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1

Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at least one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

Sohal, Monohar S. (Idaho Falls, ID); O'Brien, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

2

Energy Separation And Lox Separation Studies In Vortex Tubes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vortex Tube (VT) is a simple device having no moving mechanical parts, in which compressed gas at high pressure is injected through one or more… (more)

Behera, Upendra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Dynamics of Magnetized Vortex Tubes in the Solar Chromosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use 3D radiative MHD simulations to investigate the formation and dynamics of small-scale (less than 0.5 Mm in diameter) vortex tubes spontaneously generated by turbulent convection in quiet-Sun regions with initially weak mean magnetic fields. The results show that the vortex tubes penetrate into the chromosphere and substantially affect the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere. The vortex tubes are mostly concentrated in intergranular lanes and are characterized by strong (near sonic) downflows and swirling motions that capture and twist magnetic field lines, forming magnetic flux tubes that expand with height and which attain magnetic field strengths ranging from 200 G in the chromosphere to more than 1 kG in the photosphere. We investigate in detail the physical properties of these vortex tubes, including thermodynamic properties, flow dynamics, and kinetic and current helicities, and conclude that magnetized vortex tubes provide an important path for energy and momentum transfer from the con...

Kitiashvili, I N; Mansour, N N; Wray, A A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

UBIQUITOUS SOLAR ERUPTIONS DRIVEN BY MAGNETIZED VORTEX TUBES  

SciTech Connect

The solar surface is covered by high-speed jets transporting mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. The most prominent of these jets have been known as spicules. However, the mechanism initiating these eruption events is still unknown. Using realistic numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push the surrounding material up, generating shocks. Our simulations reveal complicated high-speed flow patterns and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes. The main new results are: (1) the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers; (2) the fluctuations in the vortex tubes penetrating into the chromosphere are quasi-periodic with a characteristic period of 2-5 minutes; and (3) the eruptions are highly non-uniform: the flows are predominantly downward in the vortex tube cores and upward in their surroundings; the plasma density and temperature vary significantly across the eruptions.

Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G. [Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lele, S. K.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A., E-mail: irinasun@stanford.edu [Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

5

Ubiquitous Solar Eruptions Driven by Magnetized Vortex Tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar surface is covered by high-speed jets transporting mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. The most prominent of these jets have been known as spicules. However, the mechanism initiating these eruptions events is still unknown. Using realistic numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push surrounding material up, generating quasiperiodic shocks. Our simulations reveal a complicated high-speed flow patterns, and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes. We found that the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by the high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere, and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers.

Kitiashvili, I N; Lele, S K; Mansour, N N; Wray, A A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Increasing liquid hydrocarbon recovery from natural gas: Evaluation of the vortex-tube device  

SciTech Connect

The vortex-tube device provides a useful addition to the range of equipment available to the gas industry. It has been shown that the use of vortex-tube equipment permits improved separation in comparison with a Joule-Thomson system, without entering into the cost and complexity of a true isentropic system such as a turbo-expander unit. The comparative advantage of the vortex tube depends upon the inlet conditions of the gas and the pressure drop that is available. An optimum pressure drop of 25--35% of the inlet gas pressure has been confirmed in practice. Although not yet tested on operating plant, it is expected that a loss of performance of vortex-tube units will occur for inlet liquid-to-gas ratios of greater than 20%. Units with up to 5% liquid at the inlet have been successfully operated showing that a single phase gas at the unit inlet is not essential. It is expected that future application of vortex tube units will be concentrated where performance improvements over Joule-Thomson units, at low capital cost, are required.

Hajdik, B. [CBS Engineering, Houston, TX (United States); Steinle, J. [BEB Erdoel and Erdgas GmbH, Hannover (Germany); Lorey, M. [Filtan Analgenbau GmbH, Langenselbold (Germany); Thomas, K. [Falk and Thomas Engineering GmbH, Wettenberg (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

DETECTION OF VORTEX TUBES IN SOLAR GRANULATION FROM OBSERVATIONS WITH SUNRISE  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated a time series of continuum intensity maps and corresponding Dopplergrams of granulation in a very quiet solar region at the disk center, recorded with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX) on board the balloon-borne solar observatory SUNRISE. We find that granules frequently show substructure in the form of lanes composed of a leading bright rim and a trailing dark edge, which move together from the boundary of a granule into the granule itself. We find strikingly similar events in synthesized intensity maps from an ab initio numerical simulation of solar surface convection. From cross sections through the computational domain of the simulation, we conclude that these granular lanes are the visible signature of (horizontally oriented) vortex tubes. The characteristic optical appearance of vortex tubes at the solar surface is explained. We propose that the observed vortex tubes may represent only the large-scale end of a hierarchy of vortex tubes existing near the solar surface.

Steiner, O.; Franz, M.; Bello Gonzalez, N.; Nutto, Ch.; Rezaei, R.; Schmidt, W. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstrasse 6, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Martinez Pillet, V.; Bonet Navarro, J. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38200, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Del Toro Iniesta, J. C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Apdo. de Correos 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Domingo, V. [Grupo de Astronomia y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Knoelker, M., E-mail: steiner@kis.uni-freiburg.d [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers with Vortex Generators: Experimental and Numerical Results  

SciTech Connect

A combined experimental and numerical investigation is under way to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to large-scale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. The research is focused on whether air-side heat transfer can be improved through the use of finsurface vortex generators (winglets,) while maintaining low heat exchanger pressure drop. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique has been employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements have also been acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus. In addition, numerical modeling techniques have been developed to allow prediction of local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds-number flows with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results presented in this paper reveal quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. The winglets were triangular (delta) with a 1:2 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (average enhancement ratio 35%) associated with the deployment of the winglets with oval tubes. Pressure drop measurements have also been obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that includes four tube rows in a staggered array. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results have been obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500.

O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh; Huff, George Albert

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Cyclostrophic adjustment in swirling gas flows and the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube effect  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical analysis of cyclostrophic adjustment is presented; i.e., adjustment to balance between pressure gradient and centrifugal force in axisymmetric flow of an inviscid gas is examined. The solution to the problem is represented as the sum of a time-independent (balanced) and time-dependent (wave) components. It is shown that the wave component of the flow in an unbounded domain decays with time, and the corresponding solution reduces to the balanced component. In a bounded domain, the balanced flow component exists against the background of undamped acoustic waves. It is found that the balanced flow is thermally stratified at Mach numbers close to unity, with a substantial decrease in gas temperature (to between -50 and -100 deg. C) in the axial region. This finding, combined with the results of special experiments, is used to explain the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube effect.

Kalashnik, M. V., E-mail: lingel@obninsk.com; Visheratin, K. N. [SPA Typhoon (Russian Federation)], E-mail: kvisher@typhoon.obninsk.ru

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Reconnection in orthogonally interacting vortex tubes: Direct numerical simulations and quantifications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The three?dimensional time evolution of two orthogonally offset cylindrical vortices of equal strength is simulated by solving the hyperviscosity?regularized incompressible Navier–Stokes equations. A Fourier pseudospectral method with a time?split integration scheme is used for the solution. Four runs with different Reynolds numbers ranging between 690–2100 are performed each with a resolution of 963 collocation points. The sequence of important physical processes and the evolution of local and global quantities such as vorticity velocity and mean?square strain rate are presented. It is found that the growth rate of the maximum vorticity is at most exponential. The Reynolds number dependence of the time scale of reconnection the vorticity growth rate and the time at which the maximum vorticity is attained are examined and differences between the present results and Saffman’s essentially two?dimensional model predictions are encountered and elucidated. The distributions of the eigenvalues ? ? ? and the corresponding eigenvectors s ? s ? s ? of the rate of strain tensor S i j are calculated at different times. It is found that as the mean?square strain rate ? increases during the evolution s ? and the vorticity vector ? are perfectly aligned and ?>0 in high ? regions. Strong temporal spatial and Reynolds number dependence of the strain fields is also seen. Evidence is presented that during reconnection the vorticity growth in newly forming bridges takes place in the vicinity of the upper stagnation line segment of the vortex dipole due to the nature of the vortex stretching term. Also examined is the initial finger formation and it is found that the initial nonuniform axial stretching and the displacement of the vortex cores due to a lift force play an important role in this process.

O. N. Boratav; R. B. Pelz; N. J. Zabusky

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced vortex element Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

method of plasma Summary: with the new simple explanation of the energy separation in vortex tubes described here. Advanced numerical... vortex method of plasma insulation and...

12

PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 125108 (2012) Quantum vortex reconnections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is continuous, not discrete, and parts of the initial vortical tubes can be left behind as vortex threads, whichPHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 125108 (2012) Quantum vortex reconnections S. Zuccher,1 M. Caliari,1 A. W that the minimum distance between vortices scales differently with time before and after the vortex reconnection

Zuccher, Simone

13

Reconnection of vortex filaments and Kolmogorov spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy spectrum of the 3D velocity field, induced by collapsing vortex filaments is studied. One of the aims of this work is to clarify the appearance of the Kolmogorov type energy spectrum $E(k)\\varpropto k^{-5/3}$, observed in many numerical works on discrete vortex tubes (quantized vortex filaments in quantum fluids). Usually, explaining classical turbulent properties of quantum turbulence, the model of vortex bundles, is used. This model is necessary to mimic the vortex stretching, which is responsible for the energy transfer in classical turbulence. In our consideration we do not appeal to the possible "bundle arrangement" but explore alternative idea that the turbulent spectra appear from singular solution, which describe the collapsing line at moments of reconnection. One more aim is related to an important and intensively discussed topic - a role of hydrodynamic collapse in the formation of turbulent spectra. We demonstrated that the specific vortex filament configuration generated the spectrum $E...

Nemirovskii, Sergey K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Vortex Structure in Charged Condensate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study magnetic fields in the charged condensate that we have previously argued should be present in helium-core white dwarf stars. We show that below a certain critical value the magnetic field is entirely expelled from the condensate, while for larger values it penetrates the condensate within flux-tubes that are similar to Abrikosov vortex lines; yet higher fields lead to the disruption of the condensate. We find the solution for the vortex lines in both relativistic and nonrelativistic theories that exhibit the charged condensation. We calculate the energy density of the vortex solution and the values of the critical magnetic fields. The minimum magnetic field required for vortices to penetrate the helium white dwarf cores ranges from roughly 10^7 to 10^9 Gauss. Fields of this strength have been observed in white dwarfs. We also calculate the London magnetic field due to the rotation of a dwarf star and show that its value is rather small.

Gabadadze, Gregory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Vortex Structure in Charged Condensate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study magnetic fields in the charged condensate that we have previously argued should be present in helium-core white dwarf stars. We show that below a certain critical value the magnetic field is entirely expelled from the condensate, while for larger values it penetrates the condensate within flux-tubes that are similar to Abrikosov vortex lines; yet higher fields lead to the disruption of the condensate. We find the solution for the vortex lines in both relativistic and nonrelativistic theories that exhibit the charged condensation. We calculate the energy density of the vortex solution and the values of the critical magnetic fields. The minimum magnetic field required for vortices to penetrate the helium white dwarf cores ranges from roughly 10^7 to 10^9 Gauss. Fields of this strength have been observed in white dwarfs. We also calculate the London magnetic field due to the rotation of a dwarf star and show that its value is rather small.

Gregory Gabadadze; Rachel A. Rosen

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

16

CALTECH ASCI TECHNICAL REPORT 129 On Velocity Structure Functions and the Spherical Vortex Model for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the stretched-spiral vortex has been suc- cessfully applied to the calculation of the energy spectrum,6 and some for larger scales is perhaps questionable. Most quantitative vortex-based models have utilized tube and sheetCALTECH ASCI TECHNICAL REPORT 129 On Velocity Structure Functions and the Spherical Vortex Model

Barr, Al

17

Vortex reconnections in atomic condensates at finite temperature A. J. Allen1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, reconnections of stream lines, vortex lines and magnetic flux tubes change the topology of the flowVortex reconnections in atomic condensates at finite temperature A. J. Allen1 , S. Zuccher2 , M (Dated: May 28, 2014) The study of vortex reconnections is an essential ingredient of understanding

Zuccher, Simone

18

Apparatus Drawings Project. Report Number 17. Small X-Ray Tube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A small well-shielded high-vacuum molybdenum-anode x-ray tube designed for use as an ionizing source with a Millikan oil-drop apparatus is described. An accelerating potential of 28-kv peak provides a continuous x-ray spectrum with a short-wavelength cutoff of 0.436 A as well as the intense K L M and N series of the characteristic line spectrum of molybdenum. The 28-kv accelerating potential with a saturation current of 0.2–0.3 ma rms ensures adequate ionization with conventional equipment while still permitting the convenient installation of the massive external shielding necessary in a teaching laboratory. Information on essential safety precautions and construction procedures is given.

Robert G. Marcley

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Annular Vortex Generation for Inertial Fusion Energy Beam-Line Protection  

SciTech Connect

The use of swirling annular vortex flow inside beam entrance tubes can protect beam-line structural materials in chambers for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (IFE) applications. An annular wall jet, or vortex tube, is generated by injecting liquid tangent to the inner surface of a tube wall with both axially and azimuthally directed velocity components. A layer of liquid then lines the beam tube wall, which may improve the effectiveness of neutron shielding, and condenses and removes vaporized coolant that may enter the beam tubes. Vortex tubes have been constructed and tested with a thickness of three-tenths the pipe radius. Analysis of the flow is given, along with experimental examples of vortex tube fluid mechanics and an estimate of the layer thickness, based on simple mass conservation considerations.

Pemberton, Steven J.; Abbott, Ryan P.; Peterson, Per F. [University of California (United States)

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

An application of vortex cancellation to vortex generator techniques in low speed wind tunnels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'lugs/ft-sec Axial distance between sets of vortex generators root chord lengths /Y Vertical dimension of duct cross section Tube height/Y in. none ~St i t ()i ()2 (), ( )?q Measured at station g 1 Measured at Station 0 8 Upstream srl... TABLE I II BOUNDARY LAYER PROFILE DATA IN THE VICINITY OF A VORTEX FILAMENT AT STATION 0 7 Tube Number I 2 3 4. 5 6 7 8 9 '10 I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Ft-Fs in. H 0 1. 31 1. 31 1. 31 I . 26 1. 20...

Mount, Glynn O., Jr

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Liquid Vortex Shielding for Fusion Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Swirling liquid vortices can be used in fusion chambers to protect their first walls and critical elements from the harmful conditions resulting from fusion reactions. The beam tube structures in heavy ion fusion (HIF) must be shielded from high energy particles, such as neutrons, x-rays and vaporized coolant, that will cause damage. Here an annular wall jet, or vortex tube, is proposed for shielding and is generated by injecting liquid tangent to the inner surface of the tube both azimuthally and axially. Its effectiveness is closely related to the vortex tube flow properties. 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) is being conducted to precisely characterize its turbulent structure. The concept of annular vortex flow can be extended to a larger scale to serve as a liquid blanket for other inertial fusion and even magnetic fusion systems. For this purpose a periodic arrangement of injection and suction holes around the chamber circumference are used, generating the layer. Because it is important to match the index of refraction of the fluid with the tube material for optical measurement like PIV, a low viscosity mineral oil was identified and used that can also be employed to do scaled experiments of molten salts at high temperature.

Bardet, Philippe M. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Supiot, Boris F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Peterson, Per F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Savas, Oemer [University of California, Berkeley (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

arXiv:1206.2498v2[cond-mat.other]19Nov2012 Quantum vortex reconnections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and parts of the initial vortical tubes can be left behind as vortex threads, which then undergo successivearXiv:1206.2498v2[cond-mat.other]19Nov2012 Quantum vortex reconnections S. Zuccher,1 M. Caliari,1 A with time before and after the vor- tex reconnection. We also compute vortex reconnections using the Biot

Caliari, Marco

23

The role of boundary conditions in a simple model of incipient vortex breakdown F. Gallaire and J.-M. Chomaz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In the labora- tory, it is preferentially studied in vortex tubes, where it is seen in many cases to give riseThe role of boundary conditions in a simple model of incipient vortex breakdown F. Gallaire and J of a hairpin vortex in a shear-thinning fluid governed by a power-law model Phys. Fluids 25, 101703 (2013); 10

Boyer, Edmond

24

Reconnection of vortex filaments and Kolmogorov spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy spectrum of the 3D velocity field, induced by collapsing vortex filaments is studied. One of the aims of this work is to clarify the appearance of the Kolmogorov type energy spectrum $E(k)\\varpropto k^{-5/3}$, observed in many numerical works on discrete vortex tubes (quantized vortex filaments in quantum fluids). Usually, explaining classical turbulent properties of quantum turbulence, the model of vortex bundles, is used. This model is necessary to mimic the vortex stretching, which is responsible for the energy transfer in classical turbulence. In our consideration we do not appeal to the possible "bundle arrangement" but explore alternative idea that the turbulent spectra appear from singular solution, which describe the collapsing line at moments of reconnection. One more aim is related to an important and intensively discussed topic - a role of hydrodynamic collapse in the formation of turbulent spectra. We demonstrated that the specific vortex filament configuration generated the spectrum $E(k)$ close to the Kolmogorov dependence and discussed the reason for this as well as the reason for deviation. We also discuss the obtained results from point of view of the both classical and quantum turbulence.

Sergey K. Nemirovskii

2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

25

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspiration neural tube Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into the buffer 3. Transfer cell material into large glass tube 4. Add 1 ml CHCl3. Vortex 30 sec... and allow tubes to sit until phases separate. The rate of phase separate can...

26

Application of fiber Bragg grating based strain sensor in pipeline vortex-induced vibration measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) is an important topic of ... of different methods have been applied to the measurement of VIV, especially for the elongated, ... in stainless steel tubes were applied to the measurement

Liang Ren; ZiGuang Jia; Michael Siu Chun Ho…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOENETL FE 0513 ORD 2011 John Ontko Approx. one month NETL: Morgantown, WV Vortex Tube Project Decommissioning Project Decommissioning of Vortex Tube project located in Buildings...

29

Vortex Hydro Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydro Energy LLC Hydro Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Vortex Hydro Energy LLC Address 4870 West Clark Rd Suite 108 Place Ypsilanti Zip 48197 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 734.971.4020 Website http://www.vortexhydroenergy.c Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University of Michigan This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Vortex_Hydro_Energy_LLC&oldid=678497

30

MHK Technologies/Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Vortex Hydro Energy LLC Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University of Michigan Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Reciprocating Device Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description The VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy) device is based on the extensively studied phenomenon of Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV), which was first observed five-hundred years ago by Leonardo DaVinci in the form of 'Aeolian Tones.' VIV results from vortices forming and shedding on the downstream side of a bluff body in a current. Vortex shedding alternates from one side to the other, thereby creating a vibration or oscillation. The VIV phenomenon is non-linear, which means it can produce useful energy at high efficiency over a wide range of current speeds and directions.This converter is unlike any existing technology, as it does not use turbines, propellers, or dams. VIVACE converts the horizontal hydrokinetic energy of currents into cylinder mechanical energy. The latter is then converted to electricity through electric power generators.

31

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

32

Vortex Characterization for Engineering Applications  

SciTech Connect

Realistic engineering simulation data often have features that are not optimally resolved due to practical limitations on mesh resolution. To be useful to application engineers, vortex characterization techniques must be sufficiently robust to handle realistic data with complex vortex topologies. In this paper, we present enhancements to the vortex topology identification component of an existing vortex characterization algorithm. The modified techniques are demonstrated by application to three realistic data sets that illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of our approach.

Jankun-Kelly, M; Thompson, D S; Jiang, M; Shannahan, B; Machiraju, R

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Photomultiplier Tube Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Homepage Project Homepage Classroom Projects Homepage - Teacher Homepage - Student Homepage Abstract: Photons are created in scintillator devices in most modern particle detectors. These photons yield information about particle collisions that must be measured and decoded. This Website follows the track of a photon as it enters a photomultiplier tube (pmt), an amplifying device that increases the effect of a single photon to levels that are measurable. This signal amplification is crucial; without it, no information exists for decoding. The site presents information regarding the innards of a pmt and allows students to investigate predictive mathematical models describing the signal increase under different, adjustable parameters. Introduction to Research: Photomultipler tubes are omnipresent in particle physics. Understanding the

34

Improving Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Greenville Tube Company, a manufacturer of high-precision, small-diameter stainless steel tubing, conducted an in-house system performance optimization project to improve the efficiency of its No. 6 tube drawing bench. This four-page case study summarizes their experience.

35

Argonne CNM Highlight: Biofunctionalized magnetic-vortex microdiscs for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofunctionalized magnetic-vortex microdiscs for targeted cancer-cell destruction Biofunctionalized magnetic-vortex microdiscs for targeted cancer-cell destruction Magnetic microdisks Reflection optical microscope image of a dried suspension of the discs prepared via magnetron sputtering and optical lithography. Magnetic spin vortex Model of magnetic-vortex spin distribution in a disc. Users from Argonne's Materials Science Division and University of Chicago's Pritzker School of Medicine, working collaboratively on a user science project with CNM's Nanobio Interfaces Group, have discovered that nanostructured magnetic materials offer exciting avenues for probing cell mechanics, activating mechanosensitive ion channels, and advancing potential cancer therapies. Their new report describes an approach based on interfacing cells with lithographically defined microdiscs (1-micron

36

Multiple tube premixing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

Uhm, Jong Ho; Naidu, Balachandar; Ziminksy, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

37

Multiple tube premixing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

Uhm, Jong Ho; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

38

Transient vortex events in the initial value problem for turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A vorticity surge event that could be a paradigm for a wide class of bursting events in turbulence is studied to examine how the energy cascade is established and how this event could serve as a new test of LES turbulence models. This vorticity surge event is tied to the formation of the energy cascade in a direct numerical simulation by the traditional signatures of a turbulent energy cascade such as spectra approaching -5/3 and strongly Beltramized vortex tubes. A coherent mechanism is suggested by the nearly simultaneous development of a maximum of the peak vorticity $\\|\\omega\\|_\\infty$, growth of the dissipation, the appearance of a helically aligned local vortex configuration and strong, transient oscillations in the helicity wavenumber spectrum. This coherence is also examined for two LES models, a traditional purely dissipative eddy viscosity model and a modern method (LANS$-\\alpha$) that respects the nonlinear transport properties of fluids. Both LES models properly represent the spectral energy and energy dissipation associated with this vorticity surge event. However, only the model that preserves nonlinear fluid transport properties reproduces the helical properties, including Beltrami-like vortex tubes.

Darryl D. Holm; Robert M. Kerr

2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

39

Tube furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

Foster, Kenneth G. (Livermore, CA); Frohwein, Eugene J. (San Ramon, CA); Taylor, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Bowen, David W. (Livermore, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Tapered pulse tube for pulse tube refrigerators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermal insulation of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube refrigerator is maintained by optimally varying the radius of the pulse tube to suppress convective heat loss from mass flux streaming in the pulse tube. A simple cone with an optimum taper angle will often provide sufficient improvement. Alternatively, the pulse tube radius r as a function of axial position x can be shaped with r(x) such that streaming is optimally suppressed at each x.

Swift, Gregory W. (Sante Fe, NM); Olson, Jeffrey R. (San Mateo, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell.

Ashcroft, John (Scotia, NY); Campbell, Brian (Scotia, NY); DePoy, David (Clifton Park, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Effective world-sheet theory of color magnetic flux tubes in dense QCD  

SciTech Connect

Color magnetic flux tubes appear in the color-flavor locked phase of high density QCD, which exhibits color superconductivity as well as superfluidity. They are non-Abelian superfluid vortices and are accompanied by orientational zero modes in the internal space associated with the color-flavor locked symmetry spontaneously broken in the presence of the vortex. We show that those zero modes are localized around the vortex in spite of the logarithmic divergence of its tension and derive the low-energy effective theory of them on the world sheet of the vortex string.

Eto, Minoru [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nakano, Eiji [Extreme Matter Institute, GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, and Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Color Magnetic Flux Tubes in Dense QCD. II: Effective World-Sheet Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Color magnetic flux tubes appear in the color-flavor locked phase of high density QCD, which exhibits color superconductivity as well as superfluidity. They are non-Abelian superfluid vortices and are accompanied by orientational zero modes in the internal space associated with the color-flavor locked symmetry spontaneously broken in the presence of the vortex. We show that those zero modes are localized around the vortex in spite of the logarithmic divergence of its tension, and derive the low-energy effective theory of them on the world-sheet of the vortex-string.

Minoru Eto; Eiji Nakano; Muneto Nitta

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Color Magnetic Flux Tubes in Dense QCD. II: Effective World-Sheet Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Color magnetic flux tubes appear in the color-flavor locked phase of high density QCD, which exhibits color superconductivity as well as superfluidity. They are non-Abelian superfluid vortices and are accompanied by orientational zero modes in the internal space associated with the color-flavor locked symmetry spontaneously broken in the presence of the vortex. We show that those zero modes are localized around the vortex in spite of the logarithmic divergence of its tension, and derive the low-energy effective theory of them on the world-sheet of the vortex-string.

Eto, Minoru; Nitta, Muneto

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Study of junction flows in louvered fin round tube heat exchangers using the dye injection technique  

SciTech Connect

Detailed studies of junction flows in heat exchangers with an interrupted fin design are rare. However, understanding these flow structures is important for design and optimization purposes, because the thermal hydraulic performance of heat exchangers is strongly related to the flow behaviour. In this study flow visualization experiments were performed in six scaled-up models of a louvered fin round tube heat exchanger. The models have three tube rows in a staggered layout and differ only in their fin spacing and louver angle. A water tunnel was designed and built and the flow visualizations were carried out using dye injection. At low Reynolds numbers the streakline follows the tube contours, while at higher Reynolds numbers a horseshoe vortex is developed ahead of the tubes. The two resulting streamwise vortex legs are destroyed by the downstream louvers (i.e. downstream the turnaround louver), especially at higher Reynolds numbers, smaller fin pitches and larger louver angles. Increasing the fin spacing results in a larger and stronger horseshoe vortex. This illustrates that a reduction of the fin spacing results in a dissipation of vortical motion by mechanical blockage and skin friction. Furthermore it was observed that the vortex strength and number of vortices in the second tube row is larger than in the first tube row. This is due to the thicker boundary layer in the second tube row, and the flow deflection, which is typical for louvered fin heat exchangers. Visualizations at the tube-louver junction showed that in the transition part between the angled louver and the flat landing a vortex is present underneath the louver surface which propagates towards the angled louver. (author)

Huisseune, H.; Willockx, A.; De Paepe, M. [Department of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Gent (Belgium); T'Joen, C. [Department of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Department Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); De Jaeger, P. [Department of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Gent (Belgium); NV Bekaert SA, Bekaertstraat 2, 8550 Zwevegem (Belgium)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

High-Pressure Tube Trailers and Tanks  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation on High-Pressure Tube Trailers and Tanks for the DOE Hydrogen Delivery High-Pressure Tanks and Analysis Project Review Meeting held February 8-9, 2005 at Argonne National Laboratory

47

Vortex lines and transitions in superfluid hydrodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Preface to Vortices, dislocations, and line singularities in partial differential equations...Leslie and J. R. Ockendon. Vortex lines and transitions in superfluid hydrodynamics...nature and the motion of qunatized vortex lines. This paper illustrates the transitions...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Gravity waves from vortex dipoles and jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissertation first investigates gravity wave generation and propagation from jets within idealized vortex dipoles using a nonhydrostatic mesoscale model. Several initially balanced and localized jets induced by vortex dipoles are examined here...

Wang, Shuguang

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Explicit mean-field radius for nearly parallel vortex filaments in statistical equilibrium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geophysical research has focused on flows, such as ocean currents, as two dimensional. Two dimensional point or blob vortex models have the advantage of having a Hamiltonian, whereas 3D vortex filament or tube systems do not necessarily have one, although they do have action functionals. On the other hand, certain classes of 3D vortex models called nearly parallel vortex filament models do have a Hamiltonian and are more accurate descriptions of geophysical and atmospheric flows than purely 2D models, especially at smaller scales. In these ``quasi-2D'' models we replace 2D point vortices with vortex filaments that are very straight and nearly parallel but have Brownian variations along their lengths due to local self-induction. When very straight, quasi-2D filaments are expected to have virtually the same planar density distributions as 2D models. An open problem is when quasi-2D model statistics behave differently than those of the related 2D system and how this difference is manifested. In this paper we study the nearly parallel vortex filament model of Klein, Majda, Damodaran in statistical equilibrium. We are able to obtain a free-energy functional for the system in a non-extensive thermodynamic limit that is a function of the mean square vortex position $R^2$ and solve \\emph{explicitly} for $R^2$. Such an explicit formula has never been obtained for a non-2D model. We compare the results of our formula to a 2-D formula of \\cite{Lim:2005} and show qualitatively different behavior even when we disallow vortex braiding. We further confirm our results using Path Integral Monte Carlo (Ceperley (1995)) \\emph{without} permutations and that the Klein, Majda, Damodaran model's asymptotic assumptions \\emph{are valid} for parameters where these deviations occur.

Timothy D. Andersen; Chjan C. Lim

2006-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

50

Flame–vortex interaction in a reacting vortex ring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Direct numerical simulations are used to study the flame–vortex interaction in a laminar reacting vortex ring. The chemical reaction occurs by a one-step Arrhenius-type reaction that mimics the combustion of typical hydrocarbon and air. The ring is generated by an axisymmetric jet that is impulsed to emit a cold fuel through a nozzle. The fuel enters a quiescent ambient at a much higher temperature. By adjusting the ratio of the ambient and fuel temperatures the ignition either occurs during the formation or post-formation phase of the ring. When ignition occurs during the formation phase of the ring the bulk of combustion is by a flame at the front of the vortex bubble. When ignition is delayed until after the formation phase most of the reaction occurs inside the vortex ring. It is found that premixing the fuel and the oxidizer enhances the amount of product formation. The heat released from the reaction significantly affects production redistribution and diffusion of the vorticity throughout the field. The results of the simulations also reveal that the heat of reaction affects the strain rate fields differently depending on when the ignition of the ring occurs.

J. S. Hewett; C. K. Madnia

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Reduction of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to decrease/suppress Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Suppression is required when fluid-structure interaction becomes destructive as in VIM of flexible cylinders or rigid cylinders on elastic support, such as underwater pipelines, marine risers, tubes in heat exchangers, nuclear fuel rods, cooling towers, SPAR offshore platforms.

Bernitsas, Michael M; Raghavan, Kamaldev

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Acoustic emission from magnetic flux tubes in the solar network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of three-dimensional numerical simulations to investigate the excitation of waves in the magnetic network of the Sun due to footpoint motions of a magnetic flux tube. We consider motions that typically mimic granular buffeting and vortex flows and implement them as driving motions at the base of the flux tube. The driving motions generates various MHD modes within the flux tube and acoustic waves in the ambient medium. The response of the upper atmosphere to the underlying photospheric motion and the role of the flux tube in channeling the waves is investigated. We compute the acoustic energy flux in the various wave modes across different boundary layers defined by the plasma and magnetic field parameters and examine the observational implications for chromospheric and coronal heating.

Vigeesh, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

An experimental investigation of the rolling moment on a flat plate in the presence of a free vortex of known strength  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not affect their vertical or lateral positioning. The vortex probe assembly is shown in Figure 2. A comparison of the free-stream velocities obtained from the vortex probe assembly and a standard pitot-static tube revealed a difference of less than one...AN EXPERIMENTAL 1NVES1'IGATION OF THE ROLLING MOMENT ON A ILAT PLATE IN THE ?RESENCE OP A FREE VORTEX OF KNOWN STRENGTH A Thesis by MAURICE VERNE VAN DUSEN, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Teras A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Van Dusen, Maurice Verne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

54

Microhole Tubing Bending Report  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

Oglesby, Ken

55

Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring the Standard Model Exploring the Standard Model       You've heard a lot about the Standard Model and the pieces are hopefully beginning to fall into place. However, even a thorough understanding of the Standard Model is not the end of the story but the beginning. By exploring the structure and details of the Standard Model we encounter new questions. Why do the most fundamental particles have the particular masses we observe? Why aren't they all symmetric? How is the mass of a particle related to the masses of its constituents? Is there any other way of organizing the Standard Model? The activities in this project will elucidate but not answer our questions. The Standard Model tells us how particles behave but not necessarily why they do so. The conversation is only beginning. . . .

56

Vortex molecules in Bose-Einstein condensates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stable vortex dimers are known to exist in coherently coupled two component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). We construct stable vortex trimers in three component BECs and find that the shape can be controlled by changing the internal coherent (Rabi) couplings. Stable vortex N-omers are also constructed in coherently coupled N-component BECs. We classify all possible N-omers in terms of the mathematical graph theory. Next, we study effects of the Rabi coupling in vortex lattices in two-component BECs. We find how the vortex lattices without the Rabi coupling known before are connected to the Abrikosov lattice of integer vortices with increasing the Rabi coupling. In this process, vortex dimers change their partners in various ways at large couplings. We then find that the Abrikosov lattices are robust in three-component BECs.

Muneto Nitta; Minoru Eto; Mattia Cipriani

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

57

Quantum Kinematics of Bosonic Vortex Loops  

SciTech Connect

Poisson structure for vortex filaments (loops and arcs) in 2D ideal incompressible fluid is analyzed in detail. Canonical coordinates and momenta on coadjoint orbits of the area-preserving diffeomorphism group, associated with such vortices, are found. The quantum space of states in the simplest case of ''bosonic'' vortex loops is built within a geometric quantization approach to the description of a quantum fluid. Fock-like structure and non-local creation and annihilation operators of quantum vortex filaments are introduced.

Goldin, G.A.; Owczarek, R.; Sharp, D.H.

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

58

Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water Currents Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water...

59

The idea of vortex energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work formulates and gives grounds for general principles and theorems that question the energy function doctrine and its quantum version as a genuine law of nature without borders of adequacy. The emphasis is on the domain where the energy of systems is conserved -- I argue that only in its tiny part the energy is in the kinetic, potential and thermal forms describable by a generalized thermodynamic potential, whereas otherwise the conserved energy constitutes a whole linked to vortex forces, and can be a factor of things like persistent currents and dark matter.

V. E. Shapiro

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

60

Conduction cooled tube supports  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Becht, IV, Charles (Morristown, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Wound tube heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Coiled Tubing Safety Manual  

SciTech Connect

This document addresses safety concerns regarding the use of coiled tubing as it pertains to the preservation of personnel, environment and the wellbore.

Crow, W.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

63

Stability of vortex solitons in a photorefractive optical lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.njp.org/ DOI: 10.1088/1367-2630/6/1/047 Abstract. Stability of on- and off-site vortex solitons with unit stable than off-site ones. Increasing the DC field stabilizes both types of vortex solitons. Contents 1. Introduction 2 2. Off-site vortex solitons 4 3. On-site vortex solitons 9 4. Summary 11 Acknowledgments 11

Yang, Jianke

64

Gated SIT vidicon streak tube  

SciTech Connect

A recently developed prototype streak tube designed to produce high gain and resolution by incorporating the streak and readout functions in one envelope thereby minimizing photon-to-change transformations and eliminating external coupling losses is presented. The tube is based upon a grid-gated Silicon-Intensified-Target Vidicon (SITV) with integral Focus Projection Scan (FPS) TV readout. Demagnifying electron optics (m=0.63) in the image section map the 40-mm-diameter photocathode image unto a 25-mm-diameter silicon target where gains greater than or equal to10/sup 3/ are achieved with only 10 KV accelerating voltage. This is compared with much lower gains (approx.50) at much higher voltages (approx.30 KV) reported for streak tubes using phosphor screens. Because SIT technology is well established means for electron imaging in vacuum, such fundamental problems as ''backside thinning'' required for electron imaging unto CCDs do not exist. The high spatial resolution (approx.30 lp/mm), variable scan formats, and high speed electrostatic deflection (250 mm/sup 2/ areas are routinely rastered with 256 scan lines in 1.6 ms) available from FPS readout add versatility not available in CCD devices. Theoretical gain and spatial resolution for this design (developed jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and General Electric Co.) are compared with similar calculations and measured data obtained for RCA 73435 streaks fiber optically coupled to (1) 25-mm-diameter SIT FPS vidicons and (2) 40-mm-diameter MCPTs (proximity-focused microchannel plate image intensifier tubes) fiber optically coupled to 18-mm-diameter Sb/sub 2/S/sub 3/ FPS vidicons. Sweep sensitivity, shutter ratio, and record lengths for nanosecond duration (20 to 200 ns) streak applications are discussed.

Dunbar, D.L.; Yates, G.J.; Black, J.P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Guided wave acoustic monitoring of corrosion in recovery boiler tubing  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion of tubing used in black-liquor recovery boilers is a major concern in all pulp and paper mills. Extensive corrosion in recovery boiler tubes can result in a significant safety and environmental hazard. Considerable plant resources are expended to inspect recovery boiler tubing. Currently, visual and ultrasonic inspections are primarily used during the annual maintenance shutdown to monitor corrosion rates and cracking of tubing. This Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies project is developing guided acoustic waves for use on recovery boiler tubing. The feature of this acoustic technique is its cost-effectiveness in inspecting long lengths of tubes from a single inspection point. A piezoelectric or electromagnetic transducer induces guided waves into the tubes. The transducer detects fireside defects from the coldside or fireside of the tube. Cracking and thinning on recovery boiler tubes have been detected with this technique in both laboratory and field applications. This technique appears very promising for recovery boiler tube application, potentially expediting annual inspection of tube integrity.

Quarry, M J; Chinn, D J

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

66

Local Heat Transfer for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers using Oval Tubes  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of an experimental study of forced convection heat transfer in a narrow rectangular duct fitted with either a circular tube or an elliptical tube in crossflow. The duct was designed to simulate a single passage in a fin-tube heat exchanger. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using a transient technique in which a heated airflow is suddenly introduced to the test section. High-resolution local fin-surface temperature distributions were obtained at several times after initiation of the transient using an imaging infrared camera. Corresponding local fin-surface heat transfer coefficient distributions were then calculated from a locally applied one-dimensional semi-infinite inverse heat conduction model. Heat transfer results were obtained over an airflow rate ranging from 1.56 x 10-3 to 15.6 x 10-3 kg/s. These flow rates correspond to a duct-height Reynolds number range of 630 – 6300 with a duct height of 1.106 cm and a duct width-toheight ratio, W/H, of 11.25. The test cylinder was sized such that the diameter-to-duct height ratio, D/H is 5. The elliptical tube had an aspect ratio of 3:1 and a/H equal to 4.33. Results presented in this paper reveal visual and quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer distributions in the vicinity of circular and oval tubes and their relationship to the complex horseshoe vortex system that forms in the flow stagnation region. Fin surface stagnation-region Nusselt numbers are shown to be proportional to the square-root of Reynolds number.

O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Aircraft Emissions Deposited in the Stratosphere and Within the Arctic Polar Vortex. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an analysis of the quantity of emissions (water vapor, NO(x)) projected to be deposited directly within the Arctic polar vortex by projected fleets of Mach 2.4 high speed civil transports (HSCT`s). It also evaluates the amount of emissions from subsonic aircraft which are emitted into the lower stratosphere using aircraft emission inventories developed earlier for May 1990 as representative of the annual average.

Baughcum, S.L.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Boiler Stack Economizer Tube Failure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A metallurgical evaluation was performed to investigate the failure of a type 304 stainless steel tube from a boiler stack economizer. The tube had three distinct degradation mechanisms...

Ryan J. Haase; Larry D. Hanke

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Particle resuspension by an impacting vortex ring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coherent vortex structures play a significant and important role in the dynamics of many commonly occurring natural flows, for example turbulent boundary layers and channel flows. One particularly important fe...

Rick J. Munro; Stuart B. Dalziel

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

‘Optimal’ vortex rings and aquatic propulsion mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...vortex rings and aquatic propulsion mechanisms P. F. Linden...fluid mechanics behind these propulsion mechanisms and show that...over the cycle. 4. FISH PROPULSION BY UNDULATORY SWIMMING Most marine organisms have only discrete...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Polarization dependent forces in optical vortex pipeline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study both, theoretically and in experiments, the dependence of optical forces acting on a spherical particle guided in air with an optical vortex beam, on the light polarization...

Eckerskorn, Niko; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Shvedov, Vladlen; Rode, Andrei

72

Airfoil Vortex Induced Vibration suppression devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV) is a major concern of the offshore oil industry. This problem leads to fatigue failure in the marine risers and causes costly replacement of the risers. Appendages such as helical strakes ...

Lee, Evan J. (Evan Joseph)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Holographic Vortex Liquids and Superfluid Turbulence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of Kelvin waves flowing along vortex strings in 3D quantum turbulence...theory correlators from non-critical string theory . Phys. Lett. B...S. , Emergence of turbulence in an oscillating Bose-Einstein condensate . Phys. Rev...

Paul M. Chesler; Hong Liu; Allan Adams

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

74

Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors  

SciTech Connect

Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards flashback regime. Even a small amount of hydrogen in a fuel blend triggers the onset of flashback by altering the kinetics and thermophysical characteristics of the mixture. Additionally, the presence of hydrogen in the fuel mixture modifies the response of the flame to the global effects of stretch and preferential diffusion. Despite its immense importance in fuel flexible combustor design, little is known about the magnitude of fuel effects on CIVB induced flashback mechanism. Hence, this project investigates the effects of syngas compositions on flashback resulting from combustion induced vortex breakdown. The project uses controlled experiments and parametric modeling to understand the velocity field and flame interaction leading to CIVB driven flashback.

Ahsan Choudhuri

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Magnetic materials are characterized by the ordering of electron spins, with nearest-neighbor spins parallel to each other in ferromagnetic (FM) materials and antiparallel to each other in antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. As the size of a magnetic system is reduced to micron scale, it has been shown that the spins in an FM microstructure can curl around to form a magnetic vortex state. While there has been intensive activity in the study of vortex states in FM disks, there has been no direct observation of such states in an AFM microstructure, although theory predicts many interesting and unique properties for the AFM vortex state. Recently, a research team from Berkeley, Korea, and China has taken the first direct image of an AFM vortex in multilayered magnetic disk structures using x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) and photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) at ALS Beamlines 4.0.2 and 11.0.1 , respectively. The experiments observed two types of AFM vortices, one of which has no analogue in FM vortices.

76

Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Magnetic materials are characterized by the ordering of electron spins, with nearest-neighbor spins parallel to each other in ferromagnetic (FM) materials and antiparallel to each other in antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. As the size of a magnetic system is reduced to micron scale, it has been shown that the spins in an FM microstructure can curl around to form a magnetic vortex state. While there has been intensive activity in the study of vortex states in FM disks, there has been no direct observation of such states in an AFM microstructure, although theory predicts many interesting and unique properties for the AFM vortex state. Recently, a research team from Berkeley, Korea, and China has taken the first direct image of an AFM vortex in multilayered magnetic disk structures using x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) and photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) at ALS Beamlines 4.0.2 and 11.0.1 , respectively. The experiments observed two types of AFM vortices, one of which has no analogue in FM vortices.

77

Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States Print Magnetic materials are characterized by the ordering of electron spins, with nearest-neighbor spins parallel to each other in ferromagnetic (FM) materials and antiparallel to each other in antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. As the size of a magnetic system is reduced to micron scale, it has been shown that the spins in an FM microstructure can curl around to form a magnetic vortex state. While there has been intensive activity in the study of vortex states in FM disks, there has been no direct observation of such states in an AFM microstructure, although theory predicts many interesting and unique properties for the AFM vortex state. Recently, a research team from Berkeley, Korea, and China has taken the first direct image of an AFM vortex in multilayered magnetic disk structures using x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) and photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) at ALS Beamlines 4.0.2 and 11.0.1 , respectively. The experiments observed two types of AFM vortices, one of which has no analogue in FM vortices.

78

Photomultiplier Tube Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photomultiplier Tube Testing for the MiniBooNE Experiment B. T. Fleming, L. Bugel, E. Hawker, S. Koutsoliotas, S. McKenney, V. Sandberg, and D. Smith for the MiniBooNE...

79

Flameless tube sealing apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A flameless sealer for glass and polymeric tubes uses a circular filament as a heating element and can be used for sealing relatively large diameter tubes while they are within a glovebox or other protected enclosure. The electrically conductive rods extending from a non-conductive base which defines an aperture for mounting the apparatus to a lattice rod of a glove box. A remotely located power supply provides electrical power to the filament. 2 figs.

McFarlan, J.T.; Zwick, B.D.; Avens, L.R.

1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

80

Texture control of zircaloy tubing during tube reduction  

SciTech Connect

Seven batches of Zircaloy-2 nuclear fuel cladding tubes with different textures were processed from tube shells of the same size, by different reduction routes, using pilger and 3-roll mills. Based on the texture data of these tubes, the texture control of Zircaloy tubing, the texture gradient across the wall, and the texture change during annealing were studied. The deformation texture of Zicaloy-2 tubing was dependent on the tool's curvature and was independent of the dimensions of the mother tubes. The different slopes of texture gradients were observed between the tubing of higher strain ration and that of lower strain ratio.

Nagai, N.; Kakuma, T.; Fujita, K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Tunable negligible-loss energy transfer between dipolar-coupled magnetic disks by stimulated vortex gyration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structure of magnetic vortex cores. Science 298, 577– Park,Magnetic vortex core observation in circular dots of Permalloy. Science

Jung, Hyunsung

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Low-amplitude magnetic vortex core reversal by non-linear interaction between azimuthal spin waves and the vortex gyromode  

SciTech Connect

We show, by experiments and micromagnetic simulations in vortex structures, that an active “dual frequency” excitation of both the sub-GHz vortex gyromode and multi-GHz spin waves considerably changes the frequency response of spin wave mediated vortex core reversal. Besides additional minima in the switching threshold, a significant broadband reduction of the switching amplitudes is observed, which can be explained by non-linear interaction between the vortex gyromode and the spin waves. We conclude that the well known frequency spectra of azimuthal spin waves in vortex structures are altered substantially, when the vortex gyromode is actively excited simultaneously.

Sproll, Markus; Noske, Matthias; Kammerer, Matthias; Dieterle, Georg; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (formerly MPI for Metals Research), Heisenbergstr. 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (formerly MPI for Metals Research), Heisenbergstr. 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Bauer, Hans; Gangwar, Ajay; Woltersdorf, Georg; Back, Christian H. [Department of Physics, University of Regensburg, Universitätsstr. 31, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)] [Department of Physics, University of Regensburg, Universitätsstr. 31, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

83

Casimir energy and force induced by an impenetrable flux tube of finite radius  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A perfectly reflecting (Dirichlet) boundary condition at the edge of an impenetrable magnetic-flux-carrying tube of nonzero transverse size is imposed on the charged massive scalar matter field which is quantized outside the tube. We show that the vacuum polarization effects outside the tube give rise to a macroscopic force acting at the increase of the tube radius (if the magnetic flux is held steady). The Casimir energy and force are periodic in the value of the magnetic flux, being independent of the coupling to the space-time curvature scalar. We conclude that a topological defect of the vortex type can polarize the vacuum of only those quantum fields that have masses which are much less than a scale of the spontaneous symmetry breaking.

Gorkavenko, V M; Stepanov, O B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Casimir energy and force induced by an impenetrable flux tube of finite radius  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A perfectly reflecting (Dirichlet) boundary condition at the edge of an impenetrable magnetic-flux-carrying tube of nonzero transverse size is imposed on the charged massive scalar matter field which is quantized outside the tube. We show that the vacuum polarization effects outside the tube give rise to a macroscopic force acting at the increase of the tube radius (if the magnetic flux is held steady). The Casimir energy and force are periodic in the value of the magnetic flux, being independent of the coupling to the space-time curvature scalar. We conclude that a topological defect of the vortex type can polarize the vacuum of only those quantum fields that have masses which are much less than a scale of the spontaneous symmetry breaking.

V. M. Gorkavenko; Yu. A. Sitenko; O. B. Stepanov

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

85

Erosion of heat exchanger tubes in fluidized beds  

SciTech Connect

This final report describes the activities of the 3-year project entitled Erosion of Heat Exchanger Tubes In Fluidized Beds.'' which was completed at the end of 1990. Project accomplishments include the collection of a substantial body of wear data In a 24in. [times] 24in. fluidized bed, comparative wear results In a 6in. [times] 6in. fluidized bed, the development of a dragometer and the collection of a comprehensive set of drag force data in the 24in. [times] 24in. bed, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis of bubble probe data to establish dominant bubble frequencies in the 24in. [times] 24in. bed, the use of a heat flux gauge for measurement of heat transfer coefficients in the 24in. [times] 24in. bed and the modeling of the tube wear in the 24in. [times] 24in. bed. Analysis of the wear data from the 24in. square bed indicates that tube wear increases with increase in superficial velocity, and with increase in tube height. The latter effect is a result of the tubes higher up in the bed seeing greater movement of dense phase than tubes lower down In the bed. In addition, tube wear was found to decrease with increase in particle size, for constant superficial velocity. Three models of tube wear were formulated and provided acceptable prediction of wear when compared with the experimental data.

Johnson, E.K.; Flemmer, R.L.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Stress-Assisted Corrosion in Boiler Tubes  

SciTech Connect

A number of industrial boilers, including in the pulp and paper industry, needed to replace their lower furnace tubes or decommission many recovery boilers due to stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) on the waterside of boiler tubes. More than half of the power and recovery boilers that have been inspected reveal SAC damage, which portends significant energy and economic impacts. The goal of this project was to clarify the mechanism of stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) of boiler tubes for the purpose of determining key parameters in its mitigation and control. To accomplish this in-situ strain measurements on boiler tubes were made. Boiler water environment was simulated in the laboratory and effects of water chemistry on SAC initiation and growth were evaluated in terms of industrial operations. Results from this project have shown that the dissolved oxygen is single most important factor in SAC initiation on carbon steel samples. Control of dissolved oxygen can be used to mitigate SAC in industrial boilers. Results have also shown that sharp corrosion fatigue and bulbous SAC cracks have similar mechanism but the morphology is different due to availability of oxygen during boiler shutdown conditions. Results are described in the final technical report.

Preet M Singh; Steven J Pawel

2006-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

87

Experimental and numerical investigation on air-side performance of fin-and-tube heat exchangers with various fin patterns  

SciTech Connect

Air-side heat transfer and friction characteristics of five kinds of fin-and-tube heat exchangers, with the number of tube rows (N = 12) and the diameter of tubes (D{sub o} = 18 mm), have been experimentally investigated. The test samples consist of five types of fin configurations: crimped spiral fin, plain fin, slit fin, fin with delta-wing longitudinal vortex generators (VGs) and mixed fin with front 6-row vortex-generator fin and rear 6-row slit fin. The heat transfer and friction factor correlations for different types of heat exchangers were obtained with the Reynolds numbers ranging from 4000 to 10000. It was found that crimped spiral fin provides higher heat transfer and pressure drop than the other four fins. The air-side performance of heat exchangers with the above five fins has been evaluated under three sets of criteria and it was shown that the heat exchanger with mixed fin (front vortex-generator fin and rear slit fin) has better performance than that with fin with delta-wing vortex generators, and the slit fin offers best heat transfer performance at high Reynolds numbers. Based on the correlations of numerical data, Genetic Algorithm optimization was carried out, and the optimization results indicated that the increase of VG attack angle or length, or decrease of VG height may enhance the performance of vortex-generator fin. The heat transfer performances for optimized vortex-generator fin and slit fin at hand have been compared with numerical method. (author)

Tang, L.H.; Zeng, M.; Wang, Q.W. [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Knot energy in unstretching ergodic magnetic flux tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently Titov et al [ApJ \\textbf{693},(2009) and ApJ (2007)] have made use of a covariant model to investigate magnetic reconnection of astrophysical plasmas. Earlier R Ricca [Phys Rev A (1991)] has used another covariant formalism, to investigated vortex filaments and solitons. This formalism, called Ricci rotation coefficients (RRC), is applied here, to the Chui and Moffatt [PRSA (1995)] knotted magnetic flux tube (MFT) Riemann metric in the case of vanishing stretch. It is shown that, the vanishing of some components of the (RRC) leads to unstretching knotted tubes. Computing of magnetic knot energy in terms of the RCC, shows that, uniform, unstretching and constant cross-section tubes leads to a marginal dynamo action over magnetic surfaces. Recent investigation on the role of stretching in plasma dynamo action showed that in diffusive media [Phys Plasma \\textbf{14} (2008)], unstretching unknotted tubes would not support fast dynamo action. This result was generalized here to much more general knotted MF...

de Andrade, Garcia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Sediment resuspension and erosion by vortex rings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle resuspension and erosion induced by a vortex ringinteracting with a sediment layer was investigated experimentally using flow visualization (particle image velocimetry) high-speed video and a recently developed light attenuation method for measuring displacements in bed level. Near-spherical sediment particles were used throughout with relative densities of 1.2–7 and diameters ( d ) ranging between 90 and 1600 ? ? m . Attention was focused on initially smooth horizontal bedforms with the vortex ring aligned to approach the bed vertically. Interaction characteristics were investigated in terms of the dimensionless Shields parameter defined using the vortex-ring propagation speed. The critical conditions for resuspension (whereby particles are only just resuspended) were determined as a function of particle Reynolds number (based on the particle settling velocity and d ). The effects of viscous damping were found to be significant for d / ? resuspension volumes are analyzed as a function interaction time impact condition and sediment size.

R. J. Munro; N. Bethke; S. B. Dalziel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Vortex reconnections between coreless vortices in binary condensates  

SciTech Connect

Vortex reconnections plays an important role in the turbulent flows associated with the superfluids. To understand the dynamics, we examine the reconnections of vortex rings in the superfluids of dilute atomic gases confined in trapping potentials using Gross-Petaevskii equation. Further more we study the reconnection dynamics of coreless vortex rings, where one of the species can act as a tracer.

Gautam, S. [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560 012 (India); Suthar, K.; Angom, D. [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad-380 009 (India)

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

91

Downhole pulse tube refrigerators  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a preliminary design study to explore the plausibility of using pulse tube refrigeration to cool instruments in a hot down-hole environment. The original motivation was to maintain Dave Reagor`s high-temperature superconducting electronics at 75 K, but the study has evolved to include three target design criteria: cooling at 30 C in a 300 C environment, cooling at 75 K in a 50 C environment, cooling at both 75 K and 30 C in a 250 C environment. These specific temperatures were chosen arbitrarily, as representative of what is possible. The primary goals are low cost, reliability, and small package diameter. Pulse-tube refrigeration is a rapidly growing sub-field of cryogenic refrigeration. The pulse tube refrigerator has recently become the simplest, cheapest, most rugged and reliable low-power cryocooler. The authors expect this technology will be applicable downhole because of the ratio of hot to cold temperatures (in absolute units, such as Kelvin) of interest in deep drilling is comparable to the ratios routinely achieved with cryogenic pulse-tube refrigerators.

Swift, G.; Gardner, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Condensed Matter and Thermal Physics Group

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fluorescent Tube Lamps  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP temporarily suspended its energy efficiency requirements for fluorescent tube lamps as it evaluates the market impact of the pending 2012 minimum efficiency standards for fluorescent lamps. The program will issue updated energy efficiency requirements when the market distribution of this product category stabilizes and when doing so has the potential to result in significant Federal energy savings.

93

Condensation in horizontal heat exchanger tubes  

SciTech Connect

Many innovative reactor concepts for Generation III nuclear power plants use passive safety equipment for residual heat removal. These systems use two phase natural circulation. Heat transfer to the coolant results in a density difference providing the driving head for the required mass flow. By balancing the pressure drop the system finds its operational mode. Therefore the systems depend on a strong link between heat transfer and pressure drop determining the mass flow through the system. In order to be able to analyze these kind of systems with the help of state of the art computer codes the implemented numerical models for heat transfer, pressure drop or two phase flow structure must be able to predict the system performance in a wide parameter range. Goal of the program is to optimize the numerical models and therefore the performance of computer codes analyzing passive systems. Within the project the heat transfer capacity of a heat exchanger tube will be investigated. Therefore the tube will be equipped with detectors, both temperature and pressure, in several directions perpendicular to the tube axis to be able to resolve the angular heat transfer. In parallel the flow structure of a two phase flow inside and along the tube will be detected with the help of x-ray tomography. The water cooling outside of the tube will be realized by forced convection. It will be possible to combine the flow structure measurement with an angular resolved heat transfer for a wide parameter range. The test rig is set up at the TOPLFOW facility at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), so that it will be possible to vary the pressure between 5 and 70 bar. The steam mass content will be varied between 0 and 100 percent. The results will be compared to the large scaled Emergency Condenser Tests performed at the INKA test facility in Karlstein (Germany). The paper will explain the test setup and the status of the project will be presented. (authors)

Leyer, S.; Zacharias, T.; Maisberger, F.; Lamm, M. [AREVA NP GmbH, Paul-Gossen-Strasse 100, Erlangen, 91052 (Germany); Vallee, C.; Beyer, M.; Hampel, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Bautzner Landstrasse 400, Dresden, 01328 (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Dynamic decay of a single vortex into vortex-antivortex pairs  

SciTech Connect

A variety of metastable states, including vortices, antivortices, and their combinations, is typical for magnetically soft, thin films and patterned structures. The physics of individual spin vortices in patterned structures has been rather extensively explored. In contrast, there are few studies of the vortex–antivortex–vortex (v-av-v) system, in part because the configuration is rather challenging to obtain experimentally. We demonstrate herein how a recently proposed resonant-spin-ordering technique can be used to induce the dynamic decay of a single vortex into v-av states in elongated elements. The approach is based on first driving the system from the linear regime of constant vortex gyrations to the non-linear regime of vortex-core reversals at a fixed excitation frequency, and then subsequently reducing the excitation field back to the linear regime. This procedure stabilizes the system into a v-av-v state that is completely decoupled from the initialization excitation frequency. The newly acquired state is stable in remanence. The dynamic response of this system is expected to demonstrate a number of collective modes, depending on the combination of the vortex core polarities, and/or the excitation field direction, and, hence, is of interest for future studies.

Lendínez, Sergi [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Universidad Barcelona, Departamento Fisica Fonamental, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jain, Shikha; Novosad, Valentyn, E-mail: novosad@anl.gov; Fradin, Frank Y.; Pearson, John E. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Tejada, Javier [Universidad Barcelona, Departamento Fisica Fonamental, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bader, Samuel D. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

Jammed vortex matter Hajime Yoshino1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Abstract: Irrationally frustrated Josephson junction array (JJA), namely JJA with irrational number density point. Figure 1: Josephson junction array (JJA) on a square lattice. The vertexes and bonds represent- not develop usual periodic vortex lattices. 1 Introduction Josephson junction array under mag- netic field

Katsumoto, Shingo

96

Vortex lines in films: Fields and interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

General expressions are given for the magnetic field and energy of arbitrary arrangements of straight and curved vortices in an anisotropic superconductor film of finite thickness within anisotropic London theory. As examples we consider the magnetic field and interaction of straight perpendicular vortex lines in films of finite thickness.

Gilson Carneiro and Ernst Helmut Brandt

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Vortex Jitter in Hover Swathi M. Mula  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

78712, USA Abstract The trajectory of the tip vortex of a reduced-scale, 1 m diameter, four-bladed rotor condition of the rotor is at a blade loading of CT / = 0.0645 and a rotational speed of 1240RPM wake dominated by the tip vortices shed from the rotor blades. The complexity of the flow

Tinney, Charles E.

98

The multiple vortex nature of tropical cyclogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) __________________________ __________________________ John Nielsen-Gammon Craig Epifanio (Chair of Committee) (Member) __________________________ __________________________ Fuqing Zhang Hongxing Liu (Member) (Member) December 2004 Major Subject: Atmospheric Sciences... iii ABSTRACT The Multiple Vortex Nature of Tropical Cyclogenesis. (December 2004) Jason Allen Sippel, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon This thesis contains an observational analysis...

Sippel, Jason Allen

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

99

Quenching Processes in Flame-Vortex Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes 1 , Chicago, IL 60637 y Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University-vortex interactions in order to understand quenching of thermonuclear ames. The key question is|can a ther- monuclear. If a ame encounters a 1) The Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes is supported by the Department

Zingale, Michael

100

Vortex dynamics in 4 Banavara N. Shashikanth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during the interaction of a pair of counter-rotating vortices Phys. Fluids 24, 014107 (2012) The onset of oblique vortex shedding behind a heated circular cylinder in laminar wake regime Phys. Fluids 24, 011701 fluids Phys. Fluids 23, 115106 (2011) Asymptotic properties of wall-induced chaotic mixing in point

Shashikanth, Banavara N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Joined concentric tubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tubular objects having two or more concentric layers that have different properties are joined to one another during their manufacture primarily by compressive and friction forces generated by shrinkage during sintering and possibly mechanical interlocking. It is not necessary for the concentric tubes to display adhesive-, chemical- or sinter-bonding to each other in order to achieve a strong bond. This facilitates joining of dissimilar materials, such as ceramics and metals.

DeJonghe, Lutgard; Jacobson, Craig; Tucker, Michael; Visco, Steven

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Single-tube thermal and hydraulic tube support test. Volume 2. Appendixes. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report (volumes 1 and 2) was an experimental project to measure the inception and extent of dryout or liquid deficient heat transfer and chemical precipitation in presently used steam generator tube-tube support geometries and modified geometries. Since chemical precipitation or concentration may lead to corrosion, this program was planned to find the dependence of dryout and chemical precipitation on geometry, heat flux and fluid conditions. It was found that dryout depended principally on tube support geometry and heat flux. There was little dependence on flow rate, quality and pressure. It was found that certain tube support geometries could produce local dryout which in turn could permit significant chemical concentration. Chemical concentration was not found in the tube support geometries not exhibiting dryout. The interrelationship between the heat and mass transfer processes in the crevices was further demonstrated by comparing the results of an analytic model for predicting the shape of the liquid-vapor interface to the outline of a precipitate pattern resulting from chemical concentration.

Curlee, N.J. Jr.; Baum, A.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Single-tube thermal and hydraulic tube support test. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report (volumes 1 and 2) was an experimental project to measure the inception and extent of dryout or liquid deficient heat transfer and chemical precipitation in presently used steam generator tube-tube support geometries and modified geometries. Since chemical precipitation or concentration may lead to corrosion this program was planned to find the dependence of dryout and chemical precipitation on geometry, heat flux and fluid conditions. It was found that dryout depended principally on tube support geometry and heat flux. There was little dependence on flow rate, quality and pressure. It was found that certain tube support geometries could produce local dryout which in turn could permit significant chemical concentration. Chemical concentration was not found in tube support geometries not exhibiting dryout. The interrelationship between the heat and mass transfer processes in the crevices was further demonstrated by comparing the results of an analytic model for predicting the shape of the liquid vapor interface to the outline of a precipitate pattern resulting from chemical concentration.

Curlee, N.J. Jr.; Baum, A.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Neutron Scattering Studies of Vortex Matter in Type-II Superconductors  

SciTech Connect

The proposed program is an experimental study of the fundamental properties of Abrikosov vortex matter in type-II superconductors. Most superconducting materials used in applications such as MRI are type II and their transport properties are determined by the interplay between random pinning, interaction and thermal fluctuation effects in the vortex state. Given the technological importance of these materials, a fundamental understanding of the vortex matter is necessary. The vortex lines in type-II superconductors also form a useful model system for fundamental studies of a number of important issues in condensed matter physics, such as the presence of a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the presence of random pinning. Recent advances in neutron scattering facilities such as the major upgrade of the NIST cold source and the Spallation Neutron Source are providing unprecedented opportunities in addressing some of the longstanding issues in vortex physics. The core component of the proposed program is to use small angle neutron scattering and Bitter decoration experiments to provide the most stringent test of the Bragg glass theory by measuring the structure factor in both the real and reciprocal spaces. The proposed experiments include a neutron reflectometry experiment to measure the precise Q-dependence of the structure factor of the vortex lattice in the Bragg glass state. A second set of SANS experiments will be on a shear-strained Nb single crystal for testing a recently proposed theory of the stability of Bragg glass. The objective is to artificially create a set of parallel grain boundaries into a Nb single crystal and use SANS to measure the vortex matter diffraction pattern as a function of the changing angle between the applied magnetic field to the grain boundaries. The intrinsic merits of the proposed work are a new fundamental understanding of type-II superconductors on which superconducting technology is based, and a firm understanding of phases and phase transitions in condensed matter systems with random pinning. The broader impact of the program includes the training of future generation of neutron scientists, and further development of neutron scattering and complementary techniques for studies of superconducting materials. The graduate and undergraduate students participating in this project will learn the state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques, acquire a wide range of materials research experiences, and participate in the frontier research of superconductivity. This should best prepare the students for future careers in academia, industry, or government.

Xinsheng Ling

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

105

CX-005663: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-005663: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vortex Tube Project Decommissioning Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04292011 Location(s):...

106

Shock Tube Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The driver section drives the shock-front because of high pressured driving fluid contained in it. It contains the diaphragm holders, and the mechanisms that control their rupture along with an end cap. The driven section is the portion of the tube where... and to withstand higher pressures. The driver sections named driver-1 and driver-2 are shown in Figure 1. 10 Figure 1. Section view of the driver section. The end cap on the rear driver section is made of thicker material than the side walls because...

Koppenberger, Peter K.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

107

A Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations Kevin T. Raterman (ratekt@inel.gov; 208-526-5444) Michael McKellar (mgq@inel.gov; 208-526-1346) Anna Podgorney (poloak@inel.gov; 208-526-0064) Douglas Stacey (stacde@inel.gov; 208-526-3938) Terry Turner (tdt@inel.gov; 208-526-8623) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-2110 Brian Stokes (bxs9@pge.com; 415-972-5591) John Vranicar (jjv2@pge.com; 415-972-5591) Pacific Gas & Electric Company 123 Mission Street San Francisco, CA 94105 Introduction Many analysts 1,2,3 identify carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and separation as a major roadblock in efforts to cost effectively mitigate greenhouse gas emissions via sequestration. An assessment 4 conducted by the International Energy Agency (IEA)

108

Vortex Dynamics in NanoScale Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Into the Vortex: Dynamics in Nanoscale Materials Into the Vortex: Dynamics in Nanoscale Materials Micron and nanosized magnets are of great interest for their potential applications in new electronic devices, such as magnetic random access memories. As the size of magnets is reduced to a 1-micron scale and below, the boundaries (surfaces, perimeters, etc) of the objects begin to profoundly influence both the static and dynamic behavior of the materials. Researchers from Argonne's Materials Science Division (MSD), Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), and Advanced Photon Source (APS) have recently examined the dynamics of 3- to 7-micron-diameter NiFe alloy disks with a combination of theoretical calculations and a new time-resolved magnetic imaging technique using synchrotron-based x-ray photoemission electron

109

Temperature dependence of vortex charges in high-temperature superconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a model Hamiltonian with d-wave superconductivity and competing antiferromagnetic (AF) interactions, the temperature (T) dependence of the vortex charge in high-Tc superconductors is investigated by numerically solving the Bogoliubov–de Gennes equations. The strength of the induced AF order inside the vortex core is T dependent. The vortex charge could be negative when the AF order with sufficient strength is present at low temperatures. At higher temperatures, the AF order may be completely suppressed and the vortex charge becomes positive. A first-order-like transition in the T-dependent vortex charge is seen near the critical temperature TAF. For an underdoped sample, the spatial profiles of the induced spin-density wave and the charge-density wave orders could have stripelike structures at TTs. As a result, a vortex charge discontinuity occurs at Ts.

Yan Chen; Z. D. Wang; C. S. Ting

2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

110

Acceleration and vortex filaments in turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report recent results from a high resolution numerical study of fluid particles transported by a fully developed turbulent flow. Single particle trajectories were followed for a time range spanning more than three decades, from less than a tenth of the Kolmogorov time-scale up to one large-eddy turnover time. We present some results concerning acceleration statistics and the statistics of trapping by vortex filaments.

F. Toschi; L. Biferale; G. Boffetta; A. Celani; B. J. Devenish; A. Lanotte

2005-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

111

Jet?vortex Interaction: A Numerical Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction of a vortex and a jet plays an important role for many industrial processes such as Carbon Black formation or combustion in diesel engines. The knowledge of physics of these phenomena is crucial for engineers but also for scientists who wish to reveal many interesting and complex issues hidden there. In this research we numerically investigate cases where a cylindrical reactor is charged with gas injected through five ports. The first one is located along the main axis of the cylinder and this leads to the formation of the main jet. The other four ports are situated along the side walls such that the gas entering the cylinder tangentially through them causes a vortex to be formed. The objective of this paper is to show the fundamental physical phenomena and also how the initial and boundary conditions influence the results. Our most important observation at this stage is that the mixing process is more intense if the vortex is inclined towards x?axis. The results are mainly shown as snapshots of gas velocity.

Catalin G. Ilea; Pawel Kosinski; Alex C. Hoffmann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Analysis of cracking of co-extruded recovery boiler floor tubes  

SciTech Connect

Cracking of the stainless steel layer in co-extruded 304L/SA210 tubing used in black liquor recovery boilers is being found in an ever-increasing number of North American pulp and paper mills. Because of the possibility of a tube failure, this is a significant safety issue, and, because of the extra time required for tube inspection and repair, this can become an economic issue as well. In a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and given wide support among paper companies, boiler manufacturers, and tube fabricators, studies are being conducted to determine the cause of the cracking and to identify alternate materials and/or operating procedures to prevent tube cracking. Examination of cracked tubes has permitted characterization of crack features, and transmission electron microscopy is providing information about the thermal history, particularly cyclic thermal exposures, that tubes have experienced. Neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques are being used to determine the residual stresses in as-fabricated tube panels and exposed tubes, and finite element modeling is providing information about the stresses the tubes experience during operation. Laboratory studies are being conducted to determine the susceptibility of the co-extruded 304L/SA210 tubes to stress corrosion cracking, thermal fatigue, and corrosion in molten smelt. This paper presents the current status of these studies. On the basis of all of these studies, recommendations for means to prevent tube cracking will be offered.

Keiser, J.R.; Taljat, B.; Wang, X.L. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Ion plated electronic tube device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronic tube and associated circuitry which is produced by ion plating techniques. The process is carried out in an automated process whereby both active and passive devices are produced at very low cost. The circuitry is extremely reliable and is capable of functioning in both high radiation and high temperature environments. The size of the electronic tubes produced are more than an order of magnitude smaller than conventional electronic tubes.

Meek, T.T.

1983-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

114

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known...

115

Novel Vortex Generator and Mode Converter for Electron Beams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mode converter for electron vortex beams is described. Numerical simulations, confirmed by experiment, show that the converter transforms a vortex beam with a topological charge m=±1 into beams closely resembling Hermite-Gaussian HG10 and HG01 modes. The converter can be used as a mode discriminator or filter for electron vortex beams. Combining the converter with a phase plate turns a plane wave into modes with topological charge m=±1. This combination serves as a generator of electron vortex beams of high brilliance.

P. Schattschneider; M. Stöger-Pollach; J. Verbeeck

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

116

Vortex motion rectification in Josephson junction arrays with a ratchet potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By means of electrical transport measurements we have studied the rectified motion of vortices in ratchet potentials engineered on over-damped Josephson junction arrays. The rectified voltage as a function of the vortex density shows a maximum efficiency close a matching condition to the period of the ratchet potential indicating a collective vortex motion. Vortex current reversals where detected varying the driving force and vortex density revealing the influence of vortex-vortex interaction in the ratchet effect.

D. E. Shalom; H. Pastoriza

2004-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

117

VFLOW2D - A Vorte-Based Code for Computing Flow Over Elastically Supported Tubes and Tube Arrays  

SciTech Connect

A numerical flow model is developed to simulate two-dimensional fluid flow past immersed, elastically supported tube arrays. This work is motivated by the objective of predicting forces and motion associated with both deep-water drilling and production risers in the oil industry. This work has other engineering applications including simulation of flow past tubular heat exchangers or submarine-towed sensor arrays and the flow about parachute ribbons. In the present work, a vortex method is used for solving the unsteady flow field. This method demonstrates inherent advantages over more conventional grid-based computational fluid dynamics. The vortex method is non-iterative, does not require artificial viscosity for stability, displays minimal numerical diffusion, can easily treat moving boundaries, and allows a greatly reduced computational domain since vorticity occupies only a small fraction of the fluid volume. A gridless approach is used in the flow sufficiently distant from surfaces. A Lagrangian remap scheme is used near surfaces to calculate diffusion and convection of vorticity. A fast multipole technique is utilized for efficient calculation of velocity from the vorticity field. The ability of the method to correctly predict lift and drag forces on simple stationary geometries over a broad range of Reynolds numbers is presented.

WOLFE,WALTER P.; STRICKLAND,JAMES H.; HOMICZ,GREGORY F.; GOSSLER,ALBERT A.

2000-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

118

Symmetry breaking in the formation of magnetic vortex states in a permalloy nanodisk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structure of magnetic vortex cores. Science 298, 6. Fischer,Magnetic Material Center, National Institute for Materials Science (Magnetic vortex core observation in circular dots of Permalloy. Science

Im, Mi-Young

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated vortex ring Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

left behind... forces were derived from the vortex rings, assuming all propulsive energy to be compiled in the rings... , ending up in a separate vortex ... Source:...

120

Transverse energy circulation and the edge diffraction of an optical vortex beam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Edge diffraction of a circular Laguerre–Gaussian beam represents an example of the optical vortex symmetry breakdown in which the hidden “vortex” energy...

Bekshaev, Aleksandr Ya; Mohammed, Kadhim A; Kurka, Ivan A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

SINGLE CRYSTAL NIOBIUM TUBES FOR PARTICLE COLLIDERS ACCELERATOR CAVITIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to produce single crystal niobium (Nb) tubes for use as particle accelerator cavities for the Fermi laboratory’s International Linear Collider project. Single crystal Nb tubes may have superior performance compared to a polycrystalline tubes because the absence of grain boundaries may permit the use of higher accelerating voltages. In addition, Nb tubes that are subjected to the high temperature, high vacuum crystallization process are very pure and well annealed. Any impurity with a significantly higher vapor pressure than Nb should be decreased by the relatively long exposure at high temperature to the high vacuum environment. After application of the single crystal process, the surfaces of the Nb tubes are bright and shiny, and the tube resembles an electro polished Nb tube. For these reasons, there is interest in single crystal Nb tubes and in a process that will produce single crystal tubes. To convert a polycrystalline niobium tube into a single crystal, the tube is heated to within a few hundred ?C of the melting temperature of niobium, which is 2477 ?C. RF heating is used to rapidly heat the tube in a narrow zone and after reaching the operating temperature, the hot zone is slowly passed along the length of the tube. For crystallization tests with Nb tubes, the traverse rate was in the range of 1-10 cm per hour. All the crystallization tests in this study were performed in a water-cooled, stainless steel chamber under a vacuum of 5 x10-6 torr or better. In earliest tests of the single crystal growth process, the Nb tubes had an OD of 1.9 cm and a wall thickness of 0.15 mm. With these relatively small Nb tubes, the single crystal process was always successful in producing single crystal tubes. In these early tests, the operating temperature was normally maintained at 2200 ?C, and the traverse rate was 5 cm per hour. In the next test series, the Nb tube size was increased to 3.8 cm OD and the wall thickness was increased 0.18 mm and eventually to 0.21 mm. Again, with these larger tubes, single crystal tubes were usually produced by the crystallization process. The power supply was generally operated at full output during these tests, and the traverse rate was 5 cm per hour. In a few tests, the traverse rate was increased to 10 cm per hour, and at the faster traverse rate, single crystal growth was not achieved. In these tests with a faster traverse rate, it was thought that the tube was not heated to a high enough temperature to achieve single crystal growth. In the next series of tests, the tube OD was unchanged at 3.8 cm and the wall thickness was increased to 0.30 mm. The increased wall thickness made it difficult to reach an operating temperature above 2,000 ?C, and although the single crystal process caused a large increase in the crystal grains, no single crystal tubes were produced. It was assumed that the operating temperature in these tests was not high enough to achieve single crystal growth. In FY 2012, a larger power supply was purchased and installed. With the new power supply, temperatures above the melting point of Nb were easily obtained regardless of the tube thickness. A series of crystallization tests was initiated to determine if indeed the operating temperature of the previous tests was too low to achieve single crystal growth. For these tests, the Nb tube OD remained at 3.8 cm and the wall thickness was 0.30 mm. The first test had an operating temperature of 2,000 ?C. and the operating temperature was increased by 50 ?C increments for each successive test. The final test was very near the Nb melting temperature, and indeed, the Nb tube eventually melted in the center of the tube. These tests showed that higher temperatures did yield larger grain sizes if the traverse rate was held constant at 5 cm per hour, but no single crystal tubes were produced even at the highest operating temperature. In addition, slowing the traverse rate to as low as 1 cm per hour did not yield a single crystal tube regardless of operating temperature. At this time, it

MURPHY, JAMES E [University of Nevada, Reno] [University of Nevada, Reno

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

122

SHORT-TUBE SUBCRITICAL FLOW Enerag Division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;SHORT-TUBE SUBCRITICAL FLOW Y. C. Mei Enerag Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge-tube subcritical flow. For short tubes used as refrigerant expansion devices, the orifice model is found inadequate-TUBE SUBCRITICAL FLOW INTRODUCTION Much theoretical and experimental work regarding short tube fluid flow has

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

123

2014 Tube -1 STANDING WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2014 Tube - 1 STANDING WAVES IN AN AIR COLUMN The objective of the experiment is: · To study the harmonic structure of standing waves in an air column. APPARATUS: Computer, FFTScope software, PC speaker, meterstick, sound tube apparatus, thermometer, microphone INTRODUCTION traveling wave of sinusoidal shape

Glashausser, Charles

124

Helical tubes in crowded environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When placed in a crowded environment, a semiflexible tube is forced to fold so as to make a more compact shape. One compact shape that often arises in nature is the tight helix, especially when the tube thickness is of comparable size to the tube length. In this paper we use an excluded volume effect to model the effects of crowding. This gives us a measure of compactness for configurations of the tube, which we use to look at structures of the semiflexible tube that minimize the excluded volume. We focus most of our attention on the helix and which helical geometries are most compact. We found helices of specific pitch to radius ratio 2.512 to be optimally compact. This is the same geometry that minimizes the global curvature of the curve defining the tube. We further investigate the effects of adding a bending energy or multiple tubes to begin to explore the more complete space of possible geometries a tube could form.

Yehuda Snir and Randall D. Kamien

2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

125

Tubing pressurized firing apparatus for a tubing conveyed perforating gun  

SciTech Connect

A tubing pressurized firing apparatus is shown for use with a tubing conveyed perforating gun of the type used to perforate a cased well bore. The firing apparatus has a tubular body with an upper end for connection in the well tubing string and with a lower end for connection to a well perforating gun. An inner mandrel is slidably mounted within the tubular body and has a ball seat formed in the interior bore thereof for receiving a ball dropped through the well tubing string. The ball and ball seat together form a pressure tight seal whereby tubing pressure in the well tubing string acts on the inner mandrel to slide the mandrel downwardly within the tubular body. A cocking mechanism located below the inner mandrel within the body includes a lockout member which is initially positioned between a detonating pin and a percussion detonator. The cocking mechanism is actuated by downward sliding movement of the inner mandrel to move the lockout member from between the detonating pin and percussion detonator whereby a subsequent release of tubing pressure and upward sliding movement of the inner mandrel exposes the detonating pin to the percussion detonator to actuate the detonator and fire the perforating gun.

Davies, D. L.

1985-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

126

Mechanical (acoustic?like) wave propagation along a vortex array in the superconducting heterostructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Magnetic flux can penetrate the type ? II superconductor in the form of Abrikosov vortices (also called flux lines flux tubes or fluxons) each carrying a quantum of magnetic flux. These tiny vortices of supercurrent tend to arrange themselves in a triangular or quadratic flux?line lattice. Since the vortices are formed by the applied magnetic field around of each of them the supercurrent flows. Moreover there also exist some Lorentz force interactions among them. Those interactions form an origin of an additional mechanical (stress) field occurring in the type?II superconductor. The paper deals with an analysis of elastic (acoustic?like) wave propagation solely along vortices in a heterostructure consisted of the superconducting layer put on the superconducting substrate. Dispersion and the amplitude distribution of those waves in the vortex field existing in that structure has been presented.

Bogdan T. Maruszewski; Andrzej Drzewiecki; Roman Starosta

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print Wednesday, 28 March 2007 00:00 In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very strong magnetic fields of around half a tesla (approximately one-third the field of the strongest permanent magnet) were previously thought to be necessary to accomplish this. At the ALS, a team of researchers from Germany, Belgium, and the U.S. has used time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to observe vortex motion and demonstrate the feasibility of using weak magnetic fields as low as 1.5 millitesla (mT) to reverse the direction of a vortex core. The observed switching mechanism, which can be understood within the framework of micromagnetic theory, gives insights into basic magnetization dynamics and their possible application to data storage technologies.

128

ENERGY LEVEL SPECTROSCOPY OF A BOUND VORTEX-ANTIVORTEX PAIR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vortex- antivortex (VAV) state in an annular Josephson junction. The bound VAV pair is formed microwave spectroscopy. Keywords: Macroscopic quantum effects, long Josephson junctions, vortex­9]. Most of the studied systems, such as dc-biased Josephson junctions (JJ), supercon- ducting quantum

Wallraff, Andreas

129

Identification of sensitivity genes involved in teratogen-induced neural tube defects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that NTDs have a strong genetic component to their development. My project is designed to examine differential expression patterns of genes within the neural tube cells of inbred LM/Bc mouse fetuses following exposure to the known teratogenic agent...

Hayes, Blaine G

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

130

Analysis of conjugate heat transfer in tube-in-block heat exchangers for some engineering applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project studied the effect of different parameters on the conjugate heat transfer in tube-in-block heat exchangers for various engineering applications. These included magnetic coolers… (more)

Gari, Abdullatif Abdulhadi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerator drift-tube braze-joint Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DRIFTTUBE LINAC FOR THE ISAC PROJECT AT TRIUMF Summary: , 105 MHz variable energy drift tube linac (DTL) to accelerate ions of 13 qA 16 to a final energy... A SEPARATED...

132

Improving Vortex Generators to Enhance the Performance of Air-Cooled Condensers in a Geothermal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop strategies to enhance air-side heat transfer in geothermal air-cooled condensers such that it should not significantly increase pressure drop and parasitic fan pumping power. The work was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) of Japan, Yokohama National University, and the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India. A combined experimental and numerical investigation was performed to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to largescale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique was employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements were obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that included four tube rows in a staggered array. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements were also acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus in the Single Blow Test Facility. In addition, a numerical modeling technique was developed to predict local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds number flows, with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results were obtained that reveal quantitative details of local finsurface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results were obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500. The winglets were of triangular (delta) shape with a 1:2 or 1:3 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface heat transfer results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (in terms of Colburn j-factor) associated with deployment of the winglets with circular as well as oval tubes. In general, toe-in (common flow up) type winglets appear to have better performance than the toe-out (common flow down) type winglets. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. During the course of their independent research, all of the researchers have established that about 10 to 30% enhancement in Colburn j-factor is expected. However, actual increase in heat transfer rate from a heat exchanger employing finned tubes with winglets may be smaller, perhaps on the order of 2 to 5%. It is also concluded that for any specific application, more full-size experimentation is needed to optimize the winglet design for a specific heat exchanger application. If in place of a circular tube, an oval tube can be economically used in a bundle, it is expected that the pressure drop across the tube bundle with the application of vortex generators (winglets) will be similar to that in a conventional circular tube bundle. It is hoped that the results of this research will demonstrate the benefits of applying vortex generators (winglets) on the fins to improve the heat transfer from the air-side of the tube bundle.

Manohar S. Sohal

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Combustion-thermoelectric tube  

SciTech Connect

In direct combustion-thermoelectric energy conversion, direct fuel injection and reciprocation of the air flowing in a solid matrix are combined with the solid conduction to allow for obtaining super-adiabatic temperatures at the hot junctions. While the solid conductivity is necessary, the relatively large thermal conductivity of the available high-temperature thermoelectric materials (e.g., Si-Ge alloys) results in a large conduction loss from the hot junctions and deteriorates the performance. Here a combustion-thermoelectric tube is introduced and analyzed. Radially averaged temperatures are used for the fluid and solid phases. A combination of external cooling of the cold junctions, and direct injection of the fuel, has been used to increase the energy conversion efficiency for low thermal conductivity, high-melting temperature thermoelectric materials. The parametric study (geometry, flow, stoichiometry, materials) shows that with the current high figure of merit, high temperature Si{sub 0.7}Ge{sub 0.3} properties, a conversion efficiency of about 11% is achievable. With lower thermal conductivities for these high-temperature materials, efficiencies about 25% appear possible. This places this energy conversion in line with the other high efficiency, direct electric power generation methods.

Park, C.W.; Kaviany, M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Method of making straight fuel cell tubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and an apparatus for making straight fuel cell tubes are disclosed. Extruded tubes comprising powders of fuel cell material and a solvent are dried by rotating the extruded tubes. The rotation process provides uniform circumferential drying which results in uniform linear shrinkage of the tubes. The resultant dried tubes are very straight, thereby eliminating subsequent straightening steps required with conventional processes. The method is particularly useful for forming inner air electrode tubes of solid oxide fuel cells.

Borglum, Brian P. (Edgewood, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Flux tubes in the SU(3) vacuum: London penetration depth and coherence length  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the dual superconductor scenario for the QCD confining vacuum, the chromoelectric field generated by a static $q\\overline{q}$ pair can be fitted by a function derived, by dual analogy, from a simple variational model for the magnitude of the normalized order parameter of an isolated Abrikosov vortex. Previous results for the SU(3) vacuum are revisited, but here the transverse chromoelectric field is measured by means of the connected correlator of two Polyakov loops and, in order to reduce noise, the smearing procedure is used instead of cooling. The penetration and coherence lengths of the flux tube are then extracted from the fit and compared with previous results.

Paolo Cea; Leonardo Cosmai; Francesca Cuteri; Alessandro Papa

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

136

Electromagnetic Behavior of the Vortex Sponge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In an introductory paper the vortex sponge was shown to be governed in restricted cases by Maxwell's free-space equations. In the present paper analogs to electric and magnetic energies and Poynting's theorem are derived by simple mechanical considerations. Rotational stability suggested originally by MacCullagh as a fundamental property of a luminiferous ether turns out to be a quality of the medium as do the stresses introduced by Faraday and Maxwell to explain the mechanical actions of electric and magnetic fields. A rudimentary model for the electrostatic field is suggested on this basis. A conventional definition of charge and the laws of Coulomb and Biot complete Maxwell's equations for cases including charges and currents. A model of the magnetic field based on the bulk rotation and the Faraday-Maxwell stresses combined with the laws of Coulomb and Biot permits the inference of the Lorentz force. Although numerous gaps occur in the treatment it seems not unlikely that the vortex sponge has the qualities described by the electromagnetic field equations as well as the mechanical attributes required for a model of these fields.

Edward M. Kelly

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Microhole Coiled Tubing Bottom Hole Assemblies  

SciTech Connect

The original objective of the project, to deliver an integrated 3 1/8-inch diameter Measurement While Drilling (MWD) and Logging While Drilling (LWD) system for drilling small boreholes using coiled tubing drilling, has been achieved. Two prototype systems have been assembled and tested in the lab. One of the systems has been successfully tested downhole in a conventional rotary drilling environment. Development of the 3 1/8-inch system has also lead to development and commercialization of a slightly larger 3.5-inch diameter system. We are presently filling customer orders for the 3.5-inch system while continuing with commercialization of the 3 1/8-inch system. The equipment developed by this project will be offered for sale to multiple service providers around the world, enabling the more rapid expansion of both coiled tubing drilling and conventional small diameter drilling. The project was based on the reuse of existing technology whenever possible in order to minimize development costs, time, and risks. The project was begun initially by Ultima Labs, at the time a small company ({approx}12 employees) which had successfully developed a number of products for larger oil well service companies. In September, 2006, approximately 20 months after inception of the project, Ultima Labs was acquired by Sondex plc, a worldwide manufacturer of downhole instrumentation for cased hole and drilling applications. The acquisition provided access to proven technology for mud pulse telemetry, downhole directional and natural gamma ray measurements, and surface data acquisition and processing, as well as a global sales and support network. The acquisition accelerated commercialization through existing Sondex customers. Customer demand resulted in changes to the product specification to support hotter (150 C) and deeper drilling (20,000 psi pressure) than originally proposed. The Sondex acquisition resulted in some project delays as the resistivity collar was interfaced to a different MWD system and also as the mechanical design was revised for the new pressure requirements. However, the Sondex acquisition has resulted in a more robust system, secure funding for completion of the project, and more rapid commercialization.

Don Macune

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

Irreversible flow of vortex matter: Polycrystal and amorphous phases Paolo Moretti and M.-Carmen Miguel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems exhibiting this phenomenol- ogy, flux line vortex lattices in type II superconductors rep- resent

Miguel-Lopez, Carmen

139

Potential Flow Model of a Vortex Street Near a Fish-like Body  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Flow Model of a Vortex Street Near a Fish-like Body Joshua Brulé, University of Maryland to inviscid, irrotational solutions of Navier-Stokes · Vortex potential: "A model of the lateral line of fish for vortex sensing." Ren Z, Mohseni K. 2012 #12;Vortex near a (circular) fish · (Insert your own spherical

Anlage, Steven

140

Vortex-vacancy interactions in two-dimensional easy-plane magnets G. M. Wysin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vortex-vacancy interactions in two-dimensional easy-plane magnets G. M. Wysin Department of Physics of a magnetic vacancy site on a nearby magnetic vortex are analyzed on square, hexagonal and triangular lattices. When the vortex is centered on a vacancy, the critical anisotropies where the stable vortex structure

Wysin, Gary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

142

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

143

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very strong magnetic fields of around half a tesla (approximately one-third the field of the strongest permanent magnet) were previously thought to be necessary to accomplish this. At the ALS, a team of researchers from Germany, Belgium, and the U.S. has used time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to observe vortex motion and demonstrate the feasibility of using weak magnetic fields as low as 1.5 millitesla (mT) to reverse the direction of a vortex core. The observed switching mechanism, which can be understood within the framework of micromagnetic theory, gives insights into basic magnetization dynamics and their possible application to data storage technologies.

144

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very strong magnetic fields of around half a tesla (approximately one-third the field of the strongest permanent magnet) were previously thought to be necessary to accomplish this. At the ALS, a team of researchers from Germany, Belgium, and the U.S. has used time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to observe vortex motion and demonstrate the feasibility of using weak magnetic fields as low as 1.5 millitesla (mT) to reverse the direction of a vortex core. The observed switching mechanism, which can be understood within the framework of micromagnetic theory, gives insights into basic magnetization dynamics and their possible application to data storage technologies.

145

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very strong magnetic fields of around half a tesla (approximately one-third the field of the strongest permanent magnet) were previously thought to be necessary to accomplish this. At the ALS, a team of researchers from Germany, Belgium, and the U.S. has used time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to observe vortex motion and demonstrate the feasibility of using weak magnetic fields as low as 1.5 millitesla (mT) to reverse the direction of a vortex core. The observed switching mechanism, which can be understood within the framework of micromagnetic theory, gives insights into basic magnetization dynamics and their possible application to data storage technologies.

146

Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar Model Utilizing Boron-10 Lined Tubes  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report, providing results for model development of Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) designs, is a deliverable under Task 2 of the project.

Rogers, Jeremy L.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

147

Vortex configurations of bosons in an optical lattice  

SciTech Connect

The single-vortex problem in a strongly correlated bosonic system is investigated self-consistently within the mean-field theory of the Bose-Hubbard model. Near the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition, the vortex core has a tendency toward the Mott-insulating phase, with the core particle density approaching the nearest commensurate value. If the nearest-neighbor repulsion exists, the charge-density wave order may develop locally in the core. The evolution of the vortex configuration from the strong- to weak-coupling regions is studied. This phenomenon can be observed in systems of rotating ultracold atoms in optical lattices and Josephson-junction arrays.

Wu Congjun; Zhang Shoucheng [Department of Physics, McCullough Building, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4045 (United States); Chen Handong [Department of Applied Physics, McCullough Building, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4045 (United States); Hu Jiangpiang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

NUMERICAL EXPERIMENTS ON THE TWO-STEP EMERGENCE OF TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN THE SUN  

SciTech Connect

We present the new results of the two-dimensional numerical experiments on the cross-sectional evolution of a twisted magnetic flux tube rising from the deeper solar convection zone (-20,000 km) to the corona through the surface. The initial depth is 10 times deeper than most of the previous calculations focusing on the flux emergence from the uppermost convection zone. We find that the evolution is illustrated by the following two-step process. The initial tube rises due to its buoyancy, subject to aerodynamic drag due to the external flow. Because of the azimuthal component of the magnetic field, the tube maintains its coherency and does not deform to become a vortex roll pair. When the flux tube approaches the photosphere and expands sufficiently, the plasma on the rising tube accumulates to suppress the tube's emergence. Therefore, the flux decelerates and extends horizontally beneath the surface. This new finding owes to our large-scale simulation, which simultaneously calculates the dynamics within the interior as well as above the surface. As the magnetic pressure gradient increases around the surface, magnetic buoyancy instability is triggered locally and, as a result, the flux rises further into the solar corona. We also find that the deceleration occurs at a higher altitude than assumed in our previous experiment using magnetic flux sheets. By conducting parametric studies, we investigate the conditions for the two-step emergence of the rising flux tube: field strength {approx}> 1.5 x 10{sup 4} G and the twist {approx}> 5.0 x 10{sup -4} km{sup -1} at -20,000 km depth.

Toriumi, S.; Yokoyama, T., E-mail: toriumi@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2011-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

149

Monopole-Antimonopole Chains and Vortex Rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider static axially symmetric solutions of SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs theory. The simplest such solutions represent monopoles, multimonopoles and monopole-antimonopole pairs. In general such solutions are characterized by two integers, the winding number m of their polar angle, and the winding number n of their azimuthal angle. For solutions with n=1 and n=2, the Higgs field vanishes at m isolated points along the symmetry axis, which are associated with the locations of m monopoles and antimonopoles of charge n. These solutions represent chains of m monopoles and antimonopoles in static equilibrium. For larger values of n, totally different configurations arise, where the Higgs field vanishes on one or more rings, centered around the symmetry axis. We discuss the properties of such monopole-antimonopole chains and vortex rings, in particular their energies and magnetic dipole moments, and we study the influence of a finite Higgs self-coupling constant on these solutions.

Burkhard Kleihaus; Jutta Kunz; Yasha Shnir

2004-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

150

Integrated multi vector vortex beam generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel method to generate and manipulate vector vortex beams in an integrated, ring resonator based geometry is proposed. We show numerically that a ring resonator, with an appropriate grating, addressed by a vertically displaced access waveguide emits a complex optical field. The emitted beam possesses a specific polarization topology, and consequently a transverse intensity profile and orbital angular momentum. We propose a combination of several concentric ring resonators, addressed with different bus guides, to generate arbitrary orbital angular momentum qudit states, which could potentially be used for classical and quantum communications. Finally, we demonstrate numerically that this device works as an orbital angular momentum sorter with an average cross-talk of -10 dB between different orbital angular momentum channels.

Sebastian A. Schulz; Taras Machula; Ebrahim Karimi; Robert W. Boyd

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

151

Interim Report: Coiled Tubing Drilling and Intervention System Using Cost Effective Vessel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOCUMENT TITLE: DOCUMENT TITLE: Self Supporting Riser Technology to Enable Coiled Tubing Intervention for Deepwater Wells Document No.: 08121-1502-12 RPSEA PROJECT TITLE: Coil Tubing Drilling and Intervention System Using a Cost Effective Vessel RPSEA Project No.: 08121-1502 01 April 2011 Charles R. Yemington, PE Project Manager Nautilus International 400 North Sam Houston Parkway East, Suite 105 Houston, Texas 77060 RPSEA Project No.: 08121-1502 Coiled Tubing Drilling and Intervention System Using a Cost Effective Vessel RPSEA Project 08121-1502 01 April 2011 Page 2 of 91 LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by Nautilus International, LLC. as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America (RPSEA). RPSEA members, the

152

Project 261  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOVEL CORROSION SENSOR FOR ADVANCED NOVEL CORROSION SENSOR FOR ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY POWER SYSTEMS Description The overall objective of this proposed project is to develop a new technology for on-line corrosion monitoring based on an innovative concept. The specific objectives and corresponding tasks are (1) develop the sensor and electronic measurement system; (2) evaluate and improve the system in a laboratory muffle furnace; and (3) evaluate and improve the system through tests conducted in a pilot-scale coal combustor (~1 MW). Fireside corrosion refers to the metal loss caused by chemical reactions on surfaces exposed to the combustion environment. Such corrosion is the leading mechanism for boiler tube failures and is a serious concern for current and future energy plants due to the introduction of technologies targeting emissions

153

A study on passive methods of vortex induced vibrations suppression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A number of engineering systems, including those found in offshore operations, are often affected by vortex-induced vibrations (VIV). This phenomenon is caused by the interaction between a structure and shed vortices which ...

Galvao, Richardo A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Experimental demonstration of vortex pancake in high temperature superconductor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to demonstrate the existence of the vortex pancake in high temperature superconductor experimentally, a configuration in which the current...E-j relation obtained with this electrodes spatial configurati...

Wei-xian Wang; Yu-heng Zhang

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

MHK Technologies/SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Elemental Energy Technologies Limited ABN 46 128 491 903 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description A revolutionary vortex reaction turbine branded the SeaUrchin an advanced third generation marine turbine technology capable of delivering inexpensive small to large scale baseload or predictable electricity by harnessing the kinetic energy of free flowing ocean currents tides and rivers Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 55:15.2

156

Numerical simulation of swirling flow in complex hydroturbine draft tube using unsteady statistical turbulence models  

SciTech Connect

A numerical method is developed for carrying out unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) simulations and detached-eddy simulations (DESs) in complex 3D geometries. The method is applied to simulate incompressible swirling flow in a typical hydroturbine draft tube, which consists of a strongly curved 90 degree elbow and two piers. The governing equations are solved with a second-order-accurate, finite-volume, dual-time-stepping artificial compressibility approach for a Reynolds number of 1.1 million on a mesh with 1.8 million nodes. The geometrical complexities of the draft tube are handled using domain decomposition with overset (chimera) grids. Numerical simulations show that unsteady statistical turbulence models can capture very complex 3D flow phenomena dominated by geometry-induced, large-scale instabilities and unsteady coherent structures such as the onset of vortex breakdown and the formation of the unsteady rope vortex downstream of the turbine runner. Both URANS and DES appear to yield the general shape and magnitude of mean velocity profiles in reasonable agreement with measurements. Significant discrepancies among the DES and URANS predictions of the turbulence statistics are also observed in the straight downstream diffuser.

Paik, Joongcheol [University of Minnesota; Sotiropoulos, Fotis [University of Minnesota; Sale, Michael J [ORNL

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Erosion of heat exchanger tubes in fluidized beds. Annual report, 1990  

SciTech Connect

This final report describes the activities of the 3-year project entitled ``Erosion of Heat Exchanger Tubes In Fluidized Beds.`` which was completed at the end of 1990. Project accomplishments include the collection of a substantial body of wear data In a 24in. {times} 24in. fluidized bed, comparative wear results In a 6in. {times} 6in. fluidized bed, the development of a dragometer and the collection of a comprehensive set of drag force data in the 24in. {times} 24in. bed, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis of bubble probe data to establish dominant bubble frequencies in the 24in. {times} 24in. bed, the use of a heat flux gauge for measurement of heat transfer coefficients in the 24in. {times} 24in. bed and the modeling of the tube wear in the 24in. {times} 24in. bed. Analysis of the wear data from the 24in. square bed indicates that tube wear increases with increase in superficial velocity, and with increase in tube height. The latter effect is a result of the tubes higher up in the bed seeing greater movement of dense phase than tubes lower down In the bed. In addition, tube wear was found to decrease with increase in particle size, for constant superficial velocity. Three models of tube wear were formulated and provided acceptable prediction of wear when compared with the experimental data.

Johnson, E.K.; Flemmer, R.L.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Core-tube data logger  

SciTech Connect

Wireline core drilling, increasingly used for geothermal exploration, employs a core-tube to capture a rock core sample during drilling. Three types of core-tube data loggers (CTDL) have been built and tested to date by Sandia national Laboratories. They are: (1) temperature-only logger, (2) temperature/inclinometer logger and (3) heat-shielded temperature/inclinometer logger. All were tested during core drilling operations using standard wireline diamond core drilling equipment. While these tools are designed for core-tube deployment, the tool lends itself to be adapted to other drilling modes and equipment. Topics covered in this paper include: (1) description on how the CTDLs are implemented, (2) the components of the system, (3) the type of data one can expect from this type of tool, (4) lessons learned, (5) comparison to its counterpart and (6) future work.

Henfling, J.A.; Normann, R.A.; Knudsen, S.; Drumheller, D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

FINAL REPORT: RPSEA PROJECT NO.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REPORT: REPORT: RPSEA PROJECT NO. 07121-DW1603D RICE UNIVERSITY Structural Health Monitoring System for Deepwater Risers with Vortex-induced Vibration: Nonlinear Modeling, Blind Identification Fatigue/Damage Estimation and Local Monitoring using Magnetic Flux Leakage by Chaojun Huang A Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Doctor of Philosophy Approved, Thesis Committee: Satish Nagarajaiah, Chair Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Mechanical Engineering and Material Science Jamie E. Padgett Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering Andrew J. Dick Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Material Science Houston, Texas June, 2012 ABSTRACT Structural Health Monitoring System for Deepwater Risers with Vortex-induced Vibration: Nonlinear Modeling, Blind Identification Fatigue/Damage

160

Flash photolysis-shock tube studies  

SciTech Connect

Even though this project in the past has concentrated on the measurement of thermal bimolecular reactions of atomic species with stable molecules by the flash or laser photolysis-shock tube (FP- or LP-ST) method using atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS) as the diagnostic technique, during the past year the authors have concentrated on studies of the thermal decompositions of selected chlorocarbon molecules. These studies are necessary if the degradation of chlorine containing organic molecules by incineration are to be understood at the molecular level. Clearly, destruction of these molecules will not only involve abstraction reactions, when possible, but also thermal decomposition followed by secondary reactions of the initially formed atoms and radicals. Studies on the thermal decomposition of CH{sub 3}Cl are complete, and the curve-of-growth for Cl-atom atomic resonance absorption has been determined. The new thermal decomposition studies are similar to those already reported for CH{sub 3}Cl.

Michael, J.V. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost of the project to labor only. The efficacy of the examples will be assessed through their useProject Year 2012-2013 Project Title Sight-Reading at the Piano Project Team Ken Johansen, Peabody) Faculty Statement The goal of this project is to create a bank of practice exercises that student pianists

Gray, Jeffrey J.

162

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design goals for this project include low cost (less than $30 per paddle) and robustness. The projectProject Year 2001 Project Team Faculty: Allison Okamura, Mechanical Engineering, Whiting School Project Title Haptic Display of Dynamic Systems Audience 30 to 40 students per year, enrolled

Gray, Jeffrey J.

163

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-year section of the summer project will cost $1344.) This project will be measured by the CER surveys conductedProject Year 2005 Project Team Sean Greenberg, Faculty, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences; Kevin Clark, Student, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project

Gray, Jeffrey J.

164

Continuation of Studies on Development of ODS Heat Exchanger Tubing  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Center (NETL), has initiated a strategic plan for the development of advanced technologies needed to design and build fossil fuel plants with very high efficiency and environmental performance. These plants, referred to as 'Vision 21' and FutureGen programs by DOE, will produce electricity, chemicals, fuels, or a combination of these products, and possibly secondary products such as steam/heat for industrial use. MA956 is a prime candidate material being considered for a high temperature heat exchanger in the 'Vision 21' and FutureGen programs. This material is an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy; however, there are some gaps in the data required to commit to the use of these alloys in a full-size plant. To fill the technology gaps for commercial production and use of the material for 'Advanced Power Generation Systems' this project has performed development activity to significant increase in circumferential strength of MA956 as compared to currently available material, investigated bonding technologies for bonding tube-to-tube joints through joining development, and performed tensile, creep and fire-side corrosion tests to validate the use and fabrication processes of MA956 to heat exchanger tubing applications. Development activities within this projected has demonstrated increased circumferential strength of MA956 tubes through flow form processing. Of the six fabrication technologies for bonding tube-to-tube joints, inertia friction welding (IFW) and flash butt welding (FBW) were identified as processes for joining MA956 tubes. Tensile, creep, and fire-side corrosion test data were generated for both base metal and weld joints. The data can be used for design of future systems employing MA956. Based upon the positive development activities, two test probes were designed and fabricated for field exposure testing at 1204 C ({approx}2200 F) flue gas. The probes contained tube portions with FBW and IFW welded MA956. Field testing of the probes and remaining heat exchanger design activity will be performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory under DOE Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

Lawrence Brown; David Workman; Bimal Kad; Gaylord Smith; Archie Robertson; Ian Wright

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Louise Pasternack, Chemistry Department, Krieger School, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project Title Introductory Chemistry Lab Demonstrations Audience an interactive virtual lab manual that will facilitate understanding of the procedures and techniques required

Gray, Jeffrey J.

166

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Karl) Zhang, Undergraduate Student, Biomedical Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering; Cheryl Kim Audio, Digital Video Project Abstract The goal of this project is to develop online modular units

Gray, Jeffrey J.

167

Apparatus for connecting aligned abutted tubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for connecting abutted tubes and for maintaining their rotary alignment during connection. The apparatus comprises first and second tubes, a rotation prevention element, a collar and a retainer. Each tube has inside and outside walls, and first and second ends, each end having an inside and outside edge. The first tube has portions defining a first plurality of cavities located at the outside edge of its first end. An external threaded portion is on the outside wall of the first tube and next to the first plurality of cavities. The second tube has portions defining a second plurality of cavities located at the outside edge of its first end. The first plurality has a different number than the second plurality. The first ends of the first and second tubes have substantially the same outside diameter and are abutted during connection so that an orifice is formed whenever first and second tube cavities substantially overlap. A rotation prevension element is placed in the orifice to prevent rotation of the first and second tubes. A collar with an internal threaded portion is slidably disposed about the second tube. The internal threaded portion engages the external threaded portion of the first tube to connect the tubes. A lip connected to the collar prevents separation of the collar from the second tube.

Williams, R.E.

1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

168

Line Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(PDCI) Upgrade Project Whistling Ridge Energy Project Line Rebuild, Relocation and Substation Projects Wind Projects Line Projects BPA identifies critical infrastructure and...

169

Ultra-Low NOx Advanced Vortex Combustor  

SciTech Connect

An ultra lean-premixed Advanced Vortex Combustor (AVC) has been developed and tested. The natural gas fueled AVC was tested at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE NETL) test facility in Morgantown (WV). All testing was performed at elevated pressures and inlet temperatures and at lean fuel-air ratios representative of industrial gas turbines. The improved AVC design exhibited simultaneous NOx/CO/UHC emissions of 4/4/0 ppmv (all emissions are at 15% O2 dry). The design also achieved less than 3 ppmv NOx with combustion efficiencies in excess of 99.5%. The design demonstrated tremendous acoustic dynamic stability over a wide range of operating conditions which potentially makes this approach significantly more attractive than other lean premixed combustion approaches. In addition, a pressure drop of 1.75% was measured which is significantly lower than conventional gas turbine combustors. Potentially, this lower pressure drop characteristic of the AVC concept translates into overall gas turbine cycle efficiency improvements of up to one full percentage point. The relatively high velocities and low pressure drops achievable with this technology make the AVC approach an attractive alternative for syngas fuel applications.

Edmonds, R.G. (Ramgen Power Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA); Steele, R.C. (Ramgen Power Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA); Williams, J.T. (Ramgen Power Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA); Straub, D.L.; Casleton, K.H.; Bining, Avtar (California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

ULTRA-LOW NOX ADVANCED VORTEX COMBUSTOR  

SciTech Connect

An ultra lean-premixed Advanced Vortex Combustor (AVC) has been developed and tested. The natural gas fueled AVC was tested at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE NETL) test facility in Morgantown (WV). All testing was performed at elevated pressures and inlet temperatures and at lean fuel-air ratios representative of industrial gas turbines. The improved AVC design exhibited simultaneous NOx/CO/UHC emissions of 4/4/0 ppmv (all emissions are at 15% O2 dry). The design also achieved less than 3 ppmv NOx with combustion efficiencies in excess of 99.5%. The design demonstrated tremendous acoustic dynamic stability over a wide range of operating conditions which potentially makes this approach significantly more attractive than other lean premixed combustion approaches. In addition, a pressure drop of 1.75% was measured which is significantly lower than conventional gas turbine combustors. Potentially, this lower pressure drop characteristic of the AVC concept translates into overall gas turbine cycle efficiency improvements of up to one full percentage point. The relatively high velocities and low pressure drops achievable with this technology make the AVC approach an attractive alternative for syngas fuel applications.

Ryan G. Edmonds; Robert C. Steele; Joseph T. Williams; Douglas L. Straub; Kent H. Casleton; Avtar Bining

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Performance of drift tubes under high radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, the aging and the rejuvenation of an ATLAS proportional drift tube are described. Firstly, the Diethorn model of gain is tested using pressure and sense-wire voltage measurements. The drift tube was then ...

Shi, Yue, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

173

Two phase flow in capillary tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The flow of two phases, gas and liquid, has been studied in horizontal tubes of capillary diameter. The flow has been primarily studied in the regime where the gas flows as long bubbles separated from the wall of the tube ...

Suo, Mikio

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that incorporate video taped procedures for student preview. Solution This project will create videos for more to study the procedure and techniques before coming to class. Our previous fellowship project addressedProject Year 2009 Project Title Enhancing Biology Laboratory Preparation through Video

Gray, Jeffrey J.

175

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, there is no resource available to view the procedure before class. Solution The purpose of this project is to capture available to view the procedure before class. The purpose #12;of this project is to capture variousProject Year 2007 Project Team Kristina Obom, Faculty, Advanced Academic Programs, Krieger School

Gray, Jeffrey J.

176

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Year 2013-2014 Project Title German Online Placement Exam Project Team Deborah Mifflin to increased cost. As well, it lacked listening comprehension, writing and speaking components providing support, we will use Blackboard for this project. The creation will require numerous steps

Gray, Jeffrey J.

177

Stability of tube rows in crossflow. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical model for the instability of tube rows subjected to crossflow is examined. The theoretical model, based on the fluid-force data for a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.33, provides additional insight into the instability phenomenon. Tests are also conducted for three sets of tube rows. The effects of mass ratio, tube pitch, damping, detuning and finned tubes are investigated. Theoretical results and experimental data are in good agreement.

Chen, S.S.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Wave–vortex interactions in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation  

SciTech Connect

This is a theoretical study of wave–vortex interaction effects in the two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which is a useful conceptual model for the limiting dynamics of superfluid quantum condensates at zero temperature. The particular wave–vortex interaction effects are associated with the scattering and refraction of small-scale linear waves by the straining flows induced by quantized point vortices and, crucially, with the concomitant nonlinear back-reaction, the remote recoil, that these scattered waves exert on the vortices. Our detailed model is a narrow, slowly varying wavetrain of small-amplitude waves refracted by one or two vortices. Weak interactions are studied using a suitable perturbation method in which the nonlinear recoil force on the vortex then arises at second order in wave amplitude, and is computed in terms of a Magnus-type force expression for both finite and infinite wavetrains. In the case of an infinite wavetrain, an explicit asymptotic formula for the scattering angle is also derived and cross-checked against numerical ray tracing. Finally, under suitable conditions a wavetrain can be so strongly refracted that it collapses all the way onto a zero-size point vortex. This is a strong wave–vortex interaction by definition. The conditions for such a collapse are derived and the validity of ray tracing theory during the singular collapse is investigated.

Guo, Yuan, E-mail: yuanguo@cims.nyu.edu; Bühler, Oliver [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)] [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Experimental Investigations of Vortex Induced Vibration of A Flat Plate in Pitch Oscillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A bluff structure placed in a flowing fluid, may be subjected to vortex-induced vibrations (VIV). For a flat plate with only rotational degree of freedom, the VIV is rotational oscillation. Based on the experimental investigation, vortex...

Yang, Yi

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

180

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:00 Magnetic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Generation and Propagation of Inertia Gravity Waves from Vortex Dipoles and Jets Shuguang Wang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation and Propagation of Inertia Gravity Waves from Vortex Dipoles and Jets Shuguang Wang generation and propagation from jets within idealized vortex dipoles using a nonhydrostatic mesoscale model, moist convection, fronts, upper level jets, geostrophic adjustment and spontaneous generation (Fritts

182

Physical and Numerical Analysis of Extrusion Process for Production of Bimetallic Tubes  

SciTech Connect

Bimetallic tubes are used for very specific applications where one of the two metals provides strength and the other provides specific properties such as aqueous corrosion and carburization, coking resistance, and special electrical and thermal properties. Bimetallic tubes have application in pulp and paper industry for heat-recovery boilers, in the chemical industry for ethylene production, and in the petrochemical industry for deep oil well explorations. Although bimetallic tubes have major applications in energy-intensive industry, they often are not used because of their cost and manufacturing sources in the United States. This project was intended to address both of these issues.

Misiolek, W.Z.; Sikka, V.K.

2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

183

Spring/dimple instrument tube restraint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel assembly for a pressurized water nuclear reactor has a spring and dimple structure formed in a non-radioactive insert tube placed in the top of a sensor receiving instrumentation tube thimble disposed in the fuel assembly and attached at a top nozzle, a bottom nozzle, and intermediate grids. The instrumentation tube thimble is open at the top, where the sensor or its connection extends through the cooling water for coupling to a sensor signal processor. The spring and dimple insert tube is mounted within the instrumentation tube thimble and extends downwardly adjacent the top. The springs and dimples restrain the sensor and its connections against lateral displacement causing impact with the instrumentation tube thimble due to the strong axial flow of cooling water. The instrumentation tube has a stainless steel outer sleeve and a zirconium alloy inner sleeve below the insert tube adjacent the top. The insert tube is relatively non-radioactivated inconel alloy. The opposed springs and dimples are formed on diametrically opposite inner walls of the insert tube, the springs being formed as spaced axial cuts in the insert tube, with a web of the insert tube between the cuts bowed radially inwardly for forming the spring, and the dimples being formed as radially inward protrusions opposed to the springs. 7 figures.

DeMario, E.E.; Lawson, C.N.

1993-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

184

Ionization tube simmer current circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current.

Steinkraus, Jr., Robert F. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Ionization tube simmer current circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current. 6 figures.

Steinkraus, R.F. Jr.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

186

Overview of the DOE studies of recovery boiler floor tube cracking  

SciTech Connect

Cracking of the stainless steel layer of coextruded 304L/SA210 recovery boiler floor tubes has been observed in an increasing number of black liquor recovery boilers. Because failure of such tubes is a serious safety concern as well as an economic issue, this project was initiated with the objective of identifying alternate materials or process changes that would prevent tube cracking. Tensile stresses are essential for the most likely failure mechanisms, i.e., fatigue or stress corrosion cracking, therefore stresses were measured at room temperature and modeling was used to predict stresses under operating conditions. Laboratory studies have identified conditions under which composite tubes crack due to thermal fatigue and stress corrosion. Floor tube temperature measurements have defined the magnitude and frequency of temperature fluctuations experienced by such tubes, and smelt corrosion studies have measured the degradation rate when molten smelt comes in contact with tubes. Based on these observations, certain materials appear more likely to resist cracking and certain process changes should help avoid conditions that cause composite tube cracking.

Keiser, J.R.; Taljat, B.; Wang, X.L. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging.

Boettcher, Gordon E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Mutual Chern-Simons gauge theory of spontaneous vortex phase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We apply the mutual Chern-Simons effective theory [Kou, Qi, and Weng, Phys. Rev. B 71, 235102 (2005)] of the doped Mott insulator to the study of the so-called spontaneous vortex phase in the low-temperature pseudogap region, which is characterized by strong unconventional superconducting fluctuations. An effective description for the spontaneous vortex phase is derived from the general mutual Chern-Simons Lagrangian, based on which the physical properties including the diamagnetism, spin paramagnetism, magnetoresistance, and the Nernst coefficient, have been quantitatively calculated. The phase boundaries of the spontaneous vortex phase, which sits between the onset temperature Tv and the superconducting transition temperature Tc, are also determined within the same framework. The results are consistent with the experimental measurements of the cuprates.

Xiao-Liang Qi and Zheng-Yu Weng

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

The effect of surface tension on the Moore singularity of vortex sheet dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of surface tension on the Moore singularity of vortex sheet dynamics F. de la Hoz , M's singularities by surface tension in the evolution of vortex sheets and its dependence on Weber number (which is inversely proportional to surface tension coefficient). The curvature of the vortex sheet, instead

Fontelos, Marco

190

Traveling Waves from the Arclength Parameterization: Vortex Sheets with Surface Tension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traveling Waves from the Arclength Parameterization: Vortex Sheets with Surface Tension Benjamin for the vortex sheet with surface tension. We use the angle- arclength description of the interface rather than prove that there exist traveling vortex sheets with surface tension bifurcating from equilibrium. We

Wright, J. Douglas

191

Development of vortex state in circular magnetic nanodots: Theory and experiment RID A-9247-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

magnetic vortex. The vortex-core diameter is controlled by competing magnetic energy contributions. For 20-nm-thick Fe dots, the values of the critical diameter (58-60 nm) and the vortex core (16-19 nm) are in very good agreement between the different...

Mejia-Lopez, J.; Altbir, D.; Landeros, P.; Escrig, J.; Romero, A. H.; Roshchin, Igor V.; Li, C-P; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Batlle, X.; Schuller, Ivan K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Turbine nozzle stage having thermocouple guide tube  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A guide tube is fixed adjacent opposite ends in outer and inner covers of a nozzle stage segment. The guide tube is serpentine in shape between the outer and inner covers and extends through a nozzle vane. An insert is disposed in the nozzle vane and has apertures to accommodate serpentine portions of the guide tube. Cooling steam is also supplied through chambers of the insert on opposite sides of a central insert chamber containing the guide tube. The opposite ends of the guide tube are fixed to sleeves, in turn fixed to the outer and inner covers.

Schotsch, Margaret Jones (Greer, SC); Kirkpatrick, Francis Lawrence (late of Galway, NY); Lapine, Eric Michael (Northwood, NH)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Vortex Formation in a Plasma Interacting with Neutral Flow  

SciTech Connect

Recently, it has been observed that there exists a class of vortices which rotates in the opposite direction to ExB drift (referred to as anti-ExB vortex). This result suggests that a predominant force other than electric field is acting on ions. It is found that momentum transport and resultant force generation through the interaction between ions and neutral flow play an essential role on anti-ExB vortex formation. The existence of inward neutral flow, which drives the ions in the anti-ExB direction, has been confirmed using a newly-developed high-resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy system.

Tanaka, M. Y.; Ogiwara, K.; Etoh, S. [Department of High Energy Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga-koen 6-1, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Aramaki, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshimura, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi 322-6, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Varanjes, J. [Center for Plasma Astrophysics, Celestijnenlaan 200 B 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Laboratory Analysis of Vortex Dynamics For Shallow Tidal Inlets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF VORTEX DYNAMICS FOR SHALLOW TIDAL INLETS A Thesis by KERRI ANN WHILDEN Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2009... Major Subject: Ocean Engineering LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF VORTEX DYNAMICS FOR SHALLOW TIDAL INLETS A Thesis by KERRI ANN WHILDEN Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree...

Whilden, Kerri Ann

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

195

Revival of Classical Vortex Generators Now for Transition Delay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Classical vortex generators, known for their efficiency in delaying or even inhibiting boundary layer separation, are here shown to be coveted devices for transition to turbulence delay. The present devices are miniature with respect to classical vortex generators but are tremendously powerful in modulating the laminar boundary layer in the direction orthogonal to the base flow and parallel to the surface. The modulation generates an additional term in the perturbation energy equation, which counteracts the wall-normal production term and, hence, stabilizes the flow. Our experimental results show that these devices are really effective in delaying transition, but we also reveal their Achilles’ heel.

Shahab Shahinfar; Sohrab S. Sattarzadeh; Jens H. M. Fransson; Alessandro Talamelli

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

196

Projectivities and Projective Embeddings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, we aim to prove some of the main achievements in the theory of generalized polygons. First, we want to show what the little projective group and the groups of projectivities of some Moufang po...

Hendrik van Maldeghem

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Project Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Questions Keeler-Pennwalt Wood Pole Removal Line Projects Line Rebuild, Relocation and Substation Projects Spacer Damper Replacement Program Wind Projects Project Overview BPA...

198

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operators, matrix indexing, vector computations, loops, functions, and plotting graphs, among others basic arithmetic operators, matrix indexing, and vector computations in MATLAB. After creatingProject Year 2011-2012 Project Title Online Tutorial for MATLAB Project Team Eileen Haase, Whiting

Gray, Jeffrey J.

199

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Year 2005 Project Team Krysia Hudson, Faculty, School of Nursing, Undergraduate Instruction for Educational Resources Project Title Enhanced Web-based Learning Environments for Beginning Nursing Students (e.g., demonstrations of procedures or tasks) into the WBL systems, it will be possible to increase

Gray, Jeffrey J.

200

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Michael McCloskey, Cognitive Science/Neuroscience, Krieger of Arts & Sciences Project Title Cognitive Neuropsychology Audience The initial audience to access. The current procedure calls for individual students or researchers to contact the faculty member

Gray, Jeffrey J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Year 2011-2012 Project Title Using M-Health and GIS Technology in the Field to Improve into teams and having each team use a different m-health data collection tool (e.g., cellular phones, smart health patterns. The Tech Fellow, Jacqueline Ferguson, will assist in creating an m-health project

Gray, Jeffrey J.

202

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Gregory Hager, Computer Science, Whiting School of Engineering Fellow: Alan Chen, Biomedical Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering Project Title Robotics is complicated, time-consuming, and costly, making a robot for an introductory-level class is not practical

Gray, Jeffrey J.

203

Project Proposal Project Logistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Proposal · Project Logistics: ­ 2-3 person teams ­ Significant implementation, worth 55 and anticipated cost of copying to/from host memory. IV. Intellectual Challenges - Generally, what makes this computation worthy of a project? - Point to any difficulties you anticipate at present in achieving high

Hall, Mary W.

204

Field dependence of the vortex structure in d-wave and s-wave superconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the vortex structure and its field dependence within the framework of the quasiclassical Eilenberger theory to find the difference between the dx2-y2- and s-wave pairings. We clarify the effect of the dx2-y2-wave nature and the vortex lattice effect on the vortex structure of the pair potential, the internal field and the local density of states. The dx2-y2-wave pairing introduces a fourfold-symmetric structure around each vortex core. With increasing field, their contribution becomes significant to the whole structure of the vortex lattice state, depending on the vortex lattice’s configuration. It is reflected in the form factor of the internal field, which may be detected by small-angle neutron scattering, or the resonance line shape of muon spin resonance and NMR experiments. We also study the induced s- and dxy-wave components around the vortex in dx2-y2-wave superconductors.

Masanori Ichioka; Akiko Hasegawa; Kazushige Machida

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Role of the core energy in the vortex Nernst effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present an analytical study of diamagnetism and transport in a film with superconducting phase fluctuations, formulated in terms of vortex dynamics within the Debye-Hückel approximation. We find that the diamagnetic and Nernst signals decay strongly with temperature in a manner that is dictated by the vortex core energy. Using the theory to interpret Nernst measurements of underdoped La2?xSrxCuO4 above the critical temperature regime, we obtain a considerably better fit to the data than a fit based on Gaussian order-parameter fluctuations. Our results indicate that the core energy in this system scales roughly with the critical temperature and is significantly smaller than expected from BCS theory. Furthermore, it is necessary to assume that the vortex mobility is much larger than the Bardeen-Stephen value in order to reconcile conductivity measurements with the same vortex picture. Therefore, either the Nernst signal is not due to fluctuating vortices, or vortices in underdoped La2?xSrxCuO4 have highly unconventional properties.

Gideon Wachtel and Dror Orgad

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

206

New vortex ring configurations for the MAP dyon solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrically charged magnetic solutions of SU (2) Yang-Mills-Higgs theory with net zero topological charge has been obtained as axially symmetric saddle-point solutions in Ref. [1]. These solutions are characterized by an integer the winding number n of their azimuthal angle ? and an electric charge parameter 0vortex ring configuration with n=2 ?=0.65 and varying Higgs field strength. Our observations showed that beside the fundamental solution which is an electrically charged MAP solution there also exist two other branches of eclectically charged vortex ring solutions which both appear at ?=20.45. The difference in total energy between these two branches of solution is very small but the difference in diameter of vortex rings of the two branches is quite significant. Finding of a branching phenomena in presence of a fundamental MAP solution has been for the first time. In Ref. [2] new branching solutions occur for the electrically neutral case in presence of fundamental vortex ring solutions but not for the fundamental MAP solution.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Creation and pinning of vortex-antivortex pairs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer modeling is reported about the creation and pinning of a magnetic vortex-antivortex (V-AV) pair in a superconducting thin film, due to the magnetic field of a vertical magnetic dipole above the film, and two antidot pins inside the film...

Kim, Sangbum; Hu, Chia-Ren; Andrews, Malcolm J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Vortex trimer in three-component Bose-Einstein condensates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vortex trimer is predicted in three-component Bose-Einstein condensates with internal coherent couplings. The molecule is made by three constituent vortices which are bounded by domain walls of the relative phases. We show that the shape and the size of the molecule can be controlled by changing the internal coherent couplings.

Minoru Eto; Muneto Nitta

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

High-Resolution Simulations of Parallel BladeVortex Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= perturbation pressure coefficient, p ps= 1 2 1U2 1 c = rotor blade chord p = instantaneous airfoil surface­vortex interaction computations Introduction A MAJOR source of rotorcraft noise is generated by the rotor blades on the rotor blades. BVI noise is especially important because it is known to propagate out

Alonso, Juan J.

210

WAVE-VORTEX INTERACTIONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE, AND CLIMATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parcel dynamics, linear modes, balan- ced models, gravity waves, weather and climate prediction Introduction Numerical weather and climate prediction is complicated because only the flow scales larger thanWAVE-VORTEX INTERACTIONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE, AND CLIMATE PREDICTION Onno Bokhove Numerical Analysis

Vellekoop, Michel

211

Modified Black Hole with Polar Jet and Vortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many models relating an accretion disk of Black Hole to jet outflow. The herein heuristic model describes the continuation of an external accretion disk to an internal accretion disk for less than Black Hole horizon, and subsequent polar jet outflow along polar axis out of polar vortex wherein the event horizon is no longer descriptive.

T. Tmmalm

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

Vortex strings in electric dipole radiation near a mirror  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The energy flow pattern of the radiation emitted by an oscillating electric dipole near a mirror has a complicated structure, including numerous singularities and vortices. We consider the flow lines of energy in the plane through the surface normal and the oscillation direction of the dipole. It is shown that the vortices are due to the vanishing of the magnetic field at their centers. The locations of the vortices have the appearance of beads on strings, and there are four such strings. The rotation direction of the energy flow for each vortex on a given string is the same. There are two strings with clockwise rotation and two strings with counterclockwise rotation. Field lines of energy flow either start or end at the center of a vortex. For a given string, field lines end at each vortex or field lines start at each vortex. There are two strings on which field lines end at the centers of the vortices, and there are two strings on which field lines start inside the vortices.

Xin Li; Henk F. Arnoldus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Ultrasonic Concentration in a Line-Driven Cylindrical Tube  

SciTech Connect

The fractionation of particles from their suspending fluid or noninvasive micromanipulation of particles in suspension has many applications ranging from the recovery of valuable reagents from process flows to the fabrication of microelectromechanical devices. Techniques based on size, density, solubility, or electromagnetic properties exist for fulfilling these needs, but many particles have traits that preclude their use such as small size, neutral buoyancy, or uniform electromagnetic characteristics. While separation by those techniques may not be possible, often compressibility differences exist between the particle and fluid that would allow fractionation by acoustic forces. The potential of acoustic separation is known, but due to inherent difficulties in achieving and maintaining accurate alignment of the transduction system, it is rarely utilized. The objective of this project is to investigate the use of structural excitation as a potentially efficient concentration/fractionation method for particles in suspension. It is demonstrated that structural excitation of a cylindrically symmetric cavity, such as a tube, allows non-invasive, fast, and low power concentration of particles suspended in a fluid. The inherent symmetry of the system eliminates the need for careful alignment inherent in current acoustic concentration devices. Structural excitation distributes the acoustic field throughout the volume of the cavity, which also significantly reduces temperature gradients and acoustic streaming in the fluid; cavitation is no longer an issue. The lowest-order coupled modes of a long cylindrical glass tube and fluid-filled cavity, driven by a line contact, are tuned, via material properties and aspect ratio, to achieve a coupled dipolar vibration of the system, shown to generate efficient concentration of particles to the central axis of the tube. A two dimensional elastodynamic model of the system was developed and subsequently utilized to optimize particle concentration within the system. The effects of tubing, fluid, and particle material properties, tube geometry, fluid flow, and tube length on the structural excitation and consequently power requirements and concentration quality within the tube were investigated theoretically and experimentally. Limitations of the method are discussed, as well as ways to minimize or compensate for deleterious effects. Finally a preliminary demonstration of the efficacy of acoustic concentration is presented.

G.R. Goddard

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Large Diameter Lasing Tube Cooling Arrangement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling structure (16) for use inside a ceramic cylindrical tube (11) of a metal vapor laser (10) to cool the plasma in the tube (11), the cooling structure (16) comprising a plurality of circular metal members (17,31) and mounting members (18, 34) that position the metal members (17,31) coaxially in the tube (11) to form an annular lasing volume, with the metal members (17, 31) being axially spaced from each other along the length of the tube (11) to prevent the metal members from shorting out the current flow through the plasma in the tube (11) and to provide spaces through which the heat from localized hot spots in the plasma may radiate to the other side of the tube (11).

Hall, Jerome P.; Alger, Terry W.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Arnold, Philip A.

2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

215

Tube support grid and spacer therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tube support grid and spacers therefor provide radially inward preloading of heat exchange tubes to minimize stress upon base welds due to differential thermal expansion. The grid comprises a concentric series of rings and spacers with opposing concave sides for conforming to the tubes and V-shaped ends to provide resilient flexibility. The flexibility aids in assembly and in transmitting seismic vibrations from the tubes to a shroud. The tube support grid may be assembled in place to achieve the desired inwardly radial preloading of the heat exchange tubes. Tab and slot assembly further minimizes stresses in the system. The radii of the grid rings may be preselected to effect the desired radially inward preloading.

Ringsmuth, Richard J. (Solano Beach, CA); Kaufman, Jay S. (Del Mar, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A Built for Purpose Micro-Hole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR)  

SciTech Connect

This report will serve as the final report on the work performed from the contract period October 2005 thru April 2007. The project 'A Built for Purpose Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR)' purpose was to upgrade an existing state-of-the-art Coiled Tubing Drilling Rig to a Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) capable of meeting the specifications and tasks of the Department of Energy. The individual tasks outlined to meet the Department of Energy's specifications are: (1) Concept and development of lubricator and tool deployment system; (2) Concept and development of process control and data acquisition; (3) Concept and development of safety and efficiency improvements; and (4) Final unit integration and testing. The end result of the MCTR upgrade has produced a unit capable of meeting the following requirements: (1) Capable of handling 1-inch through 2-3/8-inch coiled tubing (Currently dressed for 2-3/8-inch coiled tubing and capable of running up to 3-1/2-inch coiled tubing); (2) Capable of drilling and casing surface, intermediate, production and liner hole intervals; (3) Capable of drilling with coiled tubing and has all controls and installation piping for a top drive; (4) Rig is capable of running 7-5/8-inch range 2 casing; and (5) Capable of drilling 5,000 ft true vertical depth (TVD) and 6,000 ft true measured depth (TMD).

Bart Patton

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

Sampling artifacts from conductive silicone tubing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sampling artifacts from conductive silicone tubing Sampling artifacts from conductive silicone tubing Title Sampling artifacts from conductive silicone tubing Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Timko, Michael T., Zhenhong Yu, Jesse Kroll, John T. Jayne, Douglas R. Worsnop, Richard C. Miake-Lye, Timothy B. Onasch, David Liscinsky, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Hugo Destaillats, Amara L. Holder, Jared D. Smith, and Kevin R. Wilson Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 43 Issue 9 Pagination 855-865 Date Published 06/03/2009 Abstract We report evidence that carbon impregnated conductive silicone tubing used in aerosol sampling systems can introduce two types of experimental artifacts: (1) silicon tubing dynamically absorbs carbon dioxide gas, requiring greater than 5 minutes to reach equilibrium and (2) silicone tubing emits organic contaminants containing siloxane that are adsorbed onto particles traveling through it and onto downstream quartz fiber filters. The consequence can be substantial for engine exhaust measurements as both artifacts directly impact calculations of particulate mass-based emission indices. The emission of contaminants from the silicone tubing can result in overestimation of organic particle mass concentrations based on real-time aerosol mass spectrometry and the off-line thermal analysis of quartz filters. The adsorption of siloxane contaminants can affect the surface properties of aerosol particles; we observed a marked reduction in the water-affinity of soot particles passed through conductive silicone tubing. These combined observations suggest that the silicone tubing artifacts may have wide consequence for the aerosol community and the tubing should, therefore, be used with caution. Contamination associated with the use of silicone tubing was observed at ambient temperature and, in some cases, was enhanced by mild heating (<70°C) or pre-exposure to a solvent (methanol). Further evaluation is warranted to quantify systematically how the contamination responds to variations in system temperature, physicochemical particle properties, exposure to solvent, sample contact time, tubing age, and sample flow rates.

218

Vortex motion in Josephson-junction arrays near f=0 and f=1/2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study vortex motion in two-dimensional Josephson arrays at magnetic fields near zero and one-half flux quanta per plaquette (f=0 and f=1/2). The array is modeled as a network of resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson junctions at temperature T=0. Calculations are carried out over a range of the McCumber-Stewart junction damping parameter ?. Near both f=0 and f=1/2, the I-V characteristics exhibit two critical currents, Ic1(f) and Ic2(f), representing the critical current for depinning a single vortex, and for depinning the entire ground-state phase configuration. Near f=0, single vortex motion just above Ic1(0) leads to Josephson-like voltage oscillations. The motion of the vortex is seemingly overdamped (i.e., nonhysteretic) even when the individual junction parameters are highly underdamped, in agreement with experiments. At sufficiently large ?, and sufficiently high vortex velocity, the vortex breaks up into a row of resistively switched junctions perpendicular to the current. Near f=1/2, the vortex potential, and corresponding vortex trajectories, are more complicated than near f=0. Nevertheless, the vortex is still ‘‘overdamped’’ even when the individual junctions are highly underdamped, and there is still row-switching behavior at large values of ?. A high-energy vortex in a very underdamped array tends to generate resistively switched rows rather than to move ballistically. Some possible explanations for this behavior are discussed.

Wenbin Yu; K. H. Lee; D. Stroud

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Leakage-flow-induced vibration of a tube-in-tube slip joint. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

The susceptibility of a cantilevered tube conveying water to self-excitation by leakage flow through a slip joint is assessed experimentally. The slip joint is formed by inserting a smaller, rigid tube into the free end of the cantilevered tube. Variations of the slip joint annular gaps and engagement lengths are tested, and several mechanisms for self-excitation are described.

Mulcahy, T.M.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

NETL: Deepwater Technology Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deepwater Technology Deepwater Technology Deepwater Technology Offshore Architecture | Safety & Environmental | Other UDW Technology | Completed DW Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer 10121-4306-01 All Electric Subsea Autonomous High Integrity Pressure Protection System (HIPPS) Architecture GE Global Research 10121-4401-02 Ultra-Deepwater Riser Concepts for High Motion Vessels Stress Engineering Services, Inc. 10121-4405-02 Ultra-deepwater Dry Tree System for Drilling and Production in the Gulf of Mexico Det Norske Veritas 10121-4505-01 Coil Tubing Drilling and Intervention System Using Cost Effective Vessel Nautilus International, LLC 09121-3500-01 Intelligent Production System for Ultra-Deepwater with Short Hop Wireless Power and Wireless Data Transfer for Lateral Production Control and Optimization

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Relationship between heat transfer intensity and absolute vorticity flux intensity in flat tube bank fin channels with Vortex Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heat transfer enhancement can be achieved through the secondary flow. It is found that absolute vorticity flux along the main flow can describe the secondary flow intensity and correspond to the heat transfer enhancement averaged in span wise direction. Investigations to verify this phenomenon are reported. The results show that there has a similar distribution for absolute vorticity flux in the main flow direction compared with that for span averaged Nusselt number. The conformance of Nusselt number and absolute vorticity flux shows that absolute vorticity flux can reflect the intensity of heat transfer produced by the secondary flow.

Ke-Wei Song; Liang-Bi Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Characterization of stainless steel 304 tubing  

SciTech Connect

Earlier studies have shown that stainless steel 304 (SS304) containing martensite is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. This generated concern regarding the structural integrity of SS304 tubing we use in the W87 pit tube. During surveillance operations, the pit tube undergoes a series of bending and straightening as it goes through a number of surveillance cycles. This motivated the study to characterize austenitic SS304 tubing obtained from Rocky Flats. The tubes continued to display structural soundness even after numerous repeated bending and straightening cycles. The minimum and maximum number of bends to failure occurred after 13 and 16 cycles, respectively. After 5 bends, both the inner and outer surfaces of the tubing showed no microcracks. When the bent tubing samples were pressurized and tested using deuterium at 74{degrees}C and at {approximately}78{degrees}C, they failed away from the bent area. Thus deuterium embrittlement of the bent SS304 tubing should not be a problem. Moreover, to increase our 95% confidence level to 5 bends, we are planning to perform at least four additional bends to failure tests.

Sunwoo, A.J.; Brooks, M.A.; Kervin, J.E.

1995-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

Sampling Artifacts from Conductive Silicone Tubing  

SciTech Connect

We report evidence that carbon impregnated conductive silicone tubing used in aerosol sampling systems can introduce two types of experimental artifacts: 1) silicon tubing dynamically absorbs carbon dioxide gas, requiring greater than 5 minutes to reach equilibrium and 2) silicone tubing emits organic contaminants containing siloxane that adsorb onto particles traveling through it and onto downstream quartz fiber filters. The consequence can be substantial for engine exhaust measurements as both artifacts directly impact calculations of particulate mass-based emission indices. The emission of contaminants from the silicone tubing can result in overestimation of organic particle mass concentrations based on real-time aerosol mass spectrometry and the off-line thermal analysis of quartz filters. The adsorption of siloxane contaminants can affect the surface properties of aerosol particles; we observed a marked reduction in the water-affinity of soot particles passed through conductive silicone tubing. These combined observations suggest that the silicone tubing artifacts may have wide consequence for the aerosol community and should, therefore, be used with caution. Gentle heating, physical and chemical properties of the particle carriers, exposure to solvents, and tubing age may influence siloxane uptake. The amount of contamination is expected to increase as the tubing surface area increases and as the particle surface area increases. The effect is observed at ambient temperature and enhanced by mild heating (<100 oC). Further evaluation is warranted.

Timko, Michael T.; Yu, Zhenhong; Kroll, Jesse; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Miake-Lye, Richard C.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Liscinsky, David; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Destaillats, Hugo; Holder, Amara L.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Vortex properties in superconducting Nb/Pd multilayers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have investigated the upper critical magnetic field Hc2, the critical current density Jc, and the pinning force Fp in sputtered Nb/Pd multilayers, varying the temperatures T, the Pd thicknesses dPd and the magnetic field H orientation (parallel and perpendicular to the plane of the sample). In perpendicular fields, the vortex dynamics was strongly influenced by grain-boundary pinning. In parallel fields, a peak was observed in the Jc(H) curves for samples with Pd thicknesses dPd>100 Å. After comparing the experimental results with the existing theories, we have related the presence of this peak effect to the matching of vortex kinks with the layered artificial structure.

C. Coccorese; C. Attanasio; L. V. Mercaldo; M. Salvato; L. Maritato; J. M. Slaughter; C. M. Falco; S. L. Prischepa; B. I. Ivlev

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Higher Derivative Corrections to Non-Abelian Vortex Effective Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a systematic method to calculate higher derivative corrections to low-energy effective theories of solitons, which are in general non-linear sigma models on the moduli spaces of the solitons. By applying it to the effective theory of a single BPS non-Abelian vortex in U(N) gauge theory with N fundamental Higgs fields, we obtain four derivative corrections to the effective sigma model on the moduli space C \\times CP^{N-1}. We compare them with the Nambu-Goto action and the Faddeev-Skyrme model. We also show that Yang-Mills instantons/monopoles trapped inside a non-Abelian vortex membrane/string are not modified in the presence of higher derivative terms.

Minoru Eto; Toshiaki Fujimori; Muneto Nitta; Keisuke Ohashi; Norisuke Sakai

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

226

Precession of a single vortex line in superfluid B3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the discovery of a new vortex phenomenon in superfluid B3. A single filament of quantized vortex line precesses as a solid body around a wire extending along the axis of a cylinder. The precession frequency equals the angular velocity of the apparatus at which the presence of a single quantum of circulation minimizes the system’s free energy. The period of precession is related to the circulation quantum and the dimensions of the apparatus. Thus a measurement of the precession period is an accurate determination of the quantum unit. We find ?=(1.020±0.03)h/2m3, where m3 is the mass of the He3 atom.

R. J. Zieve; Yu. Mukharsky; J. D. Close; J. C. Davis; R. E. Packard

1992-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

227

MHK Technologies/Vortex Oscillation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oscillation Oscillation < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Vortex Oscillation.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Vortex Oscillation Technology Ltd Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description If cylinder or another body is fixed on a moving bonding this force can set the body or its separate parts into oscillation e g elastic slat If the system of mechanical energy output is organized correctly this device can be considered as generator Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 08:12.7 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from

228

Vortex energy and 360 Neel walls in thinfilm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.Ignat@math.u-psud.fr) Courant Institute, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA (e-mail: knuepfer@cims.nyu.edu) 1 #12Vortex energy and 360 ­N´eel walls in thin­film micromagnetics Radu Ignat , Hans Kn¨upfer October-section. The model is based on the following energy functional: E2d (m) = Z B2 |m|2 dx + | ln | 2 Z R2 ||-1

229

Coherence Current, Coherence Vortex, and the Conservation Law of Coherence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Introducing scalar and vector densities for a mutual coherence function, we present a new conservation law for optical coherence of scalar wave fields in the form of a continuity equation. This coherence conservation law provides new insights into topological phenomena for the complex coherence function. Some properties related to the newly introduced coherence vector density, such as a circulating coherence current associated with a coherence vortex, are investigated both theoretically and experimentally for the first time.

Wei Wang and Mitsuo Takeda

2006-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

230

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Ian Sims, Student, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering Project Title and Jazz Theory/Keyboard I & II. Technologies Used Digital Audio, Digital Video, Graphic Design, HTML

Gray, Jeffrey J.

231

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling DE-FC26-03NT15476 Project Goal The goal of the project is to develop an innovative mud system for coiled tubing drilling (CTD) and small-diameter holes (microholes) for vertical, horizontal and multilateral drilling and completion applications. The system will be able to mix the required fluids (water, oil, chemicals, muds, slurries), circulate that mixture downhole (modified 350 gpm @1,000 psi and 15 gpm@ 5,000 psi), clean and store (200 bbls) the base fluids, and be able to perform these functions in an underbalanced condition with zero discharge and low environmental impact. Another primary and most important goal of this project is to develop key components for a new abrasive slurry drilling system.

232

Summer Student Project Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

My project covered a preliminary R&D phase in which an HPD tube with 163-pixels and external readout was tested. The external readout electronics were based on the existing Beetle front-end chip. The HPD performance for single-photon detection was assessed. The experimental setup made use of a fast laser light sources and an electronics readout chain specifically developed for laboratory tests. In parallel to the measurements, I improved the software which was used to make measurements and to display the data in a useful way.

Kazan, Oguz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The STACEE Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a telescope designed to explore the gamma-ray sky between 20 and 250 GeV using the atmospheric Cherenkov technique. STACEE is currently under construction. When completed, it will use 48 large heliostat mirrors at the solar research facility at Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM) to reflect Cherenkov light created in gamma-ray air showers to secondary mirrors on a central tower. The secondary mirrors image this light onto photomultiplier tube cameras. This paper provides an overview of the STACEE project, including a description of the experimental site and an outline of the current design for the detector components.

Ong, R A; Ong, Rene A.; Covault, Corbin E.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The STACEE Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a telescope designed to explore the gamma-ray sky between 20 and 250 GeV using the atmospheric Cherenkov technique. STACEE is currently under construction. When completed, it will use 48 large heliostat mirrors at the solar research facility at Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM) to reflect Cherenkov light created in gamma-ray air showers to secondary mirrors on a central tower. The secondary mirrors image this light onto photomultiplier tube cameras. This paper provides an overview of the STACEE project, including a description of the experimental site and an outline of the current design for the detector components.

Rene A. Ong; Corbin E. Covault

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

235

Coherence Holography and Spatial Frequency Comb for 3-D Coherence Imaging and Coherence Vortex Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The principle and the applications of a recently proposed unconventional holography technique, coherence holography, applied for coherence vortex generation, and a related technique...

Takeda, Mitsuo; Wang, Wei; Duan, Zhihui; Miyamoto, Yoko; Rosen, Joseph

236

Vortex shedding from square plates near a ground plane: an experimental study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vortex shedding frequencies were obtained experimentally for square plates near a ground plane in the Texas Tech wind tunnel. These frequencies, in the form of… (more)

Matty, Rosemary Ricohermoso

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Rotational Doppler-effect due to selective excitation of vector-vortex field in optical fiber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental demonstration of rotational Doppler-effect due to direct and simultaneous excitation of orthogonal elliptically-polarized fundamental and vortex modes in a two-mode...

Inavalli, V V G Krishna; Viswanathan, Nirmal K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Multi-tube fuel nozzle with mixing features  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes a multi-tube fuel nozzle having an inlet plate and a plurality of tubes adjacent the inlet plate. The inlet plate includes a plurality of apertures, and each aperture includes an inlet feature. Each tube of the plurality of tubes is coupled to an aperture of the plurality of apertures. The multi-tube fuel nozzle includes a differential configuration of inlet features among the plurality of tubes.

Hughes, Michael John

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

239

Detonation limits in rough walled tubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present paper reports the results of a study of detonation limits in rough tubes. Detonation velocity is measured by photodiodes and ionization probes spaced at 10 cm intervals along the length of the tube. Short lengths of smoked foils inserted into the core of the rough tube is used to register the structure of the detonation wave. Pressure transducers are also used to obtain the pressure profile. The results indicate that in rough tubes, the detonation velocity is generally much lower than the corresponding values for smooth tubes. The velocity decreases slowly at first and then more rapidly as the limit is approached. The velocity variation is generally continuous and at the limits, the failure velocity is of the order of about 0.4 V CJ for all cases. The detonation limits in rough tubes are found to be wider than for a smooth tube. This indicates that the turbulence generated by the wall roughness facilitates the propagation of the detonation and extends the limits. Smoked foil records show that in the core of the rough tube the detonation front has a cellular structure corresponding to the usual cellular structure due to instability of the detonation. Thus the intrinsic unstable cellular structure is quite robust and retains its global characteristics in spite of the large perturbations generated by the rough wall. The detonation in the core of the rough tube goes from multi-headed to single headed as the limit is approached. Past the single headed spin, the low velocity detonation has no cellular structure but consists of interacting weak transverse waves from the rough wall. The averaged pressure of the low velocity detonation front corresponds to about the constant volume explosion pressure, in accord with the velocity of the low velocity detonation.

Amanda Starr; John H.S. Lee; Hoi Dick Ng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Alternative Electrostatic Green's Function for a Long Tube. ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Electrostatic Green's Function for a Long Tube. Alternative Electrostatic Green's Function for a Long Tube. Abstract: This note describes an expression for the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Starter for inductively coupled plasma tube  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A starter assembly is provided for use with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) tube to reliably initiate a plasma at internal pressures above about 30 microns. A conductive probe is inserted within the inductor coil about the tube and insulated from the tube shield assembly. A capacitive circuit is arranged for momentarily connecting a high voltage radio-frequency generator to the probe while simultaneously energizing the coil. When the plasma is initiated the probe is disconnected from the generator and electrically connected to the shield assembly for operation. 1 fig.

Hull, D.E.; Bieniewski, T.M.

1988-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £1.1M Funding Source: Departmental Construction Project Programme: Start on Site: November 2010 End Date : March 2011 Occupation Date: March 2011 For further information contact Project Manager as listed above

243

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: The works cover the refurbishment of floors 4, 5 operating theatre. The Bionanotechnology Centre is one of the projects funded from the UK Government's £20.imperial.ac.uk/biomedeng Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £13,095,963 Funding Source: SRIF II and Capital

244

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: This project refurbished half of the 5th and 7th floors on the Faculty of Medicine, please visit: http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/ Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £3,500,000 Funding Source: SRIF III Construction Project Programme: Start

245

Frictional forces in helical buckling of tubing  

SciTech Connect

Previous analyses of helical buckling of tubing have not considered frictional forces. This paper describes the modifications to helical buckling theory necessary to include friction. The first need is a relationship between the buckling force and the casing to tubing contact force. This contact force is determined through use of the principle of virtual work. The next need is the relationship between the friction forces, the buckling force, and the geometry of the tubing helix. Differential equations are derived and solved for two cases of interest: buckling during the landing of the tubing and thermal and differential pressure loading subsequent to landing. Several example problems are examined to evaluate the relative importance of friction.

Mitchell, R.F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Impedance tube measurements of printed porous materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An impedance tube has been used to make measurements of the acoustic impedance of porous samples. Porous with designed porosities and tortuosities have been produced using 3D printing. Measured impedances are compared to calculated values.

Carl Frederickson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Sample inlet tube for ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved inlet tube is positioned within an aperture through the device to allow the passage of ions from the ion source, through the improved inlet tube, and into the interior of the device. The inlet tube is designed with a larger end and a smaller end wherein the larger end has a larger interior diameter than the interior diameter of the smaller end. The inlet tube is positioned within the aperture such that the larger end is pointed towards the ion source, to receive ions therefrom, and the smaller end is directed towards the interior of the device, to deliver the ions thereto. Preferably, the ion source utilized in the operation of the present invention is a standard electrospray ionization source. Similarly, the present invention finds particular utility in conjunction with analytical devices such as mass spectrometers.

Prior, David [Hermiston, OR; Price, John [Richland, WA; Bruce, Jim [Oceanside, CA

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

248

Magnetic field lines for a flux tube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Equations for the magnetic field components in a two dimensional cylindrically symmetric ... in a simple case, solved. The resulting magnetic configuration possesses a strong magnetic field in a thin tube below a...

C. D. C. Steele; Rekha Jain

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Forced-convection condensation inside tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High vapor velocity condensation inside a tube was studied analytically. The von Karman universal velocity distribution was applied to the condensate flow, pressure drops were calculated using the Lockhart- Martinelli ...

Traviss, Donald P.

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Floor tube corrosion in recovery boilers  

SciTech Connect

Lower sulfur emissions at a pulp mill result in higher sulfidity levels and in the enrichment of potassium in the mill`s liquor system. The sulfidity values at Scandinavian kraft mills previously fluctuated between 28 and 35%; today they exceed 45%. Viscosity measurements show that the viscosity decreases drastically when the sulfidity increases from 30 mole% to 40 mole%, its potassium and chlorine levels are high enough, and the char bed is low, the smelt flows easily and may penetrate the char bed, approaching the floor tubes. In extreme cases, the hot smelt destroys the layer of solidified smelt on the floor tube`s surface and reacts very rapidly with the floor tube.

Klarin, A. [A. Ahistrom Corp., Helsinki (Finland)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Controlled Thermal-Mechanical Processing of Tubes and Pipes for Enhanced Manufacturing and Performance  

SciTech Connect

The Alloy Steel Business of The Timken Company won an award for the controlled thermo-mechanical processing (CTMP) project and assembled a strong international public/private partnership to execute the project. The premise of the CTMP work was to combine Timken's product understanding with its process expertise and knowledge of metallurgical and deformation fundamentals developed during the project to build a predictive process design capability. The CTMP effort succeeded in delivering a pc-based capability in the tube optimization model, with a virtual pilot plant (VPP) feature to represent the desired tube making process to predict the resultant microstructure tailored for the desired application. Additional tasks included a system for direct, online measurement of grain size and demonstration of application of CTMP via robotically enhanced manufacturing.

Kolarik, Robert V.

2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

252

Vortex-induced vibration of a circular cylinder with combined in-line and cross-flow motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deep water, string-like, marine risers subject to strong ocean currents, suffer from vortex-induced vibrations (VIV), where vortex shedding interacts with the structural properties of the riser, resulting in large amplitude ...

Dahl, Jason (Jason Michael)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Generalized correlation for foam flow in tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GENERALIZED CORRELATION FOR FOAM FLOW IN TUBES A Thesis by CAROL LYNNETTE COTTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December.... (December 1996) Carol Lynnette Cotter, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Raymond W. Flumerfelt A novel experimental procedure to determine the behavior of foam flow in tubes is established. Using an approach developed...

Cotter, Carol Lynnette

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

Soft pion emission from fat flux tubes  

SciTech Connect

The emission of pions from multiquark flux tubes is examined as an explanation of the soft pion puzzle. Although the soft pion spectra from the decay of fat flux tubes can account for some low {ital p}{sub {perpendicular}} enhancement, the dependence on the number of involved quarks is too weak to provide a plausible explanation of the observed enhancement in the pion spectrum at low transverse momenta.

Kusnezov, D.; Danielewicz, P. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (USA))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Engineer's Guide to the Structures of Baltimore Audience Students from the Krieger School of Arts City, interfaced through a course website, the team will integrate descriptions of structural behavior format. Technologies Used HTML/Web Design, MySQL Project Abstract Structural analysis is typically taught

Gray, Jeffrey J.

256

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information systems (GIS) tools to design maps that integrate data for visualizing geographic concepts School of Engineering Project Title GIS & Introductory Geography Audience Undergraduate students on how to use the Internet for geographic research, and an interactive introduction to GIS through online

Gray, Jeffrey J.

257

Project Management Project Managment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Inspired by agile methods #12;Background · Large-scale software development & IT projects, plagued relations #12;One Agile Approach to Scheduling · The creative nature of game development resist heavy up Problems ­incompatible platforms, 3rd party etc. #12;Is Games Development Similar? · Yes & No

Stephenson, Ben

258

Tube construction for fluidized bed combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed combustor comprises a reactor or a housing which has a windbox distributor plate adjacent the lower end thereof which contains a multiplicity of hole and air discharge nozzles for discharging air and coal into a fluidized bed which is maintained above the distributor plate and below a take-off connection or flue to a cyclone separator in which some of the products of combustion are treated to remove the dust which is returned into the fluidized bed. A windbox is spaced below the fluidized bed and it has a plurality of tubes passing therethrough with the passage of combustion air and fluidizing air which passes through an air space so that fluidizing air is discharged into the reaction chamber fluidized bed at the bottom thereof to maintain the bed in a fluidized condition. A fluid, such as air, is passed through the tubes which extend through the windbox and provide a preheating of the combustion air and into an annular space between telescoped inner and outer tubes which comprise heat exchanger tubes or cooling tubes which extend upwardly through the distributor plate into the fluidized bed. The heat exchanger tubes are advantageously arranged so that they may be exposed in groups within the reactor in a cluster which is arranged within holding rings.

De Feo, Angelo (Totowa, NJ); Hosek, William (Mt. Tabor, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Fluidized bed combustor and tube construction therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed combustor comprises a reactor or a housing which has a windbox distributor plate adjacent the lower end thereof which contains a multiplicity of hole and air discharge nozzles for discharging air and coal into a fluidized bed which is maintained above the distributor plate and below a take-off connection or flue to a cyclone separator in which some of the products of combustion are treated to remove the dust which is returned into the fluidized bed. A windbox is spaced below the fluidized bed and it has a plurality of tubes passing therethrough with the passage of combustion air and fluidizing air which passes through an air space so that fluidizing air is discharged into the reaction chamber fluidized bed at the bottom thereof to maintain the bed in a fluidized condition. A fluid, such as air, is passed through the tubes which extend through the windbox and provide a preheating of the combustion air and into an annular space between telescoped inner and outer tubes which comprise heat exchanger tubes or cooling tubes which extend upwardly through the distributor plate into the fluidized bed. The heat exchanger tubes are advantageously arranged so that they may be exposed in groups within the reactor in a cluster which is arranged within holding rings.

De Feo, Angelo (Passaic, NJ); Hosek, William (Morris, NJ)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

van Hove singularities and vortex motion in superconductors B. I. Ivlev,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

´ 78000, Mexico Received 16 February 2001; published 18 June 2001 When vortices move in a type by an electric current, any peculiarity of the vortex radiation friction due to emission of acoustic waves vortices. When a vortex moves under the action of a transport electric current, an electric field

Kunchur, Milind N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Magnetization reversal via single and double vortex states in submicron Permalloy ellipses P. Vavassori,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetization reversal via single and double vortex states in submicron Permalloy ellipses P University, Ithaca, New York, USA Received December 5, 2003; published 3 June 2004 The magnetization reversal of the magnetic field and to occur via the formation of one or two vortices; the one vortex state is nucleated

Metlushko, Vitali

262

Nucleation-controlled vortex entry in a square-columnar Josephson-junction array  

SciTech Connect

The initial magnetization curve of square-columnar Josephson-junction arrays is calculated from fundamental laws. It is found that the first vortex entry is controlled by vortex nucleation rather than surface depinning and it occurs at a field greater than that predicted by the traditional surface-barrier theory. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Chen, D.; Moreno, J.J.; Hernando, A. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, RENFE-UCM-CSIC, 28230 Las Rozas, Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, RENFE-UCM-CSIC, 28230 Las Rozas, Madrid (Spain)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Modeling bubble-vortex interactions Modeling and simulation of multiple bubble entrainment and interactions with two  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling bubble-vortex interactions Modeling and simulation of multiple bubble entrainment, OR 97331. (Dated: 5 November 2010) 1 #12;Modeling bubble-vortex interactions Simulations of bubble direct numerical simulation whereas motion of subgrid bubbles is modeled using Lagrangian track- ing

Apte, Sourabh V.

264

Generation and Propagation of InertiaGravity Waves from Vortex Dipoles and Jets SHUGUANG WANG*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation and Propagation of Inertia­Gravity Waves from Vortex Dipoles and Jets SHUGUANG WANG) ABSTRACT This study investigates gravity wave generation and propagation from jets within idealized vortex, geostrophic adjust- ment, and spontaneous generation (Fritts and Alexander 2003, and references therein

265

Stripe Domains and First-Order Phase Transition in the Vortex Matter of Anisotropic High-Temperature Superconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stripe Domains and First-Order Phase Transition in the Vortex Matter of Anisotropic High-Temperature temperature superconductor and reveal a sharp transition in the state of this phase resulting in regular that can subsequently melt at high temperatures to a vortex liquid, a pinned vortex glassy state that can

Alexei, Koshelev

266

Effect of time-dependent piston velocity program on vortex ring formation in a piston/cylinder arrangement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of time-dependent piston velocity program on vortex ring formation in a piston An analytical model describing laminar vortex ring formation in a nozzle flow generator piston/ cylinder.1063/1.2188918 I. INTRODUCTION Vortex rings are usually generated in the laboratory by the motion of a piston

Dabiri, John O.

267

Project Accounts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Project Accounts » Project Accounts Project Accounts Overview Project accounts are designed to facilitate collaborative computing by allowing multiple users to use the same account. All actions performed by the project account are traceable back to the individual who used the project account to perform those actions via gsisshd accounting logs. Requesting a Project Account PI's, PI proxies and project managers are allowed to request a project account. In NIM do "Actions->Request a Project Account" and fill in the form. Select the repository that the Project Account is to use from the drop-down menu, "Sponsoring Repository". Enter the name you want for the account (8 characters maximum) and a description of what you will use the account for and then click on the "Request Project Account" button. You

268

Quantum dynamics of a vortex in a Josephson junction  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the tunneling character of vortex in an asymmetrical potential well with a finite barrier by using the periodic instanton method. We obtain the total decay rate which is valid for the entire range of temperature and show how it reduces to the appropriate results for the classical thermal activation at high temperatures, the thermally assisted tunneling at intermediate temperatures, and the pure quantum tunneling at low temperature. We can even give the exact definition of the 'crossover' temperature and find experimental data to support our theoretical analysis.

Li Hong; Liu Wuming [Joint Laboratory of Advanced Technology in Measurements, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Shen Shunqing [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Liang Jiuqing [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Collective Effects in Vortex Movements in Complex Plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the onset and characteristics of vortices in complex (dusty) plasmas using two-dimensional simulations in a setup modeled after the PK-3 Plus laboratory. A small number of microparticles initially self-arranges in a monolayer around the void. As additional particles are introduced, an extended system of vortices develops due to a nonzero curl of the plasma forces. We demonstrate a shear-thinning effect in the vortices. Velocity structure functions and the energy and enstrophy spectra show that vortex flow turbulence is present that is in essence of the “classical” Kolmogorov type.

Mierk Schwabe, Sergey Zhdanov, Christoph Räth, David B. Graves, Hubertus M. Thomas, and Gregor E. Morfill

2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

270

Spontaneous vortex phase and pinning in ferromagnetic-superconducting systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of epsilon10 as a function of rho0lambda for the case when n = 1, lambdaxi = 10,R1 = lambda,R2 = 2lambda and deltam = 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 ix FIGURE Page 12 A superconducting thin film pierced by a ferromagnetic nano rod of radius R, length L... circle of radius rho0 that depends on the radii and magnetization per unit area of the annulus, and on the SC pene- tration depth lambda. In section five I focus on pinning and spontaneous vortex creation by a ferromagnetic rod which penetrates...

Kayali, Mohammad Amin

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Interaction of Josephson Junction and Distant Vortex in Narrow Thin-Film Superconducting Strips  

SciTech Connect

The phase difference between the banks of an edge-type planar Josephson junction crossing the narrow thin-film strip depends on wether or not vortices are present in the junction banks. For a vortex close to the junction this effect has been seen by Golod, Rydh, and Krasnov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 227003 (2010)], who showed that the vortex may turn the junction into ? type. It is shown here that even if the vortex is far away from the junction, it still changes the 0 junction to a ? junction when situated close to the strip edges. Within the approximation used, the effect is independent of the vortex-junction separation, a manifestation of the topology of the vortex phase which extends to macroscopic distances of superconducting coherence.

Kogan, V. G. [Ames Laboratory; Mints, R. G. [Tel Aviv University

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: A state of the art facility, at Hammersmith information visit the Faculty of Medicine web pages http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/ Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £60 000 000 Funding Source: SRIF II (Imperial College), GSK, MRC

273

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: The refurbishment of the instrumentation equipment. This project encompasses refurbishment work on over 1,150m2 of laboratory space across four, the completed project will allow researchers to expand their work in satellite instrumentation, the fabrication

274

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: In the first phase of the Union Building re.union.ic.ac.uk/marketing/building Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £1,400,000 Funding Source: Capital Plan and Imperial College Union reserves Construction Project Programme: Start on Site: August 2006 End Date: March

275

Method of positioning tubing within a horizontal well  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of variably and selectively positioning coil tubing in a horizontally drilled well having a generally vertical section, a curve section and a generally horizontal section. It comprises securing a generally hollow tubing guide shoe to one end of a tubing string; inserting the tubing guide shoe and a portion of the tubing string through the generally vertical section and the curve section and into a portion of the generally horizontal section; and inserting coil tubing through the tubing string.

Young, C.E.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

276

Volume Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Math 13900. Volume Project. For the following project, you may use any materials. This must be your own original creation. Construct a right pyramid with a base ...

rroames

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

277

Fireside carburization of stainless steel furnace tubes  

SciTech Connect

Most heavy Venezuelan crudes are recognized for having a high total acid number (TAN) that is usually associated with a high tendency to produce naphthenic acid corrosion. To resist this type of corrosion in vacuum heaters, 9Cr-1Mo steel and stainless steels containing molybdenum are usually recommended. In 1993 the original 5Cr-1/2Mo roof tubes of the furnace in a vacuum unit were replaced by stainless steel 316Ti to minimize tube replacement and increase heater reliability. Unexpectedly, some of the new tubes failed after only three years of service, and just one year after undergoing the last turnaround inspection. The damage occurred in the form of deep holes and perforations, starting from the outside tube surface on the fireside. Coke build-up occurred due to severe operating conditions, overheating the tubes on the fireside, above 675 C (1250 F). Metallographic and Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) examination revealed internal and external carburization of the material due to the presence of coke and combustion ashes, respectively. The increase in the skin metal temperature facilitated the diffusion of carbon from these carbon-rich deposits into the low carbon content material (0.023 O/O).Depletion of chromium at the grain boundaries due to the massive formation of chromium carbides, resulted in a severe intergranular corrosion attack by molten salts rich in vanadium and sulfur due to asphalt burning. Normal operating practice demands the use of steam for the heater tubes to control coke build-up. This practice had been first reduced and then eliminated, during the past two years prior to the failure, because of economic incentives. This paper describes the root cause analysis conducted to account for these premature tube failures.

Mirabal, E.; Molina, C. [PDVSA-Refineria Isla, Curayao (Netherlands); Mayorga, A.; Hau, J.L. [PDVSA-Intevep, Caracas (Venezuela)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Project 106  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single Large Format Single Large Format Tube Tester Large Format OTM Tubes Multi-tube Pilot Plant Reactor, P-1 DEVELOPMENT OF OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANE (OTM) FOR PRODUCTION AND TESTING OF SYNTHESIS GAS-DERIVED ULTRA-CLEAN FUELS Description Natural gas is an attractive feedstock for the production of ultra-clean fuels (UCF) because it is abundant and inexpensive, and can be converted into a number of sulfur free fuels including diesel, gasoline, dimethyl ether and derivatives, methanol and other oxygenates that can be used within the existing fuel distribution infrastructure. These fuels, when used neat, or when blended with petroleum based fuels, have the potential to dramatically reduce vehicle emissions from a number of propulsion systems including advanced IC (internal combustion) engines, fuel cells, and IC- fuel cell hybrids.

279

The U-tube sampling methodology and real-time analysis of geofluids  

SciTech Connect

The U-tube geochemical sampling methodology, an extension of the porous cup technique proposed by Wood [1973], provides minimally contaminated aliquots of multiphase fluids from deep reservoirs and allows for accurate determination of dissolved gas composition. The initial deployment of the U-tube during the Frio Brine Pilot CO{sub 2} storage experiment, Liberty County, Texas, obtained representative samples of brine and supercritical CO{sub 2} from a depth of 1.5 km. A quadrupole mass spectrometer provided real-time analysis of dissolved gas composition. Since the initial demonstration, the U-tube has been deployed for (1) sampling of fluids down gradient of the proposed Yucca Mountain High-Level Waste Repository, Armagosa Valley, Nevada (2) acquiring fluid samples beneath permafrost in Nunuvut Territory, Canada, and (3) at a CO{sub 2} storage demonstration project within a depleted gas reservoir, Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia. The addition of in-line high-pressure pH and EC sensors allows for continuous monitoring of fluid during sample collection. Difficulties have arisen during U-tube sampling, such as blockage of sample lines from naturally occurring waxes or from freezing conditions; however, workarounds such as solvent flushing or heating have been used to address these problems. The U-tube methodology has proven to be robust, and with careful consideration of the constraints and limitations, can provide high quality geochemical samples.

Freifeld, Barry; Perkins, Ernie; Underschultz, James; Boreham, Chris

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Combustion of pulverized coal in vortex structures. Quarterly progress report No. 1, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of the project are: to investigate the changes in the characteristics of large scale vortex structures in the shear layer caused by the introduction of inert solid particles in one of the feed streams; to understand the effects of pyrolyzing solids on the shear layer behavior; to study the effect of combustion of the pyrolysis products on the shear layer structure, heat release rate, and pollutant emission characteristics; and to study the effect of modifying the shear layer characteristics on the ensuing flame behavior. The specific objectives for the first quarter were: to update the literature survey, to design and fabrication of the two-dimensional nozzle, and to modify the combustion chamber facility already existing in the lab to accommodate the nozzle constructed.

Gollahalli, S.R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Project Controls  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Project controls are systems used to plan, schedule, budget, and measure the performance of a project/program. The cost estimation package is one of the documents that is used to establish the baseline for project controls. This chapter gives a brief description of project controls and the role the cost estimation package plays.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

282

Power Tube Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Tube Inc Power Tube Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Power Tube Inc Place Houston, Texas Zip 77060 Sector Geothermal energy Product Texan geothermal systems developer. Has developed a new range of geothermal heat exchangers from biodegradable materials. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

283

Alternate Materials for Recovery Boiler Superheater Tubes  

SciTech Connect

The ever escalating demands for increased efficiency of all types of boilers would most sensibly be realized by an increase in the steam parameters of temperature and pressure. However, materials and corrosion limitations in the steam generating components, particularly the superheater tubes, present major obstacles to boiler designers in achieving systems that can operate under the more severe conditions. This paper will address the issues associated with superheater tube selection for many types of boilers; particularly chemical recovery boilers, but also addressing the similarities in issues for biomass and coal fired boilers. It will also review our recent study of materials for recovery boiler superheaters. Additional, more extensive studies, both laboratory and field, are needed to gain a better understanding of the variables that affect superheater tube corrosion and to better determine the best means to control this corrosion to ultimately permit operation of recovery boilers at higher temperatures and pressures.

Keiser, James R [ORNL; Kish, Joseph [McMaster University; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Biaxial creep behavior of textured zircaloy tubing  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on zirconium alloys which are commonly used in light-water reactors as thin-walled tubing to clad highly radioactive fuel. The tubes experience varied stresses at high temperatures while being exposed to high-neutron radiation, resulting in thermal creep and radiation growth and creep. However, the dimensional stability of these materials is important to preventing leakage of fission gases and contamination of the coolant water. Predicting the dimensional changes of the thin-walled tubes is further complicated by the anisotropic nature of the hexagonal close-packaged metals. This article summarizes the procedures used in the texture analyses and crystal plasticity in developing model equations to predict the dimensional changes of Zircaloy fuel cladding, both out-of-pile and in-reactor. These methodologies can be extended to the life prediction of these important structures in nuclear reactors.

Murty, L.K. (North Carolina State Univ., NC (US))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Field Demonstraton of Existing Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) Technology  

SciTech Connect

The performance of an advanced Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) has been measured in the field during the drilling of 25 test wells in the Niobrara formation of Western Kansas and Eastern Colorado. The coiled tubing (CT) rig designed, built and operated by Advanced Drilling Technologies (ADT), was documented in its performance by GTI staff in the course of drilling wells ranging in depth from 500 to nearly 3,000 feet. Access to well sites in the Niobrara for documenting CT rig performance was provided by Rosewood Resources of Arlington, VA. The ADT CT rig was selected for field performance evaluation because it is one of the most advanced commercial CT rig designs that demonstrate a high degree of process integration and ease of set-up and operation. Employing an information collection protocol, data was collected from the ADT CT rig during 25 drilling events that encompassed a wide range of depths and drilling conditions in the Niobrara. Information collected included time-function data, selected parametric information indicating CT rig operational conditions, staffing levels, and field observations of the CT rig in each phase of operation, from rig up to rig down. The data obtained in this field evaluation indicates that the ADT CT rig exhibited excellent performance in the drilling and completion of more than 25 wells in the Niobrara under varied drilling depths and formation conditions. In the majority of the 25 project well drilling events, ROP values ranged between 300 and 620 feet per hour. For all but the lowest 2 wells, ROP values averaged approximately 400 feet per hour, representing an excellent drilling capability. Most wells of depths between 500 and 2,000 feet were drilled at a total functional rig time of less than 16 hours; for wells as deep at 2,500 to 3,000 feet, the total rig time for the CT unit is usually well under one day. About 40-55 percent of the functional rig time is divided evenly between drilling and casing/cementing. The balance of time is divided among the remaining four functions of rig up/rig down, logging, lay down bottomhole assembly, and pick up bottomhole assembly. Observations made during all phases of CT rig operation at each of the project well installations have verified a number of characteristics of the technology that represent advantages that can produce significant savings of 25-35 percent per well. Attributes of the CT rig performance include: (1) Excellent hole quality with hole deviation amounting to 1-2 degrees; (2) Reduced need for auxiliary equipment; (3) Efficient rig mobilization requiring only four trailers; (4) Capability of ''Zero Discharge'' operation; (5) Improved safety; and, (6) Measurement while drilling capability. In addition, commercial cost data indicates that the CT rig reduces drilling costs by 25 to 35% compared to conventional drilling technology. Widespread commercial use of the Microhole Coiled Tubing technology in the United States for onshore Lower-48 drilling has the potential of achieving substantially positive impacts in terms of savings to the industry and resource expansion. Successfully commercialized Microhole CT Rig Technology is projected to achieve cumulative savings in Lower-48 onshore drilling expenditures of approximately 6.8 billion dollars by 2025. The reduced cost of CT microhole drilling is projected to enable the development of gas resources that would not have been economic with conventional methods. Because of the reduced cost of drilling achieved with CT rig technology, it is estimated that an additional 22 Tcf of gas resource will become economic to develop. In the future, the Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig represents an important platform for the continued improvement of drilling that draws on a new generation of various technologies to achieve goals of improved drilling cost and reduced impact to the environment.

Kent Perry; Samih Batarseh; Sheriff Gowelly; Thomas Hayes

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

286

Random center vortex lines in continuous 3D space-time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a model of center vortices, represented by closed random lines in continuous 2+1- dimensional space- time. These random lines are modeled as being piece-wise linear and an ensemble is generated by Monte Carlo methods. The physical space in which the vortex lines are defined is a cuboid with periodic boundary conditions. Besides moving, growing and shrinking of the vortex configuration, also reconnections are allowed. Our ensemble therefore contains not a fixed, but a variable number of closed vortex lines. This is expected to be important for realizing the deconfining phase transition. Using the model, we study both vortex percolation and the potential V (R) between quark and anti-quark as a function of distance R at different vortex densities, vortex segment lengths, reconnection conditions and at different temperatures. We have found three deconfinement phase transitions, as a function of density, as a function of vortex segment length, and as a function of temperature. The model reproduces the qualitative features of confinement physics seen in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory.

Roman Höllwieser; Derar Altarawneh; Michael Engelhardt

2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

287

Project Hindsight  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and extended the life of the engine com-pared...blades employed in the turbine engine-that drives...1943, to prevent gas "clean-up" due...compensate for the residual hydrogen clean-up...study of the hydrogen gas discharge and its ef-fect on tube life, were able to develop...

Chalmers W. Sherwin; Raymond S. Isenson

1967-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

288

Microhole High-Pressure Jet Drill for Coiled Tubing  

SciTech Connect

Tempress Small Mechanically-Assisted High-Pressure Waterjet Drilling Tool project centered on the development of a downhole intensifier (DHI) to boost the hydraulic pressure available from conventional coiled tubing to the level required for high-pressure jet erosion of rock. We reviewed two techniques for implementing this technology (1) pure high-pressure jet drilling and (2) mechanically-assisted jet drilling. Due to the difficulties associated with modifying a downhole motor for mechanically-assisted jet drilling, it was determined that the pure high-pressure jet drilling tool was the best candidate for development and commercialization. It was also determined that this tool needs to run on commingled nitrogen and water to provide adequate downhole differential pressure and to facilitate controlled pressure drilling and descaling applications in low pressure wells. The resulting Microhole jet drilling bottomhole assembly (BHA) drills a 3.625-inch diameter hole with 2-inch coil tubing. The BHA consists of a self-rotating multi-nozzle drilling head, a high-pressure rotary seal/bearing section, an intensifier and a gas separator. Commingled nitrogen and water are separated into two streams in the gas separator. The water stream is pressurized to 3 times the inlet pressure by the downhole intensifier and discharged through nozzles in the drilling head. The energy in the gas-rich stream is used to power the intensifier. Gas-rich exhaust from the intensifier is conducted to the nozzle head where it is used to shroud the jets, increasing their effective range. The prototype BHA was tested at operational pressures and flows in a test chamber and on the end of conventional coiled tubing in a test well. During instrumented runs at downhole conditions, the BHA developed downhole differential pressures of 74 MPa (11,000 psi, median) and 90 MPa (13,000 psi, peaks). The median output differential pressure was nearly 3 times the input differential pressure available from the coiled tubing. In a chamber test, the BHA delivered up to 50 kW (67 hhp) hydraulic power. The tool drilled uncertified class-G cement samples cast into casing at a rate of 0.04 to 0.17 m/min (8 to 33 ft/hr), within the range projected for this tool but slower than a conventional PDM. While the tool met most of the performance goals, reliability requires further improvement. It will be difficult for this tool, as currently configured, to compete with conventional positive displacement downhole motors for most coil tubing drill applications. Mechanical cutters on the rotating nozzle head would improve cutting. This tool can be easily adapted for well descaling operations. A variant of the Microhole jet drilling gas separator was further developed for use with positive displacement downhole motors (PDM) operating on commingled nitrogen and water. A fit-for-purpose motor gas separator was designed and yard tested within the Microhole program. Four commercial units of that design are currently involved in a 10-well field demonstration with Baker Oil Tools in Wyoming. Initial results indicate that the motor gas separators provide significant benefit.

Ken Theimer; Jack Kolle

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Digital radiographic systems detect boiler tube cracks  

SciTech Connect

Boiler water wall leaks have been a major cause of steam plant forced outages. But conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques have a poor track record of detecting corrosion fatigue cracking on the inside surface of the cold side of waterwall tubing. EPRI is performing field trials of a prototype direct-digital radiographic system that promises to be a game changer. 8 figs.

Walker, S. [EPRI, Charlotte, NC (United States)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Remote Opening and Sealing of Metal Tubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

``One?shot'' methods of opening and sealing metal tubes are described. These methods were developed for taking high altitude atmospheric samples in metal bottles carried aloft by rockets and are performed by pyrotechnic means. The sealing is done by cold welding.

L. T. Loh; H. W. Neill; M. H. Nichols; E. A. Wenzel

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

"Fine grain Nb tube for SRF cavities"  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in charged particle linear accelerators, are currently fabricated by deep drawing niobium sheets and welding the drawn dishes together. The Nb sheet has a non-uniform microstructure, which leads to unpredictable cavity shape and surface roughness, and inconsistent "spring-back" during forming. In addition, weld zones cause hot spots during cavity operation. These factors limit linear accelerator performance and increase cavity manufacturing cost. Equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) can be used to refine and homogenize the microstructure of Nb tube for subsequent hydroforming into SRF cavities. Careful selection of deformation and heat treatment conditions during the processing steps can give a uniform and consistent microstructure in the tube, leading to improved deformability and lower manufacturing costs. Favorable microstructures were achieved in short test samples of RRR Nb tube, which may be particularly suitable for hydroforming into SRF cavity strings. The approach demonstrated could be applicable to microstructure engineering of other tube materials including tantalum, titanium, and zirconium.

Robert E. Barber

2012-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

292

Vortex and gap generation in gauge models of graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective quantum field theoretical continuum models for graphene are investigated. The models include a complex scalar field and a vector gauge field. Different gauge theories are considered and their gap patterns for the scalar, vector, and fermion excitations are investigated. Different gauge groups lead to different relations between the gaps, which can be used to experimentally distinguish the gauge theories. In this class of models the fermionic gap is a dynamic quantity. The finite-energy vortex solutions of the gauge models have the flux of the "magnetic field" quantized, making the Bohm-Aharonov effect active even when external electromagnetic fields are absent. The flux comes proportional to the scalar field angular momentum quantum number. The zero modes of the Dirac equation show that the gauge models considered here are compatible with fractionalization.

O. Oliveira; C. E. Cordeiro; A. Delfino; W. de Paula; T. Frederico

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

293

Alum Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Alum Innovative Exploration Project Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description Phase 1 exploration will consist of two parts: 1) surface and near surface investigations and 2) subsurface geophysical surveys and modeling. The first part of Phase 1 includes: a hyperspectral imaging survey (to map thermal anomalies and geothermal indicator minerals), shallow (6 ft) temperature probe measurements, and drilling of temperature gradient wells to depths of 1000 feet. In the second part of Phase 1, 2D & 3D geophysical modeling and inversion of gravity, magnetic, and magnetotelluric datasets will be used to image the subsurface. This effort will result in the creation of a 3D model composed of structural, geological, and resistivity components. The 3D model will then be combined with the temperature and seismic data to create an integrated model that will be used to prioritize drill target locations. Four geothermal wells will be drilled and geologically characterized in Phase 2. The project will use a coiled-tube rig to test this drilling technology at a geothermal field for the first time. Two slimwells and two production wells will be drilled with core collected and characterized in the target sections of each well. In Phase 3, extended flow tests will be conducted on the producible wells to confirm the geothermal resource followed by an overall assessment of the productivity of the Alum geothermal area. Finally, Phase 3 will evaluate the relative contribution of each exploration technique in reducing risk during the early stages of the geothermal project.

294

Science Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Argonne Science Project Ideas! Our Science Project section provides you with sample classroom projects and experiments, online aids for learning about science, as well as ideas for Science Fair Projects. Please select any project below to continue. Also, if you have an idea for a great project or experiment that we could share, please click our Ideas page. We would love to hear from you! Science Fair Ideas Science Fair Ideas! The best ideas for science projects are learning about and investigating something in science that interests you. NEWTON has a list of Science Fair linkd that can help you find the right topic. Toothpick Bridge Web Sites Toothpick Bridge Sites! Building a toothpick bridge is a great class project for physics and engineering students. Here are some sites that we recommend to get you started!

295

Projection Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a general rule, broad-band sources which employ projection optics are the most difficult to evaluate. In addition to the problems encountered in evaluating exposed lamps, one must characterize the projected...

David Sliney; Myron Wolbarsht

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Circle Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project asks students to decide if a collection of points in space do or do not lie on a ... The project is accessible to linear algebra students who have studied ...

297

Hydropower Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's hydropower project funding from fiscal years 2008 to 2014.

298

Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Tubes by Means of Tube Bulge Test  

SciTech Connect

Mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints are generally evaluated by means of conventional tensile test. This testing method might provide insufficient information because maximum strain obtained in tensile test before necking is small; moreover, the application of tensile test is limited when the joint path is not linear or even when the welds are executed on curved surfaces. Therefore, in some cases, it would be preferable to obtain the joints properties from other testing methods. Tube bulge test can be a valid solution for testing circumferential or longitudinal welds executed on tubular workpieces. The present work investigates the mechanical properties and the formability of friction stir welded tubes by means of tube bulge tests. The experimental campaign was performed on tubular specimens having a thickness of 3 mm and an external diameter of 40 mm, obtained starting from two semi-tubes longitudinally friction stir welded. The first step, regarding the fabrication of tubes, was performed combining a conventional forming process and friction stir welding. Sheets in Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy AA6060 T6 were adopted for this purpose. Plates having a dimension of 225x60 mm were bent (with a bending axis parallel to the main dimension) in order to obtain semi-tubes. A particular care was devoted to the fabrication of forming devices (punch and die) in order to minimize the springback effects. Semi-tubes were then friction stir welded by means of a CNC machine tool. Some preliminary tests were carried out by varying the welding parameters, namely feed rate and rotational speed. A very simple tool having flat shoulder and cylindrical pin was used. The second step of the research was based on testing the welded tubes by means of tube bulge test. A specific equipment having axial actuators with a conical shape was adopted for this study. Some analyses were carried out on the tubes bulged up to a certain pressure level. In particular, the burst pressure and the wall thickness were measured for each tested tube.

D'Urso, G.; Longo, M.; Giardini, C. [University of Bergamo-Dept. of Design and Technologies-Italy-Viale Marconi 5, 24044 Dalmine (Italy)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

299

Vortex Hydro Energy (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Integration of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- PB500, 500 kW Utility-Scale PowerBuoy Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project Water Power Program About the Program Research &...

300

CFD Numerical Simulation of Vortex-Induced Vibration of a Stay Cable under a Wind Profile  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

VIV (Vortex-induced vibration) of a stay cable subjected to a wind profile is numerically simulated through combining CFD ... numerical model. Under a profile of mean wind speed, unsteady aerodynamic lift coeffic...

Wenli Chen; Hui Li

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Optimal Excitation of Asymmetric Perturbations on an Axisymmetric Barotropic Vortex: A linear Singular Value Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Singular vectors on a barotropic circular vortex consisting of three regions of piecewise-constant vorticity are investigated under the L2-norm to reveal the shape and growth rate of possible perturbations that may contribute to the formation of ...

Toshihisa Itano

302

Dynamical mass of a quantum vortex in a Josephson junction array  

SciTech Connect

The real-time response to a small external perturbation of a vortex in a quantum Josephson junction array, with long-range Coulomb interaction between Cooper pairs, is analyzed. While the static damping is zero for vortex velocities below some threshold value v{sub th} (which implies the possibility of ballistic motion), a dynamical friction due to the coupling to the plasma oscillations is always present for frequencies higher than a given threshold {omega}{sub th}. The latter approaches zero when the velocity increases to v{sub th}. However, radiative dissipation of the vortex affects the threshold for ballistic motion. We discuss the conditions under which a mass can be defined for the vortex as a quantum particle. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Eckern, U. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany)] [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany); Luciano, G.; Tagliacozzo, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli, Mostra dOltremare Pad. 19, I-80125 Napoli (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli, Mostra dOltremare Pad. 19, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), I-16152 Genova (Italy)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - axially-symmetric cyclonic vortex Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

> >> 1 1 APRIL 2002 1213W A N G 2002 American Meteorological Society Summary: and wind fields of the vortex Rossby waves are quasi-balanced, with confluent cyclonic (divergent... ,...

304

Ultraviolet vortex generation using periodically bonded ?-BaB2O4 device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the first demonstration of ultraviolet (266nm) vortex generation using the combination of a frequency-doubled nanosecond green laser, a spiral phase plate, and a...

Sasaki, Yuta; Koyama, Mio; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Ariga, Yoshimi; Onda, Tomomi; Shoji, Ichiro; Omatsu, Takashige

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Vortex-Induced Vibration of a slender horizontal cylinder in currents and waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vortex-Induced Vibration (VIV) is a concern when dealing with slender, flexible structural members of deepwater platforms. While much is known about the characteristics of VIV in uniform and sheared current flows, very little is known about...

Chitwood, James Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

306

Resonant amplification of vortex-core oscillations by coherent magnetic-field pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structure of magnetic vortex cores. Science 298, 577–580 (D. A. et al. Magnetic domain-wall logic. Science 309, 1688 (L. Magnetic domain-wall racetrack memory. Science 320, 190–

Yu, Young-Sang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

The Roles of Vortex Rossby Waves in Hurricane Secondary Eyewall Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A high-resolution, full-physics model initiated with an idealized tropical cyclone–like vortex is used to simulate and investigate the secondary eyewall formation. The beta skirt axisymmetrization (BSA) hypothesis previously proposed is examined ...

Xin Qiu; Zhe-Min Tan; Qingnong Xiao

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Vortex life cycles in two-and three-layer quasi-geostrophic models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coherent vortices and their properties were studied in two- and three-layer quasi-geostrophic beta-plane turbulence. Much research has discussed vortex characteristics in a number of applications, but no significant study of vortices in turbulent...

Fox, Amanda Katherine

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

309

Vortex Induced Vibrations of cylinders : experiments in reducing drag force and amplitude of motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reducing the deleterious effect of Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV) in marine risers is an important task for ocean engineers; and many competing factors exist in the design of VIV suppression devices. This thesis explores ...

Farrell, David Emmanuel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Effects of trailing edge flap dynamic deployment on blade-vortex interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theoretical and experimental investigation is undertaken to determine the effects of an actively deployable trailing edge flap on the disturbances created during blade-vortex interactions (BVI). The theoretical model consists of an unsteady panel...

Nelson, Carter T.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

Steady-state and equilibrium vortex configurations, transitions, and evolution in a mesoscopic superconducting cylinder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the system passes through nearly metastable intermediate configurations while seeking the final minimum-energy steady state consistent with the square symmetry of the sample. An efficient scheme to determine the equilibrium vortex configuration in a...

Kim, S.; Hu, Chia-Ren; Andrews, MJ.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

An adaptive mesh method for the simulation of Blade Vortex Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An adaptive mesh method for the simulation of parallel ics. Blade Vortex Interaction (BV1) with an active Trailing Edge Flap (TEF) is presented. The two-dimensional 1111-steady problem is solved by a higher order upwind Euler method...

Kim, Kyu-Sup

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

MEC E 638 VORTEX FLOWS Winter 2014 LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURES IN TURBULENCE PROF L. SIGURDSON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to find the characteristic vortex structures; to read the literature, nomenclature, terminology. TOPICS: Professor Lorenz Sigurdson, 5-1B Mech Eng Bldg, lorenz@ualberta.ca, http://websrv.mece.ualberta.ca/intranet

Flynn, Morris R.

314

Visualization of Intricate Flow Structures for Vortex Breakdown Analysis Xavier Tricoche  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hansen University of Utah Figure 1: Vortex breakdown bubble in numerical simulation of a cylindrical to study their impact on flight stability. Yet, to fully exploit the huge amount of information contained

Utah, University of

315

Horizontal Beam Tubes - HFIR Technical Parameters | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Horizontal Beam Tubes Horizontal Beam Tubes The reactor has four horizontal beam tubes that supply the neutrons to the neutron scattering instruments. Details for each beam tube and instrument can be found on the HFIR instrument page. Each of the beam tubes that supply these instruments with neutrons is described subsequently. HB-1 and HB-3 The HB-1 and HB-3 thermal neutron beam tube designs are identical except for the length. Both are situated tangential to the reactor core so that the tubes point at reflector material and do not point directly at the fuel. An internal collimator is installed at the outboard end. This collimator is fabricated out of carbon steel and is plated with nickel. The collimator provides a 2.75-in by 5.5-in. rectangular aperture. A rotary shutter is located outboard of each of these beam tubes. The

316

Refrigerant forced-convection condensation inside horizontal tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Condensing heat transfer rates inside a horizontal tube were investigated -for large quality changes across the tube. The proposed correlation is a modification of the work of Rohsenow, Webber and Ling [29]. The result of ...

Bae, Soonhoon

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Corrosion Failure of an In-service Economizer Tube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This investigation was primarily aimed to examine the in-service failure of an economizer tube. Apart from preliminary visual examination, ... thickness hole in the weld region of the economizer tube. This water ...

H. Roy; P. Sharma; D. Ghosh; A. K. Shukla

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Delayed hydride cracking behavior for ZIRCALOY-2 tubing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The delayed hydride cracking (DHC) behavior for ZIRCALOY-2 tubing was characterized at temperatures ranging from 93 °C to 288 °C. Testing was performed on the three types of pressure tubes that were used in th...

F. H. Huang; W. J. Mills

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

High-frequency vortex dynamics and dissipation of high-temperature superconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The high-frequency vortex dynamics of high-temperature superconductors near the flux-line depinning threshold is investigated based on a thermally activated flux-flow (TAFF) model. Dissipation due to vortex motion driven by a microwave electromagnetic field is studied as a function of the frequency, temperature, dc magnetic field, and microwave power. The generalized TAFF model is also compared to the conventional flux-creep theory and is found qualitatively consistent.

N.-C. Yeh

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Effect of a surface boundary layer on an intensifying, downward-propagating vortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECT OF A SURFACE BOUNDARY LAYER ON AN INTENSIFYING, DOWNWARD-PROPAGATING VORTEX A Thesis by VINCENT TUNSTALL WOOD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1977 Major Subject: Meteorology EFFECT OF A SURFACE BOUNDARY LAYER ON AN INTENSIFYING, DOWNWARD-PROPAGATING VORTEX A Thesis by VINCENT TUNSTALL WOOD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department...

Wood, Vincent Tunstall

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Power Projects Contact SN Customers Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > About SNR Power Projects Central Valley: In California's Central Valley, 18 dams create reservoirs that can store 13 million acre-feet of water. The project's 615 miles of canals irrigate an area 400 miles long and 45 miles wide--almost one third of California. Powerplants at the dams have an installed capacity of 2,099 megawatts and provide enough energy for 650,000 people. Transmission lines total about 865 circuit-miles. Washoe: This project in west-central Nevada and east-central California was designed to improve the regulation of runoff from the Truckee and Carson river systems and to provide supplemental irrigation water and drainage, as well as water for municipal, industrial and fishery use. The project's Stampede Powerplant has a maximum capacity of 4 MW.

322

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Yield prediction for seamless tubing processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tubing process 1 Introduction Pipe products made from carbon and alloy steel are commonly used in oil and natural gas exploration and production, fluid transmission, and the construction indus- try. A market an increasing demand for seamless tubing for gas and oil production [1]. Steel tubes are made by several

Huang, Samuel H.

323

Instability characteristics of fluidelastic instability of tube rows in crossflow  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study is reported to investigate the jump phenomenon in critical flow velocities for tube rows with different pitch-to-diameter ratios and the excited and intrinsic instabilities for a tube row with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.75. The experimental data provide additional insights into the instability phenomena of tube arrays in crossflow. 9 refs., 10 figs.

Chen, S.S.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

ACCELERATOR TUBES H. R. McK. HYDER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCELERATOR TUBES H. R. McK. HYDER Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH The characteristics and performance of accelerator tubes required by the new generation of large tandem accelerators conclusions are drawn about future progress and developments. ACCELERATOR TUBES AND INSULATORS. 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

325

Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2010 Wellbore Coil Tubing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2010 Wellbore Coil Tubing Overview In BP reaching the bottom of the wellbore utilizing a pre- loaded constant force spring. The coiled tubing's North American Gas Division, there are approximately 800 wellbores with coiled tubing installed

Demirel, Melik C.

326

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

327

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

328

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:00 Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

329

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

330

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

331

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

332

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

333

Source Terms for HFIR Beam Tube Shielding Analyses, and a Complete Shielding Analysis of the HB-3 Tube  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is in the midst of a massive upgrade program to enhance experimental facilities. The reactor presently has four horizontal experimental beam tubes, all of which will be replaced or redesigned. The HB-2 beam tube will be enlarged to support more guide tubes, while the HB-4 beam tube will soon include a cold neutron source.

Bucholz, J.A.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Helium-filled aluminum flight tubes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Helium-filled aluminum flight tubes. Helium-filled aluminum flight tubes. Detector housing for the CCD camera lens, mirror, and scintillator. For more information, contact Instrument Scientist: Hassina Bilheux, bilheuxhn@ornl.gov, 865.384.9630 neutrons.ornl.gov/instruments/HFIR/factsheets/Instrument-cg1d.pdf The CG-1D beam is used for neutron imaging measurements using a white beam. Apertures (with different diameters D (pinhole geometry) are used at the entrance of the helium-filled flight path to allow L/D variation from 400 to 800. L is the distance between the aperture and the detector (where the image is produced). Samples sit on a translation/ rotation stage for alignment and tomography purposes. Detectors for CG-1D include

335

Color Magnetic Flux Tubes in Dense QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QCD is expected to be in the color-flavor locking phase in high baryon density, which exhibits color superconductivity. The most fundamental topological objects in the color superconductor are non-Abelian vortices which are topologically stable color magnetic flux tubes. We present numerical solutions of the color magnetic flux tube for diverse choices of the coupling constants. We also analytically study its asymptotic profiles and find that they are different from the case of usual superconductors. We propose the width of color magnetic fluxes and find that it is larger than naive expectation of the Compton wave length of the massive gluon when the gluon mass is larger than the scalar mass.

Minoru Eto; Muneto Nitta

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

336

Color magnetic flux tubes in dense QCD  

SciTech Connect

QCD is expected to be in the color-flavor locking phase in high baryon density, which exhibits color superconductivity. The most fundamental topological objects in the color superconductor are non-Abelian vortices which are topologically stable color magnetic flux tubes. We present numerical solutions of the color magnetic flux tube for diverse choices of the coupling constants based on the Ginzburg-Landau Lagrangian. We also analytically study its asymptotic profiles and find that they are different from the case of usual superconductors. We propose the width of color magnetic fluxes and find that it is larger than naive expectation of the Compton wavelength of the massive gluon when the gluon mass is larger than the scalar mass.

Eto, Minoru [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, and Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the {pi}-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is {beta}{lambda}, where {lambda} is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a {pi}/2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range. 5 figs.

Billen, J.H.

1996-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

338

Stable sonoluminescence within a water hammer tube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sonoluminescence (SL) from the collapse of a single gas bubble within a liquid can be produced repetitively using an acoustic resonator. An alternative technique using a water hammer tube, producing SL from bubbles of greater size, is described here. A sealed vertical tube partly filled with a liquid and a gas at low pressure is subjected to vertical vibrations. The oscillation of the pressure within the liquid column, due to inertial forces, excites cavitation bubbles to grow and collapse. Rotation is used to confine the bubbles to the axis of the tube. Bright SL emissions were observed in a number of liquids. Repetitive emission was produced from bubbles in condensed phosphoric acid. Bubbles of 0.4mm ambient radius (containing 2×1014 xenon atoms) were excited by vibration at 35Hz. Approximately 1012 photons were emitted per collapse in the range 400–700nm (over four orders of magnitude greater than the brightest SL reported previously), corresponding to a 1% efficiency of the conversion of mechanical energy into light.

Avik Chakravarty; Theo Georghiou; Tacye E. Phillipson; Alan J. Walton

2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

339

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the program * Project overall objectives * Technical status * Project summary * Conclusions and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * This research project develops a reservoir scale CO 2 plume migration model at the Sleipner project, Norway. The Sleipner project in the Norwegian North Sea is the world's first commercial scale geological carbon storage project. 4D seismic data have delineated the CO 2 plume migration history. The relatively long history and high fidelity data make

340

Segmented lasing tube for high temperature laser assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature laser assembly capable of withstanding operating temperatures in excess of 1500.degree. C. is described comprising a segmented cylindrical ceramic lasing tube having a plurality of cylindrical ceramic lasing tube segments of the same inner and outer diameters non-rigidly joined together in axial alignment; insulation of uniform thickness surround the walls of the ceramic lasing tube; a ceramic casing, preferably of quartz, surrounding the insulation; and a fluid cooled metal jacket surrounds the ceramic casing. In a preferred embodiment, the inner surface of each of the ceramic lasing tube segments are provided with a pair of oppositely spaced grooves in the wall thereof parallel to the center axis of the segmented cylindrical ceramic lasing tube, and both of the grooves and the center axis of the segmented cylindrical ceramic lasing tube lie in a common plane, with the grooves in each ceramic lasing tube segment in circumferential alignment with the grooves in the adjoining ceramic lasing tube segments; and one or more ceramic plates, all lying in a common plane to one another and with the central axis of the segmented ceramic lasing tube, are received in the grooves to provide additional wall area in the segmented ceramic lasing tube for collision and return to ground state of metastable metal atoms within the segmented ceramic lasing tube.

Sawicki, Richard H. (Danville, CA); Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA); Finucane, Raymond G. (Pleasanton, CA); Hall, Jerome P. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and Evaluation of Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing wells Project Number: FE0009599 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background information - Project Concept (MICP) - Ureolytic Biomineralization, Biomineralization Sealing * Accomplishments to Date - Site Characterization - Site Preparation - Experimentation and Modeling - Field Deployable Injection Strategy Development * Summary

342

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL's Consolidated Sequestration Research Program (CSRP) Project Number FWP ESD09-056 Barry Freifeld Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits and Goals of GEO-SEQ * Technical Status - Otway Project (CO2CRC) - In Salah (BP, Sonatrach and Statoil) - Ketzin Project (GFZ, Potsdam) - Aquistore (PTRC) * Accomplishments and Summary * Future Plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed: - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage capacity estimation - Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence.

343

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-23, 2012 1-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline I. Benefits II. Project Overview III. Technical Status A. Background B. Results IV. Accomplishments V. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals. - Prediction of CO 2 storage capacity. * Project benefits. - Workforce/Student Training: Support of 3 student GAs in use of multiphase flow and geochemical models simulating CO 2 injection. - Support of Missouri DGLS Sequestration Program. 4 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Project Goals and Objectives. 1. Training graduate students in use of multi-phase flow models related to CO 2 sequestration. 2. Training graduate students in use of geochemical models to assess interaction of CO

344

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Coal's Center for Coal's FY10 Carbon Sequestration Peer Review February 8 - 12, 2010 2 Collaborators * Tissa Illangasekare (Colorado School of Mines) * Michael Plampin (Colorado School of Mines) * Jeri Sullivan (LANL) * Shaoping Chu (LANL) * Jacob Bauman (LANL) * Mark Porter (LANL) 3 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Project technical status * Accomplishments to date * Future Plans * Appendix 4 Benefit to the program * Program goals being addressed (2011 TPP): - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefit: - This project is developing system modeling capabilities that can be used to address challenges associated with infrastructure development, integration, permanence &

345

Discontinued Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page lists projects that received a loan or a loan guarantee from DOE, but that are considered discontinued by LPO for one of several reasons.

346

project management  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the Baseline Change Proposal process. Two 400,000-gallon fire protection water supply tanks and associated pumping facilities were added. Later in the project, an additional...

347

Custom Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Incentive Payment - The ESIP works with utility, industry, and BPA to complete the measurement and verification, reporting and development of a custom project completion...

348

Numerical simulation of a viscous vortex ring interaction with a density interface  

SciTech Connect

When a vortex-dominated flow interacts with a sharp density interface, the dynamics are characterized by the interaction of baroclinically generated vorticity with the already existing vorticity field. This can be seen in many natural and technology settings; examples are the interaction of a ship or submarine wake with a thermocline, the collision of a buoyant thermal with a temperature inversion, and the interaction of a vortex flow with a flame front. This problem also serves as a generic model for turbulent mixing and entrainment processes across sharp density interfaces. The interaction between vortices and a free surface, with corresponds to the case where the density jump is very large, has been studied fairly extensively, both experimentally and computationally. By comparison, the literature for the more general case of vortex pairs and rings interacting with sharp density interfaces is relatively sparse. Experiments and numerical studies have been performed, but the numerical simulations were confined primarily to vortex pairs, restricted to the inviscid case, and the effect of density variation modeled under the Boussinesq approximation. The experiments were also confined to the Boussinesq regime. In this paper, we study the motion of a vortex ring in a sharply stratified, viscous fluid via a numerical solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations with finite-amplitude density variation. both Boussinesq and non-Boussinesq flow regimes will be studied, the effect of viscosity on the interaction will be examined, and three-dimensional aspects of the motion will be addressed, such as Widnall instability of the vortex ring and vortex reconnection at the interface.

Marcus, D.L.; Bell, J.B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Whistling Ridge Energy Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(PDCI) Upgrade Project Whistling Ridge Energy Project Line Rebuild, Relocation and Substation Projects Wind Projects Whistling Ridge Energy Project Bonneville Power...

350

Magnetorotational instability, current relaxation, and current-vortex sheet  

SciTech Connect

The conjugate effect of current relaxation and of current-vortex sheet formation on the magnetorotational instability is explored in a conducting fluid. It is found that the relative amplification of the magnetic viscosity from marginal stability to the instability determined by the maximum growth rate is around 924% when resistive effects dominate, while the corresponding quantity is around 220% in the ideal limit. This shows that the conjugate influence is much more efficient to amplify the magnetic viscosity than just the effect due to the standard magnetic tension. It is also found that the magnitude of the magnetic viscosity is effectively enhanced by the conjugate influence. The results presented here may contribute to the understanding of the various processes that play a significant role in the mechanism of anomalous viscosity observed in Keplerian disks. It is argued that the new effect shall be relevant in thin accretion disks. It is also mentioned that the proposed formulation may be of interest for some theories of magnetic reconnection. Possible extensions of this work are suggested.

Silveira, F. E. M. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adélia, 166, CEP 09210-170, Bairro Bangu, Santo André, SP (Brazil)] [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adélia, 166, CEP 09210-170, Bairro Bangu, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Galvão, R. M. O. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-090, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)] [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-090, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Vortex Dynamics for the Ginzburg-Landau-Schrödinger Equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The initial value problem for the Ginzburg-Landau-Schr\\"odinger equation is examined in the $\\epsilon \\rightarrow 0$ limit under two main assumptions on the initial data $\\phi^\\epsilon$. The first assumption is that $\\phi^\\epsilon$ exhibits $m$ distinct vortices of degree $\\pm 1$; these are described as points of concentration of the Jacobian $[J\\phi^\\epsilon]$ of $\\phi^\\epsilon$. Second, we assume energy bounds consistent with vortices at the points of concentration. Under these assumptions, we identify ``vortex structures'' in the $\\epsilon \\rightarrow 0$ limit of $\\phi^\\epsilon$ and show that these structures persist in the solution $u^\\epsilon(t)$ of $GLS_\\epsilon$. We derive ordinary differential equations which govern the motion of the vortices in the $\\epsilon \\rightarrow 0$ limit. The limiting system of ordinary differential equations is a Hamitonian flow governed by the renormalized energy of Bethuel, Brezis and H\\'elein. Our arguments rely on results about the structural stability of vortices which are proved in a separate paper.

James Ellis Colliander; Robert L. Jerrard

1997-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snøhvit CO Snøhvit CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 4 Principal Investigators: L. Chiaramonte, *J.A. White Team Members: Y. Hao, J. Wagoner, S. Walsh Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Summary & Accomplishments * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is focused on mechanical

353

Project title:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Requested By: David Young Mail Code : N1410 Phone: 916-353-4542 Date Submitted: 5/4/2011 Date Required: 5/7/2011 Description of the Project: Purpose and Need The Western Area Power Administration (Western), Sierra Nevada Region (SNR), is responsible for the operation and maintenance (O&M) of federally owned and operated transmission lines, Switchyards, and facilities throughout California. Western and Reclamation must comply with the National Electric Safety Code, Western States Coordinating Council (WECC), and internal directives for protecting human safety, the physical environment, and maintaining the reliable operation of the transmission system. There is an existing OPGW communications fiber on the transmission towers between Roseville and Elverta

354

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

InSalah CO InSalah CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 2 Principal Investigator: W. McNab Team Members: L. Chiaramonte, S. Ezzedine, W. Foxall, Y. Hao, A. Ramirez, *J.A. White Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is combining sophisticated

355

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Space Geodesy, Seismology, Space Geodesy, Seismology, and Geochemistry for Monitoring Verification and Accounting of CO 2 in Sequestration Sites DE-FE0001580 Tim Dixon, University of South Florida Peter Swart, University of Miami U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to program * Goals & objectives * Preliminary InSAR results (site selection phase) * Project location * Project installed equipment * Specific project results * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Focused on monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) * If successful, our project will demonstrate the utility of low cost, surface

356

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 DE-FE0001159 Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO 2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations Gary Mavko Rock Physics Project/Stanford University 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Motivating technical challenge * Approach * Technical Status - Laboratory results - Theoretical modeling * Summary Mavko: Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99% of injected CO 2 remains in injection zones. * Project benefits statement.

357

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Volume Injection of CO Large Volume Injection of CO 2 to Assess Commercial Scale Geological Sequestration in Saline Formations in the Big Sky Region Project Number: DE-FC26-05NT42587 Dr. Lee Spangler Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Kevin Dome characteristics * Project design philosophy * Infrastructure * Modeling * Monitoring * Project Opportunities 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

358

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Research on Probabilistic and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical (HTM) Modeling of CO 2 Geological Sequestration (GS) in Fractured Porous Rocks Project DE-FE0002058 Marte Gutierrez, Ph.D. Colorado School of Mines U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program (Program goals addressed and Project benefits) * Project goals and objectives * Technical status - Project tasks * Technical status - Key findings * Lessons learned * Summary - Accomplishments to date 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries'

359

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complexity and Choice of Complexity and Choice of Model Approaches for Practical Simulations of CO 2 Injection, Migration, Leakage, and Long- term Fate Karl W. Bandilla Princeton University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Project Number DE-FE0009563 2 Presentation Outline * Project Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Accomplishments * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * The aim of the project is to develop criteria for the selection of the appropriate level of model complexity for CO 2 sequestration modeling at a given site. This will increase the confidence in modeling results, and reduce computational cost when appropriate.

360

Effects of grids in drift tubes  

SciTech Connect

In 2011, we upgraded a 201 MHz buncher in the proton injector for the alternating gradient synchrotron (AGS) - relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) complex. In the buncher we installed four grids made of tungsten to improve the transit time factor. The grid installed drift tubes have 32 mm of inner diameter and the each grid consists of four quadrants. The quadrants were cut out precisely from 1mm thick tungsten plates by a computerized numerically controlled (CNC) wire cutting electrical discharge machining (EDM). The 3D electric field of the grid was simulated.

Okamura M.; Yamauchi, H.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Drift Tube Linac Conditioning of Tank1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tank1 of the Drift Tube Linac (DTL) of the Linac4 has been conditioned at the Linac4 tunnel. The tank was tuned for resonance at 352.2 MHz, and stable operation has been achieved with 725 µs long RF pulses at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. The maximum RF level that has been reached is 810 kW with a pulse width of 600 µs. Since this was the first RF structure exclusively conditioned in the Linac4 tunnel with the operation and control software of Linac4, some related issues and limitations had to be taken into account.

Shafqat, N; Toor, W A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Sound Coiled-Tubing Drilling Practices  

SciTech Connect

This Coiled-Tubing Drilling (CTD) Sound Practices Manual provides tools needed by CTD engineers and supervisors to plan, design and perform safe, successful CTD operations. As emphasized throughout, both careful planning and attention to detail are mandatory for success. A bibliography of many useful CTD references is presented in Chapter 6. This manual is organized according to three processes: 1) Pre-Job Planning Process, 2) Operations Execution Process, and 3) Post-Job Review Process. Each is discussed in a logical and sequential format.

Williams, Thomas; Deskins, Greg (Maurer Technology Inc.); Ward, Stephen L. (Advantage Energy Services Ltd); Hightower, Mel

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

363

Characterization of The Dalles Dam Spillbay 6 Vortex Using Surface Entrained Sensor Fish Device: Preliminary Report  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the pilot study to characterize The Dalles Dam Spillbay 6 vortex using a surface entrained Sensor Fish device. It was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on April 13 and 14, 2006. The total spill was controlled at approximately 110 kcfs, the forebay elevation was 157.89 ft, and the discharge of Bay 6 at the tested gate opening of 14 ft was approximately 18 kcfs. The objectives of the full study are to (1) develop baseline conditions for the detailed analysis of Sensor Fish measurements by deploying Sensor Fish in different surface locations in the vortex periphery; (2) observe the entrainment pattern and extract hydraulic data of interest such as acceleration, rotation, pressure, and estimated velocity of Sensor Fish or drogues; (3) integrate the experimental results with companion computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and inertial particle tracking studies. A total of 12 Sensor Fish were released in the surface at upstream edge, left edge, downstream edge, and the core of the vortex at Bay 6. Because of the high discharge, the vortex patterns at the test condition were less consistent than the patterns observed at lower discharges. Compared with the Sensor Fish released at mid-bay at Bay 6, Sensor Fish released from the surface at the vortex experienced higher pressure fluctuations, a larger percentage of severe events, and much more rapid angular velocities.

Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

364

A New Heat Transfer Fluid for Concentrating Solar Systems: Particle Flow in Tubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper demonstrates a new concept of heat transfer fluid (HTF) for CSP applications, developed in the frame of both a National and a European project (CSP2 FP7 project). It involves a dense suspension of small solid particles. This innovation is currently. The dense suspension of particles receiver (DSPR) consists in creating the upward circulation of a dense suspension of particles (solid fraction in the range 30%-40%) in vertical absorbing tubes submitted to concentrated solar energy. So the suspension acts as a heat transfer fluid with a heat capacity similar to a liquid HTF but only limited in temperature by the working temperature limit of the receiver tubes. Suspension temperatures up to 750 °C are expected for metallic tubes, thus opening new opportunities for high efficiency thermodynamic cycles such as supercritical steam and carbon dioxide. First experimental results were obtained during on-sun testing with CNRS solar facility of a single tube DSPR for an outlet temperature lower than 300 °C. In this lab-scale experimental setup, the solar absorber is a single opaque metallic tube, containing upward solid circulation, located inside a cylindrical cavity dug in a receiver made of refractory, and submitted to the concentrated solar radiation through a 0.10m x 0.50m slot. The absorber is a 42.4 mm o.d. stainless steel tube. SiC was used because of its thermal properties, availability and rather low cost. The 63.9 ?m particle mean diameter permits a good fluidization with almost no bubbles, for very low air velocities. Solar flux densities in the range 200-250 kW/m2 were tested resulting in solid temperature increase ranging between 50 and 150 °C. The mean wall-to-suspension heat transfer coefficient (h) was calculated from experimental data. It is very sensitive to the solid fraction of the solid suspension, which was varied from 27% to 36%. These latter values are one order of magnitude larger than the solid fraction in circulating fluidized beds operating at much higher air velocity. Heat transfer coefficients ranging from 140 to 500 W/m2.K have been obtained; i.e. 400 W/m2.K mean value for standard operating conditions at low temperature.

G. Flamant; D. Gauthier; H. Benoit; J.-L. Sans; B. Boissière; R. Ansart; M. Hemati

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Numerical Simulation of the Meso-? Scale Structure and Evolution of the 1977 Johnstown Flood. Part II: Inertially Stable Warm-Core Vortex and the Mesoscale Convective Complex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mesoscale warm-core vortex associated with the mesoscale convective complex (MCC) that produced the 1977 Johnstown flood is examined using a three-dimensional nested-grid model simulation of the flood episode. In the simulation, the vortex ...

Da-Lin Zhang; J. Michael Fritsch

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS: CCS: Life Cycle Water Consumption for Carbon Capture and Storage Project Number 49607 Christopher Harto Argonne National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage efficiency while ensuring containment effectiveness. * Project benefits statement. - This work supports the development of active reservoir management approaches by identifying cost effective and environmentally benign strategies for managing extracted brines (Tasks 1 + 2). - This work will help identify water related constraints

367

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leakage Mitigation Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number: FE0004478 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background Information * Accomplishments to Date - Injection strategy development (control and prediction) - Large core tests - ambient pressure - Large core tests - high pressure - Small core tests - high pressure - MCDP, permeability and porosity assessments * Progress Assessment and Summary

368

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Leakage Mitigation CO2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number FE0004478 Lee H Spangler, Al Cunningham, Robin Gerlach Energy Research Institute Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation * Background information * Large core tests - ambient pressure * Large core tests - high pressure 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. Project benefits statement. The Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies

369

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS CCS Project Number 49607 Christopher Harto Argonne National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Increased control of reservoir pressure, reduced risk of CO2 migration, and expanded formation storage capacity. * Project benefits statement. - This work supports the development of active reservoir management approaches by identifying cost effective and environmentally benign strategies for managing extracted brines (Tasks 1 + 2). - This work will help identify water related constraints on CCS deployment and provide insight into

370

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Multiphase of Multiphase Flow for Improved Injectivity and Trapping 4000.4.641.251.002 Dustin Crandall, URS PI: Grant Bromhal, NETL ORD Morgantown, West Virginia U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Breakdown of FY12 project tasks * Facilities and personnel * Task progress to date * Planned task successes * Tech transfer and summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

371

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Resources International, Inc. Advanced Resources International, Inc. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Project benefits statement: - This research seeks to develop a set of robust mathematical modules to predict how coal and shale permeability and

372

Coiled tubing as initial production tubing: An overview of case histories  

SciTech Connect

From Jan. 1993 through Feb. 1995 Marathon Oil Co. completed 23 newly drilled gas wells with coiled tubing as the initial production string. This paper reviews operational aspects of representative jobs, summarizes areas where improvements in equipment and technique were implemented, and addresses cost and productivity benefits of rigless completions. A summary of lessons learned is also included.

Nirider, H.L.; Snider, P.M.; Walsh, K.D.; Williams, J.D. [Marathon Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States); Cordera, J.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

MHK Technologies/Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Checkmate SeaEnergy Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description Anaconda uses a large water filled distensible rubber tube floating just beneath the ocean surface and oriented parallel to wave direction As a wave passes the bulge tube is lifted with the surrounding water and this causes a bulge wave to be excited which then passes down the tubes walls gathering energy from the ocean wave as it passes By matching the speed of the bulge wave to that of the sea wave resonance is achieved and high power capture becomes possible The bulge waves are then used to drive a turbine generator located at the stern of the device

374

Stress Assisted Corrosion in Boiler Tubes - Failure Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Stress assisted corrosion (SAC) of carbon steel boiler tubes is one of the major causes of waterside failure in industrial boilers. SAC is a major concern for kraft recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry as any water leak into the furnace can cause a smelt-water explosion in the boiler. Failed carbon steel boiler tubes from different kraft recovery boilers were examined to understand the role of carbon steel microstructure on crack initiation and SAC crack morphology. A number of carbon steel tubes showed a deep decarburized layer on the inner surface (water-touched) and also an unusually large grain size at the inner tube surface. SAC cracks were found to initiate in these areas with large-graineddecarburized microstructure. Tubes without such microstructure were also found to have SAC cracks. It was found that the decarburization and large grained microstructure may facilitate initiation and growth but is not necessary for SAC of carbon steel boiler tubes.

Singh, Preet M [Georgia Institute of Technology; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Yang, Dong [Georgia Institute of Technology; Mahmood, Jamshad [Georgia Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

HIGH-POWER TURBODRILL AND DRILL BIT FOR DRILLING WITH COILED TUBING  

SciTech Connect

Commercial introduction of Microhole Technology to the gas and oil drilling industry requires an effective downhole drive mechanism which operates efficiently at relatively high RPM and low bit weight for delivering efficient power to the special high RPM drill bit for ensuring both high penetration rate and long bit life. This project entails developing and testing a more efficient 2-7/8 in. diameter Turbodrill and a novel 4-1/8 in. diameter drill bit for drilling with coiled tubing. The high-power Turbodrill were developed to deliver efficient power, and the more durable drill bit employed high-temperature cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. This project teams Schlumberger Smith Neyrfor and Smith Bits, and NASA AMES Research Center with Technology International, Inc (TII), to deliver a downhole, hydraulically-driven power unit, matched with a custom drill bit designed to drill 4-1/8 in. boreholes with a purpose-built coiled tubing rig. The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory has funded Technology International Inc. Houston, Texas to develop a higher power Turbodrill and drill bit for use in drilling with a coiled tubing unit. This project entails developing and testing an effective downhole drive mechanism and a novel drill bit for drilling 'microholes' with coiled tubing. The new higher power Turbodrill is shorter, delivers power more efficiently, operates at relatively high revolutions per minute, and requires low weight on bit. The more durable thermally stable diamond drill bit employs high-temperature TSP (thermally stable) diamond cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. Expectations are that widespread adoption of microhole technology could spawn a wave of 'infill development' drilling of wells spaced between existing wells, which could tap potentially billions of barrels of bypassed oil at shallow depths in mature producing areas. At the same time, microhole coiled tube drilling offers the opportunity to dramatically cut producers' exploration risk to a level comparable to that of drilling development wells. Together, such efforts hold great promise for economically recovering a sizeable portion of the estimated remaining shallow (less than 5,000 feet subsurface) oil resource in the United States. The DOE estimates this U.S. targeted shallow resource at 218 billion barrels. Furthermore, the smaller 'footprint' of the lightweight rigs utilized for microhole drilling and the accompanying reduced drilling waste disposal volumes offer the bonus of added environmental benefits. DOE analysis shows that microhole technology has the potential to cut exploratory drilling costs by at least a third and to slash development drilling costs in half.

Robert Radtke; David Glowka; Man Mohan Rai; David Conroy; Tim Beaton; Rocky Seale; Joseph Hanna; Smith Neyrfor; Homer Robertson

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Casimir effect in hemisphere capped tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the vacuum densities for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling in background of a (2+1)-dimensional spacetime corresponding to a cylindrical tube with a hemispherical cap. A complete set of mode functions is constructed and the positive-frequency Wightman function is evaluated for both the cylindrical and hemispherical subspaces. On the base of this, the vacuum expectation values of the field squared and energy-momentum tensor are investigated. The mean field squared and the normal stress are finite on the boundary separating two subspaces, whereas the energy density and the parallel stress diverge as the inverse power of the distance from the boundary. For a conformally coupled field, the vacuum energy density is negative on the cylindrical part of the space. On the hemisphere, it is negative near the top and positive close to the boundary. In the case of minimal coupling the energy density on the cup is negative. On the tube it is positive near the boundary and negative at large distances. Though the geometries of the subspaces are different, the Casimir pressures on the separate sides of the boundary are equal and the net Casimir force vanishes. The results obtained may be applied to capped carbon nanotubes described by an effective field theory in the long-wavelength approximation.

E. R. Bezerra de Mello; A. A. Saharian

2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

377

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUMNER SUMNER COUNTY, KANSAS Project Number DE-FE0006821 W. Lynn Watney Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Fountainview Wednesday 8-21-12 1:10-1:35 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary Small Scale Field Test Wellington Field Regional Assessment of deep saline Arbuckle aquifer Acknowledgements & Disclaimer Acknowledgements * The work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Grant DE-FE0002056 and DE- FE0006821, W.L. Watney and Jason Rush, Joint PIs. Project is managed and

378

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0-22, 2013 0-22, 2013 Collaborators Zhengrong Wang, Yale University Kevin Johnson, University of Hawaii 2 Presentation Outline * Program Focus Area and DOE Connections * Goals and Objectives * Scope of Work * Technical Discussion * Accomplishments to Date * Project Wrap-up * Appendix (Organization Chart, Gantt Chart, and Bibliography 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed: - Technology development to predict CO 2 storage capacity - Demonstrate fate of injected CO 2 and most common contaminants * Project benefits statement: This research project conducts modeling, laboratory studies, and pilot-scale research aimed at developing new technologies and new systems for utilization of basalt formations for long term subsurface storage of CO 2 . Findings from this project

379

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

behavior of shales as behavior of shales as seals and storage reservoirs for CO2 Project Number: Car Stor_FY131415 Daniel J. Soeder USDOE/NETL/ORD U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Program Goals - Support industry's ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage efficiency while ensuring containment effectiveness * Project Objectives - Assess how shales behave as caprocks in contact with CO 2 under a variety of conditions - Assess the viability of depleted gas shales to serve as storage reservoirs for sequestered CO

380

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 leakage and cap rock remediation DE-FE0001132 Runar Nygaard Missouri University of Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Technical status * Accomplishments to date * Summary 2 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefits statement. - The project develops a coupled reservoir and geomechanical modeling approach to simulate cap rock leakage and simulate the success of remediation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

LUCF Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RZWR'HVLJQDQG RZWR'HVLJQDQG +RZWR'HVLJQDQG ,PSOHPHQW&DUERQ ,PSOHPHQW&DUERQ 0HDVXULQJDQG0RQLWRULQJ 0HDVXULQJDQG0RQLWRULQJ $.WLYLWLHVIRU/8&) $.WLYLWLHVIRU/8&) 3URMH.WV 3URMH.WV Sandra Brown Winrock International sbrown@winrock.org Winrock International 2 3URMH.WGHVLJQLVVXHV 3URMH.WGHVLJQLVVXHV z Baselines and additionality z Leakage z Permanence z Measuring and monitoring z Issues vary with projects in developed versus developing countries Winrock International 3 /HDNDJH /HDNDJH z Leakage is the unanticipated loss or gain in carbon benefits outside of the project's boundary as a result of the project activities-divide into two types: - Primary leakage or activity shifting outside project area - Secondary leakage or market effects due to

382

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web-based CO Web-based CO 2 Subsurface Modeling Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Project Number DE-FE0002069 Christopher Paolini San Diego State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and goals. * Web interface for simulating water-rock interaction. * Development of, and experience teaching, a new Carbon Capture and Sequestration course at San Diego State University. * Some noteworthy results of student research and training in CCS oriented geochemistry. * Status of active student geochemical and geomechancal modeling projects.

383

Project Title:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 DOE Code: Project Lead: Wes Riesland NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY # 291 Project Information Date: 3/1 1/2010 Contractor Code: Project Overview In order to repair this line it was decided to trench a line aproximately 100 feet and tie it into the line at 71-3- 1. What are the environmental sx-3. This will get us out of the old flow line which has been repaired 5-6 times. this will mitigate the chances impacts? of having spills in the future. 2. What is the legal location? This flowline runs from the well77-s-1 0 to the B-2-10 manifold.+ "/-,~?X3 3. What is the duration of the project? Approximately 10 hours(1 day) to complete 4. What major equipment will be used backhoe and operator and one hand if any (work over rig. drilling rig.

384

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Co-Sequestration Co-Sequestration Studies Project Number 58159 Task 2 B. Peter McGrail Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Program Focus Area and DOE Connections * Goals and Objectives * Scope of Work * Technical Discussion * Accomplishments to Date * Project Wrap-up * Appendix (Organization Chart, Gantt Chart, and Bibliography 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed: - Technology development to predict CO 2 and mixed gas storage capacity in various geologic settings - Demonstrate fate of injected mixed gases * Project benefits statement:

385

Project X  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provided by Project X would be a cost- effective approach toin Section I and for the cost estimate necessary as part ofby DOE order 413.3b. The cost range required for CD-0 will

Holmes, Steve

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Sequestration: A Design of Experiment (DoE) & Response Surface (RS) Uncertainty Analysis Project Number: DE-FE-0009238 Mingkan Zhang 1 , Ye Zhang 1 , Peter Lichtner 2 1. Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 2. OFM Research, Inc., Santa Fe, New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project major goals and benefits; * Detailed project objectives & success criteria; * Accomplishments to date; * Summary of results; * Appendix (organization chart; Gantt chart; additional results). Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, University of Wyoming

387

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Region Region DE-FE0001812 Brian J. McPherson University of Utah U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Acknowledgements * NETL * Shell * Tri-State * Trapper Mining * State of Colorado 3 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project / Program Goals * Technical Status: Finalizing 10-Point Protocol for CO 2 Storage Site Characterization * Key Accomplishments * Summary 4 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project / Program Goals * Technical Status: Finalizing 10-Point Protocol for CO 2 Storage Site Characterization * Key Accomplishments * Summary 5 Benefit to the Program Program Goals Being Addressed by this Project

388

Joule heating induced by vortex motion in a type-II superconductor Z. L. Xiao and E. Y. Andrei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joule heating induced by vortex motion in a type-II superconductor Z. L. Xiao and E. Y. Andrei-II superconductor due to Joule heating induced by vortex motion. The effect of Joule heating is detected s duration, where the Joule heating is negligible and saturates, respectively. The thermometry is based

Andrei, Eva Y.

389

Method for the assessment of airborne off-target pesticide spray concentrations due to aircraft wing-tip vortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that spherical spray droplets are transported by a two dimensional parametric representation of a spray-engulfing aircraft wing-tip vortex pair. Two distinctive flow regions were considered for the spray-vortex dynamics. The first occurs in the vicinity...

Oliva, Sergio Eduardo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

390

Counter-rotating vortex patches in shear: a model of the effect of wind shear on aircraft trailing vortices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...significantly a following passenger-containing aircraft and cause an accident. For example, the vortex wake of a Boeing 747 can rotate a Boeing 737 through 45 . This problem is called the trailing-vortex hazard, and since the trailing vortices can...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Slowing of vortex rings by development of Kelvin waves Robert E. Hershberger, Diogo Bolster, and Russell J. Donnelly*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of existence, their duration a problem of stability and if there are several we have a problem of vortex mecha- nism is that the bubble loses impulse as the radius of the ring grows due to viscous decay of circulation 6 . A further theory suggests that the vortex bubble the ambient fluid car- ried along

Bolster, Diogo

392

Observation of Hybrid Soliton Vortex-Ring Structures in Bose-Einstein Condensates Naomi S. Ginsberg,1,* Joachim Brand,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Einstein condensates. We examine both their creation via soliton-vortex collisions and their subsequent development into vortex rings (VRs) [7,8] via the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili, or ``snake,'' instability [9]. In this Letter frequencies !z 2 21 Hz and !x !y 3:0!z in our 4-Dee magnetic trap [14]. We work at temperatures well below

Hau, Lene Vestergaard

393

LANSCE Drift Tube Linac Water Control System Refurbishment  

SciTech Connect

There are several refurbishment projects underway at the Los Alamos National Laboratory LANSCE linear accelerator. Systems involved are: RF, water cooling, networks, diagnostics, timing, controls, etc. The Drift Tube Linac (DTL) portion of the accelerator consists of four DTL tanks, each with three independent water control systems. The systems are about 40 years old, use outdated and non-replaceable equipment and NIM bin control modules, are beyond their design life and provide unstable temperature control. Insufficient instrumentation and documentation further complicate efforts at maintaining system performance. Detailed design of the replacement cooling systems is currently in progress. Previous design experience on the SNS accelerator water cooling systems will be leveraged, see the SNS DTL FDR. Plans call for replacement of water piping, manifolds, pumps, valves, mix tanks, instrumentation (flow, pressure and temperature) and control system hardware and software. This presentation will focus on the control system design with specific attention on planned use of the National Instruments Compact RIO platform with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control system (EPICS) software toolkit.

Marroquin, Pilar S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Experimental Study of A Solar-Powered Adsorption Cooling Tube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The operating principle of this solar cooling tube, which consists of four major components, a solar collector, an adsorbent bed, a condenser, and an evaporator all in one glass tube, is also presented. ... Inserted into the chilling water tank, the evaporator of the solar cooling tube was used to collect the refrigeration capacity produced by the evaporation of the refrigerant at night. ... The experimental setup was mounted facing south at an angle of 30° from the horizontal on a steel shelf. ...

Xiaodong Ma; Zhenyan Liu; Huizhong Zhao

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

395

Polarization-selective vortex-core switching by tailored orthogonal Gaussian-pulse currents  

SciTech Connect

We experimentally demonstrate low-power-consumption vortex-core switching in magnetic nanodisks using tailored rotating magnetic fields produced with orthogonal and unipolar Gaussian-pulse currents. The optimal width of the orthogonal pulses and their time delay are found, from analytical and micromagnetic numerical calculations, to be determined only by the angular eigenfrequency {omega}{sub D} for a given vortex-state disk of polarization p, such that {sigma}=1/{omega}{sub D} and ?{Delta}t={pi}/2 p/{omega}{sub D} . The estimated optimal pulse parameters are in good agreement with the experimental results. This work lays a foundation for energy-efficient information recording in vortex-core cross-point architecture.

Jung, H.; Choi, Y. -S.; Yoo, M. -W.; Im, M. -Y.; Kim, S. -K.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

396

Experimental study of vortex generators effects on low Reynolds number airfoils in turbulent flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present work, we study the aerodynamic effects of triangular vortex generators, as passive flow control devices, placed on the upper surface of an airfoil submitted to a low Reynolds number turbulent flow. In the experiments, different configurations of those devices have been studied. An Eppler 387 airfoil was used. The tests were performed in a turbulent boundary layer wind tunnel using a two component aerodynamic balance and flow visualisation systems. Turbulent flow characterisation was made by means of hot wire anemometry. Calculations of local turbulent intensity as well as temporal and spatial turbulent scales were made. Vortex generators were located at 10% and 20% of the airfoil chord from the leading edge, modifying its angle of incidence refereed to the free stream. The results show changes in the aerodynamic section coefficients, C1, Cd and C1, for the different vortex generator configurations. Neither hysteresis effects, nor leading edge bubbles were found in the experiments.

Juan Sebastián Delnero; Julio Marañon Di Leo; Mauricio Ezequiel Camocardi; Mariano A. Martinez; Jorge L. Colman Lerner

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Residual Strain Distribution in Bent Composite Boiler Tubes  

SciTech Connect

Kraft recovery boilers are typically constructed of carbon steel boiler tubes clad with a corrosion resistant layer, and these composite tubes are bent and welded together to form air port panels which enable the combustion air to enter the boiler. In this paper, the through-thickness residual strain in the carbon steel layer of non-heat-treated and heat-treated composite bent tubes were measured by neutron diffraction techniques and modeled by finite element modeling. The results can be used to optimize material selection and manufacturing processes to prevent stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue cracking in the boiler tubes.

Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL; Tang, Fei [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Thermal Performance of a Double-Tube Type Lng Vaporizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This report concerns the confirmed test results and method of analysis of the thermal performance of a double-tube type LNG vaporizer (DTV). The DTV is a...

Y. Miyata; T. Miura; S. Kasahara; H. Shohtani…

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Fracture analysis of HFIR beam tube caused by radiation embrittlement  

SciTech Connect

With an attempt to estimate the neutron beam tube embrittlement condition for the Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), fracture mechanics calculations are carried out in this paper. The analysis provides some numerical result on how the tube has been structurally weakened. In this calculation, a lateral impact force is assumed. Numerical result is obtained on how much the critical crack size should be reduced if the beam tube has been subjected to an extended period of irradiation. It is also calculated that buckling strength of the tube is increased, not decreased, with irradiation.

Chang, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Research Reactors Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

Penetrameter positioner for bore-side radiography of tubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positioner is provided for placing plaque or wire penetrameters, as used in radiographic inspection, in close proximity with the inner wall of tubing at any desired location along the tubing. The positioner head carrying the penetrameter is inflatable whereby it is positioned in tte deflated condition, inflated to place the penetrameter against a weld to be inspected in the tubing wall, and then deflated during removal. If desired, the penetrameter holder may be used to center the radiographic source on the axis of the tube.

Davis, E.V.; Foster, B.E.

1980-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Failure of extruded magnesium alloy tubes during hydroforming.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research is currently being conducted on the feasibility of hydroforming extruded magnesium tubes to integrate multiple parts into a single hydroformed section. Among other advantages,… (more)

Hiscocks, Jessica.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Analysis of composite tube cracking in recovery boiler floors  

SciTech Connect

Cracking of co-extruded (generally identified as composite) floor tubes in kraft black liquor recovery boilers was first observed in Scandinavia, but this problem has now been found in many North American boilers. In most cases, cracking in the outer 304L stainless steel has not progressed into the carbon steel, but the potential for such crack propagation is a cause of concern. A multidimensional study has been initiated to characterize the cracking seen in composite floor tubes, to measure the residual stresses resulting from composite tube fabrication, and to predict the stresses in tubes under operating conditions. The characterization studies include review of available reports and documents on composite tube cracking, metallographic examination of a substantial number of cracked tubes, and evaluation of the dislocation structure in cracked tubes. Neutron and X-ray diffraction are being used to determine the residual stresses in composite tubes from two major manufacturers, and finite element analysis is being used to predict the stresses in the tubes during normal operation and under conditions where thermal fluctuations occur.

Keiser, J.R.; Taljat, B.; Wang, X.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Singbeil, D.L.; Prescott, R. [Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Lower pseudogap phase of Mott insulators: A spin/vortex liquid state  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pseudogap phase is considered to be a new state of matter in the phase string model of the doped Mott insulator, which is composed of two distinct regimes known as the upper and lower pseudogap phases, respectively. The former corresponds to the formation of spin-singlet pairing, the magnetic characterizations of which have been recently studied [Phys. Rev. B 72, 104520 (2005)]. The latter, as a low-temperature regime of the pseudogap phase, is systematically explored in this work, which is characterized by the formation of the Cooper pair amplitude and described by a generalized Ginzburg-Landau theory. Elementary excitation in this phase is a charge-neutral object carrying spin-1?2 and locking with a supercurrent vortex, known as a spinon-vortex composite. Such a lower pseudogap phase can be regarded as a vortex liquid state due to the presence of free spinon vortices. Here thermally excited spinon vortices destroy the phase coherence and are responsible for the nontrivial Nernst effect and diamagnetism. The transport entropy and core energy associated with a spinon vortex are determined by the spin degrees of freedom. Such a spontaneous vortex liquid phase can be also considered as a spin liquid with a finite correlation length and gaped S=1?2 excitations, where a resonancelike nonpropagating spin mode emerges at the antiferromagnetic wavevector (?,?) with a doping-dependent characteristic energy. The superconducting phase is closely related to the lower pseudogap phase by a topological transition with spinon vortices and antivortices forming bound pairs and the emergence of fermionic quasiparticles as holon-spinon-vortex bound objects. A quantitative phase diagram in the parameter space of doping, temperature, and magnetic field is determined. Comparisons with experiments are also made.

Zheng-Yu Weng and Xiao-Liang Qi

2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

404

Novel vortex dynamics in untwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} single crystals  

SciTech Connect

Magnetotransport measurements on a clean, untwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} single crystal show that the vortex dynamics at temperatures just below the vortex lattice melting transition are highly dependent on the type of modulation of the probing current. While in the case of DC current the flux flow is disordered, the {open_quotes}shaking{close_quotes} of the vortex lattice by a square-wave current leads to a more uniform vortex motion. A small asymmetry ({approximately}10%) in the durations of the positive and negative parts of the square-wave period induces periodical oscillations of the voltage response amplitude. The period of oscillations ({approximately}100 s) is the same order of magnitude as the time needed for vortices to cross the sample (transit time). The authors relate the observed voltage oscillations to a periodically ordered vortex motion.

Gordeev, S.N.; Oussena, M.; Pinfold, S.; Langan, R.M. [Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom)] [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Phase-locking of driven vortex lattices with transverse ac force and periodic pinning  

SciTech Connect

For a vortex lattice moving in a periodic array we show analytically and numerically that a new type of phase locking occurs in the presence of a longitudinal dc driving force and a transverse ac driving force. This phase locking is distinct from the Shapiro step phase locking found with longitudinal ac drives. We show that an increase in critical current and a fundamental phase-locked step width scale with the square of the driving ac amplitude. Our results should carry over to other systems such as vortex motion in Josephson-junction arrays.

Reichhardt, Charles; Kolton, Alejandro B.; Dominguez, Daniel; Gronbech-Jensen, Niels

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Low-temperature vortex dynamics in a high-temperature superconductor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Magnetic-field gradients in the mixed state of a type-II superconductor are studied using Tl205 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10+?. An anomalous peak was observed in the temperature dependence of the transverse relaxation rate at T/Tc?0.25. We attribute this behavior to magnetic-field flucutations from vortex dynamics. We interpret this behavior as a crossover of the principal time scale for vortex dynamics with that of the NMR experiment, approximately 100 ?s. The temperature dependence of this time scale is discussed.

Y.-Q. Song; S. Tripp; W. P. Halperin; L. Tonge; T. J. Marks

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The effects of a jet on vortex breakdown over a sharp leading-edge delta wing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE EFFECTS OF A JET ON VORTEX BREAKDOWN OVER A SHARP LEADING-EDGE DELTA WING A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985... Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering THE EFFECTS OF A JET ON VORTEX BREAKDOWN OVER A SHARP LEADING-EDGE DELTA WING A Thesis by IAN KENNETH MAYNARD Approved as to style and content by: Cyrus Ostowar (Chairman of Committee) Stan J Miley (M er...

Maynard, Ian Kenneth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

408

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

medical and dental centre; shop and café area for students and vacation accommodation centre. The new & Figures: Budget: £51,074,000 Funding Source: Capital Plan Construction Project Programme: Start on Site

409

Preparing for Project Implementation Financing Project Implementation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Project Implementation Financing Project Implementation Save Energy Now LEADER Web Conference Project Implementation Seminar Series Save Energy Now LEADER Web Conference...

410

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Geological CO Monitoring Geological CO 2 Sequestration using Perfluorocarbon and Stable Isotope Tracers Project Number FEAA-045 Tommy J. Phelps and David R. Cole* Oak Ridge National Laboratory Phone: 865-574-7290 email: phelpstj@ornl.gov (*The Ohio State University) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 22, 2013 2 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Goal: Develop methods to interrogate subsurface for improved CO 2 sequestration, field test characterization and MVA, demonstrate CO 2 remains in zone, and tech transfer. Objectives: 1. Assessment of injections in field. PFT gas tracers are analyzed by GC-ECD to

411

Project Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle School Home Energy Audit Middle School Home Energy Audit Project Homepage NTEP Home - Project Homepage - Teacher Homepage - Student Pages Abstract: This set of lessons provides an opportunity for midlevel students to gain a basic understanding of how energy is turned into power, how power is measured using a meter, the costs of those units and the eventual reduction of energy consumption and cost to the consumer. Introduction to Research: By conducting energy audits of their own homes and completing exercises to gain baclground information, students begin to see the importance of energy in their daily lives. By using the Internet as a research tool, students gain develop research skills as they gain knowledge for their project. They use e-mail to collaborate with energy experts and share results with other

412

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Title: DEVELOPING A Title: DEVELOPING A COMPREHENSIVE RISK ASSESMENT FRAMEWORK FOR GEOLOGICAL STORAGE OF CO2 Ian Duncan University of Texas U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline 1. Benefit to the Program 2. Goals and Objectives 3. Technical Status Project 4. Accomplishments to Date 5. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program The research project is developing a comprehensive understanding of the programmatic (business), and technical risks associated with CCS particularly the likelihood of leakage and its potential consequences. This contributes to the Carbon Storage Program's effort of ensuring 99 percent CO

413

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Acknowledgments Dave Harris, Kentucky Geological Survey Dave Barnes, Western Michigan University John Rupp, Indiana Geological Survey Scott Marsteller, Schlumberger Carbon Services John McBride, Brigham Young University * Project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and by a cost share agreement with the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Office of Coal Development through the Illinois Clean Coal Institute * ConocoPhillips: in-kind match * Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation: matching funding * SeisRes 2020, Houston: VSP acquisition and processing

414

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Analyze Spatial and Temporal to Analyze Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneities in Reservoir and Seal Petrology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry: Implications for CO 2 Sequestration Prediction, Simulation, and Monitoring Project Number DE-FE0001852 Dr. Brenda B. Bowen Purdue University (now at the University of Utah) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction to the project * Tasks * Student training * Student research successes * Lessons learned and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Addresses Carbon Storage Program major goals: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

415

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Results from Simulation Project Results from Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO 2 Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of Midwest United States DOE Award No. DE-FE0001034 Ohio Dept. of Dev. Grant CDO/D-10-03 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting August 21-23, 2012 Joel Sminchak and Neeraj Gupta Battelle Energy Systems sminchak@battelle.org, 614-424-7392 gupta@battelle.org, 614-424-3820 BUSINESS SENSITIVE 2 Presentation Outline 1. Technical Status 2. Background (CO 2 Sources, Geologic Setting) 3. Injection Well history 4. Geocellular Model Development 5. Geological Data (Geological dataset, Geostatistics) 6. Geocellular porosity/permeability model development 7. Pipeline Routing Analysis

416

Research projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yuan » Research projects Yuan » Research projects Research projects Research Interests Scientific computing, domain decomposition methods Linear solvers for sparse matrices Computational plasma physics Grid generation techniques GPU computing Current Research PDSLin: A hybrid linear solver for large-scale highly-indefinite linear systems The Parallel Domain decomposition Schur complement based Linear solver (PDSLin), which implements a hybrid (direct and iterative) linear solver based on a non-overlapping domain decomposition technique called chur complement method, and it has two levels of parallelism: a) to solve independent subdomains in parallel and b) to apply multiple processors per subdomain. In such a framework, load imbalance and excessive communication lead to the performance bottlenecks, and several techniques are developed

417

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SECARB Anthropogenic Test: SECARB Anthropogenic Test: CO 2 Capture/Transportation/Storage Project # DE-FC26-05NT42590 Jerry Hill, Southern Sates Energy Board Richard A. Esposito, Southern Company U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - CO 2 Capture - CO 2 Transportation - CO 2 Storage * Accomplishments to Date * Organization Chart * Gantt Chart * Bibliography * Summary Benefit to the Program 1. Predict storage capacities within +/- 30% * Conducted high resolution reservoir characterization of the Paluxy saline formation key

418

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of the CO Investigation of the CO 2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations Project Number DE-FE-0004731 Jennifer Wilcox, Tony Kovscek, Mark Zoback Stanford University, School of Earth Sciences U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Project Benefits * Technical Status * Imaging at mm- to micron-scales using CT - Permeability measurements and application of the Klinkenberg effect - Molecular Dynamics simulations for permeability and viscosity estimates * Accomplishments to Date * Summary Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Carbon Storage Program major goals

419

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fidelity Computational Analysis of Fidelity Computational Analysis of CO2 Trappings at Pore-scales Project Number: DE-FE0002407 Vinod Kumar (vkumar@utep.edu) & Paul Delgado (pmdelgado2@utep.edu) University of Texas at El Paso U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Collaborators: Dr. C. Harris (Shell Oil Company/Imperial College), Dr. G. Bromhal (NETL), Dr. M. Ferer (WVU/NETL), Dr. D. Crandall (NETL-Ctr), and Dr. D. McIntyre (NETL). 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - Pore-network modeling - Conductance derivation for irregular geom. - Pore-to-CFD Computations

420

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY Bittersweet Energy Inc. Partners FE0002056 Devilbiss Coring Service Basic Energy Services Wellington Field Operator Industrial and Electrical Power Sources of CO 2 Southwest Kansas CO 2 -EOR Initiative Industry Partners (modeling 4 Chester/Morrowan oil fields to make CO2 ready) +drilling and seismic contractors TBN

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 Brighton 1&2 2:40 August 20, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Modeling CO 2 Sequestration in Saline A quifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional CO 2 Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau A quifer System, South-Central Kansas Co-Principal Investigators Co-Principal Investigators Kerry D. Newell -- stratigraphy, geochemistry

422

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracer for Tracking Permanent CO 2 Storage in Basaltic Rocks DE-FE0004847 Jennifer Hall Columbia University in the City of New York U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Conservative and Reactive Tracer Techniques * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * The goal of the project is to develop and test novel geochemical tracer techniques for quantitative monitoring, verification and accounting of stored CO 2 . These techniques contribute to the Carbon Storage Program's

423

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Geotechnical Site and Geotechnical Site Investigations for the Design of a CO 2 Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection Facility Project Number DOE Grant FE0001833 Paul Metz Department of Mining & Geological Engineering University of Alaska Fairbanks U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix: Not Included in Presentation 3 Benefit to the Program * Carbon Storage Program Major Goals: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to

424

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale CO Scale CO 2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States Project Number: DE-FE0010554 George J. Koperna, Jr. Shawna Cyphers Advanced Resources International U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Program Goals * Benefits Statement * Project Overview - Goals - Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix USDOE/NETL Program Goals * Support industry's ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence. * Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage

425

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUMNER COUNTY, KANSAS DE-FE0006821 W. Lynn Watney, Jason Rush, Joint PIs Kansas Geological Survey The University of Kansas Lawrence, KS U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Brighton 1&2 Wednesday 8-21-13 1:10-1:35 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 2 Small Scale Field Test Wellington Field Regional Assessment of deep saline Arbuckle aquifer Project Team DOE-NETL Contract #FE0006821 KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 3 L. Watney (Joint PI), J. Rush (Joint PI), J. Doveton, E. Holubnyak, M. Fazelalavi, R. Miller, D. Newell, J. Raney

426

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seal Repair Using Seal Repair Using Nanocomposite Materials Project Number DE-FE0009562 John Stormont, Mahmoud Reda Taha University of New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Ed Matteo, Thomas Dewers Sandia National Laboratories 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction and overview * Materials synthesis * Materials testing and characterization * Annular seal system testing * Numerical simulation * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * BENEFITS STATEMENT: The project involves the development and testing of polymer-cement nanocomposites for repairing flaws in annular wellbore seals. These materials will have superior characteristics compared to conventional

427

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming: MVA Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock Integrity Project Number DE-FE0002112 PIs Drs. John Kaszuba and Kenneth Sims Virginia Marcon University of Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - Results - Conclusions - Next Steps * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. - Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA). MVA technologies seek to monitor, verify, and

428

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of CO Impact of CO 2 Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology Project Number (DEFE0002421) Dr. Yiran Dong Drs. Bruce W. Fouke, Robert A. Sanford, Stephen Marshak University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Technical status * Results and discussion * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program This research project has developed scientific, technical and institutional collaborations for the development of

429

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira University of Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status o Experimentation: core-flooding and IFT/CA o Pore-scale modeling modeling * Accomplishments to Date * Summary University of Wyoming 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: o 'Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent.' * Benefits statement: o The research project is focused on performing reservoir conditions experiments to measure steady-state relative permeabilities,

430

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MVA Tools MVA Tools Sam Clegg, Kristy Nowak-Lovato, Ron Martinez, Julianna Fessenden, Thom Rahn, & Lianjie Huang Los Alamos National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview - Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix - Organization Chart - Bibliography 3 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Surface MVA - Frequency Modulated Spectroscopy - Quantitatively identify CO2, H2S and CH4 seepage from geologic sequestration sites - Distinguish anthropogenic CO2 from natural CO2 emissions * CO2 carbon stable isotope measurements

431

Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services1 Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services1 #12;Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The purpose of the UBC Project Services web-based project management portal project on campus within Project Services, and with the rest of the UBC community. We began this project by defining

432

NREL: Biomass Research - Biochemical Conversion Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion Projects Biochemical Conversion Projects A photo of a woman looking at the underside of a clear plastic tray. The tray has a grid of small holes to hold sample tubes. An NREL researcher examines a sample tray used in the BioScreen C, an instrument used to monitor the growth of microorganisms under different conditions. NREL's projects in biochemical conversion involve three basic steps to convert biomass feedstocks to fuels: Converting biomass to sugar or other fermentation feedstock Fermenting these biomass intermediates using biocatalysts (microorganisms including yeast and bacteria) Processing the fermentation product to yield fuel-grade ethanol and other fuels. Among the current biochemical conversion RD&D projects at NREL are: Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis

433

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 BROWN 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits & overview of deriving acrylates from coupling carbon dioxide and ethylene * Chemical catalysis approach: background and battles left to fight * Experimental assessment of the viability of thermochemical acrylate production * Perspectives for the future BROWN 3 Benefit to the Program * This project identifies the critical catalyst features necessary to promote carbon dioxide coupling with ethylene to acrylate at molybdenum catalysts. This research demonstrates the viability of acrylate production

434

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Proof-of-Feasibility of Using Wellbore Deformation as a Diagnostic Tool to Improve CO2 Sequestration DE FE0004542 Larry Murdoch, Clemson University Stephen Moysey, Clemson University Leonid Germanovich, Georgia Tech Cem Ozan, Baker Hughes Sihyun Kim, Georgia Tech Glenn Skawski, Clemson University Alex Hanna, Clemson University Johnathan Ebenhack, Clemson University Josh Smith, Clemson University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Proof-of-Feasibility of Using Wellbore Deformation as a Diagnostic Tool, Larry Murdoch Project Review Meeting, 23 Aug. 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Preliminaries

435

Hallmark Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Project Commercialization of the Secure SCADA Communications Protocol, a cryptographic security solution for device-to-device communication Increased connectivity and automation in the control systems that manage the nation's energy infrastructure have improved system functionality, but left systems more vulnerable to cyber attack. Intruders could severely disrupt control system operation by sending fabricated information or commands to control system devices. To ensure message integrity, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems require a method to validate device-to- device communication and verify that information has come from a trusted source and not been altered in transit. The Secure SCADA Communications Protocol (SSCP) provides message

436

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE-FE0001836: DE-FE0001836: Numerical modeling of geomechanical processes related to CO 2 injection within generic reservoirs Andreas Eckert & Runar Nygaard Missouri University of Science & Technology U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Objectives, Benefits and Outcomes * Technical status: Project summary - Teaching - Reservoir scale (Geomechanics & Fluid flow simulation) - Borehole scale (Wellbore integrity & wellbore trajectory planning) * Conclusions * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries'

437

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE-FE0002225: DE-FE0002225: Actualistic and geochemical modeling of reservoir rock, CO 2 and formation fluid interaction, Citronelle oil field, Alabama West Virginia University & University of Alabama Presenter: Dr. Amy Weislogel (WVU) Co-PI: Dr. Rona Donahoe (UA) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits * Overview & Project Map * Reservoir Geochemical Characterization * Formation Fluid Geochemistry * Geochemical Modeling * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries'

438

Cloudnet Project  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Cloudnet is a research project supported by the European Commission. This project aims to use data obtained quasi-continuously for the development and implementation of cloud remote sensing synergy algorithms. The use of active instruments (lidar and radar) results in detailed vertical profiles of important cloud parameters which cannot be derived from current satellite sensing techniques. A network of three already existing cloud remote sensing stations (CRS-stations) will be operated for a two year period, activities will be co-ordinated, data formats harmonised and analysis of the data performed to evaluate the representation of clouds in four major european weather forecast models.

Hogan, Robin

439

Status Report on Studies of Recovery Boiler Composite Floor Tube Cracking  

SciTech Connect

Cracking of the stainless steel layer of co-extruded 304L stainless steel/SA210 Gd A 1 carbon steel black liquor recovery boiler floor tubes has been identified as one of the most serious material problems in the pulp and paper industry. A DOE-funded study was initiated in 1995 with the goal of determining the cause of and possible solutions to this cracking problem. These studies have characterized tube cracking as well as the chemical and thermal environment and stress state of floor tubes. Investigations of possible cracking mechanisms indicate that stress corrosion cracking rather than thermal fatigue is a more likely cause of crack initiation. The cracking mechanism appears to require the presence of hydrated sodium sulfide and is most likely active during shut-downs and/or start-ups. Based on these results and operating experience, certain alloys appear to be more resistant than others to cracking in the floor environment, and certain operating practices appear to significantly lessen the likelihood of cracking. This report is the latest in a series of progress reports presented on this project.

Eng, P.; Frederick, L.A.; Hoffmann, C.M.; Keiser, J.R.; Mahmood, J.; Maziasz, P.J.; Prescott, R.; Sarma, G.B.; Singbeil, D.L.; Singh, P.M.; Swindeman, R.W.; Wang, X.-L.

1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

440

Correlated vortex pinning in slightly orthorhombic twinned Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 single crystals: Possible shift of the vortex-glass/liquid transition  

SciTech Connect

The interest in twin-boundary (TB) planes as a source of vortex pinning has been recently renewed with the discovery of the new iron-arsenide pnictide superconductors. In the family of compounds Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 a structural transition from a tetragonal to orthorhombic lattice takes place for compounds with xvortex cores. In this work we investigate the changes in anisotropy produced by subtle differences in the Co doping level, in the neighborhood of the structural transition, in good-quality single crystals. Using a scaling approach we are able to determine the angular regions where correlated or uncorrelated disorder prevails. In the tetragonal samples (x>xcr) there is no twinning and we find good agreement with the expected scaling function under uncorrelated disorder, with small anisotropy values similar to those reported in the literature. We show that in the orthorhombic samples (xvortex liquid-glass transition temperature.

Bermudez, M. Marziali [Universidad de Buenos Aires; Pasquini, G. [Universidad de Buenos Aires; Budko, Sergey L. [Ames Laboratory; Canfield, Paul C. [Ames Laboratory

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Waterside Stress Assisted Corrosion (SAC) of Boiler Tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waterside Stress Assisted Corrosion (SAC) of Boiler Tubes School of Materials Science Boiler Areas Susceptible to SAC · Generally SAC initiates near weld joints on cold side of tubes · SAC cracks are difficult to detect inaccessibility · Failures Detected at Various Locations in Boilers

Das, Suman

442

Gaseous Detonation-Driven Fracture of Tubes Tong Wa Chao  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gaseous Detonation-Driven Fracture of Tubes Thesis by Tong Wa Chao In Partial Fulfillment An experimental investigation of fracture response of aluminum 6061-T6 tubes under internal gaseous detonation on the detonation velocity, strain history, blast pressure from the crack opening, and crack speeds. The curved

443

Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

Liska, Donald J. (Los Alamos, NM); Schamaun, Roger G. (Los Alamos, NM); Clark, Donald C. (Los Alamos, NM); Potter, R. Christopher (Los Alamos, NM); Frank, Joseph A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

LinkedTube: semantic information on web media objects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

LinkedTube is a service to create semantic and non-semantic relationships between videos available on services on the Internet (such as YouTube) and external elements (such as Wikipedia, Internet Movie Database, DBPedia, etc). The relationships are defined ... Keywords: metadata, multimedia, semantic web

Carlos Eduardo C. F. Batista; Daniel Schwabe

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

Liska, D.J.; Schamaun, R.G.; Clark, D.C.; Potter, R.C.; Frank, J.A.

1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

446

Variable-energy drift-tube linear accelerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A linear accelerator system includes a plurality of post-coupled drift-tubes wherein each post coupler is bistably positionable to either of two positions which result in different field distributions. With binary control over a plurality of post couplers, a significant accumlative effect in the resulting field distribution is achieved yielding a variable-energy drift-tube linear accelerator.

Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM); Potter, James M. (Los Alamos, NM); Stovall, James E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

ORCHARD BEE NESTING MATERIALS ACE PAPER TUBE CORPORATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORCHARD BEE NESTING MATERIALS ACE PAPER TUBE CORPORATION Nesting Tubes 4918 Denison Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 44102 Tel: 216-961-0250 Mason Bees and Nesting Supplies 21323 232nd St. SE, Monroe, Washington 98272-8982 Fax: 206-820-8037 E-mail: easugden@msn.com MAXTEK Nest Blocks Chuck McSween Tel: 425

448

Cosmic R-string, R-tube and Vacuum Instability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that a cosmic string associated with spontaneous $U(1)_R$ symmetry breaking gives a constraint for supersymmetric model building. In some models, the string can be viewed as a tube-like domain wall with a winding number interpolating a false vacuum and a true vacuum. Such string causes inhomogeneous decay of the false vacuum to the true vacuum via rapid expansion of the radius of the tube and hence its formation would be inconsistent with the present Universe. However, we demonstrate that there exist metastable solutions which do not expand rapidly. Furthermore, when the true vacua are degenerate, the structure inside the tube becomes involved. As an example, we show a "bamboo"-like solution, which suggests a possibility observing an information of true vacua from outside of the tube through the shape and the tension of the tube.

Minoru Eto; Yuta Hamada; Kohei Kamada; Tatsuo Kobayashi; Keisuke Ohashi; Yutaka Ookouchi

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Heavy wall production tubing design for special alloy steels  

SciTech Connect

Critical wells require a comprehensive design philosophy for downhole tubulars. This paper describes novel design techniques used on four key tasks in tubing design common to all severe service wells: Material Selection, Sizing the Tubing, Threaded Connector Qualification, Field Installation Planning. The in-depth engineering approach applies stringent material and threaded connector qualification with new tubing sizing methods and thorough installation planning. Standard tubing sizing methods are unacceptable due to conservatism with respect to erosional velocity and inaccuracy with respect to stress analysis. Proper stress analysis of alloys requires consideration of triaxial stress, anisotropy, and temperatureweakening. New design equations are given for tubing sizing applicable to critical, corrosive wells where special materials are selected for corrosion mitigation.

Payne, M.L.; Hurst, D.M.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Application of hydrostatic extrusion to fabrication of zircaloy tubing  

SciTech Connect

Two approaches are presented to the fabrication of BWR Zircaloy cladding tubes: (7) replacing the final pass of the pilgering process with cold hydrostatic extrusion, and (2) application of hot hydrostatic extrusion to the manufacture of tube shells which are then processed by the conventional pilgering process. With the first approach, an extrusion ratio (ER) of 5 could be obtained, but it should be limited to a maximum of 3 to prevent the occurence of galling. The properties of the obtained tubes were nearly identical to those of the current BWR cladding tubes. Application of the second technique resulted in an increase of ER to three times that of the conventional direct extrusion. The tubing processed at higher ER showed higher strength and lower ductility in the tension tests but exhibited higher ductility in the burst tests. 5 refs.

Nagai, N.; Kakuma, T.; Matsushita, T.; Kimpara, M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

PROJECT REQUEST FORM PROJECT HOLDER INFORMATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROJECT REQUEST FORM Last Name: Email: PROJECT HOLDER INFORMATION UCID:Last Name: Email: Institute if different than Project Holder) First Name: Project Short Name: (50 characters max) (for eFIN view only) Project Title: PROJECT INFORMATION Start Date (MM/DD/YYYY): End Date (MM/DD/YYYY): For Questions or HELP

de Leon, Alex R.

452

Tropical cyclone genesis efficiency: mid-level versus bottom vortex Xuyang Ge and Tim Li  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;4 1. Introduction Tropical cyclone (TC) genesis is the least understood phase in a TC life cycle is cyclogenesis in an environment with a mid-level vortex (EMV). An analysis of the WNP TC genesis in 2000 the QuikSCAT-derived surface wind observations, there was no sign

Li, Tim

453

Cherenkov resonances in vortex dissipation in superconductors B. I. Ivlev and S. Mejia-Rosales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Mexico M. N. Kunchur Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South-two superconductors the magnetic flux is carried by vortices. If the transport electric current greatly exceeds in the crystal the dissipa- tion increases due to Cherenkov emission of sound waves. Each moving vortex creates

Kunchur, Milind N.

454

ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 27, NO. 2, 2010, 243252 Mesoscale Barotropic Instability of Vortex Rossby  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 27, NO. 2, 2010, 243­252 Mesoscale Barotropic Instability of Vortex Rossby Waves in Tropical Cyclones ZHONG Wei1 ( Í), LU Han-Cheng1 (ö ), and Da-Lin ZHANG2 1 Institute of Meteorology, PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 211101 2 Department

Zhang, Da-Lin

455

Sediment resuspension and erosion by vortex rings R. J. Munro,1,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediment resuspension and erosion by vortex rings R. J. Munro,1,a N. Bethke,2 and S. B. Dalziel2 1; accepted 26 January 2009; published online 8 April 2009 Particle resuspension and erosion induced-ring propagation speed. The critical conditions for resuspension whereby particles are only just resuspended were

Dalziel, Stuart

456

Particle resuspension by an impacting vortex ring RICK J. MUNRO & STUART B. DALZIEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particle resuspension by an impacting vortex ring RICK J. MUNRO & STUART B. DALZIEL Department results from a set of visualization experiments conducted to analyse the hydrodynamic resuspension of particles from a thick horizontal sediment layer. The mechanism employed to produce the resuspension

Dalziel, Stuart

457

Vortex Ring Interaction with a Particle Layer: Implications for Sediment Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resuspension has been studied much less. This is an important mechanism, however, as it represents an integral conducted to study particle resuspension by vortex rings colliding with a particle bed. The dynamics at the resuspension onset are investigated, showing that the deformable particle bed resembles a free slip boundary

Dalziel, Stuart

458

Resuspension onset and crater erosion by a vortex ring interacting with a particle layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents results from an experimental investigation of the interaction of a vortex ring with a particle layer. The flowdynamics during the onset of particle resuspension are analysed using particle image velocimetry while a light attenuation method provides accurate measurements of the final eroded crater shape. This work is a continuation of the research described in R. J. Munro N. Bethke and S. B. Dalziel “Sediment resuspension and erosion by vortex rings ” Phys. Fluids21 046601 (2009)10.1063/1.3083318 which focussed on the general resuspension onset dynamics and initial crater formation. Here we analyse the velocity induced by the vortex ring on the particle layer surface during the resuspension of particles for different particle sizes and the shape and size of the final craters that are formed by the impact of the vortex ring. We find that the boundary condition is characterised by a quasi-slip velocity at the particle layer surface independent of the particle size. The particle diameter and thus bed permeability is found to have a significant effect on the final crater characteristics.

N. Bethke; S. B. Dalziel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Resuspension onset and crater erosion by a vortex ring interacting with a particle layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resuspension onset and crater erosion by a vortex ring interacting with a particle layer N. Bethke://pof.aip.org/features/most_downloaded Information for Authors: http://pof.aip.org/authors #12;PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 063301 (2012) Resuspension onset layer. The flow dynamics during the onset of particle resuspension are analysed using particle image

Dalziel, Stuart

460

Tip Vortex Field Resolution Using an Adaptive Dual-Mesh Computational Nathan Hariharan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the aforementioned unsteady, vortical fields. 1. Introduction 1.1 Background Vortical wakes introduce important AMR in an unstructured Euler solver. Potsdam[3] also applied unstructured AMR to wind turbine wake1 Tip Vortex Field Resolution Using an Adaptive Dual-Mesh Computational Paradigm Nathan Hariharan

Steffen, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

First-order disorder-driven transition and inverse melting of the vortex lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

`inverse' melting behavior. � 2001 Published by Elsevier Science B.V. Keywords: Type-II superconductivity-order transition (FOT) [1±5] whereas at low temperatures the ordered vortex lattice transforms into a disordered open questions in the phase diagram of HTS is the thermodynamic nature of the disorder-dri- ven

Zeldov, Eli

462

Computational Analysis of a Tip Vortex Structure Shed from a Bioinspired Blade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design for this purpose. Different rotor blade designs and relevant insect wings are under study Computational Analysis of a Tip Vortex Structure Shed from a Bioinspired Blade Sebastian was generated with SolidWorks CAD software from measurements performed on a wing sample obtained from

Maccabe, Barney

463

VIVDR -Vortex-induced vibration data repository An overview of available riser datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VIVDR - Vortex-induced vibration data repository An overview of available riser datasets http://oe.mit.edu/VIV H. Mukundan and M. Triantafyllou 20 April 2008 #12;NDP 38m long riser model datasets #12;33 q Rig q Tension applied through spring-supported clump weights NDP 38m long riser model datasets

464

2094 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 21 / November 1, 2003 Fundamental and vortex solitons in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2094 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 21 / November 1, 2003 Fundamental and vortex solitons in a two-dimensional optical lattice Jianke Yang Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Vermont, Burlington-dimensional optically induced waveguide array are reported. In the strong localization regime the fundamental soliton

Yang, Jianke

465

Effect of asymmetric axial strain on the behavior of the juncture vortex system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to investigate the behavior of the vortex formed in a wing-body juncture in a water tunnel flow. The wing-body juncture was created by mounting a symmetrical airfoil with an elliptical leading edge normal to a flat...

Trosper, Jeffrey Randall

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

466

Nanogenerator as an active sensor for vortex capture and ambient wind-velocity detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and mechanical (wind, water flow, vibration, friction and body movement) energies are common in the ambientNanogenerator as an active sensor for vortex capture and ambient wind-velocity detection Rui Zhang principle, ambient wind-speed measurements with the NG are demonstrated. Due to the simple structure, high

Wang, Zhong L.

467

ORIGIN OF MACROSPICULE AND JET IN POLAR CORONA BY A SMALL-SCALE KINKED FLUX TUBE  

SciTech Connect

We report an observation of a small-scale flux tube that undergoes kinking and triggers the macrospicule and a jet on 2010 November 11 in the north polar corona. The small-scale flux tube emerged well before the triggering of the macrospicule and as time progresses the two opposite halves of this omega-shaped flux tube bent transversely and approach each other. After {approx}2 minutes, the two approaching halves of the kinked flux tube touch each other and an internal reconnection as well as an energy release takes place at the adjoining location and a macrospicule was launched which goes up to a height of 12 Mm. Plasma begins to move horizontally as well as vertically upward along with the onset of the macrospicule and thereafter converts into a large-scale jet in which the core denser plasma reaches up to {approx}40 Mm in the solar atmosphere with a projected speed of {approx}95 km s{sup -1}. The fainter and decelerating plasma chunks of this jet were also seen up to {approx}60 Mm. We perform a two-dimensional numerical simulation by considering the VAL-C initial atmospheric conditions to understand the physical scenario of the observed macrospicule and associated jet. The simulation results show that reconnection-generated velocity pulse in the lower solar atmosphere steepens into slow shock and the cool plasma is driven behind it in the form of macrospicule. The horizontal surface waves also appeared with shock fronts at different heights, which most likely drove and spread the large-scale jet associated with the macrospicule.

Kayshap, P.; Srivastava, Abhishek K. [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263129 (India); Murawski, K. [Group of Astrophysics, UMCS, ul. Radziszewskiego 10, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Tripathi, Durgesh, E-mail: pradeep.kashyap@aries.res.in, E-mail: aks@aries.res.in, E-mail: kmur@kft.umcs.lublin.pl, E-mail: durgesh@iucaa.ernet.in [Inter-University Centre for Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

468

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RCS1 Sub-station HV Installation completed in April 2011 In defects until April 2012 For more Project Manager: Rob Pask Phase 2a RCS1 Sub-station enclosing works completed in December 2010 Phase 2b when completed will provide a new 11,000 volt electrical substation, switching gear and associated

469

Bradbury-Nielsen vs. Field switching shutters for high resolution drift tube ion mobility spectrometers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A key component in the design of every drift tube ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) is the ion shutter which controls the injection of ions into the drift tube. Especially, compact drift tube IMS require very short...

Ansgar T. Kirk; Stefan Zimmermann

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing tube wall Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARIES-CS T-TUBE DIVERTOR DESIGN Summary: Temperature K Maximum Temperature of Tube0Tile Interface K DP kPa Standard k-, with wall enhancement... of the actual T-tube...

471

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigating the Fundamental Investigating the Fundamental Scientific Issues Affecting the Long-term Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide Project Number DE-FE0000397 Lee H Spangler Energy Research Institute Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Computational tool development * Laboratory studies to understand subsurface CO 2 behavior * Analog studies to inform risk analysis * Near surface detection technologies / testing * Mitigation method development 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

472

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FE/NETL CTS Cost Models and FE/NETL CTS Cost Models and Benefits Assessment of Carbon Storage R&D Program David Morgan Benefits Division Office of Program Planning and Analysis National Energy Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY 2 Presentation Outline * Overview of benefits assessment * Overview of FE/NETL models used to assess benefits of CO 2 capture and storage * Benefits evaluation of Storage Program's R&D projects using a model to estimate costs of CO 2 storage in a saline aquifer * Description of model used to estimate costs of

473

Project 307  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INTEGRATING MONO ETHANOL AMINE (MEA) INTEGRATING MONO ETHANOL AMINE (MEA) REGENERATION WITH CO 2 COMPRESSION AND PEAKING TO REDUCE CO 2 CAPTURE COSTS Background In Phase I, Trimeric Corporation, in collaboration with the University of Texas at Austin, performed engineering and economic analyses necessary to determine the feasibility of novel MEA processing schemes aimed at reducing the cost of CO 2 capture from flue gas. These novel MEA-based CO 2 capture schemes are designed for integration into coal-fired power plants with the aim of reducing costs and improving efficiency. Primary Project Goal The primary goal of this project was to reduce the cost of MEA scrubbing for the recovery of CO 2 from flue gas by improved process integration. CONTACTS Sean I. Plasynski Sequestration Technology Manager

474

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-23, 2012 1-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview: Why 14 C for MVA? * Technical status: Cartridges, injections, lasers * Summary * Organizational chart * Collaborators 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. Permanent storage of CO 2 can be demonstrated by adding carbon-14 ( 14 C) prior to injection. This research project aims to demonstrate this by tagging fossil CO 2 with 14 C at a field site. When completed, this system will show that 14 C can be a safe and effective tracer for sequestered CO 2 . A laser-based 14 C measurement method is being adapted for continuous monitoring. This technology contributes to the Carbon Storage Program's effort of ensuring 99 percent

475

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leakage Pathways and Leakage Pathways and Mineralization within Caprocks for Geologic Storage of CO 2 Project DE-FC26-0xNT4 FE0001786 James P. Evans Utah State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits * Goals and Objectives * Relationship to overall program goals * Overview of seal bypass * Technical status; bypass systems - Field based studies - Technological advances * Accomplishments and Summary * Appendices 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent.

476

Project 301  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2006 2006 Combustion Technologies CONTACTS Robert R. Romanosky Advanced Research Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4721 robert.romanosky@netl.doe.gov Arun C. Bose Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4467 arun.bose@netl.doe.gov ADVANCED, LOW/ZERO EMISSION BOILER DESIGN AND OPERATION Background Over the past years, environmental concerns regarding pollutants have grown dramatically. Current annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are 12% higher than they were in 1992. In addition, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions are projected to increase by an additional 34% over the next 20 years. About one third of carbon emissions in the

477

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Michael G. Waddell Earth Sciences and Resources Institute University of South Carolina U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project goals and benefits * Overview of the geology of the South Georgia Rift basin in SC * Results of petrographic and core analysis from the Rizer #1 * Future investigations in the SGR * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program Program Goals: * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected

478

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High-T and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments DE-FE0001127 Investigators: Hai Xiao, Hai-Lung Tsai, Missouri University of Science and Technology Junhang Dong, University of Cincinnati Program Manager: Norm Popkie, Gasification Division, NETL DOE Project Kickoff Meeting in the NETL Pittsburgh December 15, 2009 Outline * Background * Objectives * Project Elements * Management Plan * Research Plan and Approaches * Risk Management * Summary Background * Demands: High-performance, reliable, in situ sensors are highly demanded for advanced process control and lifecycle management in existing and future advanced power and fuel systems - Improved efficiency/safety/reliability/availability/maintainability

479

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mart Oostrom Mart Oostrom Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline  Project overview  Sub-Task 1: Investigation of CO 2 migration in heterogeneous porous media  Sub-Task 2: Modeling CCUS deployment in China  Summary Collaboration with China on Clean Energy Research 3 Benefit to the Program The Clean Energy Partnership was established by a memorandum of understanding between the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in May of 2009 with the goal of significantly reducing the environmental emissions and improving the efficiency of

480

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Evaluation of Geophysical Methods for Monitoring and Tracking CO 2 Migration in the Subsurface PI: Jeffrey Daniels Co-PI: Robert Burns & Franklin Schwartz Students: Michael Murphy & Kyle Shalek The Ohio State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 FOA Number: DE-FOA-0000032 NETL Award Number: DE-FE0002441 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program Goal: Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vortex tube project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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481

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin Influence of Local Capillary Trapping on Containment System Effectiveness DE-FE0004956 Steven Bryant The University of Texas at Austin U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation and relevance to Program * Project goals * Technical status * Accomplishments * Summary * Future plans Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin

482

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and objectives * Carbon gasification * Carbon reactivity studies * Catalyst development * Techno-economic analysis * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: Reduce CO 2 emissions by developing beneficial uses that meet the DOE net cost metric of $10/MT for captured CO 2 that will mitigate CO 2 emissions in areas where geological storage may not be an optimal solution * Benefits statement: Development of a commercial process for converting CO 2 and a carbon source into a commodity chemical at a

483

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Caprock Integrity and Improved Caprock Integrity and Risk Assessment Techniques Project Number (FE0009168) Michael Bruno, PhD, PE GeoMechanics Technologies U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Introduction and Motivation 2 A primary requirement for long-term geologic storage and containment of carbon dioxide is ensuring caprock integrity. Large-scale CO2 injection requires improved and advanced simulation tools and risk assessment techniques to better predict and help control system failures, and to enhance performance of geologic storage. GeoMechanics Technologies is developing enhanced simulation and risk analysis approaches to assess and

484

Irene Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irene Station, African Weather Bureau Irene Station, African Weather Bureau The photos on this site come from the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) project. Additional photos can be found on the SHADOZ Project Web Site. Photo of the Dobson 89 Instrument The Irene Weather Office Agnes Phahlane sits behind the Dobson and collects Total Ozone Data The lab at the Irene station Cal Archer Prepares an ozonesonde Flight Preparations The balloon is readied The release Back to the SAFARI 2000 Photo Page Index Other Sites: Skukuza, MISR Validation Site | Skukuza, Eddy Covariance Site | C-130 Flight Photos | Sua Pan Site | Irene Weather Station | Fire Studies | Kalahari Transect | Kalahari Transect Sites for Canopy Structure Data | ORNL DAAC Home || ORNL Home || NASA || Privacy, Security, Notices || Data

485

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin Inexpensive Monitoring and Uncertainty Assessment of CO 2 Plume Migration DOE-FE0004962 Steven Bryant The University of Texas at Austin U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation and relevance to Program * Project goals * Technical status * Accomplishments * Summary * Future plans Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin

486

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Impact on CCS Energy Market Competitiveness Catherine A. Peters Jeffery P. Fitts Michael A. Celia Princeton University Paul D. Kalb Vatsal Bhatt Brookhaven National Laboratory Elizabeth J. Wilson Jeffrey M. Bielicki Melisa Pollak University of Minnesota DOE Award DE-FE0000749 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to CCUS research program * Project Goals & Objectives * Technical Status  Thrust I - Reservoir-scale simulations of leakage potential with permeability evolution

487

Project Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Description Project Description The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007), and Presidential Executive Order 13423 all contain requirements for Federal facilities to decrease energy consumption and increase the use of renewable energy by the year 2015. To provide leadership in meeting these requirements, DOE, in partnership with the General Services Administration (GSA), has installed a rooftop solar electric, or PV, system on the roof of DOE's headquarters in Washington, D.C. The 205 kilowatt (kW) installation is one of the largest of its kind in the Nation's capital. A display in the For- restal building will show the power output of the PV system during the day and the energy produced over

488

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Modeling CO for Modeling CO 2 Processes: Pressure Management, Basin-Scale Models, Model Comparison, and Stochastic Inversion ESD09-056 Jens T. Birkholzer with Abdullah Cihan, Marco Bianchi, Quanlin Zhou, Xiaoyi Liu, Sumit Mukhopadhyay, Dorothee Rebscher, Barbara Fialeix Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview and Technical Status - Task 1: Optimization of Brine Extraction for Pressure Management and Mitigation - Task 2: Basin-scale Simulation of CO 2 Storage in the Northern Plains - Prairie Basal Aquifer - Task 3: Sim-SEQ Model Comparison

489

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beneficial Use of CO Beneficial Use of CO 2 in Precast Concrete Production DE-FE0004285 Yixin Shao, Yaodong Jia Liang Hu McGill University 3H Company U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation outline * Goals and objectives * Benefits to the program * Project overview * Technical status * Accomplishment to date * Summary 2 Objective Masonry blocks Fiber-cement panels Prefabricated buildings Concrete pipes To develop a carbonation process to replace steam curing in precast concrete production for energy reduction, and carbon storage and utilization. Goals * CO 2 sequestration capacity by cement:

490

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Kansas Center for Research University of Kansas Center for Research Kansas Geological Survey U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Benefits, objectives, overview * Methods * Background & setting * Technical status * Accomplishments * Summary Benefit to the Program * Program goal addressed: Develop technologies that will support the industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ± 30 percent. * Program goal addressed: This project will confirm - via a horizontal test boring - whether fracture attributes derived from 3-D seismic PSDM Volumetric Curvature (VC) processing are real. If

491

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and objectives * Carbon reactivity studies * Catalyst mechanism studies * Catalyst development * Test results * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: Reduce CO 2 emissions by developing beneficial uses that meet the DOE net cost metric of $10/MT for captured CO 2 that will mitigate CO 2 emissions in areas where geological storage may not be an optimal solution * Benefits statement: Development of a commercial process for converting CO 2 and a carbon source into a commodity chemical at a

492

FUSRAP Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Project Project 23b 14501 FUSRAP TECHNICAL BULLETIN N O . - R 3 v . L DATE: 1.2 9-99 SUBJECT : Pr.pec.d BY T r m L u d Approval Summary of the results for the Springdale characterization activities performed per WI-94-015, Rev. 0. TUO separate radiological characterization surveys and a limited cherical characterization survey were performed on the Springdale Site in Octcjer and December, 1993. The design of the radiological surveys were to supplement and define existing ORNL surveys. The limited cher.ica1 characterization survey was performed to assist in the completion of waste disposal paperwork. Radiological contamination is primarily ir. the 'belt cutting and belt fabrication'areas of the building with a small erea of contamination in the south end of the building. The chemiccl sac~le