Daniel

13

VIRGINIA BUSINESS Advertising SupplementVIRGINIA BUSINESSVIRGINIA BUSINESS Advertising Supplement INNINNOOVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIOwww.vt.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VIRGINIA BUSINESS Advertising SupplementVIRGINIA BUSINESSVIRGINIA BUSINESS Advertising Supplement.vt.edu Owww.vt.edu OOwww.vt.edu Owww.vt.edu ONN #12;VIRGINIA BUSINESS Advertising Supplement IDEASATWORK VT2-added byproducts and,in the process,reducing pollutants flowing into the Chesapeake Bay; and improving automated

Buehrer, R. Michael

14

VT Exchange Program in South Africa University of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VT Exchange Program in South Africa University of the Free State Jim McKenna jamckenn@vt.edu http://www.ufs.ac.za/ #12;Republic of South Africa South African Provinces Fly into Bloemfontein in the Free State #12;Kruger National Park #12;Travels in South Africa Cape Town & Stellenbosch #12;

Buehrer, R. Michael

15

NREL: Wind Research - Ventera's VT 10 Turbine Testing and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventera's VT 10 Turbine Testing and Results Ventera's VT 10 Turbine Testing and Results Ventera's VT10 wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL is testing Ventera's VT10 small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The VT10 is a horizontal-axis downwind, three-bladed turbine rated at 10 kilowatts (kW). Its diameter is 6.7 meters, and it is mounted on a lattice tower with a hub height of 21.7 meters. The VT10 uses a single-phase, grid-connected, permanent-magnet generator that operates at 240 volts AC. Testing Summary The summary of the tests is listed below, along with the final reports. Cumulative Energy Production 3/22/2010: 0; 3/29/2010: 26; 3/31/2010: 74; 4/1/2010: 75; 4/2/2010: 174;

16

Rapid Ammonia Gas Transport Accounts for Futile Transmembrane Cycling under NH3/NH4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid Ammonia Gas Transport Accounts for Futile Transmembrane Cycling under NH3/NH4 + Toxicity) seedlings is predominately of the gaseous NH3 species, rather than the NH4 + ion. Influx of 13 NH3/13 NH4 + , which exceeded 200 mmol g­1 h­1 , was not commensurate with membrane depolarization or increases in root

Britto, Dev T.

17

Category:Concord, NH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Go Back to PV Economics By Location Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Concord, NH" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 74 KB SVHospital Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVHospital Concord NH ... 75 KB SVLargeHotel Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVLargeHotel Concord N... 74 KB SVLargeOffice Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVLargeOffice Concord ... 76 KB SVMediumOffice Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVMediumOffice Concord... 74 KB SVMidriseApartment Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVMidriseApartment Con... 71 KB SVOutPatient Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVOutPatient Concord N... 72 KB SVPrimarySchool Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png

18

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.00-1.99 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1996 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1996 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: In 1996, consumption of natural gas for agricultural use

19

Presented in Randolph Center, VT and West Lebanon, NH by UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program Course info and registration online  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: ArcGIS 10 Topics covered: Creating GIS maps GIS techniques GIS data maintenance $495 standard $349 to ArcGIS 10. Participants learn how to use ArcGIS 10 to produce attractive, effective maps. Data processing and data editing techniques are covered, as well as, new techniques for mapping and sharing GIS

New Hampshire, University of

20

Company Name: JobsInNH.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Company Name: JobsInNH.com Web Site: www.jobsinnh.com Industry: Advertising & Marketing Brief Company Overview: "Since 2002, JobsInNH.com has been New Hampshire?s #1 employment resource. As recruiting and accelerate your job search. Connect with the best employers in the state who are hiring now" Majors

New Hampshire, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vt nh ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

VrnVtR^iTY OF CALIFOKKIA L  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VrnVtR^iTY OF CALIFOKKIA VrnVtR^iTY OF CALIFOKKIA L a w r e n c s BadidUon L a b o r a t o r y B e r k e l e y , Calift^raia Contract rto "*'-740n-.e,ig~48 THE EARLY ANJ'IPROTON WORK Owen GharBDeriair. DecetDfter 15, 195.9 L i G A L N O T I C E - This report was prepared as an account ot <: I nor any person acUng on beliflU of the C DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product,

22

The Regulatory Assistance Project 50 State Street, Suite 3 Montpelier, VT 05602  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Loads to Resources (and Resources to Loads) 1. Targeted energy efficiency 2. Orient solar panels 3. Use State Street, Suite 3 Montpelier, VT 05602 Phone: 802-223-8199 web: www.raponline.org Resource MaterialsThe Regulatory Assistance Project 50 State Street, Suite 3 Montpelier, VT 05602 Phone: 802

California at Davis, University of

23

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- R Brew Co - NH 01  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R Brew Co - NH 01 R Brew Co - NH 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: R. BREW CO. (NH.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Concord , New Hampshire NH.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 NH.01-2 Site Operations: Conducted vacuum furnace tests using uranium and copper billets. NH.01-1 NH.01-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NH.01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NH.01-1 NH.01-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - radiological monitoring during operations NH.01-3 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to R. BREW CO. NH.01-1 - Memorandum/Checklist; Landis to File; Subject: R. Brew

24

Apple Tree, NH Big Tree for May By Anne Krantz, NH Big Tree Team,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apple Tree, NH Big Tree for May By Anne Krantz, NH Big Tree Team, UNH Cooperative Extension The explosion of apple blossoms in May transforms the most gnarled old tree into a delicate cloud of beauty (1817-1862) in his essay "The Wild Apple Tree," described the blossoms perfectly: `The flowers

New Hampshire, University of

25

Determination of the ( Ammonium (NH4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, paleoclimate history, biologic cycling of nutrients, ground-water contamination, and natural remediation contributed to understanding of water-supply sustainability, ground-water/surface-water interactionsDetermination of the ( 15 N/ 14 N) of Ammonium (NH4 + ) in Water: RSIL Lab Code 2898 Chapter 15

26

EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson Valley Clean Communities, Inc. (NY, MA, PA); NYSERDA (ME, NH, VT, MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD, DC) EV Community...

27

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Northeast Divisions and States" "New England",5.5,2232,1680,625,903,680,253 "Massachusetts",2.5,2076,1556,676,850,637,277 "CT, ME, NH, RI, VT",3,2360,1781,583,946,714,...

28

NETL CT Imaging Facility  

SciTech Connect

NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

None

2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

29

NETL CT Imaging Facility  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

None

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

30

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography Stress Testing Rotation The Nuclear Medicine/CT angiography. Understand the indications for exercise treadmill testing and specific nuclear cardiology tests, safe use Level 2 proficiency in performing and interpreting cardiac nuclear imaging tests. Progression

Ford, James

31

NH House Committee_April27 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Control Mercury Control Technology R&D Program for Coal-Fired Boilers Working Session of the New Hampshire House Science, Technology, & Energy Committee April 26, 2005 Concord, New Hampshire Thomas J. Feeley, III thomas.feeley@netl.doe.gov National Energy Technology Laboratory NH House Committee_April 2005 Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program Performance/Cost Objectives * Have technologies ready for commercial demonstration by 2007 for all coals * Reduce "uncontrolled" Hg emissions by 50-70% * Reduce cost by 25-50% compared to baseline cost estimates Baseline Costs: $50,000 - $70,000 / lb Hg Removed 2000 Year Cost NH House Committee_April 2005 Stages of Mercury Control Technology Development DOE RD&D Model Lab/Bench/Pilot-Scale Testing Field Testing

32

ECPE/PHYS 4984: Nanotechnology Randy Heflin 1-4504 108 Robeson rheflin@vt.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ECPE/PHYS 4984: Nanotechnology Randy Heflin 1-4504 108 Robeson rheflin@vt.edu Stephane Evoy 1 of instructor Course Number: ECPE 4984 PHYS 4984 Transcript Title: SS: Nanotechnology II. Rationale of course/ECPE 4984: Nanotechnology Course pack, edited by S. Rayyan , W. Barnhart, J. R. Heflin, and S. Evoy

Heflin, Randy

33

VT-2014-00407.R1 1 Abstract--Simulation-based design optimization of an electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a motor design, thus confining its application to the early conceptual design stage. Practical electric analysis accuracy and efficiency, direct integration of a motor model into a system optimization model hasVT-2014-00407.R1 1 Abstract--Simulation-based design optimization of an electric vehicle (EV

Papalambros, Panos

34

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and pricing to remain profitable? Conserving Energy in Greenhouses The Greenhouse Structure The first linewww.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State, Petersburg. publication 430-101 Dealing with the High Cost

Liskiewicz, Maciej

35

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be produced in greenhouses or even in the desert sands. Hydroponic techniques also allow for precise waterwww.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences is often defined as "the cultivation of plants in water." Research has since determined that many different

Liskiewicz, Maciej

36

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Chesapeake Bay, its tributaries, and other water bodies. How is reclaimed water produced? Reclaimed waterwww.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Extension Program, Virginia State, Petersburg. publication 452-014 What is water reuse? Water reuse can

Liskiewicz, Maciej

37

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-foot equals 325,851 gallons of water. activated carbon ­ A material produced by heating coal or woodwww.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State, Petersburg. publication 442-758 A Glossary of Water

Liskiewicz, Maciej

38

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.virginia.gov/consumers/faqs.shtml. This publication goes over the main points of the ten- ant rights, responsibilities, and remedies sections such as hallways, stairs, foyers and/or heat- ing facilities, hot water equipment, or any other essential facility

Liskiewicz, Maciej

39

Dynamic Vt SRAM : A Leakage Tolerant Cache Memory for Low Voltage Microprocessors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biasing is not implemented in our DTSRAM design. Fig. 2 shows the schematic of a DTSRAM cache line (DTSRAM) ar- chitecture to reduce the subthreshold leakage in cache mem- ories. The Vt of each cache line is controlled separately by means of body biasing. In order to minimize the energy and delay overhead, a cache

Kim, Chris H.

40

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the extent of public sewers, developing them requires a means for on-site wastewater treatment and dispersal in establish- ing on-site wastewater treatment and disposal systems on nonideal soils, as described in On online through the Vir- ginia Cooperative Extension website (www.ext.vt.edu). Wastewater Treatment

Liskiewicz, Maciej

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vt nh ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ester is a scientific term for the biodiesel fuel produced when methanol is used in the biodiesel production process. CHwww.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and emissions. This pub- lication addresses producing one's own biodiesel fuel from waste oil, fats, and oilseed

Liskiewicz, Maciej

42

Ab initio molecular dynamics investigations on the SN2 reactions of OH? with NH2F and \\{NH2Cl\\}  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reactions of hydroxide anion (OH?) with fluoroamine (NH2F) and chloramine (NH2Cl) have been investigated with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. For the SN2 reaction of OH? with NH2F, there are two main dynamic reaction pathways after passing the [HONH2F]? barrier. The first one is that the [HONH2F]? transition state directly dissociates to the products of F? and NH2OH without involving any dynamic intermediate complex, and on the contrary, the other one involves the dynamic hydrogen bond F?H?NH?OH and/or F?H?O?NH2 intermediate complexes. As to the SN2 reaction of OH? with NH2Cl, there is only one dominant dynamic reaction pathway, which leads to the products of Cl? and NH2OH directly. According to our calculations, the statistical theories including the RiceRamspergerKasselMarcus (RRKM) theory and transition state (TS) theory cannot be utilized to model the reaction kinetics for these two SN2 reactions.

Feng Yu; Lei Song; Xiaoguo Zhou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1994 January ........................... 89.6 91.0 90.2 83.8 88.4 80.4 87.3 88.8 92.1 102.5 February ......................... 92.9 94.6 93.8 90.4 91.3 86.6 91.4 92.3 91.5 105.5 March .............................. 91.4 92.5 92.1 85.9 88.3 83.6 89.4 91.0 91.2 102.0 April ................................ 88.2 89.0 89.4 80.8 86.0 78.2 85.1 88.3 89.2 93.7 May ................................. 86.1 86.6 85.4 76.8 85.1 75.4 83.3 86.7 84.4 83.1 June ................................ 85.2 85.6 86.1 75.6 83.7 73.1 82.3 84.6 82.0 W July ................................. 82.7 83.1 84.2 75.6 82.1 71.8 81.6 83.0 80.5 W August ............................ 82.1 82.4 79.7 78.0 78.7 72.8 84.0 83.8 82.3 81.9 September ...................... 83.2 83.7 80.5 78.5 81.1 72.9 84.7 83.3 83.1 86.2 October ........................... 84.7

44

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1993 January ........................... 94.3 95.7 94.9 85.2 94.0 87.1 91.7 93.4 91.2 105.2 February ......................... 94.6 95.9 96.2 85.4 94.4 86.9 91.8 93.3 90.8 106.8 March .............................. 95.4 96.5 96.7 86.4 94.8 86.6 92.4 93.7 92.4 108.5 April ................................ 92.6 93.4 93.6 83.0 91.5 84.5 90.4 91.2 91.6 106.7 May ................................. 91.1 91.7 91.6 81.7 91.1 83.9 90.7 91.3 89.4 104.3 June ................................ 88.9 89.4 88.6 81.1 88.6 82.4 87.6 89.7 90.6 100.4 July ................................. 85.6 85.9 86.5 78.5 83.9 78.3 85.2 85.5 86.4 100.2 August ............................ 84.1 84.6 84.0 77.4 83.4 76.0 82.7 85.6 83.5 96.1 September ...................... 85.5 85.8 84.2 78.3 83.8 74.9 84.8 86.6 84.6 95.5 October ...........................

45

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1995 January ........................... 86.9 87.6 86.7 77.8 84.8 78.4 87.3 85.7 88.4 102.4 February ......................... 87.4 88.2 87.8 77.4 84.9 78.5 87.3 85.9 88.5 103.4 March .............................. 86.6 87.3 87.0 76.3 82.5 77.7 87.0 85.6 87.6 103.3 April ................................ 85.4 85.8 85.2 76.7 81.9 76.6 86.5 84.8 87.0 100.0 May ................................. 86.4 86.9 86.5 78.7 84.7 75.8 86.1 84.5 85.2 93.2 June ................................ 84.6 85.2 84.2 78.1 82.5 74.5 83.2 83.9 83.0 NA July ................................. 82.0 82.4 79.4 76.9 80.6 72.9 81.7 81.7 80.0 85.1 August ............................ 80.7 81.1 77.4 76.7 80.9 73.0 85.3 81.7 82.1 W September ...................... 82.3 82.7 79.2 76.2 81.7 73.8 84.9 82.5 82.4 86.1 October ...........................

46

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1997 January ........................... 107.9 109.0 108.6 105.2 106.5 102.1 107.0 104.4 106.5 130.4 February ......................... 105.1 106.0 105.2 102.2 103.4 101.0 104.5 103.5 104.2 127.0 March .............................. 101.6 102.5 99.3 94.3 97.7 98.6 100.4 103.1 100.7 121.4 April ................................ 99.2 100.3 97.6 90.9 95.9 95.2 99.4 100.4 100.1 116.3 May ................................. 96.4 97.1 93.4 90.6 93.0 91.9 97.3 97.7 96.4 108.6 June ................................ 92.3 92.9 89.9 88.1 89.1 89.1 93.3 92.9 90.8 99.9 July ................................. 88.3 88.7 83.7 86.7 87.5 85.6 91.6 91.1 88.8 W August ............................ 86.9 86.8 84.2 85.8 84.7 85.3 91.0 92.7 89.2 W September ...................... 88.7 89.0 85.5 87.0 87.0 86.3 91.2 91.7 88.5 NA October ...........................

47

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1996 January ........................... 94.6 96.1 94.5 93.0 92.0 89.1 94.9 92.6 94.7 111.7 February ......................... 95.9 97.5 96.2 93.2 93.8 90.8 95.6 93.7 94.4 112.9 March .............................. 99.1 100.6 99.6 96.7 99.3 93.8 99.7 97.3 96.1 117.7 April ................................ 101.5 102.7 102.1 98.7 101.5 96.5 98.8 100.3 100.7 115.9 May ................................. 97.8 98.1 96.8 95.4 95.9 93.6 94.9 98.8 98.0 109.7 June ................................ 91.0 91.3 88.8 90.1 87.9 87.2 88.7 92.2 91.9 102.5 July ................................. 87.9 88.0 84.9 87.5 87.5 83.6 87.7 88.5 91.0 97.3 August ............................ 88.1 88.2 84.0 89.5 89.0 85.1 88.3 89.0 91.0 99.2 September ...................... 94.5 94.4 92.5 96.4 93.1 91.9 96.6 94.4 95.3 106.2 October ...........................

48

-CT CT)Computed Tomography(. ,. , -100 ,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· . · , , , , . · , " , , . · , . , . : · . ·2-4 . ·2-3 -. ·) D,DMAIC, SPC, FMEA, Control Plan, Lean) 8(-. · -. ·. ·. NPI ·. · , , .' , ·" . " * . : ·) B.A ,(-. ·4-6. ·) QFD, CtQ breakdown, DfSS, SPC, AQP, FMEA, Control Plan.( ·Six Sigma GB

Pinsky, Ross

49

NH4-smectite: Characterization, hydration properties and hydro mechanical behaviour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NH4-smectite: Characterization, hydration properties and hydro mechanical behaviour M. Gautier a and drive to environmental problems. The purpose of this study was to understand the hydro- physical changes the pressure on small amounts of samples, proved the strong increase of the permeability of NH4-smectite

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

50

NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NH Department of Environmental Services The Act calls for annual reductions of multiple pollutants, including SO2, Nox, CO2, and mercury. The Act calls for an 87% reduction in SO2 emissions and a 70% reduction in Nox emissions from 1999 levels. CO2 emissions are to be reduced to 1990 levels by the end of 2006. Act is implemented under NH Rules Env-A 2900. This act applies specifically to three existing fossil

51

CT Solar Loan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered...

52

Electric-spark hardening of VT3-1 titanium alloy with tungsten-free composite ceramics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mass transfer and wear resistance of both monolayer and multilayer coatings on VT3-1 alloy are examined. The coatings are deposited by electrospark alloying (ESA) with composite titanium and zirconium refr...

I. A. Podchernyaeva; V. M. Panashenko

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

U.S. DEPARTlVIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT )'vtAHAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

)'vtAHAGEMENT CENTER )'vtAHAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERl\ifINATION RECIPIENT:Colorado School of Mines Page 1 of2 STATE: CO PROJECT TITLE: Joint Inversion of Electrical and Seismic data for Fracture Characterization and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geotllermal Systems Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE·PS36·08G098008 . DE·FG36·08G018195 GFO·G018195·002 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

54

EPR and IR studies of [Ru(NH?)?]+-Y and [Ru(NH?)?N?]+-Y type zeolites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPR AND IR STUDIES OF [Ru(NH ) ] -Y 3 6 AND [Ru(NE ) N ] -Y TYPE ZEOLITES 2+ A Thesis by RAYMOND LEON LEUBNER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia1 fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Chemistry EPR AND IR STUDIES OF [Ru(NH3) ] -Y 3+ AND [Ru(NH3) N ) -Y TYPE ZEOLITES 2+ 3&2 A Thesis by RAYMOND LEON LEUBNER Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ (Head of Department) (Memb...

Leubner, Raymond Leon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in a Commercial Small Port Cu Zeolite Urea SCR Catalyst Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions in a Commercial Small Port Cu Zeolite Urea SCR Catalyst...

56

Quasielastic neutron scattering of -NH3 and -BH3 rotational dynamics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quasielastic neutron scattering of -NH3 and -BH3 rotational dynamics in orthorhombic ammonia borane. Quasielastic neutron scattering of -NH3 and -BH3 rotational dynamics in...

57

Vibrational spectroscopy of the ammoniated ammonium ions NH sub 4 sup + (NH sub 3 ) sub n (n = 1-10)  

SciTech Connect

The gas-phase vibration-internal rotation spectra of mass-selected ammoniated ammonium ions, NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub n} (for n = 1-10), have been observed from 2600 to 4000 cm{sup {minus}1}. The spectra show vibrational features that have been assigned to modes involving both the ion core species, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, and the first shell NH{sub 3} solvent molecules. Nearly free internal rotation of the solvent molecules about their local C{sub 3} axes in the first solvation shell has been observed in the smaller clusters (n = 1-6). For the larger clusters studied (n = 7-10) the spectra converge, with little difference between clusters differing by one solvent molecule. For these clusters, the spectrum in the 3200-3500 cm{sup {minus}1} region is quite similar to that of liquid ammonia, and the entire region of 2600-3500 cm{sup {minus}1} also bears considerable resemblance to the spectra of ammonium salts dissolved in liquid ammonia under some chemical conditions. This indicates the onset of a liquidlike environment for the ion core and first shell solvent molecules in clusters as small as NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub 8}.

Price, J.M.; Crofton, M.W.; Lee, Y.T. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States))

1991-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

58

Public Service Co of NH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NH NH (Redirected from PSNH) Jump to: navigation, search Name Public Service Co of NH Place New Hampshire Service Territory New Hampshire Website www.psnh.com Green Button Landing Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Reference Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 15472 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections

59

PORTSMOUTH HARBOR AND PISCATAQUA RIVER, NH & ME NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the states of New Hampshire and Maine. The existing project consists of 35-foot deep entrance channel, with a minimum width of 400 feet, extending about 6.2 miles from deep water at the harbor entrance upriverPORTSMOUTH HARBOR AND PISCATAQUA RIVER, NH & ME NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT 21 August 2014

US Army Corps of Engineers

60

Public Service Co of NH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Public Service Co of NH Name Public Service Co of NH Place New Hampshire Service Territory New Hampshire Website www.psnh.com Green Button Landing Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Reference Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 15472 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now!

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vt nh ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Evaluation of NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary Diesel Genset Evaluation of NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary Diesel Genset 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

62

Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation The feasibility of on-board ammonia generation was...

63

Structure-Activity Relationships in NH3-SCR over Cu-SSZ-13 as...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure-Activity Relationships in NH3-SCR over Cu-SSZ-13 as Probed by Reaction Kinetics and EPR Studies. Structure-Activity Relationships in NH3-SCR over Cu-SSZ-13 as Probed by...

64

EECBG Success Story: Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy EECBG Success Story: Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses...

65

NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

use by sector * cars light trucks 3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Why NH 3 -generation on TWCs? * Zeolite-based NH 3 -SCR has been shown to have very...

66

Low Temperature Milling of the LiNH2 + LiH Hydrogen Storage System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Milling of the LiNH2 + LiH Hydrogen Storage System. Low Temperature Milling of the LiNH2 + LiH Hydrogen Storage System. Abstract: Ball milling of the LiNH2 + LiH storage system was...

67

CT NC0  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

x-L* d! x-L* d! CT NC0 - i , ,. i, .' i :.:(e.!' ,A\~, L.,t, - (iI :i' , . y- 2 .L i ._ 1 c\ :- i;! Ii $ 4. Ci:lc:i.nnati. 39, t>:::i.f> (J&l3 q-1 -3 sui3 Jrn T3 FRCM .I iirz 1 ?j ~ 1.3 bL1 T:' IP !REFOI?T TC 5YC?CZCiC~ :EWllIFl;j",tsSS L' I"JIsIc:;. .:;xli3;. iCAN !fA(=;-fL,yg-j L' sc,, E. $.iCLX:i?, -iIJ,x:q()Is. ON hL4X 24 - 25 ) 1.9tic ;i. A. Quiglel;, A.3, 3, M. ChenauEt gpxrIvB OF TP.~ The purpose of t3is trip was tc observe a proposed method for the dchy- dratim of green salt md to determine that all health and safety measures were being xrried out, SurveiU.ance of this nature provided protection against excessi3z personnel exposure, insured compliance with ICC shipping regulaticns, tion of the equ'~ and determined when adequate decontamira-

68

Category:Bridgeport, CT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bridgeport, CT Bridgeport, CT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Bridgeport, CT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 64 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 63 KB SVHospital Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVHospital Bridgeport ... 71 KB SVLargeHotel Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVLargeHotel Bridgepor... 67 KB SVLargeOffice Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVLargeOffice Bridgepo... 72 KB SVMediumOffice Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVMediumOffice Bridgep...

69

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Torrington Co - CT 09  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alternate Name: Torrington Co. - Specialties Division CT.09-1 Location: Torrington , Connecticut CT.09-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.09-1 Site Operations: Performed swaging...

70

Theoretical study of the ammoniated NH/sub 4/ radical and related structures  

SciTech Connect

The ground- and some of the excited-state surfaces for the reaction of the Rydberg radical NH/sub 4/ to give either NH/sub 3/ + H or NH/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/ are computed. The preferred ground reaction channel is that observed experimentally, the formation of NH/sub 3/ + H. The Rydberg character, as well as the low barrier for fragmentation, is rationalized using a Rydberg extended-state structure correlation diagram. The excited-state surfaces show deep potential wells whose forms are also rationalized using this correlation diagram. Calculations on the surface of tetramethylammonium radical show no enhanced stability due to alkyl substitution. Comparative calculations on the complexation energies of HN/sub 4//sup +/ (NH/sub 3/)/sub n/ and NH/sub 4/(NH/sub 3/)/sub n/, n = 1-6, show the semiionic character of the Rydberg radical. The variation of stepwise complexation energies with n for the Rydberg species is not completely understood. The stability of solvated NH/sub 4/ radical in liquid NH/sub 3/ is estimated to be of the same order as (NH/sub 4//sup +/)/sub s/ + (e/sup -/)/sub s/.

Kassab, E.; Evleth, E.M.

1987-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

71

Array-type NH.sub.3 sensor  

SciTech Connect

An array-type sensor that senses NH.sub.3 includes non-Nernstian sensing elements constructed from metal and/or metal-oxide electrodes on an O.sub.2 ion conducting substrate. In one example sensor, one electrode may be made of platinum, another electrode may be made of manganese (III) oxide (Mn.sub.2O.sub.3), and another electrode may be made of tungsten trioxide (WO.sub.3). Some sensing elements may further include an electrode made of La.sub.0.6Sr.sub.0.4Co.sub.0.2Fe.sub0.8O.sub.3 and another electrode made of LaCr.sub.0.95.Mg.sub.0.05O.sub.3.

West, David Lawrence; Montgomery, Frederick Charles; Armstrong, Timothy R; Warmack, Robert J

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Radiation Exposure from CT Examinations in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Computed tomography (CT) is the largest source of medical radiation exposure to the general population, and is ... assess the current situation of CT use in Japan, and to investigate variations in radiation expos...

Yoshito Tsushima; Ayako Taketomi-Takahashi; Hiroyuki Takei

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

A review of "The Restoration: England in the 1660s." by N.H. Keeble  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

80 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS N.H. Keeble. The Restoration: England in the 1660s. History of Early Modern England series. Oxford: Blackwell, 2002. xvi + 270 pp. $34.95. Review by TY M. REESE, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA. N.H. Keeble...80 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS N.H. Keeble. The Restoration: England in the 1660s. History of Early Modern England series. Oxford: Blackwell, 2002. xvi + 270 pp. $34.95. Review by TY M. REESE, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA. N.H. Keeble...

Ty M. Reese

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Preliminary Release: April 19, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ast",20.8,44.1,34.5,19.1 "Northeast Divisions and States" "New England",5.5,12.3,9.3,3.4 "Massachusetts",2.5,5.1,3.9,1.7 "CT, ME, NH, RI, VT",3,7.2,5.4,1.8 "Mid-Atlantic",15.3,31.7...

75

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Supply Model Regions Atlantic WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA VT...

76

F-7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2014 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI...

77

F-5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supply Model Regions Atlantic WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA VT...

78

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI...

79

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2013 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI...

80

padd map  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Defense Districts AK HI WA OR CA NV AZ MT WY CO UT ID ND SD NE KS OK MO MN WI MI IL IN OH KY TN IA NM TX AR LA AL MS WV VA NC SC GA FL ME NH VT NY PA NJ MD DE MA CT RI...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vt nh ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2012 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI...

82

Microsoft Word - figure_99.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production." IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI DE DC NC SC GA FL NJ AL MS LA MO AR TX NM OK CO KS UT AZ WY NE IL IA MN WI ND SD ID MT WA OR NV CA HI AK MI Gulf...

83

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AZ OR CA HI V MT WY ID UT CO IV OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN WI MI OH NE SD MN ND II NM TX MS AL AR LA III NJ CT VT ME RI MA NH FL GA SC NC WV MD DE VA NY PA I PAD District I - East...

84

Theoretical studies of the structures and electronic properties of U(NH{sub 2}){sub 3} and Np(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}  

SciTech Connect

The electronic structure of the model compounds U(NH{sub 2}){sub 3} and Np(NH{sub 2}){sub 3} is investigated with the aid of ab initio electronic structure techniques. The electronic ground states and equilibrium geometries of these complexes are determined using multi-configuration SCF techniques. Comparisons are made to their counterparts U(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} and Np(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}.

Hay, P.J.; Martin, R.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Published by the IEEE CS n 1536-1268/08/$25.00 2008 IEEE PERVASIVE computing Education & TrainingEditor: Scott F. Midkiff n Virginia Tech n midkiff@vt.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& TrainingEditor: Scott F. Midkiff n Virginia Tech n midkiff@vt.edu As a field, computer science faces (www. scribblerrobot.com)withacustomIPRE EdITor'S InTro An exciting new initiative at Georgia Tech at midkiff@vt.edu. --Scott Midkiff QuICk FACTS Course: Computer Science 1 (CS1) Level: undergraduate

Guzdial, Mark

86

A LOW COST MULTI-BAND/MULTI-MODE RADIO FOR PUBLIC SAFETY S.M. Hasan (Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A., hasan@vt.edu); P. Balister  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A LOW COST MULTI-BAND/MULTI-MODE RADIO FOR PUBLIC SAFETY S.M. Hasan (Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A., hasan@vt.edu); P. Balister (Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A., balister@vt.edu); K. Lee

Ellingson, Steven W.

87

Hydrogen Storage Properties of New Hydrogen-Rich BH3NH3-Metal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Properties of New Hydrogen-Rich BH3NH3-Metal Hydride (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2, andor CaH2) Composite Systems. Hydrogen Storage Properties of New Hydrogen-Rich BH3NH3-Metal...

88

July 2013 GIS Workshops in Lee, NH SPACE IS LIMITED -PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 2013 GIS Workshops in Lee, NH SPACE IS LIMITED - PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED Registration://gisworkshops.org email: gis@unh.edu Presented at the NH Sea Grant Extension Offices in Lee by the UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program Workshop summary: Participants learn the basics of Geographic Information System (GIS

New Hampshire, University of

89

Futile transmembrane NH4 cycling: A cellular hypothesis to explain ammonium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 to be preferred by plants, as its assimilation requires less energy than that of NO3 (1), only with intensive agriculture and cultivation of livestock, where high levels of NH3 emission, and subsequent NH4 is exceeded by as much as 10-fold, and damage to forest and agricultural crops alike has been attributed

Britto, Dev T.

90

CT Offshore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CT Offshore CT Offshore Place Otterup, Denmark Zip 5450 Sector Wind energy Product Denmark-based consultancy which provides assistance for project management, damage assessment and stabilization as well as other activities related to wind farms and subsea maintenance. Coordinates 55.543228°, 10.40294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.543228,"lon":10.40294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

3-D agricultural air quality modeling: Impacts of NH3/H2S gasphase reactions and bi-directional exchange of NH3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Accurately simulating the transport and fate of reduced nitrogen (NHx=ammonia (NH3)+ammonium (NH4+))- and sulfur-containing compounds emitted from agricultural activities represents a major challenge in agricultural air quality modeling. In this study, the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system is further developed and improved by implementing 22 ammonia (NH3)/hydrogen sulfide (H2S) related gas-phase reactions and adjusting a few key parameters (e.g., emission potential) for bi-directional exchange of NH3 fluxes. Several simulations are conducted over the eastern U.S. domain at a 12-km horizontal resolution for January and July 2002 to examine the impacts of those improved treatments on air quality. The 5th generation mesoscale model (MM5) and CMAQ predict an overall satisfactory and consistent performance with previous modeling studies, especially for 2-m temperature, 2-m relative humidity, ozone (O3), and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). High model biases exist for precipitation in July and also dry/wet depositions. The updated model treatments contribute to O3, NHx, and PM2.5 by up to 0.4ppb, 1.0?gm?3, and 1.0?gm?3 in January, respectively, and reduce O3 by up to 0.8ppb and contribute to \\{NHx\\} and PM2.5 by up to 1.2 and 1.1?gm?3 in July, respectively. The spatial distributions of O3 in both months and sulfur dioxide (SO2) in January are mainly affected by inline dry deposition velocity calculation. The spatial distributions of SO2 and sulfate (SO42?) in July are affected by both inline dry deposition velocity and NH3/H2S reactions. The variation trends of NH3, NHx, ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), PM2.5 and total nitrogen (TN) are predominated by bi-directional exchange of NH3 fluxes. Uncertainties of NH3 emission potentials and empirical constants used in the bi-directional exchange scheme may significantly affect the concentrations of \\{NHx\\} and PM2.5, indicating that a more accurate and explicit treatment for those parameters should be considered in the future work.

Kai Wang; Yang Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Petersburg. VT/0813/BSE-90P Publication 426-125 What Is Rainwater Harvesting? Rainwater harvesting (RWH), also known as rainwater harvesting systems or cisterns, are devices that inter- cept, divert, store management practice (BMP) for treatment of urban stormwater. Because of its dual purpose and benefit, RWH

Liskiewicz, Maciej

93

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the likelihood of nitrogen loss via ammonia volatilization. In addition to gaseous losses, water percolating, Petersburg. VT/0813/CSES-52P Publication CSES-52P What Are Nitrogen Stabilizers? The recent increase in fertilizer costs, especially nitro- gen fertilizers, has resulted in technologies that may improve nitrogen

Liskiewicz, Maciej

94

APA Citation Style for a Bibliography/Works Cited Page Zerby, C. (2002). Devil's details: A history of footnotes. Montpelier, VT: Invisible  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from subscription database) May, E. R. (2005, May 23). When government writes history. New Republic, 30 ________________________________________________________________ Book Zerby, C. (2002). Devil's details: A history of footnotes. Montpelier, VT: Invisible Cities Press-129. ________________________________________________________________ Journal Article (continuous pagination, full text from subscription database) Elliott, S. N., Huai, N

Kasman, Alex

95

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Petersburg. Publication ANR-50P Introduction Family forest owners ask themselves many questions about owners ask is whether they should certify their forests. This publication can help forest owners

Liskiewicz, Maciej

96

Virginia Seafood Agricultural Research and Extension Center102SKingSt.,Hampton,VA23669757-727-4861www.arec.vaes.vt.edu/virginia-seafood Physical Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Virginia Seafood Agricultural Research and Extension Center102SKingSt.,Hampton,VA23669·757-727-4861·www.arec.vaes.vt.edu/virginia-seafood Physical Resources Land and Facilities Description Land Specialist, Muscle food safety and quality Safety and quality of seafood, beef, poultry, and pork products

Virginia Tech

97

Virginia Seafood Agricultural Research and Extension Center102SKingSt.,Hampton,VA23669757/727-4861www.arec.vaes.vt.edu/virginia-seafood Physical Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Virginia Seafood Agricultural Research and Extension Center102SKingSt.,Hampton,VA23669·757/727-4861·www.arec.vaes.vt.edu/virginia-seafood Physical Resources Land and Facilities Description Land and quality Safety and quality of seafood, beef, poultry, and pork products. HACCP and bilingual training

Liskiewicz, Maciej

98

Suggested Courses for ME Students Interested in Green Engineering Please see http://www.eng.vt.edu/green/ for information on the Green Engineering minor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for increasing efficiencies (energy storage, batteries, green building, conservation). Options for transportationSuggested Courses for ME Students Interested in Green Engineering Please see http://www.eng.vt.edu/green/ for information on the Green Engineering minor. Required Courses: ME 4015-4016 ­ Engineering Design and Project (6

Virginia Tech

99

Abstract 476: Mammary tumors in lipocalin-2 deficient MMTV-PyVT mice grow faster but show decreased metastasis to lung  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mammary tumors in lipocalin-2 deficient MMTV-PyVT mice grow faster but show decreased metastasis to lung Heiman Chow 1 Pengcheng Fan 1 Aimin Xu 1 Wen Laun Wendy Hsiao 2 Yu Wang 1 1Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacy, The University of Hong Kong...

Heiman Chow; Pengcheng Fan; Aimin Xu; Wen Laun Wendy Hsiao; Yu Wang

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF NH{sub 3} AND NH{sub 3}:N{sub 2} AMORPHOUS ICES IN THE NEAR-INFRARED AND MID-INFRARED REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia ice has been detected on different astrophysical media ranging from interstellar medium (ISM) particles to the surface of various icy bodies of our solar system, where nitrogen is also present. We have carried out a detailed study of amorphous NH{sub 3} ice and NH{sub 3}:N{sub 2} ice mixtures, based on infrared (IR) spectra in the mid-IR (MIR) and near-IR (NIR) regions, supported by theoretical quantum chemical calculations. Spectra of varying ice thicknesses were obtained and optical constants were calculated for amorphous NH{sub 3} at 15 K and 30 K and for a NH{sub 3}:N{sub 2} mixture at 15 K over a 500-7000 cm{sup 1} spectral range. These spectra have improved accuracy over previous data, where available. Moreover, we also obtained absolute values for the band strengths of the more prominent IR features in both spectral regions. Our results indicate that the estimated NH{sub 3} concentration in ISM ices should be scaled upward by ?30%.

Zanchet, Alexandre; Rodrguez-Lazcano, Yamilet; Glvez, scar; Herrero, Vctor J.; Escribano, Rafael; Mat, Beln, E-mail: belen.mate@csic.es [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vt nh ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

U.S . DEPART]\.1ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT T'....IANACiE!vtENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S S . DEPART]\.1ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT T'....IANACiE!vtENT CENTER NEPA DETERl\HNATION RECI PI ENT:Amonix, Inc. STATE: CA PROJECT Low Cost High Concentration Photovoltaic Power Systems for Utility Power Generation - Sandia site TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-PS36-06G 096034 DE-FC36-07G017042 GFO-G017042-006 G017042 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as N EPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1 A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation , and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

102

Simulation of an Ar/NH{sub 3} low pressure magnetized direct current discharge  

SciTech Connect

A two-dimensional fluid model has been used to investigate the properties of plasma in an Ar/NH{sub 3} low pressure magnetized direct current discharge. We compared the simulation results with the theoretical and experimental results of the other gas discharge in which the magnetic field is considered. Results that obtained using this method are in good agreement with literature. The simulation results show that the positive ammonia ion density follows the positive argon ion density. The Ar{sub 2}{sup +} density is slightly higher than the Ar{sup +} density at 100 mTorr. The largest ammonia ion is NH{sub 3}{sup +} ion, followed by NH{sub 2}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, and NH{sup +} ions. The contribution of NH{sup +} ions to the density of the positive ammonia ions is marginal. The influence of pressure on the plasma discharge has been studied by simulation, and the mechanisms have been discussed. The average plasma density increases as pressure increased. The plasma density appears to be more inhomogeneous than that at the lower pressure. The ratio of charge particles changed as pressure increased. The Ar{sup +} density is slightly higher than the Ar{sub 2}{sup +} density as the pressure increased. It makes NH{sub 4}{sup +} ratio increase as pressure increased. It shows that the electron temperature drops with rising pressure by numerical calculation.

Li Zhi [School of Science, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao Zhen [School of Chemistry and Life Science, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114007 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); Li Xuehui [Physiccal Science and Technical College, Dalian University, Dalian 116622 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Global distributions, time series and error characterization of atmospheric ammonia (NH[subscript 3]) from IASI satellite observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ammonia (NH[subscript 3]) emissions in the atmosphere have increased substantially over the past decades, largely because of intensive livestock production and use of fertilizers. As a short-lived species, NH[subscript 3] ...

Van Damme, M.

104

Dental CT: A New Diagnostic Tool in Dental Radiology Based on Double Spiral CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the beginning of 1990, dental computed tomography (CT) software program was developed which offers the possibility of reconstructing panoramic and transaxial images of the maxilla and the mandible from CT d...

U. Hirschfelder; H. Hirschfelder; J. Regn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

MISE EN VIDENCE D'UN ORDRE A COURTE DISTANCE DANS LA PHASE II DES CRISTAUX DE NH4Cl,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

respectivement au point tricritique et au point de transition phase II - phase IV pour les cristaux de NH4Cl. Phase IV : phase cubique ordonnée ; tous les ions NH4 sont dans la configuration 1. Phase II : phase configuration 2. Phase III : phase tétragonale ordonnée ; les ions NH4 sont alternativement dans la

Boyer, Edmond

106

Consequences of Substituting 2NH2A for a in Synthetic DNAS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical and spectroscopic consequences of replacing A with 2NH2A have been examined in a variety of synthetic DNAs. This substitution, which permits formation...m elevation, however, is much smaller in the deox...

Frank B. Howard; H. Todd Miles

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

formulations and operation for the in-situ generation of NH3, storage on a downstream SCR catalyst, and utilized to reduce the remaining NOx deer12toops.pdf More Documents &...

108

Volume 130, number 6 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 24 October1986 VIBRATIONAL DEPENDENCE OF THE NH,+ (v2)+NO AND NO+(v) +NH,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volume 130, number 6 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 24 October1986 VIBRATIONAL DEPENDENCE OF THE NH,+ (v2 of an electron by the ion as it passes by its neutral collision partner. Such so-called charge transfer reactions reactions would suggest a fast rate controlled by the Langevin capture cross section [ 61. This in turn

Zare, Richard N.

109

Limited View Angle Iterative CT Reconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Some Prior Literature in Limited View Tomography CT with limited-angle data and few views IRR algorithm Iterative Reconstruction-Reprojection (IRR) : An Algorithm for Limited Data Cardiac- Computed-views and limited-angle data in divergent-beam CT by E. Y. Sidky, CM Kao, and X. Pan (2006) Few-View Projection

110

CT Solar Loan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CT Solar Loan CT Solar Loan CT Solar Loan < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Connecticut Program Type State Loan Program Provider Sungage, Inc. The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered through Sungage. Interested residents must apply online to be pre-qualified for the loan. Once the loan is in place, an approved installer files permits, order equipment, and installs the system on behalf of the resident. See the program web site for application materials. Source http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CT101F

111

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New England Lime Co - CT...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: NELCO (Magnesium Division) CT.10-1 Location: Canaan , Connecticut CT.10-2 Evaluation Year: 1987...

112

Addition of NH{sub 3} to Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}  

SciTech Connect

Recent computational studies on the addition of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) to the Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} cluster anion [A. Guevara-Garcia, A. Martinez, and J. V. Ortiz, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 214309 (2005)] have motivated experimental and additional computational studies, reported here. Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} is observed to react with a single NH{sub 3} molecule to form the Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}NH{sub 3}{sup -} ion in mass spectrometric studies. This is in contrast to similarly performed studies with water, in which the Al{sub 3}O{sub 5}H{sub 4}{sup -} product was highly favored. However, the anion PE spectrum of the ammoniated species is very similar to that of Al{sub 3}O{sub 4}H{sub 2}{sup -}. The adiabatic electron affinity of Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}NH{sub 3} is determined to be 2.35(5) eV. Based on comparison between the spectra and calculated electron affinities, it appears that NH{sub 3} adds dissociatively to Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}, suggesting that the time for the Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}{center_dot}NH{sub 3} complex to either overcome or tunnel through the barrier to proton transfer (which is higher for NH{sub 3} than for water) is short relative to the time for collisional cooling in the experiment.

Wyrwas, Richard B.; Jarrold, Caroline Chick; Das, Ujjal; Raghavachari, Krishnan [Indiana University, Department of Chemistry, Bloomington, Indiana 47405-7102 (United States)

2006-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

113

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area (Redirected from New York Area - NY NJ CT PA) Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

114

A Nonparametrized Ab Initio Determination of the Heat of Formation of Hydroxylamine, NH2OH  

SciTech Connect

Large basis set coupled cluster calculations through noniterative triple excitations were used to compute optimized structures, harmonic vibrational frequencies, atomization energies at 0 K and heats of formation at 298 K for hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and three related compounds (NH3, HNO and H2O2). The use of basis sets as large as augmented sextuple zeta resulted in small extrapolations to the complete basis set limit in order to achieve chemical accuracy ( 1 kcal/mol) in the thermodynamic properties. Complete basis set estimates were determined from several simple extrapolation formulas. In addition, four other corrections were applied to the frozen core atomization energies, (1) a zero point vibrational correction: (2) a core/valence correlation correction; (3) a Douglas-Kroll-Hess scalar relativistic correction; and (4) a first order atomic spin-orbit correction. For NH3 and HNO we incorporated a fifth correction term intended to approximate the difference between coupled cluster theory and the full configuration interact result. This correction was based on coupled cluster theory through iterative quadruple excitations (CCSDTQ). Excellent agreement with experiment was found for the heats of formation of NH3, HNO and H2O2. For NH2OH the best current estimate of the heat of formation at 298 K is 10.1 0.3 kcal/mol, which falls roughly midway between two experimental values at 12.0 2.4 and 7.9 1.5 kcal/mol.

Feller, David F.; Dixon, David A.

2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

115

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all while conserving energy. In all, the state has received $17.3 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Of that, $9.6 million has been sent to the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning (NHOEP) to launch several energy saving projects. NHOEP established a subgrant program to award $6.6 million of the EECBG grant funding to local municipalities and counties. New Hampshire municipalities and counties submitted over 270 applications, totaling over $21 million in grant requests. "Substantial energy efficiency improvements will be made throughout the

116

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all while conserving energy. In all, the state has received $17.3 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Of that, $9.6 million has been sent to the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning (NHOEP) to launch several energy saving projects. NHOEP established a subgrant program to award $6.6 million of the EECBG grant funding to local municipalities and counties. New Hampshire municipalities and counties submitted over 270 applications, totaling over $21 million in grant requests. "Substantial energy efficiency improvements will be made throughout the

117

A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH  

SciTech Connect

The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

R. W. Swindeman

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

118

Superionicity in the hydrogen storage material Li2NH: Molecular dynamics simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have employed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations in an attempt to study a temperature-induced order-disorder structural phase transformation that occurs in Li2NH at about 385 K. A structural phase transition was observed by us in the temperature range 300400 K, in good agreement with experiment. This transition is associated with a melting of the cation sublattice (Li+), giving rise to a superionic phase, which in turn is accompanied by an order-disorder transition of the N-H bond orientation. The results obtained here can contribute to a better understanding of the hydrogen storage reactions involving Li2NH and furthermore broaden its possible technological applications toward batteries and fuel cells.

C. Moyss Arajo; Andreas Blomqvist; Ralph H. Scheicher; Ping Chen; Rajeev Ahuja

2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

119

Efficient chemical regeneration of LiBH4NH3 spent fuel for hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The absence of an efficient method for the regeneration of ammine metal borohydrides (M(BH4)nxNH3, AMBs) from their dehydrogenated products has hindered their potential application as hydrogen storage materials. In this paper, we demonstrate a high-yield chemical regeneration of LiBH4NH3 based on a three step process (digestion (H+ addition), reduction (H? addition), and ammonia complexation) at ambient temperature. Our results demonstrated that LiBN polymer was digested by methanol to form LiB(OCH3)4, which can be converted into LiBH4 by using LiAlH4 in the reduction process. The generation of LiBH4NH3 in ammonia complexion step was achieved by exposing the obtained LiBH4 in an ammonia atmosphere.

Yingbin Tan; Xiaowei Chen; Guanglin Xia; Xuebin Yu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Brass Co - CT 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Brass Co - CT 01 Brass Co - CT 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Brass Co (CT.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Anaconda Company Brass Division CT.01-1 Location: 414 Meadow Street , Waterbury , Connecticut CT.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 CT.01-2 Site Operations: Limited work with copper clad uranium billets during the 1950s. CT.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based upon the limited scope of activities at the site CT.01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.01-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - health and safety monitoring during operations only CT.01-3 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vt nh ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11 Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fenn Machinery Co. (CT.11 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Britain , Connecticut CT.11-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.11-1 Site Operations: Performed short-term tests on small quantities of uranium metal to explore potential for swaging, circa mid-1950 CT.11-1 CT.11-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope of activities and relatively small quantities of radioactive material used CT.11-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.11-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP CT.11-2

122

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

123

Polymorphism and optical properties in [NH{sub 4}][InSe{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

The solvothermal synthesis and characterization of two indium selenides with stoichiometry [NH{sub 4}][InSe{sub 2}] is described. Yellow [NH{sub 4}][InSe{sub 2}] (1), which exhibits a layered structure, was initially prepared in an aqueous solution of trans-1,4-diaminocyclohexane, and subsequently using a concentrated ammonia solution. A red polymorph of one-dimensional character, [NH{sub 4}][InSe{sub 2}] (2), was obtained using 3,5-dimethylpyridine as solvent. [NH{sub 4}][InSe{sub 2}] (1) crystallizes in the non-centrosymmetric space group Cc (a=11.5147(6), b=11.3242(6), c=15.9969(9) and ?=100.354(3)). The structural motif of the layers is the In{sub 4}Se{sub 10} adamantane unit, composed of four corner-linked InSe{sub 4} tetrahedra. These units are linked by their corners, forming [InSe{sub 2}]{sup ?} layers which are stacked back to back along the c-direction, and interspaced by [NH{sub 4}]{sup +}cations. The one-dimensional polymorph, (2), crystallizes in the tetragonal space group, I4/mcm (a=8.2519(16), c=6.9059 (14) ). This structure contains infinite chains of edge-sharing InSe{sub 4} tetrahedra separated by [NH{sub 4}]{sup +} cations. - Graphical abstract: Two polymorphic forms of [NH{sub 4}][InSe{sub 2}], which are yellow and red, have been prepared and their optical properties investigated. Highlights: Two new indium selenides prepared by a solvothermal method. Depending on synthesis conditions, two polymorphic forms of [NH{sub 4}][InSe{sub 2}] prepared. Layered polymorph contains In{sub 4}Se{sub 10} adamantane clusters, linked by their corners. One-dimensional polymorph contains [InSe{sub 2}]{sup ?} chains of edge-sharing tetrahedra. Non-centrosymmetric layered polymorph shows a second harmonic generation response.

Ewing, Sarah J. [Institute of Chemical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, Scotland EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Woodward, David I. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Powell, Anthony V. [Institute of Chemical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, Scotland EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Vaqueiro, Paz, E-mail: P.Vaqueiro-Rodriguez@hw.ac.uk [Institute of Chemical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, Scotland EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Measurement of Hyperfine Structure in the Infrared Rotation-Vibration Spectrum of NH-  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hyperfine structure (hfs) has been observed in the P, Q, and R branches of the fundamental rotation-vibration spectrum of the X?2 electronic state of the molecular anion NH-. A coaxial ion-beam-laser-beam spectrometer is employed in which rotation-vibration transitions are induced by a color-center laser operating near 3000 cm-1. The vibrationally excited ions autodetach, and the fast neutral NH is detected. The structure has been analyzed and the magnetic dipole hfs parameters obtained in both N14H- and N15H-. This is the first analyzed case of hfs in any molecular anion.

Harold C. Miller; Mohammad Al-Za'al; John W. Farley

1987-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

125

Vol. 92 Concord, NH, Wednesday, November 6, 2013 No. 37 Weekly Market Bulletin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to recruit new members and future customers for the full-service cooperative grocery store the group plans sustainability. The cooperative- ly owned business "strives to serve the North Country of New HampshireVol. 92 Concord, NH, Wednesday, November 6, 2013 No. 37 Weekly Market Bulletin State of New

New Hampshire, University of

126

Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

levels 10 PSI laboratory test apparatus Computer FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC N 2 O 2 NO NH 3 TIC TIC TI MCT Detector TI TIC N 2 TI IR Source 2 3 4 3 3 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 heated gas line...

127

March 2012 GIS Workshops in Concord, NH SPACE IS LIMITED -PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2012 GIS Workshops in Concord, NH SPACE IS LIMITED - PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. phone: 603.862.1029 web: http://gisworkshops.org email: gis@unh.edu GIS 101: Learning to Map in the Digital Age March 27th, 9am to noon Topics covered: basic GIS concepts types of GIS data types of GIS

New Hampshire, University of

128

May 2012 GIS Workshops in Plymouth, NH SPACE IS LIMITED -PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 2012 GIS Workshops in Plymouth, NH SPACE IS LIMITED - PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED Registration. phone: 603.862.1029 web: http://gisworkshops.org email: gis@unh.edu GIS 101: Learning to Map in the Digital Age May 10, 9am to noon Topics covered: basic GIS concepts types of GIS data types of GIS software

New Hampshire, University of

129

April 2012 GIS Workshops in Conway, NH SPACE IS LIMITED -PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

April 2012 GIS Workshops in Conway, NH SPACE IS LIMITED - PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED Registration.862.1029 web: http://gisworkshops.org email: gis@unh.edu GIS 101: Learning to Map in the Digital Age April 18, 9am to noon Topics covered: basic GIS concepts types of GIS data types of GIS software $49 Skill

New Hampshire, University of

130

January 2012 GIS Workshops in Durham, NH SPACE IS LIMITED -PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

January 2012 GIS Workshops in Durham, NH SPACE IS LIMITED - PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.862.1029 web: http://gisworkshops.org email: gis@unh.edu GIS 101: Learning to Map in the Digital Age January 10th, 9am to noon Topics covered: basic GIS concepts types of GIS data types of GIS software $49 Skill

New Hampshire, University of

131

June 2013 GIS Workshops in Plymouth, NH SPACE IS LIMITED -PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

June 2013 GIS Workshops in Plymouth, NH SPACE IS LIMITED - PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. phone: 603.862.1029 web: http://gisworkshops.org email: gis@unh.edu Presented at the Whole Village: Participants learn the basics of Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping software and explore a variety

New Hampshire, University of

132

Intramolecular electron transfer in mixed-valence complexes [(NH3)5Ru-L-Ru(NH3)5]5+ (L = N2, pyz, pym, 4,4?-bipy, bpa)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamics of the intramolecular electron transfer from Ru(II) to Ru(III) in binuclear mixedvalence complexes [(NH3)5Ru-L- Ru(NH3)5]5+ (L = N2,pyz, bipy, pym, bpa) is analyzed by the semiempirical CINDO +...

O. V. Sizova; V. I. Baranovskii; A. I. Panin

133

Intramolecular electron transfer in mixed-valence complexes [(NH3)5Ru-L-Ru(NH3)5]5+ (L = N2, pyz, pym, 4,4-bipy, bpa)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamics of the intramolecular electron transfer from Ru(II) to Ru(III) in binuclear mixed-valence complexes [NH3)5Ru -L-Ru(NH3)5]5+ (L = N2, pyz, bipy, pym, bpa) is analyzed by the semiempiri...

O. V. Sizova; V. I. Baranovskii; A. I. Panin

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sperry Products Inc - CT 07  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sperry Products Inc - CT 07 Sperry Products Inc - CT 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SPERRY PRODUCTS, INC. (CT.07) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Danbury , Connecticut CT.07-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 CT.07-2 Site Operations: Performed tests involving non-destructive inspection techniques in the 1950s. CT.07-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited scope of activities performed at the site CT.07-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.07-3 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to SPERRY PRODUCTS, INC. CT.07-1 - Sperry Products Letter; VanValkenburg to DeRenzis;

135

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Cyanamid Co - CT 13  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cyanamid Co - CT 13 Cyanamid Co - CT 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Cyanamid Co (CT.13 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Stamford , Connecticut CT.13-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.13-1 Site Operations: Produced boron and possibly handled small amounts of refined radioactive source material circa 1940's. Also possibly performed research work on irradiated "J" slugs in 1952 and 1953. CT.13-1 CT.13-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited scope of activities involving radioactive material performed at this site CT.13-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.13-1 Radiological Survey(s): No

136

Presented in Concord, Merrimack and West Lebanon, NH by the UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program ArcGIS Workshops Fall 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drivers Permit 10 1-day, 9am to 4pm To be announced Topics covered: ArcGIS 10 Exploring GIS maps Basic GIS Lebanon, NH December 4-6, Merrimack, NH Topics covered: ArcGIS 10 Creating GIS maps GIS techniques GIS and applications, participants learn how to use ArcGIS 10 to produce effective maps, edit and create GIS data

New Hampshire, University of

137

CHNG 5 CHNG TRNH KHI PHC SM XUT: PHT TRIN V NH GI CC GII PHP ...............................................................................................................................................................1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lng Môi Trng(CEQ) v vic thc hin Chính Sách Lut Môi Trng Quc Gia (NEPA) cng hng dn các t chc nghiên cu hp lý nu áp ng c mc tiêu và yêu cu ra, khôi phc hoc làm tng cht lng môi trng nhân sinh, và phòng tránh hoc gim thiu các hiu ng tiêu cc t hành ng ca các t chc ti cht lng môi trng nhân sinh (40 C

138

LONG-TERM COMPONENTS OF RISK PRICES1 Lars Peter Hansen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an important line of research on recursive preferences that pushed beyond the additive discounted utility framework. References: Stationary Ordinal Utility and Impatience - Econometrica 1960 Stationary Utility UTILITY Utility representation: Vt = [U(Ct), Vt+1] as a generalization of Vt = U(Ct) + Vt+1 where Ct

Hansen, Lars Peter

139

Trapping volumetric measurement by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Effect of CT threshold  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various computed tomography (CT) thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Methods: Twenty-three COPD patients were scanned with a 64-slice CT scanner in both the inspiratory and expiratory phase. CT thresholds of ?950 Hu in inspiration and ?950 to ?890 Hu in expiration were used, after which trapping volumetric measurements were made using computer software. Trapping volume percentage (Vtrap%) under the different CT thresholds in the expiratory phase and below ?950 Hu in the inspiratory phase was compared and correlated with lung function.Results: Mean Vtrap% was similar under ?930 Hu in the expiratory phase and below ?950 Hu in the inspiratory phase, being 13.18 9.66 and 13.95 6.72 (both lungs), respectively; this difference was not significant (P= 0.240). Vtrap% under ?950 Hu in the inspiratory phase and below the ?950 to ?890 Hu threshold in the expiratory phase was moderately negatively correlated with the ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity and the measured value of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percentage of the predicted value.Conclusions: Trapping volumetric measurement with multidetector CT is a promising method for the quantification of COPD. It is important to know the effect of various CT thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements.

Wang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Huishu [Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China)] [Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China); Duan, Jianghui [Medical School, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China)] [Medical School, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Du, Yipeng; Shen, Ning; He, Bei [Department of Respiration Internal Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China)] [Department of Respiration Internal Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wesleyan University - CT 12  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wesleyan University - CT 12 Wesleyan University - CT 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Wesleyan University (CT.12 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Middletown , Connecticut CT.12-1 Evaluation Year: 1995 CT.12-2 Site Operations: Spectrographic research on small quantities of uranium wire (several inches in length) in Physics Department circa late 1950. CT.12-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited scope of activities performed CT.12-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.12-1 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Wesleyan University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vt nh ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Effect of magnetic reconnection on CT penetration into magnetized plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To understand the fuelling process in a fusion device by a compact toroid (CT) injection method, three dimensional MHD numerical simulations, where a spheromak-like CT (SCT) is injected into...

Yoshio Suzuki; Takaya Hayashi; Yasuaki Kishimoto

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Canaan Site - CT 08  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Canaan , Connecticut CT.08-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 CT.08-2 Site Operations: None; Investigation of area...

143

General Working Principles of CH3NH3PbX3 Perovskite Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

General Working Principles of CH3NH3PbX3 Perovskite Solar Cells ... Organometal halide perovskite-based solar cells have recently realized large conversion efficiency over 15% showing great promise for a new large scale cost-competitive photovoltaic technology. ... Using impedance spectroscopy measurements we are able to separate the physical parameters of carrier transport and recombination in working devices of the two principal morphologies and compositions of perovskite solar cells, viz. ...

Victoria Gonzalez-Pedro; Emilio J. Juarez-Perez; Waode-Sukmawati Arsyad; Eva M. Barea; Francisco Fabregat-Santiago; Ivan Mora-Sero; Juan Bisquert

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

144

General Geometry CT Reconstruction Alexei Ramotar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, reconstruction, Filtered Back Projection Submitted to IPCV'06 Abstract We present an efficient and accurate acquired by a parallel-beam CT scanner. Once in that form, Filtered Back Projection can be used to perform technology that uses many small x-ray images to reconstruct a view of the internal structures of an object

Orchard, Jeffery J.

145

RADIATION EXPOSURE DURING PAEDIATRIC CT IN SUDAN: CT DOSE, ORGAN AND EFFECTIVE DOSES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Paper RADIATION EXPOSURE DURING PAEDIATRIC...Energy Commission, Radiation Safety Institute, PO Box 3001...assess the magnitude of radiation exposure during paediatric...CT-Expo 2.1 dosimetry software. Doses were evaluated......

I. I. Suliman; H. M. Khamis; T. H. Ombada; K. Alzimami; M. Alkhorayef; A. Sulieman

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Figure F7. Coal Demand Regions CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT...

147

Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative {sup 99m}Tc SPECT/CT imaging  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (?) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (? ? 200400 HU) resulted in low ?-maps noise (? ? 1%3%). Noise levels greater than ?10% in 140 keV ?-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ?15% in {sup 99m}Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 4 ?Gy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected ? values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in ?. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ?100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in ?{sub 140} {sub keV} on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ?10% into the reconstructed {sup 99m}Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because CT dose levels that affect SPECT quantification is low (CTDI{sub vol} ? 4 ?Gy), the low dose limit for the CT exam as part of SPECT/CT will be guided by CT image quality requirements for anatomical localization and artifact reduction. A CT technique with higher kVp in combination with lower mAs is recommended when low-dose CT images are used for AC to minimize beam-hardening artifacts.

Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C., E-mail: skappadath@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions in a Commercial Small Port Cu Zeolite Urea SCR Catalyst  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A modified Spaci-IR technique can measure transient NH3 and NOx concentrations; data have been used to calibrate and validate an SCR model, with good agreement between experiments and simulations.

149

SPECTROSCOPIC INVESTIGATION OF (NH4)2S TREATED GaSeTe FOR RADIATION DETECTOR APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The surface of the layered III-VI chalcogenide semiconductor GaSeTe was treated with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S at 60 C to modify the surface chemistry and determine the effect on transport properties. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements were used to assess the effect of the (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S treatment on surface defect states. Evaluation of the subsequent surface chemistry was performed with high-resolution core-level photoemission measurements. Metal overlayers were deposited on the (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S treated surfaces and the I-V characteristics were measured. The measurements were correlated to understand the effect of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S modification of the interfacial electronic structure with the goal of optimizing the metal/GaSeTe interface for radiation detector devices.

Nelson, A; Laurence, T; Conway, A; Behymer, E; Sturm, B; Voss, L; Nikolic, R; Payne, S; Mertiri, A; Pabst, G; Mandal, K; Burger, A

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

150

CT volumetry of the skeletal tissues  

SciTech Connect

Computed tomography (CT) is an important and widely used modality in the diagnosis and treatment of various cancers. In the field of molecular radiotherapy, the use of spongiosa volume (combined tissues of the bone marrow and bone trabeculae) has been suggested as a means to improve the patient-specificity of bone marrow dose estimates. The noninvasive estimation of an organ volume comes with some degree of error or variation from the true organ volume. The present study explores the ability to obtain estimates of spongiosa volume or its surrogate via manual image segmentation. The variation among different segmentation raters was explored and found not to be statistically significant (p value >0.05). Accuracy was assessed by having several raters manually segment a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe with known volumes. Segmentation of the outer region of the PVC pipe resulted in mean percent errors as great as 15% while segmentation of the pipe's inner region resulted in mean percent errors within {approx}5%. Differences between volumes estimated with the high-resolution CT data set (typical of ex vivo skeletal scans) and the low-resolution CT data set (typical of in vivo skeletal scans) were also explored using both patient CT images and a PVC pipe phantom. While a statistically significant difference (p value <0.002) between the high-resolution and low-resolution data sets was observed with excised femoral heads obtained following total hip arthroplasty, the mean difference between high-resolution and low-resolution data sets was found to be only 1.24 and 2.18 cm{sup 3} for spongiosa and cortical bone, respectively. With respect to differences observed with the PVC pipe, the variation between the high-resolution and low-resolution mean percent errors was a high as {approx}20% for the outer region volume estimates and only as high as {approx}6% for the inner region volume estimates. The findings from this study suggest that manual segmentation is a reasonably accurate and reliable means for the in vivo estimation of spongiosa volume. This work also provides a foundation for future studies where spongiosa volumes are estimated by various raters in more comprehensive CT data sets.

Brindle, James M.; Alexandre Trindade, A.; Pichardo, Jose C.; Myers, Scott L.; Shah, Amish P.; Bolch, Wesley E. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Statistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); MD Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida 32806 (United States); Department of Nuclear and Radiological and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Diffusive and rotational dynamics of condensed n-H2 confined in MCM-41  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we report an inelastic neutron scattering study of liquid and solid n-H2 confined within MCM-41. This is a high surface area, mesoporous silica glass with a narrow pore size distribution centered at 3.5 nm. The scattering data provides information about the diffusive and rotational dynamics of the adsorbed n-H2 at low temperatures. In the liquid state, the neutron scattering data demonstrates that only a fraction of the adsorbed o-H2 is mobile on the picosecond time scale. This mobile fraction undergoes liquid-like jump diffusion, and values for the residence time t and effective mean-squared displacement hu2i are reported as a function of pore filling. In the solid state, the rotational energy levels of adsorbed H2 are strongly perturbed from their free quantum rotor behavior in the bulk solid. The underlying orientational potential of the hindered rotors is due to the surface roughness and heterogeneity of the MCM-41 pore walls. This potential is compared to the hindering potential of other porous silicas, such as Vycor. Strong selective adsorption makes the interfacial layer rich in o-H2, leaving the inner core volume consisting of a depleted mixture of o-H2 and p-H2.

Prisk, Timothy R [ORNL; Bryan, Matthew [Indiana University; Sokol, Paul E [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dorr Corp - CT 14  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Operations: Conducted heat treatment tests of source material using depleted uranium in an enclosed calciner CT.14-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - AEC...

153

Computed Tomography (CT) Scanning For Petrophysical Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D Fac R&D Fac ts Carbon Sequestration ContaCtS David Wildman Division Director Geosciences Division National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4913 david.wildman@netl.doe.gov T. Robert McLendon Geosciences Division National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-2008 t.mclen@netl.doe.gov Duane H. Smith Geosciences Division

154

CT-121_cover.p65  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INNOVATIVE APPLICATIONS INNOVATIVE APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY FOR THE CT-121 FGD PROCESS PROJECT PERFORMANCE SUMMARY CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM AUGUST 2002 SOUTHERN COMPANY SERVICES, INC. DOE/FE-0449 Disclaimer This report was prepared using publicly available information, including the Final Technical Report and other reports prepared pursuant to a cooperative agreement partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Neither the United States Government nor any agency, employee, contractor, or representative thereof, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe upon privately

155

Explosive Detection in Aviation Applications Using CT  

SciTech Connect

CT scanners are deployed world-wide to detect explosives in checked and carry-on baggage. Though very similar to single- and dual-energy multi-slice CT scanners used today in medical imaging, some recently developed explosives detection scanners employ multiple sources and detector arrays to eliminate mechanical rotation of a gantry, photon counting detectors for spectral imaging, and limited number of views to reduce cost. For each bag scanned, the resulting reconstructed images are first processed by automated threat recognition algorithms to screen for explosives and other threats. Human operators review the images only when these automated algorithms report the presence of possible threats. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has requirements for future scanners that include dealing with a larger number of threats, higher probability of detection, lower false alarm rates and lower operating costs. One tactic that DHS is pursuing to achieve these requirements is to augment the capabilities of the established security vendors with third-party algorithm developers. A third-party in this context refers to academics and companies other than the established vendors. DHS is particularly interested in exploring the model that has been used very successfully by the medical imaging industry, in which university researchers develop algorithms that are eventually deployed in commercial medical imaging equipment. The purpose of this paper is to discuss opportunities for third-parties to develop advanced reconstruction and threat detection algorithms.

Martz, H E; Crawford, C R

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Two-photon optical pumping of NH/sub 3/ in a multipass cell  

SciTech Connect

A multipass cell was used in optical pumping of ammonia molecules by CO/sub 2/ laser radiation. Several new lasing lines were observed in the case of two-photon optical pumping of the NH/sub 3/ molecule at wavelengths in the range 16--35 ..mu... The output power of the various lines was in the range 10--50 kW. The divergence of the resultant radiation was diffraction-limited. A theoretical study was made of the two-photon pumping process. A stable (on the frequency scale) maximum was found in the gain profile of the output radiation. It was concluded that it should be possible to increase the energy and extend the emission spectrum of an ammonia laser pumped by double-photon absorption.

Bobrovskii, A.N.; Kiselev, V.P.; Kozhevnikov, A.V.; Likhanskii, V.V.; Mishchenko, V.A.; Myl'nikov, G.D.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Trends of CT Utilization in North America Over the Last Decade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given the improvements in technology and usefulness of CT for diagnosis and therapeutic-planning, the growth in CT utilization is not surprising. Current estimates are that more than 85 million CT scans are pe...

Lauren M. B. Burke; Richard C. Semelka; Rebecca Smith-Bindman

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Radiation Protection in Newer Medical Imaging Technologies: PET/CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......58 timely. Safety Report Series...challenging topic of Radiation Exposure of...of various software packages is...and age. To Safety Report Series...CT dosimetry software site impactscan...its June 2006 software version fade...Management of Radiation Dose in CT...Section 5 of Safety Report Series......

Dawn Banghart

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

CT Poison Control Center 2014 Video Contest Rules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

entry form (found on posioncontrol.uchc.edu) b. Include a link to your video from your You Tube account and community partners. Judges will consider: length of video, appropriate format, accuracy of information poison center means to you, value of the CT Poison Control Center · Programming your phone with the CT

Kim, Duck O.

160

On recent claims concerning the Rh=ct Universe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......density rho. One-on-one comparative tests between R h-=-ct and lambdaCDM have...corollary (see also Weinberg 1972). To test whether in fact the EOS p-=-rho/3...carried out an extensive suite of comparative tests using lambdaCDM and R h-=-ct, together......

Fulvio Melia

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vt nh ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Measuring and segmentation in CT data using deformable Vclav Krajcek  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tomography (CT). We take advantage of long-time research in the area of deformable models. We have developed Snakes, CT, Medical Segmentation, Volume Measurement. 1 INTRODUCTION Computed tomography is a common tool, that temperature of healthy body is about 36,5 C. Higher temperature means that body is fighting with an illness

Pelikan, Josef

162

MicroCT: Semi-Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI  

SciTech Connect

This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to R and D work - for production applications, use [4].

Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

MicroCT: Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI  

SciTech Connect

This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to production work - for R and D there are two other semi-automated methods as given in [4, 5].

Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

164

Pediatric CT scan usage in Japan: results of a hospital survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CT radiation dose settings are adjusted for children based on guidelines issued by the Japan Radiological Society, with few limitations. CT...

Nader Ghotbi; Akira Ohtsuru; Yoji Ogawa; Mariko Morishita

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

E-Print Network 3.0 - angiographic cone-beam ct Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: medical multi-slicecone-beam CT scanners typically use equiangular projection data, our new formula may... : Computed tomography (CT), cone-beam geometry, Feldkamp-type...

166

Microsoft Word - Ct121R1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Applications Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD Process A DOE Assessment DOE/NETL-2002/1177 September 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 West Third Street, Suite 1400 Tulsa, OK 74103-3519 website: www.netl.doe.gov 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

167

CT113-53 Cape Wind Report_  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M M Report of the Effect on Radar Performance of the Proposed Cape Wind Project and Advance Copy of USCG Findings and Mitigation U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS Cape Wind Energy Project January 2009 Final EIS Appendix M Report of the Effect on Radar Performance of the Proposed Cape Wind Project and Advance Copy of USCG Findings and Mitigation Technology Service Corporation an employee-owned company 55 Corporate Drive 3rd Floor, Trumbull, Connecticut 06611 Phone: (203) 268-1249 Fax: (203) 452-0260 www.tsc.com Ref: TSC-CT113-53 Report of the Effect on Radar Performance of the Proposed Cape Wind Project Submitted to the United States Coast Guard December 16, 2008 USCG Order #HSCG24-08-F-16A248

168

CT Solar Loan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Loan Solar Loan No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Summary Last modified on March 29, 2013. Financial Incentive Program Place Connecticut Name CT Solar Loan Incentive Type State Loan Program Applicable Sector Multi-Family Residential, Residential Eligible Technologies Photovoltaics Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector State/Territory Energy Category Renewable Energy Incentive Programs Terms 15 years Program Administrator The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority Website http://www.energizect.com/residents/programs/ctsolarloan Last DSIRE Review 03/29/2013 References Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency[1] Summary The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan

169

Closed-loop control of a SCR system using a NOx sensor cross-sensitive to NH3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Closed-loop control of a SCR system using a NOx sensor cross-sensitive to NH3 A.Bonfils , Y. Creff for an automotive selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system, for which the feedback is based on a NOx sensor the variety of en- countered technologies, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is one of the most appealing

170

Adapted from laboratory protocols of the Center for Freshwater Biology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, N.H. 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Durham, N.H. 2010 UNH CFB Protocol for the Monitoring of Cyanobacteria & Microcystins in Drinking Water delivery to UNH CFB lab. 5. Freeze the sample if delivery/ drop-off time exceeds 12 hours. Analyses: a, Quantiplate-ELISA Kit, (Portland, Me) with increased sensitivity (UNH, CFB). Results will be reported as ng

New Hampshire, University of

171

Effects of \\{NH4Cl\\} and MgCl2 on pretreatment and xylan hydrolysis of miscanthus straw  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigated the effects of \\{NH4Cl\\} and MgCl2 on pretreatment and xylan hydrolysis of miscanthus straw for biofuels production. It was observed that increasing the pretreatment temperature decreased the remaining solid, increased the enzymatic digestibility, and increased the xylan removal. When 0.25.0% \\{NH4Cl\\} and MgCl2 were employed in pretreatments, increasing the inorganic salt concentration slightly diminished the remaining solid, though the enzymatic digestibility was enhanced. Under the higher-than-2% condition, no xylan remained in the solid residues after pretreatment. With pretreatment time, the remaining solid slightly decreased, but the enzymatic digestibility was increased. Moreover, xylan removal was linearly increased to 15min, after which it was completely hydrolyzed. Overall, these results indicated that pretreatment by 2% \\{NH4Cl\\} or MgCl2 at 185C for 15min completely hydrolyzes the xylan of miscanthus straw. In scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, the physical surface of the miscanthus straw showed an apparently damaged surface area and exposure of the internal structure after pretreatment with \\{NH4Cl\\} and MgCl2 by SEM.

Kyeong Eop Kang; Don-Hee Park; Gwi-Taek Jeong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Coal ash as an absorbent to remove SO2, and its activity change in NO?NH3 reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After being activated with NaOH aqueous solution, coal ash showed a maximal sorption capacity of about...3 SO2/g ash. Catalytic activity of coal ash for the NO?NH3 reaction was gradually depressed by the presence...

F. Nozaki; O. Watanabe; T. Sodesawa

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Presented in Lee and Concord, NH by the UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program ArcGIS Workshops Winter 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 9am to 4pm January 17, 2013 Lee, NH Topics covered: ArcGIS 10.1 Exploring GIS maps Basic GIS: ArcGIS 10 Creating GIS maps.1 GIS techniques GIS data maintenance $495 standard, $349 reduced Skill.1 to produce effective maps, edit and create GIS data, as well as, conduct geospatial analysis. Participants

New Hampshire, University of

174

An AlGaAsGaAs quantum cascade laser operating with a thermoelectric cooler for spectroscopy of NH3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

out using a compact thermo-electrically cooled laser package. The QCL described here is designedAn AlGaAs­GaAs quantum cascade laser operating with a thermoelectric cooler for spectroscopy of NH3. Langford b a Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Rankine Building, University of Glasgow

175

Chemical analysis of HfO{sub 2}/Si (100) film systems exposed to NH{sub 3} thermal processing  

SciTech Connect

Nitrogen incorporation in HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} films utilized as high-k gate dielectric layers in advanced metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors has been investigated. Thin HfO{sub 2} blanket films deposited by atomic layer deposition on either SiO{sub 2} or NH{sub 3} treated Si (100) substrates have been subjected to NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2} anneal processing. Several high resolution techniques including electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectra, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and synchrotron x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been utilized to elucidate chemical composition and crystalline structure differences between samples annealed in NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2} ambients as a function of temperature. Depth profiling of core level binding energy spectra has been obtained by using variable kinetic energy x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with tunable photon energy. An 'interface effect' characterized by a shift of the Si{sup 4+} feature to lower binding energy at the HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interface has been detected in the Si 1s spectra; however, no corresponding chemical state change has been observed in the Hf 4f spectra acquired over a broad range of electron take-off angles and surface sensitivities. The Si 2p spectra indicate Si-N bond formation beneath the HfO{sub 2} layer in the samples exposed to NH{sub 3} anneal. The NH{sub 3} anneal ambient is shown to produce a metastable Hf-N bond component corresponding to temperature driven dissociation kinetics. These findings are consistent with elemental profiles across the HfO{sub 2}/Si(100) interface determined by electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements. X-ray diffraction measurements on similarly treated films identify the structural changes resulting from N incorporation into the HfO{sub 2} films.

Lysaght, Patrick S.; Barnett, Joel; Bersuker, Gennadi I.; Woicik, Joseph C.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Foran, Brendan; Tseng, Hsing-Huang; Jammy, Raj [Front End Process Division, SEMATECH, 2706 Montopolis Drive, Austin, Texas 78741-6499 (United States); National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Physical Characterization Laboratory, Advanced Technology Development Facility, 2706 Montopolis Drive, Austin, Texas 78741-6499 (United States); Front End Process Division, SEMATECH, 2706 Montopolis Drive, Austin, Texas 78741-6499 (United States)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

64Cu-1,4,7-Triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetic acid-para-aminobenzoic acid-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Leu-Met-NH2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 14). Prasanphanich et al. recently reported that the NOTA-based 64Cu-NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN(7­14) NH2 conjugate (where 8-Aoc = 8-aminooctanoic acid) exhibited decreased accumulation in hepatic tissue and maintain the good pharmacokinetic properties of the 64Cu-NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN(7­14)NH2 conjugate, Lane et al

Levin, Judith G.

177

Measurements of NH3 and CO2 with distributed-feedback diode lasers near 2.0 m in bioreactor vent gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

absorption transition at 5016.977 cm 1 was selected for trace gas monitoring. For CO2, an isolated transition of a diode-laser sensor used to record gas-phase NH3 and CO2 mole fractions, ex- plain the motivation for NH3 and 40 ppm for CO2, which is suitable for the expected vent gas concentrations. 2. Theory

178

Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in Disubstituted Ethanes. A Comparison of NH,,,O-and OH,,,O-Hydrogen Bonding through Conformational Analysis of 4-Amino-4-oxobutanoate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in Disubstituted Ethanes. A Comparison of NH,,,O- and OH,,,O- Hydrogen Bonding through Conformational Analysis of 4-Amino-4-oxobutanoate (succinamate) and Monohydrogen 1 of amide NH,,,O- and carboxyl OH,,,O- hydrogen bonds were investigated via conformational analysis

Goddard III, William A.

179

Effects of Hydrothermal Aging on NH3-SCR reaction over Cu/zeolites  

SciTech Connect

The effects of hydrothermal treatment on model Cu/zeolite catalysts were investigated to better understand the nature of Cu species for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by NH{sub 3}. After hydrothermal aging at 800 C for 16 h, the NO{sub x} reduction performance of Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta were significantly reduced at low temperatures, while that of Cu-SSZ-13 was not affected. When the zeolite framework aluminum species were probed using solid state {sup 27}Al-NMR, significant reduction in the intensities of the tetrahedral aluminum peak was observed for Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta, although no increase in the intensities of the octahedral aluminum peak was observed. When the redox behavior of Cu species was examined using H{sub 2}-TPR, it was found that Cu{sup 2+} could be reduced to Cu{sup +} and to Cu{sup 0} fir Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta catalysts, while Cu{sup 2+} could be reduced to Cu{sup +} only for Cu-SSZ-13. After hydrothermal aging, CuO and Cu-aluminate species were found to form in Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta, while little changes were observed for Cu-SSZ-13.

Kwak, Ja Hun; Tran, Diana N.; Burton, Sarah D.; Szanyi, Janos; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

180

Multi-atlas segmentation in head and neck CT scans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate automating the task of segmenting structures in head and neck CT scans, to minimize time spent on manual contouring of structures of interest. We focus on the brainstem and left and right parotids. To generate ...

Arbisser, Amelia M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vt nh ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Obscure pulmonary masses: bronchial impaction revealed by CT  

SciTech Connect

Dilated bronchi impacted with mucus or tumor are recognized on standard chest radiographs because they are surrounded by aerated pulmonary parenchyma. When imaged in different projections, these lesions produce a variety of appearances that are generally familiar. This report characterizes less familiar computed tomographic (CT) findings in eight patients with pathologic bronchial distension of congenital, neoplastic, or infectious etiologies and correlates them with chest films. In seven patients, CT readily revealed dilated bronchi and/or regional lung hypodensity. In four of these cases, CT led to the initial suspicion of dilated bronchi. CT should be used early in the evaluation of atypical pulmonary mass lesions or to confirm suspected bronchial impaction because of the high probability it will reveal diagnostic features.

Pugatch, R.D.; Gale, M.E.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02 Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: OLIN MATHIESON (CT.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: United Nuclear Corporation CT.0-02-1 Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.0-02-1 Site Operations: Began fabrication of nuclear reactor fuel elements for AEC circa late-1950s. Later became part of a group forming United Nuclear Corp. and were then licensed by AEC. Performed work for U.S. Navy and commercial applications. CT.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - AEC licensed CT.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes CT.0-02-1 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.0-02-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

183

X-ray MicroCT Training Presentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray MicroCT Training Presentation T. Fettah Kosar, PhD Center for Nanoscale Systems Harvard) Model: HMXST225 (max. 225 kV) #12;Overview 3 Introduction to X-ray imaging and Computed Tomography (CT) · What are X-rays and how do we generate and image them? · How do we magnify X-ray images and keep them

184

A Compact Torus Fusion Reactor Utilizing a Continuously Generated String of CTs. The CT String Reactor, CTSR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fusion reactor is described in which a moving string ... conducting cylinder where the plasma is heated to fusion-producing temperature. The CT then passes into a blanketed region where fusion energy is produce...

Charles W. Hartman; David B. Reisman; Harry S. McLean

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

In vitro and in vivo analysis of [64Cu-NO2A-8-Aoc-BBN(714)NH2]: a site-directed radiopharmaceutical for positron-emission tomography imaging of T-47D human breast cancer tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Introduction Human breast cancer, from which the T-47D cell line was derived, is known to overexpress the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) in some cases. Bombesin (BBN), an agonist for the GRPR, has been appended with a radionuclide capable of positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging and therapy. 64Cu-NO2A-8-Aoc-BBN(714)NH2 (NO2A=1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetate) has produced high-quality microPET images of GRPR-positive breast cancer xenografted tumors in mice. Methods The imaging probe was synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis followed by manual conjugation of the 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA) bifunctional chelator and radiolabeling in aqueous solution. The radiolabeled conjugate was subjected to in vitro and in vivo studies to determine its specificity for the GRPR and its pharmacokinetic profile. A T-47D tumor-bearing mouse was imaged with microPET/CT and microMRI imaging. Results The 64Cu-NO2A-8-Aoc-BBN(714)NH2 targeting vector was determined to specifically localize in GRPR-positive tissue. Accumulation was observed in the tumor in sufficient quantities to allow for identification of tumors in microPET imaging procedures. For example, uptake and retention in T-47D xenografts at 1, 4 and 24 h were determined to be 2.270.08, 1.350.14 and 0.280.07 % ID/g, respectively. Conclusions The 64Cu-NO2A-8-Aoc-BBN(714)NH2 produced high-quality microPET images. The pharmacokinetic profile justifies investigation of this bioconjugate as a potentially useful diagnostic/therapeutic agent. Additionally, the bioconjugate would serve as a good starting point for modification and optimization of similar agents to maximize tumor uptake and minimize nontarget accumulation.

Adam F. Prasanphanich; Lauren Retzloff; Stephanie R. Lane; Prasant K. Nanda; Gary L. Sieckman; Tammy L. Rold; Lixin Ma; Said D. Figueroa; Samantha V. Sublett; Timothy J. Hoffman; Charles J. Smith

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

nh Gi Thit Hi Ti Nguyn Thin Nhin ca V Trn Du Deepwater Horizon Cc D n Khu Vc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lng Sò ip Nhm Tng C Hi ánh Bt Gii Trí Trong Vùng Cán Xong Florida s c thc hin Qun Bay (h thng Vnh St Okaloosa và Walton. Lý tng ra thì bng cách thc hin d án này,s lng sò ip ti các a im c can thip cui cùng có th s tng lên ti các mc t duy trì bn vng c cho vic ánh bt gii trí. S lng sò ip các Qun Gulf và

187

Electronic Structure of TiO2/CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite Solar Cell Interfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The last two decades, the research on different types of mesoscopic solar cells has grown enormously, largely because this family of solar cells can be controlled in many different ways and for their easy production. ... Recently, the use of soluble semiconductors such as organicinorganic perovskites has shown great promise as light absorbers in solid-state mesoscopic solar cells. ... We report for the first time on a hole conductor-free mesoscopic methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskite/TiO2 heterojunction solar cell, produced by deposition of perovskite nanoparticles from a soln. of CH3NH3I and PbI2 in ?-butyrolactone on a 400 nm thick film of TiO2 (anatase) nanosheets exposing (001) facets. ...

Rebecka Lindblad; Dongqin Bi; Byung-wook Park; Johan Oscarsson; Mihaela Gorgoi; Hans Siegbahn; Michael Odelius; Erik M. J. Johansson; Hkan Rensmo

2014-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

188

Characteristics of V2O5/Ti-PILC catalyst for the reduction of NO by NH3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Titania-pillared clay (Ti-PILC) as a catalyst support exhibited peculiar physicochemical characteristics compared to that of titania for the reduction of NO by NH3. The morphological variation of Ti-PILC was examined with respect to the preparation method. For the freeze-dried Ti-PILC, the development of needle-like crystallites, which may reveal the formation of a house-of-cards structure by delamination of Ti-PILC, has been observed. Ti-PILC catalyst contains high surface acidity examined by NH3 TPD. Without the impregnation of WO3 and MoO3 on V2O5/Ti-PILC catalyst as a promoter, the catalyst exhibits competitive NO removal performance to a commercial V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. In addition, Ti-PILC catalyst also exhibits the strong sulfur tolerance mainly attributed to the unique pore structure of the catalyst.

Ho Jeong Chae; In-Sik Nam; Young Gul Kim; Hee Sung Yang; Hyun Chul Choi{rk; Seok Lyong Song{rk

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Radiation Dose Metrics in CT: Assessing Dose Using the National Quality Forum CT Patient Safety Measure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose The National Quality Forum (NQF) is a nonprofit consensus organization that recently endorsed a measure focused on CT radiation doses. To comply, facilities must summarize the doses from consecutive scans within age and anatomic area strata and report the data in the medical record. Our purpose was to assess the time needed to assemble the data and to demonstrate how review of such data permits a facility to understand doses. Methods and Materials To assemble the data we used for analysis, we used the dose monitoring softwareeXposure to automatically export dose metrics from consecutive scans in 2010 and 2012. For a subset of 50exams, we also collected dose metrics manually, copying data directly from the PACS into an excel spreadsheet. Results Manual data collection for 50 scans required 2 hours and 15 minutes. eXposure compiled the data in under an hour. All dose metrics demonstrated a 30% to 50% reduction between 2010 and 2012. There was also a significant decline and a reduction in the variability of the doses over time. Conclusion The NQF measure facilitates an institution's capacity to assess the doses they are using for CT as part of routine practice. The necessary data can be collected within a reasonable amount of time either with automatic software or manually. The collection and review of these data will allow facilities to compare their radiation dose distributions with national distributions and allow assessment of temporal trends in the doses they are using.

Jillian Keegan; Diana L. Miglioretti; Robert Gould; Lane F. Donnelly; Nicole D. Wilson; Rebecca Smith-Bindman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

DRIFT study of manganese/titania-based catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect

Manganese oxides and iron-manganese oxides supported on TiO{sub 2} were prepared by the sol-gel method and used for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH{sub 3}. Based on the previous study, Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} and Fe(0.1)-Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} were then selected to carry out the in situ diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) investigation for revealing the reaction mechanism. The DRIFT spectroscopy for the adsorption of NH{sub 3} indicated the presence of coordinated NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} on both of the two catalysts. When NO was introduced, the coordinated NH{sub 3} on the catalyst surface was consumed rapidly, indicating these species could react with NO effectively. When NH{sub 3} was introduced into the sample preadsorbed with NO + O{sub 2}, SCR reaction would not proceed on Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2}. However, for Fe(0.1)-Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} the bands due to coordinated NH{sub 3} on Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were formed. Simultaneously, the bidentate nitrates were transformed to monodentate nitrates and NH{sub 4}{sup +} was detected. NO{sub 2} from the oxidation of NO on catalyst could react with NH{sub 4}{sup +} leading to the reduction of NO. Therefore, it was suggested that the SCR reaction on Fe(0.1)-Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} could also take place in a different way from the reactions on Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} proposed by other researchers. Furthermore, the SCR reaction steps for these two kinds of catalysts were proposed. 29 refs., 9 figs.

Zhongbiao Wu; Boqiong Jiang; Yue Liu; Haiqiang Wang; Ruiben Jin [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Supporting Information Electric Field Reversal of Na2SO4, (NH4)2SO4, and Na2CO3 relative to CaCl2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water 1 M Na2 CO3 1 M Na2 SO4 1 M (NH4 )2 SO4 2 M CaCl2 2 M NaCl Re (2) (a.u.) Incident Infrared (cm -1.8 M CaCl2, 1.8 M NaCl, 1.1 M Na2CO3, 1.1 M Na2SO4, and 1.1 M (NH4)2SO4 salt solutions. ExperimentalS1 Supporting Information Electric Field Reversal of Na2SO4, (NH4)2SO4, and Na2CO3 relative to CaCl

192

Time-Resolved XAFS Spectroscopic Studies of B-H and N-H Oxidative Addition to Transition Metal Catalysts Relevant to Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect

Successful catalytic dehydrogenation of aminoborane, H3NBH3, prompted questions as to the potential role of N-H oxidative addition in the mechanisms of these processes. N-H oxidative addition reactions are rare, and in all cases appear to involve initial dative bonding to the metal by the amine lone pairs followed by transfer of a proton to the basic metal. Aminoborane and its trimethylborane derivative block this mechanism and, in principle, should permit authentic N-H oxidative attrition to occur. Extensive experimental work failed to confirm this hypothesis. In all cases either B-H complexation or oxidative addition of solvent C-H bonds dominate the chemistry.

Bitterwolf, Thomas E. [University of Idaho

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

193

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999). A low-dose spiral chest CT differs from a full-dose conventional chest CT scan primarily in the amount of radiation emitted during CT scans. Chest CT, in general, requires less radiation exposure than other CT procedures because the air-filled tissues of the lungs are not as dense as the tissues of other organs (i.e., less x-ray radiation is needed to penetrate the lung). Radiation dose can be further reduced with lung cancer screening due to the

194

Characteristics of modified CT injector for JFT-2M  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The HIT-CTI mark II compact toroid (CT) injector employed for the JFT-2M tokamak facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been upgraded to improve injection performance. The nozzle of the mark III injector now has a linear tube in place of the original focus cone to avoid rapid focus and deceleration, and the tapered outer electrode has been replaced with more gentle taper in the compression section in order to facilitate gradual compression. The dependence of CT velocity and electron density on poloidal bias flux and trigger time of CT acceleration have been investigated in the operable range of 70230km/s average CT velocity and electron density of 0.11.0 1022m?3 at an accelerator bank voltage of 25kV. The operation window is broader than that of the mark II injector. Emission of a CT plasmoid from the injector, and transport to the flux conserver as a high-density spheromak magnetic structure have also been confirmed.

N. Fukumoto; H. Ogawa; M. Nagata; T. Uyama; T. Shibata; Y. Kashiwa; Y. Kusama

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

VT_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metadata also available as Metadata: IdentificationInformation DataQualityInformation SpatialDataOrganizationInformation SpatialReferenceInformation EntityandAttributeI...

196

The discovery of [Ru(NH3)5N2]2+: A case of serendipity and the scientific method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the author provides a personal account of the events leading up to the realization [Ru9NH3)5N2]2+ is a real species.

Caesar V. Senoff

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Pillared smectite modified with carbon and manganese as catalyst for SCR of NOx with NH3. Part I. General characterization and catalyst screening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon- and manganese-modified zirconia-pillared smectites were prepared, characterized (XRD, BET and pore analysis, XPS) and tested in selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3. Both untreated and acidic pre...

Lucjan Chmielarz; Roman Dziembaj; Teresa Grzybek; Jerzy Klinik

198

Experimental trial of a hollow-core waveguide used as an absorption cell for concentration measurement of NH3 gas with a CO2 laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The basic idea of using a hollow-core waveguide as an absorption cell in a spectroscopic gas measurement system is proposed. Measurements of NH3 gas concentration were made...

Saito, Yasunori; Kanaya, Tatsunori; Nomura, Akio; Kano, Tetsuo

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Supporting Information Surface Electric Fields of Aqueous Solutions of NH4NO3, Mg(NO3)2, NaNO3,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S1 Supporting Information Surface Electric Fields of Aqueous Solutions of NH4NO3, Mg(NO3)2, NaNO3 interfaces of (a) 1.0 M and 2.0 M LiNO3, (b) 1.0 M and 1.7 M NaNO3, (c) 1.0 M and 1.6 M NH4NO3, and (d) 1.0 M water 1.0 M NaNO3 1.7 M NaNO3 c water 1.0 M NH4 NO3 1.6 M NH4 NO3 | (2) | 2 (10 3 arb.units) Wavenumber

200

64Cu-1,4,7-Triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetic acid-6-aminohexanoic acid-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Leu-Met-NH2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. recently reported that the NOTA-based 64Cu-NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN(7­14) NH2 conjugate (where 8-Aoc = 8 pharmacokinetic properties of the 64Cu-NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN(7­14)NH2 conjugate, Lane et al. synthesized a new group of conjugates with the NOTA derivative NO2A and replaced the spacer 8-Aoc with an aliphatic or aromatic linking

Levin, Judith G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vt nh ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

64Cu-1,4,7-Triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetic acid-9-aminonanoic acid-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Leu-Met-NH2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. recently reported that the NOTA-based 64Cu-NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN(7­14) NH2 conjugate (where 8-Aoc = 8 pharmacokinetic properties of the 64Cu-NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN(7­14)NH2 conjugate, Lane et al. synthesized a new group of conjugates with the NOTA derivative NO2A and replaced the spacer 8-Aoc with an aliphatic or aromatic linking

Levin, Judith G.

202

.Research Module: Scheme 2. N-Benzylation of N-H Pyrazolidinones 3. 3 6. 60 Scheme 2 Procedure: N-Alkylation Using Aldehyde  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

folder. It will actually produce two NMR printouts for you. The first one will be dominated by methanol Scheme 1, add 10 mL of anhydrous methanol. · For 4-methoxy compoud 3c, add 20 mL of methanol, since the 4-Benzylation Synthesis of N-Benzyl Pyrazolidinones NH NH O R1 3a-e + H O 4 Methanol Solvent 0.05 CF3CO2H (catalyst) N N O

Jasperse, Craig P.

203

A Compact Torus Fusion Reactor Utilizing a Continuously Generated Strings of CT's. The CT String Reactor, CTSR.  

SciTech Connect

A fusion reactor is described in which a moving string of mutually repelling compact toruses (alternating helicity, unidirectional Btheta) is generated by repetitive injection using a magnetized coaxial gun driven by continuous gun current with alternating poloidal field. An injected CT relaxes to a minimum magnetic energy equilibrium, moves into a compression cone, and enters a conducting cylinder where the plasma is heated to fusion-producing temperature. The CT then passes into a blanketed region where fusion energy is produced and, on emergence from the fusion region, the CT undergoes controlled expansion in an exit cone where an alternating poloidal field opens the flux surfaces to directly recover the CT magnetic energy as current which is returned to the formation gun. The CT String Reactor (CTSTR) reactor satisfies all the necessary MHD stability requirements and is based on extrapolation of experimentally achieved formation, stability, and plasma confinement. It is supported by extensive 2D, MHD calculations. CTSTR employs minimal external fields supplied by normal conductors, and can produce high fusion power density with uniform wall loading. The geometric simplicity of CTSTR acts to minimize initial and maintenance costs, including periodic replacement of the reactor first wall.

Hartman, C W; Reisman, D B; McLean, H S; Thomas, J

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

PET/CT-guided Interventions: Personnel Radiation Dose  

SciTech Connect

PurposeTo quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures.MethodsIn this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound).ResultsThe median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06).ConclusionThe operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

Ryan, E. Ronan, E-mail: ronan@ronanryan.com; Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Erinjeri, Joseph P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Hsu, Meier [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (United States); Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics (United States); Solomon, Stephen B. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

On Recent Claims Concerning the R_h=ct Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The R_h=ct Universe is a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology which, like LCDM, assumes the presence of dark energy in addition to (baryonic and non-luminous) matter and radiation. Unlike LCDM, however, it is also constrained by the equation of state (EOS) p=-rho/3, in terms of the total pressure p and energy density rho. One-on-one comparative tests between R_h=ct and LCDM have been carried out using over 14 different cosmological measurements and observations. In every case, the data have favoured R_h=ct over the standard model, with model selection tools yielding a likelihood ~90-95% that the former is correct, versus only ~5-10% for the latter. In other words, the standard model without the EOS p=-rho/3 does not appear to be the optimal description of nature. Yet in spite of these successes---or perhaps because of them---several concerns have been published recently regarding the fundamental basis of the theory itself. The latest paper on this subject even claims---quite remarkably---that R_h=ct is a vacuum solution, though quite evidently rho is not 0. Here, we address these concerns and demonstrate that all criticisms leveled thus far against R_h=ct, including the supposed vacuum condition, are unwarranted. They all appear to be based on incorrect assumptions or basic theoretical errors. Nevertheless, continued scrutiny such as this will be critical to establishing R_h=ct as the correct description of nature.

Fulvio Melia

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

206

Theory of Hydride-Proton Transfer (HPT) Carbonyl Reduction by [Os(III)(tpy)(Cl)(NH=CHCH3)(NSAr)  

SciTech Connect

Quantum mechanical analysis reveals that carbonyl reduction of aldehydes and ketones by the imine-based reductant cis-[Os{sup III}(tpy)(Cl)(NH?CHCH{sub 3})(NSAr)] (2), which is accessible by reduction of the analogous nitrile, occurs by hydride-proton transfer (HPT) involving both the imine and sulfilimido ligands. In carbonyl reduction, water or alcohol is necessary to significantly lower the barrier for proton shuttling between ligands. The ?N(H)SAr group activates the carbonyl group through hydrogen bonding while the ?NC(H)CH{sub 3} ligand delivers the hydride.

Ess, Daniel H.; Schauer, Cynthia; Meyer, Thomas J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Evaluation of the robustness of the preprocessing technique improving reversible compressibility of CT images: Tested on various CT examinations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To modify the preprocessing technique, which was previously proposed, improving compressibility of computed tomography (CT) images to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts and to evaluate the robustness of the technique in terms of segmentation correctness and increase in reversible compression ratio (CR) for various CT examinations.Methods: This study had institutional review board approval with waiver of informed patient consent. A preprocessing technique was previously proposed to improve the compressibility of CT images by replacing pixel values outside the body region with a constant value resulting in maximizing data redundancy. Since the technique was developed aiming at only chest CT images, the authors modified the segmentation method to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts. The modified version was evaluated as follows. In randomly selected 368 CT examinations (352 787 images), each image was preprocessed by using the modified preprocessing technique. Radiologists visually confirmed whether the segmented region covers the body region or not. The images with and without the preprocessing were reversibly compressed using Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), JPEG2000 two-dimensional (2D), and JPEG2000 three-dimensional (3D) compressions. The percentage increase in CR per examination (CR{sub I}) was measured.Results: The rate of correct segmentation was 100.0% (95% CI: 99.9%, 100.0%) for all the examinations. The median of CR{sub I} were 26.1% (95% CI: 24.9%, 27.1%), 40.2% (38.5%, 41.1%), and 34.5% (32.7%, 36.2%) in JPEG, JPEG2000 2D, and JPEG2000 3D, respectively.Conclusions: In various CT examinations, the modified preprocessing technique can increase in the CR by 25% or more without concerning about degradation of diagnostic information.

Jeon, Chang Ho; Kim, Bohyoung; Gu, Bon Seung; Lee, Jong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Ki [Medical Information Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)] [Medical Information Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Selling Corp - CT 0-01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Selling Corp - CT 0-01 Selling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: METALS SELLING CORP. (CT.0-01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Putnam , Connecticut CT.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 CT.0-01-1 Site Operations: Performed grinding of (non-radioactive) magnesium circa 1950 -1952 as a sub-contractor to Mallinckrodt Corp. CT.0-01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive materials were handled at this location CT.0-01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to METALS SELLING CORP. CT.0-01-1 - DOE Memorandum/Checklist D. Levine to File; Subject -

209

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator (CT.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.05-3 Site Operations: Research and development with solvents. CT.05-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited amount of materials handled CT.05-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Radium CT.05-1 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator CT.05-1 - MED Memorandum; To the Files, Thru Ruhoff, et. al.;

210

Patient-size-dependent radiation dose optimisation technique for abdominal CT examinations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......CT dosimetry and radiation safety. Radiol. Soc...Notification. Reducing radiation risk from computed...gov/cdrh/safety/110201-ct...McCollough C. H. Radiation dose in computed...region of interest software available in both......

J. E. Ngaile; P. Msaki; R. Kazema

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - abnormal brain ct Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: abnormal brain ct Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Hemorrhage Slices Detection in Brain CT Images Ruizhe...

212

VACT: Visualization-Aware CT Reconstruction Ziyi Zheng and Klaus Mueller, Senior Member, IEEE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract-- Computed tomography (CT) reconstruction methods are often unaware of the requirements Medical routine frequently utilizes 3D visualization tools for diagnosis. Computed tomography (CT between the raw projection data and their visualization via vol- ume rendering. Our framework can

Mueller, Klaus

213

Detektion von Phochromozytomen und rekurrenten medullren Schilddrsenkarzinomen mit F18 DOPA PET/CT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Evaluating [18F]dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) in patients with clinical suspicion for a primary or recurrent pheochromocytoma (pheo) by means of whole body PET/CT. In pheos PET/CT detects (more)

Zeich, Katrin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Exergy analysis of a novel air-cooled non-adiabatic absorption refrigeration cycle with NH3NaSCN and NH3LiNO3 refrigerant solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a methodology of exergy analysis for ammonia-lithium nitrate and ammonia-sodium thiocyanate absorption refrigeration cycle which applies a novel air-cooled type non-adiabatic absorber to improve both the coefficient of performance and exegetic efficiency of the system under air cooling condition. A modified entropy calculation method for NH3/NaSCN and NH3/LiNO3 solutions is presented in this literature and different results are obtained comparing to previous research. In addition to the variation of solution temperature and pressure from specific working state to the reference state, the variation of solution concentration, which was always neglected by previous researchers in ammonia/salt solution exergy calculation, has been taken into account while analyzing the least potential of ammonia/salt solution for doing useful work, and a corresponding approach for specific exergy calculation is presented. The effects of generator temperature, absorber outlet temperature, absorber efficiency and other system parameters on system exergetic efficiency have been discussed in this study. Analysis results indicate that relatively high system performance can be obtained by air-cooled type ammonia/salt absorption refrigeration cycles when non-adiabatic absorbers are applied in these systems.

Dehua Cai; Guogeng He; Qiqi Tian; Weier Tang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Assessment of paediatric CT exposure in a Portuguese hospital  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......paediatric CT exposure in a Portuguese hospital A. Neves 1 * A. Nunes 1 M. Rufino...2 Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Central, Hospital de S. Jose, Rua Jose Antonio Serrano...procedures was performed for a Portuguese hospital. Dosimetric data and technical parameters......

A. Neves; A. Nunes; M. Rufino; P. Madeira; P. Vaz; A. Pascoal

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Status and Promise CT's and Magnetized Target Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hill (LLNL) #12;CT's: Spheromaks & Field Reversed Configurations At LLNL, the SSPX experiment is investigating spheromak formation, sustainment, and confinement issues. (Hill, Mclean, Wood, Ryutov). At UC-Davis, formation and acceleration of spheromaks. (Hwang) At the U of Washington, field reversed configuration

217

A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems  

SciTech Connect

Cone beam CT systems are being deployed in large numbers for small animal imaging, dental imaging, and other specialty applications. A new high-precision method for cone beam CT system calibration is presented in this paper. It uses multiple projection images acquired from rotating point-like objects (metal ball bearings) and the angle information generated from the rotating gantry system is also used. It is assumed that the whole system has a mechanically stable rotation center and that the detector does not have severe out-of-plane rotation (<2 deg.). Simple geometrical relationships between the orbital paths of individual BBs and five system parameters were derived. Computer simulations were employed to validate the accuracy of this method in the presence of noise. Equal or higher accuracy was achieved compared with previous methods. This method was implemented for the geometrical calibration of both a micro CT scanner and a breast CT scanner. The reconstructed tomographic images demonstrated that the proposed method is robust and easy to implement with high precision.

Yang, Kai; Kwan, Alexander L. C.; Miller, DeWitt F.; Boone, John M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, 4701 X Street, Sacramento, California 95817 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, 4701 X Street, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, 4701 X Street, Sacramento, California 95817 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

On Recent Claims Concerning the R_h=ct Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The R_h=ct Universe is a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology which, like LCDM, assumes the presence of dark energy in addition to (baryonic and non-luminous) matter and radiation. Unlike LCDM, however, it is also constrained by the equation of state (EOS) p=-rho/3, in terms of the total pressure p and energy density rho. One-on-one comparative tests between R_h=ct and LCDM have been carried out using over 14 different cosmological measurements and observations. In every case, the data have favoured R_h=ct over the standard model, with model selection tools yielding a likelihood ~90-95% that the former is correct, versus only ~5-10% for the latter. In other words, the standard model without the EOS p=-rho/3 does not appear to be the optimal description of nature. Yet in spite of these successes---or perhaps because of them---several concerns have been published recently regarding the fundamental basis of the theory itself. The latest paper on this subject even claims---quite remarkably---that R_h=ct is ...

Melia, Fulvio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

AUTOCORRECTING RECONSTRUCTION FOR FLEXIBLE CT SCANNERS Jeff Orchard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

revolutionize the world of computed tomography (CT). Tiny x-ray emitters and detectors could be embedded scanners. Index Terms: computed tomography, image reconstruction, entropy, nanotechnology, autofocus 1. An automatic (data-driven) motion-correction method for SPECT (single photon emission computed tomog- raphy

Orchard, Jeffery J.

220

Saturday Workshop 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saturday Workshop 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly Drosophila Handbook page 1 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly Drosophila Handbook page 2 Table of Contents Standards 22 #12;Saturday Workshop 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly Drosophila Handbook

Rose, Michael R.

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221

X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction via Wavelet Frame Based Regularization and Radon Domain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reconstruct high quality CT images from limited and noisy projection data. One of the common CT systems Bin Dong Jia Li Zuowei Shen December 22, 2011 Abstract X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been,8]. Numerical simulations and comparisons will be presented at the end. Keywords: Computed tomography, wavelet

Zakharov, Vladimir

222

Quantitative cone-beam CT imaging in radiation therapy using planning CT as a prior: First patient studies  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Quantitative cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging is on increasing demand for high-performance image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). However, the current CBCT has poor image qualities mainly due to scatter contamination. Its current clinical application is therefore limited to patient setup based on only bony structures. To improve CBCT imaging for quantitative use, we recently proposed a correction method using planning CT (pCT) as the prior knowledge. Promising phantom results have been obtained on a tabletop CBCT system, using a correction scheme with rigid registration and without iterations. More challenges arise in clinical implementations of our method, especially because patients have large organ deformation in different scans. In this paper, we propose an improved framework to extend our method from bench to bedside by including several new components. Methods: The basic principle of our correction algorithm is to estimate the primary signals of CBCT projections via forward projection on the pCT image, and then to obtain the low-frequency errors in CBCT raw projections by subtracting the estimated primary signals and low-pass filtering. We improve the algorithm by using deformable registration to minimize the geometry difference between the pCT and the CBCT images. Since the registration performance relies on the accuracy of the CBCT image, we design an optional iterative scheme to update the CBCT image used in the registration. Large correction errors result from the mismatched objects in the pCT and the CBCT scans. Another optional step of gas pocket and couch matching is added into the framework to reduce these effects. Results: The proposed method is evaluated on four prostate patients, of which two cases are presented in detail to investigate the method performance for a large variety of patient geometry in clinical practice. The first patient has small anatomical changes from the planning to the treatment room. Our algorithm works well even without the optional iterations and the gas pocket and couch matching. The image correction on the second patient is more challenging due to the effects of gas pockets and attenuating couch. The improved framework with all new components is used to fully evaluate the correction performance. The enhanced image quality has been evaluated using mean CT number and spatial nonuniformity (SNU) error as well as contrast improvement factor. If the pCT image is considered as the ground truth, on the four patients, the overall mean CT number error is reduced from over 300 HU to below 16 HU in the selected regions of interest (ROIs), and the SNU error is suppressed from over 18% to below 2%. The average soft-tissue contrast is improved by an average factor of 2.6. Conclusions: We further improve our pCT-based CBCT correction algorithm for clinical use. Superior correction performance has been demonstrated on four patient studies. By providing quantitative CBCT images, our approach significantly increases the accuracy of advanced CBCT-based clinical applications for IGRT.

Niu Tianye; Al-Basheer, Ahmad; Zhu Lei [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Georgia Radiation Therapy Center, Department of Radiology, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, Georgia 30912 (United States); Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Elementary steps of the catalytic NO{sub x} reduction with NH{sub 3}: Cluster studies on reaction paths and energetics at vanadium oxide substrate  

SciTech Connect

We consider different reaction scenarios of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO in the presence of ammonia at perfect as well as reduced vanadium oxide surfaces modeled by V{sub 2}O{sub 5}(010) without and with oxygen vacancies. Geometric and energetic details as well as reaction paths are evaluated using extended cluster models together with density-functional theory. Based on earlier work of adsorption, diffusion, and reaction of the different surface species participating in the SCR we confirm that at Brnsted acid sites (i.e., OH groups) of the perfect oxide surface nitrosamide, NH{sub 2}NO, forms a stable intermediate. Here adsorption of NH{sub 3} results in NH{sub 4} surface species which reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. Nitrosamide is also found as intermediate of the SCR near Lewis acid sites of the reduced oxide surface (i.e., near oxygen vacancies). However, here the adsorbed NH{sub 3} species is dehydrogenated to surface NH{sub 2} before it reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. The calculations suggest that reaction barriers for the SCR are overall higher near Brnsted acid sites of the perfect surface compared with Lewis acid sites of the reduced surface, examined for the first time in this work. The theoretical results are consistent with experimental findings and confirm the importance of surface reduction for the SCR process.

Gruber, M.; Hermann, K. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)] [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

224

Initial experience with single-source dual-energy CT abdominal angiography and comparison with single-energy CT angiography: image quality, enhancement, diagnosis and radiation dose  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To assess image quality of virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images, compared to single-energy (SE) CT, and to evaluate the...

Daniella F. Pinho; Naveen M. Kulkarni; Arun Krishnaraj

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

4D Density Determination of NH Radicals in an MSE Microplasma Combining Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

An application of microplasmas is surface modification under mild conditions and of small, well defined areas. For this, an understanding of the plasma composition is of importance. First results of our work on the production and detection of NH radicals in a capacitively coupled radio frequency (RF) microplasma are presented. A microstructured comb electrode was used to generate a glow discharge in a hydrogen/nitrogen gas mixture by applying 13.56 MHz RF voltage. The techniques of planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) are used for space and time resolved, quantitative detection of the NH radical in the plasma. The rotational temperature was determined to be 820 K and, the density 5.1x10{sup 12} cm{sup 3}. Also, time dependent behaviour of the NH production was observed.

Visser, Martin; Schenk, Andreas; Gericke, Karl-Heinz [Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie Hans-Sommer-Str. 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

226

Unusual defect physics in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite solar cell absorber  

SciTech Connect

Thin-film solar cells based on Methylammonium triiodideplumbate (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}) halide perovskites have recently shown remarkable performance. First-principle calculations show that CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} has unusual defect physics: (i) Different from common p-type thin-film solar cell absorbers, it exhibits flexible conductivity from good p-type, intrinsic to good n-type depending on the growth conditions; (ii) Dominant intrinsic defects create only shallow levels, which partially explain the long electron-hole diffusion length and high open-circuit voltage in solar cell. The unusual defect properties can be attributed to the strong Pb lone-pair s orbital and I p orbital antibonding coupling and the high ionicity of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}.

Yin, Wan-Jian, E-mail: wanjian.yin@utoledo.edu; Shi, Tingting; Yan, Yanfa, E-mail: yanfa.yan@utoledo.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States)

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

227

NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 ACTO3NH  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 ACTO3NH 0661 This publication may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone, or telecommunications device for the hearing impaired. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows: National Energy Information Center Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 Telecommunications Device for the Hearing Impaired Only: (202) 586-1181 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., eastern time, M-F

228

nh Gi Thit Hi Ti Nguyn Thin Nhin ca V Trn Du Deepwater Horizon Cc D n Qun Franklin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Công Viên Bald Point Ca Tiu Bangc xut s xây dng các mái che cm tri, các li i lót ván, và mt nhà v sinh vi h thng x lý bng khí và bãi thi ti Công Viên Bald Point ca Tiu bang Alligator Point. Ngoài ra u xe kèm theo ti Cash Bayou. Xut Ci To Công Viên và Dc Th Thuyn Qun Franklin: D án Công Viên Indian

229

Kinetics of GaAs Dissolution in H2O2?NH4OH?H2O Solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gallium arsenide and other group III?V semiconductors have found numerous applications in the electronics industry because of such characteristics as the direct band gap and higher electron mobility, which make them more suitable than silicon in the fabrication of optoelectronic and high-frequency devices. ... For example, the solubilities of both As2O3 and As2O5 in water increase between 15 and 40 C (Perry and Phillips, 1995), while Ga2O3 and Ga(OH)3 are insoluble in water and no data are available on the temperature dependence of their solubility at higher pH. ... Both Sheka et al. (1966) and Sidgwick (1950) confirm that gallium hydroxides are particularly soluble in NH4OH. ...

Christine Bryce; Dimitrios Berk

1996-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

230

Assessment of Summer RBOB Supply for NY & CT  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Assessment for New York and Connecticut May 5, 2004 In October 2003, EIA published a review of the status of the methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban transition in New York (NY) and Connecticut (CT) 1 that noted significant uncertainties in gasoline supply for those States for the summer of 2004. To obtain updated information, EIA spoke to major suppliers to the two States over the past several months as the petroleum industry began the switch from winter- to summer-grade gasoline. As discussed on our earlier report, the NY and CT bans on MTBE mainly affect reformulated gasoline (RFG), which in recent years has been provided by domestic refineries on the East Coast (PADD 1) and imports. Our recent findings indicate that

231

Effective dose estimation during conventional and CT urography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Intravenous urography (IVU) and CT urography (CTU) are efficient radiological examinations for the evaluation of the urinary system disorders. However patients are exposed to a significant radiation dose. The objectives of this study are to: (i) measure and compare patient radiation dose by computed tomography urography (CTU) and conventional intravenous urography (IVU) and (ii) evaluate organ equivalent dose and cancer risks from CTU and IVU imaging procedures. A total of 141 patients were investigated. A calibrated CT machine (Siemens-Somatom Emotion duo) was used for CTU, while a Shimadzu X ray machine was used for IVU. Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used to measure patients' entrance surface doses (ESD). \\{TLDs\\} were calibrated under reproducible reference conditions. Patients radiation dose values (DLP) for CTU were 17261mGycm, \\{CTDIvol\\} 4.752mGy and effective dose 2.581mSv. Patient cancer probabilities were estimated to be 1.4 per million per CTU examination. Patients \\{ESDs\\} values for IVU were 21.625mGy, effective dose 1.791mSv. CT involves a higher effective dose than IVU. In this study the radiation dose is considered low compared to previous studies. The effective dose from CTU procedures was 30% higher compared to IVU procedures. Wide dose variation between patient doses suggests that optimization is not fulfilled yet.

K. Alzimami; A. Sulieman; E. Omer; I.I. Suliman; K. Alsafi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Structure-Activity Relationships in NH3-SCR over Cu-SSZ-13 as Probed by Reaction Kinetics and EPR Studies  

SciTech Connect

Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts with various Cu loadings were prepared via solution ion exchange. The hydrated samples were studied with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). Cu2+ ion coordination numbers were obtained by analyzing the hyperfine structures while Cu-Cu distances were estimated from line broadening of the EPR features. By coupling EPR and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) results, two Cu2+ ion locations were suggested. Standard and fast NH3-SCR, as well as non-selective NH3 oxidation reactions were carried out over these catalysts at high space velocities. For the SCR reaction, intra-particle diffusion limitation was found throughout the reaction temperatures investigated. Although clear structure-activity relationships cannot be derived, the reaction results allow for reactant diffusivities and Cu2+ ion locations to be estimated. The slower NH3 oxidation reaction, on the other hand, is kinetically limited at low temperatures, and, therefore, allows for a correlation between Cu2+ ion location and reaction kinetics to be made. Furthermore, the dynamic Cu2+ ion motion as a function of temperature could also be derived from the NH3 oxidation kinetics.

Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Karp, Eric M.; Luo, Jin-Yong; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Surface characterization studies of TiO2 supported manganese oxide catalysts for low temperature SCR of NO with NH3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCR of NO with NH3 Padmanabha Reddy Ettireddy a , Neeraja Ettireddy a , Sergey Mamedov b , Punit-impregnation method for the low temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with ammonia as a reductantO2 supported catalysts for low temperature SCR reaction at catalyst bed temperature 175 8C under

Boolchand, Punit

234

Phase Transformations of the Ternary System (NH4)2SO4-H2SO4-H2O and the Implications for Cirrus Cloud Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the presence of NH4 + ions in the aerosol of the upper troposphere. Low-temperature ternary phase diagrams distribution alters the cloud's radiative properties, persistence, and surface area available for heterogeneous radiation, which insulates or warms Earth, and scattering the sun's visible radiation upward, thus cooling

235

Detailed modeling and laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH3-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

non-premixed methane/air flame John B. Bell, Marcus S. Day, Joseph F. Grcar Computing Sciences-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH3-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame Abstract In this paper we study the formation of NO in laminar, nitrogen diluted methane diffusion flames that are seeded

Bell, John B.

236

Interactions of elevated CO2, NH3 and O3 on mycorrhizal infection, gas exchange and N metabolism in saplings of Scots pine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four-year-old saplings of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) (L.) were exposed for 11 weeks in controlled-environment chambers to charcoad-filtered air, or to charcoal-filtered air supplemented with NH3 (40 ?g m?3), O

Marta Prez-Soba; Thomas A Dueck; Gigliola Puppi; Pieter J. C. Kuiper

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of the Specific Features of the Phase Transitions in (NH4)2WO2F4  

SciTech Connect

Oxyfluoride (NH4)2WO2F4 has been studied by the inelastic neutron scattering method over a wide temperature range 10 300 K at two initial neutron energies of 15 and 60 meV. The role of tetrahedral ammonium groups in the mechanism of sequential phase transitions at T1 = 201 K and T2 = 160 K has been discussed.

Smirnov, Lev S [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia; Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL; Flerov, I. N. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Krasnoyarsk, Russia; Laptash, N. M. [Institute of Chemistry, Vladivostok, Russia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Mixed quantum/classical investigation of the photodissociation of NH3,,A~ ... and a practical method for maintaining zero-point energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a classical mechanical treatment of nuclear motion on coupled potential-energy surfaces. Whereas older mixedMixed quantum/classical investigation of the photodissociation of NH3,,A~ ... and a practical method for maintaining zero-point energy in classical trajectories David Bonhommeaua and Donald G

Truhlar, Donald G

239

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Computed Tomography (CT) Scanner CT Scanner - Courtesy Stanford University Department of Energy Resources Engineering Computed tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) have been used to resolve industrial problems, for materials characterizations, and to provide non-destructive evaluations for discovering flaws in parts before their use, resulting in greater reliability and greater safety for workers; to identify the presence and facilitate the recovery/extraction of oil, water, coal, and/or gas; and to provide non-destructive testing and quality control of fresh fruits and vegetables, enhancing the safety of food. These benefits of non-medical uses of CT and NMR contribute to the economy and improve people's lives.

240

A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Jump to:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vt nh ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Quantification of liver iron content with CTadded value of dual-energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To evaluate the value of dual-energy CT (DECT) with use of an ... decomposition algorithm for the quantification of liver iron content (LIC).

Michael A. Fischer; Caecilia S. Reiner; Dimitri Raptis; Olivio Donati

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

MIEDER, WOLFGANG. Proverbs: A Handbook. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2004. 304 pp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

selecta bibliografa, Proverbs: A Handbook interesado en unWOLFGANG. Proverbs: A Handbook. Westport, CT: Greenwood,libros de referencia de Handbooks" publicado en el nueva la

Lee, Alejandro

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

E-Print Network 3.0 - aided ct image Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 ARTICLE IN PRESS Computer-Aided Design ( ) Summary: a limited number of computed tomography (CT) images. The three-dimensional template geometry of a healthy... contour shown...

244

Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a tracer compound tagged with a .gamma.-ray emitting nuclide; directing an x-ray source toward the subject; rotating the x-ray source around the subject; emitting x-rays during the rotating step; rotating a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) two-sided detector on an opposite side of the subject from the source; simultaneously detecting the position and energy of each pulsed x-ray and each emitted .gamma.-ray captured by the CZT detector; recording data for each position and each energy of each the captured x-ray and .gamma.-ray; and, creating CT and SPECT images from the recorded data. The transmitted energy levels of the x-rays lower are biased lower than energy levels of the .gamma.-rays. The x-ray source is operated in a continuous mode. The method can be implemented at ambient temperatures.

Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Lubbock, TX); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Validation of Plaster Endocast Morphology Through 3D CT Image Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Validation of Plaster Endocast Morphology Through 3D CT Image Analysis P. Thomas Schoenemann,1 by creating endo- casts out of rubber latex shells filled with plaster. The extent to which the method questions. Pairs of virtual endocasts (VEs) created from high-resolution CT scans of corresponding latex/plaster

Schoenemann, P. Thomas

246

Bone Surface Reconstruction From CT/MR Images Using Fast Marching and Level Set Methods1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bone Surface Reconstruction From CT/MR Images Using Fast Marching and Level Set Methods1) Istv surfaces reconstructed from MR volumes are shown. 1 Outline of the project One of our current projects steps of bone surface reconstruction from CT/MR slice images. 2 Main steps of reconstruction 2.1

Chetverikov, Dmitry

247

Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans Amelia M. Arbisser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M. Arbisser B.S., Computer Science of Engineering Thesis Committee #12;2 #12;Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M, we employ an atlas of labeled training images. We register each of these images to the unlabeled

Golland, Polina

248

Accurate model-based high resolution cardiac image reconstruction in dual source CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cardiac imaging represents one of the most challenging imaging problems, requiring high spatial and temporal resolutions along with good tissue contrast. One of the newest clinical cardiac CT scanners incorporates two source-detector pairs in order to ... Keywords: cardiac, dual source CT, iterative method, model-based imaging

Synho Do; Sanghee Cho; W. Clem Karl; Mannudeep K. Kalra; Thomas J. Brady; Homer Pien

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hemorrhage Slices Detection in Brain CT Images Ruizhe Liu, Chew Lim Tan, Tze Yun Leong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hemorrhage Slices Detection in Brain CT Images Ruizhe Liu, Chew Lim Tan, Tze Yun Leong Department) scans are widely used in today's diagnosis of head traumas. It is effective to disclose the bleeding Tomography (CT) scans are widely used in today's diagnosis of head traumas. It is effective to disclose

Tan, Chew Lim

250

AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING G. Funka-Lea1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING GRAPH-CUTS G. Funka-Lea1 , Y. Boykov3 isolate the outer surface of the entire heart in Computer Tomogra- phy (CT) cardiac scans. Isolating the entire heart allows the coronary vessels on the surface of the heart to be easily visu- alized despite

Boykov, Yuri

251

GPU IMPLEMENTATION OF A 3D BAYESIAN CT ALGORITHM AND ITS APPLICATION ON REAL FOAM RECONSTRUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tomography (CT) [1, 3]. The limits of these meth- ods appear when the number of projections is small, and as well as any iterative algebraic meth- ods is the computation time and especially for projection solve is to reconstruct the object f from the projection data g collected by a cone beam 3D CT. The link

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

252

Searching Effective Parameters for Low-Dose CT Reconstruction by Ant Colony Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Eric Papenhausen and Klaus Mueller Abstract-- Low-dose Computed Tomography (CT) has been gaining. To cope with the limited data collected at 30% of standard radiation, low-dose CT reconstruction algorithms generally require several iterations of forward projection, back-projection and regularization

Mueller, Klaus

253

Locating the Eyes in CT Brain Scan Data Kostis Kaggelides, Peter J. Elliott  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a technique for locating the eyes in Computed Tomography brain scan data, is described. The objective and implemented an algorithm which automaticallyidenti es and locates the eyes in a Computed Tomography(CT) brainLocating the Eyes in CT Brain Scan Data Kostis Kaggelides, Peter J. Elliott IBM UK Scienti c Centre

Fisher, Bob

254

A direct method for air kermalength product measurement in CT for verification of dose display calibrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......kerma-length product measurement in CT for verification of dose display calibrations...kerma-length product measurement in CT for verification of dose display calibrations...practice, this means doing measurements in the standard phantoms......

Katja Merimaa; Hannu Jrvinen; Mika Kortesniemi; Juhani Karppinen

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Computed Tomography (CT) Scanner CT Scanner - Courtesy Stanford University Department of Energy Resources Engineering Computed tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) have been used to resolve industrial problems, for materials characterizations, and to provide non-destructive evaluations for discovering flaws in parts before their use, resulting in greater reliability and greater safety for workers; to identify the presence and facilitate the recovery/extraction of oil, water, coal, and/or gas; and to provide non-destructive testing and quality control of fresh fruits and vegetables, enhancing the safety of food. These benefits of non-medical uses of CT and NMR contribute to the economy and improve people's lives.

256

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental

257

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGAla1109.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2000 2000 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-99.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2000 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 20. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 2000 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural

258

C:\Annual\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2002 2002 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA 910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." 17. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Commercial Consumers, 2002 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 2002 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Source: Energy Information Administration

259

Microsoft Word - Figure_18_19.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 0.00-2.49 2.50-4.49 4.50-6.49 6.50-8.49 8.50-10.49 10.50+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK MD 0.00-2.49 2.50-4.49 4.50-6.49 6.50-8.49 8.50-10.49 10.50+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Figure 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2004 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Power Consumers, 2004 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: States where the electric power price has been withheld (see Table 23) are included in the $0.00-$2.49 price category.

260

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

49 49 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK MD 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Figure 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2003 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Power Consumers, 2003 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: States where the electric power price has been withheld (see Table 23) are included in the $0.00-$1.99 price category.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vt nh ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

C:\Annual\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2002 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 2002 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost

262

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure

263

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 1997 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure

264

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NewNGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 28. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Residential Consumers, 2001 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition."

265

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 1998 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure

266

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NewNGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 30. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2001 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK 31. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 2001 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of

267

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental

268

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGAla1109.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2000 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ 17. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential

269

Frequency stabilization of 1. 5-. mu. m InGaAsP distributed feedback laser to NH/sub 3/ absorption lines  

SciTech Connect

NH/sub 3/ absorption lines due to vibration-rotation transitions are observed at 1.50--1.54 ..mu..m by using an InGaAsP superluminescent diode. A 1.5-..mu..m InGaAsP distributed feedback (DFB) laser is frequency stabilized to an NH/sub 3/ linear absorption line at 15196 A. Frequency stability of sigma(2,tau) = 8 x 10/sup -11/tau/sup -1/ is achieved for an averaging time range of 10 ms< or =tau< or =1 s. Such an absolute frequency-stabilized DFB laser is useful for coherent optical system applications, since it is free from the longitudinal mode jumping which results from a wide range of temperature changes and long-term device degradation.

Yanagawa, T.; Saito, S.; Yamamoto, Y.

1984-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Phase transitions in C2O4H NH4 1/2H2O : a light scattering study of the high pressure phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1711 Phase transitions in C2O4H NH4 1/2H2O : a light scattering study of the high pressure phase J) Résumé. 2014 AHO présente, à la pression ordinaire, une transition de phase ferroélastique du deuxième phase III soit, comme la phase II, due à une mise en ordre des ions ammoniums : leur orientation serait

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

271

Hydrothermal synthesis and structure of an open framework Co0.7Zn1.3(PO4)2(NH3CH2CH2NH3) and Co6.2(OH)4(PO4)4Zn1.80, a new adamite type phase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrothermal reaction of cobalt(II)oxalate di-hydrate, zinc oxide, and triethyl-orthophosphate, using 1,2-diaminoethane as structure directing template in water, produced two major crystal phases in almost equal amount: the purple crystals of [NH3CH2CH2NH3][Co0.7Zn1.3(PO4)2] (1) and the red burgundy crystals of Co6.2(OH)4(PO4)4Zn1.80 (2), a new adamite type phase. The structure of [NH3CH2CH2NH3] [Co0.7Zn1.3(PO4)2] (1) exhibits a 3D open framework built from PO4 and (Co/Zn)O4 tetrahedra, and (Co/Zn)O5 trigonal bipyramids, forming two major channels, an 8-membered ring channel and a 16-membered ring channel, that host the ethanediammonium ions. The Co6.2(OH)4(PO4)4Zn1.80 (2) is isomorphous with adamite-type M2(OH)XO4 structure, with a condensed vertex and edge sharing network of (Co/Zn)O5, and distorted CoO6, and PO4 subunits. The cobalt preference for higher coordination numbers is displayed in this structure, where the octahedral sites are wholly occupied by cobalt. Thermal analysis confirmed that these compounds display high thermal stability.

Aderemi Oki; Matthias Zeller; Yaneth Coranza; Jose Luevano; Allen D. Hunter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

THE c2d SPITZER SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF ICES AROUND LOW-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS. IV. NH{sub 3} AND CH{sub 3}OH  

SciTech Connect

NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}OH are key molecules in astrochemical networks leading to the formation of more complex N- and O-bearing molecules, such as CH{sub 3}CN and CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}. Despite a number of recent studies, little is known about their abundances in the solid state. This is particularly the case for low-mass protostars, for which only the launch of the Spitzer Space Telescope has permitted high-sensitivity observations of the ices around these objects. In this work, we investigate the {approx}8-10 {mu}m region in the Spitzer IRS (InfraRed Spectrograph) spectra of 41 low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs). These data are part of a survey of interstellar ices in a sample of low-mass YSOs studied in earlier papers in this series. We used both an empirical and a local continuum method to correct for the contribution from the 10 {mu}m silicate absorption in the recorded spectra. In addition, we conducted a systematic laboratory study of NH{sub 3}- and CH{sub 3}OH-containing ices to help interpret the astronomical spectra. We clearly detect a feature at {approx}9 {mu}m in 24 low-mass YSOs. Within the uncertainty in continuum determination, we identify this feature with the NH{sub 3} {nu}{sub 2} umbrella mode and derive abundances with respect to water between {approx}2% and 15%. Simultaneously, we also revisited the case of CH{sub 3}OH ice by studying the {nu}{sub 4} C-O stretch mode of this molecule at {approx}9.7 {mu}m in 16 objects, yielding abundances consistent with those derived by Boogert et al. based on a simultaneous 9.75 and 3.53 {mu}m data analysis. Our study indicates that NH{sub 3} is present primarily in H{sub 2}O-rich ices, but that in some cases, such ices are insufficient to explain the observed narrow FWHM. The laboratory data point to CH{sub 3}OH being in an almost pure methanol ice, or mixed mainly with CO or CO{sub 2}, consistent with its formation through hydrogenation on grains. Finally, we use our derived NH{sub 3} abundances in combination with previously published abundances of other solid N-bearing species to find that up to 10%-20% of nitrogen is locked up in known ices.

Bottinelli, Sandrine; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Lahuis, Fred [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Boogert, A. C. Adwin [IPAC, NASA Herschel Science Center, Mail Code 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bouwman, Jordy; Beckwith, Martha; Oeberg, Karin I.; Linnartz, Harold [Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics, Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Blake, Geoffrey A. [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Evans, Neal J., E-mail: sandrine.bottinelli@cesr.f [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

CT effective dose per dose length product using ICRP 103 weighting factors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To generate effective dose per unit dose length product (E/DLP) conversion factors incorporating ICRP Publication 103 tissue weighting factors. Methods: Effective doses for CT examinations were obtained using the IMPACT Dosimetry Calculator using all 23 dose data sets that are offered by this spreadsheet. CT examinations were simulated for scans performed along the patient long axis for each dosimetry data set using a 4 cm beam width ranging from the upper thighs to top of the head. Five basic body regions (head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis), as well as combinations of the regions (head/neck, chest/abdomen, abdomen/pelvis, and chest/abdomen/pelvis) and whole body CT scans were investigated. Correction factors were generated that can be applied to convert E/DLP conversion factors based on ICRP 60 data to conversion factors that are valid for ICRP 103 data (i.e., E{sub 103}/E{sub 60}). Results: Use of ICRP 103 weighting factors increase effective doses for head scans by {approx}11%, for chest scans by {approx}20%, and decrease effective doses for pelvis scans by {approx}25%. Current E/DLP conversion factors are estimated to be 2.4 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for head CT examinations and range between 14 and 20 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for body CT examinations. Conclusions: Factors that enable patient CT doses to be adjusted to account for ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors are provided, which result in E/DLP factors that were increased in head and chest CT, reduced in pelvis CT, and showed no marked change in neck and abdomen CT.

Huda, Walter; Magill, Dennise; He Wenjun [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Clemson-MUSC Bioengineering Program, Clemson University, Charleston, South Carolina 29425 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to Announce Major Initiative to Enhance America's Energy Security 10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to Announce Major Initiative to Enhance America's Energy Security August 16, 2011 - 9:52am Addthis White House Rural Economic Council Promotes Production of Next Generation Biofuels, Job Creation and Economic Opportunity WASHINGTON, Aug. 16, 2011 - Today at 10 a.m. CT (11 a.m. ET), the Obama Administration will advance a major initiative to produce next generation aviation and marine biofuels to power military and commercial transportation. The initiative responds to a directive from President Obama issued in March as part of his Blueprint for a Secure Energy Future, the

275

A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Rock samples-collected from a recent deep-water exploration well drilled in the Faeroe-Shetland Channel, northwest of the UK-confirm that a distinctive high-amplitude seismic reflector that crosscuts the Upper Palaeogene and Neogene succession and covers an area of 10 000 km(2) is an example of a fossilized Opal A to Opal C/T (Cristobalite/Tridymite)

276

American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location New London County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.5185189°, -72.0468164° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5185189,"lon":-72.0468164,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

277

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999).

278

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Danbury, CT, that scored HERS 35 without PV. This 2-story, 1,650-ft2 cabin built by a custom home builder for his own family meets Passive House...

279

RIS-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RIS?-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN - A TWO-DIMENSIONAL APPROACH Gunner C. Larsen Abstract. This report documents the results obtained from an elastic-plastic

280

Dental CT: imaging technique, anatomy, and pathologic conditions of the jaws  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In addition to conventional imaging methods, dental CT has become an established method for anatomic imaging of the jaws prior to dental implant placement. More recently, this high- ... resolution imaging techni...

Andr Gahleitner; G. Watzek; H. Imhof

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Finite Element Analysis of Ballistic Penetration of Plain Weave Twaron CT709 Fabrics: A Parametric Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ballistic impact of Twaron CT709 plain weave fabrics is studied using an explicit finite element method. Many existing approximations pertaining to woven fabrics cannot adequately represent strain rate-dependent behavior exhibited by the Twaron...

Gogineni, Sireesha

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

The effects of mapping CT images to Monte Carlo materials on GEANT4 proton simulation accuracy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations of radiation therapy require conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) in CT images to an exact tissue composition and density. The number of discrete densities (or density bins) used in this mapping affects the simulation accuracy, execution time, and memory usage in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo code. The relationship between the number of density bins and CT noise was examined in general for all simulations that use HU conversion to density. Additionally, the effect of this on simulation accuracy was examined for proton radiation. Methods: Relative uncertainty from CT noise was compared with uncertainty from density binning to determine an upper limit on the number of density bins required in the presence of CT noise. Error propagation analysis was also performed on continuously slowing down approximation range calculations to determine the proton range uncertainty caused by density binning. These results were verified with Monte Carlo simulations. Results: In the presence of even modest CT noise (5 HU or 0.5%) 450 density bins were found to only cause a 5% increase in the density uncertainty (i.e., 95% of density uncertainty from CT noise, 5% from binning). Larger numbers of density bins are not required as CT noise will prevent increased density accuracy; this applies across all types of Monte Carlo simulations. Examining uncertainty in proton range, only 127 density bins are required for a proton range error of <0.1 mm in most tissue and <0.5 mm in low density tissue (e.g., lung). Conclusions: By considering CT noise and actual range uncertainty, the number of required density bins can be restricted to a very modest 127 depending on the application. Reducing the number of density bins provides large memory and execution time savings in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo packages.

Barnes, Samuel; McAuley, Grant; Slater, James [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California 92350 (United States); Wroe, Andrew [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92350 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Mitigation of Hydrogen Capacity Losses during Pressure Cycling of the Li3NH System by the Addition of Nitrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mitigation of Hydrogen Capacity Losses during Pressure Cycling of the Li3NH System by the Addition of Nitrogen ... We attribute this enhancement to the reaction of nitrogen with liquid lithium during cycling as the Gibbs free energy of formation of Li3N (?Go = ?98.7 kJ/mol) is more negative than that of LiH (?Go = ?50.3 ... This triggered intensive research on hydrogen as a renewable fuel because the exhaust gases in hydrogen-powered vehicles mainly contain water vapor. ...

Joshua Lamb; Dhanesh Chandra; Wen-Ming Chien; Delphine Phanon; Nicolas Penin; Radovan C?erny?; Klaus Yvon

2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

284

Effects of gaseous NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on the concentration profiles of PCDD/F in flyash under post-combustion zone conditions  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on 2378-PCDD/F in flyash and flue gases was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 21-40% from the flue gases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 99% PCDD and 93% PCDF reductions in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 89% PCDD and 76% PCDF reductions in the flue gases. - Abstract: The influence of gaseous ammonia and sulphur dioxide on the formation of 2378-substituted PCDD/F on a reference flyash from a municipal waste incinerator has been investigated using a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor. The reference flyash samples (BCR-490) was reacted under a simulated flue gas stream at temperatures of 225 and 375 Degree-Sign C for 96 h. The experiments were carried out in two series: first with simulated flue gas alone, and then with injection of NH{sub 3} or SO{sub 2} gas into the flue gas just before the reactor inlet. It was found that the injection of gaseous ammonia into the flue gas could decrease the concentration of both PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% from the solid phase and by 21-40% from the gas phase. Converting the results to I-TEQ values, it could reduce the total I-TEQ values of PCDD and PCDF in the sum of the flyash and exhaust flue gas by 42-75% and 24-57% respectively. The application of SO{sub 2} led to 99% and 93% reductions in the PCDD and PCDF average congener concentrations, respectively in the solid phase. In the gas phase, the total reductions were 89% and 76% for PCDD and PCDF, respectively. Moreover, addition of SO{sub 2} reduced the total I-TEQ value of PCDD and PCDF in the flyash and exhaust flue gas together by 60-86% and 72-82% respectively. Sulphur dioxide was more effective than ammonia in suppressing PCDD/F formation in flyash under the conditions investigated.

Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A. [Energy Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Williams, Paul T., E-mail: p.t.williams@leeds.ac.uk [Energy Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Frequency stabilization of an InGaAsP distributed feedback laser to an NH/sub 3/ absorption line at 15137 A with an external frequency modulator  

SciTech Connect

The oscillation frequency of a 1.5-..mu..m InGaAsP distributed feedback laser is stabilized to an NH/sub 3/ linear absorption line at 15137 A. A LiNbO/sub 3/ external frequency modulator is used instead of direct frequency modulation of the laser to extract error signals. An effective bandwidth of 100 kHz for the feedback loop is obtained through this external modulation scheme. Frequency stability of sigma(2,tau) = 4 x 10/sup -11/ is achieved for an averaging time of 1 s< or =tau< or =100 s.

Yanagawa, T.; Saito, S.; Machida, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Noguchi, Y.

1985-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Critical properties at the field-induced Bose-Einstein condensation on NiCl2-4SC(NH2)2  

SciTech Connect

We report new magnetization measurements on the spin-gap compound NiCl{sub 2}-4SC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} at the low-field boundary of the magnetic field induced ordering. The critical density of the magnetization is analyzed in terms of a Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of bosonic quasiparticles. The analysis of the magnetization at the transition leads to the conclusion for the preservation of the U(1) symmetry, as required for BEC. The experimental data are well described by quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

Sengupta, Pinaki [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Al-hassenieh, Khaled A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jaime, Macelo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Paduan-filho, Armando [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Characteristics of vanadia on the surface of V2O5/Ti-PILC catalyst for the reduction of \\{NOx\\} by NH3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of vanadia catalysts impregnated on titania pillared interlayered clays (Ti-PILCs) were prepared to identify the characteristics of vanadia on the surface of Ti-PILC for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH3. V2O5/Ti-PILC exhibited superior performance as a novel SCR catalyst compared to conventional catalysts including V2O5/TiO2 and V2O5/Al2O3. NO removal activity over the supported vanadia catalyst is strongly influenced by the structure of vanadia species on the catalyst surface. The structure of vanadia species on various supports including TiO2, Al2O3, and SiO2 along with Ti-PILC has been examined by XRD, NMR and Raman analyses for the comparative study. Increasing the content of vanadia up to the monolayer coverage of the surface of Ti-PILC catalyst enhanced the ratio of the polymerized surface vanadia species to the isolated ones. These results are well correlated with TOF of vanadia on the catalyst surface for the reduction of NO by NH3.

Ho Jeong Chae; In-Sik Nam; Sung-Won Ham; Suk Bong Hong

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Auto calibration of a cone-beam-CT  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This paper introduces a novel autocalibration method for cone-beam-CTs (CBCT) or flat-panel CTs, assuming a perfect rotation. The method is based on ellipse-fitting. Autocalibration refers to accurate recovery of the geometric alignment of a CBCT device from projection images alone, without any manual measurements. Methods: The authors use test objects containing small arbitrarily positioned radio-opaque markers. No information regarding the relative positions of the markers is used. In practice, the authors use three to eight metal ball bearings (diameter of 1 mm), e.g., positioned roughly in a vertical line such that their projection image curves on the detector preferably form large ellipses over the circular orbit. From this ellipse-to-curve mapping and also from its inversion the authors derive an explicit formula. Nonlinear optimization based on this mapping enables them to determine the six relevant parameters of the system up to the device rotation angle, which is sufficient to define the geometry of a CBCT-machine assuming a perfect rotational movement. These parameters also include out-of-plane rotations. The authors evaluate their method by simulation based on data used in two similar approaches [L. Smekal, M. Kachelriess, S. E, and K. Wa, 'Geometric misalignment and calibration in cone-beam tomography,' Med. Phys. 31(12), 3242-3266 (2004); K. Yang, A. L. C. Kwan, D. F. Miller, and J. M. Boone, 'A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems,' Med. Phys. 33(6), 1695-1706 (2006)]. This allows a direct comparison of accuracy. Furthermore, the authors present real-world 3D reconstructions of a dry human spine segment and an electronic device. The reconstructions were computed from projections taken with a commercial dental CBCT device having two different focus-to-detector distances that were both calibrated with their method. The authors compare their reconstruction with a reconstruction computed by the manufacturer of the CBCT device to demonstrate the achievable spatial resolution of their calibration procedure. Results: Compared to the results published in the most closely related work [K. Yang, A. L. C. Kwan, D. F. Miller, and J. M. Boone, 'A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems,' Med. Phys. 33(6), 1695-1706 (2006)], the simulation proved the greater accuracy of their method, as well as a lower standard deviation of roughly 1 order of magnitude. When compared to another similar approach [L. Smekal, M. Kachelriess, S. E, and K. Wa, 'Geometric misalignment and calibration in cone-beam tomography,' Med. Phys. 31(12), 3242-3266 (2004)], their results were roughly of the same order of accuracy. Their analysis revealed that the method is capable of sufficiently calibrating out-of-plane angles in cases of larger cone angles when neglecting these angles negatively affects the reconstruction. Fine details in the 3D reconstruction of the spine segment and an electronic device indicate a high geometric calibration accuracy and the capability to produce state-of-the-art reconstructions. Conclusions: The method introduced here makes no requirements on the accuracy of the test object. In contrast to many previous autocalibration methods their approach also includes out-of-plane rotations of the detector. Although assuming a perfect rotation, the method seems to be sufficiently accurate for a commercial CBCT scanner. For devices which require higher dimensional geometry models, the method could be used as a initial calibration procedure.

Gross, Daniel; Heil, Ulrich; Schulze, Ralf; Schoemer, Elmar; Schwanecke, Ulrich [Department of Design, Computer Science and Media, RheinMain University of Applied Sciences, 65195 Wiesbaden, Germany and Institute of Computer Science, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Oral Surgery (and Oral Radiology), University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Institute of Computer Science, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Design, Computer Science and Media, RheinMain University of Applied Sciences, 65195 Wiesbaden (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Canada  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012...

290

Kandidatexamensarbete i fysik Valbara projekt VT2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a nuclear reactor. In order to study this phenomenon, the diffusion coefficients of the system have and the related issues occurring in a nuclear reactor. They will develop their programming skills in C or C (polsson@kth.se) Generation IV reactors are designed in order to increase the burnup and decrease

Haviland, David

291

www.ictas.vt.edu NEW HORIZONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-1996, Felker worked in senior engineering positions at Kenetech Windpower. As manager of engineering modeling

Crawford, T. Daniel

292

www.ictas.vt.edu NEW HORIZONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative calls for an aggressive reduction in the overall systems costs by 75 are impressive, much work remains in addressing the challenges toward fully realizing the SunShot goal. The talk of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot Initiative. At DOE, he sets the science and technology

Crawford, T. Daniel

293

Conversion of the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density based on a single linear relationship: an experimental verification using a clinical dual-source CT scanner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In radiotherapy treatment planning, the conversion of the computed tomography (CT) number to electron density is one of the main processes that determine the accuracy of patient dose calculations. However, in general, the CT number and electron density of tissues cannot be interrelated using a simple one-to-one correspondence. This study aims to experimentally verify the clinical feasibility of an existing novel conversion method proposed by the author of this note, which converts the energy-subtracted CT number (?HU) to the relative electron density (?e) via a single linear relationship by using a dual-energy CT (DECT). The ?HU?econversion was performed using a clinical second-generation dual-source CT scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with tube potentials of 80kV and 140kV with and without an additional tin filter. The ?HU?ecalibration line was obtained from the DECT image acquisition for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom. In addition, the effect of object size on ?HU?econversion was also experimentally investigated. The plot of the measured ?HU versus nominal ?evalues exhibited a single linear relationship over a wide ?erange from 0.00 (air) to 2.35 (aluminum). The ?HU?econversion performed with the tin filter yielded a lower dose and more reliable ?evalues that were less affected by the object-size variation when compared to the corresponding values obtained for the case without the tin filter.

Masayoshi Tsukihara; Yoshiyuki Noto; Takahide Hayakawa; Masatoshi Saito

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Comparison of the efficiency of N2 and NH3 plasma treatments to improve the adhesion of PP films to in situ deposited Al coatings. Study of ageing phenomena in terms of acid-base properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports on the characteristics of polypropylene (PP) treated at two different frequencies, 70 kHz and 13.56 MHz, in two plasma atmospheres, NH3 and N2 plasmas. Chemical modifications created on the plasma-treated material were investigated by different complementary surface analytical techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements), which revealed a higher reactivity of the NH3 plasma. The incorporation of nitrogen plays an important role as revealed by the adhesion study of thermally evaporated aluminium with treated PP: the measured peel strengths were two times higher for NH3-treated surfaces than for N2-treated ones, with XPS measurements showing a sharper increase of N/C ratio as a function of treatment time for the former treatment. Ageing of the PP pretreated in NH3 was also studied in terms of surface acid-base properties. The work of adhesion, calculated from contact angle measurements, showed a distinct dependence on the pH value of the test liquids and good correlations were obtained with peel test results. The basic character of the NH3-treated PP disappears with ageing, leading to an amphoteric surface.

M. Tatoulian; F. Arefi-Khonsari; N. Shahidzadeh-Ahmadi; J. Amouroux

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

First pass cable artefact correction for cardiac C-arm CT imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cardiac C-arm CT imaging delivers a tomographic region-of-interest reconstruction of the patient's heart during image guided catheter interventions. Due to the limited size of the flat detector a volume image is reconstructed, which is truncated in the cone-beam (along the patient axis) and the fan-beam (in the transaxial plane) direction. To practically address this local tomography problem correction methods, like projection extension, are available for first pass image reconstruction. For second pass correction methods, like metal artefact reduction, alternative correction schemes are required when the field of view is limited to a region-of-interest of the patient. In classical CT imaging metal artefacts are corrected by metal identification in a first volume reconstruction and generation of a corrected projection data set followed by a second reconstruction. This approach fails when the metal structures are located outside the reconstruction field of view. When a C-arm CT is performed during a cardiac intervention pacing leads and other cables are frequently positioned on the patients skin, which results in propagating streak artefacts in the reconstruction volume. A first pass approach to reduce this type of artefact is introduced and evaluated here. It makes use of the fact that the projected position of objects outside the reconstruction volume changes with the projection perspective. It is shown that projection based identification, tracking and removal of high contrast structures like cables, only detected in a subset of the projections, delivers a more consistent reconstruction volume with reduced artefact level. The method is quantitatively evaluated based on 50 simulations using cardiac CT data sets with variable cable positioning. These data sets are forward projected using a C-arm CT system geometry and generate artefacts comparable to those observed in clinical cardiac C-arm CT acquisitions. A C-arm CT simulation of every cardiac CT data set without cables served as a ground truth. The 3D root mean square deviation between the simulated data set with and without cables could be reduced for 96% of the simulated cases by an average of 37% (min ?9%, max 73%) when using the first pass correction method. In addition, image quality improvement is demonstrated for clinical whole heart C-arm CT data sets when the cable removal algorithm was applied.

C Haase; D Schfer; M Kim; S J Chen; J D Carroll; P Eshuis; O Dssel; M Grass

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Adaptive mean filtering for noise reduction in CT polymer gel dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

X-ray computed tomography (CT) as a method of extracting 3D dose information from irradiated polymer gel dosimeters is showing potential as a practical means to implement gel dosimetry in a radiation therapy clinic. However, the response of CT contrast to dose is weak and noise reduction is critical in order to achieve adequate dose resolutions with this method. Phantom design and CT imaging technique have both been shown to decrease image noise. In addition, image postprocessing using noise reduction filtering techniques have been proposed. This work evaluates in detail the use of the adaptive mean filter for reducing noise in CT gel dosimetry. Filter performance is systematically tested using both synthetic patterns mimicking a range of clinical dose distribution features as well as actual clinical dose distributions. Both low and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) situations are examined. For all cases, the effects of filter kernel size and the number of iterations are investigated. Results indicate that adaptive mean filtering is a highly effective tool for noise reduction CT gel dosimetry. The optimum filtering strategy depends on characteristics of the dose distributions and image noise level. For low noise images (SNR {approx}20), the filtered results are excellent and use of adaptive mean filtering is recommended as a standard processing tool. For high noise images (SNR {approx}5) adaptive mean filtering can also produce excellent results, but filtering must be approached with more caution as spatial and dose distortions of the original dose distribution can occur.

Hilts, Michelle; Jirasek, Andrew [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia, V8R6V5 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, V8W2Y2 (Canada)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Malignant pleural mesothelioma: value of CT and MR imaging in predicting resectability  

SciTech Connect

OBJECTIVE. The objective was to determine if CT or MR imaging findings could be used to accurately predict resectability in patients with biopsy-proved malignant pleural mesotheliomas. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. CT and MR findings in 41 consecutive patients with malignant mesotheliomas who were referred to the thoracic surgery clinic for extrapleural pneumonectomy were studied by thoracic radiologists before surgery. Review of radiologic studies focused on local invasion of three separate regions: the diaphragm, chest wall, and mediastinum. Results of all imaging examinations were carefully correlated with intraoperative, gross, and microscopic pathologic findings. RESULTS. After radiologic and clinical evaluation, 34 patients (83%) had thoracotomy; 24 of these had tumors that were resectable. The sensitivity was high (> 90%) for both CT and MR in each region. Specificity, however, was low, probably because of the small number of patients with unresectable tumors. CONCLUSION. CT and MR provided similar information on resectability in most cases. Sensitivity was high for both procedures. Because CT is more widely available and used, the authors suggest it as the initial study when determining resectability. In difficult cases, important complementary anatomic information can be derived from MR images obtained before surgical intervention.

Patz, E.F. Jr.; Shaffer, K.; Piwnica-Worms, D.R.; Jochelson, M.; Sarin, M.; Sugarbaker, D.J.; Pugatch, R.D. (Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

3D Dose Verification Using Tomotherapy CT Detector Array  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate a three-dimensional dose verification method based on the exit dose using the onboard detector of tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study included 347 treatment fractions from 24 patients, including 10 prostate, 5 head and neck (HN), and 9 spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases. Detector sonograms were retrieved and back-projected to calculate entrance fluence, which was then forward-projected on the CT images to calculate the verification dose, which was compared with ion chamber and film measurement in the QA plans and with the planning dose in patient plans. Results: Root mean square (RMS) errors of 2.0%, 2.2%, and 2.0% were observed comparing the dose verification (DV) and the ion chamber measured point dose in the phantom plans for HN, prostate, and spinal SBRT patients, respectively. When cumulative dose in the entire treatment is considered, for HN patients, the error of the mean dose to the planning target volume (PTV) varied from 1.47% to 5.62% with a RMS error of 3.55%. For prostate patients, the error of the mean dose to the prostate target volume varied from -5.11% to 3.29%, with a RMS error of 2.49%. The RMS error of maximum doses to the bladder and the rectum were 2.34% (-4.17% to 2.61%) and 2.64% (-4.54% to 3.94%), respectively. For the nine spinal SBRT patients, the RMS error of the minimum dose to the PTV was 2.43% (-5.39% to 2.48%). The RMS error of maximum dose to the spinal cord was 1.05% (-2.86% to 0.89%). Conclusions: An excellent agreement was observed between the measurement and the verification dose. In the patient treatments, the agreement in doses to the majority of PTVs and organs at risk is within 5% for the cumulative treatment course doses. The dosimetric error strongly depends on the error in multileaf collimator leaf opening time with a sensitivity correlating to the gantry rotation period.

Sheng Ke, E-mail: ks2mc@virginia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Jones, Ryan; Yang Wensha; Saraiya, Siddharth; Schneider, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Chen Quan; Sobering, Geoff; Olivera, Gustavo [TomoTherapy, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Read, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

METALLICITIES, DUST, AND MOLECULAR CONTENT OF A QSO-DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEM REACHING log N(H I) = 22: AN ANALOG TO GRB-DLAs  

SciTech Connect

We present the elemental abundance and H{sub 2} content measurements of a damped Ly{alpha} (DLA) system with an extremely large H I column density, log N(H I) (cm{sup -2}) = 22.0 {+-} 0.10, at z{sub abs} = 3.287 toward the QSO SDSS J081634+144612. We measure column densities of H{sub 2}, C I, C I*, Zn II, Fe II, Cr II, Ni II, and Si II from a high signal-to-noise and high spectral resolution VLT-UVES spectrum. The overall metallicity of the system is [Zn/H] = -1.10 {+-} 0.10 relative to solar. Two molecular hydrogen absorption components are seen at z = 3.28667 and 3.28742 (a velocity separation of Almost-Equal-To 52 km s{sup -1}) in rotational levels up to J = 3. We derive a total H{sub 2} column density of log N(H{sub 2}) (cm{sup -2}) = 18.66 and a mean molecular fraction of f = 2N(H{sub 2})/[2N(H{sub 2}) + N(H I)] = 10{sup -3.04{+-}0.37}, typical of known H{sub 2}-bearing DLA systems. From the observed abundance ratios we conclude that dust is present in the interstellar medium of this galaxy, with an enhanced abundance in the H{sub 2}-bearing clouds. However, the total amount of dust along the line of sight is not large and does not produce any significant reddening of the background QSO. The physical conditions in the H{sub 2}-bearing clouds are constrained directly from the column densities of H{sub 2} in different rotational levels, C I and C I*. The kinetic temperature is found to be T Almost-Equal-To 75 K and the particle density lies in the range n{sub H} = 50-80 cm{sup -3}. The neutral hydrogen column density of this DLA is similar to the mean H I column density of DLAs observed at the redshift of {gamma}-ray bursts (GRBs). We explore the relationship between GRB-DLAs and the high column density end of QSO-DLAs finding that the properties (metallicity and depletion) of DLAs with log N(H I) > 21.5 in the two populations do not appear to be significantly different.

Guimaraes, R. [Programa de Modelagem Computacional-SENAI-Cimatec, 41650-010 Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Noterdaeme, P.; Petitjean, P. [UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis Blvd. Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Ledoux, C. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago 19 (Chile); Srianand, R.; Rahmani, H. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Lopez, S., E-mail: rguimara@eso.org [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Application of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for mouse dosimetry in micro-CT imaging  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Micro-CT is considered to be a powerful tool to investigate various models of disease on anesthetized animals. In longitudinal studies, the radiation dose delivered by the micro-CT to the same animal is a major concern as it could potentially induce spurious effects in experimental results. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) are a relatively new kind of detector used in radiation dosimetry for medical applications. The aim of this work was to assess the dose delivered by the CT component of a micro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT camera during a typical whole-body mouse study, using commercially available OSLDs based on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C crystals.Methods: CTDI (computed tomography dose index) was measured in micro-CT with a properly calibrated pencil ionization chamber using a rat-like phantom (60 mm in diameter) and a mouse-like phantom (30 mm in diameter). OSLDs were checked for reproducibility and linearity in the range of doses delivered by the micro-CT. Dose measurements obtained with OSLDs were compared to those of the ionization chamber to correct for the radiation quality dependence of OSLDs in the low-kV range. Doses to tissue were then investigated in phantoms and cadavers. A 30 mm diameter phantom, specifically designed to insert OSLDs, was used to assess radiation dose over a typical whole-body mouse imaging study. Eighteen healthy female BALB/c mice weighing 27.1 0.8 g (1 SD) were euthanized for small animal measurements. OLSDs were placed externally or implanted internally in nine different locations by an experienced animal technician. Five commonly used micro-CT protocols were investigated.Results: CTDI measurements were between 78.0 2.1 and 110.7 3.0 mGy for the rat-like phantom and between 169.3 4.6 and 203.6 5.5 mGy for the mouse-like phantom. On average, the displayed CTDI at the operator console was underestimated by 1.19 for the rat-like phantom and 2.36 for the mouse-like phantom. OSLDs exhibited a reproducibility of 2.4% and good linearity was found between 60 and 450 mGy. The energy scaling factor was calculated to be between 1.80 0.16 and 1.86 0.16, depending on protocol used. In phantoms, mean doses to tissue over a whole-body CT examination were ranging from 186.4 7.6 to 234.9 7.1 mGy. In mice, mean doses to tissue in the mouse trunk (thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and flanks) were between 213.0 17.0 and 251.2 13.4 mGy. Skin doses (3 OSLDs) were much higher with average doses between 350.6 25.3 and 432.5 34.1 mGy. The dose delivered during a topogram was found to be below 10 mGy. Use of the multimouse bed of the system gave a significantly 20%40% lower dose per animal (p < 0.05).Conclusions: Absorbed doses in micro-CT were found to be relatively high. In micro-SPECT/CT imaging, the micro-CT unit is mainly used to produce a localization frame. As a result, users should pay attention to adjustable CT parameters so as to minimize the radiation dose and avoid any adverse radiation effects which may interfere with biological parameters studied.

Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Courteau, Alan; Oudot, Alexandra; Collin, Bertrand [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-Franois Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex (France)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-Franois Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex (France); Ranouil, Julien [Landauer Europe, 33 avenue du Gnral Leclerc, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92266 Cedex (France)] [Landauer Europe, 33 avenue du Gnral Leclerc, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92266 Cedex (France); Morgand, Loc; Raguin, Olivier [Oncodesign, 20 rue Jean Mazen, Dijon 21076 Cedex (France)] [Oncodesign, 20 rue Jean Mazen, Dijon 21076 Cedex (France); Walker, Paul [LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)] [LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France); Brunotte, Franois [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-Franois Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex, France and LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-Franois Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex, France and LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Tiu Ch Chn La D n Khi Phc Sm Vo ngy 21 thng 4 nm 2011, cc y Vin nh Gi Tn Hi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

con ngi bng cách khôi phc, phc hi môi trng sng, thay th, hoc thu gom mt lng tng ng vi ngun tài nguyên thiên nhiên có cht lng, giá tr sinh thái hoc dân dng tng ng n bù các tài nguyên và dch v b tn hi t s c, nhng vn c chp nhn và hu ích giúp sàng lc mt s lng ln các d án có tim nng. Không mt yu t nào c s dng nh

302

Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Radiology, Shanghai 6th People's Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Xuhui, Shanghai (China); Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States) and Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Correction of CT artifacts and its influence on Monte Carlo dose calculations  

SciTech Connect

Computed tomography (CT) images of patients having metallic implants or dental fillings exhibit severe streaking artifacts. These artifacts may disallow tumor and organ delineation and compromise dose calculation outcomes in radiotherapy. We used a sinogram interpolation metal streaking artifact correction algorithm on several phantoms of exact-known compositions and on a prostate patient with two hip prostheses. We compared original CT images and artifact-corrected images of both. To evaluate the effect of the artifact correction on dose calculations, we performed Monte Carlo dose calculation in the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc code. For the phantoms, we performed calculations in the exact geometry, in the original CT geometry and in the artifact-corrected geometry for photon and electron beams. The maximum errors in 6 MV photon beam dose calculation were found to exceed 25% in original CT images when the standard DOSXYZnrc/CTCREATE calibration is used but less than 2% in artifact-corrected images when an extended calibration is used. The extended calibration includes an extra calibration point for a metal. The patient dose volume histograms of a hypothetical target irradiated by five 18 MV photon beams in a hypothetical treatment differ significantly in the original CT geometry and in the artifact-corrected geometry. This was found to be mostly due to miss-assignment of tissue voxels to air due to metal artifacts. We also developed a simple Monte Carlo model for a CT scanner and we simulated the contribution of scatter and beam hardening to metal streaking artifacts. We found that whereas beam hardening has a minor effect on metal artifacts, scatter is an important cause of these artifacts.

Bazalova, Magdalena; Beaulieu, Luc; Palefsky, Steven; Verhaegen, Frank [Medical Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, H3G1A4 (Canada); Department de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, G1K7P4 (Canada) and Department de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec, G1R2J6 (Canada); Medical Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, H3G1A4 (Canada)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Resolution enhancement of lung 4D-CT data using multiscale interphase iterative nonlocal means  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Four-dimensional computer tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in lung cancer radiotherapy due to its capability in providing important tumor motion information. However, the prolonged scanning duration required by 4D-CT causes considerable increase in radiation dose. To minimize the radiation-related health risk, radiation dose is often reduced at the expense of interslice spatial resolution. However, inadequate resolution in 4D-CT causes artifacts and increases uncertainty in tumor localization, which eventually results in extra damages of healthy tissues during radiotherapy. In this paper, the authors propose a novel postprocessing algorithm to enhance the resolution of lung 4D-CT data. Methods: The authors' premise is that anatomical information missing in one phase can be recovered from the complementary information embedded in other phases. The authors employ a patch-based mechanism to propagate information across phases for the reconstruction of intermediate slices in the longitudinal direction, where resolution is normally the lowest. Specifically, the structurally matching and spatially nearby patches are combined for reconstruction of each patch. For greater sensitivity to anatomical details, the authors employ a quad-tree technique to adaptively partition the image for more fine-grained refinement. The authors further devise an iterative strategy for significant enhancement of anatomical details. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm using a publicly available lung data that consist of 10 4D-CT cases. The authors' algorithm gives very promising results with significantly enhanced image structures and much less artifacts. Quantitative analysis shows that the authors' algorithm increases peak signal-to-noise ratio by 3-4 dB and the structural similarity index by 3%-5% when compared with the standard interpolation-based algorithms. Conclusions: The authors have developed a new algorithm to improve the resolution of 4D-CT. It outperforms the conventional interpolation-based approaches by producing images with the markedly improved structural clarity and greatly reduced artifacts.

Zhang Yu [School of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China and Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Yap, Pew-Thian; Wu Guorong [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Feng Qianjin; Chen Wufan [School of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Lian Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Shen Dinggang [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Resolution enhancement of lung 4D-CT via group-sparsity  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: 4D-CT typically delivers more accurate information about anatomical structures in the lung, over 3D-CT, due to its ability to capture visual information of the lung motion across different respiratory phases. This helps to better determine the dose during radiation therapy for lung cancer. However, a critical concern with 4D-CT that substantially compromises this advantage is the low superior-inferior resolution due to less number of acquired slices, in order to control the CT radiation dose. To address this limitation, the authors propose an approach to reconstruct missing intermediate slices, so as to improve the superior-inferior resolution.Methods: In this method the authors exploit the observation that sampling information across respiratory phases in 4D-CT can be complimentary due to lung motion. The authors approach uses this locally complimentary information across phases in a patch-based sparse-representation framework. Moreover, unlike some recent approaches that treat local patches independently, the authors approach employs the group-sparsity framework that imposes neighborhood and similarity constraints between patches. This helps in mitigating the trade-off between noise robustness and structure preservation, which is an important consideration in resolution enhancement. The authors discuss the regularizing ability of group-sparsity, which helps in reducing the effect of noise and enables better structural localization and enhancement.Results: The authors perform extensive experiments on the publicly available DIR-Lab Lung 4D-CT dataset [R. Castillo, E. Castillo, R. Guerra, V. Johnson, T. McPhail, A. Garg, and T. Guerrero, A framework for evaluation of deformable image registration spatial accuracy using large landmark point sets, Phys. Med. Biol. 54, 18491870 (2009)]. First, the authors carry out empirical parametric analysis of some important parameters in their approach. The authors then demonstrate, qualitatively as well as quantitatively, the ability of their approach to achieve more accurate and better localized results over bicubic interpolation as well as a related state-of-the-art approach. The authors also show results on some datasets with tumor, to further emphasize the clinical importance of their method.Conclusions: The authors have proposed to improve the superior-inferior resolution of 4D-CT by estimating intermediate slices. The authors approach exploits neighboring constraints in the group-sparsity framework, toward the goal of achieving better localization and noise robustness. The authors results are encouraging, and positively demonstrate the role of group-sparsity for 4D-CT resolution enhancement.

Bhavsar, Arnav; Wu, Guorong; Shen, Dinggang [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lian, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

DOE/EIA-0131(96) Distribution Category/UC-960 Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ID ID OR WY ND SD CA NV UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA IL IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Japan Mexico Mexico Algeria Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada United Arab Emirates Interstate Movements of Natural Gas in the United States, 1996 (Volumes Reported in Million Cubic Feet) Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To (T) AL KY (T) MA ME (T) AL LA MA NH (T) AL MO (T) MA NJ (T) AL SC MD DC CT RI RI MA DE MD VA DC MA CT (T) Trucked Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." E I A NERGY NFORMATION DMINISTRATION 906,407 355,260 243,866 220 384,311 576,420 823,799 842,114 27,271 126,012 133 602,841 266 579,598 16,837 268,138 48,442 182,511 219,242 86,897 643,401 619,703 8,157 937,806 292,711 869,951 12,316 590,493 118,256

307

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WA WA MT ID OR WY ND SD CA NV UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA IL IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Japan Mexico Mexico Algeria Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada United Arab Emirates Australia Australia Trinidad Qatar Malaysia Canada Mexico Interstate Movements of Natural Gas in the United States, 1999 (Volumes Reported in Million Cubic Feet) Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To (T) AL TX MA NH CT RI MD DC DE MD RI MA MA CT VA DC (T) Trucked Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." E I A NERGY NFORMATION DMINISTRATION 837,902 415,636 225,138 232 308,214 805,614 803,034 800,345 685 147 628,589 9,786 790,088 17,369 278,302 40,727 214,076 275,629 51,935 843,280 826,638 9,988 998,603 553,440 896,187 11,817 629,551 98,423

308

Phase I and Pharmacokinetic Study of CT-322 (BMS-844203), a Targeted Adnectin Inhibitor of VEGFR-2 Based on a Domain of Human Fibronectin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, New Jersey Note: Supplementary...or biweekly (q2w). Plasma samples were assayed for CT-322 concentrations, plasma VEGF-A concentrations...kg qw or q2w. CT-322 plasma concentrations increased...

Anthony W. Tolcher; Christopher J. Sweeney; Kyri Papadopoulos; Amita Patnaik; Elena G. Chiorean; Alain C. Mita; Kamalesh Sankhala; Eric Furfine; Jochem Gokemeijer; Lisa Iacono; Cheryl Eaton; Bruce A. Silver; and Monica Mita

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Patterns of Colorectal Cancer Test Use, Including CT Colonography, in the 2010 National Health Interview Survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Trial of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN), CT...for one type of service such as dental care, vision care, or prescriptions...Cancer, and American College of Radiology.Radiology 2008;248:717-20. 9. Johnson...

Jean A. Shapiro; Carrie N. Klabunde; Trevor D. Thompson; Marion R. Nadel; Laura C. Seeff; and Arica White

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Derby, CT, that achieves a HERS score of 45 without PV or HERS 26 with PV. The production home is one of a development of 7 two-story, 4,000+-ft2...

311

A semi-automatic semantic method for mapping SNOMED CT concepts to VCM icons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A semi-automatic semantic method for mapping SNOMED CT concepts to VCM icons Jean-Baptiste Lamya of Concept in Medicine) is an iconic lan- guage for representing key medical concepts by icons. How- ever icons to the terms of these terminologies. Here, we present and evaluate a semi-automatic semantic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

312

DAWN: A JOURNEY TO THE BEGINNING OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM C.T. Russell(1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ray/neutron spectrometer, a magnetometer and a gravity investigation. Dawn uses solar arrays to power its xenon ion engine solar panels roughly 21 m tip-to-tip, a 5 m magnetometer boom and three ion thrusters, one of whichDAWN: A JOURNEY TO THE BEGINNING OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM C.T. Russell(1) , A. Coradini(2) , W

Zuber, Maria

313

Multi-energy CT Based on a Prior Rank, Intensity and Sparsity Model (PRISM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-energy CT Based on a Prior Rank, Intensity and Sparsity Model (PRISM) Hao Gao1 , Hengyong Yu2 spectrum. Besides, the energy-dependent intensity information can be incorporated into the PRISM in terms on the generalized rank and sparsity of a multi-energy image, and intensity/spectral characteristics of base

Soatto, Stefano

314

Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector.Methods: Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom.Results: In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%63% and 4%34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%30% (with Al filtration) and 32%38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for detection of microcalcifications was higher by greater than 19% (for the different energy weighting methods tested) as compared to the AUC obtained with an energy integrating detector.Conclusions: This study showed that breast CT with a CZT photon counting detector using energy weighting can provide improvements in pixel SNR, and detectability of microcalcifications as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector. Since a number of degrading physical factors were not modeled into the photon counting detector, this improvement should be considered as an upper bound on achievable performance.

Kalluri, Kesava S. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 and Biomedical Engineering and Biotechnology Program, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 and Biomedical Engineering and Biotechnology Program, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Mahd, Mufeed [Biomedical Engineering and Biotechnology Program, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)] [Biomedical Engineering and Biotechnology Program, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Glick, Stephen J. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Comparison of blood flow models and acquisitions for quantitative myocardial perfusion estimation from dynamic CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be estimated from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) cardiac CT acquisitions, leading to quantitative assessment of regional perfusion. The need for low radiation dose and the lack of consensus on MBF estimation methods motivates this study to refine the selection of acquisition protocols and models for CT-derived MBF. DCE cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (MBF = 0.5, 1, 2, 3ml (min g)?1, cardiac output = 3, 5, 8 L min?1). Patient kinetics were generated by a mathematical model of iodine exchange incorporating numerous physiological features including heterogenenous microvascular flow, permeability and capillary contrast gradients. CT acquisitions were simulated for multiple realizations of realistic x-ray flux levels. CT acquisitions that reduce radiation exposure were implemented by varying both temporal sampling (1, 2, and 3s sampling intervals) and tube currents (140, 70, and 25 mAs). For all acquisitions, we compared three quantitative MBF estimation methods (two-compartment model, an axially-distributed model, and the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneous model) and a qualitative slope-based method. In total, over 11000 time attenuation curves were used to evaluate MBF estimation in multiple patient and imaging scenarios. After iodine-based beam hardening correction, the slope method consistently underestimated flow by on average 47.5% and the quantitative models provided estimates with less than 6.5% average bias and increasing variance with increasing dose reductions. The three quantitative models performed equally well, offering estimates with essentially identical root mean squared error (RMSE) for matched acquisitions. MBF estimates using the qualitative slope method were inferior in terms of bias and RMSE compared to the quantitative methods. MBF estimate error was equal at matched dose reductions for all quantitative methods and range of techniques evaluated. This suggests that there is no particular advantage between quantitative estimation methods nor to performing dose reduction via tube current reduction compared to temporal sampling reduction. These data are important for optimizing implementation of cardiac dynamic CT in clinical practice and in prospective CT MBF trials.

Michael Bindschadler; Dimple Modgil; Kelley R Branch; Patrick J La Riviere; Adam M Alessio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia using Cu-ZSM-5 and Va-based honeycomb monolith catalysts: effect of H2 pretreatment, NH3-to-NO ratio, O2, and space velocity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, the steady-state performance of zeolite-based (Cu-ZSM-5) and vanadium-based honeycomb monolith catalysts was investigated in the selective catalytic reduction process (SCR) for NO removal using NH3. The aim was to delineate the effect...

Gupta, Saurabh

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

317

Experimental and Theoretical EPR Study of Jahn?Teller-Active [HIPTN[subscript 3]N]MoL Complexes (L = N[subscript 2], CO, NH[subscript 3])  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The trigonally symmetric Mo(III) coordination compounds [HIPTN[subscript 3]N]MoL (L = N[subscript 2], CO, NH[subscript 3]; [HIPTN3N]Mo = [(3,5-(2,4,6-i-Pr[subscript 3]C[subscript 6]H[subscript 2])[subscript 2]C[subscript ...

McNaughton, Rebecca L.

318

Lack of Correlation Between External Fiducial Positions and Internal Tumor Positions During Breath-Hold CT  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: For thoracic tumors, if four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is unavailable, the internal margin can be estimated by use of breath-hold (BH) CT scans acquired at end inspiration (EI) and end expiration (EE). By use of external surrogates for tumor position, BH accuracy is estimated by minimizing the difference between respiratory extrema BH and mean equivalent-phase free breathing (FB) positions. We tested the assumption that an external surrogate for BH accuracy correlates with internal tumor positional accuracy during BH CT. Methods and Materials: In 16 lung cancer patients, 4DCT images, as well as BH CT images at EI and EE, were acquired. Absolute differences between BH and mean equivalent-phase (FB) positions were calculated for both external fiducials and gross tumor volume (GTV) centroids as metrics of external and internal BH accuracy, respectively, and the results were correlated. Results: At EI, the absolute difference between mean FB and BH fiducial displacement correlated poorly with the absolute difference between FB and BH GTV centroid positions on CT images (R{sup 2} = 0.11). Similarly, at EE, the absolute difference between mean FB and BH fiducial displacements correlated poorly with the absolute difference between FB and BH GTV centroid positions on CT images (R{sup 2} = 0.18). Conclusions: External surrogates for tumor position are not an accurate metric of BH accuracy for lung cancer patients. This implies that care should be taken when using such an approach because an incorrect internal margin could be generated.

Hunjan, Sandeep, E-mail: shunjan@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Starkschall, George; Prado, Karl; Dong Lei; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

A synchroton single crystal X-ray structure determination of (NH4)3Mo4P3O16: A microporous molybdenum phosphate with Mo4O6+4 cubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reaction of MoO3, Mo, (NH4)2HPO4, H3PO4, and H2O in a mole ratio of 1.4:1:3.6:6:120 at 360C for 16 hr gives a nearly quantitative yield of black cubes of (NH4)3Mo4P3O16 (1). The structure of (1) was solved from data collected on a 30 30 30 ?m3 crystal at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The compound is cubic, space group P43m, with a = 7.736(2) , and was refined to residuals of R(Rw) = 0.035(0.049). Phosphate (1) is isotypic with Cs3Mo4P3O16 and is related to the iron arsenate mineral pharmacosiderite. Unlike the Cs+ compound, (1) can be rendered microporous by thermal removal of the NH+4 cations to give ammonia with the charge compensating proton remaining behind in the lattice. Water absorption isotherms show the reversible uptake of 5.6 wt% water, which corresponds to over 15 vol% void space in (1) after the NH3 removal. The framework consists of Mo4O6+4 cubes, with six Mo?Mo contacts of 2.570(4) , joined together together by (PO4)62 along ?100? to form a 3-D network composed of tetramers of triply edge-sharing Mo-centered octahedra and phosphate groups alternating along all ?100? directions. The windows and cavities in (1) are large enough that the NH+4 cations occupy several different positions in the unit cell.

H.E. King Jr.; Linda A. Mundi; Karl G. Strohmaier; Robert C. Haushalter

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Interfractional Prostate Shifts: Review of 1870 Computed Tomography (CT) Scans Obtained During Image-Guided Radiotherapy Using CT-on-Rails for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To review 1870 CT scans of interfractional prostate shift obtained during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 1870 pretreatment CT scans were acquired with CT-on-rails, and the corresponding shift data for 329 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. Results: Of the 1870 scans reviewed, 44% required no setup adjustments in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction, 14% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 29% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 13% had shifts of >10 mm. In the superior-inferior direction, 81% had no adjustments, 2% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 15% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 2% had shifts of >10 mm. In the left-right direction, 65% had no adjustment, 13% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 17% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 5% had shifts of >10 mm. Further analysis of the first 66 consecutive patients divided into three groups according to body mass index indicates that the shift in the AP direction for the overweight subgroup was statistically larger than those for the control and obese subgroups (p < 0.05). The interfractional shift in the lateral direction for the obese group (1 SD, 5.5 mm) was significantly larger than those for the overweight and control groups (4.1 and 2.9 mm, respectively) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These data demonstrate that there is a significantly greater shift in the AP direction than in the lateral and superior-inferior directions for the entire patient group. Overweight and obese patient groups show a significant difference from the control group in terms of prostate shift.

Wong, James R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, NJ (United States)], E-mail: james.wong@atlantichealth.org; Gao Zhanrong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, NJ (United States); Uematsu, Minoru [Department of Radiation Oncology, UAS Oncology Center, Kagoshima (Japan); Merrick, Scott; Machernis, Nolan P.; Chen, Timothy; Cheng, C.W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, NJ (United States)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vt nh ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Application of x-ray tomography to optimization of new NOx/NH3 mixed potential sensors for vehicle on-board emissions control  

SciTech Connect

Mixed potential sensors for the detection of hydrocarbons, NO{sub x}, and NH{sub 3} have been previously developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The LANL sensors have a unique design incorporating dense ceramic-pelletlmetal-wire electrodes and porous electrolytes. The performance of current-biased sensors using an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and platinum and La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}CrO{sub 3} electrodes is reported. X-ray tomography has been applied to non-destructively examine internal structures of these sensors. NO{sub x} and hydrocarbon response of the sensors under various bias conditions is reported, and very little NO{sub x} response hysteresis was observed. The application of a 0.6 {mu}A bias to these sensors shifts the response from a hydrocarbon response to a NO{sub x} response equal for both NO and NO{sub 2} species at approximately 500 {sup o}C in air.

Nelson, Mark A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brosha, Eric L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garzon, Fernando H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The Surface Texturing of Monocrystalline Silicon with NH4OH and Ion Implantation for Applications in Solar Cells Compatible with CMOS Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work presents the development of photovoltaic cells based on p+/n junction in Si substrates, aimed at compatibility with fabrication processes with CMOS technology. The compatible processes, which are developed in this study, are the techniques: i) Si surface texturing, with the textured surface reflection of 15% obtained by the formation of micro-pyramids (heights between 3 and 7?m) using NH4OH (ammonium hydroxide) alkaline solution, which is free of undesirable contamination by Na+ and K+ ions, when NaOH and KOH traditional solutions are used, respectively, and ii) of the ECR-CVD (Electron Cyclotron Resonance - Chemical Vapor Deposition) deposition of SiNx (silicon nitride) anti-reflective coating (ARC), which is carried out at room temperature and can be performed after the end of cell fabrication without damage on metallic tracks and without variation of p+/n junction depth. The ARC coating characterization presented that the silicon nitride has a refractive index of 1.92 and a minimum reflectance of 1.03%, which is an excellent result for application in solar (or photovoltaic) cells. For the formation of the pn junction was used ion implantation process with 11B+, E=20KeV, dose of 1x1015cm2 and four rotations of 90 to get uniformity on texturized surfaces.

A.R. Silva; J. Miyoshi; J.A. Diniz; I. Doi; J. Godoy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A photoemission study of Au, Ge, and O{sub 2} deposition on NH{sub 4}F etched Si(111)  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the interaction of a metal, Au, a semiconductor, Ge, and a non-metal, O{sub 2}, with the NH{sub 4}F etched Si(111) surface with photoemission spectroscopy. Two components were present in Si 2p core level spectra from the H-terminated surface. We observed the flat band condition from the as-etched, n-type, Si(111) surface. We performed stepwise depositions of Au and measured the band bending with photoemission spectroscopy. The Fermi level pinned near mid-gap as Au was deposited onto the as-etched surface. After the deposition of 1 ML of Au, a Au-silicide layer formed. This interfacial component indicated that the passivating H layer was compromised. As the Au coverage was increased, layers of pure Au formed between the bulk silicon and the Au-silicide layer. The observed behavior was nearly identical to that of Au deposition on the Si(111) 7 {times} 7 surface. Next, we tested the ability of the monohydride layer to sustain surfactant assisted growth of Ge. Ge islanding was observed at 400{degree}C indicating that good surfactant growth was not obtained. Although the monohydride layer was not a good surfactant for the Si(111) surface at this temperature, further study at different temperatures is needed to determine the ability of the ideal monohydride layer to act as a surfactant. Finally, we observed no oxidation of the as-etched surface at room temperature upon exposure to molecular oxygen.

Terry, J.; Cao, R.; Wigren, C.; Pianetta, P.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Thermochemical treatments based on NH3/O2 for improved graphite-based fiber electrodes in vanadium redox flow batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Electrochemical behavior of the polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based graphite as a low cost electrode material for vanadium based redox batteries (VFB) in sulfuric acid medium has been improved by means of the successful introduction of nitrogen and oxygen-containing groups at the graphite surface by thermal activation under NH3/O2 (1:1) atmosphere. Influence of the temperature and treatment duration times have been studied towards the positive reaction of VFB. The structure, composition, and electrochemical properties of the treated samples have been characterized with field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The estimation of electrochemical surface area has also been evaluated. The treatment of PAN graphite material at 773K for 24-h leads to electrode materials with the best electrochemical activity towards the VO 2 + /VO2+ redox couple. This method produces an increase of the nitrogen and oxygen content at the surface up to 8% and 32%, respectively, and is proved to be a straightforward and cost-effective methodology. This improvement of the electrochemical properties is attributed to the incorporation of the nitrogen and oxygen-containing groups that facilitate the electron transfer through the electrode/electrolyte interface for both oxidation and reduction processes.

Cristina Flox; Javier Rubio-Garca; Marcel Skoumal; Teresa Andreu; Juan Ramn Morante

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Instructions for completing Form W-4VT Who must complete Form W-4VT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is different from the federal W-4. This would include employees anticipating Child Tax Credit, Hope Credit, or other federal credits which do not pass through to Vermont income tax and employees who are in civil- tional allowances for Federal tax because of an anticipated child credit or education credit, do

Simaan, Nabil

326

How California Came to Pass AB 32, the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), a coalition of seven eastNH, NJ, NY and VT). But, RGGI focuses solely on emissionsGHG emissions. Moreover, the RGGI cap is less stringent than

Hanemann, W. Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Reference dosimetry during diagnostic CT examination using XR-QA radiochromic film model  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The authors applied 2D reference dosimetry protocol for dose measurements using XR-QA radiochromic film model during diagnostic computed tomography (CT) examinations carried out on patients and humanoid Rando phantom. Methods: Response of XR-QA model GAFCHROMIC film reference dosimetry system was calibrated in terms of Air-Kerma in air. Four most commonly used CT protocols were selected on their CT scanner (GE Lightspeed VCT 64), covering three anatomical sites (head, chest, and abdomen). For each protocol, 25 patients ongoing planned diagnostic CT examination were recruited. Surface dose was measured using four or eight film strips taped on patients' skin and on Rando phantom. Film pieces were scanned prior to and after irradiation using Epson Expression 10000XL document scanner. Optical reflectance of the unexposed film piece was subtracted from exposed one to obtain final net reflectance change, which is subsequently converted to dose using previously established calibration curves. Results: The authors' measurements show that body skin dose variation has a sinusoidal pattern along the scanning axis due to the helical movement of the x-ray tube, and a comb pattern for head dose measurements due to its axial movement. Results show that the mean skin dose at anterior position for patients is (51 {+-} 6) mGy, (29 {+-} 11) mGy, (45 {+-} 13) mGy and (38 {+-} 20) mGy for head, abdomen, angio Abdomen, and chest and abdomen protocol (UP position), respectively. The obtained experimental dose length products (DLP) show higher values than CT based DLP taken from the scanner console for body protocols, but lower values for the head protocol. Internal dose measurements inside the phantom's head indicate nonuniformity of dose distribution within scanned volume. Conclusions: In this work, the authors applied an Air-Kerma in air based radiochromic film reference dosimetry protocol for in vivo skin dose measurements. In this work, they employed green channel extracted from the scanned RGB image for dose measurements in the range from 0 to 200 mGy. Measured skin doses and corresponding DLPs were higher than DLPs provided by the CT scanner manufacturer as they were measured on patients' skin.

Boivin, Jonathan; Tomic, Nada; Fadlallah, Bassam; DeBlois, Francois; Devic, Slobodan [Institut de Genie Biomedical, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montral, Quebec H3G 1A4, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, SMBD Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, 3755 chemin de la Cote-Sainte-Catherine, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Engineering, SMBD Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2 (Canada); Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, SMBD Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2 (Canada)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Ab initio potential energy surfaces for NH,,3 -...NH,,3 -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1063/1.3268920 I. INTRODUCTION The field of cold T 1 K and ultracold 1 mK molecules has attracted great interest in the last few years. The production of such ultra cold species may find impor- tant applications,11 There are, in principle, two different strate- gies for producing molecular samples at ultra low tempera

329

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Natural Gas",69.2,13.8,2.9,1.7,1.1,10.9,5.7,2.3,2.8

330

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Computers and Other Electronics",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,4.7,1,0.5,0.5,3.7,1.7,1.4,0.5 1,46.9,8.7,2.3,1,1.3,6.4,3.2,2,1.2 2,24.3,4.3,1.2,0.5,0.7,3.1,1.4,0.9,0.8

331

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Televisions in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Televisions in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Televisions",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.4,0.1,0.1,"Q",0.2,"Q","Q","Q" 1,24.2,4.6,1.2,0.6,0.6,3.5,2,1,0.4

332

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Diego  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diego to Diego to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Diego on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Diego on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Diego on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Diego on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Diego on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Diego on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY NC | OH | OR | PA | SC TN | TX | VT | VI | VA WA | WI San Diego County, California Energy Upgrade California Motivates Home Improvements in San Diego County

333

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions Figure F6. Coal Supply Regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI MT NE IA KS MI AZ NM 500 0 SCALE IN MILES APPALACHIA Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia INTERIOR NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS Eastern Interior Western Interior Gulf Lignite Dakota Lignite Western Montana Wyoming, Northern Powder River Basin Wyoming, Southern Powder River Basin Western Wyoming OTHER WEST Rocky Mountain Southwest Northwest KY AK 1000 0 SCALE IN MILES Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office

334

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Alabama - SEP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alabama - Alabama - SEP to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Alabama - SEP on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Alabama - SEP on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Alabama - SEP on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Alabama - SEP on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Alabama - SEP on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Alabama - SEP on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY NC | OH | OR | PA | SC TN | TX | VT | VI | VA WA | WI Alabama - SEP Alabama Program Takes a Dual Approach to Energy Efficiency Upgrades

335

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Space Heating",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do "

336

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Average Square Footage of Northeast Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 0 Average Square Footage of Northeast Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Northeast",20.8,2121,1663,921,836,656,363 "Northeast Divisions and States" "New England",5.5,2232,1680,625,903,680,253 "Massachusetts",2.5,2076,1556,676,850,637,277 "CT, ME, NH, RI, VT",3,2360,1781,583,946,714,234 "Mid-Atlantic",15.3,2080,1657,1028,813,647,402

337

Preliminary Release: April 19, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Total Square Footage of Northeast Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 2 Total Square Footage of Northeast Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,,"Total Square Footage" ,"Housing Units1","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Billions","Billions","Billions" "Total Northeast",20.8,44.1,34.5,19.1 "Northeast Divisions and States" "New England",5.5,12.3,9.3,3.4 "Massachusetts",2.5,5.1,3.9,1.7 "CT, ME, NH, RI, VT",3,7.2,5.4,1.8 "Mid-Atlantic",15.3,31.7,25.3,15.7 "New York",7.2,13.2,10.6,4.9 "Pennsylvania",4.9,11,8.4,5.9 "New Jersey",3.2,7.6,6.2,4.9 "Urban and Rural3"

338

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Virginia - SEP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virginia - Virginia - SEP to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Virginia - SEP on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Virginia - SEP on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Virginia - SEP on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Virginia - SEP on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Virginia - SEP on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Virginia - SEP on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY NC | OH | OR | PA | SC TN | TX | VT | VI | VA WA | WI Virginia - SEP Virginia's Regional Energy Alliances Help Forge a State Program for

339

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Austin, Texas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Austin, Texas Austin, Texas to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Austin, Texas on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Austin, Texas on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Austin, Texas on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Austin, Texas on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Austin, Texas on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Austin, Texas on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY NC | OH | OR | PA | SC TN | TX | VT | VI | VA WA | WI Austin, Texas Austin Energy Accelerates Residential and Multifamily Efficiency Upgrades

340

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Michigan - SEP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- - SEP to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Michigan - SEP on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Michigan - SEP on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Michigan - SEP on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Michigan - SEP on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Michigan - SEP on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Michigan - SEP on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY NC | OH | OR | PA | SC TN | TX | VT | VI | VA WA | WI Michigan - SEP Better Buildings Means Better Business for Michigan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vt nh ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Household Demographics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Household Demographics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Household Demographics",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,6,1.5,0.7,0.8,4.5,2.1,1.6,0.8 "2 Persons",35.8,6.3,1.8,0.8,1,4.5,2,1.5,0.9

342

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" ,,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Urban and Rural2" "Urban",88.1,18,4.4,2.2,2.2,13.6,6.6,3.9,3.1 "Rural",25.5,2.8,1.1,0.3,0.8,1.7,0.6,1,"Q"

343

New England Wind Forum: Publications  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Connecticut Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Publications This page lists publications for New England. Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Total of 298 records found. Page 1 of 30, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Publication and Potential New England Wind Forum Information 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title More Details

344

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Economics  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Cost Components Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England How does wind compare to the cost of other electricity options? Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Wind Power Economics Long-Term Cost Trends Since the first major installations of commercial-scale wind turbines in the 1980s, the cost of energy from wind power projects has decreased substantially due to larger turbine generators, towers, and rotor lengths; scale economies associated with larger projects; improvements in manufacturing efficiency, and technological advances in turbine generator and blade design. These technological advances have allowed for higher generating capacities per turbine and more efficient capture of wind, especially at lower wind speeds.

345

New England Wind Forum: Large Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Small Wind Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Large Wind When establishing wind farms, wind energy developers generally approach landowners where they want to build. Interest in wind farms is frequently spurred by external pressures such as tax and other financial incentives and legislative mandates. Since each situation is influenced by local policies and permitting, we can only provide general guidance to help you learn about the process of installing wind turbines. Publications Wind Project Development Process Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities: A Handbook. (August 2002). National Wind Coordinating Collaborative. Landowner Frequently Asked Questions and Answers. (August 2003). "State Wind Working Group Handbook." pp. 130-133.

346

New England Wind Forum: New England Wind Projects  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share New England Wind Projects This page shows the location of installed and planned New England wind projects. Find windfarms, community-scale wind projects, customer-sited wind projects, small wind projects, and offshore wind projects. Read more information about how to use the Google Map and how to add your wind project to the map. Text version New England Wind Energy Projects Connecticut, East Canaan Wind Connecticut, Klug Farm Connecticut, Phoenix Press Connecticut, Wind Colebrook (South and North)

347

New England Wind Forum: Past Webinars  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Connecticut Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Newsletter Perspectives Events Past Webinars Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Past Webinars Here you will find audio visual files and transcripts of webinars hosted by the New England Wind Energy Project (NEWEEP). You can also learn about upcoming NEWEEP webinars. Title: Wind Power as a Neighbor: Experience with Techniques for Mitigating Public Impacts: A NEWEEP Webinar Speaker(s): Charles Newcomb, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; John Knab, Sheldon, NY; Nils Bolgen, Massachusetts Clean Energy Center Date: 12/7/2011 Running time: 2 hour, 20 minutes Title: Understanding the Current Science, Regulation, and Mitigation of Shadow Flicker: A NEWEEP Webinar

348

New England Wind Forum: New England Wind Energy Education Project  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Webinars Webinars Conference Historic Wind Development in New England State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share New England Wind Energy Education Project The New England Wind Energy Education Project (NEWEEP) is designed to complement the New England Wind Forum website and newsletter as a comprehensive source of objective information on wind energy issues in the New England region. The project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) former Wind Powering America Initiative under a 2-year grant, began as an eight-part webinar series and a conference. The NEWEEP webinar series provides the public with objective information to allow informed decisions about proposed wind energy projects throughout the New England region.

349

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Toledo, Ohio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Toledo, Ohio Toledo, Ohio to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Toledo, Ohio on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Toledo, Ohio on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Toledo, Ohio on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Toledo, Ohio on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Toledo, Ohio on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Toledo, Ohio on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY NC | OH | OR | PA | SC TN | TX | VT | VI | VA WA | WI Toledo, Ohio A Broad Approach to Energy Efficiency in Northwest Ohio

350

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Jose  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

San Jose to San Jose to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Jose on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Jose on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Jose on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Jose on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Jose on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Jose on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY NC | OH | OR | PA | SC TN | TX | VT | VI | VA WA | WI San Jose, California San Jose Leverages Partnerships to Improve Low-Income Households' Energy

351

New England Wind Forum: Interviews with Wind Industry Stakeholders and  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Small Wind Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Interviews With Wind Industry Stakeholders and Pioneers in New England The New England Wind Forum will interview different stakeholders actively shaping the wind power landscape in New England and wind pioneers to examine how they have laid the groundwork for today's New England wind energy market. Stephan Wollenburg, Green Energy Program Director of Energy Consumers Alliance of New England January 2013 A Panel of Seven Offer Insight into the Evolving Drivers and Challenges Facing Wind Development in New England June 2011 John Norden, Manager of Renewable Resource Integration, Independent System Operator-New England September 2010 Angus King, Former Governor of Maine and Co-Founder of Independence Wind

352

New England Wind Forum: New England Wind Forum Newsletter  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share New England Wind Forum Newsletter Follow news from the New England Wind Forum by subscribing to its newsletter. Newsletter The New England Wind Forum Newsletter informs stakeholders of New England Wind Energy Education Project announcements, plus, events, project, siting, and policy updates. Enter your email address below to begin the registration process. After you subscribe to the New England Wind Forum Newsletter, you can choose to subscribe to other energy efficiency and renewable energy news. Archived copies of this e-newsletter are not available, but all of the news items can be found on this website under news, events, and publications. If you have ideas or news items to contribute for future issues, please contact Sustainable Energy Advantage.

353

New England Wind Forum: New England Regional and State Activities  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Connecticut Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share New England Activities Although much of the wind-power-related activity in the New England region occurs at the state level, regional activities and organizations are also prevalent. For state-specific wind power activities and information, follow the links to specific states on the left-hand menu. Operating and Planned Wind Projects A clickable regional map provides information on operating and planned wind projects in New England. Regional Resource Agencies Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management New England Governors Conference

354

New England Wind Forum: Building Wind Energy in New England  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Building Wind Energy in New England Many factors influence the ability to develop wind power in the New England region. A viable project requires the right site and the right technology for the application. It must provide suitable revenue or economic value to justify investment in this capital-intensive but zero-fuel technology. Policy initiatives are in place throughout the region to support the expansion of wind power's role in the regional supply mix. However, issues affecting public acceptance of wind projects in host communities must be addressed. Information on topics affecting wind power development in New England can be found by using the navigation to the left.

355

New England Wind Forum: New England Wind Resources  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

New England Wind Forum About the New England Wind Forum New England Wind Energy Education Project Historic Wind Development in New England State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resources Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share New England Wind Resources Go to the Vermont wind resource map. Go to the New Hampshire wind resource map. Go to the Maine wind resource map. Go to the Massachusetts wind resource map. Go to the Connecticut wind resource map. Go to the Rhode Island wind resource map. New England Wind Resource Maps Wind resources maps of Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

356

Wind Powering America: New England Wind Forum  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

About the New England Wind Forum About the New England Wind Forum New England Wind Energy Education Project Historic Wind Development in New England State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share The New England Wind Forum was conceived in 2005 as a platform to provide a single, comprehensive and objective source of up-to-date, Web-based information on a broad array of wind-energy-related issues pertaining to New England. The New England Wind Forum provides information to wind energy stakeholders through Web site features, periodic newsletters, and outreach activities. The New England Wind Forum covers the most frequently discussed wind energy topics.

357

New England Wind Forum: News  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Connecticut Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share News This page lists news for New England. Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Total of 251 records found. Page 1 of 26, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: News and Potential New England Wind Forum Information 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title More Details

358

Wind Program: Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Outreach Outreach Printable Version Bookmark and Share The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program is designed to educate, engage, and enable critical stakeholders to make informed decisions about how wind energy contributes to the U.S. electricity supply. Highlights Resources Wind Resource Maps State Activities What activities are happening in my state? AK AL AR AZ CA CO CT DC DE FL GA HI IA ID IL IN KS KY LA MA MD ME MI MN MO MS MT NC ND NE NH NJ NM NV NY OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VA VT WA WI WV WY Installed wind capacity maps. Features A image of a house with a residential-scale small wind turbine. Small Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, and Businesses Stakeholder Engagement & Outreach Projects

359

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2010 213 Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central South Atlantic Mountain Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012

360

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Air Conditioning in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Air Conditioning in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Air Conditioning",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,16.5,3.9,1.9,2,12.6,5.3,4.4,2.9 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vt nh ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

clothes drying, ceiling fans, coffee makers, spas, home security clothes drying, ceiling fans, coffee makers, spas, home security systems, microwave ovens, set-top boxes, home audio equipment, rechargeable electronics, and VCR/DVDs. In addition to the major equipment-driven end-uses, the average energy consumption per household is projected for other electric and nonelectric appliances. The module's output includes number Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 19 Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central

362

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 13. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2007 (Million Cubic Feet) Nigeria Algeria 37,483 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports.

363

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Maine - SEP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- SEP to - SEP to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Maine - SEP on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Maine - SEP on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Maine - SEP on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Maine - SEP on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Maine - SEP on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Maine - SEP on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY NC | OH | OR | PA | SC TN | TX | VT | VI | VA WA | WI Maine - SEP Maine Makes Multifamily Units Energy-Efficient and Cost-Effective

364

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Seattle, Washington  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seattle, Seattle, Washington to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Seattle, Washington on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Seattle, Washington on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Seattle, Washington on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Seattle, Washington on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Seattle, Washington on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Seattle, Washington on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY NC | OH | OR | PA | SC TN | TX | VT | VI | VA

365

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Home Appliances in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Home Appliances in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Home Appliances",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,19.2,5.2,2.3,2.8,14.1,6.8,4.6,2.7

366

Graystone Group Advertising, 2710 North Ave, Suite 200 Bridgeport, CT 06604 Phone: 8005440005 or 2035490060 Fax: 2035490061  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graystone Group Advertising, 2710 North Ave, Suite 200 Bridgeport, CT 06604 Phone: 8005440005 or 2035490060 Fax: 2035490061 Email: ads@graystoneadv.com Placing Recruitment Advertising To assist University departments with all recruitment and advertising needs, Clemson is now partnered

Bolding, M. Chad

367

Supplementary testing is not required on the cobas 4800 CT/NG test for Neisseria gonorrhoeae weak positive urogenital samples.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...not required on the cobas 4800 CT/NG test for Neisseria gonorrhoeae weak positive...gonorrhoeae (NG) nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) results are difficult to interpret...treatment should be based on clinical pre-test probability.

Collette Bromhead; Nadika Liyanarachchy; Julia Mayes; Arlo Upton; Michelle Balm

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

368

A method for measuring joint kinematics designed for accurate registration of kinematic data to models constructed from CT data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method for measuring three-dimensional kinematics that incorporates the direct cross-registration of experimental kinematics with anatomic geometry from Computed Tomography (CT) data has been developed. Plexiglas ...

Fischer, Kenneth J.; Manson, T. T.; Pfaeffle, H. J.; Tomaino, M. M.; Woo, S. L-Y

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

PET/CT com FDG-18 F em pacientes com suspeita de recidiva de carcinoma de ovrio.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O exame PET/CT com FDG-18F um mtodo de diagnstico por imagem, til em oncologia. O cncer de ovrio o cncer ginecolgico de maior (more)

Sanja Dragosavac

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Coronary artery wall imaging in mice using osmium tetroxide and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)  

SciTech Connect

The high spatial resolution of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is ideal for 3D imaging of coronary arteries in intact mouse heart specimens. Previously, micro-CT of mouse heart specimens utilized intravascular contrast agents that hardened within the vessel lumen and allowed a vascular cast to be made. However, for mouse coronary artery disease models, it is highly desirable to image coronary artery walls and highlight plaques. For this purpose, we describe an ex vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT imaging technique based on tissue staining with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) solution. As a tissue-staining contrast agent, OsO{sub 4} is retained in the vessel wall and surrounding tissue during the fixation process and cleared from the vessel lumens. Its high X-ray attenuation makes the artery wall visible in CT. Additionally, since OsO{sub 4} preferentially binds to lipids, it highlights lipid deposition in the artery wall. We performed micro-CT of heart specimens of 5- to 25-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type mice and 5- to 13-week-old apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE{sup -/-}) mice at 10 {mu}m resolution. The results show that walls of coronary arteries as small as 45 {mu}m in diameter are visible using a table-top micro-CT scanner. Similar image clarity was achieved with 1/2000th the scan time using a synchrotron CT scanner. In 13-week-old apoE mice, lipid-rich plaques are visible in the aorta. Our study shows that the combination of OsO{sub 4} and micro-CT permits the visualization of the coronary artery wall in intact mouse hearts.

Pai, Vinay M.; Kozlowski, Megan; Donahue, Danielle; Miller, Elishiah; Xiao, Xianghui; Chen, Marcus Y.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Connelly, Patricia; Jeffries, Kenneth; Wen, Han (NIH)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

371

NH_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metadata also available as Metadata: IdentificationInformation DataQualityInformation SpatialDataOrganizationInformation SpatialReferenceInformation EntityandAttributeI...

372

CT-Guided Interventions Using a Free-Hand, Optical Tracking System: Initial Clinical Experience  

SciTech Connect

PurposeThe present study was designed to evaluate the geometrical accuracy and clinical applicability of a new, free-hand, CT-guided, optical navigation system.MethodsFifteen procedures in 14 consecutive patients were retrospectively analyzed. The navigation system was applied for interventional procedures on small target lesions, in cases with long needle paths, narrow access windows, or when an out-of-plane access was expected. Mean lesion volume was 27.9 ml, and mean distance to target measured was 107.5 mm. Eleven of 15 needle trajectories were planned as out-of-plane approaches regarding the axial CT plane.ResultsNinety-one percent of the biopsies were diagnostic. All therapeutic interventions were technically successful. Targeting precision was high with a mean distance of the needle tip from planned target of 1.98 mm. Mean intervention time was 1:12 h. A statistically significant correlation between angular needle deviation and intervention time (p = 0.007), respiratory movement of the target (p = 0.008), and body mass index (p = 0.02) was detected. None of the evaluated parameters correlated significantly with the distance from the needle tip to the planned target.ConclusionsThe application of a navigation system for complex CT-guided procedures provided safe and effective targeting within a reasonable intervention time in our series.

Schubert, Tilman, E-mail: TSchubert@uhbs.ch; Jacob, Augustinus L.; Pansini, Michele [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Liu, David [Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology (Canada); Gutzeit, Andreas [Winterthur Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiology (Switzerland); Kos, Sebastian [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Coupled-surface investigation of the photodissociation of NH{sub 3}(A-tilde): Effect of exciting the symmetric and antisymmetric stretching modes  

SciTech Connect

Using previously developed potential energy surfaces and their couplings, non-Born-Oppenheimer trajectory methods are used to study the state-selected photodissociation of ammonia, prepared with up to six quanta of vibrational excitation in the symmetric ({nu}{sub 1}) or antisymmetric ({nu}{sub 3}) stretching modes of NH{sub 3}(A-tilde). The predicted dynamics is mainly electronically nonadiabatic (that is, it produces ground electronic state amino radicals). The small probability of forming the excited-state amino radical is found, for low excitations, to increase with total energy and to be independent of whether the symmetric or antisymmetric stretch is excited; however some selectivity with respect to exciting the antisymmetric stretch is found when more than one quantum of excitation is added to the stretches, and more than 50% of the amino radical are found to be electronically excited when six quanta are placed in the antisymmetric stretch. These results are in contrast to the mechanism inferred in recent experimental work, where excitation of the antisymmetric stretch by a single quantum was found to produce significant amounts of excited-state products via adiabatic dissociation at total energies of about 7.0 eV. Both theory and experiment predict a broad range of translational energies for the departing H atoms when the symmetric stretch is excited, but the present simulations do not reproduce the experimental translational energy profiles when the antisymmetric stretch is excited. The sensitivity of the predicted results to several aspects of the calculation is considered in detail, and the analysis leads to insight into the nature of the dynamics that is responsible for mode selectivity.

Bonhommeau, David; Valero, Rosendo; Truhlar, Donald G. [Department of Chemistry and Supercomputing Institute, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455-0431 (United States); Jasper, Ahren W. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969, Livermore, California 94551-0969 (United States)

2009-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

374

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Regional maps Figure F7. Coal demand regions Figure F7. Coal Demand Regions CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT 16. PC 15. ZN 12. WS 11. C2 9. AM 5. GF 8. KT 4. S2 7. EN 6. OH 2. YP 1. NE 3. S1 10. C1 KY,TN 8. KT 16. PC AK,HI,WA,OR,CA 10. C1 CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT

375

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Regional maps Figure F7. Coal demand regions Figure F7. Coal Demand Regions CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT 16. PC 15. ZN 12. WS 11. C2 9. AM 5. GF 8. KT 4. S2 7. EN 6. OH 2. YP 1. NE 3. S1 10. C1 KY,TN 8. KT 16. PC AK,HI,WA,OR,CA 10. C1 CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT

376

Radiochemical investigations of 177Lu-DOTA-8-Aoc-BBN[7-14]NH2: an in vitro/in vivo assessment of the targeting ability of this new radiopharmaceutical for PC-3 human prostate cancer cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bombesin (BBN), a 14 amino acid peptide, is an analogue of human gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) that binds to GRP receptors (GRPr) with high affinity and specificity. The \\{GRPr\\} is over expressed on a variety of human cancer cells including prostate, breast, lung, and pancreatic cancers. The specific aim of this study was to identify a BBN analogue that can be radiolabeled with 177Lu and maintains high specificity for \\{GRPr\\} positive prostate cancer tumors in vivo. A preselected synthetic sequence via solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) was designed to produce a DOTA-BBN (DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N?,N??,N???-tetraacetic acid) conjugate with the following general structure: DOTA-X-Q-W-A-V-G-H-L-M-(NH2), where the spacer group, X = ?-NH2(CH2)7COOH (8-Aoc). The BBN-construct was purified by reversed phase-HPLC (RP-HPLC). Electrospray Mass Spectrometry (ES-MS) was used to characterize both metallated and non-metallated BBN-conjugates. The new DOTA-conjugate was metallated with 177Lu(III)Cl3 or non-radioactive Lu(III)Cl3. The 177Lu(III)- and non-radiolabeled Lu(III)-conjugates exhibit the same retention times under identical RP-HPLC conditions. The 177Lu-DOTA-8-Aoc-BBN[7-14]NH2 conjugate was found to exhibit optimal pharmacokinetic properties in CF-1 normal mice. In vitro and in vivo models demonstrated the ability of the 177Lu-DOTA-8-Aoc-BBN[7-14]NH2 conjugate to specifically target GRP receptors expressed on PC-3 human prostate cancer cells.

C.Jeffrey Smith; Hariprasad Gali; Gary L. Sieckman; Donald L. Hayes; Nellie K. Owen; Dana G. Mazuru; Wynn A. Volkert; Timothy J. Hoffman

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Synthesis of HA-Seeded TTCP (Ca4(PO4)2O) Powders at 12301C from Ca(CH3COO)2 . H2O and NH4H2PO4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthesis of HA-Seeded TTCP (Ca4(PO4)2O) Powders at 12301C from Ca(CH3COO)2 . H2O and NH4H2PO4 University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 Tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) Ca4(PO4)2O is one of the major powder- state process by soaking Ca- and P-containing precursors be- tween 13501 and 15001C. Such procedures

Tas, A. Cuneyt

378

Refinement of the crystal structure of the high-temperature phase G0 in (NH4)2WO2F4 (powder, x-ray, and neutron scattering)  

SciTech Connect

The (NH4)2WO2F4 compound undergoes a series of phase transitions: G0 -> 201 K -> G1 -> 160 K -> G2, with a significant change in entropy ( S1 ~ Rln10 at the G0 -> G1 transition), which indicates significant orientational disordering in the G0 phase and the order disorder type of the phase transition. X-ray diffraction is used to identify the crystal structure of the G0 phase as rhombohedral (sp. gr. Cmcm, Z = 4), determine the lattice parameters and the positions of all atoms (except hydrogen), and show that [WO2F4]2 ions can form a superposition of dynamic and static orientational disorders in the anionic sublattice. A determination of the orientational position of [NH4]+ ions calls for the combined method of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering. Inelastic neutron scattering is used to determine the state of hindered rotation for ammonium ions in the G0 phase. Powder neutron diffraction shows that the orientational disorder of NH4 ions can adequately be described within the free rotation approximation.

Novak, D. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Smirnov, Lev S [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia; Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL; Voronin, Vladimir [Institute of Metal Physics, Russia; Berger, I. F. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russia; Laptash, N. M. [Institute of Chemistry, Vladivostok, Russia; Vasil'ev, N. M. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Krasnoyarsk, Russia; Flerov, I. N. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Krasnoyarsk, Russia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Solgel synthesis of iron(III) oxyhydroxide nanostructured monoliths using Fe(NO3)39H2O/CH3CH2OH/NH4OH ternary system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron(III) oxyhydroxide xerogels were prepared through solgel technology, using iron(III) nitrate nonahydrate as precursor, ethanol as solvent and ammonium hydroxide as gelation agent. This base is used for propylene oxide substitution, which was the gelation agent in previous works. Synthesis of a gel using NH4OH as a gelation agent is an innovative result with this type of precursor, since with metal salts the addition of a strong base commonly results in precipitation of the solid. The gel synthesis was achieved by controlling the base addition time. The dried material has a residual amount of organic impurities, in contrast with the significant amount detected in xerogels prepared using propylene oxide. The iron phase prevailing in the produced xerogels can be defined as ?-FeO(OH) (lepidocrocite), according to FTIR and Mssbauer analyses. The xerogels are formed by large clusters of well connected nanocrystallites of this phase. XRD revealed a crystalline phase retained inside the iron oxyhydroxide amorphous structure, which corresponds to NH4NO3 and results from the combination of NO3? and NH4+ ions in solution. The produced xerogel has a promising composition to be an oxidizing composite for the energetic materials area.

Lusa Dures; Orlando Oliveira; Leandro Benedini; Benilde F.O. Costa; Ana Matos Beja; Antnio Portugal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Refinement of the crystal structure of the high-temperature phase G{sub 0} in (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}WO{sub 2}F{sub 4} (powder, X-ray, and neutron scattering)  

SciTech Connect

The (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}WO{sub 2}F{sub 4} compound undergoes a series of phase transitions: G{sub 0} {yields} 201, K {yields} G{sub 1} {yields} 160, and K {yields} G{sub 2}, with a significant change in entropy ({Delta}S{sub 1} {approx} Rln10 at the G{sub 0} {yields} G{sub 1} transition), which indicates significant orientational disordering in the G{sub 0} phase and the order-disorder type of the phase transition. X-ray diffraction is used to identify the crystal structure of the G{sub 0} phase as rhombohedral (sp. gr. Cmcm, Z = 4), determine the lattice parameters and the positions of all atoms (except hydrogen), and show that [WO{sub 2}F{sub 4}]{sup 2-} ions can form a superposition of dynamic and static orientational disorders in the anionic sublattice. A determination of the orientational position of [NH{sub 4}]{sup +} ions calls for the combined method of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering. Inelastic neutron scattering is used to determine the state of hindered rotation for ammonium ions in the G{sub 0} phase. Powder neutron diffraction shows that the orientational disorder of NH{sub 4} ions can adequately be described within the free-rotation approximation.

Novak, D. M., E-mail: dmn@nf.jinr.ru; Smirnov, L. S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Frank Neutron Physics Laboratory (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Frank Neutron Physics Laboratory (Russian Federation); Kolesnikov, A. I. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Neutron Scattering Sciences Division (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Neutron Scattering Sciences Division (United States); Voronin, V. I.; Berger, I. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Laptash, N. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Far Eastern Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Far Eastern Branch (Russian Federation); Vasil'ev, A. D.; Flerov, I. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Development of a dynamic quality assurance testing protocol for multisite clinical trial DCE-CT accreditation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Credentialing can have an impact on whether or not a clinical trial produces useful quality data that is comparable between various institutions and scanners. With the recent increase of dynamic contrast enhanced-computed tomography (DCE-CT) usage as a companion biomarker in clinical trials, effective quality assurance, and control methods are required to ensure there is minimal deviation in the results between different scanners and protocols at various institutions. This paper attempts to address this problem by utilizing a dynamic flow imaging phantom to develop and evaluate a DCE-CT quality assurance (QA) protocol.Methods: A previously designed flow phantom, capable of producing predictable and reproducible time concentration curves from contrast injection was fully validated and then utilized to design a DCE-CT QA protocol. The QA protocol involved a set of quantitative metrics including injected and total mass error, as well as goodness of fit comparison to the known truth concentration curves. An additional region of interest (ROI) sensitivity analysis was also developed to provide additional details on intrascanner variability and determine appropriate ROI sizes for quantitative analysis. Both the QA protocol and ROI sensitivity analysis were utilized to test variations in DCE-CT results using different imaging parameters (tube voltage and current) as well as alternate reconstruction methods and imaging techniques. The developed QA protocol and ROI sensitivity analysis was then applied at three institutions that were part of clinical trial involving DCE-CT and results were compared.Results: The inherent specificity of robustness of the phantom was determined through calculation of the total intraday variability and determined to be less than 2.2 1.1% (total calculated output contrast mass error) with a goodness of fit (R{sup 2}) of greater than 0.99 0.0035 (n= 10). The DCE-CT QA protocol was capable of detecting significant deviations from the expected phantom result when scanning at low mAs and low kVp in terms of quantitative metrics (Injected Mass Error 15.4%), goodness of fit (R{sup 2}) of 0.91, and ROI sensitivity (increase in minimum input function ROI radius by 146 86%). These tests also confirmed that the ASIR reconstruction process was beneficial in reducing noise without substantially increasing partial volume effects and that vendor specific modes (e.g., axial shuttle) did not significantly affect the phantom results. The phantom and QA protocol were finally able to quickly (<90 min) and successfully validate the DCE-CT imaging protocol utilized at the three separate institutions of a multicenter clinical trial; thereby enhancing the confidence in the patient data collected.Conclusions: A DCE QA protocol was developed that, in combination with a dynamic multimodality flow phantom, allows the intrascanner variability to be separated from other sources of variability such as the impact of injection protocol and ROI selection. This provides a valuable resource that can be utilized at various clinical trial institutions to test conformance with imaging protocols and accuracy requirements as well as ensure that the scanners are performing as expected for dynamic scans.

Driscoll, B. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Keller, H. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Jaffray, D.; Coolens, C. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L5 (Canada)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

PET/CT for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning in Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To study the possibility of incorporating positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) information into radiotherapy treatment planning in patients with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods and Materials: We studied 17 patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy at our institution from 2005 to 2007. All patients had a high-grade STS and had had a staging PET/CT scan. For each patient, an MRI-based gross tumor volume (GTV), considered to be the contemporary standard for radiotherapy treatment planning, was outlined on a T1-gadolinium enhanced axial MRI (GTV{sub MRI}), and a second set of GTVs were outlined using different threshold values on PET images (GTV{sub PET}). PET-based target volumes were compared with the MRI-based GTV. Threshold values for target contouring were determined as a multiple (from 2 to 10 times) of the background soft tissue uptake values (B) sampled over healthy tissue. Results: PET-based GTVs contoured using a threshold value of 2 or 2.5 most closely resembled the GTV{sub MRI} volumes. Higher threshold values lead to PET volumes much smaller than the GTV{sub MRI}. The standard deviations between the average volumes of GTV{sub PET} and GTV{sub MRI} ratios for all thresholds were large, ranging from 36% for 2 xB up to 93% for 10 xB. Maximum uptake-to-background ratio correlated poorly with the maximum standardized uptake values. Conclusions: It is unlikely that PET/CT will make a significant contribution in GTV definition for radiotherapy treatment planning in patients with STS using threshold methods on PET images. Future studies will focus on molecular imaging and tumor physiology.

Karam, Irene [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Devic, Slobodan [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hickeson, Marc [Department of Nuclear Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Roberge, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Turcotte, Robert E. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Freeman, Carolyn R., E-mail: carolyn.freeman@muhc.mcgill.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Reference-free ground truth metric for metal artifact evaluation in CT images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In computed tomography (CT), metal objects in the region of interest introduce data inconsistencies during acquisition. Reconstructing these data results in an image with star shaped artifacts induced by the metal inconsistencies. To enhance image quality, the influence of the metal objects can be reduced by different metal artifact reduction (MAR) strategies. For an adequate evaluation of new MAR approaches a ground truth reference data set is needed. In technical evaluations, where phantoms can be measured with and without metal inserts, ground truth data can easily be obtained by a second reference data acquisition. Obviously, this is not possible for clinical data. Here, an alternative evaluation method is presented without the need of an additionally acquired reference data set. Methods: The proposed metric is based on an inherent ground truth for metal artifacts as well as MAR methods comparison, where no reference information in terms of a second acquisition is needed. The method is based on the forward projection of a reconstructed image, which is compared to the actually measured projection data. Results: The new evaluation technique is performed on phantom and on clinical CT data with and without MAR. The metric results are then compared with methods using a reference data set as well as an expert-based classification. It is shown that the new approach is an adequate quantification technique for artifact strength in reconstructed metal or MAR CT images. Conclusions: The presented method works solely on the original projection data itself, which yields some advantages compared to distance measures in image domain using two data sets. Beside this, no parameters have to be manually chosen. The new metric is a useful evaluation alternative when no reference data are available.

Kratz, Baerbel; Ens, Svitlana; Mueller, Jan; Buzug, Thorsten M. [Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Luebeck, 23538 Luebeck (Germany)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Experimental and theoretical investigations of the reactions NH(X {sup 3}{sigma}{sup -})+D({sup 2}S){yields}ND(X {sup 3}{sigma}{sup -})+H({sup 2}S) and NH(X {sup 3}{sigma}{sup -})+D({sup 2}S){yields}N({sup 4}S)+HD(X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +})  

SciTech Connect

The rate coefficient of the reaction NH(X {sup 3}{sigma}{sup -})+D({sup 2}S){yields}{sup k{sub 1}}products (1) is determined in a quasistatic laser-flash photolysis, laser-induced fluorescence system at low pressures. The NH(X) radicals are produced by quenching of NH(a {sup 1}{delta}) (obtained in the photolysis of HN{sub 3}) with Xe and the D atoms are generated in a D{sub 2}/He microwave discharge. The NH(X) concentration profile is measured in the presence of a large excess of D atoms. The room-temperature rate coefficient is determined to be k{sub 1}=(3.9{+-}1.5)x10{sup 13} cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The rate coefficient k{sub 1} is the sum of the two rate coefficients, k{sub 1a} and k{sub 1b}, which correspond to the reactions NH(X {sup 3}{sigma}{sup -})+D({sup 2}S){yields}{sup k{sub 1a}}ND(X {sup 3}{sigma}{sup -})+H({sup 2}S) (1a) and NH(X {sup 3}{sigma}{sup -})+D({sup 2}S){yields}{sup k{sub 1b}}N({sup 4}S)+HD(X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}) (1b), respectively. The first reaction proceeds via the {sup 2}A{sup ''} ground state of NH{sub 2} whereas the second one proceeds in the {sup 4}A{sup ''} state. A global potential energy surface is constructed for the {sup 2}A{sup ''} state using the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction method and the augmented correlation consistent polarized valence quadrupte zeta atomic basis. This potential energy surface is used in classical trajectory calculations to determine k{sub 1a}. Similar trajectory calculations are performed for reaction (1b) employing a previously calculated potential for the {sup 4}A{sup ''} state. The calculated room-temperature rate coefficient is k{sub 1}=4.1x10{sup 13} cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} with k{sub 1a}=4.0x10{sup 13} cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} and k{sub 1b}=9.1x10{sup 11} cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The theoretically determined k{sub 1} shows a very weak positive temperature dependence in the range 250{<=}T/K{<=}1000. Despite the deep potential well, the exchange reaction on the {sup 2}A{sup ''} ground-state potential energy surface is not statistical.

Qu, Z.-W.; Zhu, H.; Schinke, R.; Adam, L.; Hack, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Dynamik und Selbstorganisation, D-37073 Goettingen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer biophysikalische Chemie, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

2005-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

385

Cost-Effectiveness of CT Screening in the National Lung Screening Trial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States; however, until recently, no method of screening had been shown to reduce mortality from lung cancer. The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) showed that screening with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) of the... The screening of persons at risk for lung cancer may reduce lung-cancer mortality by 20%. Although cost-effectiveness estimates vary widely depending on assumptions, a careful analysis indicates that the cost is $81,000 per quality-adjusted life-year.

Black W.C.; Gareen I.F.; Soneji S.S.

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

386

Probability of Cancer in Pulmonary Nodules Detected on First Screening CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nodules; one-sided 97.5% CI, 0 to 0.006). The location of a nodule was evaluated according to lobar distribution. A larger number of nodules and a larger number of cancers were observed in the left upper and right upper lobes than in the left or right lower lobes or the right middle lobe (Table 1). For... Using data from two large data sets of lung-cancer screening by CT, the authors identified factors that increased the likelihood that a nodule was malignant, including older age, female sex, nodule location in the upper lobe, lower nodule count, and certain nodule features.

McWilliams A.; Tammemagi M.C.; Mayo J.R.

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

387

Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Preferred Builders, Old Greenwich, CT, Custom  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Old Greenwich CT, that scored HERS 42 without PV or HERS 20 with PV. This 2,700 ft2 custom home has advanced framed walls with R-24 blown cellulose plus R-7.5 EPS rigid foam, membrane-coated OSB, a close-cell spray foamed attic, R-13 closed-cell spray foam under the slab and on basement walls, an ERV, and a gas boiler for forced air and radiant floor heat.

389

MRI- Versus CT-Based Volume Delineation of Lumpectomy Cavity in Supine Position in Breast-Conserving Therapy: An Exploratory Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for lumpectomy cavity (LC) volume delineation in supine radiotherapy treatment position and to assess the interobserver variability. Methods and Materials: A total of 15 breast cancer patients underwent a planning CT and directly afterward MRI in supine radiotherapy treatment position. Then, 4 observers (2 radiation oncologists and 2 radiologists) delineated the LC on the CT and MRI scans and assessed the cavity visualization score (CVS). The CVS, LC volume, conformity index (CI), mean shift of the center of mass (COM), with the standard deviation, were quantified for both CT and MRI. Results: The CVS showed that MRI and CT provide about equal optimal visibility of the LC. If the CVS was high, magnetic resonance imaging provided more detail of the interfaces of the LC seroma with the unaffected GBT. MRI also pictured in more detail the interfaces of axillary seromas (if present) with their surroundings and their relationship to the LC. Three observers delineated smaller, and one observer larger, LC volumes comparing the MRI- and CT-derived delineations. The mean {+-} standard deviation CI was 32% {+-} 25% for MRI and 52% {+-} 21% for CT. The mean {+-} standard deviation COM shift was 11 {+-} 10 mm (range 1-36) for MRI and 4 {+-} 3 mm (range 1-10) for CT. Conclusions: MRI does not add additional information to CT in cases in which the CVS is assessed as low. The conformity (CI) is lower for MRI than for CT, especially at a low CVS owing to greater COM shifts for MRI, probably caused by inadequate visibility of the surgical clips on magnetic resonance (MR) images. The COM shifts seriously dictate a decline in the CI more than the variability of the LC volumes does. In cases in which MRI provides additional information, MRI must be combined with the CT/surgical clip data.

Giezen, Marina, E-mail: marinagiezen@zonnet.nl [Radiotherapy Center West, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Kouwenhoven, Erik [Radiotherapy Center West, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Scholten, Astrid N. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Coerkamp, Emile G.; Heijenbrok, Mark [Department of Radiology, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Jansen, Wim P.A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Mast, Mirjam E.; Petoukhova, Anna L. [Radiotherapy Center West, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Struikmans, Henk [Radiotherapy Center West, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

MRI and CT image indexing and retrieval using local mesh peak valley edge patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, a new pattern based feature, local mesh peak valley edge pattern (LMePVEP) is proposed for biomedical image indexing and retrieval. The standard LBP extracts the gray scale relationship between the center pixel and its surrounding neighbors in an image. Whereas the proposed method extracts the gray scale relationship among the neighbors for a given center pixel in an image. The relations among the neighbors are peak/valley edges which are obtained by performing the first-order derivative. The performance of the proposed method (LMePVEP) is tested by conducting two experiments on two benchmark biomedical databases. Further, it is mentioned that the databases used for experiments are OASIS?MRI database which is the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) database and VIA/IELCAP-CT database which includes region of interest computer tomography (CT) images. The results after being investigated show a significant improvement in terms average retrieval precision (ARP) and average retrieval rate (ARR) as compared to LBP and LBP variant features.

Subrahmanyam Murala; Q.M. Jonathan Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Comparative dosimetry of dental CBCT devices and 64-slice CT for oral and maxillofacial radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objectives This study compares 2 measures of effective dose, E1990 and E2007, for 8 dentoalveolar and maxillofacial cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) units and a 64-slice multidetector CT (MDCT) unit. Study design Average tissue-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, and effective dose were calculated using thermoluminescent dosimeter chips in a radiation analog dosimetry phantom. Effective doses were derived using 1990 and the superseding 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations. Results Large-field of view (FOV) CBCT E2007 ranged from 68 to 1,073 ?Sv. Medium-FOV CBCT E2007 ranged from 69 to 560 ?Sv, whereas a similar-FOV MDCT produced 860 ?Sv. The E2007 calculations were 23% to 224% greater than E1990. Conclusions The 2007 recommendations of the ICRP, which include salivary glands, extrathoracic region, and oral mucosa in the calculation of effective dose, result in an upward reassessment of fatal cancer risk from oral and maxillofacial radiographic examinations. Dental CBCT can be recommended as a dose-sparing technique in comparison with alternative medical CT scans for common oral and maxillofacial radiographic imaging tasks.

John B. Ludlow; Marija Ivanovic

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Dose calculation software for helical tomotherapy, utilizing patient CT data to calculate an independent three-dimensional dose cube  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Treatment plans for the TomoTherapy unit are produced with a planning system that is integral to the unit. The authors have produced an independent dose calculation system, to enable plans to be recalculated in three dimensions, using the patient's CT data. Methods: Software has been written using MATLAB. The DICOM-RT plan object is used to determine the treatment parameters used, including the treatment sinogram. Each projection of the sinogram is segmented and used to calculate dose at multiple calculation points in a three-dimensional grid using tables of measured beam data. A fast ray-trace algorithm is used to determine effective depth for each projection angle at each calculation point. Calculations were performed on a standard desktop personal computer, with a 2.6 GHz Pentium, running Windows XP. Results: The time to perform a calculation, for 3375 points averaged 1 min 23 s for prostate plans and 3 min 40 s for head and neck plans. The mean dose within the 50% isodose was calculated and compared with the predictions of the TomoTherapy planning system. When the modified CT (which includes the TomoTherapy couch) was used, the mean difference for ten prostate patients, was -0.4% (range -0.9% to +0.3%). With the original CT (which included the CT couch), the mean difference was -1.0% (range -1.7% to 0.0%). The number of points agreeing with a gamma 3%/3 mm averaged 99.2% with the modified CT, 96.3% with the original CT. For ten head and neck patients, for the modified and original CT, respectively, the mean difference was +1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.1%) and 1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.0%) with 94.4% and 95.4% passing a gamma 4%/4 mm. The ability of the program to detect a variety of simulated errors has been tested. Conclusions: By using the patient's CT data, the independent dose calculation performs checks that are not performed by a measurement in a cylindrical phantom. This enables it to be used either as an additional check or to replace phantom measurements for some patients. The software has potential to be used in any application where one wishes to model changes to patient conditions.

Thomas, Simon J.; Eyre, Katie R.; Tudor, G. Samuel J.; Fairfoul, Jamie [Medical Physics Department, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,833 ,833 35 Egypt Figure 13. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2009 (Million Cubic Feet) Norway Trinidad/ Tobago Trinidad/ Tobago Egypt Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 111,144 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates

394

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 (Million Cubic Feet) Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 42,411 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 253,214 690,780 634,185 658,523 134,764 63,063 526,726 121,049 34,531 492,655 101,101 23,154 40,113 1,496,283 68,601

395

Microsoft Word - figure_14.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 14. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2010 (Million Cubic Feet) Norway India Trinidad/ Tobago Egypt Yemen Japan Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 53,122 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Gulf of Mexico Canada Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates based on historical data. Energy Information

396

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WA WA MT ID OR WY ND SD CA NV UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA IL IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Japan Mexico Mexico Algeria Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Mexico Trinidad Canada Canada Nigeria Oman Qatar Trinidad Gulf of Mexico Gulf of Mexico Gulf of Mexico Canada Trinidad Trinidad Gulf of Mexico Malaysia 13,623 Figure 8. Interstate Movements of Natural Gas in the United States, 2003 (Million Cubic Feet) Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2003 Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 366,224 655,731 666,614 633,960 144,284 43,869 536,776 63,133 36,848

397

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 13. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2008 (Million Cubic Feet) Norway Trinidad/ Tobago Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 45,772 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates.

398

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 (Million Cubic Feet) 24,891 2,895 Nigeria WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico Algeria C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada Canada N i g e r i a O m a n Qatar Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Malaysia 2,986 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 335,380 634,982 664,318 612,297 125,202 33,223 531,868 103,624

399

Predicting the fidelity of JPEG2000 compressed CT images using DICOM header information  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To propose multiple logistic regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) models constructed using digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) header information in predicting the fidelity of Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compressed abdomen computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: Our institutional review board approved this study and waived informed patient consent. Using a JPEG2000 algorithm, 360 abdomen CT images were compressed reversibly (n = 48, as negative control) or irreversibly (n = 312) to one of different compression ratios (CRs) ranging from 4:1 to 10:1. Five radiologists independently determined whether the original and compressed images were distinguishable or indistinguishable. The 312 irreversibly compressed images were divided randomly into training (n = 156) and testing (n = 156) sets. The MLR and ANN models were constructed regarding the DICOM header information as independent variables and the pooled radiologists' responses as dependent variable. As independent variables, we selected the CR (DICOM tag number: 0028, 2112), effective tube current-time product (0018, 9332), section thickness (0018, 0050), and field of view (0018, 0090) among the DICOM tags. Using the training set, an optimal subset of independent variables was determined by backward stepwise selection in a four-fold cross-validation scheme. The MLR and ANN models were constructed with the determined independent variables using the training set. The models were then evaluated on the testing set by using receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis regarding the radiologists' pooled responses as the reference standard and by measuring Spearman rank correlation between the model prediction and the number of radiologists who rated the two images as distinguishable. Results: The CR and section thickness were determined as the optimal independent variables. The areas under the ROC curve for the MLR and ANN predictions were 0.91 (95% CI; 0.86, 0.95) and 0.92 (0.87, 0.96), respectively. The correlation coefficients of the MLR and ANN predictions with the number of radiologists who responded as distinguishable were 0.76 (0.69, 0.82, p < 0.001) and 0.78 (0.71, 0.83, p < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: The MLR and ANN models constructed using the DICOM header information offer promise in predicting the fidelity of JPEG2000 compressed abdomen CT images.

Kim, Kil Joong; Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, Hyunna; Choi, Hosik; Jeon, Jong-June; Ahn, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-Ro, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Informational Statistics, Hoseo University, 165, Sechul-ri, Baebang-myeon, Asan-si, Chungcheongnam-do, 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Statistics, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-Ro, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Korean Intellectual Property Office, Government Complex-Daejeon, 139 Seonsa-ro, Seo-gu, Daejeon, 302-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

A hybrid approach for rapid, accurate, and direct kilovoltage radiation dose calculations in CT voxel space  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop and validate a fast and accurate method that uses computed tomography (CT) voxel data to estimate absorbed radiation dose at a point of interest (POI) or series of POIs from a kilovoltage (kV) imaging procedure. Methods: The authors developed an approach that computes absorbed radiation dose at a POI by numerically evaluating the linear Boltzmann transport equation (LBTE) using a combination of deterministic and Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. This hybrid approach accounts for material heterogeneity with a level of accuracy comparable to the general MC algorithms. Also, the dose at a POI is computed within seconds using the Intel Core i7 CPU 920 2.67 GHz quad core architecture, and the calculations are performed using CT voxel data, making it flexible and feasible for clinical applications. To validate the method, the authors constructed and acquired a CT scan of a heterogeneous block phantom consisting of a succession of slab densities: Tissue (1.29 cm), bone (2.42 cm), lung (4.84 cm), bone (1.37 cm), and tissue (4.84 cm). Using the hybrid transport method, the authors computed the absorbed doses at a set of points along the central axis and x direction of the phantom for an isotropic 125 kVp photon spectral point source located along the central axis 92.7 cm above the phantom surface. The accuracy of the results was compared to those computed with MCNP, which was cross-validated with EGSnrc, and served as the benchmark for validation. Results: The error in the depth dose ranged from -1.45% to +1.39% with a mean and standard deviation of -0.12% and 0.66%, respectively. The error in the x profile ranged from -1.3% to +0.9%, with standard deviations of -0.3% and 0.5%, respectively. The number of photons required to achieve these results was 1x10{sup 6}. Conclusions: The voxel-based hybrid method evaluates the LBTE rapidly and accurately to estimate the absorbed x-ray dose at any POI or series of POIs from a kV imaging procedure.

Kouznetsov, Alexei; Tambasco, Mauro [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Oncology, University of Calgary and Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Morphology control of open-framework zinc phosphate Zn{sub 4}(H{sub 3}O)(NH{sub 4}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4} via microwave-assisted technique  

SciTech Connect

Open-framework zinc phosphates were synthesized by microwave-assisted technique, and it was shown that the morphology of as-prepared materials could be easily tailored by changing synthesis temperature, reaction time and pH value. During the synthesis, when the reaction temperature increases from 130 C to 220 C, the products transformed from hexagonal prisms to polyhedron along with the disappearance of the hexagonal prisms vertical plane. Simultaneously, both the reaction time and pH value could promote the nucleation and growth of crystal particles. More interestingly, the target products with different morphologies could be obtained by varying the usage of NaOH or NH{sub 3}H{sub 2}O at 130 C during the microwave synthesis process. - Graphical abstract: Zinc phosphates with variable morphologies can be obtained by simply tuning the microwave-heating temperatures. Display Omitted - Highlights: Synthesis of open-framework Zn{sub 4} (H{sub 3}O) (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4} compounds employing microwave technique. Dependence of morphology on the reaction conditions. Morphology transformation from hexagonal prisms to polyhedron was observed.

Ding, Ling [School of Textile and Material Science, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); Song, Yu, E-mail: songyu@dlpu.edu.cn [School of Textile and Material Science, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); Yang, Wei; Xue, Run-Miao [School of Textile and Material Science, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); Zhai, Shang-Ru [Faculty of Light Industry and Chemical Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); An, Qing-Da, E-mail: anqingda@dlpu.edu.cn [Faculty of Light Industry and Chemical Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

A Backprojection-Filtration Algorithm for Nonstandard Spiral Cone-beam CT with an N-PI Window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

triangulation. Then, they proposed a quasi-exact FBP reconstruction algorithm [9] using three sets of filter1 A Backprojection-Filtration Algorithm for Nonstandard Spiral Cone-beam CT with an N-PI Window in the nonstandard spiral scanning case. In this paper, we design an n-PI-window-based BPF algorithm, and report

Ye, Yangbo

403

Methods for reduced platen compression (RPC) test specimen cutting locations using micro-CT and planar radiographs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to complete an RPC analysis and improving the quality of the obtained results. High-resolution micro-CT scans are used to gain a better understanding of rat long bone anatomy by quantifying the location, shape, and orientation of the growth plate, primary...

Lemmon, Heber

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Abstract-Proton Computed Tomography (CT) has important implications for both image-guided diagnosis and radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-guided diagnosis and radiation therapy. For diagnosis, the fact that the patient dose committed by proton CT only render approximate stopping power estimates, limiting the power of proton radiation therapy radiation therapy is one of the most precise forms of image-guided cancer therapy since the sharp dose peak

California at Santa Cruz, University of

405

Model-based image reconstruction for dual-energy X-ray CT with fast KVP switching  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most recent generation of X-ray CT systems can collect dual energy (DE) sinograms by rapidly switching the X-ray tube voltage between two levels for alternate projection views. This reduces motion artifacts in DE imaging, but yields sinograms that ... Keywords: dualenergy X-ray computed tomography, model-based image reconstruction, penalized likelihood

Wonseok Huh; Jeffrey A. Fessler

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A resource for the assessment of lung nodule size estimation methods: database of thoracic CT scans of an anthropomorphic phantom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of interrelated factors can affect the precision and accuracy of lung nodule size estimation. To quantify the effect of these factors, we have been conducting phantom CT... Full-Text PDF contains links to datasets. See ISP homepage for software requirements and other information.

Gavrielides, Marios A; Kinnard, Lisa M; Myers, Kyle J; Peregoy, Jennifer; Pritchard, William F; Zeng, Rongping; Esparza, Juan; Karanian, John; Petrick, Nicholas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Multi-GPU parallelization of a 3D Bayesian CT algorithm and its application on real foam reconstruction with incomplete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tomography (CT) [1,2]. The limits of these methods appear when the number of projections is small, and for example, the data set are not complete due to the limited acquistion time. In this specific context is the computation time and especially for projection and backprojection steps. In this study, first we show how we

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

408

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, Preferred Builders, Old Greenwhich, CT, Custom  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preferred Preferred Builders, Inc. Old Greenwich, CT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

409

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, BPC Green Builders, Custom Home, New Fairfield, CT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BPC Green BPC Green Builders New Fairfi eld, CT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

410

Dynamic Multiscale Boundary Conditions for 4D CT Images of Healthy and Emphysematous Rat  

SciTech Connect

Changes in the shape of the lung during breathing determine the movement of airways and alveoli, and thus impact airflow dynamics. Modeling airflow dynamics in health and disease is a key goal for predictive multiscale models of respiration. Past efforts to model changes in lung shape during breathing have measured shape at multiple breath-holds. However, breath-holds do not capture hysteretic differences between inspiration and expiration resulting from the additional energy required for inspiration. Alternatively, imaging dynamically without breath-holds allows measurement of hysteretic differences. In this study, we acquire multiple micro-CT images per breath (4DCT) in live rats, and from these images we develop, for the first time, dynamic volume maps. These maps show changes in local volume across the entire lung throughout the breathing cycle and accurately predict the global pressure-volume (PV) hysteresis.

Jacob, Rick E.; Carson, James P.; Thomas, Mathew; Einstein, Daniel R.

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

411

Simulation of Cone Beam CT System Based on Monte Carlo Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) was developed based on Image-guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) and it is the trend of photon radiation therapy. To get a better use of Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images for ART, the CBCT system model was established based on Monte Carlo program and validated against the measurement. The BEAMnrc program was adopted to the KV x-ray tube. Both IOURCE-13 and ISOURCE-24 were chosen to simulate the path of beam particles. The measured Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) and lateral dose profiles under 1cm water were compared with the dose calculated by DOSXYZnrc program. The calculated PDD was better than 1% within the depth of 10cm. More than 85% points of calculated lateral dose profiles was within 2%. The correct CBCT system model helps to improve CBCT image quality for dose verification in ART and assess the CBCT image concomitant dose risk.

Wang, Yu; Cao, Ruifen; Hu, Liqin; Li, Bingbing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Fast Scatter Artifacts Correction for Cone-Beam CT without System Modification and Repeat Scan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a fast and accurate scatter artifacts correction algorithm for cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The method starts with an estimation of coarse scatter profile for a set of CBCT images. A total-variation denoising algorithm designed specifically for Poisson signal is then applied to derive the final scatter distribution. Qualitatively and quantitatively evaluations using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, experimental CBCT phantom data, and \\emph{in vivo} human data acquired for a clinical image guided radiation therapy were performed. Results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce scatter artifacts and recover the correct HU within either projection domain or image domain. Further test shows the method is robust with respect to segmentation procedure.

Zhao, Wei; Wang, Luyao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Contouring Variability of the Penile Bulb on CT Images: Quantitative Assessment Using a Generalized Concordance Index  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Within a multicenter study (DUE-01) focused on the search of predictors of erectile dysfunction and urinary toxicity after radiotherapy for prostate cancer, a dummy run exercise on penile bulb (PB) contouring on computed tomography (CT) images was carried out. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess interobserver contouring variability by the application of the generalized DICE index. Methods and Materials: Fifteen physicians from different Institutes drew the PB on CT images of 10 patients. The spread of DICE values was used to objectively select those observers who significantly disagreed with the others. The analyses were performed with a dedicated module in the VODCA software package. Results: DICE values were found to significantly change among observers and patients. The mean DICE value was 0.67, ranging between 0.43 and 0.80. The statistics of DICE coefficients identified 4 of 15 observers who systematically showed a value below the average (p value range, 0.013 - 0.059): Mean DICE values were 0.62 for the 4 'bad' observers compared to 0.69 of the 11 'good' observers. For all bad observers, the main cause of the disagreement was identified. Average DICE values were significantly worse from the average in 2 of 10 patients (0.60 vs. 0.70, p < 0.05) because of the limited visibility of the PB. Excluding the bad observers and the 'bad' patients,' the mean DICE value increased from 0.67 to 0.70; interobserver variability, expressed in terms of standard deviation of DICE spread, was also reduced. Conclusions: The obtained values of DICE around 0.7 shows an acceptable agreement, considered the small dimension of the PB. Additional strategies to improve this agreement are under consideration and include an additional tutorial of the so-called bad observers with a recontouring procedure, or the recontouring by a single observer of the PB for all patients included in the DUE-01 study.

Carillo, Viviana [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Cozzarini, Cesare [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Perna, Lucia; Calandra, Mauro [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Gianolini, Stefano [Medical Software Solutions GmbH, Hagendorn (Switzerland)] [Medical Software Solutions GmbH, Hagendorn (Switzerland); Rancati, Tiziana [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy)] [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Spinelli, Antonello Enrico [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Vavassori, Vittorio [Department of Radiotherapy, Cliniche Gavazzeni Humanitas, Bergamo (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Cliniche Gavazzeni Humanitas, Bergamo (Italy); Villa, Sergio [Department of Radiotherapy 1, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy 1, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Valdagni, Riccardo [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy) [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy 1, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Fiorino, Claudio, E-mail: fiorino.claudio@hsr.it [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Statistical CT noise reduction with multiscale decomposition and penalized weighted least squares in the projection domain  

SciTech Connect

Purposes: The suppression of noise in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging is of clinical relevance for diagnostic image quality and the potential for radiation dose saving. Toward this purpose, statistical noise reduction methods in either the image or projection domain have been proposed, which employ a multiscale decomposition to enhance the performance of noise suppression while maintaining image sharpness. Recognizing the advantages of noise suppression in the projection domain, the authors propose a projection domain multiscale penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) method, in which the angular sampling rate is explicitly taken into consideration to account for the possible variation of interview sampling rate in advanced clinical or preclinical applications. Methods: The projection domain multiscale PWLS method is derived by converting an isotropic diffusion partial differential equation in the image domain into the projection domain, wherein a multiscale decomposition is carried out. With adoption of the Markov random field or soft thresholding objective function, the projection domain multiscale PWLS method deals with noise at each scale. To compensate for the degradation in image sharpness caused by the projection domain multiscale PWLS method, an edge enhancement is carried out following the noise reduction. The performance of the proposed method is experimentally evaluated and verified using the projection data simulated by computer and acquired by a CT scanner. Results: The preliminary results show that the proposed projection domain multiscale PWLS method outperforms the projection domain single-scale PWLS method and the image domain multiscale anisotropic diffusion method in noise reduction. In addition, the proposed method can preserve image sharpness very well while the occurrence of 'salt-and-pepper' noise and mosaic artifacts can be avoided. Conclusions: Since the interview sampling rate is taken into account in the projection domain multiscale decomposition, the proposed method is anticipated to be useful in advanced clinical and preclinical applications where the interview sampling rate varies.

Tang Shaojie; Tang Xiangyang [Imaging and Medical Physics, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1701 Uppergate Dr., C-5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); School of Automation, Xi'an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710121 (China); Imaging and Medical Physics, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1701 Uppergate Dr., C-5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Best fit refractive index of matching liquid for 3D NIPAM gel dosimeters using optical CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The accuracy of an optical computed tomography (CT)-based dosimeter is significantly affected by the refractive index (RI) of the matching liquid. Mismatched RI induces reflection and refraction as the laser beam passes through the gel phantom. Moreover, the unwanted light rays collected by the photodetector produce image artifacts after image reconstruction from the collected data. To obtain the best image quality, this study investigates the best-fit RI of the matching liquid for a 3D NIPAM gel dosimeter. The three recipes of NIPAM polymer gel used in this study consisted of 5% gelatin, 5% NIPAM and 3% N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide, which were combined with three compositions (5, 10, and 20mM) of Tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride. Results were evaluated using a quantitative evaluation method of the gamma evaluation technique. Results showed that the best-fit RI for the non-irradiated NIPAM gel ranges from 1.340 to 1.346 for various NIPAM recipes with sensitivities ranging from 0.0113 to 0.0227. The greatest pass rate of 88.00% is achieved using best-fit RI=1.346 of the matching liquid. The adoption of mismatching RI decreases the gamma pass rate by 2.63% to 16.75% for all three recipes of NIPAM gel dosimeters. In addition, the maximum average deviation is less than 0.1% for the red and transparent matching liquids. Thus, the color of the matching liquid does not affect the measurement accuracy of the NIPAM gel dosimeter, as measured by optical CT.

Chin-Hsing Chen; Jay Wu; Bor-Tsung Hsieh; De-Shiou Chen; Tzu-Hwei Wang; Sou-Hsin Chien; Yuan-Jen Chang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Supercritical CO2 core flooding and imbibition in Berea sandstone CT imaging and numerical simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports a numerical simulation study of a full CO2 core flooding and imbibition cycle on a Berea sandstone core (measured 14.45cm long and 3.67cm in diameter). During the test, supercritical CO2 (at 10MPa and 40C) and CO2-saturated brine was injected into one end of the horizontal core and a X-ray CT scanner (with a resolution of 0.35mmנ0.35mm) was employed to monitor and record changes in the fluid saturations, which enabled 3D mapping of the saturation profiles throughout the core during the course of core flooding test. From the digital CT saturation data, mean saturation profiles along the core length were plotted with time. A 1D model of the core was constructed to simulate the core flooding test and attempt was made to history match core test results, particularly the evolution of the mean CO2 saturation profiles during CO2 injection. Curve-fitting of the centrifugal air-water capillary pressure data (drainage) for the Berea core showed that the core test data could be adequately described by the Van Genuchten equation. The matched set of parameters ( S l r , P 0 , m ) were 0.09, 20KPa, 0.425 respectively. In the absence of the relative permeability for the Berea core, it was decided to use the parameters obtained from matching the air-water capillary pressure data as a first approximation for the CO2-brine system in the model.

Ji-Quan Shi; Ziqiu Xue; Sevket Durucan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Reducing metal artifacts in cone-beam CT images by preprocessing projection data  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) streak artifacts caused by metallic implants remain a challenge for the automatic processing of image data. The impact of metal artifacts in the soft-tissue region is magnified in cone-beam CT (CBCT), because the soft-tissue contrast is usually lower in CBCT images. The goal of this study was to develop an effective offline processing technique to minimize the effect. Methods and Materials: The geometry calibration cue of the CBCT system was used to track the position of the metal object in projection views. The three-dimensional (3D) representation of the object can be established from only two user-selected viewing angles. The position of the shadowed region in other views can be tracked by projecting the 3D coordinates of the object. Automatic image segmentation was used followed by a Laplacian diffusion method to replace the pixels inside the metal object with the boundary pixels. The modified projection data were then used to reconstruct a new CBCT image. The procedure was tested in phantoms, prostate cancer patients with implanted gold markers and metal prosthesis, and a head-and-neck patient with dental amalgam in the teeth. Results: Both phantom and patient studies demonstrated that the procedure was able to minimize the metal artifacts. Soft-tissue visibility was improved near or away from the metal object. The processing time was 1-2 s per projection. Conclusion: We have implemented an effective metal artifact-suppressing algorithm to improve the quality of CBCT images.

Zhang Yongbin [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhang Lifei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chambers, Mark [Department of Dental Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: ldong@mdanderson.org

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Automatic tracking of implanted fiducial markers in cone beam CT projection images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This paper describes a novel method for simultaneous intrafraction tracking of multiple fiducial markers. Although the proposed method is generic and can be adopted for a number of applications including fluoroscopy based patient position monitoring and gated radiotherapy, the tracking results presented in this paper are specific to tracking fiducial markers in a sequence of cone beam CT projection images. Methods: The proposed method is accurate and robust thanks to utilizing the mean shift and random sampling principles, respectively. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated with qualitative and quantitative methods, using data from two pancreatic and one prostate cancer patients and a moving phantom. The ground truth, for quantitative evaluation, was calculated based on manual tracking preformed by three observers. Results: The average dispersion of marker position error calculated from the tracking results for pancreas data (six markers tracked over 640 frames, 3840 marker identifications) was 0.25 mm (at iscoenter), compared with an average dispersion for the manual ground truth estimated at 0.22 mm. For prostate data (three markers tracked over 366 frames, 1098 marker identifications), the average error was 0.34 mm. The estimated tracking error in the pancreas data was < 1 mm (2 pixels) in 97.6% of cases where nearby image clutter was detected and in 100.0% of cases with no nearby image clutter. Conclusions: The proposed method has accuracy comparable to that of manual tracking and, in combination with the proposed batch postprocessing, superior robustness. Marker tracking in cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is useful for a variety of purposes, such as providing data for assessment of intrafraction motion, target tracking during rotational treatment delivery, motion correction of CBCT, and phase sorting for 4D CBCT.

Marchant, T. E.; Skalski, A.; Matuszewski, B. J. [Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester M20 4BX, United Kingdom and Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); AGH University of Science and Technology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, Krakow 30-059 (Poland); School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan) and Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Myouken-chou, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8650 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Section of Radiological Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Inter-slice bidirectional registration-based segmentation of the prostate gland in MR and CT image sequences  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Accurate segmentation and volume estimation of the prostate gland in magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images are necessary steps in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of prostate cancer. This paper presents an algorithm for the prostate gland volume estimation based on the semiautomated segmentation of individual slices in T2-weighted MR and CT image sequences. Methods: The proposedInter-Slice Bidirectional Registration-based Segmentation (iBRS) algorithm relies on interslice image registration of volume data to segment the prostate gland without the use of an anatomical atlas. It requires the user to mark only three slices in a given volume dataset, i.e., the first, middle, and last slices. Next, the proposed algorithm uses a registration algorithm to autosegment the remaining slices. We conducted comprehensive experiments to measure the performance of the proposed algorithm using three registration methods (i.e., rigid, affine, and nonrigid techniques). Results: The results with the proposed technique were compared with manual marking using prostate MR and CT images from 117 patients. Manual marking was performed by an expert user for all 117 patients. The median accuracies for individual slices measured using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were 92% and 91% for MR and CT images, respectively. The iBRS algorithm was also evaluated regarding user variability, which confirmed that the algorithm was robust to interuser variability when marking the prostate gland. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm exploits the interslice data redundancy of the images in a volume dataset of MR and CT images and eliminates the need for an atlas, minimizing the computational cost while producing highly accurate results which are robust to interuser variability.

Khalvati, Farzad, E-mail: farzad.khalvati@uwaterloo.ca; Tizhoosh, Hamid R. [Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)] [Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Salmanpour, Aryan; Rahnamayan, Shahryar [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada)] [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada); Rodrigues, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6C 2R6, Canada and Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6C 2R6, Canada and Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Experimental evaluation of actual delivered dose using mega-voltage cone-beam CT and direct point dose measurement  

SciTech Connect

Radiation therapy in patients is planned by using computed tomography (CT) images acquired before start of the treatment course. Here, tumor shrinkage or weight loss or both, which are common during the treatment course for patients with head-and-neck (H and N) cancer, causes unexpected differences from the plan, as well as dose uncertainty with the daily positional error of patients. For accurate clinical evaluation, it is essential to identify these anatomical changes and daily positional errors, as well as consequent dosimetric changes. To evaluate the actual delivered dose, the authors proposed direct dose measurement and dose calculation with mega-voltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT). The purpose of the present study was to experimentally evaluate dose calculation by MVCBCT. Furthermore, actual delivered dose was evaluated directly with accurate phantom setup. Because MVCBCT has CT-number variation, even when the analyzed object has a uniform density, a specific and simple CT-number correction method was developed and applied for the H and N site of a RANDO phantom. Dose distributions were calculated with the corrected MVCBCT images of a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom. Treatment processes from planning to beam delivery were performed for the H and N site of the RANDO phantom. The image-guided radiation therapy procedure was utilized for the phantom setup to improve measurement reliability. The calculated dose in the RANDO phantom was compared to the measured dose obtained by metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor detectors. In the polymethyl methacrylate phantom, the calculated and measured doses agreed within about +3%. In the RANDO phantom, the dose difference was less than +5%. The calculated dose based on simulation-CT agreed with the measured dose within3%, even in the region with a high dose gradient. The actual delivered dose was successfully determined by dose calculation with MVCBCT, and the point dose measurement with the image-guided radiation therapy procedure.

Matsubara, Kana, E-mail: matsubara-kana@hs.tmu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Arakawa-ku Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Ryosuke [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chiba (Japan); Nishioka, Shie; Shibuya, Toshiyuki; Ariji, Takaki; Akimoto, Tetsuo [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); Saitoh, Hidetoshi [Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Arakawa-ku Tokyo (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Potential of dual-energy subtraction for converting CT numbers to electron density based on a single linear relationship  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The conversion of the computed tomography (CT) number to electron density is one of the main processes that determine the accuracy of patient dose calculations in radiotherapy treatment planning. However, the CT number and electron density of tissues cannot be generally interrelated via a simple one-to-one correspondence because the CT number depends on the effective atomic number as well as the electron density. The purpose of this study is to present a simple conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number ({Delta}HU) by means of dual-energy CT (DECT) to the relative electron density ({rho}{sub e}) via a single linear relationship. Methods: The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion method was demonstrated by performing analytical DECT image simulations that were intended to imitate a second-generation dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner with an additional tin filtration for the high-kV tube. The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} calibration line was obtained from the image simulation with a 33 cm-diameter electron density calibration phantom equipped with 16 inserts including polytetrafluoroethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and aluminum; the elemental compositions of these three inserts were quite different to those of body tissues. The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion method was also applied to previously published experimental CT data, which were measured using two different CT scanners, to validate the clinical feasibility of the present approach. In addition, the effect of object size on {rho}{sub e}-calibrated images was investigated by image simulations using a 25 cm-diameter virtual phantom for two different filtrations: with and without the tin filter for the high-kV tube. Results: The simulated {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} plot exhibited a predictable linear relationship over a wide range of {rho}{sub e} from 0.00 (air) to 2.35 (aluminum). Resultant values of the coefficient of determination, slope, and intercept of the linear function fitted to the data were close to those of the ideal case. The maximum difference between the ideal and simulated {rho}{sub e} values was -0.7%. The satisfactory linearity of {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} was also confirmed from analyses of the experimental CT data. In the experimental cases, the maximum difference between the nominal and simulated {rho}{sub e} values was found to be 2.5% after two outliers were excluded. When compared with the case without the tin filter, the {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion performed with the tin filter yielded a lower dose and more reliable {rho}{sub e} values that were less affected by the object-size variation. Conclusions: The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} calibration line with a simple one-to-one correspondence would facilitate the construction of a well-calibrated {rho}{sub e} image from acquired dual-kV images, and currently, second generation DSCT may be a feasible modality for the clinical use of the {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion method.

Saito, Masatoshi [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

A One-Step Cone-Beam CT-Enabled Planning-to-Treatment Model for Palliative Radiotherapy-From Development to Implementation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop a cone-beam computed tomography (CT)-enabled one-step simulation-to-treatment process for the treatment of bone metastases. Methods and Materials: A three-phase prospective study was conducted. Patients requiring palliative radiotherapy to the spine, mediastinum, or abdomen/pelvis suitable for treatment with simple beam geometry ({<=}2 beams) were accrued. Phase A established the accuracy of cone-beam CT images for the purpose of gross tumor target volume (GTV) definition. Phase B evaluated the feasibility of implementing the cone-beam CT-enabled planning process at the treatment unit. Phase C evaluated the online cone-beam CT-enabled process for the planning and treatment of patients requiring radiotherapy for bone metastases. Results: Eighty-four patients participated in this study. Phase A (n = 9) established the adequacy of cone-beam CT images for target definition. Phase B (n = 45) established the quality of treatment plans to be adequate for clinical implementation for bone metastases. When the process was applied clinically in bone metastases (Phase C), the degree of overlap between planning computed tomography (PCT) and cone-beam CT for GTV and between PCT and cone-beam CT for treatment field was 82% {+-} 11% and 97% {+-} 4%, respectively. The oncologist's decision to accept the plan under a time-pressured environment remained of high quality, with the cone-beam CT-generated treatment plan delivering at least 90% of the prescribed dose to 100% {+-} 0% of the cone-beam CT planning target volume (PTV). With the assumption that the PCT PTV is the gold-standard target, the cone-beam CT-generated treatment plan delivered at least 90% and at least 95% of dose to 98% {+-} 2% and 97% {+-} 5% of the PCT PTV, respectively. The mean time for the online planning and treatment process was 32.7 {+-} 4.0 minutes. Patient satisfaction was high, with a trend for superior satisfaction with the cone-beam CT-enabled process. Conclusions: The cone-beam CT-enabled palliative treatment process is feasible and is ready for clinical implementation for the treatment of bone metastases using simple beam geometry, providing a streamlined one-step process toward palliative radiotherapy.

Wong, Rebecca K.S., E-mail: rebecca.wong@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Letourneau, Daniel; Varma, Anita [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bissonnette, Jean Pierre; Fitzpatrick, David; Grabarz, Daniel; Elder, Christine [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Martin, Melanie; Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Panzarella, Tony [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gospodarowicz, Mary [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Effects of ray profile modeling on resolution recovery in clinical CT  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Iterative image reconstruction gains more and more interest in clinical routine, as it promises to reduce image noise (and thereby patient dose), to reduce artifacts, or to improve spatial resolution. However, among vendors and researchers, there is no consensus of how to best achieve these goals. The authors are focusing on the aspect of geometric ray profile modeling, which is realized by some algorithms, while others model the ray as a straight line. The authors incorporate ray-modeling (RM) in nonregularized iterative reconstruction. That means, instead of using one simple single needle beam to represent the x-ray, the authors evaluate the double integral of attenuation path length over the finite source distribution and the finite detector element size in the numerical forward projection. Our investigations aim at analyzing the resolution recovery (RR) effects of RM. Resolution recovery means that frequencies can be recovered beyond the resolution limit of the imaging system. In order to evaluate, whether clinical CT images can benefit from modeling the geometrical properties of each x-ray, the authors performed a 2D simulation study of a clinical CT fan-beam geometry that includes the precise modeling of these geometrical properties. Methods: All simulations and reconstructions are performed in native fan-beam geometry. A water phantom with resolution bar patterns and a Forbild thorax phantom with circular resolution patterns representing calcifications in the heart region are simulated. An FBP reconstruction with a RamLak kernel is used as a reference reconstruction. The FBP is compared to iterative reconstruction techniques with and without RM: An ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm without any RM (OSC), an OSC where the forward projection is modeled concerning the finite focal spot and detector size (OSC-RM) and an OSC with RM and with a matched forward and backprojection pair (OSC-T-RM, T for transpose). In all cases, noise was matched to be able to focus on comparing spatial resolution. The authors use two different simulation settings. Both are based on the geometry of a typical clinical CT system (0.7 mm detector element size at isocenter, 1024 projections per rotation). Setting one has an exaggerated source width of 5.0 mm. Setting two has a realistically small source width of 0.5 mm. The authors also investigate the transition from setting one to two. To quantify image quality, the authors analyze line profiles through the resolution patterns to define a contrast factor (CF) for contrast-resolution plots, and the authors compare the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with respect to the ground truth of the circular resolution patterns. To independently analyze whether RM is of advantage, the authors implemented several iterative reconstruction algorithms: The statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm OSC, the ordered subsets simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (OSSART) and another statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, denoted with ordered subsets maximum likelihood (OSML) algorithm. All algorithms were implemented both without RM (denoted as OSC, OSSART, and OSML) and with RM (denoted as OSC-RM, OSSART-RM, and OSML-RM). Results: For the unrealistic case of a 5.0 mm focal spot the CF can be improved by a factor of two due to RM: the 4.2 LP/cm bar pattern, which is the first bar pattern that cannot be resolved without RM, can be easily resolved with RM. For the realistic case of a 0.5 mm focus, all results show approximately the same CF. The NCC shows no significant dependency on RM when the source width is smaller than 2.0 mm (as in clinical CT). From 2.0 mm to 5.0 mm focal spot size increasing improvements can be observed with RM. Conclusions: Geometric RM in iterative reconstruction helps improving spatial resolution, if the ray cross-section is significantly larger than the ray sampling distance. In clinical CT, however, the ray is not much thicker than the distance between neighboring ray centers, as the focal spot size is small and detector crosstalk is negligi

Hofmann, Christian [Institute of Medical Physics, FriedrichAlexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, FriedrichAlexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany); Knaup, Michael [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Kachelrie, Marc, E-mail: marc.kachelriess@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, FriedrichAlexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, FriedrichAlexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Ion mobility and phase transitions in heptafluorodiantimonates(III) Cs(1?x)(NH4)xSb2F7 and K0.4Rb0.6Sb2F7 according to NMR and DSC data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ion mobility and phase transitions in heptafluorodiantimonates(III) Cs1?x(NH4)xSb2F7 (x=0.2; 0.6) and K0.4Rb0.6Sb2F7 were studied by the 19F, 1H NMR and DSC. The character of ionic motions in fluoride and ammonium sublattices with temperature variations was investigated. Types of ion motions and temperature ranges in which they are observed were determined. It was found that the predominant form of ionic motions in high-temperature modifications is a diffusion of fluorine atoms, whereas the number of diffusing ammonium ions depends on the sample composition. The observed phase transitions in heptafluorodiantimonates(III) of cesiumammonium and potassiumrubidium with a formation of high-temperature modifications are transitions into a superionic state (?>10?3S/cm above 450K).

V.Ya. Kavun; M.M. Polyantsev; L.A. Zemnukhova; A.B. Slobodyuk; V.I. Sergienko

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

1H NMR investigation of the spin dynamics of the spin-frustrated trinuclear Fe cluster (NH4)[Fe3(?3-OH)(H2L)3(HL)3]?(H3L=orotic acid)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Proton nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) measurements have been performed in the cluster (NH4)[Fe3(?3-OH)(H2L)3(HL)3]?(H3L=orotic acid) in order to investigate the electron spin dynamics of the Fe trinuclear unit. The proton NMR spectra and spin-lattice relaxation times T1 have been measured at temperatures between 3 K and room temperature. The 1/T1 rate exhibits a broad maximum around 50 K, which is attributed to slow local-field fluctuations of the electronic spin system of the order of the Larmor period, associated with magnetic excitations between the discrete low-lying energy levels of the cluster. The observation and relaxation analysis of the 1/T1 maximum provide an independent measurement of the energy difference between the ground and the first-excited state of the trinuclear unit and corroborates the results of previous static susceptibility measurements.

M. Fardis; G. Diamantopoulos; M. Karayianni; G. Papavassiliou; V. Tangoulis; A. Konsta

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

Hydrogen storage in a combined M.sub.xAlH.sub.6/M'.sub.y(NH.sub.2).sub.z system and methods of making and using the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

As a promising clean fuel for vehicles, hydrogen can be used for propulsion, either directly or in fuel cells. Hydrogen storage compositions having high storage capacity, good dehydrogenation kinetics, and hydrogen release and uptake reactions which are reversible are disclosed and described. Generally a hydrogen storage composition of a metal aluminum hexahydride and a metal amide can be used. A combined system (Li.sub.3AIH.sub.6/3LiNH.sub.2) with a very high inherent hydrogen capacity (7.3 wt %) can be carried out at moderate temperatures, and with approximately 95% of that inherent hydrogen storage capacity (7.0%) is reversible over repeated cycling of release and uptake.

Lu, Jun (Salt Lake City, UT); Fang, Zhigang Zak (Salt Lake City, UT); Sohn, Hong Yong (Salt Lake City, UT)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

428

Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The combination of quickly rotating C-arm gantry with digital flat panel has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional data (3D) in the interventional suite. However, image quality is still somewhat limited since the hardware has not been optimized for CT imaging. Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the ability to improve image quality by reducing the noise level and therewith the radiation dose without introducing noticeable blurring. By applying the filtering prior to 3D reconstruction, noise-induced streak artifacts are reduced as compared to processing in the image domain. Methods: 3D anisotropic adaptive filtering was used to process an ensemble of 2D x-ray views acquired along a circular trajectory around an object. After arranging the input data into a 3D space (2D projections + angle), the orientation of structures was estimated using a set of differently oriented filters. The resulting tensor representation of local orientation was utilized to control the anisotropic filtering. Low-pass filtering is applied only along structures to maintain high spatial frequency components perpendicular to these. The evaluation of the proposed algorithm includes numerical simulations, phantom experiments, and in-vivo data which were acquired using an AXIOM Artis dTA C-arm system (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany). Spatial resolution and noise levels were compared with and without adaptive filtering. A human observer study was carried out to evaluate low-contrast detectability. Results: The adaptive anisotropic filtering algorithm was found to significantly improve low-contrast detectability by reducing the noise level by half (reduction of the standard deviation in certain areas from 74 to 30 HU). Virtually no degradation of high contrast spatial resolution was observed in the modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, hardware acceleration using Nvidia's CUDA Interface provided an 8.9-fold speed-up of the processing (from 1336 to 150 s). Conclusions: Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the potential to substantially improve image quality and/or reduce the radiation dose required for obtaining 3D image data using cone beam CT.

Maier, Andreas; Wigstroem, Lars; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Hornegger, Joachim; Zhu Lei; Strobel, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Pattern Recognition Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054, Erlangen (Germany); Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Siemens AG Healthcare, Forchheim 91301 (Germany); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations  

SciTech Connect

To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

Rees, E.V.L.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Seol, Y.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Fusion of Immunoscintigraphy Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) with CT of the Chest in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the eighth patient, fusion demonstrated the absence...image registration or fusion of oefunctional studies...were acquired with dual energy windows to provide anatomic and landmark...the other. The 5761s FUSION OF CHEST SPECT AND CT...

Sanjeev Katyal; Elissa Lipcon Kramer; Marilyn E. Noz; Dorothy McCauley; Abraham Chachoua; and Alan Steinfeld

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Bone scintigraphy (BS) may no longer be relevant in the era of integrated PET/CT for women undergoing evaluation for suspected metastatic breast cancer (MBC).  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...women undergoing extent-of-disease (EOD) evaluation for suspected MBC. Methods: Women undergoing EOD evaluation for suspected MBC with integrated...CT in detecting osseous metastases when EOD evaluation for suspected MBC is considered...

HL McArthur; C Lynch; P Morris; S Larson; K Grabski; J Howard; S Patil; CA Hudis; MN Dickler

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

432

PREFECTURE-WIDE MULTI-CENTRE RADIATION DOSE SURVEY AS A USEFUL TOOL FOR CT DOSE OPTIMISATION: REPORT OF GUNMA RADIATION DOSE STUDY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......as two or more different patients with each undergoing a single CT session. The anatomical regions were divided into head (brain), face, neck, chest, upper abdomen, pelvis (lower abdomen) and coronary. When a patient was scanned in two or more......

Yasuhiro Fukushima; Ayako Taketomi-Takahashi; Takahito Nakajima; Yoshito Tsushima

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Application of X-ray CT for investigating fluid flow and conformance control during CO2 injection in highly heterogeneous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were performed using homogeneous and heterogeneous cores and a 4th generation X-Ray CT scanner was used to visualize heterogeneity and fluid flow in the core. Porosity and saturation measurements were made during the course of the experiment...

Chakravarthy, Deepak

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

434

Effects of ceftriaxone on ethanol intake: a possible role for xCT and GLT-1 isoforms modulation of glutamate levels in P rats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence suggests that glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and cystine/glutamate exchanger transporter(xCT) are critical in maintaining glutamate homeostasis. We have recently demonstrated that ceftriaxone treatment...

Hasan Alhaddad; Sujan C. Das; Youssef Sari

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

PET Motion Compensation for Radiation Therapy Using a CT-Based Mid-Position Motion Model: Methodology and Clinical Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Four-dimensional positron emission tomography (4D PET) imaging of the thorax produces sharper images with reduced motion artifacts. Current radiation therapy planning systems, however, do not facilitate 4D plan optimization. When images are acquired in a 2-minute time slot, the signal-to-noise ratio of each 4D frame is low, compromising image quality. The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate the construction of mid-position 3D PET scans, with motion compensated using a 4D computed tomography (CT)-derived motion model. Methods and Materials: All voxels of 4D PET were registered to the time-averaged position by using a motion model derived from the 4D CT frames. After the registration the scans were summed, resulting in a motion-compensated 3D mid-position PET scan. The method was tested with a phantom dataset as well as data from 27 lung cancer patients. Results: PET motion compensation using a CT-based motion model improved image quality of both phantoms and patients in terms of increased maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) values and decreased apparent volumes. In homogenous phantom data, a strong relationship was found between the amplitude-to-diameter ratio and the effects of the method. In heterogeneous patient data, the effect correlated better with the motion amplitude. In case of large amplitudes, motion compensation may increase SUV{sub max} up to 25% and reduce the diameter of the 50% SUV{sub max} volume by 10%. Conclusions: 4D CT-based motion-compensated mid-position PET scans provide improved quantitative data in terms of uptake values and volumes at the time-averaged position, thereby facilitating more accurate radiation therapy treatment planning of pulmonary lesions.

Kruis, Matthijs F.; Kamer, Jeroen B. van de; Houweling, Antonetta C.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Belderbos, Jos S.A.; Herk, Marcel van, E-mail: m.v.herk@nki.nl

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Exposure to Ionizing Radiation and Estimate of Secondary Cancers in the Era of High-Speed CT Scanning: Projections From the Medicare Population  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose The aims of this study were to analyze the distribution and amount of ionizing radiation delivered by CT scans in the modern era of high-speed CT and to estimate cancer risk in the elderly, the patient group most frequently imaged using CT scanning. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Medicare claims spanning 8 years (1998-2005) to assess CT use. The data were analyzed in two 4-year cohorts, 1998 to 2001 (n = 5,267,230) and 2002 to 2005 (n = 5,555,345). The number and types of CT scans each patient received over the 4-year periods were analyzed to determine the percentage of patients exposed to threshold radiation of 50 to 100 mSv (defined as low) and >100 mSv (defined as high). The National Research Council's Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII models were used to estimate the number of radiation-induced cancers. Results CT scans of the head were the most common examinations in both Medicare cohorts, but abdominal imaging delivered the greatest proportion (43% in the first cohort and 40% in the second cohort) of radiation. In the 1998 to 2001 cohort, 42% of Medicare patients underwent CT scans, with 2.2% and 0.5% receiving radiation doses in the low and high ranges, respectively. In the 2002 to 2005 cohort, 50% of Medicare patients received CT scans, with 4.2% and 1.2% receiving doses in the low and high ranges. In the two populations, 1,659 (0.03%) and 2,185 (0.04%) cancers related to ionizing radiation were estimated, respectively. Conclusions Although radiation doses have been increasing along with the increasing reliance on CT scans for diagnosis and therapy, using conservative estimates with worst-case scenario methodology, the authors found that the risk for secondary cancers is low in older adults, the group subjected to the most frequent CT scanning. Trends showing increasing use, however, underscore the importance of monitoring CT utilization and its consequences.

Aabed B. Meer; Pat A. Basu; Laurence C. Baker; Scott W. Atlas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

CT Scan Not Only a Medical Technique NETL Wins Two 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y * O f f i c e o f F o s s i l E n e r g y * N a t i o n a l E n e r g y Te c h n o l o g y L a b o r a t o r y S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y * O f f i c e o f F o s s i l E n e r g y * N a t i o n a l E n e r g y Te c h n o l o g y L a b o r a t o r y CT Scan Not Only a Medical Technique NETL Wins Two 2008 R&D 100 Awards First Measurements at Oxy-Fuel Flame Test Facility NETL's R&D newsletter January 2008 / issue 8 October 2008, Issue 11 CONTENTS Medical Technique Adopted to Study Mobility of CO 2 in Coal ____________________________________________ 2 Two Technologies Chosen for 2008 R&D 100 Awards _____ 3 Computer Code for Geologic Sequestration Modified for Parallel Computers ________________________________

438

Introduction of heat map to fidelity assessment of compressed CT images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study aimed to introduce heat map, a graphical data presentation method widely used in gene expression experiments, to the presentation and interpretation of image fidelity assessment data of compressed computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: The authors used actual assessment data that consisted of five radiologists' responses to 720 computed tomography images compressed using both Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (JPEG2000) 2D and JPEG2000 3D compressions. They additionally created data of two artificial radiologists, which were generated by partly modifying the data from two human radiologists. Results: For each compression, the entire data set, including the variations among radiologists and among images, could be compacted into a small color-coded grid matrix of the heat map. A difference heat map depicted the advantage of 3D compression over 2D compression. Dendrograms showing hierarchical agglomerative clustering results were added to the heat maps to illustrate the similarities in the data patterns among radiologists and among images. The dendrograms were used to identify two artificial radiologists as outliers, whose data were created by partly modifying the responses of two human radiologists. Conclusions: The heat map can illustrate a quick visual extract of the overall data as well as the entirety of large complex data in a compact space while visualizing the variations among observers and among images. The heat map with the dendrograms can be used to identify outliers or to classify observers and images based on the degree of similarity in the response patterns.

Lee, Hyunna; Kim, Bohyoung; Seo, Jinwook; Park, Seongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil [School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-ro, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

,"North Troy, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:16:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North...

440

Combined iterative reconstruction and image-domain decomposition for dual energy CT using total-variation regularization  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) is being increasingly used for its capability of material decomposition and energy-selective imaging. A generic problem of DECT, however, is that the decomposition process is unstable in the sense that the relative magnitude of decomposed signals is reduced due to signal cancellation while the image noise is accumulating from the two CT images of independent scans. Direct image decomposition, therefore, leads to severe degradation of signal-to-noise ratio on the resultant images. Existing noise suppression techniques are typically implemented in DECT with the procedures of reconstruction and decomposition performed independently, which do not explore the statistical properties of decomposed images during the reconstruction for noise reduction. In this work, the authors propose an iterative approach that combines the reconstruction and the signal decomposition procedures to minimize the DECT image noise without noticeable loss of resolution. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated as an optimization problem, which balances the data fidelity and total variation of decomposed images in one framework, and the decomposition step is carried out iteratively together with reconstruction. The noise in the CT images from the proposed algorithm becomes well correlated even though the noise of the raw projections is independent on the two CT scans. Due to this feature, the proposed algorithm avoids noise accumulation during the decomposition process. The authors evaluate the method performance on noise suppression and spatial resolution using phantom studies and compare the algorithm with conventional denoising approaches as well as combined iterative reconstruction methods with different forms of regularization. Results: On the Catphan600 phantom, the proposed method outperforms the existing denoising methods on preserving spatial resolution at the same level of noise suppression, i.e., a reduction of noise standard deviation by one order of magnitude. This improvement is mainly attributed to the high noise correlation in the CT images reconstructed by the proposed algorithm. Iterative reconstruction using different regularization, including quadratic orq-generalized Gaussian Markov random field regularization, achieves similar noise suppression from high noise correlation. However, the proposed TV regularization obtains a better edge preserving performance. Studies of electron density measurement also show that our method reduces the average estimation error from 9.5% to 7.1%. On the anthropomorphic head phantom, the proposed method suppresses the noise standard deviation of the decomposed images by a factor of ?14 without blurring the fine structures in the sinus area. Conclusions: The authors propose a practical method for DECT imaging reconstruction, which combines the image reconstruction and material decomposition into one optimization framework. Compared to the existing approaches, our method achieves a superior performance on DECT imaging with respect to decomposition accuracy, noise reduction, and spatial resolution.

Dong, Xue; Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei, E-mail: leizhu@gatech.edu [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

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441

A robust and efficient approach to detect 3D rectal tubes from CT colonography  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The rectal tube (RT) is a common source of false positives (FPs) in computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for CT colonography. A robust and efficient detection of RT can improve CAD performance by eliminating such ''obvious'' FPs and increase radiologists' confidence in CAD. Methods: In this paper, we present a novel and robust bottom-up approach to detect the RT. Probabilistic models, trained using kernel density estimation on simple low-level features, are employed to rank and select the most likely RT tube candidate on each axial slice. Then, a shape model, robustly estimated using random sample consensus (RANSAC), infers the global RT path from the selected local detections. Subimages around the RT path are projected into a subspace formed from training subimages of the RT. A quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) provides a classification of a subimage as RT or non-RT based on the projection. Finally, a bottom-top clustering method is proposed to merge the classification predictions together to locate the tip position of the RT. Results: Our method is validated using a diverse database, including data from five hospitals. On a testing data with 21 patients (42 volumes), 99.5% of annotated RT paths have been successfully detected. Evaluated with CAD, 98.4% of FPs caused by the RT have been detected and removed without any loss of sensitivity. Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates a high detection rate of the RT path, and when tested in a CAD system, reduces FPs caused by the RT without the loss of sensitivity.

Yang Xiaoyun; Slabaugh, Greg [Medicsight PLC, Kensington Centre, 66 Hammersmith Road, London (United Kingdom)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Khi i hc k thut thng tin (Undergraduateds School of IES) http://www.uec.ac.jp/ies/faculty/index.html (Jpns)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lng Lng t hc Vt liu hc Cht bán dn - Siêu bán dn Thit b in t - Thit b quang in t - T - Vt liu quang Thông tin quang Vt lý rn Sinh hc - Thn kinh hc H thng sinh hc o lng sinh hc Tên thng qun lý doanh nghip... nh hng ngh nghip: K s h thng, K s qun lý sn xut - cht lng sn phm, Chuyên

Yanai, Keiji

443

Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning systemMultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was printed using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A passing rate of 99% was measured in areas of above 40% of the prescription dose. The final inverse treatment plan was comprised of 43 beams ranging from 5 to 12.5 mm in diameter (2.5 mm size increments are available up to 15 mm in diameter collimation). Using the Xsight Spine Tracking module, the CyberKnife system could not reliably identify and track the tiny mouse spine; however, the CyberKnife system could identify and track the fiducial markers on the 3D mold.In vivo positional accuracy analysis using the 3D mold generated a mean error of 1.41 mm 0.73 mm when fiducial markers were used for position tracking. Analysis of the dissected brain confirmed the ability to target the correct brain volume. Conclusions: With the use of a stereotactic body mold with fiducial markers, microCT imaging, and resolution down-sampling, the CyberKnife system can successfully perform small-animal radiotherapy studies.

Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W., E-mail: jason.sohn@case.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and University Hospitals of Cleveland, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Tumor Tracking Method Based on a Deformable 4D CT Breathing Motion Model Driven by an External Surface Surrogate  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop a tumor tracking method based on a surrogate-driven motion model, which provides noninvasive dynamic localization of extracranial targets for the compensation of respiration-induced intrafraction motion in high-precision radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The proposed approach is based on a patient-specific breathing motion model, derived a priori from 4-dimensional planning computed tomography (CT) images. Model parameters (respiratory baseline, amplitude, and phase) are retrieved and updated at each treatment fraction according to in-room radiography acquisition and optical surface imaging. The baseline parameter is adapted to the interfraction variations obtained from the daily cone beam (CB) CT scan. The respiratory amplitude and phase are extracted from an external breathing surrogate, estimated from the displacement of the patient thoracoabdominal surface, acquired with a noninvasive surface imaging device. The developed method was tested on a database of 7 lung cancer patients, including the synchronized information on internal and external respiratory motion during a CBCT scan. Results: About 30 seconds of simultaneous acquisition of CBCT and optical surface images were analyzed for each patient. The tumor trajectories identified in CBCT projections were used as reference and compared with the target trajectories estimated from surface displacement with the a priori motion model. The resulting absolute differences between the reference and estimated tumor motion along the 2 image dimensions ranged between 0.7 and 2.4 mm; the measured phase shifts did not exceed 7% of the breathing cycle length. Conclusions: We investigated a tumor tracking method that integrates breathing motion information provided by the 4-dimensional planning CT with surface imaging at the time of treatment, representing an alternative approach to point-based externalinternal correlation models. Although an in-room radiograph-based assessment of the reliability of the motion model is envisaged, the developed technique does not involve the estimation and continuous update of correlation parameters, thus requiring a less intense use of invasive imaging.

Fassi, Aurora, E-mail: aurora.fassi@mail.polimi.it [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Schaerer, Jol; Fernandes, Mathieu [CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, Universit Lyon 1, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Lon Brard, Lyon (France); Riboldi, Marco [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy); Sarrut, David [CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, Universit Lyon 1, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Lon Brard, Lyon (France); Baroni, Guido [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Screening of mixed surfactant systems: Phase behavior studies and CT imaging of surfactant-enhanced oil recovery experiments  

SciTech Connect

A systematic chemical screening study was conducted on selected anionic-nonionic and nonionic-nonionic systems. The objective of the study was to evaluate and determine combinations of these surfactants that would exhibit favorable phase behavior and solubilization capacity. The effects of different parameters including (a) salinity, (b) temperature, (c) alkane carbon number, (c) hydrophilic/lipophilic balance (HLB) of nonionic component, and (d) type of surfactant on the behavior of the overall chemical system were evaluated. The current work was conducted using a series of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants in combinations of several anionic systems with various hydrocarbons. Efforts to correlate the behavior of these mixed systems led to the development of several models for the chemical systems tested. The models were used to compare the different systems and provided some guidelines for formulating them to account for variations in salinity, oil hydrocarbon number, and temperature. The models were also evaluated to determine conformance with the results from experimental measurements. The models provided good agreement with experimental results. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. CT-monitored corefloods were conducted to examine the effect of changing surfactant slug size injection on oil bank formation and propagation. Reducing surfactant slug size resulted in lower total oil production. Oil recovery results, however, did not correlate with slug size for the low-concentration, alkaline, mixed surfactant system used in these tests. The CT measurements showed that polymer mobility control and core features also affected the overall oil recovery results.

Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Lorenz, P.B.; Cook, I.M.; Scott, L.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

TH?D?201C?08: Multi?Modal MRI SPECT and CT Imaging of Theranostic Nanoplatforms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: The development of non?invasive imaging techniques for the assessment of cancer treatment is rapidly becoming highly important. Magnetic Cationic Liposomes (MCL) that carry a cargo of anti?cancer drugs and magnetic nanoparticles that will selectively target primary and metastatic cancertumorsdeliver drugs to them and visualize their effects through magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) and fluorescence spectroscopy. The aim of the present study is to evaluate MCL as a versatile theranostic nanoplatform for enhanced drug deliveryimaging and monitoring of cancer treatment. Materials and Method: Poly?ethyleneglycol (PEG) coated cationic liposomes are loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS) and tagged with the radioisotope Indium?111. MCL was administered to SCID mouse with metastatic (B16?F10) melanoma grown in the right flank. Pre?injection and post?injection MR and SPECT/CT images were used to assess response to magnetic targeting effects and tumor and organ distribution. Results:Tumor signal intensities in T2 weighted images decreased an average of 205% and T2* values decreased and average of 147ms in the absence of magnetic targeting. This compares to an average signal decrease of 5712% and a decrease in T2* relaxation times of 278ms with the aid of external magnet showing up to 2?fold greater accumulation by magnetic targeting. SPECT/CT images showed the localization and distribution of MCL in the tumor.Conclusion: MR SPECT/CT and biodistribution analyses clearly show the efficacy of MCL as MRI contrast agents prove the use of magnetic guidance and demonstrate the potential of MCL as agents for imaging guidance and therapeutic delivery.

F Reynoso; E Gultepe; A Jhaveri; P Kulkarni; B Gershman; C Ferris; R Campbell; M Harisinghani; S Sridhar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Effective hole extraction using MoO{sub x}-Al contact in perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} solar cells  

SciTech Connect

We report an 11.4%-efficient perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} solar cell using low-cost molybdenum oxide/aluminum (i.e., MoO{sub x}/Al) as an alternative top contact to replace noble/precious metals (e.g., Au or Ag) for extracting photogenerated holes. The device performance of perovskite solar cells using a MoO{sub x}/Al top contact is comparable to that of cells using the standard Ag top contact. Analysis of impedance spectroscopy measurements suggests that using 10-nm-thick MoO{sub x} and Al does not affect charge-recombination properties of perovskite solar cells. Using a thicker (20-nm) MoO{sub x} layer leads to a lower cell performance caused mainly by a reduced fill factor. Our results suggest that MoO{sub x}/Al is promising as a low-cost and effective hole-extraction contact for perovskite solar cells.

Zhao, Yixin; Nardes, Alexandre M.; Zhu, Kai, E-mail: Kai.Zhu@nrel.gov [Chemical and Materials Science Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

448

Hydrogen Storage Properties of New Hydrogen-Rich BH3NH3-Metal Hydride (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2, and/or CaH2) Composite Systems  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia borane (AB = NH3BH3) is one of the most attractive materials for chemical hydrogen storage due to its high hydrogen contents of 19.6 wt.%, however, impurity levels of borazine, ammonia and diborane in conjunction with foaming and exothermic hydrogen release calls for finding ways to mitigate the decomposition reactions. In this paper we present a solution by mixing AB with metal hydrides (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2 and CaH2) which have endothermic hydrogen release in order to control the heat release and impurity levels from AB upon decomposition. The composite materials were prepared by mechanical ball milling, and their H2 release properties were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The formation of volatile products from decomposition side reactions, such as borazine (N3B3H6) was determined by mass spectrometry (MS). Sieverts type pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) gas-solid reaction instrument was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the combined systems and neat AB. In situ 11B MAS-NMR revealed a destabilized decomposition pathway. We found that by adding specific metal hydrides to AB we can eliminate the impurities and mitigate the heat release.

Choi, Young Joon; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.; Ronnebro, Ewa

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

449

Image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer by CT-linear accelerator combination: Prostate movements and dosimetric considerations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Multiple studies have indicated that the prostate is not stationary and can move as much as 2 cm. Such prostate movements are problematic for intensity-modulated radiotherapy, with its associated tight margins and dose escalation. Because of these intrinsic daily uncertainties, a relative generous 'margin' is necessary to avoid marginal misses. Using the CT-linear accelerator combination in the treatment suite (Primatom, Siemens), we found that the daily intrinsic prostate movements can be easily corrected before each radiotherapy session. Dosimetric calculations were performed to evaluate the amount of discrepancy of dose to the target if no correction was done for prostate movement. Methods and materials: The Primatom consists of a Siemens Somatom CT scanner and a Siemens Primus linear accelerator installed in the same treatment suite and sharing a common table/couch. The patient is scanned by the CT scanner, which is movable on a pair of horizontal rails. During scanning, the couch does not move. The exact location of the prostate, seminal vesicles, and rectum are identified and localized. These positions are then compared with the planned positions. The daily movement of the prostate and rectum were corrected for and a new isocenter derived. The patient was treated immediately using the new isocenter. Results: Of the 108 patients with primary prostate cancer studied, 540 consecutive daily CT scans were performed during the last part of the cone down treatment. Of the 540 scans, 46% required no isocenter adjustments for the AP-PA direction, 54% required a shift of {>=}3 mm, 44% required a shift of >5 mm, and 15% required a shift of >10 mm. In the superoinferior direction, 27% required a shift of >3 mm, 25% required a shift of >5 mm, and 4% required a shift of >10 mm. In the right-left direction, 34% required a shift of >3 mm, 24% required a shift of >5 mm, and 5% required a shift of >10 mm. Dosimetric calculations for a typical case of prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with 5-mm margin coverage from the clinical target volume (prostate gland) was performed. With a posterior shift of 10 mm for the prostate, the dose coverage dropped from 95-107% to 71-100% coverage. Conclusion: We have described a technique that corrects for the daily prostate motion, allowing for extremely precise prostate cancer treatment. This technique has significant implications for dose escalation and for decreasing rectal complications in the treatment of prostate cancer.

Wong, James R. [Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, Morristown Memorial Hospital/Atlantic Health System, Morristown, NJ (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (United States); Grimm, Lisa [Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, Morristown Memorial Hospital/Atlantic Health System, Morristown, NJ (United States); Uematsu, Minoru [National Defense Medical College, Namiki, Tokorozawa (Japan); Oren, Reva [Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, Morristown Memorial Hospital/Atlantic Health System, Morristown, NJ (United States); Cheng, C.W. [Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, Morristown Memorial Hospital/Atlantic Health System, Morristown, NJ (United States); Merrick, Scott; Schiff, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (United States)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The objective of this work is to introduce a prototype fan-beam optical computed tomography scanner for three-dimensional (3D) radiation dosimetry. Methods: Two techniques of fan-beam creation were evaluated: a helium-neon laser (HeNe, {lambda} = 543 nm) with line-generating lens, and a laser diode module (LDM, {lambda} = 635 nm) with line-creating head module. Two physical collimator designs were assessed: a single-slot collimator and a multihole collimator. Optimal collimator depth was determined by observing the signal of a single photodiode with varying collimator depths. A method of extending the dynamic range of the system is presented. Two sample types were used for evaluations: nondosimetric absorbent solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters, each housed in 1 liter cylindrical plastic flasks. Imaging protocol investigations were performed to address ring artefacts and image noise. Two image artefact removal techniques were performed in sinogram space. Collimator efficacy was evaluated by imaging highly opaque samples of scatter-based and absorption-based solutions. A noise-based flask registration technique was developed. Two protocols for gel manufacture were examined. Results: The LDM proved advantageous over the HeNe laser due to its reduced noise. Also, the LDM uses a wavelength more suitable for the PRESAGE{sup TM} dosimeter. Collimator depth of 1.5 cm was found to be an optimal balance between scatter rejection, signal strength, and manufacture ease. The multihole collimator is capable of maintaining accurate scatter-rejection to high levels of opacity with scatter-based solutions (T < 0.015%). Imaging protocol investigations support the need for preirradiation and postirradiation scanning to reduce reflection-based ring artefacts and to accommodate flask imperfections and gel inhomogeneities. Artefact removal techniques in sinogram space eliminate streaking artefacts and reduce ring artefacts of up to {approx}40% in magnitude. The flask registration technique was shown to achieve submillimetre and subdegree placement accuracy. Dosimetry protocol investigations emphasize the need to allow gel dosimeters to cool gradually and to be scanned while at room temperature. Preliminary tests show that considerable noise reduction can be achieved with sinogram filtering and by binning image pixels into more clinically relevant grid sizes. Conclusions: This paper describes a new optical CT scanner for 3D radiation dosimetry. Tests demonstrate that it is capable of imaging both absorption-based and scatter-based samples of high opacities. Imaging protocol and gel dosimeter manufacture techniques have been adapted to produce optimal reconstruction results. These optimal results will require suitable filtering and binning techniques for noise reduction purposes.

Campbell, Warren G.; Rudko, D. A.; Braam, Nicolas A.; Jirasek, Andrew [University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2 (Canada); Wells, Derek M. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia V8R 6V5 (Canada)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Rotational micro-CT using a clinical C-arm angiography gantry  

SciTech Connect

Rotational angiography (RA) gantries are used routinely to acquire sequences of projection images of patients from which 3D renderings of vascular structures are generated using Feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction algorithms. However, these systems have limited resolution (<4 lp/mm). Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) systems have better resolution (>10 lp/mm) but to date have relied either on rotating object imaging or small bore geometry for small animal imaging, and thus are not used for clinical imaging. The authors report here the development and use of a 3D rotational micro-angiography (RMA) system created by mounting a micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) [35 {mu}m pixel, resolution >10 lp/mm, field of view (FOV)=3.6 cm] on a standard clinical FPD-based RA gantry (Infinix, Model RTP12303J-G9E, Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tustin, CA). RA image sequences are obtained using the MAF and reconstructed. To eliminate artifacts due to image truncation, lower-dose (compared to MAF acquisition) full-FOV (FFOV) FPD RA sequences (194 {mu}m pixel, FOV=20 cm) were also obtained to complete the missing data. The RA gantry was calibrated using a helical bead phantom. To ensure high-quality high-resolution reconstruction, the high-resolution images from the MAF were aligned spatially with the lower-dose FPD images, and the pixel values in the FPD image data were scaled to match those of the MAF. Images of a rabbit with a coronary stent placed in an artery in the Circle of Willis were obtained and reconstructed. The MAF images appear well aligned with the FPD images (average correlation coefficient before and after alignment: 0.65 and 0.97, respectively) Greater details without any visible truncation artifacts are seen in 3D RMA (MAF-FPD) images than in those of the FPD alone. The FWHM of line profiles of stent struts (100 {mu}m diameter) are approximately 192{+-}21 and 313{+-}38 {mu}m for the 3D RMA and FPD data, respectively. In addition, for the dual-acquisition 3D RMA, FFOV FPD data need not be of the highest quality, and thus may be acquired at lower dose compared to a standard FPD acquisition. These results indicate that this system could provide the basis for high resolution images of regions of interest in patients with a reduction in the integral dose compared to the standard FPD approach.

Patel, V.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Ionita, C. N.; Keleshis, C.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S. [Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Physics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physics, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Department of Computer Science, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Neurosurgery, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Electrical Engineering, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physics, and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Department of Electrical Engineering, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Visiting Companies, Institutions and Laboratories 3M Health Care St. Paul, MN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Orthopaedics and Optima Sports Medicine Salem, NH Ethicon Somerville, NJ Fraunhofer Center for Manufacturing Innovation Brookline, MA GE Healthcare Lawrence, MA Gems Sensors - Controls Plainville, CT Genzyme

Vajda, Sandor

453

MRI-based Preplanning Using CT and MRI Data Fusion in Patients With Cervical Cancer Treated With 3D-based Brachytherapy: Feasibility and Accuracy Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-assisted radiation treatment planning enables enhanced target contouring. The purpose of this study is to analyze the feasibility and accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and MRI data fusion for MRI-based treatment planning in an institution where an MRI scanner is not available in the radiotherapy department. Methods and Materials: The registration inaccuracy of applicators and soft tissue was assessed in 42 applications with CT/MRI data fusion. The absolute positional difference of the center of the applicators was measured in four different planes from the top of the tandem to the cervix. Any inaccuracy of registration of soft tissue in relation to the position of applicators was determined and dose-volume parameters for MRI preplans and for CT/MRI fusion plans with or without target and organs at risk (OAR) adaptation were evaluated. Results: We performed 6,132 measurements in 42 CT/MRI image fusions. Median absolute difference of the center of tandem on CT and MRI was 1.1 mm. Median distance between the center of the right ovoid on CT and MRI was 1.7 and 1.9 mm in the laterolateral and anteroposterior direction, respectively. Corresponding values for the left ovoid were 1.6 and 1.8 mm. Rotation of applicators was 3.1 Degree-Sign . Median absolute difference in position of applicators in relation to soft tissue was 1.93, 1.50, 1.05, and 0.84 mm in the respective transverse planes, and 1.17, 1.28, 1.27, and 1.17 mm in selected angular directions. The dosimetric parameters for organs at risk on CT/MRI fusion plans without OAR adaptation were significantly impaired whereas the target coverage was not influenced. Planning without target adaptation led to overdosing of the target volume, especially high-risk clinical target volume - D{sub 90} 88.2 vs. 83.1 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI-based preplanning with consecutive CT/MRI data fusion can be safe and feasible, with an acceptable inaccuracy of soft tissue registration.

Dolezel, Martin, E-mail: dolezelm@email.cz [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic) [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Odrazka, Karel [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic) [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Zizka, Jan [Department of Radiology, Charles University Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)] [Department of Radiology, Charles University Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Vanasek, Jaroslav; Kohlova, Tereza; Kroulik, Tomas [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic)] [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Spitzer, Dusan; Ryska, Pavel [Department of Radiology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic)] [Department of Radiology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Tichy, Michal; Kostal, Milan [Department of Gynaecology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic)] [Department of Gynaecology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Jalcova, Lubica [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic)] [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

SU?E?I?41: Study On the CT Radiation Attenuation Characteristics of Human Body for Phantom Design Using Monte Carlo Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: The CTDI values measured with standard PMMA phantoms were now being challenged due to the clinical application of new technologies such as automatic tube current modulation(TCM) the aim of this study is to simulate the CT radiation attenuation characteristics of human body along Z?axis which were the basic data of developing new phantoms used to evaluate TCM. Methods: The CT model used in this study has been modeled including the source energy spectrum the bow?tie filter as well and the beam shape. The voxel phantoms RPI Adult Male designed to match the ICRP anatomical references for average individuals were also selected in this study. MCNPX 2.5.0 was used to simulate the 120 kVp CT X?ray attenuation of voxel phantom along the z?axis. Averaged photon flux was tallied before and after it passed though the phantom separately simulations were also carried out using different thickness of PMMA plates instead of the voxel phantom. Results: The CT X?ray attenuation of PMMA and its thickness presents a significant negative exponential relationship with the r2=0.9975. The CT X?ray attenuation data of every 2cm along Z?axis direction of voxel phantom were obtained combined with characteristics of CT X?ray attenuation of PMMA the PMMA equivalent thickness of the voxel phantom torso along the Z?axis direction in terms of CT X?ray attenuation were calculated. The PMMA equivalent thickness ranges from 5.5cm to 30.1cm. The liver and spleen plane which contents substantive organs such as the liver and spleen and bone structure as ribs and the lumbar was the maximum attenuation plane. Conclusion: The trend of the overall attenuation characteristics of the human body in terms of CT X?ray was in accord with the anatomical structure these results could be used to develop new dose phantoms which were used to evaluate automatic tube current modulation with further study. This project was partially funded by National Institutes of Health (National Library of Medicine R01LM009362 and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering R42EB010404)

h Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

14 Engineering Drive Hanover, NH 03755  

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of their sponsors, the CEDC staff, faculty advisors and mentors, and the technical staff of Thayer's CAD facility Formula Racing Dartmouth Organic Farm Graphicast Maponics Norwich Technologies Optra Inc. Dr. Joseph Technologies Terry Smith Solaflect Energy Matt Strand Victor Technologies Walvisstaart B.V. Dr. Mitchell Wolf

456

Multi-energy CT based on a prior rank, intensity and sparsity model (PRISM) This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-energy CT based on a prior rank, intensity and sparsity model (PRISM) This article has been:10.1088/0266-5611/27/11/115012 Multi-energy CT based on a prior rank, intensity and sparsity model and sparsity of a multi-energy image, and intensity/spectral characteristics of base materials. Furthermore, we

Wang, Ge

457

3/26/13 Section of brain does more than expected, Universityof Chicago scientists find -chicagotribune.com www.chicagotribune.com/health/ct-x-monkeys-processing-visual-information-0320-20130320,0,298755.story 1/3  

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- chicagotribune.com www.chicagotribune.com/health/ct-x-monkeys-processing-visual-information-0320 of brain does more than expected, Universityof Chicago scientists find - chicagotribune.com www.chicagotribune.com/health/ct-x-monkeys-processing and troubleshooting HOME PROTECTION PLANS From foundation to fixtures FESTIVAL OF HOMES Five financial things every

Freedman, David J.

458

A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515  

SciTech Connect

Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer ({>=}60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7-22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

Bradley, Jeffrey, E-mail: jbradley@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Department of Statistics, RTOG, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Choi, Noah [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Forster, Ken [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Siegel, Barry A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Brunetti, Jacqueline [Holy Name Medical Center, Teaneck, NJ (United States); Purdy, James [University of California at Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Faria, Sergio [McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Vu, Toni [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal, Hospital Notre Dame, Montreal (Canada); Thorstad, Wade [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Choy, Hak [University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results  

SciTech Connect

Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany); Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J. [Clinic for Urology, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH (Germany); Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pereira, P. L. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR brachytherapy planning.

Chibani, Omar, E-mail: omar.chibani@fccc.edu; C-M Ma, Charlie [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)] [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

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